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Sample records for anhydrous ammonia nh

  1. Project Profile: Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation UCLA ELEMENTS Webpage Pic.jpg Ammonia synthesis reactors have not previously been designed to produce supercritical steam at 650C. Furthermore, since the ammonia ...

  2. Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy The feasibility of on-board ammonia generation was examined using synthesized exhaust compositions PDF icon deer09_wong.pdf More Documents & Publications On-Board Ammonia Generation Using Delphi Diesel Fuel Reformer Delphi On-board Ammonia Generation (OAG) Reductant Utilization in a LNT + SCR System

  3. Anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte battery. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1972-06-26

    It is an object of the invention to provide a primary cell or battery using ammonium fluoride--anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte having improved current and power production capabilities at low temperatures. It is operable at temperatures substantially above the boiling point of hydrogen fluoride. (GRA)

  4. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vandergrift, G.F. III; Krumpelt, M.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-10-08

    A process is described for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  5. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the uncharged NH3 "gas." A Doorway for Letting Ammonia into Cells Like any factory, a biological cell takes in raw materials and energy and expels waste products. What goes in...

  6. Process for synthesis of ammonia borane for bulk hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Autrey, S Thomas [West Richland, WA; Heldebrant, David J [Richland, WA; Linehan, John C [Richland, WA; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J [Richland, WA; Zheng, Feng [Richland, WA

    2011-03-01

    The present invention discloses new methods for synthesizing ammonia borane (NH.sub.3BH.sub.3, or AB). Ammonium borohydride (NH.sub.4BH.sub.4) is formed from the reaction of borohydride salts and ammonium salts in liquid ammonia. Ammonium borohydride is decomposed in an ether-based solvent that yields AB at a near quantitative yield. The AB product shows promise as a chemical hydrogen storage material for fuel cell powered applications.

  7. A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The Moon Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  8. Method and apparatus for synthesizing anhydrous HNO.sub.3

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coon, Clifford L.; Harrar, Jackson E.; Pearson, Richard K.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for electrochemically synthesizing anhydrous HNO.sub.3 from an aqueous solution of HNO.sub.3 includes oxidizing a solution of N.sub.2 O.sub.4 /aqueous HNO.sub.3 at an anode, while maintaining a controlled potential between the N.sub.2 O.sub.4 /aqueous HNO.sub.3 solution and the anode. A potential of about 1.80V vs. SCE is preferred. Anhydrous or aqueous HNO.sub.3 may be disposed at the cathode within the electrochemical cell. Aqueous HNO.sub.3 having a water content of up to about 12% by weight is utilized to synthesize anhydrous HNO.sub.3.

  9. CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF PURE AMMONIA AND AMMONIA-WATER ICES INDUCED BY HEAVY IONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordalo, V.; Da Silveira, E. F.; Seperuelo Duarte, E.

    2013-09-10

    Cosmic rays are possibly the main agents to prevent the freeze-out of molecules onto grain surfaces in cold dense clouds. Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is one of the most abundant molecules present in dust ice mantles, with a concentration of up to 15% relative to water (H{sub 2}O). FTIR spectroscopy is used to monitor pure NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice samples as they are irradiated with Ni and Zn ion beams (500-600 MeV) at GANIL/France. New species, such as hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}), diazene (N{sub 2}H{sub 2} isomers), molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) were identified after irradiation of pure NH{sub 3} ices. Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), and hydroxylamine (NH{sub 2}OH) are some of the products of the NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice radiolysis. The spectral band at 6.85 {mu}m was observed after irradiation of both types of ice. Besides the likely contribution of ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) and amino (NH{sub 2}) radicals, data suggest a small contribution of NH{sub 2}OH to this band profile after high fluences of irradiation of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ices. The spectral shift of the NH{sub 3} ''umbrella'' mode (9.3 {mu}m) band is parameterized as a function of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O ratio in amorphous ices. Ammonia and water destruction cross-sections are obtained, as well as the rate of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O (1:10) ice compaction, measured by the OH dangling bond destruction cross-section. Ammonia destruction is enhanced in the presence of H{sub 2}O in the ice and a power law relationship between stopping power and NH{sub 3} destruction cross-section is verified. Such results may provide relevant information for the evolution of molecular species in dense molecular clouds.

  10. Compact anhydrous HCl to aqueous HCl conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.

    1993-06-01

    The present invention is directed to an inexpensive and compact apparatus adapted for use with a [sup 196]Hg isotope separation process and the conversion of anhydrous HCl to aqueous HCl without the use of air flow to carry the HCl vapor into the converter system.

  11. Compact anhydrous HCl to aqueous HCl conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; Speer, Richard

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an inexpensive and compact apparatus adapted for use with a .sup.196 Hg isotope separation process and the conversion of anhydrous HCl to aqueous HCl without the use of air flow to carry the HCl vapor into the converter system.

  12. Method of synthesis of anhydrous thorium(IV) complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Cantat, Thibault

    2013-04-30

    Method of producing anhydrous thorium(IV) tetrahalide complexes, utilizing Th(NO.sub.3).sub.4(H.sub.2O).sub.x, where x is at least 4, as a reagent; method of producing thorium-containing complexes utilizing ThCl.sub.4(DME).sub.2 as a precursor; method of producing purified ThCl.sub.4(ligand).sub.x compounds, where x is from 2 to 9; and novel compounds having the structures: ##STR00001##

  13. Simulation of an Ar/NH{sub 3} low pressure magnetized direct current discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhi [School of Science, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao Zhen [School of Chemistry and Life Science, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114007 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); Li Xuehui [Physiccal Science and Technical College, Dalian University, Dalian 116622 (China)

    2013-01-15

    A two-dimensional fluid model has been used to investigate the properties of plasma in an Ar/NH{sub 3} low pressure magnetized direct current discharge. We compared the simulation results with the theoretical and experimental results of the other gas discharge in which the magnetic field is considered. Results that obtained using this method are in good agreement with literature. The simulation results show that the positive ammonia ion density follows the positive argon ion density. The Ar{sub 2}{sup +} density is slightly higher than the Ar{sup +} density at 100 mTorr. The largest ammonia ion is NH{sub 3}{sup +} ion, followed by NH{sub 2}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, and NH{sup +} ions. The contribution of NH{sup +} ions to the density of the positive ammonia ions is marginal. The influence of pressure on the plasma discharge has been studied by simulation, and the mechanisms have been discussed. The average plasma density increases as pressure increased. The plasma density appears to be more inhomogeneous than that at the lower pressure. The ratio of charge particles changed as pressure increased. The Ar{sup +} density is slightly higher than the Ar{sub 2}{sup +} density as the pressure increased. It makes NH{sub 4}{sup +} ratio increase as pressure increased. It shows that the electron temperature drops with rising pressure by numerical calculation.

  14. Method for forming ammonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong; Peter C.; Pink, Robert J.; Zuck, Larry D.

    2008-08-19

    A method for forming ammonia is disclosed and which includes the steps of forming a plasma; providing a source of metal particles, and supplying the metal particles to the plasma to form metal nitride particles; and providing a substance, and reacting the metal nitride particles with the substance to produce ammonia, and an oxide byproduct.

  15. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia Print Wednesday, 25 May 2005 00:00 Membrane proteins provide molecular-sized entry and exit portals for the various substances that pass into and out of cells. While life scientists have solved the structures of protein channels for ions, uncharged solutes, and even water, up to now they have only been able to guess at the precise mechanisms by which gases (such as NH3, CO2, O2, NO, N2O, etc.) cross

  16. Numerical analysis of a mixture of Ar/NH{sub 3} microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhi [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); School of Science, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); Zhao Zhen [Chemistry Department, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114007 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); Li Xuehui [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Physical Science and Technical College, Dalian University, Dalian 116622 (China)

    2012-06-01

    A two-dimensional fluid model has been used to investigate the properties of plasma in Ar/NH{sub 3} microwave electron cyclotron resonance discharge at low pressure. The electromagnetic field model solved by the three-dimensional Simpson method is coupled to a fluid plasma model. The finite difference method was employed to discrete the governing equations. 40 species (neutrals, radicals, ions, and electrons) are consisted in the model. In total, 75 electron-neutral, 43 electron-ion, 167 neutral-neutral, 129 ion-neutral, 28 ion-ion, and 90 3-body reactions are used in the model. According to the simulation, the distribution of the densities of the considered plasma species has been showed and the mechanisms of their variations have been discussed. It is found that the main neutrals (Ar*, Ar**, NH{sub 3}{sup *}, NH, H{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}, H, and N{sub 2}) are present at high densities in Ar/NH{sub 3} microwave electron cyclotron resonance discharge when the mixing ratio of Ar/NH{sub 3} is 1:1 at 20 Pa. The density of NH is more than that of NH{sub 2} atom. And NH{sub 3}{sup +} are the most important ammonia ions. But the uniformity of the space distribution of NH{sub 3}{sup +} is lower than the other ammonia ions.

  17. Reactor for removing ammonia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luo, Weifang; Stewart, Kenneth D.

    2009-11-17

    Disclosed is a device for removing trace amounts of ammonia from a stream of gas, particularly hydrogen gas, prepared by a reformation apparatus. The apparatus is used to prevent PEM "poisoning" in a fuel cell receiving the incoming hydrogen stream.

  18. Photolysis of solid NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O mixtures at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2010-12-07

    We have studied UV photolysis of solid ammonia and ammonia-dihydrate samples at 40 K, using infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and microgravimetry. We have shown that in the pure NH{sub 3} sample, the main species ejected are NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}, where the hydrogen and nitrogen increase with laser fluence. This increase in N{sub 2} ejection with laser fluence explains the increase in mass loss rate detected by a microbalance. In contrast, for the ammonia-water mixture, we see very weak signals of H{sub 2} and N{sub 2} in the mass spectrometer, consistent with the very small mass loss during the experiment and with a <5% decrease in the NH{sub 3} infrared absorption bands spectroscopy after a fluence of {approx}3 x 10{sup 19} photons/cm{sup 2}. The results imply that ammonia-ice mixtures in the outer solar system are relatively stable under solar irradiation.

  19. Project Profile: Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia: Optimizing the Synthesis Reactor for Direct Production of Supercritical Steam

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative has made an award to University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) through the Concentrating Solar Power: Efficiently Leveraging Equilibrium Mechanisms for Engineering New Thermochemical Storage (CSP: ELEMENTS) funding program.

  20. Category:Concord, NH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 74 KB SVHospital Concord NH Public...

  1. Method and apparatus for synthesizing anhydrous HNO/sub 3/. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coon, C.L.; Harrar, J.E.; Pearson, R.K.; McGuire, R.R.

    1982-07-20

    A method and apparatus for electrochemically synthesizing anhydrous HNO/sub 3/ from an aqueous solution of HNO/sub 3/- includes oxidizing a solution of N/sub 2/O/sub 4//aqueous HNO/sub 3/ at an anode, while maintaining a controlled potential between the N/sub 2/O/sub 4//aqueous HNO/sub 3/ solution and the anode. A potential of about 1.80V vs. SCE is preferred. Anhydrous or aqueous HNO/sub 3/ may be disposed at the cathode within the electrochemical cell. Aqueous HNO/sub 3/ having a water content of up to about 12% by weight is utilized to synthesize anhydrous HNO/sub 3/.

  2. Ammonia Generation over TWC for Passive SCR NOX Control for Lean Gasoline Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Parks, II, James E; Pihl, Josh A; Toops, Todd J

    2014-01-01

    A commercial three-way catalyst (TWC) was evaluated for ammonia (NH3) generation on a 2.0-liter BMW lean burn gasoline direct injection engine as a component in a passive ammonia selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. The passive NH3 SCR system is a potential low cost approach for controlling nitrogen oxides (NOX) emissions from lean burn gasoline engines. In this system, NH3 is generated over a close-coupled TWC during periodic slightly rich engine operation and subsequently stored on an underfloor SCR catalyst. Upon switching to lean, NOX passes through the TWC and is reduced by the stored NH3 on the SCR catalyst. NH3 generation was evaluated at different air-fuel equivalence ratios at multiple engine speed and load conditions. Near complete conversion of NOX to NH3 was achieved at =0.96 for nearly all conditions studied. At the =0.96 condition, HC emissions were relatively minimal, but CO emissions were significant. Operation at AFRs richer than =0.96 did not provide more NH3 yield and led to higher HC and CO emissions. Results of the reductant conversion and consumption processes were used to calculate a representative fuel consumption of the engine operating with an ideal passive SCR system. The results show a 1-7% fuel economy benefit at various steady-state engine speed and load points relative to a stoichiometric engine operation.

  3. Life cycle impact assessment of ammonia production in Algeria: A comparison with previous studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhlouf, Ali Serradj, Tayeb; Cheniti, Hamza

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) from “cradle to gate” of one anhydrous ton of ammonia with a purity of 99% was achieved. Particularly, the energy and environmental performance of the product (ammonia) were evaluated. The eco-profile of the product and the share of each stage of the Life Cycle on the whole environmental impacts have been evaluated. The flows of material and energy for each phase of the life cycle were counted and the associated environmental problems were identified. Evaluation of the impact was achieved using GEMIS 4.7 software. The primary data collection was executed at the production installations located in Algeria (Annaba locality). The analysis was conducted according to the LCA standards ISO 14040 series. The results show that Cumulative Energy Requirement (CER) is of 51.945 × 10{sup 3} MJ/t of ammonia, which is higher than the global average. Global Warming Potential (GWP) is of 1.44 t CO{sub 2} eq/t of ammonia; this value is lower than the world average. Tropospheric ozone precursor and Acidification are also studied in this article, their values are: 549.3 × 10{sup −6} t NMVOC eq and 259.3 × 10{sup −6} t SO{sub 2} eq respectively.

  4. Patched bimetallic surfaces are active catalysts for ammonia decomposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2015-10-07

    In this study, ammonia decomposition is often used as an archetypical reaction for predicting new catalytic materials and understanding the very reason of why some reactions are sensitive on material’s structure. Core–shell or surface-segregated bimetallic nanoparticles expose outstanding activity for many heterogeneously catalysed reactions but the reasons remain elusive owing to the difficulties in experimentally characterizing active sites. Here by performing multiscale simulations in ammonia decomposition on various nickel loadings on platinum (111), we show that the very high activity of core–shell structures requires patches of the guest metal to create and sustain dual active sites: nickel terraces catalyse N-H bond breaking and nickel edge sites drive atomic nitrogen association. The structure sensitivity on these active catalysts depends profoundly on reaction conditions due to kinetically competing relevant elementary reaction steps. We expose a remarkable difference in active sites between transient and steady-state studies and provide insights into optimal material design.

  5. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia Print Membrane proteins provide molecular-sized entry and exit portals for the various substances that pass into and out of cells. While life scientists have solved the structures of protein channels for ions, uncharged solutes, and even water, up to now they have only been able to guess at the precise mechanisms by which gases (such as NH3, CO2, O2, NO, N2O, etc.) cross biological membranes. But, with the first high-resolution structure of a

  6. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia Print Membrane proteins provide molecular-sized entry and exit portals for the various substances that pass into and out of cells. While life scientists have solved the structures of protein channels for ions, uncharged solutes, and even water, up to now they have only been able to guess at the precise mechanisms by which gases (such as NH3, CO2, O2, NO, N2O, etc.) cross biological membranes. But, with the first high-resolution structure of a

  7. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia Print Membrane proteins provide molecular-sized entry and exit portals for the various substances that pass into and out of cells. While life scientists have solved the structures of protein channels for ions, uncharged solutes, and even water, up to now they have only been able to guess at the precise mechanisms by which gases (such as NH3, CO2, O2, NO, N2O, etc.) cross biological membranes. But, with the first high-resolution structure of a

  8. Ammonia and methane dairy emissions in the San Joaquin Valley of California from individual feedlot to regional scale

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miller, David J.; Sun, Kang; Tao, Lei; Nowak, John B.; Liu, Zhen; Diskin, Glenn; Sasche, Glen; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Ferrare, Richard; Scarino, Amy Jo; et al

    2015-09-27

    Agricultural ammonia (NH3) emissions are highly uncertain, with high spatiotemporal variability and a lack of widespread in situ measurements. Regional NH3 emission estimates using mass balance or emission ratio approaches are uncertain due to variable NH3 sources and sinks as well as unknown plume correlations with other dairy source tracers. We characterize the spatial distributions of NH3 and methane (CH4) dairy plumes using in situ surface and airborne measurements in the Tulare dairy feedlot region of the San Joaquin Valley, California, during the NASA Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality 2013more » field campaign. Surface NH3 and CH4 mixing ratios exhibit large variability with maxima localized downwind of individual dairy feedlots. The geometric mean NH3:CH4 enhancement ratio derived from surface measurements is 0.15 ± 0.03 ppmv ppmv–1. Individual dairy feedlots with spatially distinct NH3 and CH4 source pathways led to statistically significant correlations between NH3 and CH4 in 68% of the 69 downwind plumes sampled. At longer sampling distances, the NH3:CH4 enhancement ratio decreases 20–30%, suggesting the potential for NH3 deposition as a loss term for plumes within a few kilometers downwind of feedlots. Aircraft boundary layer transect measurements directly above surface mobile measurements in the dairy region show comparable gradients and geometric mean enhancement ratios within measurement uncertainties, even when including NH3 partitioning to submicron particles. Individual NH3 and CH4 plumes sampled at close proximity where losses are minimal are not necessarily correlated due to lack of mixing and distinct source pathways. As a result, our analyses have important implications for constraining NH3 sink and plume variability influences on regional NH3 emission estimates and for improving NH3 emission inventory spatial allocations.« less

  9. Equations of State of Anhydrous AlF3 and AlI3: Modeling of Extreme...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Condition Halide Chemistry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Equations of State of Anhydrous AlF3 and AlI3: Modeling of Extreme Condition Halide Chemistry Authors: ...

  10. Exhaust purification with on-board ammonia production (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Exhaust purification with on-board ammonia production Title: Exhaust purification with on-board ammonia production A method of ammonia production for a selective catalytic ...

  11. Modeling of plasma chemistry in an atmospheric pressure Ar/NH{sub 3} cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge described using the one-dimensional fluid model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhi [School of Science, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao Zhen [School of Chemistry and Life Science, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114007 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); Li Xuehui [Physical Science and Technical College, Dalian University, Dalian 116622 (China)

    2013-01-15

    The keynote of our research is to study the gas phase chemistry in an atmospheric pressure Ar/NH{sub 3} cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge, which is very important to produce the iron-nitride magnetic fluid. For this purpose, a home-made one dimensional fluid model with the Scharfetter-Gummel method has been developed. The equations solved are the particle balances, assuming a drift-diffusion approximation for the fluxes, and the electron energy equation. The self-consistent electric field is obtained by the simultaneous solution of Poisson's equation. The simulations were carried out for the different ammonia concentrations (2%, 3.5%, and 7%), at a voltage of 1 kV, and a driving frequency of 20 kHz. It concluded that the major ion products of Ar are Ar{sup +} and Ar{sub 2}{sup +}. Ar{sup +} is the most important positive ions, followed by Ar{sub 2}{sup +}. It is shown that the NH{sup +} density is smaller than that of the other ammonia ions. The density of NH{sub 4}{sup +} is more than that of the other ammonia ions when the ammonia concentration increased. The diffuse mode can be established after the discharge was ignited, and the mode changes to filamentary mode with an increase in ammonia concentration.

  12. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition and process for electrolysis thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vandegrift, George F. (Bolingbrook, Naperville, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Hinsdale, IL)

    1983-01-01

    A process for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  13. Laser separation of nitrogen isotopes by the IR+UV dissociation of ammonia molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apatin, V M; Klimin, S A; Laptev, V B; Lokhman, V N; Ogurok, D D; Pigul'skii, S V; Ryabov, E A

    2008-08-31

    The separation of nitrogen isotopes is studied upon successive single-photon IR excitation and UV dissociation of ammonia molecules. The excitation selectivity was provided by tuning a CO{sub 2} laser to resonance with {sup 14}NH{sub 3} molecules [the 9R(30) laser line] or with {sup 15}NH{sub 3} molecules [the 9R(10) laser line]. Isotopic mixtures containing 4.8% and 0.37% (natural content) of the {sup 15}NH isotope were investigated. The dependences of the selectivity and the dissociation yield for each isotopic component on the buffer gas pressure (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, Ar) and the ammonia pressure were obtained. In the limit of low NH{sub 3} pressures (0.5-2 Torr), the dissociation selectivity {alpha}(15/14) for {sup 15}N was 17. The selectivity mechanism of the IR+UV dissociation is discussed and the outlook is considered for the development of the nitrogen isotope separation process based on this approach. (laser isotope separation)

  14. Hydrogen production using ammonia borane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Charles W; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy A; Shrestha, Roshan P

    2013-12-24

    Hydrogen ("H.sub.2") is produced when ammonia borane reacts with a catalyst complex of the formula L.sub.nM-X wherein M is a base metal such as iron, X is an anionic nitrogen- or phosphorus-based ligand or hydride, and L is a neutral ancillary ligand that is a neutral monodentate or polydentate ligand.

  15. Remediation of Uranium in the Hanford Vadose Zone Using Ammonia Gas: FY 2010 Laboratory-Scale Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Zhong, Lirong; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Mark D.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Zheming; Bargar, John; Faurie, Danielle K.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2010-12-01

    This investigation is focused on refining an in situ technology for vadose zone remediation of uranium by the addition of ammonia (NH3) gas. Objectives are to: a) refine the technique of ammonia gas treatment of low water content sediments to minimize uranium mobility by changing uranium surface phases (or coat surface phases), b) identify the geochemical changes in uranium surface phases during ammonia gas treatment, c) identify broader geochemical changes that occur in sediment during ammonia gas treatment, and d) predict and test injection of ammonia gas for intermediate-scale systems to identify process interactions that occur at a larger scale and could impact field scale implementation.Overall, NH3 gas treatment of low-water content sediments appears quite effective at decreasing aqueous, adsorbed uranium concentrations. The NH3 gas treatment is also fairly effective for decreasing the mobility of U-carbonate coprecipitates, but shows mixed success for U present in Na-boltwoodite. There are some changes in U-carbonate surface phases that were identified by surface phase analysis, but no changes observed for Na-boltwoodite. It is likely that dissolution of sediment minerals (predominantly montmorillonite, muscovite, kaolinite) under the alkaline conditions created and subsequent precipitation as the pH returns to natural conditions coat some of the uranium surface phases, although a greater understanding of these processes is needed to predict the long term impact on uranium mobility. Injection of NH3 gas into sediments at low water content (1% to 16% water content) can effectively treat a large area without water addition, so there is little uranium mobilization (i.e., transport over cm or larger scale) during the injection phase.

  16. Equations of State of Anhydrous AlF3 and AlI3: Modeling of Extreme

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Condition Halide Chemistry (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Equations of State of Anhydrous AlF3 and AlI3: Modeling of Extreme Condition Halide Chemistry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Equations of State of Anhydrous AlF3 and AlI3: Modeling of Extreme Condition Halide Chemistry Authors: Stavrou, E ; Zaug, J M ; Bastea, S ; Crowhurst, J C ; Goncharov, A F ; Radousky, H B ; Armstrong, M R ; Roberts, S K ; Plaue, J W Publication Date: 2015-02-18 OSTI Identifier:

  17. Large-scale production of anhydrous nitric acid and nitric acid solutions of dinitrogen pentoxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrar, Jackson E.; Quong, Roland; Rigdon, Lester P.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for a large scale, electrochemical production of anhydrous nitric acid and N.sub.2 O.sub.5. The method includes oxidizing a solution of N.sub.2 O.sub.4 /aqueous-HNO.sub.3 at the anode, while reducing aqueous HNO.sub.3 at the cathode, in a flow electrolyzer constructed of special materials. N.sub.2 O.sub.4 is produced at the cathode and may be separated and recycled as a feedstock for use in the anolyte. The process is controlled by regulating the electrolysis current until the desired products are obtained. The chemical compositions of the anolyte and catholyte are monitored by measurement of the solution density and the concentrations of N.sub.2 O.sub.4.

  18. Ammonia Process by Pressure Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr Felix Jegede

    2010-12-27

    The overall objective of the project is to design, develop and demonstrate a technically feasible and commercially viable system to produce ammonia along with recovery of the products by adsorption separation methods and significantly decrease the energy requirement in ammonia production. This is achieved through a significantly more efficient ammonia psa recovery system. The new ammonia recovery system receives the reactor effluents and achieves complete ammonia recovery, (which completely eliminates the energy intensive refrigeration and condensation system currently used in ammonia production). It also recovers the unused reactants and recycles them back to the reactor, free of potential reactor contaminants, and without the need for re-compression and re-heat of recycle stream thereby further saving more energy. The result is a significantly lower energy consumption, along with capital cost savings.

  19. Polyaniline-based optical ammonia detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duan, Yixiang; Jin, Zhe; Su, Yongxuan

    2002-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy of a polyaniline film deposited on a polyethylene surface by chemical oxidation of aniline monomer at room temperature was used to quantitatively detect ammonia gas. The present optical ammonia gas detector was found to have a response time of less than 15 s, a regeneration time of less than 2 min. at room temperature, and a detection limit of 1 ppm (v/v) for ammonia, with a linear dynamic range from 180 ppm to 18,000 ppm.

  20. Ammonia and methane dairy emissions in the San Joaquin Valley of California from individual feedlot to regional scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David J.; Sun, Kang; Tao, Lei; Nowak, John B.; Liu, Zhen; Diskin, Glenn; Sasche, Glen; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Ferrare, Richard; Scarino, Amy Jo; Zondlo, Mark A.; Pan, Da

    2015-09-27

    Agricultural ammonia (NH3) emissions are highly uncertain, with high spatiotemporal variability and a lack of widespread in situ measurements. Regional NH3 emission estimates using mass balance or emission ratio approaches are uncertain due to variable NH3 sources and sinks as well as unknown plume correlations with other dairy source tracers. We characterize the spatial distributions of NH3 and methane (CH4) dairy plumes using in situ surface and airborne measurements in the Tulare dairy feedlot region of the San Joaquin Valley, California, during the NASA Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality 2013 field campaign. Surface NH3 and CH4 mixing ratios exhibit large variability with maxima localized downwind of individual dairy feedlots. The geometric mean NH3:CH4 enhancement ratio derived from surface measurements is 0.15 ± 0.03 ppmv ppmv–1. Individual dairy feedlots with spatially distinct NH3 and CH4 source pathways led to statistically significant correlations between NH3 and CH4 in 68% of the 69 downwind plumes sampled. At longer sampling distances, the NH3:CH4 enhancement ratio decreases 20–30%, suggesting the potential for NH3 deposition as a loss term for plumes within a few kilometers downwind of feedlots. Aircraft boundary layer transect measurements directly above surface mobile measurements in the dairy region show comparable gradients and geometric mean enhancement ratios within measurement uncertainties, even when including NH3 partitioning to submicron particles. Individual NH3 and CH4 plumes sampled at close proximity where losses are minimal are not necessarily correlated due to lack of mixing and distinct source pathways. As a result, our analyses have important implications for constraining NH3 sink and plume variability influences on regional NH3 emission estimates and for improving NH3 emission inventory spatial allocations.

  1. Study of an ammonia-based wet scrubbing process in a continuous flow system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, James X.; Lee, Anita S.; Kitchin, John R.; Nulwala, Hunaid B.; Luebke, David R.; Damodaran, Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    A continuous gas and liquid flow, regenerative scrubbing process for CO{sub 2} capture was demonstrated at the bench-scale level. An aqueous ammonia-based solution captures CO{sub 2} from simulated flue gas in an absorber and releases a nearly pure stream of CO{sub 2} in the regenerator. After the regeneration, the solution of ammonium compounds is recycled to the absorber. The design of a continuous flow unit was based on earlier exploratory results from a semi-batch reactor, where a CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} simulated flue gas mixture flowed through a well-mixed batch of ammonia-based solution. During the semi-batch tests, the solution was cycled between absorption and regeneration steps to measure the carrying capacity of the solution at various initial ammonia concentrations and temperatures. Consequentially, a series of tests were conducted on the continuous unit to observe the effect of various parameters on CO{sub 2} removal efficiency and regenerator effectiveness within the flow system. The parameters that were studied included absorber temperature, regenerator temperature, initial NH{sub 3} concentration, simulated flue gas flow rate, liquid solvent inventory in the flow system, and height of the packed-bed absorber. From this testing and subsequent testing, ammonia losses from both the absorption and regeneration steps were quantified, and attempts were made to maintain steady state during operations. Implications of experimental results with respect to process design are discussed.

  2. Ammonia Production Using Pressure Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose overall objective is to develop and demonstrate a technically feasible and commercially viable system that integrates reaction to produce ammonia along with recovery of the products by adsorption separation methods and significantly decrease the energy requirement in ammonia production.

  3. Regeneration of ammonia borane from polyborazylene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutton, Andrew; Gordon, John C; Ott, Kevin C; Burrell, Anthony K

    2013-02-05

    Method of producing ammonia borane, comprising providing a reagent comprising a dehydrogenated material in a suitable solvent; and combining the reagent with a reducing agent comprising hydrazine, a hydrazine derivative, or combinations thereof, in a reaction which produces a mixture comprising ammonia borane.

  4. Method for releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varma, Arvind; Diwan, Moiz; Shafirovich, Evgeny; Hwang, Hyun-Tae; Al-Kukhun, Ahmad

    2013-02-19

    A method of releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane is disclosed. The method comprises heating an aqueous ammonia borane solution to between about 80-135.degree. C. at between about 14.7 and 200 pounds per square inch absolute (psia) to release hydrogen by hydrothermolysis.

  5. Potential of High-Throughput Experimentation with Ammonia Borane...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of High-Throughput Experimentation with Ammonia Borane Solid Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Potential of High-Throughput Experimentation with Ammonia Borane Solid ...

  6. Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattus, Alfred J.

    1993-01-01

    Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product.

  7. Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattus, A.J.

    1993-11-30

    Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product. 3 figures.

  8. Saccharification of newspaper waste after ammonia fiber expansion or

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    extractive ammonia (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Saccharification of newspaper waste after ammonia fiber expansion or extractive ammonia Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Saccharification of newspaper waste after ammonia fiber expansion or extractive ammonia Here, the lignocellulosic fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW) can be used as renewable resources due to the widespread availability, predictable and low pricing and suitability for most conversion technologies. In

  9. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Whitlow, Eugene P.

    1998-09-22

    A method of inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425.degree. F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25.degree. C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425.degree. F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer.

  10. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, B.A.; Whitlow, E.P.

    1998-09-22

    A method is described for inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425 F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25 C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425 F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer. 5 figs.

  11. Evidence for decoupled electron and proton transfer in the electrochemical oxidation of ammonia on Pt(100)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Katsounaros, Ioannis; Chen, Ting; Gewirth, Andrew A.; Markovic, Nenad M.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-01-12

    The two traditional mechanisms of the electrochemical ammonia oxidation consider only concerted proton-electron transfer elementary steps and thus they predict that the rate–potential relationship is independent of the pH on the pH-corrected RHE potential scale. In this letter we show that this is not the case: the increase of the solution pH shifts the onset of the NH3-to-N2 oxidation on Pt(100) to lower potentials and also leads to higher surface concentration of formed NOad before the latter is oxidized to nitrite. Therefore, we present a new mechanism for the ammonia oxidation which incorporates a deprotonation step occurring prior to themore » electron transfer. The deprotonation step yields a negatively charged surface-adsorbed species which is discharged in a subsequent electron transfer step before the N–N bond formation. The negatively charged species is thus a precursor for the formation of N2 and NO. The new mechanism should be a future guide for computational studies aiming at the identification of intermediates and corresponding activation barriers for the elementary steps. As a result, ammonia oxidation is a new example of a bond-forming reaction on (100) terraces which involves decoupled proton-electron transfer.« less

  12. Energy Efficient Operation of Ammonia Refrigeration Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammed, Abdul Qayyum; Wenning, Thomas J; Sever, Franc; Kissock, Professor Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia refrigeration systems typically offer many energy efficiency opportunities because of their size and complexity. This paper develops a model for simulating single-stage ammonia refrigeration systems, describes common energy saving opportunities, and uses the model to quantify those opportunities. The simulation model uses data that are typically available during site visits to ammonia refrigeration plants and can be calibrated to actual consumption and performance data if available. Annual electricity consumption for a base-case ammonia refrigeration system is simulated. The model is then used to quantify energy savings for six specific energy efficiency opportunities; reduce refrigeration load, increase suction pressure, employ dual suction, decrease minimum head pressure set-point, increase evaporative condenser capacity, and reclaim heat. Methods and considerations for achieving each saving opportunity are discussed. The model captures synergistic effects that result when more than one component or parameter is changed. This methodology represents an effective method to model and quantify common energy saving opportunities in ammonia refrigeration systems. The results indicate the range of savings that might be expected from common energy efficiency opportunities.

  13. 12. mu. m band tunable ammonia laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Yuteh; Kuang Ichung; Hsun Hungtao

    1987-01-01

    The 9.4 ..mu..m R(30) line from a TEA-CO/sub 2/ laser was used to pump a NH/sub 3/ laser. Tunable NH/sub 3/ laser emission in the 12 ..mu..m band has been obtained. The output energy at 12.247, 12.261, and 12.079 ..mu..m is 18.6, 23, and 26 mJ, respectively.

  14. Model Catalysis of Ammonia Synthesis ad Iron-Water Interfaces - ASum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopic Study of Solid-GasInterfaces and Anion Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study of Selected Anionclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, Michael James

    2005-12-15

    The ammonia synthesis reaction has been studied using single crystal model catalysis combined with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. The adsorption of gases N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} that play a role in ammonia synthesis have been studied on the Fe(111) crystal surface by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy using an integrated Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV)/high-pressure system. SFG spectra are presented for the dissociation intermediates, NH{sub 2} ({approx}3325 cm{sup -1}) and NH ({approx}3235 cm{sup -1}) under high pressure of ammonia or equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products on Fe(111) surfaces. Special attention was paid to understand how potassium promotion of the iron catalyst affects the intermediates of ammonia synthesis. An Fe(111) surface promoted with 0.2 monolayers of potassium red shifts the vibrational frequencies of the reactive surface intermediates, NH and NH{sub 2}, providing evidence for weakened the nitrogen-hydrogen bonds relative to clean Fe(111). Spectral features of these surface intermediates persisted to higher temperatures for promoted iron surfaces than for clean Fe(111) surfaces implying that nitrogen-iron bonds are stronger for the promoted surface. The ratio of the NH to NH{sub 2} signal changed for promoted surfaces in the presence of equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products. The order of adding oxygen and potassium to promoted surfaces does not alter the spectra indicating that ammonia induces surface reconstruction of the catalyst to produce the same surface morphology. When oxygen is co-adsorbed with nitrogen, hydrogen, ammonia or potassium on Fe(111), a relative phase shift of the spectra occurs as compared to the presence of adsorbates on clean iron surfaces. Water adsorption on iron was also probed using SFG vibrational spectroscopy. For both H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O, the only spectral feature was in the range of the free OH or free OD. From the absence of SFG spectra of ice-like structure we conclude that surface hydroxides are formed and no liquid water is present on the surface. Other than model catalysis, gas phase anion photoelectron spectroscopy of the Cl + H{sub 2} van der Waals well, silicon clusters, germanium clusters, aluminum oxide clusters and indium phosphide clusters were studied. The spectra help to map out the neutral potential energy surfaces of the clusters. For aluminum oxide, the structures of the anions and neutrals were explored and for silicon, germanium and indium phosphide the electronic structure of larger clusters was mapped out.

  15. Recovery of ammonia from industrial wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, R. ); Koncar, M. )

    1993-07-01

    The ecological problems of ammonia and ammonium salts in wastewater, and the sources of effluents containing these two products, are discussed. Feasible separation processes and methods of recovery are reviewed, and the advantages and disadvantages of the individual processes are compared.

  16. Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, G.L.; Martin, F.S.

    1994-12-13

    A method is described for depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates. 1 figure.

  17. Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, Gary L.; Martin, Frank S.

    1994-12-13

    A method of depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates.

  18. AMMONIA CONCENTRATION IN SALTSTONE HEADSPACE SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamecnik, J; Alex Cozzi, A

    2008-09-26

    The Saltstone Facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) is under revision to accommodate changes in the Composite Lower Flammability Limit (CLFL) from the introduction of Isopar into Tank 50. Saltstone samples were prepared with an 'MCU' type salt solution spiked with ammonia. The ammonia released from the saltstone was captured and analyzed. The ammonia concentration found in the headspace of samples maintained at 95 C and 1 atm was, to 95% confidence, less than or equal to 3.9 mg/L. Tank 50 is fed by several influent streams. The salt solution from Tank 50 is pumped to the salt feed tank (SFT) in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). The premix materials cement, slag and fly ash are blended together prior to transfer to the grout mixer. The premix is fed to the grout mixer in the SPF and the salt solution is incorporated into the premix in the grout mixer, yielding saltstone slurry. The saltstone slurry drops into a hopper and then is pumped to the vault. The Saltstone Facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) is under revision to accommodate changes in the Composite Lower Flammability Limit (CLFL) from the introduction of Isopar{reg_sign} L into Tank 50. Waste Solidification-Engineering requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing to characterize the release of ammonia in curing saltstone at 95 C. The test temperature represents the maximum allowable temperature in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Ammonia may be present in the salt solution and premix materials, or may be produced by chemical reactions when the premix and salt solution are combined. A final report (SRNS-STI-2008-00120, Rev. 0) will be issued that will cover in more depth the information presented in this report.

  19. Optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchwald, Melvin I.; Jones, Claude R.; Nelson, Leonard Y.

    1982-01-01

    An optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system which is capable of producing a plurality of frequencies in the middle infrared spectral region. Two optical pumping mechanisms are disclosed, i.e., pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J) in response to enhancement of rotational cascade lasing including stimulated Raman effects, and, pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J+2). The disclosed apparatus for optical pumping include a hole coupled cavity and a grating coupled cavity.

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- R Brew Co - NH 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Landis to File; Subject: R. Brew Company; May 18, 1990 NH.01-2 - DOE Memorandum; Williams to File; Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action...

  1. Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Commercial Small Port Cu Zeolite Urea SCR Catalyst Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions in a Commercial Small Port Cu Zeolite Urea SCR Catalyst A ...

  2. Public Service Co of NH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EversourceNH Outage Hotline: 800-662-7764 Outage Map: www.eversource.comContentgen Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Landing Page: www.psnh.comSaveEnergyMo...

  3. Potential of High-Throughput Experimentation with Ammonia Borane...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    US Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Chemical) Hydrogen Storage ... (NH 2 BH 2 ) n + (n-1)H 2 (<120 o C) (Intramolecular) (NH 2 BH 2 ) n (NHBH) n + H 2 (> 150 ...

  4. Secretary Bodman Highlights President Bush's Solar America Initiative in Merrimack, NH

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MERRIMACK , NH - Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman joined Representatives Jeb Bradley (NH-1st) and Charles Bass (NH-2nd) to highlight President Bush's Solar America Initiative,...

  5. UNVEILING SOURCES OF HEATING IN THE VICINITY OF THE ORION BN/KL HOT CORE AS TRACED BY HIGHLY EXCITED INVERSION TRANSITIONS OF AMMONIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddi, C.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Greenhill, L. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Matthews, L. D.

    2011-09-20

    Using the Expanded Very Large Array, we have mapped the vicinity of the Orion BN/KL Hot Core with subarcsecond angular resolution in seven metastable inversion transitions of ammonia (NH{sub 3}): (J, K) = (6,6) to (12,12). This emission comes from levels up to 1500 K above the ground state, enabling identification of source(s) responsible for heating the region. We used this multi-transition data set to produce images of the rotational/kinetic temperature (T {sub rot}/T {sub kin}) and the column density N {sub col} of NH{sub 3} for ortho and para species separately and on a position-by-position basis. We find T {sub rot} and N {sub col} in the range 160-490 K and (1-4) x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}, respectively. Our spatially resolved images show that the highest (column) density and hottest gas is found in a northeast-southwest elongated ridge to the southeast of Source I. We have also measured the ortho-para ratio of ammonia, estimated to vary in the range 0.9-1.6. Enhancement of ortho with respect to para and the offset of hot NH{sub 3} emission peaks from known (proto)stellar sources provide evidence that the NH{sub 3} molecules have been released from dust grains into the gas phase through the passage of shocks and not by stellar radiation. We propose that the combined effect of Source I's proper motion and its low-velocity outflow impinging on a pre-existing dense medium is responsible for the excitation of NH{sub 3} and the Orion Hot Core. Finally, we found for the first time evidence of a slow ({approx}5 km s{sup -1}) and compact ({approx}1000 AU) outflow toward IRc7.

  6. NREL Demonstrates Light-Driven Process for Enzymatic Ammonia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    into ammonia, the main ingredient in chemical fertilizers could inspire development of ... potential to create new, more efficient chemical and fuel production technologies," said ...

  7. Trends in on-road vehicle emissions of ammonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kean, A.J.; Littlejohn, D.; Ban-Weiss, G.A.; Harley, R.A.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Lunden, M. M.

    2008-07-15

    Motor vehicle emissions of ammonia have been measured at a California highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. Between 1999 and 2006, light-duty vehicle ammonia emissions decreased by 38 {+-} 6%, from 640 {+-} 40 to 400 {+-} 20 mg kg{sup -1}. High time resolution measurements of ammonia made in summer 2001 at the same location indicate a minimum in ammonia emissions correlated with slower-speed driving conditions. Variations in ammonia emission rates track changes in carbon monoxide more closely than changes in nitrogen oxides, especially during later evening hours when traffic speeds are highest. Analysis of remote sensing data of Burgard et al. (Environ Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 7018-7022) indicates relationships between ammonia and vehicle model year, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide. Ammonia emission rates from diesel trucks were difficult to measure in the tunnel setting due to the large contribution to ammonia concentrations in a mixed-traffic bore that were assigned to light-duty vehicle emissions. Nevertheless, it is clear that heavy-duty diesel trucks are a minor source of ammonia emissions compared to light-duty gasoline vehicles.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of ammonia diffusion in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A. Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States) 40 CHEMISTRY; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; LIQUID WASTES; AMMONIA; GAS ANALYSIS; HANFORD RESERVATION; RADIOACTIVE WASTE...

  9. Selective ammonia slip catalyst enabling highly efficient NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    slip catalyst enabling highly efficient NOx removal requirements of the future Selective ammonia slip catalyst enabling highly efficient NOx removal requirements of the future A ...

  10. Catalysts for Dehydrogenation of ammonia boranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinekey, Dennis M.

    2014-12-19

    Several effective homogeneous catalysts for the dehydrogenation of amine boranes have been developed. The best catalyst uses an iridium complex, and is capable of dehydrogenating H3NBH3 (AB) and CH3NH2BH3 (MeAB) at comparable rates. Thermodynamic measurements using this catalyst demonstrate that the dehydrogenation of AB and MeAB is substantially exothermic, which has important implications for regeneration.

  11. NEW MASER EMISSION FROM NONMETASTABLE AMMONIA IN NGC 7538. II. GREEN BANK TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS INCLUDING WATER MASERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Ian M.; Seojin Kim, Stella

    2011-12-15

    We present new maser emission from {sup 14}NH{sub 3} (9,6) in NGC 7538. Our observations include the known spectral features near v{sub LSR} = -60 km s{sup -1} and -57 km s{sup -1} and several more features extending to -46 km s{sup -1}. In three epochs of observation spanning two months we do not detect any variability in the ammonia masers, in contrast to the >10-fold variability observed in other {sup 14}NH{sub 3} (9,6) masers in the Galaxy over comparable timescales. We also present observations of water masers in all three epochs for which emission is observed over the velocity range -105 km s{sup -1} < v{sub LSR} < -4 km s{sup -1}, including the highest velocity water emission yet observed from NGC 7538. Of the remarkable number of maser species in IRS 1, H{sub 2}O and, now, {sup 14}NH{sub 3} are the only masers known to exhibit emission outside of the velocity range -62 km s{sup -1} < v{sub LSR} < -51 km s{sup -1}. However, we find no significant intensity or velocity correlations between the water emission and ammonia emission. We also present a non-detection in the most sensitive search to date toward any source for emission from the CC{sup 32}S and CC{sup 34}S molecules, indicating an age greater than Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4} yr for IRS 1-3. We discuss these findings in the context of embedded stellar cores and recent models of the region.

  12. Methane, carbon monoxide, and ammonia in brown dwarfs and self-luminous giant planets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Marley, Mark S. E-mail: Mark.S.Marley@NASA.gov

    2014-12-10

    We address disequilibrium abundances of some simple molecules in the atmospheres of solar composition brown dwarfs and self-luminous extrasolar giant planets using a kinetics-based one-dimensional atmospheric chemistry model. Our approach is to use the full kinetics model to survey the parameter space with effective temperatures between 500 K and 1100 K. In all of these worlds, equilibrium chemistry favors CH{sub 4} over CO in the parts of the atmosphere that can be seen from Earth, but in most disequilibrium favors CO. The small surface gravity of a planet strongly discriminates against CH{sub 4} when compared to an otherwise comparable brown dwarf. If vertical mixing is like Jupiter's, the transition from methane to CO occurs at 500 K in a planet. Sluggish vertical mixing can raise this to 600 K, but clouds or more vigorous vertical mixing could lower this to 400 K. The comparable thresholds in brown dwarfs are 1100 100 K. Ammonia is also sensitive to gravity, but, unlike CH{sub 4}/CO, the NH{sub 3}/N{sub 2} ratio is insensitive to mixing, which makes NH{sub 3} a potential proxy for gravity. HCN may become interesting in high-gravity brown dwarfs with very strong vertical mixing. Detailed analysis of the CO-CH{sub 4} reaction network reveals that the bottleneck to CO hydrogenation goes through methanol, in partial agreement with previous work. Simple, easy to use quenching relations are derived by fitting to the complete chemistry of the full ensemble of models. These relations are valid for determining CO, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCN, and CO{sub 2} abundances in the range of self-luminous worlds we have studied, but may not apply if atmospheres are strongly heated at high altitudes by processes not considered here (e.g., wave breaking).

  13. Extraction of uranium: comparison of stripping with ammonia vs. strong acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moldovan, B.; Grinbaum, B.; Efraim, A.

    2008-07-01

    Following extraction of uranium in the first stage of solvent extraction using a tertiary amine, typically Alamine 336, the stripping of the extracted uranium is accomplished either by use of an aqueous solution of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} /NH{sub 4}OH or by strong-acid stripping using 400-500 g/L H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Both processes have their merits and determine the downstream processing. The classical stripping with ammonia is followed by addition of strong base, to precipitate ammonium uranyl sulfate (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}UO{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}, which yields finally the yellow cake. Conversely, stripping with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, followed by oxidation with hydrogen peroxide yields uranyl oxide as product. At the Cameco Key Lake operation, both processes were tested on a pilot scale, using a Bateman Pulsed Column (BPC). The BPC proved to be applicable to both processes. It met the process criteria both for extraction and stripping, leaving less than 1 mg/L of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the raffinate, and product solution had the required concentration of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} at high flux and reasonable height of transfer unit. In the Key Lake mill, each operation can be carried out in a single column. The main advantages of the strong-acid stripping over ammonia stripping are: (1) 60% higher flux in the extraction, (2) tenfold higher concentration of the uranium in the product solution, and (3) far more robust process, with no need of pH control in the stripping and no need to add acid to the extraction in order to keep the pH above the point of precipitation of iron compounds. The advantages of the ammoniacal process are easier stripping, that is, less stages needed to reach equilibrium and lower concentration of modifier needed to prevent the creation of a third phase. (authors)

  14. Effects of gaseous NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on the concentration profiles of PCDD/F in flyash under post-combustion zone conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A.; Williams, Paul T.

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on 2378-PCDD/F in flyash and flue gases was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 21-40% from the flue gases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 99% PCDD and 93% PCDF reductions in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 89% PCDD and 76% PCDF reductions in the flue gases. - Abstract: The influence of gaseous ammonia and sulphur dioxide on the formation of 2378-substituted PCDD/F on a reference flyash from a municipal waste incinerator has been investigated using a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor. The reference flyash samples (BCR-490) was reacted under a simulated flue gas stream at temperatures of 225 and 375 Degree-Sign C for 96 h. The experiments were carried out in two series: first with simulated flue gas alone, and then with injection of NH{sub 3} or SO{sub 2} gas into the flue gas just before the reactor inlet. It was found that the injection of gaseous ammonia into the flue gas could decrease the concentration of both PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% from the solid phase and by 21-40% from the gas phase. Converting the results to I-TEQ values, it could reduce the total I-TEQ values of PCDD and PCDF in the sum of the flyash and exhaust flue gas by 42-75% and 24-57% respectively. The application of SO{sub 2} led to 99% and 93% reductions in the PCDD and PCDF average congener concentrations, respectively in the solid phase. In the gas phase, the total reductions were 89% and 76% for PCDD and PCDF, respectively. Moreover, addition of SO{sub 2} reduced the total I-TEQ value of PCDD and PCDF in the flyash and exhaust flue gas together by 60-86% and 72-82% respectively. Sulphur dioxide was more effective than ammonia in suppressing PCDD/F formation in flyash under the conditions investigated.

  15. GaN nanowires with pentagon shape cross-section by ammonia-source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yong; Leung, Benjamin; Li, Qiming; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Wang, George T.

    2015-07-14

    In this study, ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-MBE) was used to grow catalyst-assisted GaN nanowires on (11¯02) r-plane sapphire substrates. Dislocation free [112¯0] oriented nanowires are formed with pentagon shape cross-section, instead of the usual triangular shape facet configuration. Specifically, the cross-section is the result of the additional two nonpolar {101¯0} side facets, which appear due to a decrease in relative growth rate of the {101¯0} facets to the {101¯1} and {101¯1} facets under the growth regime in NH3-MBE. Compared to GaN nanowires grown by Ni-catalyzed metal–organic chemical vapor deposition, the NH3-MBE grown GaN nanowires show more than an order of magnitude increase in band-edge to yellow luminescence intensity ratio, as measured by cathodoluminescence, indicating improved microstructural and optical properties.

  16. GaN nanowires with pentagon shape cross-section by ammonia-source molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Yong; Leung, Benjamin; Li, Qiming; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Wang, George T.

    2015-07-14

    In this study, ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-MBE) was used to grow catalyst-assisted GaN nanowires on (11¯02) r-plane sapphire substrates. Dislocation free [112¯0] oriented nanowires are formed with pentagon shape cross-section, instead of the usual triangular shape facet configuration. Specifically, the cross-section is the result of the additional two nonpolar {101¯0} side facets, which appear due to a decrease in relative growth rate of the {101¯0} facets to the {101¯1} and {101¯1} facets under the growth regime in NH3-MBE. Compared to GaN nanowires grown by Ni-catalyzed metal–organic chemical vapor deposition, the NH3-MBE grown GaN nanowires show more than an ordermore » of magnitude increase in band-edge to yellow luminescence intensity ratio, as measured by cathodoluminescence, indicating improved microstructural and optical properties.« less

  17. Ammonia removal process upgrade to the Acme Steel Coke Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J.L.

    1995-12-01

    The need to upgrade the ammonia removal process at the Acme Steel Coke Plant developed with the installation of the benzene NESHAP (National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) equipment, specifically the replacement of the final cooler. At Acme Steel it was decided to replace the existing open cooling tower type final cooler with a closed loop direct spray tar/water final cooler. This new cooler has greatly reduced the emissions of benzene, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen cyanide to the atmosphere, bringing them into environmental compliance. At the time of its installation it was not fully recognized as to the effect this would have on the coke oven gas composition. In the late seventies the decision had been made at Acme Steel to stop the production of ammonia sulfate salt crystals. The direction chosen was to make a liquid ammonia sulfate solution. This product was used as a pickle liquor at first and then as a liquid fertilizer as more markets were developed. In the fall of 1986 the ammonia still was brought on line. The vapors generated from the operation of the stripping still are directed to the inlet of the ammonia absorber. At that point in time it was decided that an improvement to the cyclical ammonia removal process was needed. The improvements made were minimal yet allowed the circulation of solution through the ammonia absorber on a continuous basis. The paper describes the original batch process and the modifications made which allowed continuous removal.

  18. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit devices and methods for detecting ammonia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Paulus, Michael J [Knoxville, TN; Sayler, Gary S [Blaine, TN; Applegate, Bruce M [West Lafayette, IN; Ripp, Steven A [Knoxville, TN

    2007-04-24

    Monolithic bioelectronic devices for the detection of ammonia includes a microorganism that metabolizes ammonia and which harbors a lux gene fused with a heterologous promoter gene stably incorporated into the chromosome of the microorganism and an Optical Application Specific Integrated Circuit (OASIC). The microorganism is generally a bacterium.

  19. Selective Catalytic Oxidation (SCO) of NH3 to N2 for Hot Exhaust Treatment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Investigation of a series of transition metal oxides and precious metal based catalysts for ammonia selective oxidation at low temperatures

  20. Selective ammonia slip catalyst enabling highly efficient NOx removal requirements of the future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A low precious metal loading ammonia-slip catalyst was developed that is able to oxidize the ammonia that slips past the SCR catalyst to nitrogen.

  1. Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas ...

  2. Safe and compact ammonia storage/delivery systems for SCR-DeNOX...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and compact ammonia storagedelivery systems for SCR-DeNOX in automotive units Safe and compact ammonia storagedelivery systems for SCR-DeNOX in automotive units Presentation ...

  3. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhen Fan; Song Wu; Richard G. Herman

    2004-06-30

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the April 1 to June 30, 2004 time period.

  4. Passive Ammonia SCR for Lean Burn SIDI Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Passive NH3 SCR has been demonstrated as a high efficiency and low cost alternative lean NOx aftertreatment technology for stratified gasoline engines.

  5. Novel single stripper with side-draw to remove ammonia and sour gas simultaneously for coal-gasification wastewater treatment and the industrial implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, D.C.; Yu, Z.J.; Chen, Y.; Qian, Y.

    2009-06-15

    A large amount of wastewater is produced in the Lurgi coal-gasification process with the complex compounds carbon dioxide, ammonia, phenol, etc., which cause a serious environmental problem. In this paper, a novel stripper operated at elevated pressure is designed to improve the pretreatment process. In this technology, two noticeable improvements were established. First, the carbon dioxide and ammonia were removed simultaneously in a single stripper where sour gas (mainly carbon dioxide) is removed from the tower top and the ammonia vapor is drawn from the side and recovered by partial condensation. Second, the ammonia is removed before the phenol recovery to reduce the pH value of the subsequent extraction units, so as the phenol removal performance of the extraction is greatly improved. To ensure the operational efficiency, some key operational parameters are analyzed and optimized though simulation. It is shown that when the top temperature is kept at 40 C and the weight ratio of the side draw to the feed is above 9%, the elevated pressures can ensure the removal efficiency of NH{sub 3} and carbon dioxide and the desired purified water as the bottom product of the unit is obtained. A real industrial application demonstrates the attractiveness of the new technique: it removes 99.9% CO{sub 2} and 99.6% ammonia, compared to known techniques which remove 66.5% and 94.4%, respectively. As a result, the pH value of the wastewater is reduced from above 9 to below 7. This ensures that the phenol removal ratio is above 93% in the following extraction units. The operating cost is lower than that of known techniques, and the operation is simplified.

  6. Conversion of ammonia into hydrogen and nitrogen by reaction with a sulfided catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matthews, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    A method is provided for removing ammonia from the sour water stream of a coal gasification process. The basic steps comprise stripping the ammonia from the sour water; heating the stripped ammonia to a temperature from between 400.degree. to 1,000.degree. F; passing the gaseous ammonia through a reactor containing a sulfided catalyst to produce elemental hydrogen and nitrogen; and scrubbing the reaction product to obtain an ammonia-free gas. The residual equilibrium ammonia produced by the reactor is recycled into the stripper. The ammonia-free gas may be advantageously treated in a Claus process to recover elemental sulfur. Iron sulfide or cobalt molybdenum sulfide catalysts are used.

  7. Potential Roles of Ammonia in a Hydrogen Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Produced in February 2006 by the U.S. Department of Energy, this report focuses on the key issues and advantages and disadvantages associated with using ammonia for on-board vehicular hydrogen storage.

  8. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as AmtB) that passes ammonia gas molecules through the bacterial cell membrane of E. coli. The structure allowed them to deduce how a positively charged ammonium ion is...

  9. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were grown in the absence of any ammonium derivative and in the presence of ammonium sulfate or methyl ammonium sulfate. A stereo view of the monomeric ammonia channel viewed...

  10. Effect of ammonia plasma treatment on graphene oxide LB monolayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Gulbagh; Botcha, V. Divakar; Narayanam, Pavan K.; Sutar, D. S.; Talwar, S. S.; Major, S. S.; Srinivasa, R. S.

    2013-02-05

    Graphene oxide monolayer sheets were transferred on Si and SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates by Langmuir-Blodgett technique and were exposed to ammonia plasma at room temperature. The monolayer character of both graphene oxide and plasma treated graphene oxide sheets were ascertained by atomic force microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed that ammonia plasma treatment results in enhancement of graphitic carbon content along with the incorporation of nitrogen. The conductivity of graphene oxide monolayers, which was in the range of 10{sup -6}-10{sup -7} S/cm, increased to 10{sup -2}-10{sup -3} S/cm after the ammonia plasma treatment. These results indicate that the graphene oxide was simultaneously reduced and N-doped during ammonia plasma treatment, without affecting the morphological stability of sheets.

  11. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia Print Membrane proteins provide molecular-sized entry and exit portals for the various substances that pass into and out of cells....

  12. Synthesis and Evaluation of Cu-SAPO-34 Catalysts for Ammonia Selective Catalytic Reduction. 1. Aqueous Solution Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Washton, Nancy M.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-09-06

    SAPO-34 molecular sieves are synthesized using various structure directing agents (SDAs). Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts are prepared via aqueous solution ion exchange. Catalysts are characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Catalytic properties are examined using standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) and ammonia oxidation reactions. During solution ion exchange, different SAPO-34 samples undergo different extent of structural damage via irreversible hydrolysis. Si content within the samples (i.e., Al-O-Si bond density) and framework stress are key factors that affect irreversible hydrolysis. Even using very dilute Cu acetate solutions, it is not possible to generate Cu-SAPO-34 samples with only isolated Cu2+ ions. Small amounts of CuOx species always coexist with isolated Cu2+ ions. Highly active and selective Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts for NH3-SCR are readily generated using this synthesis protocol, even for SAPO-34 samples that degrade substantially during solution ion exchange. High-temperature aging is found to improve the catalytic performance. This is likely due to reduction of intracrystalline mass-transfer limitations via formation of additional porosity in the highly defective SAPO-34 particles formed after ion exchange. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOEs Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute under contract number DE-AC05-76RL01830.

  13. NREL Demonstrates Light-Driven Process for Enzymatic Ammonia Production -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL Demonstrates Light-Driven Process for Enzymatic Ammonia Production Carbon emissions and energy requirements reduced with new approach April 21, 2016 Image shows tubes of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles dissolved in water. A new process using light to reduce dinitrogen into ammonia, the main ingredient in chemical fertilizers could inspire development of new, more sustainable processes that eliminate the energy-intensive, lengthier processes now commonly in use. According

  14. NREL Demonstrates Light-Driven Process for Enzymatic Ammonia Production:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon emissions and energy requirements reduced with new approach | Department of Energy Demonstrates Light-Driven Process for Enzymatic Ammonia Production: Carbon emissions and energy requirements reduced with new approach NREL Demonstrates Light-Driven Process for Enzymatic Ammonia Production: Carbon emissions and energy requirements reduced with new approach April 21, 2016 - 4:03pm Addthis News release from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, April 21 A new process using light to

  15. Exhaust purification with on-board ammonia production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robel, Wade J.; Driscoll, James Joshua; Coleman, Gerald N.

    2008-05-13

    A system of ammonia production for a selective catalytic reduction system is provided. The system includes producing an exhaust gas stream within a cylinder group, wherein the first exhaust gas stream includes NOx. The exhaust gas stream may be supplied to an exhaust passage and cooled to a predetermined temperature range, and at least a portion of the NOx within the exhaust gas stream may be converted into ammonia.

  16. Exhaust purification with on-board ammonia production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robel, Wade J.; Driscoll, James Joshua; Coleman, Gerald N.

    2010-10-12

    A method of ammonia production for a selective catalytic reduction system is provided. The method includes producing an exhaust gas stream within a cylinder group, wherein the first exhaust gas stream includes NOx. The exhaust gas stream may be supplied to an exhaust passage and cooled to a predetermined temperature range, and at least a portion of the NOx within the exhaust gas stream my be converted into ammonia.

  17. Ammonia concentration modeling based on retained gas sampler data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrones, G.; Palmer, B.J.; Cuta, J.M.

    1997-09-01

    The vertical ammonia concentration distributions determined by the retained gas sampler (RGS) apparatus were modeled for double-shell tanks (DSTs) AW-101, AN-103, AN-104, and AN-105 and single-shell tanks (SSTs) A-101, S-106, and U-103. One the vertical transport of ammonia in the tanks were used for the modeling. Transport in the non-convective settled solids and floating solids layers is assumed to occur primarily via some type of diffusion process, while transport in the convective liquid layers is incorporated into the model via mass transfer coefficients based on empirical correlations. Mass transfer between the top of the waste and the tank headspace and the effects of ventilation of the headspace are also included in the models. The resulting models contain a large number of parameters, but many of them can be determined from known properties of the waste configuration or can be estimated within reasonable bounds from data on the waste samples themselves. The models are used to extract effective diffusion coefficients for transport in the nonconvective layers based on the measured values of ammonia from the RGS apparatus. The modeling indicates that the higher concentrations of ammonia seen in bubbles trapped inside the waste relative to the ammonia concentrations in the tank headspace can be explained by a combination of slow transport of ammonia via diffusion in the nonconvective layers and ventilation of the tank headspace by either passive or active means. Slow transport by diffusion causes a higher concentration of ammonia to build up deep within the waste until the concentration gradients between the interior and top of the waste are sufficient to allow ammonia to escape at the same rate at which it is being generated in the waste.

  18. Synthesis and Evaluation of Cu/SAPO-34 Catalysts for NH3-SCR 2: Solid-state Ion Exchange and One-pot Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Washton, Nancy M.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-01-01

    Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts are synthesized using two methods: solid-state ion exchange (SSIE) and one-pot synthesis. SSIE is conducted by calcining SAPO-34/CuO mixtures at elevated temperatures. For the one-pot synthesis method, Cu-containing chemicals (CuO and CuSO4) are added during gel preparation. A high-temperature calcination step is also needed for this method. Catalysts are characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Catalytic properties are examined using standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) and ammonia oxidation reactions. In Cu-SAPO-34 samples formed using SSIE, Cu presents both as isolated Cu2+ ions and unreacted CuO. The former is highly active and selective in NH3-SCR, while the latter catalyzes a side reaction; notably, the non-selective oxidation of NH3 above 350 ºC. Using the one-pot method followed by a high-temperature aging treatment, it is possible to form Cu SAPO-34 samples with predominately isolated Cu2+ ions at low Cu loadings. However at much higher Cu loadings, isolated Cu2+ ions that bind weakly with the CHA framework and CuO clusters also form. These Cu moieties are very active in catalyzing non-selective NH3 oxidation above 350 ºC. Low-temperature reaction kinetics indicate that Cu-SAPO-34 samples formed using SSIE have core-shell structures where Cu is enriched in the shell layers; while Cu is more evenly distributed within the one-pot samples. Reaction kinetics also suggest that at low temperatures, the local environment next to Cu2+ ion centers plays little role on the overall catalytic properties. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle under contract number DE-AC05-76RL01830. The authors also thank Shari Li (PNNL) for surface area/pore volume measurements, and Bruce W. Arey (PNNL) for SEM measurements. Discussions with Drs. A. Yezerets, K. Kamasamudram, J.H. Li, N. Currier and J.Y. Luo from Cummins, Inc. and H.Y. Chen and H. Hess from Johnson-Matthey are greatly appreciated.

  19. Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all ...

  20. Kinetics Study of Solid Ammonia Borane Hydrogen Release Modeling and Experimental Validation for Chemical Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Yong-Joon; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Maupin, Gary D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2014-02-24

    Ammonia borane (AB), NH3BH3, is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage with 19.6 wt% gravimetric hydrogen capacity of which 16.2 wt% hydrogen can be utilized below 200C. We have investigated the kinetics of hydrogen release from AB and from an AB-methyl cellulose (AB/MC) composite at temperatures of 160-300C using both experiments and modeling. The purpose of our study was to show safe hydrogen release without thermal runaway effects and to validate system model kinetics. AB/MC released hydrogen at ~20C lower than neat AB and at a rate that is two times faster. Based on the experimental results, the kinetics equations were revised to better represent the growth and nucleation process during decomposition of AB. We explored two different reactor concepts; Auger and fixed bed. The current Auger reactor concept turned out to not be appropriate, however, we demonstrated safe self-propagation of the hydrogen release reaction of solid AB/MC in a fixed bed reactor.

  1. DESIGN OF HYBRID POWER GENERATION CYCLES EMPLOYING AMMONIA-WATER-CARBON DIOXIDE MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashish Gupta

    2002-06-01

    A power cycle generates electricity from the heat of combustion of fossil fuels. Its efficiency is governed by the cycle configuration, the operating parameters, and the working fluid. Typical. designs use pure water as the fluid. in the last two decades, hybrid cycles based on ammonia-water, and carbon-dioxide mixtures as the working fluid have been proposed. These cycles may improve the power generation efficiency of Rankine cycles by 15%. Improved efficiency is important for two reasons: it lowers the cost of electricity being produced, and by reducing the consumption of fossil fuels per unit power, it reduces the generation of environmental pollutants. The goal of this project is to develop a computational optimization-based method for the design and analysis of hybrid bottoming power cycles to minimize the usage of fossil fuels. The development of this methodology has been achieved by formulating this task as that of selecting the least cost power cycle design from all possible configurations. They employ a detailed thermodynamic property prediction package they have developed under a DOE-FETC grant to model working fluid mixtures. Preliminary results from this work suggest that a pure NH{sub 3} cycle outperforms steam or the expensive Kalina cycle.

  2. Influence of preparation conditions of hollow titanianickel composite spheres on their catalytic activity for hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umegaki, Tetsuo, E-mail: umegaki.tetsuo@nihon-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials and Applied Chemistry, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14, Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-Ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Ohashi, Takato [Department of Materials and Applied Chemistry, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14, Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-Ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Xu, Qiang [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Kojima, Yoshiyuki [Department of Materials and Applied Chemistry, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14, Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-Ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: We study influence of preparation conditions on activity of hollow titanianickel composite spheres. The activity for hydrolytic dehydrogenation of NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} increases with increase of Ti + Ni content. The activity depends on the amount of PS residue in the hollow spheres. - Abstract: The present work reports influence of preparation conditions of hollow titanianickel composite spheres on their morphology and catalytic activity for hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}). The as-prepared hollow titanianickel composite spheres were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Catalytic activities of the hollow spheres for hydrolytic dehydrogenation of aqueous NaBH{sub 4}/NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} solution improve with the decrease of Ti + Ni content. From the results of FTIR spectra and elemental analysis, the amount of residual polystyrene (PS) templates is able to be reduced by increasing aging time for the preparation, and the catalytic activity of the hollow spheres increases when the amount of residual PS templates decreases. The carbon content in the hollow spheres prepared with aging time = 24 h is 17.3 wt.%, and the evolution of 62 mL hydrogen is finished in about 22 min in the presence of the hollow spheres from aqueous NaBH{sub 4}/NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} solution. The molar ratio of the hydrolytically generated hydrogen to the initial NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} in the presence of the hollow spheres is 2.7.

  3. Demonstration of isotype GaN/AlN/GaN heterobarrier diodes by NH{sub 3}-molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fireman, Micha N.; Browne, David A.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Speck, James S.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2015-05-18

    The results of vertical transport through nitride heterobarrier structures grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy are presented. Structures are designed with binary layers to avoid the effects of random alloy fluctuations in ternary nitride barriers. The unintentional incorporation of Ga in the AlN growth is investigated by atom probe tomography and is shown to be strongly dependent on both the NH{sub 3} flowrate and substrate temperature growth parameters. Once nominally pure AlN layer growth conditions are achieved, structures consisting of unintentionally doped (UID) GaN spacer layers adjacent to a nominally pure AlN are grown between two layers of n+ GaN, from which isotype diodes are fabricated. Varying the design parameters of AlN layer thickness, UID spacer layer thickness, and threading dislocation density show marked effects on the vertical transport characteristics of these structures. The lack of significant temperature dependence, coupled with Fowler-Nordheim and/or Milliken-Lauritsen analysis, point to a prevalently tunneling field emission mechanism through the AlN barrier. Once flatband conditions in the UID layer are achieved, electrons leave the barrier with significant energy. This transport mechanism is of great interest for applications in hot electron structures.

  4. A mass transfer model of ammonia volatilisation from anaerobic digestate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, M.J.; Everitt, T.; Villa, R.

    2010-10-15

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is becoming increasingly popular for treating organic waste. The methane produced can be burned to generate electricity and the digestate, which is high in mineral nitrogen, can be used as a fertiliser. In this paper we evaluate potential losses of ammonia via volatilisation from food waste anaerobic digestate using a closed chamber system equipped with a sulphuric acid trap. Ammonia losses represent a pollution source and, over long periods could reduce the agronomic value of the digestate. Observed ammonia losses from the experimental system were linear with time. A simple non-steady-state partitioning model was developed to represent the process. After calibration, the model was able to describe the behaviour of ammonia in the digestate and in the trap very well. The average rate of volatilisation was approximately 5.2 g N m{sup -2} week{sup -1}. The model was used to extrapolate the findings of the laboratory study to a number of AD storage scenarios. The simulations highlight that open storage of digestate could result in significant losses of ammonia to the atmosphere. Losses are predicted to be relatively minor from covered facilities, particularly if depth to surface area ratio is high.

  5. Design, start up, and three years operating experience of an ammonia scrubbing, distillation, and destruction plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gambert, G.

    1996-12-31

    When the rebuilt Coke Plant started operations in November of 1992, it featured a completely new closed circuit secondary cooler, ammonia scrubbing, ammonia distillation, and ammonia destruction plants. This is the second plant of this type to be built in North America. To remove the ammonia from the gas, it is scrubbed with three liquids: Approximately 185 gallons/minute of cooled stripped liquor from the ammonia stills; Light oil plant condensate; and Optionally, excess flushing liquor. These scrubbers typically reduce ammonia content in the gas from 270 Grains/100 standard cubic feet to 0.2 Grains/100 standard cubic feet.

  6. PROTOSOLAR AMMONIA AS THE UNIQUE SOURCE OF TITAN's NITROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandt, Kathleen E.; Mousis, Olivier; Gautier, Daniel

    2014-06-20

    The origin of Titan's nitrogen-rich atmosphere is thought to be ammonia ice, but this has not yet been confirmed. Furthermore, it is uncertain whether the building blocks of Titan formed within the Saturnian subnebula or in the colder protosolar nebula (PSN). Recent measurements of the nitrogen isotope ratio in cometary ammonia, combined with evolutionary constraints on the nitrogen isotopes in Titan's atmosphere provide firm evidence that the nitrogen in Titan's atmosphere must have originated as ammonia ice formed in the PSN under conditions similar to that of cometary formation. This result has important implications for the projected D/H ratio in cometary methane, nitrogen isotopic fractionation in the PSN and the source of nitrogen for Earth's atmosphere.

  7. Ammonia-treated phosphate glasses useful for sealing to metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brow, R.K.; Day, D.E.

    1991-09-03

    A method of improving surface-dependent properties of phosphate glass such as durability and wear resistance without significantly affecting its thermal expansion coefficient is provided which comprises annealing the glass in a dry ammonia atmosphere at temperatures approximating the transition temperature of the glass. The ammonia annealing treatment of the present invention is carried out for a time sufficient to allow incorporation of a thin layer of nitrogen into the surface of the phosphate glass, and the treatment improves the durability of the glass without the reduction in the thermal expansion coefficient that has restricted the effectiveness of prior ammonia treatments. The improved phosphate glass resulting from this method is superior in wear resistance, yet maintains suitable thermal expansion properties so that it may be used effectively in a variety of applications requiring hermetic glass-metal seals.

  8. Ammonia storage and delivery systems for NOx aftertreatment | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Poster presenation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). PDF icon deer07_johannessen.pdf More Documents & Publications 3rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct Gas Dosing Safe and compact ammonia storage/delivery systems for SCR-DeNOX in automotive units Urea SCR and

  9. 3rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct Gas Dosing 3rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct Gas Dosing SCR system provides direct ...

  10. Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI Aftertreatment System Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI Aftertreatment System Lean-burn SIDI ...

  11. Robust Nitrogen Oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Robust Nitrogen OxideAmmonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions Control Robust Nitrogen OxideAmmonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions Control 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel ...

  12. AMMONIA-FREE NOx CONTROL SYSTEM (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: AMMONIA-FREE NOx CONTROL SYSTEM Citation Details In-Document Search Title: AMMONIA-FREE NOx CONTROL SYSTEM This report describes a novel NOx control system that ...

  13. AMMONIA-FREE NOx CONTROL SYSTEM (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: AMMONIA-FREE NOx CONTROL SYSTEM Citation Details In-Document Search Title: AMMONIA-FREE NOx CONTROL SYSTEM You are accessing a document from the Department of ...

  14. 3rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct Gas Dosing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SCR system provides direct ammonia gas dosing for optimal SCR performance with simplified and flexible exhaust layout.

  15. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA 2.61 2000's 4.07 4.01 3.37 6.08 6.44 10.88 7.26 7.52 9.72 5.04 2010's 5.48 5.45 4.08 6.63 10.55 5.18 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas

  16. Array-type NH.sub.3 sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, David Lawrence; Montgomery, Frederick Charles; Armstrong, Timothy R; Warmack, Robert J

    2013-12-31

    An array-type sensor that senses NH.sub.3 includes non-Nernstian sensing elements constructed from metal and/or metal-oxide electrodes on an O.sub.2 ion conducting substrate. In one example sensor, one electrode may be made of platinum, another electrode may be made of manganese (III) oxide (Mn.sub.2O.sub.3), and another electrode may be made of tungsten trioxide (WO.sub.3). Some sensing elements may further include an electrode made of La.sub.0.6Sr.sub.0.4Co.sub.0.2Fe.sub0.8O.sub.3 and another electrode made of LaCr.sub.0.95.Mg.sub.0.05O.sub.3.

  17. Hollow-fiber gas-membrane process for removal of NH{sub 3} from solution of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Y.; Cabral, J.M.S.; Wang, S.

    1996-07-01

    A hollow-fiber supported gas membrane process for the separation of NH{sub 3} from aqueous solutions containing both NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A lumen laminar flow and radial diffusion model was applied to calculate the membrane wall transfer coefficient from the data stripping a single volatile component, NH{sub 3} or CO{sub 2}, from their individual aqueous solutions. Influence of the type of membranes and operating conditions on mass-transfer rate were discussed, especially the influence of the membrane transfer coefficient on the film mass-transfer coefficient in the lumen. Appropriate configurations of the hollow-fiber modules for stripping of a single component were analyzed to optimize mass transfer. To predict the stripping of NH{sub 3} from a solution containing NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, a mathematical model incorporating local chemical equilibria and Nernst-Planck diffusion was developed to describe the mass transport. The models described the experimental data fairly well. The experimental results showed that the supported gas membrane process can be used to remove NH{sub 3} effectively from aqueous media containing NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}.

  18. Saccharification of newspaper waste after ammonia fiber expansion or extractive ammonia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Montella, Salvatore; Balan, Venkatesh; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Gunawan, Christa; Giacobbe, Simona; Pepe, Olimpia; Faraco, Vincenza

    2016-03-02

    Here, the lignocellulosic fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW) can be used as renewable resources due to the widespread availability, predictable and low pricing and suitability for most conversion technologies. In particular, after the typical paper recycling loop, the newspaper waste (NW) could be further valorized as feedstock in biorefinering industry since it still contains up to 70 % polysaccharides. In this study, two different physicochemical methods— ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) and extractive ammonia (EA) were tested for the pretraetment of NW. Furthermore, based on the previously demonstrated ability of the recombinant enzymes endocellulase rCelStrep, α-larabinofuranosidase rPoAbf and its evolvedmore » variant rPoAbf F435Y/Y446F to improve the saccharification of different lignocellulosic pretreated biomasses (such as corn stover and Arundo donax), in this study these enzymes were tested for the hydrolysis of pretreated NW, with the aim of valorizing the lignocellulosic fractions of the MSW. In particular, a mixture of purified enzymes containing cellulases, xylanases and accessory hemicellulases, was chosen as reference mix and rCelStrep and rPoAbf or its variant were replaced to EGI and Larb. The results showed that these enzymatic mixes are not suitable for the hydrolysis of NW after AFEX or EA pretreatment. On the other hand, when the enzymes rCelStrep, rPoAbf and rPoAbf F435Y/Y446F were tested for their effect in hydrolysis of pretreated NW by addition to a commercial enzyme mixture, it was shown that the total polysaccharides conversion yield reached 37.32 % for AFEX pretreated NW by adding rPoAbf to the mix whilst the maximum sugars conversion yield for EA pretreated NW was achieved 40.80 % by adding rCelStrep. The maximum glucan conversion yield obtained (45.61 % for EA pretreated NW by adding rCelStrep to the commercial mix) is higher than or comparable to those reported in recent manuscripts adopting hydrolysis conditions similar to those used in this study.« less

  19. Corrosion protection of steel in ammonia/water heat pumps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansfeld, Florian B.; Sun, Zhaoli

    2003-10-14

    Corrosion of steel surfaces in a heat pump is inhibited by adding a rare earth metal salt to the heat pump's ammonia/water working fluid. In preferred embodiments, the rare earth metal salt includes cerium, and the steel surfaces are cerated to enhance the corrosion-inhibiting effects.

  20. Modeling Study of SCR/PGM Interactions in NH3 Slip Catalysts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The focus of this research is on the optimization of NH3 slip catalyst performance by simulating the behavior of different SCR/PGM configurations.

  1. EA-1801: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy 01: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH EA-1801: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH June 25, 2010 EA-1801: Final Environmental Impact Granite Reliable Power Wind Project, Coos County, New Hampshire July 23, 2010 EA-1801: Finding of No Significant Impact Granite Reliable Power Wind Project, Coos County, New Hampshire

  2. Adsorption analysis of ammonia in an aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arman, B.; Panchal, C.B.

    1993-08-01

    An analysis is carried out to determine the effects of the diffusional resistance on the rate of the adsorption of ammonia in an aqueous solution. A performance prediction model is developed to calculate the local rate of heat and mass transfer, including physical and thermodynamic property calculations of the mixture. An algorithm is developed for calculating the interfacial conditions. The local heat- and mass-transfer calculation is then incorporated into the performance prediction method for adsorption for a given geometry.

  3. On the stability of the disordered molecular alloy phase of ammonia hemihydrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C. W.; Bull, C. L.; Stinton, G. W.; Amos, D. M.; Donnelly, M.-E.; Loveday, J. S.

    2015-03-07

    The disordered-molecular-alloy phase (DMA) of ammonia hydrates [J. S. Loveday and R. J. Nelmes, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4329 (1999)] is unique in that it has substitutional disorder of ammonia and water over the molecular sites of a body centred cubic lattice. Whilst this structure has been observed in ammonia di- and mono-hydrate compositions, it has not been conclusively observed in the ammonia hemihydrate system. This work presents investigations of the structural behaviour of ammonia hemihydrate as a function of P and T. The indications of earlier studies [Ma et al. RSC Adv. 2, 4290 (2012)] that the DMA structure could be produced by compression of ammonia hemihydrate above 20 GPa at ambient temperature are confirmed. In addition, the DMA structure was found to form reversibly both from the melt, and on warming of ammonia hemihydrate phase-II, in the pressure range between 4 and 8 GPa. The route used to make the DMA structure from ammonia mono- and di-hydrates—compression at 170 K to 6 GPa followed by warming to ambient temperature—was found not to produce the DMA structure for ammonia hemihydrate. These results provide the first strong evidence that DMA is a thermodynamically stable form. A high-pressure phase diagram for ammonia hemihydrate is proposed which has importance for planetary modelling.

  4. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Foster Wheeler Dev Corp Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; AMMONIA; BOILERS; COAL; ...

  5. System and method for determining an ammonia generation rate in a three-way catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sun, Min; Perry, Kevin L; Kim, Chang H

    2014-12-30

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes a rate determination module, a storage level determination module, and an air/fuel ratio control module. The rate determination module determines an ammonia generation rate in a three-way catalyst based on a reaction efficiency and a reactant level. The storage level determination module determines an ammonia storage level in a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst positioned downstream from the three-way catalyst based on the ammonia generation rate. The air/fuel ratio control module controls an air/fuel ratio of an engine based on the ammonia storage level.

  6. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; AMMONIA; BOILERS; COAL; COMBUSTION; COMBUSTORS; CONTROL SYSTEMS; DESIGN; FLUE GAS; POLLUTION CONTROL; NITROUS OXIDE Word Cloud More Like This ...

  7. NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx Traps NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx Traps Research to identify most promising catalytic ...

  8. NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx Traps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research to identify most promising catalytic formulations and operation for the in-situ generation of NH3, storage on a downstream SCR catalyst, and utilized to reduce the remaining NOx

  9. Hydrogen Storage Properties of New Hydrogen-Rich BH3NH3-Metal Hydride (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2, and/or CaH2) Composite Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Young Joon; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2012-04-19

    Ammonia borane (AB = NH3BH3) is one of the most attractive materials for chemical hydrogen storage due to its high hydrogen contents of 19.6 wt.%, however, impurity levels of borazine, ammonia and diborane in conjunction with foaming and exothermic hydrogen release calls for finding ways to mitigate the decomposition reactions. In this paper we present a solution by mixing AB with metal hydrides (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2 and CaH2) which have endothermic hydrogen release in order to control the heat release and impurity levels from AB upon decomposition. The composite materials were prepared by mechanical ball milling, and their H2 release properties were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The formation of volatile products from decomposition side reactions, such as borazine (N3B3H6) was determined by mass spectrometry (MS). Sieverts type pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) gas-solid reaction instrument was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the combined systems and neat AB. In situ 11B MAS-NMR revealed a destabilized decomposition pathway. We found that by adding specific metal hydrides to AB we can eliminate the impurities and mitigate the heat release.

  10. Patched bimetallic surfaces are active catalysts for ammonia decomposition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2015-10-07

    In this study, ammonia decomposition is often used as an archetypical reaction for predicting new catalytic materials and understanding the very reason of why some reactions are sensitive on material’s structure. Core–shell or surface-segregated bimetallic nanoparticles expose outstanding activity for many heterogeneously catalysed reactions but the reasons remain elusive owing to the difficulties in experimentally characterizing active sites. Here by performing multiscale simulations in ammonia decomposition on various nickel loadings on platinum (111), we show that the very high activity of core–shell structures requires patches of the guest metal to create and sustain dual active sites: nickel terraces catalyse N-Hmore » bond breaking and nickel edge sites drive atomic nitrogen association. The structure sensitivity on these active catalysts depends profoundly on reaction conditions due to kinetically competing relevant elementary reaction steps. We expose a remarkable difference in active sites between transient and steady-state studies and provide insights into optimal material design.« less

  11. Waste Heat Powered Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit for LPG Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald C, Energy Concepts Co.; Lauber, Eric, Western Refining Co.

    2008-06-20

    An emerging DOE-sponsored technology has been deployed. The technology recovers light ends from a catalytic reformer plant using waste heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration. It is deployed at the 17,000 bpd Bloomfield, New Mexico refinery of Western Refining Company. The technology recovers approximately 50,000 barrels per year of liquefied petroleum gas that was formerly being flared. The elimination of the flare also reduces CO2 emissions by 17,000 tons per year, plus tons per year reductions in NOx, CO, and VOCs. The waste heat is supplied directly to the absorption unit from the Unifiner effluent. The added cooling of that stream relieves a bottleneck formerly present due to restricted availability of cooling water. The 350oF Unifiner effluent is cooled to 260oF. The catalytic reformer vent gas is directly chilled to minus 25oF, and the FCC column overhead reflux is chilled by 25oF glycol. Notwithstanding a substantial cost overrun and schedule slippage, this project can now be considered a success: it is both profitable and highly beneficial to the environment. The capabilities of directly-integrated waste-heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration and their benefits to the refining industry have been demonstrated.

  12. Anaerobic fermentation of woody biomass pretreated with supercritical ammonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimer, P.J.; Chou, Y.C.T.

    1986-10-01

    The degradability of ground hardwood by thermophilic anaerobic bacteria (Clostridium thermocellum with or without Thermoanaerobacter strain B6A) was greatly enhanced by pretreatment of the substrate with supercritical ammonia. Relative to C. thermocellum monocultures, cocultures of C. thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacter strain B6A degraded 1.5-fold more pretreated soft maple but produced 2- 5-fold more fermentation end products because Thermoanaerobacter sp. removed reducing sugars produced by C. thermocellum during the fermentation. Dry weight losses were not totally accounted for in end products, due to formation of partially degraded material (<0.4 ..mu..m diameter wood particles) during the fermentation. One pretreated hardwood, Southern red oak, was fermented poorly because it released soluble inhibitors at the 60/sup 0/C incubation temperature. Considerable (6- to 11-fold) increases in substrate degradability were also noted for supercritical ammonia-pretreated wood materials fermented in an in vitro rumen digestibility assay. Degradation of pretreated softwoods by either thermophilic or mesophilic fermentation was not measurable under the conditions tested.

  13. Assessment of research and development (R and D) needs in ammonia safety and environmental control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenchley, D.L.; Athey, G.F.; Bomelburg, H.J.

    1981-09-01

    This report characterizes the ammonia industry operations, reviews current knowledge of ammonia release and subsequent impacts, summarizes the status of release prevention and control methods and identify research and development needs for safety and environmental control. Appendices include: accidental spills and human exposure; adiabatic mixing of liquid nitrogen and air; fire and explosion hazards; and environmental impact rating tables. (PSB)

  14. Recovery of anhydrous hydrogen iodide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Keefe, Dennis R. (San Diego, CA); McCorkle, Jr., Kenneth H. (Del Mar, CA); de Graaf, Johannes D. (The Hague, NL)

    1982-01-01

    Relatively dry hydrogen iodide can be recovered from a mixture of HI, I.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O. After the composition of the mixture is adjusted so that the amounts of H.sub.2 O and I.sub.2 do not exceed certain maximum limits, subjection of the mixture to superatmospheric pressure in an amount equal to about the vapor pressure of HI at the temperature in question causes distinct liquid phases to appear. One of the liquid phases contains HI and not more than about 1 weight percent water. Often the adjustment in the composition will include the step of vaporization, and the distinct layers appear following the increase in pressure of the vapor mixture. Adjustment in the composition may also include the addition of an extraction agent, such as H.sub.3 PO.sub.4, and even though the adjusted composition mixture contains a significant amount of such an agent, the creation of the distinct liquid phases is not adversely affected.

  15. On-board ammonia generation and exhaust after treatment system using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Josh; Robel, Wade J.; Brown, Cory A.; Urven, Jr., Roger L.

    2010-03-30

    Often NOx selective catalysts that use ammonia to reduce NOx within exhaust to a harmless gas require on-board storage of ammonia which can be hazardous and inconvenient. In order to generate ammonia in exhaust, the present disclosure increases a NOx concentration in exhaust from at least one combustion chamber, at least in part, by injecting fuel in a predetermined increased NOx generation sequence that includes a first injection during non-auto ignition conditions and a second injection during auto ignition conditions. At least a portion of the NOx is converted to ammonia by passing at least a portion of the exhaust with the increased NOx concentration over an ammonia-producing catalyst.

  16. A SCR Model Calibration Approach with Spatially Resolved Measurements and NH3 Storage Distributions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Song, Xiaobo; Parker, Gordon G.; Johnson, John H.; Naber, Jeffrey D.; Pihl, Josh A.

    2014-11-27

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a technology used for reducing NO x emissions in the heavy-duty diesel (HDD) engine exhaust. In this study, the spatially resolved capillary inlet infrared spectroscopy (Spaci-IR) technique was used to study the gas concentration and NH3 storage distributions in a SCR catalyst, and to provide data for developing a SCR model to analyze the axial gaseous concentration and axial distributions of NH3 storage. A two-site SCR model is described for simulating the reaction mechanisms. The model equations and a calculation method was developed using the Spaci-IR measurements to determine the NH3 storage capacity andmore » the relationships between certain kinetic parameters of the model. Moreover, a calibration approach was then applied for tuning the kinetic parameters using the spatial gaseous measurements and calculated NH3 storage as a function of axial position instead of inlet and outlet gaseous concentrations of NO, NO2, and NH3. The equations and the approach for determining the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst and a method of dividing the NH3 storage capacity between the two storage sites are presented. It was determined that the kinetic parameters of the adsorption and desorption reactions have to follow certain relationships for the model to simulate the experimental data. Finally, the modeling results served as a basis for developing full model calibrations to SCR lab reactor and engine data and state estimator development as described in the references (Song et al. 2013a, b; Surenahalli et al. 2013).« less

  17. Exhaust purification with on-board ammonia production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robel, Wade J.; Driscoll, James J.; Coleman, Gerald N.; Knox, Kevin J.

    2009-06-30

    A power source is provided for use with selective catalytic reduction systems for exhaust-gas purification. The power source includes a first cylinder group with a first air-intake passage and a first exhaust passage, and a second cylinder group with a second air-intake passage and a second exhaust passage. The second air-intake passage is fluidly isolated from the first air-intake passage. A fuel-supply device may be configured to supply fuel into the first exhaust passage, and a catalyst may be disposed downstream of the fuel-supply device to convert at least a portion of the exhaust stream in the first exhaust passage into ammonia.

  18. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  19. Ammonia Sensors Based on Doped-Sol-Gel-Tipped Optical Fibers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensors Based on Doped-Sol-Gel-Tipped Optical Fibers for Catalyst System Diagnostics Ammonia Sensors Based on Doped-Sol-Gel-Tipped Optical Fibers for Catalyst System Diagnostics ...

  20. Liquid composition having ammonia borane and decomposing to form hydrogen and liquid reaction product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Benjamin L; Rekken, Brian D

    2014-04-01

    Liquid compositions of ammonia borane and a suitably chosen amine borane material were prepared and subjected to conditions suitable for their thermal decomposition in a closed system that resulted in hydrogen and a liquid reaction product.

  1. Process for removal of ammonia and acid gases from contaminated waters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, C.J.; Mackenzie, P.D.

    1982-09-03

    Contaminating basic gases, i.e., ammonia and acid gases, e.g., carbon dioxide, are removed from process waters or waste waters in a combined extraction and stripping process. Ammonia in the form of ammonium ion is extracted by an immiscible organic phase comprising a liquid cation exchange component, especially an organic phosphoric acid derivative, and preferably di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, dissolved in an alkyl hydrocarbon, aryl hydrocarbon, higher alcohol, oxygenated hydrocarbon, halogenated hydrocarbon, and mixtures thereof. Concurrently, the acidic gaseous contaminants are stripped from the process or waste waters by stripping with stream, air, nitrogen, or the like. The liquid cation exchange component has the ammonia stripped therefrom by heating, and the component may be recycled to extract additional amounts of ammonia.

  2. Process for removal of ammonia and acid gases from contaminated waters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, C. Judson; MacKenzie, Patricia D.

    1985-01-01

    Contaminating basic gases, i.e., ammonia, and acid gases, e.g., carbon dioxide, are removed from process waters or waste waters in a combined extraction and stripping process. Ammonia in the form of ammonium ion is extracted by an immiscible organic phase comprising a liquid cation exchange component, especially an organic phosphoric acid derivative, and preferably di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, dissolved in an alkyl hydrocarbon, aryl hydrocarbon, higher alcohol, oxygenated hydrocarbon, halogenated hydrocarbon, and mixtures thereof. Concurrently, the acidic gaseous contaminants are stripped from the process or waste waters by stripping with steam, air, nitrogen, or the like. The liquid cation exchange component has the ammonia stripped therefrom by heating, and the component may be recycled to extract additional amounts of ammonia.

  3. Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study describes how Terra Nitrogen Company saved 497,000 MMBtu and $3.5 million yearly after upgrading the steam system in its ammonia plant in Verdigris, Oklahoma.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Th2N2(NH) Isomorphous to Th2N3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, G W Chinthaka M; Yeamans, Charles B.; Hunn, John D; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Czerwinski, Ken R.; Weck, Dr. Phil F

    2012-01-01

    Using a new, low-temperature, fluoride-based process, thorium nitride imide of the chemical formula Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) was synthesized from thorium dioxide via an ammonium thorium fluoride intermediate. The resulting product phase was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and was found to be crystallographically similar to Th{sub 2}N{sub 3}. Its unit cell was hexagonal with a space group of P3m{bar 1} and lattice parameters of a = b = 3.886(1) and c = 6.185(2) {angstrom}. The presence of -NH in the nitride phase was verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Total energy calculations performed using all-electron scalar relativistic density functional theory (DFT) showed that the hydrogen atom in the Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) prefers to bond with nitrogen atoms occupying 1a Wyckoff positions of the unit cell. Lattice fringe disruptions observed in nanoparticle areas of the nitride species by high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) images also displayed some evidence for the presence of -NH group. As ThO{sub 2} was identified as an impurity, possible reaction mechanisms involving its formation are discussed.

  5. Conceptual designs for commercial OTEC-ammonia product plantships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, D.; Dugger, G.L.; Francis, E.J.

    1980-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy program plan for OTEC calls for design of pilot/demonstration plantships leading to commercial development for energy intensive product options as well as OTEC facilities for direct delivery of electric power to shore via undersea cables. The Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) has investigated alternative product options and their relative commercial viabilities since 1975, and has studied and developed proposed designs for OTEC plantships to produce significant amounts of energy products from the ocean in a reliable, environmentally acceptable, and cost effective manner, including resolution of some of the critical engineering design items through analysis and tests. This paper discusses some of this earlier work in its relation to the conceptual commercial plantship designs presented and describes the OTEC power systems and ammonia plant process requirements, including integration-operational aspects. Estimated OTEC power capacities and energy flow usage prospects are presented. Specific plantship layouts are discussed including construction and deployment, and projected costs versus market potentials are summarized.

  6. Nitridation under ammonia of high surface area vanadium aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merdrignac-Conanec, Odile [Laboratoire Verres et Ceramiques, UMR CNRS 6512, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, Universite de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, F-35042 Rennes Cedex (France)]. E-mail: odile.merdrignac@univ-rennes1.fr; El Badraoui, Khadija [Laboratoire Verres et Ceramiques, UMR CNRS 6512, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, Universite de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, F-35042 Rennes Cedex (France); L'Haridon, Paul [Laboratoire Verres et Ceramiques, UMR CNRS 6512, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, Universite de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, F-35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2005-01-15

    Vanadium pentoxide gels have been obtained from decavanadic acid prepared by ion exchange on a resin from ammonium metavanadate solution. The progressive removal of water by solvent exchange in supercritical conditions led to the formation of high surface area V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 1.6H{sub 2}O aerogels. Heat treatment under ammonia has been performed on these aerogels in the 450-900 deg. C temperature range. The oxide precursors and oxynitrides have been characterized by XRD, SEM, TGA, BET. Nitridation leads to divided oxynitride powders in which the fibrous structure of the aerogel is maintained. The use of both very low heating rates and high surface area aerogel precursors allows a higher rate and a lower threshold of nitridation than those reported in previous works. By adjusting the nitridation temperature, it has been possible to prepare oxynitrides with various nitrogen enrichment and vanadium valency states. Whatever the V(O,N) composition, the oxidation of the oxynitrides in air starts between 250 and 300 deg. C. This determines their potential use as chemical gas sensors at a maximum working temperature of 250 deg. C.

  7. Multi-component removal in flue gas by aqua ammonia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeh, James T.; Pennline, Henry W.

    2007-08-14

    A new method for the removal of environmental compounds from gaseous streams, in particular, flue gas streams. The new method involves first oxidizing some or all of the acid anhydrides contained in the gas stream such as sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) and nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N.sub.2O) to sulfur trioxide (SO.sub.3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2). The gas stream is subsequently treated with aqua ammonia or ammonium hydroxide which captures the compounds via chemical absorption through acid-base or neutralization reactions. The products of the reactions can be collected as slurries, dewatered, and dried for use as fertilizers, or once the slurries have been dewatered, used directly as fertilizers. The ammonium hydroxide can be regenerated and recycled for use via thermal decomposition of ammonium bicarbonate, one of the products formed. There are alternative embodiments which entail stoichiometric scrubbing of nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides with subsequent separate scrubbing of carbon dioxide.

  8. Determination of structure and phase transition of light element nanocomposites in mesoporous silica: case study of NH3BH3 in MCM-41

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

    2009-09-30

    The structure of ammonia borane (AB), NH3BH3, infused in mesoporous silica MCM-41 and its evolution over the temperature range of 80 to 300 K was investigated using the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data in order to understand the origin of improved dehydrogenation properties of the system. Our study shows how X-ray PDF analysis can be used to elucidate the structure of light guest species loaded in mesoporous silica materials despite of its low scattering power of composed elements (N, B, and H) compared to its host (SiO2). PDF analyses of two AB-loaded compositions with weight ratio AB:MCM-41=1:1 and 3:1 provide a strong evidence that AB aggregate, previously found in AB:MCM-41?1:1 samples, is same species as neat AB. For both of them an orthorhombic to tetragonal structural phase transition occurs at 225 K on warming. On the other hand, AB residing inside meso-pores, which is found in AB:MCM-41=1:2 sample, does not undergo such phase transition. It rather stays in tetragonal phase over a wide temperature range of 110 to 240 K and starts to lose structural correlation above 240 K. This strongly suggests that nano-confinement of AB inside meso-pores stabilizes high temperature tetragonal phase at much lower temperature. These results provide important clues to two critical questions: why nan-compositions of AB leads dehydrogenation to lower temperature and why the neat AB like propoerties are recovered at high AB loading samples. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  9. Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions in a

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Commercial Small Port Cu Zeolite Urea SCR Catalyst | Department of Energy A modified Spaci-IR technique can measure transient NH3 and NOx concentrations; data have been used to calibrate and validate an SCR model, with good agreement between experiments and simulations. PDF icon p-21_pihl.pdf More Documents & Publications Experimental Studies for DPF and SCR Model, Control System, and OBD Development for Engines Using Diesel and Biodiesel Fuels Cummins/ORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control &

  10. Theoretical investigation of HNgNH{sub 3}{sup +} ions (Ng = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Kunqi; Sheng, Li

    2015-04-14

    The equilibrium geometries, harmonic frequencies, and dissociation energies of HNgNH{sub 3}{sup +} ions (Ng = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) were investigated using the following method: Becke-3-parameter-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP), Boese-Matrin for Kinetics (BMK), second-order Mller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and coupled-cluster with single and double excitations as well as perturbative inclusion of triples (CCSD(T)). The results indicate that HHeNH{sub 3}{sup +}, HArNH{sub 3}{sup +}, HKrNH{sub 3}{sup +}, and HXeNH{sub 3}{sup +} ions are metastable species that are protected from decomposition by high energy barriers, whereas the HNeNH{sub 3}{sup +} ion is unstable because of its relatively small energy barrier for decomposition. The bonding nature of noble-gas atoms in HNgNH{sub 3}{sup +} was also analyzed using the atoms in molecules approach, natural energy decomposition analysis, and natural bond orbital analysis.

  11. On-Board Measurement of Ammonia and Nitrous Oxide Using Feedback...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A first set of results has found that LASAR and VLPS data in the laboratory closely correlate with real-time, in-use measurement of NH3 and NO under various driving conditions. PDF ...

  12. Ammonia Sensors Based on Doped-Sol-Gel-Tipped Optical Fibers for Catalyst System Diagnostics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This work focuses on the development and application of optical fibers sensors tip-coated with sol gels that sequester a transducing material whose optical response is sensitive to NH3.

  13. Ammonia Generation and Utilization in a Passive SCR (TWC+SCR) System on Lean Gasoline Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Parks, II, James E; Pihl, Josh A; Toops, Todd J

    2016-01-01

    Lean gasoline engines offer greater fuel economy than the common stoichiometric gasoline engine, but the current three-way catalyst (TWC) on stoichiometric engines is unable to control nitrogen oxide (NOX) emissions in the oxygen-rich exhaust. Thus, lean NOX emission control is required to meet existing Tier 2 and upcoming Tier 3 emission regulations set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). While urea-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has proven effective in controlling NOX from diesel engines, the urea storage and delivery components can add significant size and cost. As such, onboard NH3 production via a passive SCR approach is of interest. In a passive SCR system, NH3 is generated over a close-coupled TWC during periodic slightly rich engine operation and subsequently stored on an underfloor SCR catalyst. Upon switching to lean operation, NOX passes through the TWC and is reduced by the stored NH3 on the SCR catalyst. In this work, a passive SCR system was evaluated on a 2.0-liter BMW lean burn gasoline direct injection engine to assess NH3 generation over a Pd-only TWC and utilization over a Cu-based SCR catalyst. System NOX reduction efficiency and fuel efficiency improvement compared to stoichiometric engine operation were measured. A feedback control strategy based on cumulative NH3 produced by the TWC during rich operation and NOX emissions during lean operation was implemented on the engine to control lean/rich cycle timing. 15% excess NH3 production over a 1:1 NH3:NOX ratio was required (via longer rich cycle timing) to achieve 99.7% NOX conversion at an SCR average inlet temperature of 350 C. Increasing NH3 generation further resulted in even higher NOX conversion; however, tailpipe NH3 emissions resulted. At higher temperatures, NH3 oxidation becomes important and limits NH3 availability for NOX reduction. At the engine conditions studied here, greater than 99% NOX conversion was achieved with passive SCR while delivering fuel efficiency benefits ranging between 6-11% compared with stoichiometric operation.

  14. Ammonia-treated phosphate glasses useful for sealing to metals metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brow, Richard K.; Day, Delbert E.

    1991-01-01

    A method of improving surface-dependent properties of phosphate glass such as durability and wear resistance without significantly affecting its thermal expansion coefficient is provided which comprises annealing the glass in a dry ammonia atmosphere at temperatures approximating the transition temperature of the glass. The ammonia annealing treatment of the present invention is carried out for a time sufficient to allow incorporation of a thin layer of nitrogen into the surface of the phosphate glass, and the treatment improves the durability of the glass without the reduction in the thermal expansion coefficient that has restricted the effectiveness of prior ammonia treatments. The improved phosphate glass resulting from this method is superior in wear resistance, yet maintains suitable thermal expansion properties so that it may be used effectively in a variety of applications requiring hermetic glass-metal seals.

  15. Use of ammonia to reduce the viscosity of bottoms streams produced in hydroconversion processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaczepinski, Sioma; Billimoria, Rustom M.; Tao, Frank; Lington, Christopher G.; Plumlee, Karl W.

    1984-01-01

    Coal, petroleum residuum and similar carbonaceous feed materials are subjected to hydroconversion in the presence of molecular hydrogen to produce a hydroconversion effluent which is then subjected to one or more separation steps to remove lower molecular weight liquids and produce a heavy bottoms stream containing high molecular weight liquids and unconverted carbonaceous material. The viscosity of the bottoms streams produced in the separation step or steps is prevented from increasing rapidly by treating the feed to the separation step or steps with ammonia gas prior to or during the separation step or steps. The viscosity of the heavy bottoms stream produced in the final separation step is also controlled by treating these bottoms with ammonia gas. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the effluent from the hydroconversion reactor is subjected to an atmospheric distillation followed by a vacuum distillation and the feeds to these distillations are contacted with ammonia during the distillations.

  16. Amperometric detection and electrochemical oxidation of aliphatic amines and ammonia on silver-lead oxide thin-film electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ge, Jisheng

    1996-01-08

    This thesis comprises three parts: Electrocatalysis of anodic oxygen-transfer reactions: aliphatic amines at mixed Ag-Pb oxide thin-film electrodes; oxidation of ammonia at anodized Ag-Pb eutectic alloy electrodes; and temperature effects on oxidation of ethylamine, alanine, and aquated ammonia.

  17. Structural transitions of ternary imide Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, C.; Gao, M. X.; Pan, H. G. Liu, Y. F.

    2014-08-25

    Phase transitions and energetic properties of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} with different crystal structures are investigated by experiments and first-principles calculations. The Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} with the primitive cubic and orthorhombic structure is obtained by dynamically dehydrogenating a Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}-2LiH mixture up to 280?C under an initial vacuum and 9.0?bars H{sub 2}, respectively. It is found that the obtained orthorhombic Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} is converted to a primitive cubic structure as the dehydrogenation temperature is further increased to 400?C or performed by a 36?h of high-energetic ball milling. Moreover, the primitive cubic phase can be converted to an orthorhombic phase after heating at 280?C under 9.0?bars H{sub 2} for 1?h. Thermodynamic calculations show that the orthorhombic phase is the ground state structure of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2}. The mechanism for phase transitions of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} is also discussed from the angle of energy.

  18. Ammonia Gas Transport and Reactions in Unsaturated Sediments: Implications for Use as an Amendment to Immobilize Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Williams, Mark D.; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2015-05-01

    Use of gas-phase amendments for in situ remediation of inorganic contaminants in unsaturated sediments of the vadose zone may be advantageous, but there has been limited development and testing of gas remediation technologies. Treatment with ammonia gas has been studied and has a potential for use in treating inorganic contaminants such as uranium because it induces a high pore-water pH causing mineral dissolution and subsequent formation of stable precipitates that decrease the mobility of some contaminants. For field application, knowledge of ammonia transport and the geochemical reactions induced by ammonia is needed. Laboratory studies were conducted to support calculations needed for field treatment design, to quantify advective and diffusive ammonia transport in unsaturated sediments, to evaluate reactions among gas, sediment, and water, and to study reaction-induced pore-water chemistry changes as a function of ammonia delivery conditions. Ammonia gas quickly partitions into sediment pore water and increases pH up to 13.2. Injected ammonia gas front movement can be reasonably predicted by gas flow rate and equilibrium partitioning. The ammonia gas diffusion rate is a function of the water content in the sediment. Measured diffusion front movement was 0.05, 0.03, and 0.02 cm/hr. in sediments with 2.0%, 8.7%, and 13.0% water content, respectively. Sodium, aluminum, and silica pore-water concentrations increase on exposure to ammonia and then decline as aluminosilicates precipitate with declining pH. When uranium is present in the sediment and pore water, up to 85% of the water-leachable uranium was immobilized by ammonia treatment.

  19. SunShot Initiative 2014 Peer Review Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia: ... that are identified by theory and transmission electron microscopy ... concise- ly describes a line of actions that allows ...

  20. Effects of reactant rotational excitations on H{sub 2} + NH{sub 2} → H + NH{sub 3} reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Hongwei; Guo, Hua

    2014-12-28

    Rotational mode specificity of the title reaction is examined using an initial state selected time-dependent wave packet method on an accurate ab initio based global potential energy surface. This penta-atomic reaction presents an ideal system to test several dynamical approximations, which might be useful for future quantum dynamics studies of polyatomic reactions, particularly with rotationally excited reactants. The first approximation involves a seven-dimensional (7D) model in which the two non-reactive N–H bonds are fixed at their equilibrium geometry. The second is the centrifugal sudden (CS) approximation within the 7D model. Finally, the J-shifting (JS) model is tested, again with the fixed N–H bonds. The spectator-bond approximation works very well in the energy range studied, while the centrifugal sudden and J-shifting integral cross sections (ICSs) agree satisfactorily with the coupled-channel counterparts in the low collision energy range, but deviate at the high energies. The calculated integral cross sections indicate that the rotational excitation of H{sub 2} somewhat inhibits the reaction while the rotational excitations of NH{sub 2} have little effect. These findings are compared with the predictions of the sudden vector projection model. Finally, a simple model is proposed to predict rotational mode specificity using K-averaged reaction probabilities.

  1. Method to remove ammonia using a proton-conducting ceramic membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2003-10-07

    An apparatus and method for decomposing NH.sub.3. A fluid containing NH.sub.3 is passed in contact with a tubular membrane that is a homogeneous mixture of a ceramic and a first metal, with the ceramic being selected from one or more of a cerate having the formula of M'Ce.sub.1-x M".sub.3-.delta., zirconates having the formula M'Zr.sub.1-x M"O.sub.3-.delta., stannates having the formula M'Sn.sub.1-x M'O.sub.3-.delta., where M' is a group IIA metal, M" is a dopant metal of one or more of Ca, Y, Yb, In, Nd, Gd or mixtures thereof and .delta. is a variable depending on the concentration of dopant and is in the range of from 0.001 to 0.5, the first metal is a group VIII or group IB element selected from the group consisting of Pt, Ag, Pd, Fe, Co, Cr, Mn, V, Ni, Au, Cu, Rh, Ru and mixtures thereof. The tubular membrane has a catalytic metal on the side thereof in contact with the fluid containing NH.sub.3 which is effective to cause NH.sub.3 to decompose to N.sub.2 and H.sub.2. When the H.sub.2 contacts the membrane H.sup.+ ions are formed which pass through the membrane driving the NH.sub.3 decomposition toward completion.

  2. Electronic spectra of 7-azaindole/ammonia clusters and their photochemical reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koizumi, Yuna; Norihiro, Tsuji; Ishiuchi, Shun-ichi; Fujii, Masaaki; Jouvet, Christophe; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude

    2008-09-14

    The S{sub 1}-S{sub 0} electronic spectra of 7-azaindole-(NH{sub 3}){sub n} clusters (n=1-3) were measured by mass-selected two-color resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. The laser-induced fluorescence spectrum obtained by monitoring the UV fluorescence shows well-structured vibrational bands for the monomer and 7-azaindole-(NH{sub 3}){sub 1,2} clusters, while no signals appear for the 7-azaindole-(NH{sub 3}){sub 3} cluster. The action spectrum obtained by monitoring visible emission shows no signal for all species, which suggests little reactivity for excited-state proton/hydrogen transfer. From the observed and calculated IR spectra, the geometry of 7-azaindole-(NH{sub 3}){sub 1,2} was concluded to be a hydrogen-bonded bridge form, which is similar to the photochemically reactive 7-hydroxyquinoline-(NH{sub 3}){sub 3} cluster. The difference in the photochemical reactivity is discussed on the basis of excited-state quantum chemical calculations.

  3. A SCR Model Calibration Approach with Spatially Resolved Measurements and NH3 Storage Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Xiaobo; Parker, Gordon G.; Johnson, John H.; Naber, Jeffrey D.; Pihl, Josh A.

    2014-11-27

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a technology used for reducing NO x emissions in the heavy-duty diesel (HDD) engine exhaust. In this study, the spatially resolved capillary inlet infrared spectroscopy (Spaci-IR) technique was used to study the gas concentration and NH3 storage distributions in a SCR catalyst, and to provide data for developing a SCR model to analyze the axial gaseous concentration and axial distributions of NH3 storage. A two-site SCR model is described for simulating the reaction mechanisms. The model equations and a calculation method was developed using the Spaci-IR measurements to determine the NH3 storage capacity and the relationships between certain kinetic parameters of the model. Moreover, a calibration approach was then applied for tuning the kinetic parameters using the spatial gaseous measurements and calculated NH3 storage as a function of axial position instead of inlet and outlet gaseous concentrations of NO, NO2, and NH3. The equations and the approach for determining the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst and a method of dividing the NH3 storage capacity between the two storage sites are presented. It was determined that the kinetic parameters of the adsorption and desorption reactions have to follow certain relationships for the model to simulate the experimental data. Finally, the modeling results served as a basis for developing full model calibrations to SCR lab reactor and engine data and state estimator development as described in the references (Song et al. 2013a, b; Surenahalli et al. 2013).

  4. Osmotic stress-induced putrescine accumulation as a mechanism of ammonia detoxification in oat leaves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slocum, R.D. ); Weinstein, L.H. )

    1990-05-01

    In osmotically-stressed oat leaves, putrescine (Put) accumulates to very high levels within several hours of the onset of stress. It has previously been shown that increased Put levels result from induction of the arginine decarboxylase (ADC) pathway. In non-stressed leaves, this response can be mimicked to varying degrees by exogenous NH{sub 3}, glutamate or ornithine. The activities of GS/GOGAT, ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) and ADC, and levels of NH{sub 3} and Put all increase in response to stress. Incorporation of (U-{sup 14}C)-glutamate into Put is greatly increased in stressed leaves and is blocked by difluoromethylarginine, a specific, irreversible inhibitor of ADC. These findings suggest that stress-induced Put accumulation results from (1) the assimilation of NH{sub 3} nitrogen to glutamate via GS/GOGAT, (2) glutamate utilization in de novo ornithine and arginine biosynthesis and (3) incorporation of arginine into Put via the ADC pathway.

  5. Ocean thermal plantships for production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.; Pandolfini, P. P.; Kumm, W. H.; Energy Systems; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Arctic Energies, Ltd.

    2009-12-02

    Conventional petroleum, natural gas, and coal are the primary sources of energy that have underpinned modern civilization. Their continued availability in the projected quantities required and the impacts of emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the environment are issues at the forefront of world concerns. New primary sources of energy are being sought that would significantly reduce the emissions of GHGs. One such primary source that can help supply energy, water, and fertilizer without GHG emissions is available in the heretofore unexploited thermal gradients of the tropical oceans. The world's oceans are the largest natural collector and reservoir of solar energy. The potential of ocean energy is limitless for producing base-load electric power or ammonia as the hydrogen carrier and fresh water from seawater. However, until now, ocean energy has been virtually untapped. The general perception is that ocean thermal energy is limited to tropical countries. Therefore, the full potential of at-sea production of (1) ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and (2) desalinated water has not been adequately evaluated. Using ocean thermal plantships for the at-sea co-production of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and desalinated water offer potential energy, environmental, and economic benefits that support the development of the technology. The introduction of a new widespread solution to our projected energy supply requires lead times of a decade or more. Although continuation of the ocean thermal program from the 1970s would likely have put us in a mitigating position in the early 2000s, we still have a window of opportunity to dedicate some of our conventional energy sources to the development of this renewable energy by the time new sources would be critically needed. The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the technical and economic viability of ocean thermal plantships for the production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier. This objective is achieved by completing project tasks that consist of updating the John Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) pilot plantship design and extrapolating it to commercial plantships, evaluating a new energy-efficient ammonia synthesis process, evaluating the co-production of desalinated water on plantships, and developing a conceptual design of a satellite plantships system for commercial-scale ammonia production. In addition, an industrial workshop was organized to present the results and develop future goals for commercialization of ocean thermal plantships by 2015. The following goals, arranged in chronological order, were examined at the workshop: (1) Global displacement of petroleum-fuel-based (diesel, fuel oil, naphtha) power generation for freeing up these fuels for transportation, chemical feedstock, and other high-valued uses; (2) At-sea production of desalinated water for regions of critical water shortages; (3) Displacement of carbon-based feed stocks and energy for production of ammonia fertilizers; (4) Development of hydrogen supply to allow economic processing of heavy crude oils and upgrading oil sands; (5) Development of ammonia-fueled distributed energy to displace natural-gas fueled power generation to free up natural gas for higher-value uses and the mitigation of issues associated with imported liquefied natural gas (LNG); and (6) Use of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier for transportation.

  6. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA 2.61 2000's 4.07 4.01 3.37 6.08 6.44 10.88 7.26 7.52 9.72 5.04 2010's 5.48 5.45 4.08 6.63 10.55 5.18 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas

  7. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA 22,820 2000's 38,289 45,808 29,014 34,983 17,257 28,041 31,853 56,879 39,438 26,767 2010's 18,297 19,826 47,451 63,446 52,160 77,866 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Imports

  8. Tuned sensitivity towards H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} with Cu doped barium strontium titanate materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simion, C. E. Teodorescu, V. S.; Stănoiu, A.; Sackmann, A.; Ruşti, C. F.; Piticescu, R. M.

    2014-11-05

    The different amount of Cu-doped Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) thick film materials have been tested for their gas-sensing performances towards NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S under dry and 50% relative humidity (RH) background conditions. The optimum NH{sub 3} sensitivity was attained with 0.1mol% Cu-doped BST whereas the selective detection of H{sub 2}S was highlighted using 5mol% Cu-doped BST material. No cross-sensitivity effects to CO, NO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and SO{sub 2} were observed for all tested materials operated at their optimum temperature (200°C) under humid conditions (50% RH). The presence of humidity clearly enhances the gas sensitivity to NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S detection.

  9. The thermal decomposition of NH{sub 2}OH and subsequent reactions : ab initio transition state theory and reflected shock tube experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.; Ruscic, B.; Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Srinivasan, N. K.; Su, M.-C.; Michael, J. V.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Sonoma State Univ.

    2009-01-01

    Primary and secondary reactions involved in the thermal decomposition of NH{sub 2}OH are studied with a combination of shock tube experiments and transition state theory based theoretical kinetics. This coupled theory and experiment study demonstrates the utility of NH{sub 2}OH as a high temperature source of OH radicals. The reflected shock technique is employed in the determination of OH radical time profiles via multipass electronic absorption spectrometry. O-atoms are searched for with atomic resonance absorption spectrometry. The experiments provide a direct measurement of the rate coefficient, k{sub 1}, for the thermal decomposition of NH{sub 2}OH. Secondary rate measurements are obtained for the NH{sub 2} + OH (5a) and NH{sub 2}OH + OH (6a) abstraction reactions. The experimental data are obtained for temperatures in the range from 1355 to 1889 K and are well represented by the respective rate expressions: log[k/(cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1})] = (?10.12 {+-} 0.20) + (?6793 {+-} 317 K/T) (k{sub 1}); log[k/(cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1})] = (?10.00 {+-} 0.06) + (?879 {+-} 101 K/T) (k{sub 5a}); log[k/(cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1})] = (?9.75 {+-} 0.08) + (?1248 {+-} 123 K/T) (k{sub 6a}). Theoretical predictions are made for these rate coefficients as well for the reactions of NH{sub 2}OH + NH{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}OH + NH, NH + OH, NH{sub 2} + NH{sub 2}, NH{sub 2} + NH, and NH + NH, each of which could be of secondary importance in NH{sub 2}OH thermal decomposition. The theoretical analyses employ a combination of ab initio transition state theory and master equation simulations. Comparisons between theory and experiment are made where possible. Modest adjustments of predicted barrier heights (i.e., by 2 kcal/mol or less) generally yield good agreement between theory and experiment. The rate coefficients obtained here should be of utility in modeling NO{sub x} in various combustion environments.

  10. Measurement of free ammonia produced by X irradiation of glycylglycine in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, H.; Bolch, W.E.; Jacobson, K.B.; Turner, J.E. )

    1990-03-01

    This research was initiated to test the validity of predictions based on Monte Carlo calculations of the effect of ionizing radiation on a simple dipeptide. The mechanism for the formation of ammonia, proposed by Garrison, Sokol, and Bennett-Corniea, was reevaluated by measuring the yields under deoxygenated and oxygenated conditions. Although free ammonia was formed under both conditions, the yields were different, depending on the concentrations of solute and molecular oxygen. The reaction probabilities of the specific interactions of free radicals formed in pure water with solute and oxygen are discussed to account for the observed difference. Our results obtained after low-dose-rate X irradiation are compared with those obtained by Garrison et al. after high-dose-rate 60Co gamma irradiation.

  11. Increased cost-effectiveness of low-grade fossil fuels using ammonia FGD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, W.

    1998-04-01

    Current worldwide advancements in site-specific application and commercial operation of ammonia-base flue gas desulfurization, (FGD), in high-capacity, high-sulfur, electric utility service, economically justified by significant revenues from ammonium sulfate generation and worldwide sale, are detailed. This major new direction in cost-effectiveness in FGD selection/application and in the process design of such flue gas cleaning systems overcomes the problem of FGD waste/byproduct management/utilization and encompasses numerous major performance advancements reviewed herein: (1) Conversion of anions of all captured acid-gas, i.e. SO2, HCl, etc., and of all collected residual particulate matter into agriculturally-usable ammonium compounds combined in the single byproduct yield, (2) no discard or long-term, outdoor storage of sulfurous waste byproducts, and (3) no liquid effluent. In the face of a capital-cost penalty in any application of ammonia FGD, an attractive cost effectiveness is nonetheless realized.

  12. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS AROUND 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS. I. AMMONIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandian, J. D.; Wyrowski, F.; Menten, K. M.

    2012-07-01

    Methanol masers at 6.7 GHz are known to be tracers of high-mass star formation in our Galaxy. In this paper, we study the large-scale physical conditions in the star-forming clumps/cores associated with 6.7 GHz methanol masers using observations of the (1, 1), (2, 2), and (3, 3) inversion transitions of ammonia with the Effelsberg telescope. The gas kinetic temperature is found to be higher than in infrared dark clouds, highlighting the relatively evolved nature of the maser sources. Other than a weak correlation between maser luminosity and the ammonia line width, we do not find any differences between low- and high-luminosity methanol masers.

  13. Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Aftertreatment System | Department of Energy Lean-burn SIDI engine technology offers improved fuel economy. PDF icon deer10_viola.pdf More Documents & Publications Emissions Control for Lean Gasoline Engines NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx Traps Emissions Control for Lean Gasoline Engines

  14. Process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein nitrogen is separated from hydrogen via ammonia synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetka, Steven S.; Nazario, Francisco N.

    1982-01-01

    In a process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein bottoms residues are upgraded with a process wherein air is employed, the improvement wherein nitrogen buildup in the system is avoided by ammonia synthesis. In a preferred embodiment hydrogen from other portions of the liquefaction process will be combined with hydrogen produced as a result of the bottoms upgrading to increase the H.sub.2 :N.sub.2 ratio in the ammonia reactor.

  15. Reduction of nitrogen oxides with catalytic acid resistant aluminosilicate molecular sieves and ammonia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pence, Dallas T.; Thomas, Thomas R.

    1980-01-01

    Noxious nitrogen oxides in a waste gas stream such as the stack gas from a fossil-fuel-fired power generation plant or other industrial plant off-gas stream is catalytically reduced to elemental nitrogen and/or innocuous nitrogen oxides employing ammonia as reductant in the presence of a zeolite catalyst in the hydrogen or sodium form having pore openings of about 3 to 10 A.

  16. Increased cost-effectiveness of low-grade fossil fuels using ammonia FGD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, W.

    1998-07-01

    Current worldwide advancements in site-specific application and commercial operation of ammonia-base flue gas desulfurization (FGD), in high-capacity, high-sulfur, electric utility service, economically justified by significant revenues from ammonium sulfate generation and worldwide sale, are detailed. This major new direction in cost-effectiveness in FGD selection/application and in the process design of such flue gas cleaning systems overcomes the problem of FGD waste/byproduct management/utilization and encompasses numerous major performance advancements reviewed herein: (1) Conversion of anions of all captured acid-gas, i.e., SO{sub 2}, HCI, etc., and of all collected residual particulate matter into agriculturally-usable ammonium compounds combined in the single byproduct yield; (2) No discard or long-term, outdoor storage of sulfurous waste byproducts; and (3) No liquid effluent. In the face of a capital-cost penalty in any application of ammonia FGD, an attractive cost effectiveness is nonetheless realized. This favorable process economics, superior to all other available alternatives in high-capacity, high-sulfur electric utility service, is made possible through substantial value added in conversion of ammonia reagent supply to agglomerated sulfur blending stock, i.e., comprised principally of ammonium sulfate, much in demand for increased use in worldwide, large-scale agriculture. The growing, potentially vast size of the international market for ammonium sulfate is quantified herein.

  17. Increasing biogas yield of rural biogas digester by addition of NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, G.C.; Chen, G.Q.; Chen, M.; Liu, K.X.; Zhou, S.Y.

    1983-12-01

    By addition of 0.3% NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/ instead of animal manure into rural biogas digester in which the rotted rice straw was the major feedstock, the biogas yield doubled in comparison with the check digester (0.1 m/sup 3//m/sup 3//d) and the fertility of NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/ did not decrease because of biogas fermentation. Many digesters have been built in China. But, owing to the problems of improper management, unsuitable influent mixing, etc., neither digesters nor feedstock were fully utilized. In order to solve these problems, adding NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/ into digester instead of animal manure was tried. Its results showed that the suitable C/N ratio of influent mixing was obtained, the fertility of effluent went up, and biogas producing rate increased. The concentration of NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/ is 0.2-0.6%, but the optimal is 0.3%.

  18. Update and Improve Subsection NH –– Alternative Simplified Creep-Fatigue Design Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tai Asayama

    2009-10-26

    This report described the results of investigation on Task 10 of DOE/ASME Materials NGNP/Generation IV Project based on a contract between ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Task 10 is to Update and Improve Subsection NH -- Alternative Simplified Creep-Fatigue Design Methods. Five newly proposed promising creep-fatigue evaluation methods were investigated. Those are (1) modified ductility exhaustion method, (2) strain range separation method, (3) approach for pressure vessel application, (4) hybrid method of time fraction and ductility exhaustion, and (5) simplified model test approach. The outlines of those methods are presented first, and predictability of experimental results of these methods is demonstrated using the creep-fatigue data collected in previous Tasks 3 and 5. All the methods (except the simplified model test approach which is not ready for application) predicted experimental results fairly accurately. On the other hand, predicted creep-fatigue life in long-term regions showed considerable differences among the methodologies. These differences come from the concepts each method is based on. All the new methods investigated in this report have advantages over the currently employed time fraction rule and offer technical insights that should be thought much of in the improvement of creep-fatigue evaluation procedures. The main points of the modified ductility exhaustion method, the strain range separation method, the approach for pressure vessel application and the hybrid method can be reflected in the improvement of the current time fraction rule. The simplified mode test approach would offer a whole new advantage including robustness and simplicity which are definitely attractive but this approach is yet to be validated for implementation at this point. Therefore, this report recommends the following two steps as a course of improvement of NH based on newly proposed creep-fatigue evaluation methodologies. The first step is to modify the current approach by incorporating the partial advantages the new method offer, and the second step is to replace the current method by the simplified test approach when it has become technically mature enough. The recommendations are basically in line with the work scope of the Task Force on Creep-Fatigue of the Subgroup on Elevated Temperature Design of the Standards Committee of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee Section III.

  19. Ammonia formation from NO reaction with surface hydroxyls on rutile TiO2 (110) - 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Boseong; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kim, Yu Kwon

    2015-01-15

    The reaction of NO with hydroxylated rutile TiO2(110)-11 surface (h-TiO2) was investigated as a function of NO coverage using temperature-programmed desorption. Our results show that NO reaction with h-TiO2 leads to formation of NH3 which is observed to desorb at ~ 400 K. Interestingly, the amount of NH3 produced depends nonlinearly on the coverage of NO. The yield increases up to a saturation value of ~1.31013 NH3/cm2 at a NO dose of 51013 NO/cm2, but subsequently decreases at higher NO doses. Preadsorbed H2O is found to have a negligible effect on the NH3 desorption yield. Additionally, no NH3 is formed in the absence of surface hydroxyls (HObs) upon coadsorption of NO and H2O on a stoichiometric TiO2(110) (s-TiO2(110)). Based on these observations, we conclude that nitrogen from NO has a strong preference to react with HObs on the bridge-bonded oxygen rows (but not with H2O) to form NH3. The absolute NH3 yield is limited by competing reactions of HOb species with titanium-bound oxygen adatoms to form H2O. Our results provide new mechanistic insight about the interactions of NO with hydroxyl groups on TiO2(110) .

  20. Synthesis, characterization and optical properties of NH{sub 4}Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chemingui, S.; Ferhi, M. Horchani-Naifer, K.; Férid, M.

    2014-09-15

    Polycrystalline powders of NH{sub 4}Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 4} polyphosphate have been grown by the flux method. This compound was found to be isotopic with NH{sub 4}Ce(PO{sub 3}){sub 4} and RbHo(PO{sub 3}){sub 4}. It crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1/n} with unit cell parameters a=10.474(6) Å, b=9.011(4) Å, c=10.947(7) Å and β=106.64(3)°. The title compound has been transformed to triphosphate Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} after calcination at 800 °C. Powder X-ray diffraction, infrared and Raman spectroscopies and the differential thermal analysis have been used to identify these materials. The spectroscopic properties have been investigated through absorption, excitation, emission spectra and decay curves of Dy{sup 3+} ion in both compounds at room temperature. The emission spectra show the characteristic emission bands of Dy{sup 3+} in the two compounds, before and after calcination. The integrated emission intensity ratios of the yellow to blue (I{sub Y}/I{sub B}) transitions and the chromaticity properties have been determined from emission spectra. The decay curves are found to be double-exponential. The non-exponential behavior of the decay rates was related to the resonant energy transfer as well as cross-relaxation between the donor and acceptor Dy{sup 3+} ions. The determined properties have been discussed as function of crystal structure of both compounds. They reveal that NH{sub 4}Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 4} is promising for white light generation but Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} is potential candidates in field emission display (FED) and plasma display panel (PDP) devices. - Graphical abstract: The CIE color coordinate diagrams showing the chromatic coordinates of Dy{sup 3+} luminescence in NH{sub 4}Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 4} and Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 3}. - Highlights: • The polycrystalline powders of NH{sub 4}Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 4} and Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} are synthesized. • The obtained powders are characterized. • The spectroscopic properties of Dy{sup 3+} ion are investigated. • Results are discussed as function of crystal structure and chemical composition. • The usefulness of NH{sub 4}Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 4} and Dy(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} in optical devices is revealed.

  1. Surface cleaning for enhanced adhesion to packaging surfaces: Effect of oxygen and ammonia plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaddam, Sneha; Dong, Bin; Driver, Marcus; Kelber, Jeffry; Kazi, Haseeb

    2015-03-15

    The effects of direct plasma chemistries on carbon removal from silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) and oxynitride (SiO{sub x}N{sub y}) surfaces have been studied by in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ex-situ contact angle measurements. The data indicate that O{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} capacitively coupled plasmas are effective at removing adventitious carbon from silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) and Si oxynitride (SiO{sub x}N{sub y}) surfaces. O{sub 2} plasma treatment results in the formation of a silica overlayer. In contrast, the exposure to NH{sub 3} plasma results in negligible additional oxidation of the SiN{sub x} or SiO{sub x}N{sub y} surface. Ex-situ contact angle measurements show that SiN{sub x} and SiO{sub x}N{sub y} surfaces exposed to oxygen plasma are initially more hydrophilic than surfaces exposed to NH{sub 3} plasma, indicating that the O{sub 2} plasma-induced SiO{sub 2} overlayer is highly reactive toward ambient. At longer ambient exposures (?10 h), however, surfaces treated by either O{sub 2} or NH{sub 3} plasma exhibit similar steady state contact angles, correlated with rapid uptake of adventitious carbon, as determined by XPS. Surface passivation by exposure to molecular hydrogen prior to ambient exposure significantly retards the increase in contact angle upon exposure to ambient. The results suggest a practical route to enhancing the time available for effective bonding to surfaces in microelectronics packaging applications.

  2. On-Board Measurement of Ammonia and Nitrous Oxide Using Feedback Absorption

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Laser Spectroscopy Combined with Amplified Resonance and Low Pressure Sampling | Department of Energy A first set of results has found that LASAR and VLPS data in the laboratory closely correlate with real-time, in-use measurement of NH3 and NO under various driving conditions. PDF icon p-13_lanher.pdf More Documents & Publications Combining Feedback Absorption Spectroscopy, Amplified Resonance and Low Pressure Sampling for the Measurement of Nitrogen-Containing Compounds in Automotive

  3. RELAP5 assessment using semiscale SBLOCA test S-NH-1. International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, E.J.; Chung, B.D.; Kim, H.J.

    1993-06-01

    2-inch cold leg break test S-NH-1, conducted at the 1/1705 volume scaled facility Semiscale was analyzed using RELAP5/MOD2 Cycle 36.04 and MOD3 Version 5m5. Loss of HPIS was assumed, and reactor trip occurred on a low PZR pressure signal (13.1 MPa), and pumps began an unpowered coastdown on SI signal (12.5 MPa). The system was recovered by opening ADV`s when the PCT became higher than 811 K. Accumulator was finally injected into the system when the primary system pressure was less than 4.0 MPa. The experiment was terminated when the pressure reached the LPIS actuation set point RELAP5/MOD2 analysis demonstrated its capability to predict, with a sufficient accuracy, the main phenomena occurring in the depressurization transient, both from a qualitative and quantitative points of view. Nevertheless, several differences were noted regarding the break flow rate and inventory distribution due to deficiencies in two-phase choked flow model, horizontal stratification interfacial drag, and a CCFL model. The main reason for the core to remain nearly fully covered with the liquid was the under-prediction of the break flow by the code. Several sensitivity calculations were tried using the MOD2 to improve the results by using the different options of break flow modeling (downward, homogeneous, and area increase). The break area compensating concept based on ``the integrated break flow matching`` gave the best results than downward junction and homogeneous options. And the MOD3 showed improvement in predicting a CCFL in SG and a heatup in the core.

  4. Capacitive deionization of NH{sub 4}CIO{sub 4} solutions with carbon aerogel electrodes. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J.C.; Fix, D.V.; Mack, G.V.; Pekala, R.W.; Poco, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    A process for capacitive deionization of water with a stack of carbon aerogel electrodes was developed. Unlike ion exchange, one of the more conventional deionization processes, no chemicals are required for regeneration of the system; electricity is used instead. An aqueous solution of NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4} is pumped through the electrochemical cell. After polarization, NH{sub 4}{sup +} and ClO{sub 4}{sup -} ions are removed from the water by the imposed electric field and trapped in the extensive cathodic and anodic double layers. Thsi process produces one stream of purified water and a second stream of concentrate. Effects of cell voltage, salt concentration, and cycling on electrosorption capacity were studied and results reported.

  5. A reaction mechanism for titanium nitride CVD from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, R.S.; Allendorf, M.D.

    1995-12-01

    A gas-phase and surface reaction mechanism for the CVD of TiN from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} is proposed. The only gas-phase process is complex formation, which can compete with deposition. The surface mechanism postulates the stepwise elimination of Cl and H atoms from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}, respectively, to form solid TiN and gaseous HCl. The mechanism also accounts for the change in oxidation state of Ti by allowing for liberation of N{sub 2}. Provided that the surface composition is at steady state, the stoichiometry of the overall reaction is reproduced exactly. In addition, the global kinetic law predicted by the mechanism is successfully fit to new deposition data from a rotating disk reactor and is shown to be consistent with literature results.

  6. Communication: On the competition between adiabatic and nonadiabatic dynamics in vibrationally mediated ammonia photodissociation in its A band

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Changjian; Zhu, Xiaolei; Yarkony, David R. E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu E-mail: hguo@unm.edu; Ma, Jianyi E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu E-mail: hguo@unm.edu; Xie, Daiqian E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu E-mail: hguo@unm.edu; Guo, Hua E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu E-mail: hguo@unm.edu

    2015-03-07

    Non-adiabatic processes play an important role in photochemistry, but the mechanism for conversion of electronic energy to chemical energy is still poorly understood. To explore the possibility of vibrational control of non-adiabatic dynamics in a prototypical photoreaction, namely, the A-band photodissociation of NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}), full-dimensional state-to-state quantum dynamics of symmetric or antisymmetric stretch excited NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}) is investigated on recently developed coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces. The experimentally observed H atom kinetic energy distributions are reproduced. However, contrary to previous inferences, the NH{sub 2}(A{sup ~2}A{sub 1})/NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}) branching ratio is found to be small regardless of the initial preparation of NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}), while the internal state distribution of the preeminent fragment, NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}), is found to depend strongly on the initial vibrational excitation of NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}). The slow H atoms in photodissociation mediated by the antisymmetric stretch fundamental state are due to energy sequestered in the internally excited NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}) fragment, rather than in NH{sub 2}(A{sup ~2}A{sub 1}) as previously proposed. The high internal excitation of the NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}) fragment is attributed to the torques exerted on the molecule as it passes through the conical intersection seam to the ground electronic state of NH{sub 3}. Thus in this system, contrary to previous assertions, the control of electronic state branching by selective excitation of ground state vibrational modes is concluded to be ineffective. The juxtaposition of precise quantum mechanical results with complementary results based on quasi-classical surface hopping trajectories provides significant insights into the non-adiabatic process.

  7. High-temperature phase transformation and topochemical nature in ferroelastic (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kwang-Sei; Oh, In-Hwan; Ko, Jae-Hyeon

    2014-04-01

    The electrical conductivity of ferroelastic ammonium sulfate (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} revealed an anomaly at around 130 C (=403 K, T{sub P}) on heating with large and irreversible thermal hysteresis through thermal cycle. Ferroelastic domain walls and surface morphology of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} were investigated by hot-stage polarizing microscopy. Structural phase transition from an orthorhombic ferroelastic phase to a hexagonal paraelastic phase was not identified at T{sub P} upon heating. On further heating above T{sub P}, microscopic spots appeared and grew on the crystal surface, suggesting that the high-temperature anomaly at T{sub P} was an indication of an onset of thermal decomposition controlled by topochemical factors. The increase of electrical conductivity above T{sub P} was attributed to proton migration. - Graphical abstract: Surface morphology of the (100) face of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} on heating, showing chemical reaction at the surface. - Highlights: We investigate the high-temperature phase transformation of ammonium sulfate. The increasing conductivity upon heating is attributed to proton migration. Structural phase transition from orthorhombic to hexagonal phase is not confirmed. High-temperature anomaly is related to an onset of thermal decomposition. The nature of the high-temperature anomaly is topochemical controlled by defects.

  8. Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Production by [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+: Removing the Distinction Between Endo- and Exo- Protonation Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Houston JS; Wiese, Stefan; Roberts, John A.; Bullock, R. Morris; Helm, Monte L.

    2015-04-03

    A new Ni(II) complex, [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+ (7PPh2NH = 3,6-triphenyl-1-aza-3,6-diphosphacycloheptane) has been synthesized, and its electrochemical properties are reported. The 7PPh2NH ligand features an NH, ensuring properly positioned protonated amine groups (NH+) for electrocatalysis, regardless of whether protonation occurs exo- or endo- to the metal center. The compound is an electrocatalyst for H2 production in the presence of organic acids (pKa range 1013 in CH3CN) with turnover frequencies ranging from 160770 s-1 at overpotentials between 320470 mV, as measured at the half peak potential of the catalytic wave. In stark contrast to [Ni(PR2NR'2)2]2+ and other [Ni(7PPh2NR')]2+ complexes, catalytic turnover frequencies for H2 production by [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+ do not show catalytic rate enhancement upon the addition of H2O. This finding supports the assertion that [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+ eliminates the distinction between the endo- and exo-protonation isomers. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. System and method for controlling an engine based on ammonia storage in multiple selective catalytic reduction catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sun, MIn; Perry, Kevin L.

    2015-11-20

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes a storage estimation module and an air/fuel ratio control module. The storage estimation module estimates a first amount of ammonia stored in a first selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst and estimates a second amount of ammonia stored in a second SCR catalyst. The air/fuel ratio control module controls an air/fuel ratio of an engine based on the first amount, the second amount, and a temperature of a substrate disposed in the second SCR catalyst.

  10. Time-Resolved XAFS Spectroscopic Studies of B-H and N-H Oxidative Addition to Transition Metal Catalysts Relevant to Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitterwolf, Thomas E.

    2014-12-09

    Successful catalytic dehydrogenation of aminoborane, H3NBH3, prompted questions as to the potential role of N-H oxidative addition in the mechanisms of these processes. N-H oxidative addition reactions are rare, and in all cases appear to involve initial dative bonding to the metal by the amine lone pairs followed by transfer of a proton to the basic metal. Aminoborane and its trimethylborane derivative block this mechanism and, in principle, should permit authentic N-H oxidative attrition to occur. Extensive experimental work failed to confirm this hypothesis. In all cases either B-H complexation or oxidative addition of solvent C-H bonds dominate the chemistry.

  11. A Pyrrolyl-based Triazolophane: A Macrocyclic Receptor With CH and NH Donor Groups That Exhibits a Preference for Pyrophosphate Anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sessler, Jonathan L.; Cia, Jiajia; Gong, Han-Yuan; Yang, Xiauping; Arambula, Jonathan F.; Hay, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    A pyrrolyl-based triazolophane, incorporating CH and NH donor groups, acts as a receptor for the pyrophosphate anion in chloroform solution. It shows selectivity for this trianion, followed by HSO{sub 4}{sup -} > H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -} > Cl{sup -} > Br{sup -} (all as the corresponding tetrabutylammonium salts), with NH-anion interactions being more important than CH-anion interactions. In the solid state, the receptor binds the pyrophosphate anion in a clip-like slot via NH and CH hydrogen bonds.

  12. Energy-Efficiency and Air-Pollutant Emissions-Reduction Opportunities for the Ammonia Industry in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Ding; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Chen, Wenying

    2015-06-01

    As one of the most energy-intensive and polluting industries, ammonia production is responsible for significant carbon dioxide (CO2) and air-pollutant emissions. Although many energy-efficiency measures have been proposed by the Chinese government to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality, lack of understanding of the cost-effectiveness of such improvements has been a barrier to implementing these measures. Assessing the costs, benefits, and cost-effectiveness of different energy-efficiency measures is essential to advancing this understanding. In this study, a bottom-up energy conservation supply curve model is developed to estimate the potential for energy savings and emissions reductions from 26 energy-efficiency measures that could be applied in China’s ammonia industry. Cost-effective implementation of these measures saves a potential 271.5 petajoules/year for fuel and 5,443 gigawatt-hours/year for electricity, equal to 14% of fuel and 14% of electricity consumed in China’s ammonia industry in 2012. These reductions could mitigate 26.7 million tonnes of CO2 emissions. This study also quantifies the co-benefits of reducing air-pollutant emissions and water use that would result from saving energy in China’s ammonia industry. This quantitative analysis advances our understanding of the cost-effectiveness of energy-efficiency measures and can be used to augment efforts to reduce energy use and environmental impacts.

  13. Multifaceted regulations of gateway enzyme phenylalanine ammonia-lyase in the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Xuebin; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2014-12-11

    Phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in plants engenders a vast variety of aromatic metabolites critically important for their growth, development, and environmental adaptation. Some of these aromatic compounds have high economic value. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the first committed enzyme in the pathway; it diverts the central flux of carbon from primary metabolism to the synthesis of myriad phenolics. Over the decades, many studies have shown that exquisite regulatory mechanisms at multiple levels control the transcription and the enzymatic activity of PALs. In this review, we present a current overview on our understanding of the complicated regulatory mechanisms governing PAL's activity; we particularlymore » highlight recent progresses in unraveling its post-translational modifications, its metabolite feedback regulation, and its enzyme organization.« less

  14. Multifaceted regulations of gateway enzyme phenylalanine ammonia-lyase in the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuebin; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2014-12-11

    Phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in plants engenders a vast variety of aromatic metabolites critically important for their growth, development, and environmental adaptation. Some of these aromatic compounds have high economic value. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the first committed enzyme in the pathway; it diverts the central flux of carbon from primary metabolism to the synthesis of myriad phenolics. Over the decades, many studies have shown that exquisite regulatory mechanisms at multiple levels control the transcription and the enzymatic activity of PALs. In this review, we present a current overview on our understanding of the complicated regulatory mechanisms governing PAL's activity; we particularly highlight recent progresses in unraveling its post-translational modifications, its metabolite feedback regulation, and its enzyme organization.

  15. [{sup 13}N] Ammonia Cardiac Program At West Virginia University Health Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armbruster, John M.

    2011-06-01

    Due to the shortage of the more traditional cardiac imagining isotopes, specifically, Technicium-99, the Cardiologists at WVU have had to look to alternative imagining techniques such as PET. This has led to a dramatic increase in the use of [{sup 13}N] Ammonia PET scans at the Health Sciences Center. The patient load has gone from one to two patients one day a week to typically two to three patients, two days a week, with occasional add-on in-house patients; each patient typically requiring two target irradiations. In this paper, we will discuss the process that is being used to meet this increased demand from the production of the isotope through the final result.

  16. Fe/SSZ-13 as an NH3-SCR Catalyst: A Reaction Kinetics and FTIR/Mössbauer Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Kollar, Marton; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Washton, Nancy M.; Wang, Yilin; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles H.F.

    2015-03-01

    Using a traditional aqueous solution ion-exchange method under a protecting atmosphere of N2, an Fe/SSZ-13 catalyst active in NH3-SCR was synthesized. Mössbauer and FTIR spectroscopies were used to probe the nature of the Fe sites. In the fresh sample, the majority of Fe species are extra-framework cations. The likely monomeric and dimeric ferric ions in hydrated form are [Fe(OH)2]+ and [HO-Fe-O-Fe-OH]2+, based on Mössbauer measurements. During the severe hydrothermal aging (HTA) applied in this study, a majority of cationic Fe species convert to FeAlOx and clustered FeOx species, accompanied by severe dealumination of the SSZ-13 framework. The clustered FeOx species do not give a sextet Mössbauer spectrum, indicating that these are highly disordered. However, some Fe species in cationic positions remain after aging as determined from Mössbauer measurements and CO/NO FTIR titrations. NO/NH3 oxidation reaction tests reveal that dehydrated cationic Fe are substantially more active in catalyzing oxidation reactions than the hydrated ones. For NH3-SCR, enhancement of NO oxidation under ‘dry’ conditions promotes SCR rates below ~300 • C. This is due mainly to contribution from the “fast” SCR channel. Above ~300 • C, enhancement of NH3 oxidation under ‘dry’ conditions, however, becomes detrimental to NOx conversions. The HTA sample loses much of the SCR activity below ~300 • C; however, above ~400 • C much of the activity remains. This may suggest that the FeAlOx and FeOx species become active at such elevated temperatures. Alternatively, the high-temperature activity may be maintained by the remaining extra-framework cationic species. For potential practical applications, Fe/SSZ-13 may be used as a co-catalyst for Cu/CHA as integral aftertreatment SCR catalysts on the basis of the stable high temperature activity after hydrothermal aging. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  17. Decomposition Pathway of Ammonia Borane on the Surface of nano-BN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neiner, Doinita; Luedtke, Avery T.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Shaw, Wendy J.; Wang, Julia; Browning, Nigel; Autrey, Thomas; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2010-08-19

    Ammonia borane (AB) is under significant investigation as a possible hydrogen storage material. While many chemical additives have been demonstrated to have a significant positive effect on hydrogen release from ammonia borane, many provide additional complications in the regeneration cycle. Mechanically alloyed hexagonal BN (nano-BN) has been shown to facilitate the release of hydrogen from AB at lower temperature, with minimal induction time, less exothermically, and inert nano-BN may be easily removed during any regeneration of the spent AB. The samples were prepared by mechanically alloying AB with nano-BN. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the AB:nano-BN samples are physical mixtures of AB and h-BN. The release of hydrogen from AB:nano-BN mixtures as well as the decomposition products were characterized by 11B magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state NMR, TGA/DSC/MS with 15N labeled AB, and solution 11B NMR spectroscopy. The 11B MAS solid state NMR spectrum shows that diammonate of diborane (DADB) is present in the mechanically alloyed mixture, which drastically shortens the induction period for hydrogen release from AB. Analysis of the TGA/DSC/MS spectra using 15N labeled AB shows that all the borazine (BZ) produced in the reaction comes from AB and that increasing nano-BN surface area results in increased amounts of BZ. However, under high temperature, 150?C, isothermal conditions, the amount of BZ released was the same as for neat AB. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), selected area diffraction (SAD), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of the initial and final nano-BN additive provide evidence for crystallinity loss but not significant chemical changes. The higher concentration of BZ observed for low temperature dehydrogenation of AB:nano-BN mixtures versus neat AB is attributed to a surface interaction that favors the formation of precursors which ultimately result in BZ. This pathway can be avoided through isothermal heating at temperatures >150?C.

  18. Evaluation of Aqua-Ammonia Chiller Technologies and Field Site Installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, Abdolreza

    2007-09-01

    The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) has sponsored Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to review, select, and evaluate advanced, gas-fired, 5-ton, aqua-ammonia, chiller technologies. The selection criteria was that units have COP values of 0.67 or better at Air-conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI) 95 F outdoor rating conditions, an active refrigerant flow control, and a variable-speed condenser fan. These features are expected to allow these units to operate at higher ambient temperatures (up to the maximum operating temperature of 110 F) with minimal degradation in performance. ORNL evaluated three potential manufacturers of advanced, gas-fired, 5-ton, aqua-ammonia chillers-Robur, Ambian, and Cooling Technologies. Unfortunately, Robur did not meet the COP requirements and Cooling Technologies could not deliver a unit to be tested at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-ORNL environmental chamber testing facility for thermally activated heat pumps. This eliminated these two technologies from further consideration, leaving only the Ambian chillers for evaluation. Two Ambian chillers were evaluated at the DOE-ORNL test facility. Overall these chillers operated well over a wide range of ambient conditions with minimal degradation in performance due to several control strategies used such as a variable speed condenser fan, a modulating burner, and active refrigerant flow control. These Ambian pre-commercial units were selected for installation and field testing at three federal facilities. NFESC worked with ORNL to assist with the site selection for installation and evaluation of these chillers. Two sites (ORNL and Naval Surface Warfare Center [NSWC] Corona) had a single chiller unit installed; and at one site (Naval Amphibious Base [NAB] Little Creek), two 5-ton chillers linked together were installed to provide 10 tons of cooling. A chiller link controller developed under this project was evaluated in the field test at Little Creek.

  19. Scale-Up Information for Gas-Phase Ammonia Treatment of Uranium in the Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site Central Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Thomle, Jonathan N.; Johnson, Timothy C.

    2014-09-01

    Uranium is present in the vadose zone at the Hanford Central Plateau and is of concern for protection of groundwater. The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau identified gas-phase treatment and geochemical manipulation as potentially effective treatment approaches for uranium and technetium in the Hanford Central Plateau vadose zone. Based on laboratory evaluation, use of ammonia vapor was selected as the most promising uranium treatment candidate for further development and field testing. While laboratory tests have shown that ammonia treatment effectively reduces the mobility of uranium, additional information is needed to enable deployment of this technology for remediation. Of importance for field applications are aspects of the technology associated with effective distribution of ammonia to a targeted treatment zone, understanding the fate of injected ammonia and its impact on subsurface conditions, and identifying effective monitoring approaches. In addition, information is needed to select equipment and operational parameters for a field design. As part of development efforts for the ammonia technology for remediation of vadose zone uranium contamination, field scale-up issues were identified and have been addressed through a series of laboratory and modeling efforts. This report presents a conceptual description for field application of the ammonia treatment process, engineering calculations to support treatment design, ammonia transport information, field application monitoring approaches, and a discussion of processes affecting the fate of ammonia in the subsurface. The report compiles this information from previous publications and from recent research and development activities. The intent of this report is to provide technical information about these scale-up elements to support the design and operation of a field test for the ammonia treatment technology.

  20. Observational results of a multi-telescope campaign in search of interstellar urea [(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remijan, Anthony J.; Snyder, Lewis E.; Kuo, Hsin-Lun; Looney, Leslie W.; Friedel, Douglas N.; McGuire, Brett A.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu; Lovas, Frank J.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Alekseev, E. A.; Dyubko, S. F.; McCall, Benjamin J.; Hollis, Jan M.

    2014-03-10

    In this paper, we present the results of an observational search for gas phase urea [(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}CO] observed toward the Sgr B2(N-LMH) region. We show data covering urea transitions from ?100 GHz to 250 GHz from five different observational facilities: the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland-Association (BIMA) Array, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA), the NRAO 12 m telescope, the IRAM 30 m telescope, and the Swedish-ESO Submillimeter Telescope (SEST). The results show that the features ascribed to urea can be reproduced across the entire observed bandwidth and all facilities by best-fit column density, temperature, and source size parameters which vary by less than a factor of two between observations merely by adjusting for telescope-specific parameters. Interferometric observations show that the emission arising from these transitions is cospatial and compact, consistent with the derived source sizes and emission from a single species. Despite this evidence, the spectral complexity of both (NH{sub 2}){sub 2}CO and of Sgr B2(N) makes the definitive identification of this molecule challenging. We present observational spectra, laboratory data, and models, and discuss our results in the context of a possible molecular detection of urea.

  1. Passive SCR for lean gasoline NOX control: Engine-based strategies to minimize fuel penalty associated with catalytic NH3 generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y.; Parks, James E.; Pihl, Josh A.; Toops, Todd J.

    2016-02-18

    Lean gasoline engines offer greater fuel economy than common stoichiometric gasoline engines. However, excess oxygen prevents the use of the current three-way catalyst (TWC) to control nitrogen oxide (NOX) emissions in lean exhaust. A passive SCR concept, introduced by General Motors Global R&D, makes use of a TWC that is already onboard to generate NH3 under slightly rich conditions, which is stored on the downstream SCR. The stored NH3 is then used to reduce NOX emissions when the engine switches to lean operation. In this work, the effect of engine parameters, such as air-fuel equivalence ratio and spark timing, onmore » NH3 generation over a commercial Pd-only TWC with no dedicated oxygen storage component was evaluated on a 2.0-liter BMW lean burn gasoline direct injection engine. NOX reduction, NH3 formation, and reductant utilization processes were evaluated, and fuel efficiency was assessed and compared to the stoichiometric engine operation case. We found air-fuel equivalence ratio to be one of the most important parameters in controlling the NH3 production; however, the rich operation necessary for NH3 production results in a fuel consumption penalty. The fuel penalty can be minimized by adjusting spark timing to increase rich-phase engine out NOX emissions and, thereby, NH3 levels. Additionally, higher engine out NOX during engine load increase to simulate acceleration resulted in additional fuel savings. Ultimately, a 10% fuel consumption benefit was achieved with the passive SCR approach by optimizing rich air-fuel equivalence ratio and spark timing while also utilizing acceleration load conditions.« less

  2. Topologically identical, but geometrically isomeric layers in hydrous α-, β-Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})]·H{sub 2}O and anhydrous Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Na; Klepov, Vladislav V.; Villa, Eric M.; Bosbach, Dirk; Suleimanov, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.

    2014-07-01

    The hydrothermal reaction of uranyl nitrate with rubidium nitrate and arsenic (III) oxide results in the formation of polymorphic α- and β-Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})]·H{sub 2}O (α-, β-RbUAs) and the anhydrous phase Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})] (RbUAs). These phases were structurally, chemically and spectroscopically characterized. The structures of all three compounds are based upon topologically identical, but geometrically isomeric layers. The layers are linked with each other by means of the Rb cations and hydrogen bonding. Dehydration experiments demonstrate that water deintercalation from hydrous α- and β-RbUAs yields anhydrous RbUAs via topotactic reactions. - Graphical abstract: Three different layer geometries observed in the structures of Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})] and α- and β- Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})]·H{sub 2}O. Two different coordination environments of uranium polyhedra (types I and II) are shown schematically on the top of the figure. - Highlights: • Three new uranyl arsenates were synthesized from the hydrothermal reactions. • The phases consist of the topologically identical but geometrically different layers. • Topotactic transitions were observed in the processes of mono-hyrates dehydration.

  3. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Polyhedral Borane Anions and Aluminum-Ammonia-Borane Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Safronov, Alexander V.; Lee, Han Beak; Wu, Jianguo

    2010-10-01

    Phase 1. Hydrolysis of borohydride compounds offer the potential for significant hydrogen storage capacity, but most work to date has focused on one particular anion, BH4-, which requires high pH for stability. Other borohydride compounds, in particular polyhedral borane anions offer comparable hydrogen storage capacity without requiring high pH media and their long term thermal and hydrolytic stability coupled with non-toxic nature make them a very attractive alternative to NaBH4. The University of Missouri project provided the overall program focal point for the investigation of catalytic hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions for hydrogen release. Due to their inherent stability, a transition metal catalyst was necessary for the hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions. Transition metal ions such as cobalt, nickel, palladium and rhodium were investigated for their catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of nido-KB11H14, closo-K2B10H10, and closo-K2B12H12. The rate of hydrolysis follows first-order kinetics with respect to the concentration of the polyhedral borane anion and surface area of the rhodium catalyst. The rate of hydrolysis depends upon a) choice of polyhedral borane anion, c) concentration of polyhedral borane anion, d) surface area of the rhodium catalyst and e) temperature of the reaction. In all cases the yield of hydrogen was 100% which corresponds to ~7 wt% of hydrogen (based on material wt%). Phase 2. The phase 2 of program at the University of Missouri was focused upon developing aluminum ammonia-boranes (Al-AB) as chemical hydrogen storage materials, specifically their synthesis and studies of their dehydrogenation. The ammonia borane molecule (AB) is a demonstrated source of chemically stored hydrogen (19.6 wt%) which meets DOE performance parameters except for its regeneration from spent AB and elemental hydrogen. The presence of an aluminum center bonded to multiple AB residues might combine the efficiency of AB dehydrogenation with an aluminum mediated hydrogenation process leading to reversibility. The Al-AB complexes have comparable hydrogen capacity with other M-AB and have potential to meet DOEs 2010 and 2015 targets for system wt%.

  4. Biofuels from Bacteria, Electricity, and CO2: Biofuels from CO2 Using Ammonia or Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria in Reverse Microbial Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: Electrofuels Project: Columbia University is using carbon dioxide (CO2) from ambient air, ammoniaan abundant and affordable chemical, and a bacteria called N. europaea to produce liquid fuel. The Columbia University team is feeding the ammonia and CO2 into an engineered tank where the bacteria live. The bacteria capture the energy from ammonia and then use that energy to convert CO2 into a liquid fuel. When the bacteria use up all the ammonia, renewable electricity can regenerate it and pump it back into the systemcreating a continuous fuel-creation cycle. In addition, Columbia University is also working with the bacteria A. ferrooxidans to capture and use energy from ferrous iron to produce liquid fuels from CO2.

  5. REPORT ON THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND AMMONIA CONCENTRATION ON A515 CARBON STEEL IN TANK 241 AY 101 SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB; FRYE DP; WYRWAS RB

    2008-11-20

    This report documents the results from RPP-PLAN-38676, Effect of Temperature and Ammonia Concentration on A515 Carbon Steel in Tank 241-AY-101 Simulant. The purpose of this test plan was to investigate the simulant formulated for the double-shell tank (DST) 241 AY 101 (AY 101) with the addition of ammonia. The simulant was formulated from the AY-101 condensate surface layer recipe used by CC Technologies{reg_sign} in the investigation of Hanford DST chemistry, under the Expert Panel on Corrosion. AY-101 is constructed from A515 grade 60 steel. The laboratory investigation used a cylindrical corrosion coupon from this steel formulation with a surface area of 5.64 square centimeters.

  6. Comparing Metal Leaching and Toxicity from High pH, Low pH, and High Ammonia Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Fagan, Lisa Anne; Drake, Meghan M; Ruther, Rose Emily; Fisher, L. Suzanne; Amonette, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.7-12.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  7. Comparing metal leaching and toxicity from high pH, low pH, and high ammonia fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Tarver, Jana R.; Fagan, Lisa A.; McNeilly, Meghan S.; Ruther, Rose; Fisher, L. S.; Amonette, James E.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.712.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox* system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  8. Unusual defect physics in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite solar cell absorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Wan-Jian Shi, Tingting; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-02-10

    Thin-film solar cells based on Methylammonium triiodideplumbate (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}) halide perovskites have recently shown remarkable performance. First-principle calculations show that CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} has unusual defect physics: (i) Different from common p-type thin-film solar cell absorbers, it exhibits flexible conductivity from good p-type, intrinsic to good n-type depending on the growth conditions; (ii) Dominant intrinsic defects create only shallow levels, which partially explain the long electron-hole diffusion length and high open-circuit voltage in solar cell. The unusual defect properties can be attributed to the strong Pb lone-pair s orbital and I p orbital antibonding coupling and the high ionicity of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}.

  9. Chemically deposited CdS by an ammonia-free process for solar cells window layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ochoa-Landin, R.; Sastre-Hernandez, J.; Vigil-Galan, O.; Ramirez-Bon, R.

    2010-02-15

    Chemically deposited CdS window layers were studied on two different transparent conductive substrates, namely indium tin oxide (ITO) and fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO), to determine the influence of their properties on CdS/CdTe solar cells performance. Three types of CdS films obtained from different chemical bath deposition (CBD) processes were studied. The three CBD processes employed sodium citrate as the complexing agent in partial or full substitution of ammonia. The CdS films were studied by X-ray diffraction, optical transmission spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. CdS/CdTe devices were completed by depositing 3 {mu}m thick CdTe absorbent layers by means of the close-spaced vapor transport technique (CSVT). Evaporated Cu-Au was used as the back contact in all the solar cells. Dark and under illumination J-V characteristic and quantum efficiency measurements were done on the CdS/CdTe devices to determine their conversion efficiency and spectral response. The efficiency of the cells depended on the window layer and on the transparent contact with values between 5.7% and 8.7%. (author)

  10. Quantum states for quantum processes: A toy model for ammonia inversion spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteca, Gustavo A. [Departement de Chimie et Biochimie and Biomolecular Sciences Programme, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada); Department of Physical Chemistry, Uppsala University, A ring ngstroemlaboratoriet, Box 259, S-751 05 Uppsala (Sweden); Tapia, O. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Uppsala University, A ring ngstroemlaboratoriet, Box 259, S-751 05 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-07-15

    Chemical transformations are viewed here as quantum processes modulated by external fields, that is, as shifts in reactant to product amplitudes within a quantum state represented by a linear (coherent) superposition of electronuclear basis functions; their electronic quantum numbers identify the ''chemical species.'' This basis set can be mapped from attractors built from a unique electronic configurational space that is invariant with respect to the nuclear geometry. In turn, the quantum numbers that label these basis functions and the semiclassical potentials for the electronic attractors may be used to derive reaction coordinates to monitor progress as a function of the applied field. A generalization of Feynman's three-state model for the ammonia inversion process illustrates the scheme; to enforce symmetry for the entire inversion process model and ensure invariance with respect to nuclear configurations, the three attractors and their basis functions are computed with a grid of fixed floating Gaussian functions. The external-field modulation of the effective inversion barrier is discussed within this conceptual approach. This analysis brings the descriptions of chemical processes near modern technologies that employ molecules to encode information by means of confinement and external fields.

  11. Microstructures and properties of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3?x}Cl{sub x} hybrid solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Kohei E-mail: oku@mat.usp.ac.jp; Suzuki, Atsushi E-mail: oku@mat.usp.ac.jp; Zushi, Masahito E-mail: oku@mat.usp.ac.jp; Oku, Takeo E-mail: oku@mat.usp.ac.jp

    2015-02-27

    Halide-perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} was produced on mesoporous TiO{sub 2} layer by spin-coating a precursor solution of PbCl{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}I in dimethylformamide. The role of the annealing process and chlorine (Cl) doping for the perovskite-phase formation was investigated. It was found that crystallization of the perovskite materials was stimulated by the annealing process, and that longer annealing time is necessary for the Cl-doped perovskite compared with that of non-doped perovskite phase.

  12. Full-dimensional quantum calculations of vibrational levels of NH4+ and isotopomers on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hua -Gen Yu; Han, Huixian; Guo, Hua

    2016-03-29

    Vibrational energy levels of the ammonium cation (NH4+) and its deuterated isotopomers are calculated using a numerically exact kinetic energy operator on a recently developed nine-dimensional permutation invariant semiglobal potential energy surface fitted to a large number of high-level ab initio points. Like CH4, the vibrational levels of NH4+ and ND4+ exhibit a polyad structure, characterized by a collective quantum number P = 2(v1 + v3) + v2 + v4. As a result, the low-lying vibrational levels of all isotopomers are assigned and the agreement with available experimental data is better than 1 cm–1.

  13. Solvent extraction of Li+, H3O+ and NH4+ into nitrobenzene by using sodium dicarbollylcobaltate and calix[4]arene-bis(t-octylbenzo-18-crown-6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makrlik, Emanuel; Selucky, P.; Vanura, Petr; Moyer, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    From extraction experiments and c-activity measurements, the exchange extraction constants corresponding to the general equilibrium M+ (aq) + NaL+ (nb) , ML+ (nb) + Na+ (aq) taking place in the two-phase water nitrobenzene system (M+ = Li+, H3O+, NH+4; L = calix[4]arene-bis(t-octylbenzo-18-crown-6); aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) were evaluated. Furthermore, the stability constants of the ML+ complexes in nitrobenzene saturated with water were calculated; they were found to increase in the following cation order: zH3O+ < Li+ < NH+4.

  14. Rotational spectrum of the molecular ion NH{sup +} as a probe for {alpha} and m{sub e}/m{sub p} variation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beloy, K.; Borschevsky, A.; Hauser, A. W.; Schwerdtfeger, P.; Kozlov, M. G.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2011-06-15

    We identify the molecular ion NH{sup +} as a potential candidate for probing variations in the fine-structure constant {alpha} and electron-to-proton mass ratio {mu}. NH{sup +} has an anomalously low-lying excited {sup 4}{Sigma}{sup -} state, being only a few hundred cm{sup -1} above the ground {sup 2}{Pi} state. Being a light molecule, this proximity is such that rotational levels of the respective states are highly intermixed for low angular momenta. We find that several low-frequency transitions within the collective rotational spectrum experience enhanced sensitivity to {alpha} and {mu} variation. This is attributable to the close proximity of the {sup 2}{Pi} and {sup 4}{Sigma}{sup -} states, as well as the ensuing strong spin-orbit coupling between them. Suggestions that NH{sup +} may exist in interstellar space and recent predictions that trapped-ion precision spectroscopy will be adaptable to molecular ions make NH{sup +} a promising system for future astrophysical and laboratory studies of {alpha} and {mu} variation.

  15. Density Functional Studies of Stoichiometric Surfaces of Orthorhombic Hybrid Perovskite CH3NH3PbI3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yun; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Porun; Yang, Huagui; Zhao, Huijun

    2015-01-01

    Organic/inorganic hybrid perovskite materials are highly attractive for dye-sensitized solar cells as demonstrated by their rapid advances in energy conversion efficiency. In this work, the structures, energetics, and electronic properties for a range of stoichiometric surfaces of the orthorhombic perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 are theoretically studied using density functional theory. Various possible spatially and constitutionally isomeric surfaces are considered by diversifying the spatial orientations and connectivities of surface Pb-I bonds. The comparison of the surface energies for the most stable configurations identified for various surfaces shows that the stabilities of stoichiometric surfaces are mainly dictated by the coordination numbers of surface atoms, which are directly correlated with the numbers of broken bonds. Additionally, Coulombic interactions between I anions and organic countercations on the surface also contribute to the stabilization. Electronic properties are compared between the most stable (100) surface and the bulk phase, showing generally similar features except for the lifted band degeneracy and the enhanced bandgap energy for the surface. These studies on the stoichiometric surfaces serve as the first step toward gaining a fundamental understanding of the interfacial properties in the current structural design of perovskite based solar cells, in order to achieve further breakthroughs in solar conversion efficiencies.

  16. Density Functional Studies of Stoichiometric Surfaces of Orthorhombic Hybrid Perovskite CH3NH3PbI3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yun; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Porun; Yang, Huagui; Zhao, Huijun

    2015-01-01

    Organic/inorganic hybrid perovskite materials are highly attractive for dye-sensitized solar cells as demonstrated by their rapid advances in energy conversion efficiency. In this work, the structures, energetics, and electronic properties for a range of stoichiometric surfaces of the orthorhombic perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 are theoretically studied using density functional theory. Various possible spatially and constitutionally isomeric surfaces are considered by diversifying the spatial orientations and connectivities of surface Pb-I bonds. The comparison of the surface energies for the most stable configurations identified for various surfaces shows that the stabilities of stoichiometric surfaces are mainly dictated by the coordination numbers of surface atoms,more » which are directly correlated with the numbers of broken bonds. Additionally, Coulombic interactions between I anions and organic countercations on the surface also contribute to the stabilization. Electronic properties are compared between the most stable (100) surface and the bulk phase, showing generally similar features except for the lifted band degeneracy and the enhanced bandgap energy for the surface. These studies on the stoichiometric surfaces serve as the first step toward gaining a fundamental understanding of the interfacial properties in the current structural design of perovskite based solar cells, in order to achieve further breakthroughs in solar conversion efficiencies.« less

  17. The efficiency limit of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sha, Wei E. I.; Ren, Xingang; Chen, Luzhou; Choy, Wallace C. H.

    2015-06-01

    With the consideration of photon recycling effect, the efficiency limit of methylammonium lead iodide (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}) perovskite solar cells is predicted by a detailed balance model. To obtain convincing predictions, both AM 1.5 spectrum of Sun and experimentally measured complex refractive index of perovskite material are employed in the detailed balance model. The roles of light trapping and angular restriction in improving the maximal output power of thin-film perovskite solar cells are also clarified. The efficiency limit of perovskite cells (without the angular restriction) is about 31%, which approaches to Shockley-Queisser limit (33%) achievable by gallium arsenide (GaAs) cells. Moreover, the Shockley-Queisser limit could be reached with a 200 nm-thick perovskite solar cell, through integrating a wavelength-dependent angular-restriction design with a textured light-trapping structure. Additionally, the influence of the trap-assisted nonradiative recombination on the device efficiency is investigated. The work is fundamentally important to high-performance perovskite photovoltaics.

  18. Apparatus for purifying arsine, phosphine, ammonia, and inert gases to remove Lewis acid and oxidant impurities therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tom, Glenn M.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1991-01-08

    An apparatus for purifying a gaseous mixture comprising arsine, phosphine, ammonia, and/or inert gases, to remove Lewis acid and/or oxidant impurities therefrom, comprising a vessel containing a bed of a scavenger, the scavenger including a support having associated therewith an anion which is effective to remove such impurities, such anion being selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) carbanions whose corresponding protonated compounds have a pK.sub.a value of from about 22 to about 36; and (ii) anions formed by reaction of such carbanions with the primary component of the mixture.

  19. CX-012111: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia: Optimizing the Synthesis Reactor for Direct Production of Supercritical Steam CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/06/2014 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  20. Calorimetric, spectroscopic and structural investigations of phase polymorphism in [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 3}. Part I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolega, Diana; Mikuli, Edward; Inaba, Akira; Gorska, Natalia; Holderna-Natkaniec, Krystyna; Nitek, Wojciech

    2013-01-15

    Four crystalline phases of the coordination compound [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 3} are identified by adiabatic calorimetry. Three phase transitions, one at T{sub C3}(IV{yields}III)=30.7 K, the second at T{sub C2}(III{yields}II)=91.7 K (both accompanied by comparable entropy changes 3.0 and 3.1 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1}, respectively) and the third at T{sub C1}(II{yields}I)=241.6 K (accompanied by an entropy change of 8.1 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1}) were discovered. X-ray single crystal diffraction (at 293 K) demonstrates that phase I is a highly dynamic disordered cubic phase (Fm3{sup Macron }m, No. 225) with two types of BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions differing in a degree of disorder. In phase II (at 170 K) the structure remains cubic (Ia3{sup Macron }, No. 206), with two different types of cations and four different types of anions. Splitting of certain IR bands connected with NH{sub 3} ligands at the observed phase transitions suggests a lowering of the symmetry of the [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} complex cation. Both NH{sub 3} ligands and BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions perform fast reorientations ({tau}{sub R} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -12} s), which are significantly slowed down below the phase transition at T{sub C3}. {sup 1}H NMR studies led to estimate the values of the activation energy of NH{sub 3} ligands reorientation in the phases II and I as equal to {approx}8 kJ mol{sup -1}. In phase I the whole hexammineruthenium(III) cations reorientation as a tumbling process can be noticed. The activation energy value of this motion is {approx}24 kJ mol{sup -1}. {sup 19}F NMR studies give the values of the activation energy of BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions reorientation as {approx}6 kJ mol{sup -1}. Above the phase transition temperature half of BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions perform a tumbling motion with E{sub a} Almost-Equal-To 8 kJ mol{sup -1}. - Graphical abstract: A series of complementary methods, such as Adiabatic Calorimetry, Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Fourier Transform-Far and Middle Spectroscopy, proton and fluorine Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and structural methods reveal information about phase transitions in [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three novel phase transitions are found in [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermodynamic parameters of the phase transitions are derived. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The transitions are of order-disorder type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The complex belongs to Fm3{sup Macron }m at 293 K and its symmetry changes to Ia3{sup Macron} at 170 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 3} is a highly dynamically disordered crystal.

  1. Method to Produce Highly Digestible, Pretreated Lignocellulosic Biomass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Anhydrous Liquid Ammonia - Energy Innovation Portal Method to Produce Highly Digestible, Pretreated Lignocellulosic Biomass Using Anhydrous Liquid Ammonia Inventors: Shishir Chundawat, Leonardo Sousa, Albert Cheh, Venkatesh Balan, Bruce Dale Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryIn the continuing push to develop alternative fuels, bioethanol is clearly a viable option. However, if it is to become a truly economical

  2. Addendum to Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project: Additiona NH3, NOx, and CO Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel P. Connell; James E. Locke

    2008-03-01

    On March 28-30 and May 1-4, 2007, CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-MW Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. The testing in March and May demonstrated that the multi-pollutant control system attained its performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions, SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, acid gas (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF) removal efficiency, and mercury removal efficiency. However, the ammonia slip measured between the SCR outlet and air heater inlet was consistently greater than the guarantee of 2 ppmvd {at} 3% O{sub 2}. As a result, additional testing was performed on May 30-June 1 and on June 20-21, 2007, in conjunction with tuning of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system by BPEI, in an effort to achieve the performance target for ammonia slip. This additional testing occurred after the installation of a large particle ash (LPA) screen and removal system just above the SCR reactor and a fresh SCR catalyst layer in mid-May. This report describes the results of the additional tests. During the May 30-June 1 sampling period, CONSOL R&D and Clean Air Engineering (CAE) each measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet, downstream of the in-duct SCR reactor. In addition, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the economizer outlet, upstream of the SCR reactor, and CAE measured flue gas NO{sub x} and CO concentrations at the sampling grids located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor. During the June 20-21 sampling period, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet. All ammonia measurements were performed using a modified version of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Conditional Test Method (CTM) 027. The NO{sub x} and CO measurements were performed using U.S. EPA Methods 7E and 10, respectively.

  3. Electron-hole diffusion lengths >175 μm in solution-grown CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dong, Qingfeng; Fang, Yanjun; Shao, Yuchuan; Mulligan, Padhraic; Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-02-27

    Long, balanced electron and hole diffusion lengths greater than 100 nanometers in the polycrystalline organolead trihalide compound CH3NH3PbI3 are critical for highly efficient perovskite solar cells. We found that the diffusion lengths in CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals grown by a solution-growth method can exceed 175 micrometers under 1 sun (100 mW cm–2) illumination and exceed 3 millimeters under weak light for both electrons and holes. The internal quantum efficiencies approach 100% in 3-millimeter-thick single-crystal perovskite solar cells under weak light. These long diffusion lengths result from greater carrier mobility, longer lifetime, and much smaller trap densities in the single crystals thanmore »in polycrystalline thin films. As a result, the long carrier diffusion lengths enabled the use of CH3NH3PbI3 in radiation sensing and energy harvesting through the gammavoltaic effect, with an efficiency of 3.9% measured with an intense cesium-137 source.« less

  4. The Origin and Coupling Mechanism of the Magnetoelectric Effect in TM Cl 2 -4SC(NH 2 ) 2 ( TM = Ni and Co)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mun, Eundeok; Wilcox, Jason; Manson, Jamie L.; Scott, Brian; Tobash, Paul; Zapf, Vivien S.

    2014-01-01

    Most research on multiferroics and magnetoelectric effects to date has focused on inorganic oxides. Molecule-based materials are a relatively new field in which to search for magnetoelectric multiferroics and to explore new coupling mechanisms between electric and magnetic order. We present magnetoelectric behavior in NiCl 2 -4SC(NH 2 ) 2 (DTN) and CoCl 2 -4SC(NH 2 ) 2 (DTC). These compounds form tetragonal structures where the transition metal ion (Ni or Co) is surrounded by four electrically polar thiourea molecules [SC(NH 2 ) 2 ]. By tracking the magnetic and electric properties of these compounds as a function ofmore » magnetic field, we gain insights into the coupling mechanism by observing that, in DTN, the electric polarization tracks the magnetic ordering, whereas in DTC it does not. For DTN, all electrically polar thiourea molecules tilt in the same direction along the c -axis, breaking spatial-inversion symmetry, whereas, for DTC, two thiourea molecules tilt up and two tilt down with respect to c -axis, perfectly canceling the net electrical polarization. Thus, the magnetoelectric coupling mechanism in DTN is likely a magnetostrictive adjustment of the thiourea molecule orientation in response to magnetic order.« less

  5. Effects of Alkali and Alkaline Earth Cocations on the Activity and Hydrothermal Stability of Cu/SSZ-13 NH3-SCR Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Wang, Yilin; Washton, Nancy M.; Kollar, Marton; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-10-13

    Using a three-step aqueous solution ion-exchange method, cocation modified Cu/SSZ-13 SCR catalysts were synthesized. These catalysts, in both fresh and hydrothermally aged forms, were characterized with several methods including temperature-programmed reduction by H2 (H2-TPR), temperature-programmed desorption of NH3 (NH3-TPD), and 27Al solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and diffuse reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopies. Their catalytic performance was probed using steady-state standard NH3-SCR. Characterization results indicate that cocations weaken interactions between Cu-ions and the CHA framework making them more readily reducible. By removing a portion of Brønsted acid sites, cocations also help to mitigate hydrolysis of the zeolite catalysts during hydrothermal aging as evidenced from 27Al NMR. Reaction tests show that certain cocations, especially Li+ and Na+, promote low-temperature SCR rates while others show much less pronounced effects. In terms of applications, our results indicate that introducing cocations can be a viable strategy to improve both low- and high-temperature performance of Cu/SSZ-13 SCR catalysts.

  6. Electron-hole diffusion lengths >175 μm in solution-grown CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dong, Qingfeng; Fang, Yanjun; Shao, Yuchuan; Mulligan, Padhraic; Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-02-27

    Long, balanced electron and hole diffusion lengths greater than 100 nanometers in the polycrystalline organolead trihalide compound CH3NH3PbI3 are critical for highly efficient perovskite solar cells. We found that the diffusion lengths in CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals grown by a solution-growth method can exceed 175 micrometers under 1 sun (100 mW cm–2) illumination and exceed 3 millimeters under weak light for both electrons and holes. The internal quantum efficiencies approach 100% in 3-millimeter-thick single-crystal perovskite solar cells under weak light. These long diffusion lengths result from greater carrier mobility, longer lifetime, and much smaller trap densities in the single crystals thanmore » in polycrystalline thin films. As a result, the long carrier diffusion lengths enabled the use of CH3NH3PbI3 in radiation sensing and energy harvesting through the gammavoltaic effect, with an efficiency of 3.9% measured with an intense cesium-137 source.« less

  7. Molybdenum-based additives to mixed-metal oxides for use in hot gas cleanup sorbents for the catalytic decomposition of ammonia in coal gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayala, Raul E.

    1993-01-01

    This invention relates to additives to mixed-metal oxides that act simultaneously as sorbents and catalysts in cleanup systems for hot coal gases. Such additives of this type, generally, act as a sorbent to remove sulfur from the coal gases while substantially simultaneously, catalytically decomposing appreciable amounts of ammonia from the coal gases.

  8. Enhanced performance of core-shell structured polyaniline at helical carbon nanotube hybrids for ammonia gas sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Xin; Wang, Qiang; Chen, Xiangnan; Yang, Weiqing; Xu, Xiaoling E-mail: bihan-2001@163.com; Jiang, Man; Zhou, Zuowan E-mail: bihan-2001@163.com; Wu, Zuquan

    2014-11-17

    A core-shell structured hybrid of polyaniline at helical carbon nanotubes was synthesized using in situ polymerization, which the helical carbon nanotubes were uniformly surrounded by a layer of polyaniline nanorods array. More interestingly, repeatable responses were experimentally observed that the sensitivity to ammonia gas of the as-prepared helical shaped core-shell hybrid displays an enhancement of more than two times compared to those of only polyaniline or helical carbon nanotubes sensors because of the peculiar structures with high surface area. This kind of hybrid comprising nanorod arrays of conductive polymers covering carbon nanotubes and related structures provide a potential in sensors of trace gas detection for environmental monitoring and safety forecasting.

  9. Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. O’Donnell; Donald S. Griffin

    2007-05-07

    The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

  10. Exploiting parameter space in MOFs: a 20-fold enhancement of phosphate-ester hydrolysis with UiO-66-NH 2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Katz, Michael J.; Moon, Su-Young; Mondloch, Joseph E.; Beyzavi, M. Hassan; Stephenson, Casey J.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.

    2015-02-24

    The hydrolysis of nerve agents is of primary concern due to the severe toxicity of these agents. Using a MOF-based catalyst (UiO-66), we have previously demonstrated that the hydrolysis can occur with relatively fast half-lives of 50 minutes. However, these rates are still prohibitively slow to be efficiently utilized for some practical applications (e.g., decontamination wipes used to clean exposed clothing/skin/vehicles). We thus turned our attention to derivatives of UiO-66 in order to probe the importance of functional groups on the hydrolysis rate. Three UiO-66 derivatives were explored; UiO-66-NO2 and UiO-66-(OH)2 showed little to no change in hydrolysis rate. However,more » UiO-66-NH2 showed a 20 fold increase in hydrolysis rate over the parent UiO-66 MOF. Half-lives of 1 minute were observed with this MOF. In order to probe the role of the amino moiety, we turned our attention to UiO-67, UiO-67-NMe2 and UiO-67-NH2. In these MOFs, the amino moiety is in close proximity to the zirconium node. We observed that UiO-67-NH2 is a faster catalyst than UiO-67 and UiO-67-NMe2. We conclude that the role of the amino moiety is to act as a proton-transfer agent during the catalytic cycle and not to hydrogen bond or to form a phosphorane intermediate.« less

  11. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part I. Regeneration of Amine-Carboxylic Acid Extracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poole, L.J.; King, C.J.

    1990-03-01

    Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, succinic acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The concentration-based distribution ratios increase from 0.11 to 0.46 as the aqueous phase pH increases from 7.18 to 8.15. Regeneration of the organic extractant solution was carried out by stripping at elevated temperatures to remove the ammonia, with 99% recovery of the ammonia being obtained at 125 C.

  12. Quantum wells on 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunctions. Calculation of spontaneous polarization and electric field strength in experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sbruev, I. S.; Sbruev, S. B.

    2010-10-15

    The results of experiments with quantum wells on 3C-SiC/4H-SiC and 3C-SiC/6H-SiC heterojunctions obtained by various methods are reconsidered. Spontaneous polarizations, field strengths, and energies of local levels in quantum wells on 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunctions were calculated within a unified model. The values obtained are in agreement with the results of all considered experiments. Heterojunction types are determined. Approximations for valence band offsets on heterojunctions between silicon carbide polytypes and the expression for calculating local levels in quantum wells on the 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunction are presented. The spontaneous polarizations and field strengths induced by spontaneous polarization on 3C-SiC/4H-SiC and 3C-SiC/6H-SiC heterojunctions were calculated as 0.71 and 0.47 C/m{sup 2} and 0.825 and 0.55 MV/cm, respectively.

  13. AFFECTS OF MECHANICAL MILLING AND METAL OXIDE ADDITIVES ON SORPTION KINETICS OF 1:1 LiNH2/MgH2 MIXTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdy, C.; Anton, D.; Gray, J.

    2010-12-08

    The destabilized complex hydride system composed of LiNH{sub 2}:MgH{sub 2} (1:1 molar ratio) is one of the leading candidates of hydrogen storage with a reversible hydrogen storage capacity of 8.1 wt%. A low sorption enthalpy of {approx}32 kJ/mole H{sub 2} was first predicted by Alapati et al. utilizing first principle density function theory (DFT) calculations and has been subsequently confirmed empirically by Lu et al. through differential thermal analysis (DTA). This enthalpy suggests that favorable sorption kinetics should be obtainable at temperatures in the range of 160 C to 200 C. Preliminary experiments reported in the literature indicate that sorption kinetics are substantially lower than expected in this temperature range despite favorable thermodynamics. Systematic isothermal and isobaric sorption experiments were performed using a Sievert's apparatus to form a baseline data set by which to compare kinetic results over the pressure and temperature range anticipated for use of this material as a hydrogen storage media. Various material preparation methods and compositional modifications were performed in attempts to increase the kinetics while lowering the sorption temperatures. This paper outlines the results of these systematic tests and describes a number of beneficial additions which influence kinetics as well as NH{sub 3} formation.

  14. Catalytic activity of oxidized (combusted) oil shale for removal of nitrogen oxides with ammonia as a reductant in combustion gas streams, Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.G.; Taylor, R.W.; Morris, C.J.

    1993-01-04

    Oxidized oil shale from the combustor in the LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retorting process has been found to be a catalyst for removing nitrogen oxides from laboratory gas streams using NH[sub 3] as a reductant. Oxidized Green River oil shale heated at 10[degree]C/min in an Ar/O[sub 2]/NO/NH[sub 3] mixture ([approximately]93%/6%/2000 ppM/4000 ppM) with a gas residence time of [approximately]0.6 sec removed NO between 250 and 500[degree]C, with maximum removal of 70% at [approximately]400[degree]C. Under isothermal conditions with the same gas mixture, the maximum NO removal was [approximately]64%. When CO[sub 2] was added to the gas mixture at [approximately]8%, the NO removal dropped to [approximately]50%. However, increasing the gas residence time to [approximately]1.2 sec, increased NO removal to 63%. Nitrogen balances of these experiments suggest selective catalytic reduction of NO is occurring using NH[sub 3] as the reductant. These results are not based on completely optimized process conditions, but indicate oxidized oil shale is an effective catalyst for NO removal from combustion gas streams using NH[sub 3] as the reductant. Parameters calculated for implementing oxidized oil shale for NO[sub x] remediation on the current HRS retort indicate an abatement device is practical to construct.

  15. Catalytic activity of oxidized (combusted) oil shale for removal of nitrogen oxides with ammonia as a reductant in combustion gas streams, Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.G.; Taylor, R.W.; Morris, C.J.

    1993-01-04

    Oxidized oil shale from the combustor in the LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retorting process has been found to be a catalyst for removing nitrogen oxides from laboratory gas streams using NH{sub 3} as a reductant. Oxidized Green River oil shale heated at 10{degree}C/min in an Ar/O{sub 2}/NO/NH{sub 3} mixture ({approximately}93%/6%/2000 ppM/4000 ppM) with a gas residence time of {approximately}0.6 sec removed NO between 250 and 500{degree}C, with maximum removal of 70% at {approximately}400{degree}C. Under isothermal conditions with the same gas mixture, the maximum NO removal was {approximately}64%. When CO{sub 2} was added to the gas mixture at {approximately}8%, the NO removal dropped to {approximately}50%. However, increasing the gas residence time to {approximately}1.2 sec, increased NO removal to 63%. Nitrogen balances of these experiments suggest selective catalytic reduction of NO is occurring using NH{sub 3} as the reductant. These results are not based on completely optimized process conditions, but indicate oxidized oil shale is an effective catalyst for NO removal from combustion gas streams using NH{sub 3} as the reductant. Parameters calculated for implementing oxidized oil shale for NO{sub x} remediation on the current HRS retort indicate an abatement device is practical to construct.

  16. Sorption of carboxylic acid from carboxylic salt solutions at PHS close to or above the pK.sub.a of the acid, with regeneration with an aqueous solution of ammonia or low-molecular-weight alkylamine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, C. Judson; Tung, Lisa A.

    1992-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks at pHs close to or above the acids' pH.sub.a into a strongly basic organic liquid phase or onto a basic solid adsorbent or moderately basic ion exchange resin. the acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine or ammonia thus forming an alkylammonium or ammonium carobxylate which dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine or ammonia.

  17. Sorption of carboxylic acid from carboxylic salt solutions at pHs close to or above the pK[sub a] of the acid, with regeneration with an aqueous solution of ammonia or low-molecular-weight alkylamine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, C.J.; Tung, L.A.

    1992-07-21

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks at pHs close to or above the acids' pH[sub a] into a strongly basic organic liquid phase or onto a basic solid adsorbent or moderately basic ion exchange resin. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine or ammonia thus forming an alkylammonium or ammonium carboxylate which dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine or ammonia. 8 figs.

  18. METALLICITIES, DUST, AND MOLECULAR CONTENT OF A QSO-DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEM REACHING log N(H I) = 22: AN ANALOG TO GRB-DLAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guimaraes, R.; Noterdaeme, P.; Petitjean, P.; Ledoux, C.; Srianand, R.; Rahmani, H.; Lopez, S.

    2012-06-15

    We present the elemental abundance and H{sub 2} content measurements of a damped Ly{alpha} (DLA) system with an extremely large H I column density, log N(H I) (cm{sup -2}) = 22.0 {+-} 0.10, at z{sub abs} = 3.287 toward the QSO SDSS J081634+144612. We measure column densities of H{sub 2}, C I, C I*, Zn II, Fe II, Cr II, Ni II, and Si II from a high signal-to-noise and high spectral resolution VLT-UVES spectrum. The overall metallicity of the system is [Zn/H] = -1.10 {+-} 0.10 relative to solar. Two molecular hydrogen absorption components are seen at z = 3.28667 and 3.28742 (a velocity separation of Almost-Equal-To 52 km s{sup -1}) in rotational levels up to J = 3. We derive a total H{sub 2} column density of log N(H{sub 2}) (cm{sup -2}) = 18.66 and a mean molecular fraction of f = 2N(H{sub 2})/[2N(H{sub 2}) + N(H I)] = 10{sup -3.04{+-}0.37}, typical of known H{sub 2}-bearing DLA systems. From the observed abundance ratios we conclude that dust is present in the interstellar medium of this galaxy, with an enhanced abundance in the H{sub 2}-bearing clouds. However, the total amount of dust along the line of sight is not large and does not produce any significant reddening of the background QSO. The physical conditions in the H{sub 2}-bearing clouds are constrained directly from the column densities of H{sub 2} in different rotational levels, C I and C I*. The kinetic temperature is found to be T Almost-Equal-To 75 K and the particle density lies in the range n{sub H} = 50-80 cm{sup -3}. The neutral hydrogen column density of this DLA is similar to the mean H I column density of DLAs observed at the redshift of {gamma}-ray bursts (GRBs). We explore the relationship between GRB-DLAs and the high column density end of QSO-DLAs finding that the properties (metallicity and depletion) of DLAs with log N(H I) > 21.5 in the two populations do not appear to be significantly different.

  19. Interaction of vacuum ultraviolet light with a low-k organosilicate glass film in the presence of NH{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behera, Swayambhu; Lee, Joe; Graves, David; Gaddam, Sneha; Pokharel, Sundari; Wilks, Justin; Pasquale, Frank; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2010-07-19

    In situ x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and ex situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to characterize effects on organosilicate films of 147 nm irradiation in the presence of 10{sup -4} Torr NH{sub 3}. XPS and FTIR data indicate Si-O and Si-C bond scission, with nitridation only at Si sites. Photoirradiation causes the surface layer to become enriched in sp{sup 2} carbon. FTIR spectra of silanol formation upon exposure to ambient indicate reactive sites in the bulk have lifetimes of up to six days. XPS data indicate lifetimes of approxminutes for surface states. Nitrogen uptake passivates with longer exposure times, indicating surface densification.

  20. Qualifying composition dependent p and n self-doping in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qi; Shao, Yuchuan; Huang, Jinsong; Xie, Haipeng; Lyu, Lu; Liu, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yongli

    2014-10-20

    We report the observation of self-doping in perovskite. CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} was found to be either n- or p-doped by changing the ratio of methylammonium halide (MAI) and lead iodine (PbI{sub 2}) which are the two precursors for perovskite formation. MAI-rich and PbI{sub 2}-rich perovskite films are p and n self-doped, respectively. Thermal annealing can convert the p-type perovskite to n-type by removing MAI. The carrier concentration varied as much as six orders of magnitude. A clear correlation between doping level and device performance was also observed.

  1. Simplification of femtosecond transient absorption microscopy data from CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite thin films into decay associated amplitude maps

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Doughty, Benjamin; Simpson, Mary Jane; Yang, Bin; Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong

    2016-02-16

    This work aims to simplify multi-dimensional femtosecond transient absorption microscopy (TAM) data into decay associated amplitude maps that describe the spatial distributions of dynamical processes occurring on various characteristic timescales. Application of this method to TAM data obtained from a model methyl-ammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskite thin film allows us to simplify the dataset consisting of a 68 time-resolved images into 4 decay associated amplitude maps. These maps provide a simple means to visualize the complex electronic excited-state dynamics in this system by separating distinct dynamical processes evolving on characteristic timescales into individual spatial images. This approach provides new insightmore » into subtle aspects of ultrafast relaxation dynamics associated with excitons and charge carriers in the perovskite thin film, which have recently been found to coexist at spatially distinct locations.« less

  2. Origin and elimination of photocurrent hysteresis by fullerene passivation in CH3NH3PbI3 planar heterojunction solar cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shao, Yuchuan; Xiao, Zhengguo; Bi, Cheng; Yuan, Yongbo; Huang, Jinsong

    2014-12-15

    The large photocurrent hysteresis observed in many organometal trihalide perovskite solar cells has become a major hindrance impairing the ultimate performance and stability of these devices, while its origin was unknown. Here we demonstrate the trap states on the surface and grain boundaries of the perovskite materials to be the origin of photocurrent hysteresis and that the fullerene layers deposited on perovskites can effectively passivate these charge trap states and eliminate the notorious photocurrent hysteresis. Fullerenes deposited on the top of the perovskites reduce the trap density by two orders of magnitude and double the power conversion efficiency of CH3NH3PbI3more » solar cells. As a result, the elucidation of the origin of photocurrent hysteresis and its elimination by trap passivation in perovskite solar cells provides important directions for future enhancements to device efficiency.« less

  3. New operation strategy for driving the selectivity of NOx reduction to N2, NH3 or N2O during lean/rich cycling of a lean NOx trap catalyst

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mráček, David; Koci, Petr; Choi, Jae -Soon; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2015-09-08

    Periodical regeneration of NOx storage catalyst (also known as lean NOx trap) by short rich pulses of CO, H2 and hydrocarbons is necessary for the reduction of nitrogen oxides adsorbed on the catalyst surface. Ideally, the stored NOx is converted into N2, but N2O and NH3 by-products can be formed as well, particularly at low-intermediate temperatures. The N2 and N2O products are formed concurrently in two peaks. The primary peaks appear immediately after the rich-phase inception, and tail off with the breakthrough of the reductant front accompanied by NH3 product. In addition, the secondary N2 and N2O peaks then appearmore » at the rich-to-lean transition as a result of reactions between surface-deposited reductants/intermediates (CO, HC, NH3, — NCO) and residual stored NOx under increasingly lean conditions.« less

  4. Impact of Sequential Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) Pretreatment and Pelletization on the Moisture Sorption Properties of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonner, Ian J.; Thompson, David N.; Teymouri, Farzaneh; Campbell, Timothy; Bals, Bryan; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar

    2015-05-01

    Combining ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX™) pretreatment with a depot processing facility is a promising option for delivering high-value densified biomass to the emerging bioenergy industry. However, because the pretreatment process results in a high moisture material unsuitable for pelleting or storage (40% wet basis), the biomass must be immediately dried. If AFEX pretreatment results in a material that is difficult to dry, the economics of this already costly operation would be at risk. This work tests the nature of moisture sorption isotherms and thin-layer drying behavior of corn (Zea mays L.) stover at 20°C to 60°C before and after sequential AFEX pretreatment and pelletization to determine whether any negative impacts to material drying or storage may result from the AFEX process. The equilibrium moisture content to equilibrium relative humidity relationship for each of the materials was determined using dynamic vapor sorption isotherms and modeled with modified Chung-Pfost, modified Halsey, and modified Henderson temperature-dependent models as well as the Double Log Polynomial (DLP), Peleg, and Guggenheim Anderson de Boer (GAB) temperature-independent models. Drying kinetics were quantified under thin-layer laboratory testing and modeled using the Modified Page's equation. Water activity isotherms for non-pelleted biomass were best modeled with the Peleg temperature-independent equation while isotherms for the pelleted biomass were best modeled with the Double Log Polynomial equation. Thin-layer drying results were accurately modeled with the Modified Page's equation. The results of this work indicate that AFEX pretreatment results in drying properties more favorable than or equal to that of raw corn stover, and pellets of superior physical stability in storage.

  5. Catalytic activity of oxidized (combusted) oil shale for removal of nitrogen oxides with ammonia as a reductant in combustion gas streams, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.G.; Taylor, R.W.; Morris, C.J.

    1992-06-10

    Oxidized oil shale from the combustor in the LLNL hot recycle solids oil shale retorting process has been studied as a catalyst for removing nitrogen oxides from laboratory gas streams using NH{sub 3} as areductant. Combusted Green River oil shale heated at 10{degrees}C/min in an Ar/O{sub 2}/NO/NH{sub 3} mixture ({approximately}93%/6%/2000 ppm/4000 ppm) with a gas residence time of {approximately}0.6 sec exhibited NO removal between 250 and 500{degrees}C, with maximum removal of 70% at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Under isothermal conditions with the same gas mixture, the maximum NO removal was found to be {approximately}64%. When CO{sub 2} was added to the gas mixture at {approximately}8%, the NO removal dropped to {approximately}50%. However, increasing the gas residence time to {approximately}1.2 sec, increased NO removal to 63%. These results are not based on optimized process conditions, but indicate oxidized (combusted) oil shale is an effective catalyst for NO removal from combustion gas streams using NH{sub 3} as the reductant.

  6. LOW-TEMPERATURE ION TRAP STUDIES OF N{sup +}({sup 3} P{sub ja} ) + H{sub 2}(j) {yields} NH{sup +} + H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zymak, I.; Hejduk, M.; Mulin, D.; Plasil, R.; Glosik, J.; Gerlich, D.

    2013-05-01

    Using a low-temperature 22-pole ion trap apparatus, detailed measurements for the title reaction have been performed between 10 K and 100 K in order to get some state specific information about this fundamental hydrogen abstraction process. The relative population of the two lowest H{sub 2} rotational states, j = 0 and 1, has been varied systematically. NH{sup +} formation is nearly thermo-neutral; however, to date, the energetics are not known with the accuracy required for low-temperature astrochemistry. Additional complications arise from the fact that, so far, there is no reliable theoretical or experimental information on how the reactivity of the N{sup +} ion depends on its fine-structure (FS) state {sup 3} P{sub ja} . Since in the present trapping experiment, thermalization of the initially hot FS population competes with hydrogen abstraction, the evaluation of the decay of N{sup +} ions over long storage times and at various He and H{sub 2} gas densities provides information on these processes. First assuming strict adiabatic behavior, a set of state specific rate coefficients is derived from the measured thermal rate coefficients. In addition, by recording the disappearance of the N{sup +} ions over several orders of magnitude, information on nonadiabatic transitions is extracted including FS-changing collisions.

  7. Application of x-ray tomography to optimization of new NOx/NH3 mixed potential sensors for vehicle on-board emissions control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Mark A; Brosha, Eric L; Mukundan, Rangachary; Garzon, Fernando H

    2009-01-01

    Mixed potential sensors for the detection of hydrocarbons, NO{sub x}, and NH{sub 3} have been previously developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The LANL sensors have a unique design incorporating dense ceramic-pelletlmetal-wire electrodes and porous electrolytes. The performance of current-biased sensors using an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and platinum and La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}CrO{sub 3} electrodes is reported. X-ray tomography has been applied to non-destructively examine internal structures of these sensors. NO{sub x} and hydrocarbon response of the sensors under various bias conditions is reported, and very little NO{sub x} response hysteresis was observed. The application of a 0.6 {mu}A bias to these sensors shifts the response from a hydrocarbon response to a NO{sub x} response equal for both NO and NO{sub 2} species at approximately 500 {sup o}C in air.

  8. Compound and Elemental Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    gases usually include: carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrogen sulfide (H2S) ammonia (NH4) methane (CH4) Related Techniques Lab Analysis Techniques Fluid Lab Analysis Compound and...

  9. Cellulosic emissions (kg of pollutant per km2 county area) -...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cellulosic emissions (kg of pollutant per km2 county area) Data reflects projected air emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOX), ammonia (NH3), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur oxide (SOX),...

  10. Formation and consumption of NO in H{sub 2} + O{sub 2} + N{sub 2} flames doped with NO or NH{sub 3} at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shmakov, A.G.; Chernov, A.A.; Knyazkov, D.A.; Bolshova, T.A.; Korobeinichev, O.P.; Rybitskaya, I.V.; Konnov, A.A.

    2010-03-15

    Flat premixed burner-stabilized H{sub 2} + O{sub 2} + N{sub 2} flames, neat or doped with 300-1000 ppm of NO or NH{sub 3}, were studied experimentally using molecular-beam mass-spectrometry and simulated numerically. Spatial profiles of temperature and concentrations of stable species, H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NO, NH{sub 3}, and of H and OH radicals obtained at atmospheric pressure in lean ({phi} = 0.47), near-stoichiometric ({phi} = 1.1) and rich ({phi} = 2.0) flames are reported. Good agreement between measured and calculated structure of lean and near-stoichiometric flames was found. Significant discrepancy between simulated and measured profiles of NO concentration was observed in the rich flames. Sensitivity and reaction path analyses revealed reactions responsible for the discrepancy. Modification to the model was proposed to improve an overall agreement with the experiment. (author)

  11. Electron-hole diffusion lengths >175 μm in solution-grown CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Qingfeng; Fang, Yanjun; Shao, Yuchuan; Mulligan, Padhraic; Qiu, Jie; Cao, Lei; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-02-27

    Long, balanced electron and hole diffusion lengths greater than 100 nanometers in the polycrystalline organolead trihalide compound CH3NH3PbI3 are critical for highly efficient perovskite solar cells. We found that the diffusion lengths in CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals grown by a solution-growth method can exceed 175 micrometers under 1 sun (100 mW cm–2) illumination and exceed 3 millimeters under weak light for both electrons and holes. The internal quantum efficiencies approach 100% in 3-millimeter-thick single-crystal perovskite solar cells under weak light. These long diffusion lengths result from greater carrier mobility, longer lifetime, and much smaller trap densities in the single crystals than in polycrystalline thin films. As a result, the long carrier diffusion lengths enabled the use of CH3NH3PbI3 in radiation sensing and energy harvesting through the gammavoltaic effect, with an efficiency of 3.9% measured with an intense cesium-137 source.

  12. Chemical Reduction of Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4??Powders in Supercritical Sodium Ammonia Solutions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dias, Yasmin; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Haiqing; Lin, Feng; Lan, Yucheng

    2015-01-01

    Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4??powders are chemically reduced in supercritical sodium ammonia solutions from room temperature to 350C. The crystallographic structure of the reduced powders is investigated from Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction. The atomic positions are maintained constant within experimental errors while temperature factors of all atoms increase significantly after the chemical treatments, especially of Nd/Ce atoms. The ammonothermally reduced Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4??powders show diamagnetic below 24?K which is contributed to the lower oxygen content and higher temperature factors of atoms in the treated compound. The ammonothermal method paves a new way to reduce oxides in supercritical solutions near room temperature.

  13. Chemical Reduction of Nd 1.85 Ce 0.15 CuO 4− δ Powders in Supercritical Sodium Ammonia Solutions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dias, Yasmin; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Haiqing; Lin, Feng; Lan, Yucheng

    2015-01-01

    Nd 1.85 Ce 0.15 CuO 4− δ powders are chemically reduced in supercritical sodium ammonia solutions from room temperature to 350°C. The crystallographic structure of the reduced powders is investigated from Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction. The atomic positions are maintained constant within experimental errors while temperature factors of all atoms increase significantly after the chemical treatments, especially of Nd/Ce atoms. The ammonothermally reduced Nd 1.85 Ce 0.15 CuO 4− δ powders show diamagnetic below 24 K which is contributed to the lower oxygen content and higher temperature factors of atoms in the treated compound.more » The ammonothermal method paves a new way to reduce oxides in supercritical solutions near room temperature.« less

  14. Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, nitrogen, and ammonia in contact with tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1996-02-01

    Work described in this report was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. Described in this report are the results of tests to evaluate the rates of thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving flammable gases in the presence of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste. Flammable gases generated by the radiolysis of water and by the thermal and radiolytic decomposition of organic waste constituents may themselves participate in further reactions. Examples include the decomposition of nitrous oxide to yield nitrogen and oxygen, the reaction of nitrous oxide and hydrogen to produce nitrogen and water, and the reaction of nitrogen and hydrogen to produce ammonia. The composition of the gases trapped in bubbles in the wastes might therefore change continuously as a function of the time that the gas bubbles are retained.

  15. Low-temperature CVD of iron, cobalt, and nickel nitride thin films from bis[di(tert-butyl)amido]metal(II) precursors and ammonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cloud, Andrew N.; Abelson, John R., E-mail: abelson@illinois.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 201 Materials Science and Engineering Building, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Davis, Luke M.; Girolami, Gregory S., E-mail: girolami@scs.illinois.edu [School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Thin films of late transition metal nitrides (where the metal is iron, cobalt, or nickel) are grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from bis[di(tert-butyl)amido]metal(II) precursors and ammonia. These metal nitrides are known to have useful mechanical and magnetic properties, but there are few thin film growth techniques to produce them based on a single precursor family. The authors report the deposition of metal nitride thin films below 300?C from three recently synthesized M[N(t-Bu){sub 2}]{sub 2} precursors, where M?=?Fe, Co, and Ni, with growth onset as low as room temperature. Metal-rich phases are obtained with constant nitrogen content from growth onset to 200?C over a range of feedstock partial pressures. Carbon contamination in the films is minimal for iron and cobalt nitride, but similar to the nitrogen concentration for nickel nitride. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the incorporated nitrogen is present as metal nitride, even for films grown at the reaction onset temperature. Deposition rates of up to 18?nm/min are observed. The film morphologies, growth rates, and compositions are consistent with a gas-phase transamination reaction that produces precursor species with high sticking coefficients and low surface mobilities.

  16. Morphology control of open-framework zinc phosphate Zn{sub 4}(H{sub 3}O)(NH{sub 4}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4} via microwave-assisted technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Ling; Song, Yu; Yang, Wei; Xue, Run-Miao; Zhai, Shang-Ru; An, Qing-Da

    2013-08-15

    Open-framework zinc phosphates were synthesized by microwave-assisted technique, and it was shown that the morphology of as-prepared materials could be easily tailored by changing synthesis temperature, reaction time and pH value. During the synthesis, when the reaction temperature increases from 130 C to 220 C, the products transformed from hexagonal prisms to polyhedron along with the disappearance of the hexagonal prisms vertical plane. Simultaneously, both the reaction time and pH value could promote the nucleation and growth of crystal particles. More interestingly, the target products with different morphologies could be obtained by varying the usage of NaOH or NH{sub 3}H{sub 2}O at 130 C during the microwave synthesis process. - Graphical abstract: Zinc phosphates with variable morphologies can be obtained by simply tuning the microwave-heating temperatures. Display Omitted - Highlights: Synthesis of open-framework Zn{sub 4} (H{sub 3}O) (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4} compounds employing microwave technique. Dependence of morphology on the reaction conditions. Morphology transformation from hexagonal prisms to polyhedron was observed.

  17. Process for the treatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dale, Bruce E.

    2014-07-08

    A process for the treatment of biomass to render structural carbohydrates more accessible and/or digestible using concentrated ammonium hydroxide with or without anhydrous ammonia addition, is described. The process preferably uses steam to strip ammonia from the biomass for recycling. The process yields of monosaccharides from the structural carbohydrates are good, particularly as measured by the enzymatic hydrolysis of the structural carbohydrates. The monosaccharides are used as animal feeds and energy sources for ethanol production.

  18. Process for the treatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dale, Bruce E.; Lynd, Lee R.; Laser, Mark

    2013-03-12

    A process for the treatment of biomass to render structural carbohydrates more accessible and/or digestible using concentrated ammonium hydroxide with or without anhydrous ammonia addition, is described. The process preferably uses steam to strip ammonia from the biomass for recycling. The process yields of monosaccharides from the structural carbohydrates are good, particularly as measured by the enzymatic hydrolysis of the structural carbohydrates. The monosaccharides are used as animal feeds and energy sources for ethanol production.

  19. CX-100438 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia: Optimizing the Synthesis Reactor for Direct Production of Supercritical Steam Award Number: DE-EE0006536 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Solar Energy Technology Office Date: 12/22/15 Location(s): CA Office(s): Golden Field Office

  20. BN Bonded BN fiber article from boric oxide fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Robert S.

    1978-12-19

    A boron nitride bonded boron nitride fiber article and the method for its manufacture which comprises forming a shaped article with a composition comprising boron oxide fibers and boric acid, heating the composition in an anhydrous gas to a temperature above the melting point of the boric acid and nitriding the resulting article in ammonia gas.

  1. Hydrogen storage in a combined M.sub.xAlH.sub.6/M'.sub.y(NH.sub.2).sub.z system and methods of making and using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Jun; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2012-04-03

    As a promising clean fuel for vehicles, hydrogen can be used for propulsion, either directly or in fuel cells. Hydrogen storage compositions having high storage capacity, good dehydrogenation kinetics, and hydrogen release and uptake reactions which are reversible are disclosed and described. Generally a hydrogen storage composition of a metal aluminum hexahydride and a metal amide can be used. A combined system (Li.sub.3AIH.sub.6/3LiNH.sub.2) with a very high inherent hydrogen capacity (7.3 wt %) can be carried out at moderate temperatures, and with approximately 95% of that inherent hydrogen storage capacity (7.0%) is reversible over repeated cycling of release and uptake.

  2. High external quantum efficiency and fill-factor InGaN/GaN heterojunction solar cells grown by NH3-based molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, J. R.; Neufeld, C. J.; Hurni, C. A.; Cruz, S. C.; Matioli, E.; Mishra, U. K.; Speck, J. S.

    2011-04-01

    High external quantum efficiency (EQE) p-i-n heterojunction solar cellsgrown by NH3 -based molecular beam epitaxy are presented. EQE values including optical losses are greater than 50% with fill-factors over 72% when illuminated with a 1 sun AM0 spectrum. Optical absorptionmeasurements in conjunction with EQE measurements indicate an internal quantum efficiency greater than 90% for the InGaN absorbing layer. By adjusting the thickness of the top p-type GaN window contact layer, it is shown that the short-wavelength (<365 nm) quantum efficiency is limited by the minority carrier diffusion length in highly Mg-doped p-GaN.

  3. Origin and elimination of photocurrent hysteresis by fullerene passivation in CH3NH3PbI3 planar heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Yuchuan; Xiao, Zhengguo; Bi, Cheng; Yuan, Yongbo; Huang, Jinsong

    2014-12-15

    The large photocurrent hysteresis observed in many organometal trihalide perovskite solar cells has become a major hindrance impairing the ultimate performance and stability of these devices, while its origin was unknown. Here we demonstrate the trap states on the surface and grain boundaries of the perovskite materials to be the origin of photocurrent hysteresis and that the fullerene layers deposited on perovskites can effectively passivate these charge trap states and eliminate the notorious photocurrent hysteresis. Fullerenes deposited on the top of the perovskites reduce the trap density by two orders of magnitude and double the power conversion efficiency of CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells. As a result, the elucidation of the origin of photocurrent hysteresis and its elimination by trap passivation in perovskite solar cells provides important directions for future enhancements to device efficiency.

  4. Simple and low-temperature preparation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} sphere-like nanoparticles via solid-state thermolysis of the [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](NO{sub 3}){sub 3} complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farhadi, Saeid; Pourzare, Kolsoum

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ? [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](NO{sub 3}){sub 3} precursor was used for synthesizing pure Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals. ? Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals were synthesized at low temperature of 200 C. ? Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals show a weak ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. ? This simple method is low-cost and suitable for high-scale production of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}. -- Abstract: In this work, spinel-type Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} spherical nanoparticles were easily prepared via decomposition of the hexamminecobalt(III) nitrate complex, [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}](NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, at low temperature (200 C). The product was characterized by thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, UVvis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), BrunauerEmmettTeller (BET) specific surface area measurement and magnetic measurements. The results confirmed that pure single-phase Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with weak ferromagnetic behavior were obtained by this method. TEM images showed that the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are sphere-like with an average diameter size of around 15 nm. The optical spectrum indicated two direct band gaps at 2.15 and 3.56 eV which are blue-shifted relative to reported values for the bulk sample. Using this fast and simple method, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles can be produced without expensive and toxic solvents or complicated equipment.

  5. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-01

    This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 3 contains reports from 6 government contractors on LPG, anhydrous ammonia, and hydrogen energy systems. Report subjects include: simultaneous boiling and spreading of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water; LPG safety research; state-of-the-art of release prevention and control technology in the LPG industry; ammonia: an introductory assessment of safety and environmental control information; ammonia as a fuel, and hydrogen safety and environmental control assessment.

  6. Effective hole extraction using MoO{sub x}-Al contact in perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yixin; Nardes, Alexandre M.; Zhu, Kai

    2014-05-26

    We report an 11.4%-efficient perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} solar cell using low-cost molybdenum oxide/aluminum (i.e., MoO{sub x}/Al) as an alternative top contact to replace noble/precious metals (e.g., Au or Ag) for extracting photogenerated holes. The device performance of perovskite solar cells using a MoO{sub x}/Al top contact is comparable to that of cells using the standard Ag top contact. Analysis of impedance spectroscopy measurements suggests that using 10-nm-thick MoO{sub x} and Al does not affect charge-recombination properties of perovskite solar cells. Using a thicker (20-nm) MoO{sub x} layer leads to a lower cell performance caused mainly by a reduced fill factor. Our results suggest that MoO{sub x}/Al is promising as a low-cost and effective hole-extraction contact for perovskite solar cells.

  7. Accurate ab initio-based adiabatic global potential energy surface for the 2{sup 2}A″ state of NH{sub 2} by extrapolation to the complete basis set limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y. Q.; Ma, F. C.; Sun, M. T.

    2013-10-21

    A full three-dimensional global potential energy surface is reported first time for the title system, which is important for the photodissociation processes. It is obtained using double many-body expansion theory and an extensive set of accurate ab initio energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Such a work can be recommended for dynamics studies of the N({sup 2}D) + H{sub 2} reaction, a reliable theoretical treatment of the photodissociation dynamics and as building blocks for constructing the double many-body expansion potential energy surface of larger nitrogen/hydrogen containing systems. In turn, a preliminary theoretical study of the reaction N({sup 2}D)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +})(ν=0,j=0)→NH(a{sup 1}Δ)+H({sup 2}S) has been carried out with the method of quasi-classical trajectory on the new potential energy surface. Integral cross sections and thermal rate constants have been calculated, providing perhaps the most reliable estimate of the integral cross sections and the rate constants known thus far for such a reaction.

  8. Accident prevention and Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 with particular reference to anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiser, G.D. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States))

    1993-07-01

    The sections of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 that refer to accident prevention are to be found in Title III. Two significant requirements of the CAAA in this respect relate to the responsibilities of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), which has promulgated a new Process Safety Management (PSM) standard and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which at the time of writing, is developing Risk Management Program (RMP) regulations. The focus of this paper is on how the requirements of the CAAA may affect the reasons for performing a Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) or may affect the results of QRA. In order to limit the discussion, this paper focuses on HF. First, the CAAA requires that the EPA assess the hazards associated with HF; the EPA's current draft report is discussed. Second, a generic assessment of the risks associated with the use of HF is given, with emphasis on alkylation units in refineries. The principal contributors to risk are listed. Finally, an assessment of OSHA's PSM standard 29 CFR 1910.119, the related requirements of state laws such as California's Risk Management and Prevention Program and the potential requirement of EPA's Risk Management Program are given, including an assessment of how these requirements may influence quantitative estimates of risk. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Price (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 79.6 82.7 80.7 80.8 80.3 80.1 81.1 64.7 80.5 70.5 2000's 81.4 82.5 80.5 81.8 82.1 80.5 80.2 79.8 80.2 78.8 2010's 79.3 78.9 76.2 76.6 78.4 77.6 Price (Percent)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 79.9 63.4 54.5 49.6 55.4 2000's 59.3 60.5 60.0 59.1 55.5 51.2 56.3 76.0 74.9 85.3 2010's 87.7 88.6 94.9 94.5 94.5

  10. Press Releases | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Sandia National Laboratories entered into a vast array of new Cooperative Research and ... typically used in biology to drive nitrogenase to reduce dinitrogen (N2) to ammonia (NH3). ...

  11. BN Bonded BN fiber article and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Robert S.

    1981-08-18

    A boron nitride bonded boron nitride fiber article and the method for its manufacture which comprises forming a shaped article with a composition comprising a bonding compound selected from boron oxide and boric acid and a structural fiber selected from the group consisting of boron oxide, boron nitride and partially nitrided boron oxide fibers, heating the composition in an anhydrous gas to a temperature above the melting point of the compound and nitriding the resulting article in ammonia gas.

  12. Reactive formulations for a neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Mark D.; Betty, Rita G.

    2006-10-24

    Decontamination formulations for neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals, and methods of making and using same. The formulations are effective for neutralizing malathion, hydrogen cyanide, sodium cyanide, butyl isocyanate, carbon disulfide, phosgene gas, capsaicin in commercial pepper spray, chlorine gas, anhydrous ammonia gas; and may be effective at neutralizing hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, ethylene oxide, methyl bromide, boron trichloride, fluorine, tetraethyl pyrophosphate, phosphorous trichloride, arsine, and tungsten hexafluoride.

  13. Bulk gold catalyzed oxidation reactions of amines and isocyanides and iron porphyrin catalyzed N-H and O-H bond insertion/cyclization reactions of diamines and aminoalcohols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klobukowski, Erik

    2011-12-29

    This work involves two projects. The first project entails the study of bulk gold as a catalyst in oxidation reactions of isocyanides and amines. The main goal of this project was to study the activation and reactions of molecules at metal surfaces in order to assess how organometallic principles for homogeneous processes apply to heterogeneous catalysis. Since previous work had used oxygen as an oxidant in bulk gold catalyzed reactions, the generality of gold catalysis with other oxidants was examined. Amine N-oxides were chosen for study, due to their properties and use in the oxidation of carbonyl ligands in organometallic complexes. When amine N-oxides were used as an oxidant in the reaction of isocyanides with amines, the system was able to produce ureas from a variety of isocyanides, amines, and amine N-oxides. In addition, the rate was found to generally increase as the amine N-oxide concentration increased, and decrease with increased concentrations of the amine. Mechanistic studies revealed that the reaction likely involves transfer of an oxygen atom from the amine N-oxide to the adsorbed isocyanide to generate an isocyanate intermediate. Subsequent nucleophilic attack by the amine yields the urea. This is in contrast to the bulk gold-catalyzed reaction mechanism of isocyanides with amines and oxygen. Formation of urea in this case was proposed to proceed through a diaminocarbene intermediate. Moreover, formation of the proposed isocyanate intermediate is consistent with the reactions of metal carbonyl ligands, which are isoelectronic to isocyanides. Nucleophilic attack at coordinated CO by amine N-oxides produces CO{sub 2} and is analogous to the production of an isocyanate in this gold system. When the bulk gold-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of amines was examined with amine N-oxides, the same products were afforded as when O{sub 2} was used as the oxidant. When the two types of oxidants were directly compared using the same reaction system and conditions, it was found that the oxidative dehydrogenation of dibenzylamine to Nbenzylidenebenzylamine, with N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO), was nearly quantitative (96%) within 24 h. However, the reaction with oxygen was much slower, with only a 52% yield of imine product over the same time period. Moreover, the rate of reaction was found to be influenced by the nature of the amine N-oxide. For example, the use of the weakly basic pyridine N-oxide (PyNO) led to an imine yield of only 6% after 24 h. A comparison of amine N-oxide and O2 was also examined in the oxidation of PhCH{sub 2}OH to PhCHO catalyzed by bulk gold. In this reaction, a 52% yield of the aldehyde was achieved when NMMO was used, while only a 7% product yield was afforded when O{sub 2} was the oxidant after 48 h. The bulk gold-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclic amines generates amidines, which upon treatment with Aerosil and water were found to undergo hydrolysis to produce lactams. Moreover, 5-, 6-, and 7-membered lactams could be prepared through a one-pot reaction of cyclic amines by treatment with oxygen, water, bulk gold, and Aerosil. This method is much more atom economical than industrial processes, does not require corrosive acids, and does not generate undesired byproducts. Additionally, the gold and Aerosil catalysts can be readily separated from the reaction mixture. The second project involved studying iron(III) tetraphenylporphyrin chloride, Fe(TPP)Cl, as a homogeneous catalyst for the generation of carbenes from diazo reagents and their reaction with heteroatom compounds. Fe(TPP)Cl, efficiently catalyzed the insertion of carbenes derived from methyl 2-phenyldiazoacetates into O-H bonds of aliphatic and aromatic alcohols. Fe(TPP)Cl was also found to be an effective catalyst for tandem N-H and O-H insertion/cyclization reactions when 1,2-diamines and 1,2-alcoholamines were treated with diazo reagents. This approach provides a one-pot process for synthesizing piperazinones and morpholinones and related analogues such as quinoxalinones and benzoxazin-2-ones.

  14. Ammonia producing engine utilizing oxygen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Easley, Jr., William Lanier; Coleman, Gerald Nelson; Robel, Wade James

    2008-12-16

    A power system is provided having a power source, a first power source section with a first intake passage and a first exhaust passage, a second power source section with a second intake passage and a second exhaust passage, and an oxygen separator. The second intake passage may be fluidly isolated from the first intake passage.

  15. Magnetic confinement system using charged ammonia targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Porter, Gary D.; Bogdanoff, Anatoly

    1979-01-01

    A system for guiding charged laser targets to a predetermined focal spot of a laser along generally arbitrary, and especially horizontal, directions which comprises a series of electrostatic sensors which provide inputs to a computer for real time calculation of position, velocity, and direction of the target along an initial injection trajectory, and a set of electrostatic deflection means, energized according to a calculated output of said computer, to change the target trajectory to intercept the focal spot of the laser which is triggered so as to illuminate the target of the focal spot.

  16. Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit Provides Environmentally...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Motor Challenge Success Story MOTOR SYSTEM UPGRADES SMOOTH THE WAY TO SAVINGS OF 700,000 AT CHEVRON REFINERY BENEFITS * Reduced energy consumption by 1 million kWh per month * ...

  17. Equations of State of Anhydrous AlF3 and AlI3: Modeling of Extreme...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, ...

  18. Synthesis and crystal structure of a new open-framework iron phosphate (NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Fe{sub 3}(OH){sub 2}F{sub 2}[H{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}]: Novel linear trimer of corner-sharing Fe(III) octahedra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mi, Jin-Xiao; Wang, Cheng-Xin; Chen, Ning; Li, Rong; Pan, Yuanming

    2010-12-15

    A new iron phosphate (NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Fe{sub 3}(OH){sub 2}F{sub 2}[H{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}] has been synthesized hydrothermally at HF concentrations from 0.5 to 1.2 mL. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals its three-dimensional open-framework structure (monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/n (No. 14), a=6.2614(13) A, b=9.844(2) A, c=14.271(3) A, {beta}=92.11(1){sup o}, V=879.0(3) A{sup 3}). This structure is built from isolated linear trimers of corner-sharing Fe(III) octahedra, which are linked by (PO{sub 4}) groups to form ten-membered-ring channels along [1 0 0]. This isolated, linear trimer of corner-sharing Fe(III) octahedra, [(FeO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH){sub 2}F{sub 2}], is new and adds to the diverse linkages of Fe polyhedra as secondary building units in iron phosphates. The trivalent iron at octahedral sites for the title compound has been confirmed by synchrotron Fe K-edge XANES spectra and magnetic measurements. Magnetic measurements also show that this compound exhibit a strong antiferromagnetic exchange below T{sub N}=17 K, consistent with superexchange interactions expected for the linear trimer of ferric octahedra with the Fe-F-Fe angle of 132.5{sup o}. -- Graphical abstract: The three-dimensional open-framework structure of (NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Fe{sub 3}(OH){sub 2}F{sub 2}[H{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}] is built from a novel isolated, linear (FeO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH){sub 2}F{sub 2} trimer of corner-sharing Fe(III) octahedra linked by PO{sub 4} tetrahedra. Display Omitted

  19. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    18,297 19,826 47,451 63,446 52,160 77,866 1998-2015 Pipeline Prices 5.48 5.45 4.08 6.63 10.55 5.18 1998

  20. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 6.06 5.95 6.14 5.56 4.91 5.14 5.66 4.76 4.54 4.33 4.49 4.58 2012 4.22 3.79 3.14 2.55 2.72 3.49 3.75 3.52 3.30 3.80 5.65 6.66 2013 6.80 10.16 6.41 5.43 5.13 5.13 4.70 4.12 4.26 3.98 5.55 11.73 2014 19.82 25.10 12.88 5.74 5.10 5.68 4.55 3.74 3.29 3.53 5.53 9.52 2015 8.36 11.64 7.49 3.23 3.00 3.12 3.03 3.18 3.59 4.12 3.87 3.72 2016 5.50 4.15 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld

  1. Public Service Co of NH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    800-662-7764 Outage Map: www.eversource.comContentgen Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Landing Page: www.psnh.comSaveEnergyMo Green Button Reference Page:...

  2. Synthesis and crystal structure of (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}[UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 3}]{sub 2}[UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}COO)(NCS){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serezhkina, L. B.; Peresypkina, E. V.; Virovets, A. V.; Karasev, M. O.

    2010-01-15

    Single crystals of the compound (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}[UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 3}]{sub 2}[UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}COO)(NCS){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)] (I) are synthesized, and their structure is investigated using X-ray diffraction. Compound I crystallizes in the monoclinic system with the unit cell parameters a = 18.3414(6) A, b = 16.3858(7) A, c = 12.4183(5) A, {beta} = 92.992(1){sup o}, space group C2/c, Z = 4, V = 3727.1(3) A{sup 3}, and R = 0.0253. The uranium-containing structural units of crystals I are mononuclear complexes of two types with an island structure, i.e., the [UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 3}]{sup -} anionic complexes belonging to the crystal-chemical group (AB{sub 3}{sup 01} = UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, B{sup 01} = CH{sub 3}COO{sup -}) of the uranyl complexes and the [UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}COO)(NCS){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sup -} anionic complexes belonging to the crystal-chemical group AB{sup 01}M{sub 3}{sup 1} (A = UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, B{sup 01} = CH{sub 3}COO{sup -}, M{sup 1} = NCS{sup -} or H{sub 2}O).

  3. On-board Measurement of NO and NO2 using Non-dispersive Ultraviolet (NDUV)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Spectroscopy | Department of Energy Analyzer allows simultaneous and separate measurement of NO and NO2 for on-road and non-raod applications PDF icon p-11_ensfield.pdf More Documents & Publications On-Board Measurement of Ammonia and Nitrous Oxide Using Feedback Absorption Laser Spectroscopy Combined with Amplified Resonance and Low Pressure Sampling Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation 2014 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Acronyms

  4. Production of the ammonium salt of 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole by solvent extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Kien Y. (Los Alamos, NM); Ott, Donald G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01

    The ammonium salt of 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole has utility as a chemical explosive. In accordance with the present invention, it may readily be produced by solvent extraction using high-molecular weight, water-insoluble amines followed by amination with anhydrous ammonia gas. The aqueous reaction mixture produced in the synthesis of the parent compound, 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole, is quite suitable--and indeed is preferred--for use as the feed material in the process of the invention.

  5. System and method for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides in combustion exhaust gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A

    2014-04-08

    A multi-stage selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit (32) provides efficient reduction of NOx and other pollutants from about 50-550.degree. C. in a power plant (19). Hydrogen (24) and ammonia (29) are variably supplied to the SCR unit depending on temperature. An upstream portion (34) of the SCR unit catalyzes NOx+NH.sub.3 reactions above about 200.degree. C. A downstream portion (36) catalyzes NOx+H.sub.2 reactions below about 260.degree. C., and catalyzes oxidation of NH.sub.3, CO, and VOCs with oxygen in the exhaust above about 200.degree. C., efficiently removing NOx and other pollutants over a range of conditions with low slippage of NH.sub.3. An ammonia synthesis unit (28) may be connected to the SCR unit to provide NH.sub.3 as needed, avoiding transport and storage of ammonia or urea at the site. A carbonaceous gasification plant (18) on site may supply hydrogen and nitrogen to the ammonia synthesis unit, and hydrogen to the SCR unit.

  6. Equations of state of anhydrous AlF{sub 3} and AlI{sub 3}: Modeling of extreme condition halide chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Zaug, Joseph M. Bastea, Sorin; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Radousky, Harry B.; Armstrong, Michael R.; Roberts, Sarah K.; Plaue, Jonathan W.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2015-06-07

    Pressure dependent angle-dispersive x-ray powder diffraction measurements of alpha-phase aluminum trifluoride (?-AlF{sub 3}) and separately, aluminum triiodide (AlI{sub 3}) were conducted using a diamond-anvil cell. Results at 295 K extend to 50 GPa. The equations of state of AlF{sub 3} and AlI{sub 3} were determined through refinements of collected x-ray diffraction patterns. The respective bulk moduli and corresponding pressure derivatives are reported for multiple orders of the Birch-Murnaghan (B-M), finite-strain (F-f), and higher pressure finite-strain (G-g) EOS analysis models. Aluminum trifluoride exhibits an apparent isostructural phase transition at approximately 12 GPa. Aluminum triiodide also undergoes a second-order atomic rearrangement: applied stress transformed a monoclinically distorted face centered cubic (fcc) structure into a standard fcc structural arrangement of iodine atoms. Results from semi-empirical thermochemical computations of energetic materials formulated with fluorine containing reactants were obtained with the aim of predicting the yield of halogenated products.

  7. Ammonia Capture in Porous Organic Polymers Densely Functionalized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for such processes must be engendered with an exceptionally high enthalpy of adsorption for the analyte of interest. Rather than relying on a single strong interaction, the...

  8. Simplified Synthesis of Bulk Ammonia Borane - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    borane is a stable solid compound that has excellent potential as a hydrogen store for fuel cell and other applications. The ability to efficiently and economically manufacture...

  9. Urea/Ammonia Distribution Optimization in an SCR Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Through the Use of CFD Analysis Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. ...

  10. On-Board Ammonia Generation Using Delphi Diesel Fuel Reformer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). PDF icon deer07hemingway.pdf More Documents & Publications Delphi ...

  11. Saccharification of newspaper waste after ammonia fiber expansion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In particular, after the typical paper recycling loop, the newspaper waste (NW) could be further valorized as feedstock in biorefinering industry since it still contains up to 70 % ...

  12. Saccharification of newspaper waste after ammonia fiber expansion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Italy. 2 Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, DOE Great Lakes ... J Agric Food Chem. 2010;58(16):9043-53. Subhedar PB, Babu NR, Gogate PR. Intensification ...

  13. Staging Rankine Cycles Using Ammonia for OTEC Power Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharathan, D.

    2011-03-01

    Recent focus on renewable power production has renewed interest in looking into ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Early studies in OTEC applicability indicate that the island of Hawaii offers a potential market for a nominal 40-MWe system. a 40-MWe system represents a large leap in the current state of OTEC technology. Lockheed Martin Inc. is currently pursuing a more realistic goal of developing a 10-MWe system under U.S. Navy funding (Lockheed 2009). It is essential that the potential risks associated with the first-of-its-kind plant should be minimized for the project's success. Every means for reducing costs must also be pursued without increasing risks. With this in mind, the potential for increasing return on the investment is assessed both in terms of effective use of the seawater resource and of reducing equipment costs.

  14. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How much will low prices stimulate oil demand? For Oil and Money October 6, 2015 | London by Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration What are the key cyclical and structural factors driving oil demand? 2 Oil & Money Conference | How Much Will Low Prices Stimulate Oil Demand? October 6, 2015 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 January 2013 July 2013 January 2014 July 2014 January 2015 July 2015 Cyclical: EIA's world oil demand growth projections for 2014 and 2015 were

  15. Ammonia formation from NO reaction with surface hydroxyls on...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    insight about the interactions of NO with hydroxyl groups on TiO2(110) . Authors: Kim, Boseong ; Kay, Bruce D. ; Dohnalek, Zdenek ; Kim, Yu Kwon Publication Date:...

  16. Ammonia Sensor for SCR NOX Reduction | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (ASHRAE) 2016 Annual Conference | Department of Energy June 25, 2016 9:00AM EDT to June 29 (ASME/SRNL) Materials and Components for Hydrogen Infrastructure Codes and Standards Workshop and the DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Summary | Department of Energy

    The Pipeline Working Group (PWG) workshop served as a detailed review of the progress and results of pipeline research and development projects sponsored by DOE PDF icon pipeline_group_summary_ms.pdf More Documents &

  17. NOx Measurement Errors in Ammonia-Containing Exhaust

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

  18. Delphi On-board Ammonia Generation (OAG) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    With a grant from the Energy Department's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program, the community of Ocean View, Delaware, installed a carport-mounted solar array that is saving taxpayers money on town utility bills. | Photo courtesy of the Town of Ocean View. With a grant from the Energy Department's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program, the community of Ocean View, Delaware, installed a carport-mounted solar array that is saving taxpayers money on town utility

  19. Detection of Ammonia Slip Using NOx Sensor Signal Processing | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "DetecTape - A Localized Visual Detector for Hydrogen Leaks" held on March 14, 2016. PDF icon DetecTape - A Localized Visual Detector for Hydrogen Leaks Webinar Slides More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Leak Detection - Low-Cost Distributed Gas Sensors HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Proceedings of the

  20. Electrochemical reduction of nitrate in the presence of an amide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrates in aqueous solutions thereof in the presence of amides to gaseous nitrogen (N.sub.2) is described. Generally, electrochemical reduction of NO.sub.3 proceeds stepwise, from NO.sub.3 to N.sub.2, and subsequently in several consecutive steps to ammonia (NH.sub.3) as a final product. Addition of at least one amide to the solution being electrolyzed suppresses ammonia generation, since suitable amides react with NO.sub.2 to generate N.sub.2. This permits nitrate reduction to gaseous nitrogen to proceed by electrolysis. Suitable amides include urea, sulfamic acid, formamide, and acetamide.

  1. Plasma stabilisation of metallic nanoparticles on silicon for the growth of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esconjauregui, S.; Fouquet, M.; Bayer, B. C.; Gamalski, A. D.; Chen Bingan; Xie Rongsi; Hofmann, S.; Robertson, J.; Cepek, C.; Bhardwaj, S.; Ducati, C.

    2012-08-01

    Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) plasma pretreatment is used to form and temporarily reduce the mobility of Ni, Co, or Fe nanoparticles on boron-doped mono- and poly-crystalline silicon. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy proves that NH{sub 3} plasma nitrides the Si supports during nanoparticle formation which prevents excessive nanoparticle sintering/diffusion into the bulk of Si during carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapour deposition. The nitridation of Si thus leads to nanotube vertical alignment and the growth of nanotube forests by root growth mechanism.

  2. Materials Engineering and Scale Up of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for Automotive Applications (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Materials Engineering and Scale Up of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage for Automotive Applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Materials Engineering and Scale Up of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage for Automotive Applications Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to

  3. Cyanide treatment options in coke plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minak, H.P.; Lepke, P.

    1997-12-31

    The paper discusses the formation of cyanides in coke oven gas and describes and compares waste processing options. These include desulfurization by aqueous ammonia solution, desulfurization using potash solution, desulfurization in oxide boxes, decomposition of NH{sub 3} and HCN for gas scrubbing. Waste water treatment methods include chemical oxidation, precipitation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and biological treatment. It is concluded that biological treatment is the most economical process, safe in operation and requires a minimum of manpower.

  4. 2010 MARINE MICROBES GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE (JULY 4-9, 2010 - TILTON SCHOOL, TILTON NH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kirchman

    2010-04-09

    Marine microbes include representatives from all three kingdoms of life and collectively carry out virtually all forms of metabolisms found on the planet. Because of this metabolic and genetic diversity, these microbes mediate many of the reactions making up global biogeochemical cycles which govern the flow of energy and material in the biosphere. The goal of this conference is to bring together approaches and concepts from studies of microbial evolution, genomics, ecology, and oceanography in order to gain new insights into marine microbes and their biogeochemical functions. The integration of scales, from genes to global cycles, will result in a better understanding of marine microbes and of their contribution to the carbon cycle and other biogeochemical processes.

  5. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 7.61 -- 2010's -- 7.54 2.62 6.65 4.06 2.96 Cubic Feet)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 7.54 2012 2.20 2.65 2.46 3.48 2013 14.87 4.39 2014 4.06 4.09 4.01 5.00 3.08 2015 2.81 3.05 2.90 2.95 3.03 3.09 2.09

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 336 2012 0 138 55 5 2013 21 75 2014 185 76 64 25 23 2015 214 146 92 48 50 181 2

  6. Update and Improve Subsection NH - Simplified Elastic and Inelastic Design Analysis Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeries J. Abou-Hanna; Douglas L. Marriott; Timothy E. McGreevy

    2009-06-27

    The objective of this subtask is to develop a template for the 'Ideal' high temperature design Code, in which individual topics can be identified and worked on separately in order to provide the detail necessary to comprise a comprehensive Code. Like all ideals, this one may not be attainable as a practical matter. The purpose is to set a goal for what is believed the 'Ideal' design Code should address, recognizing that some elements are not mutually exclusive and that the same objectives can be achieved in different way. Most, if not all existing Codes may therefore be found to be lacking in some respects, but this does not mean necessarily that they are not comprehensive. While this subtask does attempt to list the elements which individually or in combination are considered essential in such a Code, the authors do not presume to recommend how these elements should be implemented or even, that they should all be implemented at all. The scope of this subtask is limited to compiling the list of elements thought to be necessary or at minimum, useful in such an 'Ideal' Code; suggestions are provided as to their relationship to one another. Except for brief descriptions, where these are needed for clarification, neither this repot, nor Task 9 as a whole, attempts to address details of the contents of all these elements. Some, namely primary load limits (elastic, limit load, reference stress), and ratcheting (elastic, e-p, reference stress) are dealt with specifically in other subtasks of Task 9. All others are merely listed; the expectation is that they will either be the focus of attention of other active DOE-ASME GenIV Materials Tasks, e.g. creep-fatigue, or to be considered in future DOE-ASME GenIV Materials Tasks. Since the focus of this Task is specifically approximate methods, the authors have deemed it necessary to include some discussion on what is meant by 'approximate'. However, the topic will be addressed in one or more later subtasks. This report describes work conducted toward developing a template for what might be the 'Ideal' high temperature design Code. While attempting to be as comprehensive as possible as to subject matter, it does not presume to recommend what individual components of a Code should be implemented, some of which is the focus of other Tasks in the DOE-ASME Gen IV/NGNP Materials Projects. This report does serve as a basis for construction of an attribute chart which is being prepared as part of Task 9.2; the intention for which is to provide a uniform format and concise means for summarizing and comparing other high temperature Codes currently in use around the world.

  7. sup 31 P NMR analysis of coal moieties bearing -OH, -NH, and -SH functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verkade, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Research on coal structural analysis continues. This paper discusses the use of {sup 31}P, {sup 119}Sn, and {sup 195}Pt as NMR tagging reagents in the probing of coal structure. (VC)

  8. Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype confirms Details progress on ... engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype confirms potential for formulation of ...

  9. Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1994 January ... 89.6 91.0 90.2 83.8 88.4 80.4 87.3 88.8 92.1 102.5 February ... 92.9 94.6 93.8 90.4 91.3 86.6 91.4 92.3 91.5 105.5...

  10. Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1993 January ... 94.3 95.7 94.9 85.2 94.0 87.1 91.7 93.4 91.2 105.2 February ... 94.6 95.9 96.2 85.4 94.4 86.9 91.8 93.3 90.8 106.8...

  11. Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1995 January ... 86.9 87.6 86.7 77.8 84.8 78.4 87.3 85.7 88.4 102.4 February ... 87.4 88.2 87.8 77.4 84.9 78.5 87.3 85.9 88.5 103.4...

  12. Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1996 January ... 94.6 96.1 94.5 93.0 92.0 89.1 94.9 92.6 94.7 111.7 February ... 95.9 97.5 96.2 93.2 93.8 90.8 95.6 93.7 94.4 112.9...

  13. Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1997 January ... 107.9 109.0 108.6 105.2 106.5 102.1 107.0 104.4 106.5 130.4 February ... 105.1 106.0 105.2 102.2 103.4 101.0 104.5...

  14. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 7.61 -- 2010's -- 7.54 2.62 6.65 4.06 2.96

  15. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 7.54 2012 2.20 2.65 2.46 3.48 2013 14.87 4.39 2014 4.06 4.09 4.01 5.00 3.08 2015 2.81 3.05 2.90 2.95 3.03 3.09 2.09

  16. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 64 0 2010's 0 336 199 95 373 735

  17. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 336 2012 0 138 55 5 2013 21 75 2014 185 76 64 25 23 2015 214 146 92 48 50 181 2

  18. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 5,804 3,798 865 295 2,790 248 792 242 144 126 655 4,066 2012 6,044 5,109 1,927 2,629 2,692 3,438 3,976 3,786 4,614 3,630 4,452 5,155 2013 6,664 6,797 6,522 5,574 4,956 4,182 5,538 4,209 3,136 2,256 6,141 7,471 2014 7,089 5,624 6,224 4,169 1,568 2,080 1,855 1,458 4,627 4,137 6,480 6,847 2015 8,000 7,546 8,124 6,273 4,777 4,491 6,616 6,172 6,339 7,583 6,587 5,359 2016 6,781 5,751 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  19. Evaluation of NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine and Reactor Evaluations of HC-SCR for Diesel NOx Reduction Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems

  20. Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx Storage: a Factor Controlling NH3 and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    N2O Selectivities over a Commercial LNT Catalyst | Department of Energy Evaluation of commercial Ba-based LNT (CLEERS benchmark catalyst; containing oxygen storage capacity) in a bench flow reactor under fast-cycling conditions, varying reductant type, temperature and sulfation level PDF icon deer11_choi.pdf More Documents & Publications CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics

  1. Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Details progress on non-zeolitic zirconia-based mixed oxides as promising new SCR catalyst materials and results of engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype confirms Details progress on non-zeolitic zirconia-based mixed oxides as promising new SCR catalyst materials and results of engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype confirms potential for formulation of Euro 6 SCR catalysts

  2. Selective Catalytic Oxidation (SCO) of NH3 to N2 for Hot Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Deactivation Mechanisms of Base MetalZeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber ...

  3. Hydrothermally stable, low-temperature NO.sub.x reduction NH.sub.3-SCR catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Narula, Chaitanya K; Yang, Xiaofan

    2015-03-24

    A catalyst composition includes a heterobimetallic zeolite characterized by a chabazite structure loaded with copper ions and at least one trivalent metal ion other than Al.sup.3+. The catalyst composition decreases NO.sub.x emissions in diesel exhaust and is suitable for operation in a catalytic converter.

  4. EECBG Success Story: Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all while conserving energy. The state has received $17.3 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Learn more.

  5. NH3-Selective Catalytic Reduction over Ag/Al2O3 Catalysts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DRIFT spectroscopy used together with flow reactor experiments to investigate the role of H2 for SCR over Ag/Al2O3

  6. Development of ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission Levels: Optimization of NOx, NH3

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Fuel Consumption Using High and Low Engine-Out NOx Calibrations | Department of Energy Development and validation of a simple strategy-based technique using four engine parameters to minimize emissions and fuel consumption PDF icon deer08_shade.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Emission Control Technology Review Low Emissions Potential of EGR-SCR-DPF and Advanced Fuel Formulation - A Progress Report Hydrocarbon fouling of SCR during Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI)

  7. Evaluation of NH3-SCR Catalyst Technology on a 250-kW Stationary Diesel

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Genset | Department of Energy 5 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_malyala.pdf More Documents & Publications Two Catalyst Formulations - One Solution for NOx After-treatment Systems Engine and Reactor Evaluations of HC-SCR for Diesel NOx Reduction Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems

  8. Formation of NOx precursors during Chinese pulverized coal pyrolysis in an arc plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei-ren Bao; Jin-cao Zhang; Fan Li; Li-ping Chang

    2007-08-15

    The formation of NOx precursors (HCN and NH{sub 3}) from the pyrolysis of several Chinese pulverized coals in an arc plasma jet was investigated through both thermodynamic analysis of the C-H-O-N system and experiments. Results of thermodynamic analysis show that the dominant N-containing gaseous species is HCN together with a small amount of ammonia above the temperature of 2000 K. The increase of H content advances the formation of HCN and NH{sub 3}, but the yields of HCN and NH{sub 3} are decreased with a high concentration of O in the system. These results are accordant with the experimental data. The increasing of input power promotes the formation of HCN and NH{sub 3} from coal pyrolysis in an arc plasma jet. Tar-N is not formed during the process. The yield of HCN changes insignificantly with the changing of the residence time of coal particles in the reactor, but that of NH{sub 3} decreases as residence times increase because of the relative instability at high temperature. Adsorption and gasification of CO{sub 2} on the coal surface also can restrain the formation of HCN and NH{sub 3} compare to the results in an Ar plasma jet. Yields of HCN and NH{sub 3} are sensitive to the coal feeding rate, indicating that NOx precursors could interact with the nascent char to form other N-containing species. The formation of HCN and NH{sub 3} during coal pyrolysis in a H{sub 2}/Ar plasma jet are not dependent on coal rank. The N-containing gaseous species is released faster than others in the volatiles during coal pyrolysis in an arc plasma jet, and the final nitrogen content in the char is lower than that in the parent coal, which it is independent of coal type. 16 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    Report IV, Volume 5, provides descriptions, data, and drawings pertaining to Cryogenic Hydrogen Purification (Plant 8), Sour Water Treating (Plant 9), and the Sulfur Plant (Plant 10). Cryogenic Hydrogen Purification (Plant 8) purifies the purge gas stream from the Gas Plant (Plant 7, described in Report IV, Volume 4) to a 93% purity hydrogen product. Sour Water Treating (Plant 9) removes free ammonia and acid gases from sour water and separates them to recover a high quality anhydrous ammonia product. The Sulfur Plant (Plant 10) recovers, as a saleable liquid product, approximately 95% of the sulfur in feed streams from the Gas Plant (Plant 7, described in Report IV, Volume 4), Sour Water Treating (Plant 9), Gasification and Purification (Plant 12, described in Report IV, Volume 6), and Stack Gas Scrubbing (Plant 35, described in Report V, Volume 3). The following information is included for each of the three plants described in this volume: a description of the plant's process design, including the utility balance, catalysts and chemicals usage, and a process flow diagram; an equipment list, including item numbers and descriptions; data sheets and sketches for major plant components; and pertinent engineering drawings. An appendix contains: an overall site plan showing the locations of all plants; and the symbols and legend for the piping and instrument diagrams included in this volume.

  10. Robust Nitrogen Oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  11. Safe and compact ammonia storage/delivery systems for SCR-DeNOX in

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Peter Malati, Rahul Ganguli and Vivek Mehrotra Teledyne Scientific Company U.S. DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office Peer Review Meeting Washington, D.C. May 6-7, 2014 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Project Objective Pulp and Paper Mill Currently, energy-intensive evaporators * Separate water from Weak Black Liquor (WBL) for reuse * Resulting strong black liquor burned in recovery unit  Develop membrane filtration for

  12. Robust Nitrogen Oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  13. Potential of High-Throughput Experimentation with Ammonia Borane Solid Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Storage Meeting held June 26, 2007 in Bethesda, Maryland.

  14. Hyperpolarized Xe-129 NMR Investigation of Ammonia Borane in Mesoporous Silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Li Q.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    2009-04-23

    Hyperpolarized (HP) 129Xe NMR was used for the first time to probe the porosity for nanophase ammonium borane (AB) infused in mesoporous silica (MCM). Variable temperature HP 129Xe NMR measurements have been systematically carried out on a series of AB:MCM materials with different AB loading. Three distinct types of pore environments are clearly evident: pristine mesopores; pores coated with AB inside the meso-channels, and inter-particle spacing formed from AB aggregates outside the meso-channels. We found similarly uniform coating of AB on mesoporous silica channels with 1:2 and 1:1 AB:MCM loading (ratio of weight percent). When the loading of AB to MCM is larger than 1:1, AB starts to aggregate outside the meso-channels. Further increases in loading (? 3:1) result in the formation of partially blocked meso-channels as a result of excessive AB loading. The detailed information obtained from this study on how supported AB resides in nanoporous channels and how it evolves with the increase of AB loading is helpful for rational design of novel materials with optimal hydrogen storage and release properties.

  15. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DE-FC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration ...

  16. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    October 1 to December 30, 2004 time period. Authors: Song Wu ; Zhen Fan ; Richard G. Herman Publication Date: 2004-12-31 OSTI Identifier: 896958 DOE Contract Number: FC26-03NT41865 ...

  17. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    April 1 to June 30, 2004 time period. Authors: Zhen Fan ; Song Wu ; Richard G. Herman Publication Date: 2004-06-30 OSTI Identifier: 896956 DOE Contract Number: FC26-03NT41865 ...

  18. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction ...

  19. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This report describes the work performed during the July 1 to September 30, 2005 time period. Authors: Song Wu ; Zhen Fan ; Andrew H. Seltzer Publication Date: 2005-09-30 OSTI ...

  20. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    July 1 to September 30, 2004 time period. Authors: Song Wu ; Zhen Fan ; Andrew H. Seltzer ; Richard G. Herman Publication Date: 2004-09-30 OSTI Identifier: 896957 DOE Contract ...

  1. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Song Wu ; Zhen Fan ; Andrew H. Seltzer Publication Date: 2005-06-30 OSTI Identifier: 896960 DOE Contract Number: FC26-03NT41865 Resource Type: Technical Report Research ...

  2. Alstom's chilled ammonia CO{sub 2} capture process advances toward commercialization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltier, R.

    2008-02-15

    Carbon dioxide emissions aren't yet regulated by the EPA, but it is likely they will be soon. There are many technically feasible, but as-yet-undemonstrated ways to reduce the considerable carbon footprint of any coal-fired plant, whether it uses conventional or unconventional technology. One promising approach to removing CO{sub 2} from a plant's flue gas uses chilled ammonium bicarbonate to drive the separation process.

  3. Terra nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    actively managed its energy use, the Save Energy Now assessment provided new ... plant, they are more likely to extend energy-saving activities to their other facilities. ...

  4. Release of Ammonium and Mercury from NOx Controlled Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; Kim, A.G

    2007-07-01

    One of the goals of the Department of Energy is to increase the reuse of coal utilization byproducts (CUB) to 50% by 2010. This will require both developing new markets and maintaining traditional ones such as the use of fly ash in concrete. However, the addition of pollution control devices can introduce side-effects that affect the marketability of the CUB. Such can be the case when NOx control is achieved using selective catalytic or non-catalytic reduction (SCR or SNCR). Depending on site-specific details, the ammonia slip can cause elevated levels of NH3 in the fly ash. Disposal of ammoniated fly ash can present environmental concerns related to the amount of ammonia that might be released, the amount of water that might become contaminated, and the extent to which metals might be mobilized by the presence of the ammonia. Ammonia retained in fly ash appears to be present as either an ammonium salt or as a chemisorbed species. Mercury in the leachates correlated to neither the amount of leachable ammonium nor to the total amount of Hg in the ash. The strongest correlation was between the decreases in the amount of Hg leached with increased LOI.

  5. 2011 Laser Diagnostics in Combustion Gordon Research Conference, (August 14-19, 2011, Waterville Valley Resort, Waterville Valley, NH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Settersten

    2011-08-19

    The vast majority of the world's energy needs are met by combustion of fossil fuels. Optimum utilization of limited resources and control of emissions of pollutants and greenhouse gases demand sustained improvement of combustion technology. This task can be satisfied only by detailed knowledge of the underlying physical and chemical processes. Non-intrusive laser diagnostics continuously contribute to our growing understanding of these complex and coupled multi-scale processes. The GRC on Laser Diagnostics in Combustion focuses on the most recent scientific advances and brings together scientists and engineers working at the leading edge of combustion research. Major tasks of the community are developing and applying methods for precise and accurate measurements of fluid motion and temperatures; chemical compositions; multi-phase phenomena appearing near walls, in spray and sooting combustion; improving sensitivities, precision, spatial resolution and tracking transients in their spatio-temporal development. The properties and behaviour of novel laser sources, detectors, optical systems that lead to new diagnostic capabilities are also part of the conference program.

  6. NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 ACTO3NH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 0661. Jaqopo u IO land imp I AON - I ctes I - 0 ... when severe cold temperatures cause tight natural gas supplies. ... consumption, the supply requirements may not be as great. ...

  7. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Fletcher`s Paint Works and Storage, Milford, NH, September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Fletcher`s Paint Works and Storage Facility Superfund Site (Site) located in Milford, New Hampshire. This ROD sets forth the selected remedy for Operable Unit On at the Fletcher`s Paint Site, which involves the excavation and on-site treatment of principal threat wastes which consist of primarily PCB contaminated soils, the replacement of those treated soils at the Site, and placement of a soil and asphalt cover over the residual low level threat wastes. The selected remedy also includes monitored natural attenuation of the contaminated groundwater in the overburdened and bedrock aquifers and institutional controls to prevent future ingestion of contaminated groundwater, as well as restrictions on the use and assess to the subsurface soils at the Elm Street Site.

  8. Syngas to Synfuels Process Development Unit Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Robert C.

    2012-03-30

    The process described is for the gasification of 20 kg/h of biomass (switchgrass) to produce a syngas suitable for upgrading to Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquid fuels (gas, diesel, waxes, etc.). The gas stream generated from gasification is primarily composed of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen (H2), carbon dioxide (CO2), steam (H2O), and methane (CH4), but also includes tars, particulate matter, ammonia (NH3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen chloride (HCl), hydrogen sulfide ( H2S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), etc. as contaminants. The gas stream passes through an array of cleaning devices to remove the contaminants to levels suitable for FT synthesis of fuels/chemicals. These devices consist primarily of an oil scrubber (to remove tars and remaining particulates), sulfur scrubber (to remove sulfur compounds), and a wet scrubber (to remove NH3, HCl and remaining water soluble contaminants). The ammonia and oil scrubbers are absorption columns with a combination of random and structured packing materials, using water and oil as the adsorption liquids respectively. The ammonia scrubber performed very well, while operating the oil scrubber proved to be more difficult due to the nature of tar compounds. The sulfur scrubber is a packed bed absorption device with solid extrudates of adsorbent material, primarily composed of ZnO and CuO. It performed well, but over a limited amount of time due to fouling created by excess tar/particulate matter and oil aerosols. Overall gas contaminants were reduced to below 1 ppm NH3, and less than 1 ppm collective sulfur compounds.

  9. THE EFFECTS OF INITIAL ABUNDANCES ON NITROGEN IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Kamber R.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-12-20

    The dominant form of nitrogen provided to most solar system bodies is currently unknown, though available measurements show that the detected nitrogen in solar system rocks and ices is depleted with respect to solar abundances and the interstellar medium. We use a detailed chemical/physical model of the chemical evolution of a protoplanetary disk to explore the evolution and abundance of nitrogen-bearing molecules. Based on this model, we analyze how initial chemical abundances provided as either gas or ice during the early stages of disk formation influence which species become the dominant nitrogen bearers at later stages. We find that a disk with the majority of its initial nitrogen in either atomic or molecular nitrogen is later dominated by atomic and molecular nitrogen as well as NH{sub 3} and HCN ices, where the dominant species varies with disk radius. When nitrogen is initially in gaseous ammonia, it later becomes trapped in ammonia ice except in the outer disk where atomic nitrogen dominates. For a disk with the initial nitrogen in the form of ammonia ice, the nitrogen remains trapped in the ice as NH{sub 3} at later stages. The model in which most of the initial nitrogen is placed in atomic N best matches the ammonia abundances observed in comets. Furthermore, the initial state of nitrogen influences the abundance of N{sub 2}H{sup +}, which has been detected in protoplanetary disks. Strong N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission is found to be indicative of an N{sub 2} abundance greater than n{sub N{sub 2}}/n{sub H{sub 2}}>10{sup ?6} in addition to tracing the CO snow line. Our models also indicate that NO is potentially detectable, with lower N gas abundances leading to higher NO abundances.

  10. Coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant of Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egorov, V.N.; Anikin, G.J.; Gross, M.

    1995-12-01

    Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, Russia, decided to erect a new coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant to replace the existing obsolete units and to improve the environmental conditions of the area. The paper deals with the technological concept and the design requirements. Commissioning is scheduled at the beginning of 1996. The paper describes H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} removal, sulfur recovery and ammonia destruction, primary gas cooling and electrostatic tar precipitation, and the distributed control system that will be installed.

  11. Metal regeneration of iron chelates in nitric oxide scrubbing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, S.G.; Littlejohn, D.; Shi, Y.

    1997-08-19

    The present invention relates to a process of using metal particles to reduce NO to NH{sub 3}. More specifically, the invention concerns an improved process to regenerate iron (II) (CHELATE) by reduction of iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) complex, which process comprises: (a) contacting an aqueous solution containing iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) with metal particles at between about 20 and 90 C to reduce NO present, produce ammonia or an ammonium ion, and produce free iron (II) (CHELATE) at a pH of between about 3 and 8. The process is useful to remove NO from flue gas and reduce pollution. 34 figs.

  12. Metal regeneration of iron chelates in nitric oxide scrubbing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Littlejohn, David; Shi, Yao

    1997-08-19

    The present invention relates to a process of using metal particles to reduce NO to NH.sub.3. More specifically, the invention concerns an improved process to regenerate iron (II) (CHELATE) by reduction of iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) complex, which process comprises: a) contacting an aqueous solution containing iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) with metal particles at between about 20.degree. and 90.degree. C. to reduce NO present, produce ammonia or an ammonium ion, and produce free iron (II) (CHELATE) at a pH of between about 3 and 8. The process is useful to remove NO from flue gas and reduce pollution.

  13. PROCESS FOR THE PURIFICATION OF URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosenfeld, S.

    1959-01-20

    A proccss is described for reclaiming uranium values from aqueous solutions containing U, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Cr comprising treating the solution with NH/sub 3/ to precipitate the: U, Fc, and Cr and leaving Cu and Ni in solution as ammonia complex ions. The precipitate is chlorinated with CCl/sub 4/ at an elevated temperature to convert the U, Tc, and Cr into their chlorides. The more volatile FeCl/sub 3/ and CrCl/sub 3/ are separated from the UCl/sub 4/. The process is used when U is treated in a calutron, and composite solutions are produccd which contain dissolved products of stainless steel.

  14. Destruction of acid gas emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathur, Mahendra P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fu, Yuan C. (Muroran, JP); Ekmann, James M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Boyle, John M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1991-01-01

    A method of destroying NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 in a combustion gas in disclosed. The method includes generating active species by treating stable moleucles in a high temperature plasma. Ammonia, methane, steam, hydrogen, nitrogen or a combination of these gases can be selected as the stable molecules. The gases are subjected to plasma conditions sufficient to create free radicals, ions or excited atoms such as N, NH, NH.sub.2, OH.sup.-, CH and/or CH.sub.2. These active species are injected into a combustion gas at a location of sufficiently high temperature to maintain the species in active state and permit them to react with NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2. Typically the injection is made into the immediate post-combustion gases at temperatures of 475.degree.-950.degree. C.

  15. Semipermeable polymers and method for producing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buschmann, Wayne E

    2014-04-01

    A polyamide membrane including reaction product of an anhydrous solution comprising an anhydrous solvent, at least one polyfunctional secondary amine and a pre-polymer deposition catalyst, and an anhydrous, organic solvent solution comprising a polyfunctional aromatic amine-reactive reactant having one ring. A composite semipermeable membrane including the polyamide membrane on a porous support.

  16. Apparatus and method for preparing oxygen-15 labeled water H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] in an injectable form for use in positron emission tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Schlyer, D.J.; Alexoff, D.

    1996-01-09

    A handling and processing apparatus is revealed for preparing Oxygen-15 labeled water (H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O]) in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography from preferably H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] produced by irradiating a flowing gas target of nitrogen and hydrogen. The apparatus includes a collector for receiving and directing a gas containing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] gas and impurities, mainly ammonia (NH{sub 3}) gas into sterile water to trap the H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] and form ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) in the sterile water. A device for displacing the sterile water containing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] and NH{sub 4}{sup +} through a cation resin removes NH{sub 4}{sup +} from the sterile water. A device for combining the sterile water containing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] with a saline solution produces an injectable solution. Preferably, the apparatus includes a device for delivering the solution to a syringe for injection into a patient. Also, disclosed is a method for preparing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography in which the method neither requires isotopic exchange reaction nor application of high temperature. 7 figs.

  17. Apparatus and method for preparing oxygen-15 labeled water H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] in an injectable form for use in positron emission tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferrieri, Richard A.; Schlyer, David J.; Alexoff, David

    1996-01-09

    A handling and processing apparatus for preparing Oxygen-15 labeled water (H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O]) in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography from preferably H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] produced by irradiating a flowing gas target of nitrogen and hydrogen. The apparatus includes a collector for receiving and directing a gas containing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] gas and impurities, mainly ammonia (NH.sub.3) gas into sterile water to trap the H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] and form ammonium (NH.sub.4.sup.+) in the sterile water. A device for displacing the sterile water containing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] and NH.sub.4.sup.+ through a cation resin removes NH.sub.4.sup.+ from the sterile water. A device for combining the sterile water containing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] with a saline solution produces an injectable solution. Preferably, the apparatus includes a device for delivering the solution to a syringe for injection into a patient. Also, disclosed is a method for preparing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography in which the method neither requires isotopic exchange reaction nor application of high temperature.

  18. Application of hybrid coal reburning/SNCR processes for NOx reduction in a coal-fired boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, W.J.; Zhou, Z.J.; Zhou, J.H.; Hongkun, L.V.; Liu, J.Z.; Cen, K.F.

    2009-07-01

    Boilers in Beijing Thermal Power Plant of Zhongdian Guohua Co. in China are coal-fired with natural circulation and tangential fired method, and the economical continuous rate is 410 ton per hour of steam. Hybrid coal reburning/SNCR technology was applied and it successfully reduced NOx to about 170 mg/Nm{sup 3} from about 540 mg/Nm{sup 3}, meanwhile ammonia slip was lower than 10 ppm at 450-210 t/h load and the total reduction efficiency was about 70%. Normal fineness pulverized coal from the bin was chosen as the reburning fuel and the nozzles of the upper primary air were retrofitted to be used as the reburning fuel nozzles. The reducing agent of SNCR was an urea solution, and it was injected by the four layer injectors after online dilution. At 410 t/h load, NOx emission was about 300 mg/Nm{sup 3} when the ratio of reburning fuel to the total fuel was 25.9%-33.4%. Controlling the oxygen content of the gas in the reversal chamber to less than 3.4% resulted in not only low NOx emission but also high combustion efficiency. Ammonia slip distribution in the down gas pass was uneven and ammonia slip was higher in the front of the down gas pass than in the rear of the down gas pass. NSR and NOx reduction were proportional to each other and usually resulted in more ammonia slip with reduction in NOx. About 100 mg/Nm{sup 3} NOx emission could be achieved with about 40 ppm NH{sub 3} slip at 300-450 t/h, and ammonia slip from the SNCR reactions could be used as reducing agent of SCR, which was favorable for the future SCR retrofit.

  19. LABORATORY TESTING TO SIMULATE VAPOR SPACE CORROSION IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Gray, J.

    2013-08-30

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 70 years at the Hanford nuclear facility. Vapor space corrosion of the tank walls has emerged as an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of these tanks. The interaction between corrosive and inhibitor species in condensates/supernates on the tank wall above the liquid level, and their interaction with vapor phase constituents as the liquid evaporates from the tank wall influences the formation of corrosion products and the corrosion of the carbon steel. An effort is underway to gain an understanding of the mechanism of vapor space corrosion. Localized corrosion, in the form of pitting, is of particular interest in the vapor space. CPP testing was utilized to determine the susceptibility of the steel in a simulated vapor space environment. The tests also investigated the impact of ammonia gas in the vapor space area on the corrosion of the steel. Vapor space coupon tests were also performed to investigate the evolution of the corrosion products during longer term exposures. These tests were also conducted at vapor space ammonia levels of 50 and 550 ppm NH{sub 3} (0.005, and 0.055 vol.%) in air. Ammonia was shown to mitigate vapor space corrosion.

  20. Final Report for the DOE-BES Program Mechanistic Studies of Activated Hydrogen Release from Amine-Boranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry G. Sneddon; R. Thomas Baker

    2013-01-13

    Effective storage of hydrogen presents one of the most significant technical gaps to successful implementation of the hydrogen economy, particularly for transportation applications. Amine boranes, such as ammonia borane H3NBH3 and ammonia triborane H3NB3H7, have been identified as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage media containing potentially readily released protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens. At the outset of our studies, dehydrogenation of ammonia borane had been studied primarily in the solid state, but our DOE sponsored work clearly demonstrated that ionic liquids, base-initiators and/or metal-catalysts can each significantly increase both the rate and extent of hydrogen release from amine boranes under moderate conditions. Our studies also showed that depending upon the activation method, hydrogen release from amine boranes can occur by very different mechanistic steps and yield different types of spent-fuel materials. The fundamental understanding that was developed during this grant of the pathways and controlling factors for each of these hydrogen-release mechanisms is now enabling continuing discovery and optimization of new chemical-hydride based hydrogen storage systems.

  1. Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali T-Raissi

    2005-01-14

    The aim of this work was to assess issues of cost, and performance associated with the production and storage of hydrogen via following three feedstocks: sub-quality natural gas (SQNG), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and water. Three technology areas were considered: (1) Hydrogen production utilizing SQNG resources, (2) Hydrogen storage in ammonia and amine-borane complexes for fuel cell applications, and (3) Hydrogen from solar thermochemical cycles for splitting water. This report summarizes our findings with the following objectives: Technoeconomic analysis of the feasibility of the technology areas 1-3; Evaluation of the hydrogen production cost by technology areas 1; and Feasibility of ammonia and/or amine-borane complexes (technology areas 2) as a means of hydrogen storage on-board fuel cell powered vehicles. For each technology area, we reviewed the open literature with respect to the following criteria: process efficiency, cost, safety, and ease of implementation and impact of the latest materials innovations, if any. We employed various process analysis platforms including FactSage chemical equilibrium software and Aspen Technologies AspenPlus and HYSYS chemical process simulation programs for determining the performance of the prospective hydrogen production processes.

  2. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The Assistant Secretary for Environment has responsibility for identifying, characterizing, and ameliorating the environmental, health, and safety issues and public concerns associated with commercial operation of specific energy systems. The need for developing a safety and environmental control assessment for liquefied gaseous fuels was identified by the Environmental and Safety Engineering Division as a result of discussions with various governmental, industry, and academic persons having expertise with respect to the particular materials involved: liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, hydrogen, and anhydrous ammonia. This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in Fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 1 (Executive Summary) describes the background, purpose and organization of the LGF Program and contains summaries of the 25 reports presented in Volumes 2 and 3. Annotated bibliographies on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety and Environmental Control Research and on Fire Safety and Hazards of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) are included in Volume 1.

  3. Rising from the ashes: Coal ash in recycling and construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naquin, D.

    1998-02-01

    Beneficial Ash Management (BAM, Clearfield, Pa.) has won an environmental award for its use of ash and other waste to fight acid mine drainage. The company`s workers take various waste materials, mainly fly ash from coal-burning plants, to make a cement-like material or grouting, says Ernest Roselli, BAM president. The grouting covers the soil, which helps prevent water from contacting materials. This, in turn, helps control chemical reactions, reducing or eliminating formation of acid mine drainage. The company is restoring the 1,400-acre Bark Camp coal mine site near Penfield in Clearfield County, Pa. Under a no-cost contract with the state of Pennsylvania, BAM is using boiler slag, causticizing byproducts (lime) and nonreclaimable clarifier sludge from International Paper Co. (Erie, Pa.). The mine reclamation techniques developed and monitored at the site include using man-made wetlands to treat acid mine drainage and testing anhydrous ammonia as a similar treatment agent. BAM researches and tests fly ash mixed with lime-based activators as fill material for land reclamation, and develops and uses artificial soil material from paper mill and tannery biosolids.

  4. A gas-loading system for LANL two-stage gas guns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, Lloyd Lee; Bartram, Brian Douglas; Dattelbaum, Dana Mcgraw; Lang, John Michael; Morris, John Scott

    2015-09-01

    A novel gas loading system was designed for the specific application of remotely loading high purity gases into targets for gas-gun driven plate impact experiments. The high purity gases are loaded into well-defined target configurations to obtain Hugoniot states in the gas phase at greater than ambient pressures.The small volume of the gas samples is challenging, as slight changing in the ambient temperature result in measurable pressure changes. Therefore, the ability to load a gas gun target and continually monitor the sample pressure prior to firing provides the most stable and reliable target fielding approach. We present the design and evaluation of a gas loading system built for the LANL 50 mm bore two-stage light gas gun. Targets for the gun are made of 6061 Al or OFHC Cu, and assembled to form a gas containment cell with a volume of approximately 1.38 cc. The compatibility of materials was a major consideration in the design of the system, particularly for its use with corrosive gases. Piping and valves are stainless steel with wetted seals made from Kalrez® and Teflon®. Preliminary testing was completed to ensure proper flow rate and that the proper safety controls were in place. The system has been used to successfully load Ar, Kr, Xe, and anhydrous ammonia with purities of up to 99.999 percent. The design of the system and example data from the plate impact experiments will be shown.

  5. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VII, Volume I. Introduction and background. [Storage losses of 28 products and by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01

    The proposed plant site consists of 1594 acres along the Ohio River in Breckinridge County, Kentucky. An option to purchase the site has been secured on behalf of the Breckinridge Project by the Commonwealth of Kentucky Department of Energy. Figure 1 is an area map locating the site with respect to area cities and towns. The nearest communities to the site are the hamlet of Stephensport, Kentucky, about 3-1/2 miles northeast and Cloverport, Kentucky, which is 6 miles to the southwest. The nearest major cities are Owensboro, Kentucky, 45 road miles to the west and Louisville, Kentucky, 65 miles to the northeast. The Breckinridge facility will convert about 23,000 TPD of run-of-mine (ROM) coal into a nominal 50,000 BPD of hydrocarbon liquids including a significant quantity of transportation fuels. Major products refined for marketing include pipeline gas, propane, butane, 105 RONC gasoline reformate, middle distillate and heavy distillate. By-products include sulfur, anhydrous ammonia, and commercial-grade phenol. Care is being taken to minimize the impact of the facility operations on the environment. Water and wastewater treatment systems have been designed to achieve zero discharge. Waste solids will be disposed of in a carefully designed and well-monitored landfill operation. Also, special design features have been included to minimize air emissions.

  6. Coal combustion products: trash or treasure?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, T.

    2006-07-15

    Coal combustion by-products can be a valuable resource to various industries. The American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) collects data on production and uses of coal combustion products (CCPs). 122.5 million tons of CCPs were produced in 2004. The article discusses the results of the ACCA's 2004 survey. Fly ash is predominantly used as a substitute for Portland cement; bottom ash for structural fill, embankments and paved road cases. Synthetic gypsum from the FGD process is commonly used in wallboard. Plant owners are only likely to have a buyer for a portion of their CCPs. Although sale of hot water (from Antelope Valley Station) from condensers for use in a fish farm to raise tilapia proved unviable, the Great Plains Synfuels Plant which manufactures natural gas from lignite produces a wide range of products including anhydrous ammonia, phenol, krypton, carbon dioxide (for enhanced oil recovery), tar oils and liquid nitrogen. ACCA's goal is to educate people about CCPs and how to make them into useful products, and market them, in order to reduce waste disposal and enhance revenue. The article lists members of the ACCA. 2 photos., 1 tab.

  7. Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safari, Iman; Walker, Michael E.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Dzombak, David A.; Liu, Wenshi; Vidic, Radisav D.; Miller, David C.; Abbasian, Javad

    2013-09-01

    A process simulation model has been developed using Aspen Plus® with the OLI (OLI System, Inc.) water chemistry model to predict water quality in the recirculating cooling loop utilizing secondary- and tertiary-treated municipal wastewater as the source of makeup water. Simulation results were compared with pilot-scale experimental data on makeup water alkalinity, loop pH, and ammonia evaporation. The effects of various parameters including makeup water quality, salt formation, NH3 and CO2 evaporation mass transfer coefficients, heat load, and operating temperatures were investigated. The results indicate that, although the simulation model can capture the general trends in the loop pH, experimental data on the rates of salt precipitation in the system are needed for more accurate prediction of the loop pH. It was also found that stripping of ammonia and carbon dioxide in the cooling tower can influence the cooling loop pH significantly. The effects of the NH3 mass transfer coefficient on cooling loop pH appear to be more significant at lower values (e.g., kNH3 < 4×10-3 m/s) when the makeup water alkalinity is low (e.g., <90 mg/L as CaCO3). The effect of the CO2 mass transfer coefficient was found to be significant only at lower alkalinity values (e.g., kCO2<4×10-6 m/s).

  8. NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bockelie; Marc Cremer; Kevin Davis; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior; Hong-Shig Shim; Dave Swenson; Bob Hurt; Eric Suuberg; Eric Eddings; Kevin Whitty; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker

    2006-06-30

    This is the Final Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project was to develop cost-effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low-NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided co-funding for this program. This project included research on: (1) In furnace NOx control; (2) Impacts of combustion modifications on boiler operation; (3) Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst testing and (4) Ammonia adsorption/removal on fly ash. Important accomplishments were achieved in all aspects of the project. Rich Reagent Injection (RRI), an in-furnace NOx reduction strategy based on injecting urea or anhydrous ammonia into fuel rich regions in the lower furnace, was evaluated for cyclone-barrel and PC fired utility boilers. Field tests successfully demonstrated the ability of the RRI process to significantly reduce NOx emissions from a staged cyclone-fired furnace operating with overfire air. The field tests also verified the accuracy of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) modeling used to develop the RRI design and highlighted the importance of using CFD modeling to properly locate and configure the reagent injectors within the furnace. Low NOx firing conditions can adversely impact boiler operation due to increased waterwall wastage (corrosion) and increased soot production. A corrosion monitoring system that uses electrochemical noise (ECN) corrosion probes to monitor, on a real-time basis, high temperature corrosion events within the boiler was evaluated. Field tests were successfully conducted at two plants. The Ohio Coal Development Office provided financial assistance to perform the field tests. To investigate soot behavior, an advanced model to predict soot production and destruction was implemented into an existing reacting CFD modeling tool. Comparisons between experimental data collected in a pilot scale furnace and soot behavior predicted by the CFD model showed good agreement. Field and laboratory tests were performed for SCR catalysts used for coal and biomass co-firing applications. Fundamental laboratory studies were performed to better understand mechanisms involved with catalyst deactivation. Field tests with a slip stream reactor were used to create catalyst exposed to boiler flue gas for firing coal and for co-firing coal and biomass. The field data suggests the mechanisms leading to catalyst deactivation are, in order of importance, channel plugging, surface fouling, pore plugging and poisoning. Investigations were performed to better understand the mechanisms involved with catalyst regeneration through mechanical or chemical methods. A computer model was developed to predict NOx reduction across the catalyst in a SCR. Experiments were performed to investigate the fundamentals of ammonia/fly ash interactions with relevance to the operation of advanced NOx control technologies such as selective catalytic reduction. Measurements were performed for ammonia adsorption isotherms on commercial fly ash samples subjected to a variety of treatments and on the chemistry of dry and semi-dry ammonia removal processes. This work resulted in the first fundamental ammonia isotherms on carbon-containing fly ash samples. This work confirms industrial reports that aqueous solution chemistry takes place upon the introduction of even very small amounts of water, while the ash remains in a semi-dry state.

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Robust Nitrogen Oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Los Alamos National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about robust...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Robust Nitrogen oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle on-board Emissions Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Los Alamos National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about robust...

  11. Urea/Ammonia Distribution Optimization in an SCR Emission Control System Through the Use of CFD Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  12. Gas Phase Reactions between Fuel Molecules and Halogens: A Review of the Reaction between Atomic Chlorine and Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Steven Ewa Xuefei Tao Jingjing Alecu Mielke Papajak Xu Yu Zheng Annual Report Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center Princeton, NJ Sept. 23, 2010 Truhlar group University of Minnesota Practical methods for including torsional anharmonicity in thermochemical calculations on complex molecules * We proposed a new approximation called the multi-structural method with torsional anharmonicity (MS-T) to calculate conformational-vibrational-rotational partition functions. * It is applicable for

  13. Impact of Contaminants Present in Coal-Biomass Derived Synthesis Gas on Water-gas Shift and Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2013-02-15

    Co-gasification of biomass and coal in large-scale, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants increases the efficiency and reduces the environmental impact of making synthesis gas ("syngas") that can be used in Coal-Biomass-to-Liquids (CBTL) processes for producing transportation fuels. However, the water-gas shift (WGS) and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts used in these processes may be poisoned by multiple contaminants found in coal-biomass derived syngas; sulfur species, trace toxic metals, halides, nitrogen species, the vapors of alkali metals and their salts (e.g., KCl and NaCl), ammonia, and phosphorous. Thus, it is essential to develop a fundamental understanding of poisoning/inhibition mechanisms before investing in the development of any costly mitigation technologies. We therefore investigated the impact of potential contaminants (H2S, NH3, HCN, AsH3, PH3, HCl, NaCl, KCl, AS3, NH4NO3, NH4OH, KNO3, HBr, HF, and HNO3) on the performance and lifetime of commercially available and generic (prepared in-house) WGS and FT catalysts.

  14. THE EFFECTS OF HALIDE MODIFIERS ON THE SORPTION KINETICS OF THE LI-MG-N-H SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anton, D.; Gray, J.; Price, C.; Lascola, R.

    2011-07-20

    The effects of different transition metal halides (TiCl{sub 3}, VCl{sub 3}, ScCl{sub 3} and NiCl{sub 2}) on the sorption properties of the 1:1 molar ratio of LiNH{sub 2} to MgH{sub 2} are investigated. The modified mixtures were found to contain LiNH{sub 2}, MgH{sub 2} and LiCl. TGA results showed that the hydrogen desorption temperature was reduced with the modifier addition in this order: TiCl{sub 3} > ScCl{sub 3} > VCl{sub 3} > NiCL{sub 2}. Ammonia release was not significantly reduced resulting in a weight loss greater than the theoretical hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The isothermal sorption kinetics of the modified systems showed little improvement after the first dehydrogenation cycle over the unmodified system but showed drastic improvement in rehydrogenation cycles. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy identified the cycled material to be composed of LiH, MgH{sub 2}, Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} and Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2}.

  15. Integrated Dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} Emissions Control System baseline SNCR test report, February 4--March 6, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.A.; Shiomoto, G.H.; Muzio, L.J.; Hunt, T.

    1993-09-01

    The DOE sponsored Integrated Dry NO{sub x}SO{sub 2} Emissions Control System program, which is a Clean Coal Technology III demonstration, is being conducted by Public Service Company of Colorado. The test site is Arapahoe Generating Station Unit 4, which is a 100 MWe, down-fired utility boiler burning a low sulfur western coal. The project goal is to demonstrate 70 percent reductions in NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions through the integration of: (1) down-fired low-NO{sub x} burners with overfire air; (2) selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for additional NO{sub x} removal; and (3) dry sorbent injection and duct humidification for SO{sub 2} removal. The effectiveness of the integrated system on a high-sulfur coal will also be tested. This report documents the second test phase of the program. This second test phase was comprised of the start up of the SNCR system followed by a brief parametric test series. Time constraints due to the retrofit schedule precluded optimizing the SNCR system. Testing investigated both urea and aqueous ammonia as SNCR chemicals. Other parameters investigated included boiler load, the amount of chemical injected, as well as injection parameters (injection location, amount of mixing air, dilution water flow, and injector orifice sizes). NO{sub x} removals of nominally 35 percent could be obtained with both chemicals while maintaining ammonia slip levels less than 10 ppM at full load. At higher chemical injection rates (nominal N/NO molar ratios of 1.5 to 2.0), NO{sub x} reductions in the range of 60 to 70 percent were achieved, but with unacceptable levels of NH{sub 3} slip. For a given level of NO{sub x} reduction, ammonia slip was lower with aqueous ammonia injection than with urea. The test program also confirmed prior observations that (1) the optimum temperature for NO{sub x} reduction with ammonia is lower than with urea, and (2) N{sub 2}O emissions as a by-product of the SNCR process are lower for ammonia compared to urea.

  16. Moving to Sustainable Metals. Multifunctional Ligands in Catalytic, Outer Sphere C-H, N-H and O-H Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crabtree, Robert

    2015-03-03

    Much of our work during this grant period has emphasized green chemistry and sustainability. For example, we were able to convert glycerine, a waste byproduct of biodiesel production, into lactic acid, a compound with numerous applications, notably in the food and cosmetics industry, as well as being a source material for a biodegradable plastic. This work required a catalyst, that ceases to work after a certain lapse of time. We were able to identify the way in which this deactivation occurs by identifying some of the metal catalyst deactivation products. These proved to be multimetallic clusters containing up to six metals and up to 14 hydrogen atoms. Both the catalytic reaction itself and the deactivation structures are novel and unexpected. We have previously proposed that nitrogen heterocycles could be good energy carriers in a low CO2 future world. In another part of our study, we found catalysts for introduction of hydrogen, an energy carrier that is hard to store, into nitrogen heterocycles. The mechanism of this process proved to be unusual in that the catalyst transfers the H2 to the heterocycle in the form of H+ and H-, first transferring the H+ and only then the H-. In a third area of study, some of our compounds, originally prepared for DOE catalysis purposes, also proved useful in hydrocarbon oxidation and in water oxidation. The latter is important in solar-to-fuel work, because, by analogy with natural photosynthesis, the goal of the Yale Solar Group of four PIs is to convert sunlight to hydrogen and oxygen, which requires water splitting catalysts. The catalysts that proved useful mediate the latter reaction: water oxidation to oxygen. In a more technical study, we developed methods for distinguishing the case where catalysis is mediated by a soluble catalyst from cases where catalysis arises from a deposit of finely divided solid. One particular application involved electrocatalysis, where catalysis is driven by application of a voltage to electrodes dipped in the reactant mixture. We measured the mass increase of an electrode as material is deposited, and were able to see how this process is affected by the voltage supplied to the electrode. Our work continues to be well cited and we often receive requests for information or samples from fellow researchers.

  17. Abnormal crystal growth in CH3NH3PbI3-xClx using a multi-cycle solution coating process

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dong, Qingfeng; Yuan, Yongbo; Shao, Yuchuan; Fang, Yanjun; Wang, Qi; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-06-23

    Recently, the efficiency of organolead trihalide perovskite solar cells has improved greatly because of improved material qualities with longer carrier diffusion lengths. Mixing chlorine in the precursor for mixed halide films has been reported to dramatically enhance the diffusion lengths of mixed halide perovskite films, mainly as a result of a much longer carrier recombination lifetime. Here we report that adding Cl containing precursor for mixed halide perovskite formation can induce the abnormal grain growth behavior that yields well-oriented grains accompanied by the appearance of some very large size grains. The abnormal grain growth becomes prominent only after multi-cycle coatingmore » of MAI : MACl blend precursor. The large grain size is found mainly to contribute to a longer carrier charge recombination lifetime, and thus increases the device efficiency to 18.9%, but without significantly impacting the carrier transport property. As a result, the strong correlation identified between material process and morphology provides guidelines for future material optimization and device efficiency enhancement.« less

  18. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting at T.J.Maxx in Manchester, NH Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Goettel, Russell T.

    2010-06-29

    A report describing the process and results of replacing existing parking lot lighting, looking at a LED option with occupancy sensors, and conventional alternates. Criteria include payback, light levels, occupant satisfaction. This report is Phase I of II. Phase I deals with initial installation.

  19. {sup 31}P NMR analysis of coal moieties bearing -OH, -NH, and -SH functions. Quarterly report, January 1, 1991--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verkade, J.G.

    1991-12-31

    Research on coal structural analysis continues. This paper discusses the use of {sup 31}P, {sup 119}Sn, and {sup 195}Pt as NMR tagging reagents in the probing of coal structure. (VC)

  20. Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in EnhancedGeothermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transmission fluid. Initial studies have suggested that COsub 2 will achieve larger rates of heat extraction, and can ... reservoir zone with anhydrous supercritical COsub 2. ...

  1. Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in EnhancedGeothermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    rates of heat extraction, and can offer geologic storage of carbon as an ancillary benefit. Fluid-rock interactions ... reservoir zone with anhydrous supercritical COsub 2. ...

  2. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with ... Fuel Ethanol An anhydrous alcohol (ethanol with less than 1% water) intended for gasoline ...

  3. PROCESS FOR MAKING URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosen, R.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for producing uranium hexafluoride by reacting uranium hexachloride with hydrogen fluoride at a temperature below about 150 deg C, under anhydrous conditions.

  4. Acidity characterization of a titanium and sulfate modified vermiculite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, W.Y.; Centeno, M.A.; Odriozola, J.A.; Moreno, S.; Molina, R.

    2008-07-01

    A natural vermiculite has been modified with titanium and sulfated by the intercalation and impregnation method in order to optimize the acidity of the clay mineral, and characterization of samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption isotherms, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and temperature programmed desorption with ammonia (TPD-NH{sub 3}). All the modified solids have a significantly higher number of acidic sites with respect to the parent material and in all of these, Broensted as well as Lewis acidity are identified. The presence of sulfate appears not to increase the number of acidic centers in the modified clay. For the materials sulfated with the intercalation method, it is observed that the strength of the acidic sites found in the material increases with the nominal sulfate/metal ratio. Nevertheless, when elevated quantities of sulfur are deposited, diffusion problems in the heptane reaction appear.

  5. Synthesis of Large Arrays of Well-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, P. Siegal, M.P.; Huang, Z.P.; Provencio, P.N.; Ren, Z.F.; Wang, J.H.; Xu, J.W.

    1998-11-10

    Free-standing aligned carbon nanotubes have previously been grown above 7000C on mesoporous silica embedded with iron nanoparticles. Here, carbon nanotubes aligned over areas up to several square centimeters were grown on nickel-coated glass below 666oC by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition. Acetylene (C2H2) gas was used as the carbon source and ammonia (NH3) gas was used as a catalyst and dilution gas. Nanotubes with controllable diameters from 20 to 400 nanometers and lengths from 0.1 to 50 micrometers were obtained. Using this method, large panels of aligned carbon nanotubes can be made under conditions that are suitable for device fabrication.

  6. Method and apparatus for producing laser radiation following two-photon excitation of a gaseous medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bischel, William K. [Menlo Park, CA; Jacobs, Ralph R. [Livermore, CA; Prosnitz, Donald [Hamden, CT; Rhodes, Charles K. [Palo Alto, CA; Kelly, Patrick J. [Fort Lewis, WA

    1979-02-20

    Method and apparatus for producing laser radiation by two-photon optical pumping of an atomic or molecular gaseous medium and subsequent lasing action. A population inversion is created as a result of two-photon absorption of the gaseous species. Stark tuning is utilized, if necessary, in order to tune the two-photon transition into exact resonance. In particular, gaseous ammonia (NH.sub.3) or methyl fluoride (CH.sub.3 F) is optically pumped by a pair of CO.sub.2 lasers to create a population inversion resulting from simultaneous two-photon excitation of a high-lying vibrational state, and laser radiation is produced by stimulated emission of coherent radiation from the inverted level.

  7. Method and apparatus for producing laser radiation following two-photon excitation of a gaseous medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bischel, W.K.; Jacobs, R.R.; Prosnitz, D.P.; Rhodes, C.K.; Kelly, P.J.

    1979-02-20

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for producing laser radiation by two-photon optical pumping of an atomic or molecular gaseous medium and subsequent lasing action. A population inversion is created as a result of two-photon absorption of the gaseous species. Stark tuning is utilized, if necessary, in order to tune the two-photon transition into exact resonance. In particular, gaseous ammonia (NH[sub 3]) or methyl fluoride (CH[sub 3]F) is optically pumped by a pair of CO[sub 2] lasers to create a population inversion resulting from simultaneous two-photon excitation of a high-lying vibrational state, and laser radiation is produced by stimulated emission of coherent radiation from the inverted level. 3 figs.

  8. Low-rank coal research under the UND/DOE cooperative agreement. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltsee, G.A. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Two long gasification tests were accomplished (66 and 72 hours of slagging operation) this quarter, and the balance of the wastewater needed for the second cooling tower (CT) test (approx. 11,000 gallons) was generated. Eleven thousand gallons of slagging fixed-bed gasifier (SFBG) wastewater were solvent extracted and ammonia stripped (AS) to nominal levels of 160 mg/1 phenol and 600 mg/1 NH/sub 3/. This wastewater is being further treated by activated sludge (AS) and granular activated carbon (GAC) processing to prepare a high quality makeup for the second CT test. Phenol mass balances indicated that > 90 pct of the phenol was stripped from the tower, indicating that previous assumptions of high levels of biodegradation were erroneous. Over 80 pct of the ammonia and about 25 pct of the methanol were also stripped. Data collected during steady state operation of the bench-scale rotating biological contractor indicate complete removal of phenolics and alcohols, and 94 pct removal of BOD. Nitrification also occurred in this unit, with over 30 pct removal of ammonia. Problems due to individual bacteria, present in the biotreated wastewater, passing through the multi-media filter and thus decreasing the carbon adsorption efficiency of the GAC system, have resulted in lower treatment rates than originally anticipated. As a result, to achieve the desired treatment, the contact time of the wastewater with the carbon in the granular activated carbon system has been increased. Since this has decreased the treatment rate, a larger carbon adsorption system has been designed and is presently being constructed.

  9. Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leininger, T.F.; Robin, A.M.; Wolfenbarger, J.K.; Suggitt, R.M.

    1995-03-28

    A partial oxidation process is described for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCl, HF, H{sub 2}S, COS, N{sub 2}, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000 F. 1 figure.

  10. Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leininger, Thomas F.; Robin, Allen M.; Wolfenbarger, James K.; Suggitt, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    A partial oxidation process for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2 O, CH.sub.4, NH.sub.3, HCl, HF, H.sub.2 S, COS, N.sub.2, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000.degree. F.

  11. PILOT-SCALE EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION FOR NOx ON MERCURY SPECIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis L. Laudal; John H. Pavlish; Kevin C. Galbreath; Jeffrey S. Thompson; Gregory F. Weber; Everett Sondreal

    2000-12-01

    Full-scale tests in Europe and bench-scale tests in the United States have indicated that the catalyst, normally vanadium/titanium metal oxide, used in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x}, may promote the formation of Hg{sup 2+} and/or particulate-bound mercury (Hg{sub p}). To investigate the impact of SCR on mercury speciation, pilot-scale screening tests were conducted at the Energy & Environmental Research Center. The primary research goal was to determine whether the catalyst or the injection of ammonia in a representative SCR system promotes the conversion of Hg{sup 0} to Hg{sup 2+} and/or Hg{sub p} and, if so, which coal types and parameters (e.g., rank and chemical composition) affect the degree of conversion. Four different coals, three eastern bituminous coals and a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal, were tested. Three tests were conducted for each coal: (1) baseline, (2) NH{sub 3} injection, and (3) SCR of NO{sub x}. Speciated mercury, ammonia slip, SO{sub 3}, and chloride measurements were made to determine the effect the SCR reactor had on mercury speciation. It appears that the impact of SCR of NO{sub x} on mercury speciation is coal-dependent. Although there were several confounding factors such as temperature and ammonia concentrations in the flue gas, two of the eastern bituminous coals showed substantial increases in Hg{sub p} at the inlet to the ESP after passing through an SCR reactor. The PRB coal showed little if any change due to the presence of the SCR. Apparently, the effects of the SCR reactor are related to the chloride, sulfur and, possibly, the calcium content of the coal. It is clear that additional work needs to be done at the full-scale level.

  12. PRODUCTION OF THORIUM FLUORIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zachariasen, W.H.

    1959-08-11

    A process is presented for producing anhydrous thorium fluoride comprising the step of contacting a saturated aqueous solution of thorium nitrate with an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid having a concentration of about 45 to 50% by weight at a temperature above 70 deg C whereby anhydrous thorium fluoride precipitates.

  13. Dipole Alignment at the Carbon Nanotube and Methyl Ammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Przepioski, Joshua

    2015-08-28

    This work correlates resonant peaks from first principles calculation on ammonia (NH3) Nitrogen 1s x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) within the methyl ammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3), and proposes a curve to determine the alignment of the methyl ammonium dipole if there exists angular dependence. The Nitrogen 1s XAS was performed at varying incident angles on the perovskite with and without a carbon nanotube (CNT) interface produced from an ultrasonic spray deposition. We investigated the peak contribution from PbI2 and the poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene- 2,7-diyl) with bipyridine (PFO-BPy) wrapped around the CNT, and used normalization techniques to better identify the dipole alignment. There was angular dependence on samples containing the CNT interface suggesting an existing dipole alignment, but there was no angular dependence on the perovskite samples alone; however, more normalization techniques and experimental work must be performed in order to ensure its validity and to better describe its alignment, and possible controlling factors.

  14. Clean coal technology: selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-05-01

    The report discusses a project carried out under the US Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program which demonstrated selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of NOx emissions from high-sulphur coal-fired boilers under typical boilers conditions in the United States. The project was conducted by Southern Company Services, Inc., who served as a co-funder and as the host at Gulf Power Company's Plant Crist. The SCR process consists of injecting ammonia (NH{sub 3}) into boiler flue gas and passing the flue gas through a catalyst bed where the Nox and NH{sub 3} react to form nitrogen and water vapor. The results of the CCTDP project confirmed the applicability of SCR for US coal-fired power plants. In part as a result of the success of this project, a significant number of commercial SCR units have been installed and are operating successfully in the United States. By 2007, the total installed SCR capacity on US coal-fired units will number about 200, representing about 100,000 MWe of electric generating capacity. This report summarizes the status of SCR technology. 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs., 10 photos.

  15. Nitrogen Deposition to and Cycling in a Deciduous Forest

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pryor, Sara C.; Barthelmie, Rebecca J.; Carreiro, Margaret; Davis, Melissa L.; Hartley, Anne; Jensen, Bjame; Oliphant, Andrew; Randolph, Melissa J. C.; Schoof, Justin T.

    2001-01-01

    The project described here seeks to answer questions regarding the role increased nitrogen (N) deposition is playing in enhanced carbon (C) sequestration in temperate mid-latitude forests, using detailed measurements from an AmeriFlux tower in southern Indiana (Morgan-Monroe State Forest, or MMSF). The measurements indicate an average atmosphere-surface N flux of approximately 6 mg-N m -2 day -1 during the 2000 growing season, with approximately 40% coming from dry deposition of ammonia (NH 3 ), nitric acid (HNO 3 ), and particle-bound N. Wet deposition and throughfall measurements indicate significant canopy uptake of N (particularly NH 4 +) at themore » site, leading to a net canopy exchange (NCE) of –6 kg-N ha -1 for the growing season. These data are used in combination with data on the aboveground C:N ratio, litterfall flux, and soil net N mineralization rates to indicate the level of potential perturbation of C sequestration at this site.« less

  16. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-BY-108: Results from samples collected on 10/27/94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McVeety, B.D.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-BY-108 (referred to as Tank BY-108). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Trends in NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O samples indicated a possible sampling problem. Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, the authors looked for the 40 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 15 analytes. Of these, 17 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Also, eighty-one organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff (ca.) 10 ppbv, and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal standard response factors. The nine organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Summary Table 1 and account for approximately 48% of the total organic components in the headspace of Tank BY-108. Three permanent gases, hydrogen (H{sub 2}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) were also detected. Tank BY-108 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List.

  17. DeNOx characteristics using two staged radical injection techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kambara, S.; Kumano, Y.; Yukimura, K.

    2009-06-15

    Ammonia radical injection using pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma has been investigated as a means to control NOx emissions from combustors. When DBD plasma-generated radicals (NH{sub 2}, NH, N, and H) are injected into a flue gas containing nitrogen oxide (NOx), NOx is removed efficiently by chain reactions in the gas phase. However, because the percentage of NOx removal gradually decreases with increasing oxygen concentrations beyond 1% O{sub 2}, improvement of the DeNOx (removal of nitrogen oxide) characteristics at high O{sub 2} concentrations was necessary for commercial combustors. A two-staged injection of the DeNOx agent was developed based on the detailed mechanisms of electron impact reactions and gas phase reactions. A concentration of H radical was observed to play an important role in NOx formation and removal. The effects of applied voltages, oxygen concentrations, and reaction temperatures on NOx removal were investigated under normal and staged injection. NOx removal was improved by approximately 20% using staged injection at O{sub 2} concentrations of 1 to 4%.

  18. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Investigation of Hydrogen Release from Ethane 1,2-di-amineborane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neiner, Doinita; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Bowden, Mark; Choi, Young Joon; Luedtke, Avery T.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Fisher, Allison M.; Szymczak, Nathaniel; Autrey, Thomas

    2011-07-18

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (H2) release from ethane 1,2-di-amineborane (EDAB, BH3NH2CH2CH2NH2BH3) were measured using Calvet and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), pressure-composition isotherms, and volumetric gas-burette experiments. The results presented here indicate that EDAB releases ~ 9 wt.% H2 at temperatures ranging from 100 C to 200 C in two moderately exothermic steps, approximately -101 kJ/mol H2 and -3.81 kJ/mol H2. Isothermal kinetic analysis shows that EDAB is more stable than ammonia borane (AB) at temperatures lower than 100C; however, the rates of hydrogen release are faster for EDAB than for AB at temperatures higher than 120C. In addition, no volatile impurities in the H2 released by EDAB were detected by mass spectrometry upon heating with 1C/min to 200C in a calorimeter.

  19. Integrated dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} emissions control system: integrated system test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.A.; Muzio, L.J.; Hunt, T.

    1997-04-01

    The DOE sponsored Integrated Dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} Emissions Control System Program, is a Clean Coal Technology III demonstration, being conducted by Public Service Company of Colorado. The test site is Arapahoe Generating Station Unit 4, a 100 MWe, down-fired utility boiler burning a low-sulfur Western coal. The project goal is to demonstrate up to 70 percent reductions in NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions through the integration of: (1) down-fired low NO{sub x} burners with overfire air; (2) Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for additional NO{sub x} removal; and (3) Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) and duct humidification for SO{sub 2} removal. This report documents the final phase of the test program, in which the overall performance of the integrated system was evaluated. Previous testing has shown that the goal of 70 percent NO{sub x} removal was easily achieved with the combination of low-NO{sub x} burners, overfire air, and urea-based SNCR. Similarly, the ability of the sodium-based DSI system to achieve 70 percent SO{sub 2} removal was also demonstrated previously. The integrated tests demonstrated the synergistic benefit of operating the SNCR and sodium-based DSI systems concurrently. With the automatic control system set to limit the NH{sub 3} emissions to less than 8 ppm, the NO{sub 2} emissions from the sodium-based DSI system were reduced by nominally 50 percent compared to operation with the DSI system alone. Comparably, the combined operation reduced NH{sub 3} emissions, as reflected by a higher urea injection rate for a fixed NH{sub 3} emission limit. With combined DSI and SNCR operation, an ammonia odor problem was encountered around the Unit 4 ash silo (this did not occur with the SNCR system operated alone at comparable NH{sub 3} slip levels). This odor problem is attributed to the sodium changing the rate at which NH{sub 3} is released from the ash when it is wetted for truck transport to the disposal site.

  20. Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, R.G.

    1995-06-07

    During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed.

  1. Long-term thermophilic mono-digestion of rendering wastes and co-digestion with potato pulp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayr, S. Ojanper, M.; Kaparaju, P.; Rintala, J.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: Rendering wastes mono-digestion and co-digestion with potato pulp were studied. CSTR process with OLR of 1.5 kg VS/m{sup 3} d, HRT of 50 d was unstable in mono-digestion. Free NH{sub 3} inhibited mono-digestion of rendering wastes. CSTR process with OLR of 1.5 kg VS/m{sup 3} d, HRT of 50 d was stable in co-digestion. Co-digestion increased methane yield somewhat compared to mono-digestion. - Abstract: In this study, mono-digestion of rendering wastes and co-digestion of rendering wastes with potato pulp were studied for the first time in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) experiments at 55 C. Rendering wastes have high protein and lipid contents and are considered good substrates for methane production. However, accumulation of digestion intermediate products viz., volatile fatty acids (VFAs), long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) and ammonia nitrogen (NH{sub 4}-N and/or free NH{sub 3}) can cause process imbalance during the digestion. Mono-digestion of rendering wastes at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.5 kg volatile solids (VS)/m{sup 3} d and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 50 d was unstable and resulted in methane yields of 450 dm{sup 3}/kg VS{sub fed}. On the other hand, co-digestion of rendering wastes with potato pulp (60% wet weight, WW) at the same OLR and HRT improved the process stability and increased methane yields (500680 dm{sup 3}/kg VS{sub fed}). Thus, it can be concluded that co-digestion of rendering wastes with potato pulp could improve the process stability and methane yields from these difficult to treat industrial waste materials.

  2. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2011-04-21

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH3BH3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H2, and ammonia triborane NH3B3H7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H2, were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H2-release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H2-release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H2-release, the tunability of both their H2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These studies also demonstrated that H2-release from chemical hydrides can occur by a number of different mechanistic pathways and strongly suggest that optimal chemical hydride based H2release systems may require the use of synergistic dehydrogenation methods to induce H2-loss from chemically different intermediates formed during release reactions. The efficient regeneration of ammonia borane from BNHx spent fuel is one of the most challenging problems that will have to be overcome in order to utilize AB-based hydrogen storage. Three Center partners, LANL, PNNL and Penn, each took different complimentary approaches to AB regeneration. The Penn approach focused on a strategy involving spent-fuel digestion with superacidic acids to produce boron-halides (BX3) that could then be converted to AB by coordination/reduction/displacement processes. While the Penn boron-halide reduction studies successfully demonstrated that a dialkylsulfide-based coordination/reduction/displacement process gave quantitative conversions of BBr3 to ammonia borane with efficient and safe product separations, the fact that AB spent-fuels could not be digested in good yields to BX3 halides led to a No-Go decision on this overall AB-regeneration strategy.

  3. Engineered Osmosis for Energy Efficient Separations: Optimizing Waste Heat Utilization FINAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT DOE F 241.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NATHAN HANCOCK

    2013-01-13

    The purpose of this study is to design (i) a stripper system where heat is used to strip ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from a diluted draw solution; and (ii) a condensation or absorption system where the stripped NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} are captured in condensed water to form a re-concentrated draw solution. This study supports the Industrial Technologies Program of the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and their Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge award solicitation. Results from this study show that stimulated Oasys draw solutions composed of a complex electrolyte solution associated with the dissolution of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} gas in water can successfully be stripped and fully condensed under standard atmospheric pressure. Stripper bottoms NH{sub 3} concentration can reliably be reduced to < 1 mg/L, even when starting with liquids that have an NH{sub 3} mass fraction exceeding 6% to stimulate diluted draw solution from the forward osmosis membrane component of the process. Concentrated draw solution produced by fully condensing the stripper tops was show to exceed 6 M-C with nitrogen-to-carbon (N:C) molar ratios on the order of two. Reducing the operating pressure of the stripper column serves to reduce the partial vapor pressure of both NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} in solution and enables lower temperature operation towards integration of industrial low-grade of waste heat. Effective stripping of solutes was observed with operating pressures as low as 100 mbar (3-inHg). Systems operating at reduced pressure and temperature require additional design considerations to fully condense and absorb these constituents for reuse within the Oasys EO system context. Comparing empirical data with process stimulation models confirmed that several key parameters related to vapor-liquid equilibrium and intrinsic material properties were not accurate. Additional experiments and refinement of material property databases within the chosen process stimulation software was required to improve the reliability of process simulations for engineering design support. Data from experiments was also employed to calculate critical mass transfer and system design parameters (such as the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP)) to aid in process design. When measured in a less than optimal design state for the stripping of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} from a simulated dilute draw solution the HETP for one type of commercial stripper packing material was 1.88 ft/stage. During this study it was observed that the heat duty required to vaporize the draw solution solutes is substantially affected by the amount of water boilup also produced to achieve a low NH{sub 3} stripper bottoms concentration specification. Additionally, fluid loading of the stripper packing media is a critical performance parameter that affects all facets of optimum stripper column performance. Condensation of the draw solution tops vapor requires additional process considerations if being conducted in sub-atmospheric conditions and low temperature. Future work will focus on the commercialization of the Oasys EO technology platform for numerous applications in water and wastewater treatment as well as harvesting low enthalpy energy with our proprietary osmotic heat engine. Engineering design related to thermal integration of Oasys EO technology for both low and hig-grade heat applications is underway. Novel thermal recovery processes are also being investigated in addition to the conventional approaches described in this report. Oasys Water plans to deploy commercial scale systems into the energy and zero liquid discharge markets in 2013. Additional process refinement will lead to integration of low enthalpy renewable heat sources for municipal desalination applications.

  4. Simultaneous SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3} and NOx removal with ammonia and electron beam irradiation by the EBA process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, S.; Aoki, S.; Izutsu, M.; Yuki, Y.

    1999-07-01

    Details are presented of design, performance, operational experience and cost-effectiveness of an ammonium sulfate/nitrate yielding, 90 MWe-capacity, Electron Beam system retrofit, an initial commercial installation of the EBA Process in high-sulfur bituminous coal service at the Chengdu Power Station of Sichuan Electric Power Administration in China. 1997/1998 system startup and commissioning activities leading to successful acceptance tests in 1998 are reviewed to indicate the scope of problems addressed and overcome, and the resulting broad applicability for low-grade fuel service, e.g. in Asia and North America, is illustrated. A retrofit installation of 220 MWe capacity at a powerplant of Chubu Electric Power Company, Inc., in Japan, 92+% SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} removal w/60+% NOx removal, that will start up in late 1999 is reviewed. Process economics, i.e. cost/ton SO{sub 2} removal are presented for: The Chengdu Station installation, 80+% SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} removal w/20% NOx removal; and a commonly referenced, hypothetical application on a new unit in the U.S. of 300 MWe capacity with 2.6% sulfur bituminous coal fueling designed for performance of 90% SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} removal w/65% NOx removal.

  5. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL): Available Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    storage PNNL chemists developed new synthesis methods for ammonia borane and its ... developed new lower cost ammonia borane synthesis technology Technical Point of Contact: ...

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The process preferably uses steam to strip ammonia from the biomass for recycling. The ... The process preferably uses steam to strip ammonia from the biomass for recycling. The ...

  7. The Utility of FeVO4 in Combination with Stabilized Titanias...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fresh and aged conditions; reaction of ammonia in the absence of NO was also used as measure of ammonia oxidation tendency at elevated reaction temperatures PDF icon ...

  8. Solid SCR Demonstration Truck Application | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Safe and compact ammonia storagedelivery systems for ... Investigation 3rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct Gas Dosing

  9. Biomass Gas Cleanup Using a Therminator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Dayton; Atish Kataria; Rabhubir Gupta

    2012-03-06

    The objective of the project is to develop and demonstrate a novel fluidized-bed process module called a “Therminator” to simultaneously destroy and/or remove tar, NH3 and H2S from raw syngas produced by a fluidized-bed biomass gasifier. The raw syngas contains as much as 10 g/m3 of tar, 4,000 ppmv of NH3 and 100 ppmv of H2S. The goal of the Therminator module would be to use promising regenerable catalysts developed for removing tar, ammonia, and H2S down to low levels (around 10 ppm). Tars are cracked to a non-condensable gas and coke that would deposit on the acid catalyst. We will deposit coke, much like a fluid catalytic cracker (FCC) in a petroleum refinery. The deposited coke fouls the catalyst, much like FCC, but the coke would be burned off in the regenerator and the regenerated catalyst would be returned to the cracker. The rapid circulation between the cracker and regenerator would ensure the availability of the required amount of regenerated catalyst to accomplish our goal. Also, by removing sulfur down to less than 10 ppmv, NH3 decomposition would also be possible in the cracker at 600-700°C. In the cracker, tar decomposes and lays down coke on the acid sites of the catalyst, NH3 is decomposed using a small amount of metal (e.g., nickel or iron) catalyst incorporated into the catalyst matrix, and H2S is removed by a small amount of a metal oxide (e.g. zinc oxide or zinc titanate) by the H2S-metal oxide reaction to form metal sulfide. After a tolerable decline in activity for these reactions, the catalyst particles (and additives) are transported to the regenerator where they are exposed to air to remove the coke and to regenerate the metal sulfide back to metal oxide. Sulfate formation is avoided by running the regeneration with slightly sub-stoichiometric quantity of oxygen. Following regeneration, the catalyst is transported back to the cracker and the cycling continues. Analogous to an FCC reactor system, rapid cycling will allow the use of very active cracking catalysts that lose activity due to coking within the order of several seconds.

  10. EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson Valley Clean Communities, Inc. (NY, MA, PA); NYSERDA (ME, NH, VT, MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD, DC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  11. Abnormal crystal growth in CH3NH3PbI3-xClx using a multi-cycle solution coating process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Qingfeng; Yuan, Yongbo; Shao, Yuchuan; Fang, Yanjun; Wang, Qi; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-06-23

    Recently, the efficiency of organolead trihalide perovskite solar cells has improved greatly because of improved material qualities with longer carrier diffusion lengths. Mixing chlorine in the precursor for mixed halide films has been reported to dramatically enhance the diffusion lengths of mixed halide perovskite films, mainly as a result of a much longer carrier recombination lifetime. Here we report that adding Cl containing precursor for mixed halide perovskite formation can induce the abnormal grain growth behavior that yields well-oriented grains accompanied by the appearance of some very large size grains. The abnormal grain growth becomes prominent only after multi-cycle coating of MAI : MACl blend precursor. The large grain size is found mainly to contribute to a longer carrier charge recombination lifetime, and thus increases the device efficiency to 18.9%, but without significantly impacting the carrier transport property. As a result, the strong correlation identified between material process and morphology provides guidelines for future material optimization and device efficiency enhancement.

  12. Energy and global warming impacts of HFC refrigerants and emerging technologies: TEWI-III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.; Baxter, V.D.

    1997-06-01

    The use of hydrofluorocarbons (BFCs) which were developed as alternative refrigerants and insulating foam blowing agents to replace chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) is now being affected by scientific investigations of greenhouse warming and questions about the effects of refrigerants and blowing agents on global warming. A Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) assessment analyzes the environmental affects of these halogenated working fluids in energy consuming applications by combining a direct effect resulting from the inadvertent release of HFCs to the atmosphere with an indirect effect resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels needed to provide the energy to operate equipment using these compounds as working fluids. TEWI is a more balanced measure of environmental impact because it is not based solely on the global warming potential (GWP) of the working fluid. It also shows the environmental benefit of efficient technologies that result in less CO{sub 2} generation and eventual emission to the earth`s atmosphere. The goal of TEWI is to assess total global warming impact of all the gases released to the atmosphere, including CO{sub 2} emissions from energy conversion. Alternative chemicals and technologies have been proposed as substitutes for HFCs in the vapor-compression cycle for refrigeration and air conditioning and for polymer foams in appliance and building insulations which claim substantial environmental benefits. Among these alternatives are: (1) Hydrocarbon (HC) refrigerants and blowing agents which have zero ozone depleting potential and a negligible global warming potential, (2) CO{sub 2} as a refrigerant and blowing agent, (3) Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) vapor compression systems, (4) Absorption chiller and heat pumping cycles using ammonia/water or lithium bromide/water, and (5) Evacuated panel insulations. This paper summarizes major results and conclusions of the detailed final report on the TEWI-111 study.

  13. A practical application for the chemical treatment of Southern California`s reclaimed, Title 22 water for use as makeup water for recirculating cooling water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakrzewski, J.; Cosulich, J.; Bartling, E.

    1998-12-31

    Pilot cooling water studies conducted at a Southern California landfill/cogeneration station demonstrated a successful chemical treatment program for recirculating cooling water that used unnitrified, reclaimed, Title 22 water as the primary makeup water source. The constituents in the reclaimed water are supplied by variety of residential and waste water sources resulting in a water quality that may vary to a greater degree than domestic water supplies. This water contains high concentrations of orthophosphate, ammonia, chlorides and suspended solids. The impact of which, under cycled conditions is calcium orthophosphate scaling, high corrosion of yellow metal and mild steel, stress cracking of copper alloys and stainless steel and rapidly growing biological activity. A mobile cooling water testing laboratory with two pilot recirculating water systems modeled the cogeneration station`s cooling tower operating conditions and parameters. The tube and shell, tube side cooling heat exchangers were fitted with 443 admiralty, 90/10 copper nickel, 316 stainless steel and 1202 mild steel heat exchanger tubes. Coupons and Corrater electrodes were also installed. A chemical treatment program consisting of 60/40 AA/AMPS copolymer for scale, deposits and dispersion, sodium tolyltriazole for yellow metal corrosion, and a bromination program to control the biological activity was utilized in the pilot systems. Recirculating water orthophosphate concentrations reached levels of 70 mg/L as PO, and ammonia concentrations reached levels of 35 mg/L, as total NH3. The study successfully demonstrated a chemical treatment program to control scale and deposition, minimize admiralty, 90/10 copper nickel and carbon steel corrosion rates, prevent non-heat transfer yellow metal and stainless steel stress cracking, and control the biological activity in this high nutrient water.

  14. Methods for pretreating biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E; Chundawat, Shishir; Sousa, Leonardo

    2015-03-03

    A method of alkaline pretreatment of biomass, in particular, pretreating biomass with gaseous ammonia.

  15. METHOD OF PREPARING UF$sub 6$

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davidson, R.; Fried, S.

    1959-10-27

    A method is described of preparing uraniurn hexafluoride without the use of fluorine gas by reacting uraniurn tetrafluoride with oxygen gas under rigorously anhydrous conditions at 600 to 1300 deg K within a pre-fluorinated nickel vessel.

  16. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Fuel Ethanol An anhydrous alcohol (ethanol with less than 1% water) intended for gasoline blending as ...

  17. Factors controlling physico-chemical characteristics in the coastal waters off Mangalore-A multivariate approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirodkar, P.V. Mesquita, A.; Pradhan, U.K.; Verlekar, X.N.; Babu, M.T.; Vethamony, P.

    2009-04-15

    Water quality parameters (temperature, pH, salinity, DO, BOD, suspended solids, nutrients, PHc, phenols, trace metals-Pb, Cd and Hg, chlorophyll-a (chl-a) and phaeopigments) and the sediment quality parameters (total phosphorous, total nitrogen, organic carbon and trace metals) were analysed from samples collected at 15 stations along 3 transects off Karnataka coast (Mangalore harbour in the south to Suratkal in the north), west coast of India during 2007. The analyses showed high ammonia off Suratkal, high nitrite (NO{sub 2}-N) and nitrate (NO{sub 3}-N) in the nearshore waters off Kulai and high nitrite (NO{sub 2}-N) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}-N) in the harbour area. Similarly, high petroleum hydrocarbon (PHc) values were observed near the harbour, while phenols remained high in the nearshore waters of Kulai and Suratkal. Significantly, high concentrations of cadmium and mercury with respect to the earlier studies were observed off Kulai and harbour regions, respectively. R-mode varimax factor analyses were applied separately to surface and bottom water data sets due to existing stratification in the water column caused by riverine inflow and to sediment data. This helped to understand the interrelationships between the variables and to identify probable source components for explaining the environmental status of the area. Six factors (each for surface and bottom waters) were found responsible for variance (86.9% in surface and 82.4% in bottom) in the coastal waters between Mangalore and Suratkal. In sediments, 4 factors explained 86.8% of the observed total variance. The variances indicated addition of nutrients and suspended solids to the coastal waters due to weathering and riverine transport and are categorized as natural sources. The observed contamination of coastal waters indicated anthropogenic inputs of Cd and phenol from industrial effluent sources at Kulai and Suratkal, ammonia from wastewater discharges off Kulai and harbour, PHc and Hg from boat traffic and harbour activities of New Mangalore harbour. However, the strong seasonal currents and the seasonal winds keep the coastal waters well mixed and aerated, which help to disperse the contaminants, without significantly affecting chlorophyll-a concentrations. The interrelationship between the stations as shown by cluster analyses and depicted in dendograms, categorize the contamination levels sector-wise.

  18. Semipermeable polymers and method for producing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buschmann, Wayne E.

    2012-04-03

    A polyamide membrane comprising reaction product of an anhydrous solution comprising an anhydrous solvent, at least one polyfunctional secondary amine and a pre-polymer deposition catalyst; and an anhydrous, organic solvent solution comprising a polyfunctional aromatic amine-reactive reactant comprising one ring. A composite semipermeable membrane comprising the polyamide membrane on a porous support. A method of making a composite semipermeable membrane by coating a porous support with an anhydrous solution comprising an anhydrous solvent, a polyfunctional secondary amine and a pre-polymer deposition catalyst, to form an activated pre-polymer layer on the porous support and contacting the activated pre-polymer layer with an anhydrous, organic solvent solution comprising a polyfunctional amine-reactive reactant to interfacially condense the amine-reactive reactant with the polyfunctional secondary amine, thereby forming a cross-linked, interfacial polyamide layer on the porous support. A method of impregnating a composite semipermeable membrane with nanoparticles selected from heavy metals and/or oxides of heavy metals.

  19. A thiocyanate hydrolase of Thiobacillus thioparus. A novel enzyme catalyzing the formation of carbonyl sulfide from thiocyanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katayama, Y.; Narahara, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Amano, F.; Kanagawa, T.; Kuraishi, H. (Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, (Japan))

    1992-05-05

    A thiocyanate hydrolase that catalyzes the first step in thiocyanate degradation was purified to homogeneity from Thiobacillus thioparus, an obligate chemolithotrophic eubacterium metabolizing thiocyanate to sulfate as an energy source. The thiocyanate hydrolase was purified 52-fold by steps involving ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-Sephacel column chromatography, and hydroxylapatite column chromatography. The enzyme hydrolyzed 1 mol of thiocyanate to form 1 mol of carbonyl sulfide and 1 mol of ammonia as follows: SCN- + 2H2O----COS + NH3 + OH-. This is the first report describing the hydrolysis of thiocyanate to carbonyl sulfide by an enzyme. The enzyme had a molecular mass of 126 kDa and was composed of three different subunits: alpha (19 kDa), beta (23 kDa), and gamma (32 kDa). The enzyme exhibited optimal activities at pH 7.5-8.0 and at temperatures ranging from 30 to 40 degrees C. The Km value for thiocyanate was approximately 11 mM. Immunoblot analysis with polyclonal antibodies against the purified enzyme suggested that it was induced in T. thioparus cells when the cells were grown with thiocyanate.

  20. High-Pressure Turbulent Flame Speeds and Chemical Kinetics of Syngas Blends with and without Impurities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Eric; Mathieu, Olivier; Morones, Anibal; Ravi, Sankar; Keesee, Charles; Hargis, Joshua; Vivanco, Jose

    2014-12-01

    This Topical Report documents the first year of the project, from October 1, 2013 through September 30, 2014. Efforts for this project included experiments to characterize the atmospheric-pressure turbulent flame speed vessel over a range of operating conditions (fan speeds and turbulent length scales). To this end, a new LDV system was acquired and set up for the detailed characterization of the turbulence field. Much progress was made in the area of impurity kinetics, which included a numerical study of the effect of impurities such as NO2, NO, H2S, and NH3 on ignition delay times and laminar flame speeds of syngas blends at engine conditions. Experiments included a series of laminar flame speed measurements for syngas (CO/H2) blends with various levels of CH4 and C2H6 addition, and the results were compared to the chemical kinetics model of NUI Galway. Also, a final NOx kinetics mechanism including ammonia was assembled, and a journal paper was written and is now in press. Overall, three journal papers and six conference papers related to this project were published this year. Finally, much progress was made on the design of the new high-pressure turbulent flame speed facility. An overall design that includes a venting system was decided upon, and the detailed design is in progress.

  1. Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power L-CAT).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andruski, Joel; Drennen, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The Power Systems L-CAT is a high-level dynamic model that calculates levelized production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (using either imported (LNGCC) or domestic natural gas (NGCC)), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind. All of the fossil fuel technologies also include an option for including carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. The fossil fuel options are based on detailed life cycle analysis reports conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). For each of these technologies, NETL's detailed LCAs include consideration of five stages associated with energy production: raw material acquisition (RMA), raw material transport (RMT), energy conversion facility (ECF), product transportation and distribution (PT&D), and end user electricity consumption. The goal of the NETL studies is to compare existing and future fossil fuel technology options using a cradle-to-grave analysis. The NETL reports consider constant dollar levelized cost of delivered electricity, total plant costs, greenhouse gas emissions, criteria air pollutants, mercury (Hg) and ammonia (NH3) emissions, water withdrawal and consumption, and land use (acreage).

  2. Bonding and structure in dense multi-component molecular mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Edmund R.; Ticknor, Christopher; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Hamel, Sebastien; Redmer, Ronald; Kress, Joel D.; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-10-30

    We have performed finite-temperature density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations on dense methane, ammonia, and water mixtures (CH4:NH3:H2O) for various compositions and temperatures (2000 K ? T ? 10000 K) that span a set of possible conditions in the interiors of ice-giant exoplanets. The equation-of-state, pair distribution functions, and bond autocorrelation functions (BACF) were used to probe the structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. In particular, an improvement to the choice of the cutoff in the BACF was developed that allowed analysis refinements for density and temperature effects. We note the relative changes in the nature of these systems engendered by variations in the concentration ratios. As a result, a basic tenet emerges from all these comparisons that varying the relative amounts of the three heavy components (C,N,O) can effect considerable changes in the nature of the fluid and may in turn have ramifications for the structure and composition of various planetary layers.

  3. An Integrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhicheng Wang

    2007-03-15

    The new technology concept integrates two significant complementary hydrogen production and CO{sub 2}-sequestration approaches that have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Clark Atlanta University. The process can convert biomass into hydrogen and char. Hydrogen can be efficiently used for stationary power and mobile applications, or it can be synthesized into Ammonia which can be used for CO{sub 2}-sequestration, while char can be used for making time-release fertilizers (NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}) by absorption of CO{sub 2} and other acid gases from exhaust flows. Fertilizers are then used for the growth of biomass back to fields. This project includes bench scale experiments and pilot scale tests. The Combustion and Emission Lab at Clark Atlanta University has conducted the bench scale experiments. The facility used for pilot scale tests was built in Athens, GA. The overall yield from this process is 7 wt% hydrogen and 32 wt% charcoal/activated carbon of feedstock (peanut shell). The value of co-product activated carbon is about $1.1/GJ and this coproduct reduced the selling price of hydrogen. And the selling price of hydrogen is estimated to be $6.95/GJ. The green house experimental results show that the samples added carbon-fertilizers have effectively growth increase of three different types of plants and improvement ability of keeping fertilizer in soil to avoid the fertilizer leaching with water.

  4. In situ measurements of heterogeneous reactions on ambient aerosol particles: Impacts on atmospheric chemistry and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertram, Timothy

    2015-02-11

    Aerosol particles play a critical role in the Earth’s energy budget through the absorption and scattering of radiation, and/or through their ability to form clouds and alter cloud lifetime. Heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions alter the climate-relevant properties of aerosol particles and catalyze reaction pathways that are energetically unfavorable in the gas phase. The chemical composition of aerosol particles dictates the kinetics of heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions. At present, the vast majority of the molecular level information on these processes has been determined in laboratory investigations on model aerosol systems. The work described here provides a comprehensive investigation into the reactivity of complex, ambient aerosol particles is proposed to determine: 1) how representative laboratory investigations of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes conducted on model, simple systems are of the real atmosphere, and 2) the impact of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes on ambient particle optical properties and their ability to nucleate clouds. This work has focused on the uptake kinetics for ammonia (NH3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5). The results of these investigations will be used to directly improve the representation of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes in global climate models, by identifying the key mechanistic drivers that control the variability in the observed kinetics.

  5. Synthesis and Engineering Materials Properties of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Young Joon; Westman, Matthew P.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Chun, Jaehun; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high practical hydrogen content of 14-16 wt%. This material is selected as a surrogate chemical for a hydrogen storage system. For easier transition to the existing infrastructure, a fluid phase hydrogen storage material is very attractive and thus, we investigated the engineering materials properties of AB in liquid carriers for a chemical hydrogen storage slurry system. Slurries composed of AB and high temperature liquids were prepared by mechanical milling and sonication in order to obtain stable and fluidic properties. Volumetric gas burette system was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the AB slurry and neat AB. Viscometry and microscopy were employed to further characterize slurries engineering properties. Using a tip-sonication method we have produced AB/silicone fluid slurries at solid loadings up to 40wt% (6.5wt% H2) with viscosities less than 500cP at 25°C.

  6. Bonding and structure in dense multi-component molecular mixtures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meyer, Edmund R.; Ticknor, Christopher; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Hamel, Sebastien; Redmer, Ronald; Kress, Joel D.; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-10-30

    We have performed finite-temperature density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations on dense methane, ammonia, and water mixtures (CH4:NH3:H2O) for various compositions and temperatures (2000 K ≤ T ≤ 10000 K) that span a set of possible conditions in the interiors of ice-giant exoplanets. The equation-of-state, pair distribution functions, and bond autocorrelation functions (BACF) were used to probe the structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. In particular, an improvement to the choice of the cutoff in the BACF was developed that allowed analysis refinements for density and temperature effects. We note the relative changes in the nature of these systemsmore » engendered by variations in the concentration ratios. As a result, a basic tenet emerges from all these comparisons that varying the relative amounts of the three heavy components (C,N,O) can effect considerable changes in the nature of the fluid and may in turn have ramifications for the structure and composition of various planetary layers.« less

  7. Remediation of Uranium in the Hanford Vadose Zone Using Gas-Transported Reactants: Laboratory Scale Experiments in Support of the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Zhong, Lirong; Williams, Mark D.; Resch, Charles T.; McKinley, James P.

    2010-01-04

    This laboratory-scale investigation is focused on decreasing mobility of uranium in subsurface contaminated sediments in the vadose zone by in situ geochemical manipulation at low water content. This geochemical manipulation of the sediment surface phases included reduction, pH change (acidic and alkaline), and additions of chemicals (phosphate, ferric iron) to form specific precipitates. Reactants were advected into 1-D columns packed with Hanford 200 area U-contaminated sediment as a reactive gas (for CO2, NH3, H2S, SO2), with a 0.1% water content mist (for NaOH, Fe(III), HCl, PO4) and with a 1% water content foam (for PO4). Uranium is present in the sediment in multiple phases that include (in decreasing mobility): aqueous U(VI) complexes, adsorbed U, reduced U(IV) precipitates, rind-carbonates, total carbonates, oxides, silicates, phosphates, and in vanadate minerals. Geochemical changes were evaluated in the ability to change the mixture of surface U phases to less mobile forms, as defined by a series of liquid extractions that dissolve progressively less soluble phases. Although liquid extractions provide some useful information as to the generalized uranium surface phases (and are considered operational definitions of extracted phases), positive identification (by x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, other techniques) was also used to positively identify U phases and effects of treatment. Some of the changes in U mobility directly involve U phases, whereas other changes result in precipitate coatings on U surface phases. The long-term implication of the U surface phase changes to alter U mass mobility in the vadose zone was then investigated using simulations of 1-D infiltration and downward migration of six U phases to the water table. In terms of the short-term decrease in U mobility (in decreasing order), NH3, NaOH mist, CO2, HCl mist, and Fe(III) mist showed 20% to 35% change in U surface phases. Phosphate addition (mist or foam advected) showed inconsistent change in aqueous and adsorbed U, but significant coating (likely phosphates) on U-carbonates. The two reductive gas treatments (H2S and SO2) showed little change. For long-term decrease in U reduction, mineral phases created that had low solubility (phosphates, silicates) were desired, so NH3, phosphates (mist and foam delivered), and NaOH mist showed the greatest formation of these minerals. In addition, simulations showed the greatest decrease in U mass transport time to reach groundwater (and concentration) for these silicate/phosphate minerals. Advection of reactive gasses was the easiest to implement at the laboratory scale (and presumably field scale). Both mist and foam advection show promise and need further development, but current implementation move reactants shorter distances relative to reactive gasses. Overall, the ammonia and carbon dioxide gas had the greatest overall geochemical performance and ability to implement at field scale. Corresponding mist-delivered technologies (NaOH mist for ammonia and HCl mist for carbon dioxide) performed as well or better geochemically, but are not as easily upscaled. Phosphate delivery by mist was rated slightly higher than by foam delivery simply due to the complexity of foam injection and unknown effect of U mobility by the presence of the surfactant.

  8. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don

    2011-02-14

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 ?? LiAlH4 ??Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the alanate from alkali hydride, Al and hydrogen, was hampering reversibility. The reverse reaction was then studied for the same phase diagram, starting with LiH, NaH, and MgH2, and Al. The study was extended to phase diagrams including KH and CaH2 as well. The observed hydrogen storage capacity in the Al hexahydrides was less than 4 wt. %, well short of DOE targets. The HT assay came on line and after certification with studies on NaAlH4, was first applied to the LiNH2 - LiBH4 - MgH2 phase diagram. The 60-point study elucidated trends within the system locating an optimum material of 0.6 LiNH2 ?? 0.3 MgH2 ?? 0.1 LiBH4 that stored about 4 wt. % H2 reversibly and operated below 220 °C. Also present was the phase Li4(NH2)3BH4, which had been discovered in the LiNH2 -LiBH4 system. This new ternary formulation performed much better than the well-known 2 LiNH2 ?? MgH2 system by 50 °C in the HT assay. The Li4(NH2)3BH4 is a low melting ionic liquid under our test conditions and facilitates the phase transformations required in the hydrogen storage reaction, which no longer relies on a higher energy solid state reaction pathway. Further study showed that the 0.6 LiNH2 ?? 0.3 MgH2 ?? 0.1 LiBH4 formulation was very stable with respect to ammonia and diborane desorption, the observed desorption was from hydrogen. This result could not have been anticipated and was made possible by the efficiency of HT combinatorial methods. Investigation of the analogous LiNH2 ?? LiBH4 ?? CaH2 phase diagram revealed new reversible hydrogen storage materials 0.625 LiBH4 + 0.375 CaH2 and 0.375 LiNH2 + 0.25 LiBH4 + 0.375 CaH2 operating at 1 wt. % reversible hydrogen below 175 °C. Powder x-ray diffraction revealed a new structure for the spent materials which had not been previously observed. While the storage capacity was not impressive, an important aspect is that it boron appears to participate in a low temperature reversible reaction. The last major area of study also focused

  9. Transformation and Crystallization Energetics of Synthetic and Biogenic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radha, A. V.; Forbes, Tori Z.; Killian, Christopher E.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a metastable phase often observed during low temperature inorganic synthesis and biomineralization. ACC transforms with aging or heating into a less hydrated form, and with time crystallizes to calcite or aragonite. The energetics of transformation and crystallization of synthetic and biogenic (extracted from California purple sea urchin larval spicules, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) ACC were studied using isothermal acid solution calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Transformation and crystallization of ACC can follow an energetically downhill sequence: more metastable hydrated ACC ? less metastable hydrated ACC?anhydrous ACC ~ biogenic anhydrous ACC?vaterite ? aragonite ? calcite. In a given reaction sequence, not all these phases need to occur. The transformations involve a series of ordering, dehydration, and crystallization processes, each lowering the enthalpy (and free energy) of the system, with crystallization of the dehydrated amorphous material lowering the enthalpy the most. ACC is much more metastable with respect to calcite than the crystalline polymorphs vaterite or aragonite. The anhydrous ACC is less metastable than the hydrated, implying that the structural reorganization during dehydration is exothermic and irreversible. Dehydrated synthetic and anhydrous biogenic ACC are similar in enthalpy. The transformation sequence observed in biomineralization could be mainly energetically driven; the first phase deposited is hydrated ACC, which then converts to anhydrous ACC, and finally crystallizes to calcite. The initial formation of ACC may be a first step in the precipitation of calcite under a wide variety of conditions, including geological CO? sequestration.

  10. Absorption Heat Pumps | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    an ammonia-water absorption cycle to provide heating and cooling. As in a standard heat pump, the refrigerant (in this case, ammonia) is condensed in one coil to release its...

  11. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 1 Smart Grid Demonstration Project Locations NH MA 16 Awards Support Projects in 21 States

  12. Commercialization and cost-sharing potential for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plantships and facilities by industry, utilities and government

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, E.J.

    1980-01-01

    Following the introduction and summary on the US energy situation and the potential for OTEC, the remaining chapters deal with the OTEC-ammonia model; legal aspects of OTEC commercialization; the formation of SOLARAMCO, a joint venture of ammonia companies; electric power from OTEC, fuel cells and direct cables, potential cost-sharing; and OTEC production of ammonia for fertilizer.

  13. The Utility of FeVO4 in Combination with Stabilized Titanias for Mobile SCR Application

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Selective catalytic reduction studies with ammonia/NO model gas mixtures were used to screen mixed FeVO4/titania powders for activity in both fresh and aged conditions; reaction of ammonia in the absence of NO was also used as measure of ammonia oxidation tendency at elevated reaction temperatures

  14. Effects of torrefaction and densification on switchgrass pyrolysis products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zixu; Sarkar, Madhura; Kumar, Ajay; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Huhnke, Raymond L.

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The pyrolysis behaviors of four types of pretreated switchgrass (torrefied at 230 and 270 °C, densification, and torrefaction at 270 ºC followed by densification) were studied at three temperatures (500, 600, 700 ºC) using a pyroprobe attached to a gas chromatogram mass spectroscopy (Py-GC/MS). The torrefaction of switchgrass improved its oxygen to carbon ratio and energy content. Contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products of torrefied switchgrass were higher than those in pyrolysis products of raw switchgrass. As the torrefaction temperature increased from 230 to 270 °C, the contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products increased whereas content of guaiacols decreased. High pyrolysis temperature (600 and 700 °C as compared to 500 °C) enhanced decomposition of lignin and anhydrous sugars, leading to increase in phenols, aromatics and furans. Densification enhanced depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose during pyrolysis.

  15. Effects of torrefaction and densification on switchgrass pyrolysis products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zixu; Sarkar, Madhura; Kumar, Ajay; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Huhnke, Raymond L.

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The pyrolysis behaviors of four types of pretreated switchgrass (torrefied at 230 and 270 C, densification, and torrefaction at 270 C followed by densification) were studied at three temperatures (500, 600, 700 C) using a pyroprobe attached to a gas chromatogram mass spectroscopy (Py-GC/MS). The torrefaction of switchgrass improved its oxygen to carbon ratio and energy content. Contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products of torrefied switchgrass were higher than those in pyrolysis products of raw switchgrass. As the torrefaction temperature increased from 230 to 270 C, the contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products increased whereas content of guaiacols decreased. High pyrolysis temperature (600 and 700 C as compared to 500 C) enhanced decomposition of lignin and anhydrous sugars, leading to increase in phenols, aromatics and furans. Densification enhanced depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose during pyrolysis.

  16. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foropoulos, Jr., Jerry (Los Alamos, NM); Avens, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Trujillo, Eddie A. (Espanola, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride is provided.

  17. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.; Avens, L.R.; Trujillo, E.A.

    1992-03-24

    A process is described for preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride.

  18. Radiolytic and radiolytically induced generation of gases from synthetic wastes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meisel, D.; Jonah, C.D.; Kapoor, S.; Matheson, M.S.; Sauer, M.C. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    To better understand the processes leading to the generation and release of gases from waste tanks, the authors studied the radiolytic and thermal generation of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NH{sub 3} in nonradioactive waste simulant solutions and slurries. The radiolytic sources for H{sub 2} are e{sub aq}{sup {minus}} and its predecessors and H atoms. Radiolysis of the water generates some H{sub 2} and an additional amount comes from the hydrogen abstraction reaction H + RH{yields}H{sub 2}+R{center_dot}. Nitrate scavenges e{sub aq}{sup {minus}} and its predecessors whereas nitrite is the major H-atom scavenger. Computer modeling shows that if [NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}] is above 0.5 M, and [NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}] is above 2M, the addition of other scavengers will have little effect on the yield of H{sub 2}. In the presence of organic molecules O{sub 2} is efficiently destroyed. Small yields of ammonia were measured and the yields increase linearly with dose. The nitrogen in NH{sub 3} comes from organic chelators. The yields of gases in solution depend only weakly on temperature. The rate of thermal generation of gases increases upon preirradiation, reaches a maximum, and then declines. The known radiolytic degradation products of chelators, NTA, IDA, glycolate, glyoxylate, formaldehyde, formate, oxalate, and hydroxylainine were examined for their roles in the thermal generation of H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O at 60{degrees}C. In solution or slurry only radiolytically produced Pd intermediate strongly retains H{sub 2}. Radiolytic yields of N{sub 2}O are strongly reduced by Cr(III). In irradiated slurry, loose and tight gas were found. The loose gas could be removed by bubbling from the slurry, but the tight gas could be released only by dissolution of the slurry.

  19. Sewage treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fassbender, Alex G.

    1995-01-01

    The invention greatly reduces the amount of ammonia in sewage plant effluent. The process of the invention has three main steps. The first step is dewatering without first digesting, thereby producing a first ammonia-containing stream having a low concentration of ammonia, and a second solids-containing stream. The second step is sending the second solids-containing stream through a means for separating the solids from the liquid and producing an aqueous stream containing a high concentration of ammonia. The third step is removal of ammonia from the aqueous stream using a hydrothermal process.

  20. Experimental Demonstration of Advanced Palladium Membrane Separators for Central High Purity Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sean Emerson; Neal Magdefrau; Susanne Opalka; Ying She; Catherine Thibaud-Erkey; Thoman Vanderspurt; Rhonda Willigan

    2010-06-30

    The overall objectives for this project were to: (1) confirm the high stability and resistance of a PdCu trimetallic alloy to carbon and carbide formation and, in addition, resistance to sulfur, halides, and ammonia; (2) develop a sulfur, halide, and ammonia resistant alloy membrane with a projected hydrogen permeance of 25 m{sup 3}m{sup -2}atm{sup -0.5}h{sup -1} at 400 C and capable of operating at pressures of 12.1 MPa ({approx}120 atm, 1750 psia); and (3) construct and experimentally validate the performance of 0.1 kg/day H{sup 2} PdCu trimetallic alloy membrane separators at feed pressures of 2 MPa (290 psia) in the presence of H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and HCl. This project successfully increased the technology readiness level of palladium-based metallic membranes for hydrogen separation from coal-biomass gasifier exhaust or similar hydrogen-containing gas streams. The reversible tolerance of palladium-copper (PdCu) alloys was demonstrated for H{sub 2}S concentrations varying from 20 ppmv up to 487 ppmv and NH{sub 3} concentrations up to 9 ppmv. In addition, atomistic modeling validated the resistance of PdCu alloys to carbon formation, irreversible sulfur corrosion, and chlorine attack. The experimental program highlighted two key issues which must be addressed as part of future experimental programs: (1) tube defects and (2) non-membrane materials of construction. Four out of five FCC PdCu separators developed leaks during the course of the experimental program because {approx}10% of the alloy tubes contained a single defect that resulted in a thin, weak point in the tube walls. These defects limited operation of the existing tubes to less than 220 psig. For commercial applications of a PdCu alloy hydrogen separator under high sulfur concentrations, it was determined that stainless steel 316 is not suitable for housing or supporting the device. Testing with sulfur concentrations of 487 {+-} 4 ppmv resulted in severe corrosion of the stainless steel components of the separators. The project identified an experimental methodology for quantifying the impact of gas contaminants on PdCu alloy membrane performance as well as an atomistic modeling approach to screen metal alloys for their resistance to irreversible sulfur corrosion. Initial mathematical descriptions of the effect of species such as CO and H{sub 2}S were developed, but require further experimental work to refine. At the end of the project, an improvement to the experimental approach for acquiring the necessary data for the permeability model was demonstrated in preliminary tests on an enhanced PdCu separator. All of the key DOE 2010 technical targets were met or exceeded except for the hydrogen flux. The highest flux observed for the project, 125 ft{sup 3}ft{sup -2}h{sup -1}, was obtained on a single tube separator with the aforementioned enhanced PdCu separator with a hydrogen feed pressure of 185 psig at 500 C.

  1. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger: Preliminary test plan for Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankura, B.J.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants -- while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of addressing the emission of S0{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase 1 and Phase 2 requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The Task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variables than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The data from these tests greatly expands the IFGT performance database for coals and is needed for the technology to progress from the component engineering phase to system integration and commercialization. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides a preliminary test plan for all of the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

  2. Development of an Integrated Multi-Contaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Meyer

    2010-11-30

    This project met the objective to further the development of an integrated multi-contaminant removal process in which H2S, NH3, HCl and heavy metals including Hg, As, Se and Cd present in the coal-derived syngas can be removed to specified levels in a single/integrated process step. The process supports the mission and goals of the Department of Energy’s Gasification Technologies Program, namely to enhance the performance of gasification systems, thus enabling U.S. industry to improve the competitiveness of gasification-based processes. The gasification program will reduce equipment costs, improve process environmental performance, and increase process reliability and flexibility. Two sulfur conversion concepts were tested in the laboratory under this project, i.e., the solventbased, high-pressure University of California Sulfur Recovery Process – High Pressure (UCSRP-HP) and the catalytic-based, direct oxidation (DO) section of the CrystaSulf-DO process. Each process required a polishing unit to meet the ultra-clean sulfur content goals of <50 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) as may be necessary for fuel cells or chemical production applications. UCSRP-HP was also tested for the removal of trace, non-sulfur contaminants, including ammonia, hydrogen chloride, and heavy metals. A bench-scale unit was commissioned and limited testing was performed with simulated syngas. Aspen-Plus®-based computer simulation models were prepared and the economics of the UCSRP-HP and CrystaSulf-DO processes were evaluated for a nominal 500 MWe, coal-based, IGCC power plant with carbon capture. This report covers the progress on the UCSRP-HP technology development and the CrystaSulf-DO technology.

  3. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankura, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants - while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of a addressing the emission of SO{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase I and Phase II requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variable than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides the Final Test Plan for the first coal tested in the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

  4. Effects of a gradually increased load of fish waste silage in co-digestion with cow manure on methane production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solli, Linn Bergersen, Ove; Sørheim, Roald; Briseid, Tormod

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • New results from continuous anaerobic co-digestion of fish waste silage (FWS) and cow manure (CM). • Co-digestion of FWS and CM has a high biogas potential. • Optimal mixing ratio of FWS/CM is 13–16/87–84 volume%. • High input of FWS leads to accumulation of NH4+ and VFAs and process failure. - Abstract: This study examined the effects of an increased load of nitrogen-rich organic material on anaerobic digestion and methane production. Co-digestion of fish waste silage (FWS) and cow manure (CM) was studied in two parallel laboratory-scale (8 L effective volume) semi-continuous stirred tank reactors (designated R1 and R2). A reactor fed with CM only (R0) was used as control. The reactors were operated in the mesophilic range (37 °C) with a hydraulic retention time of 30 days, and the entire experiment lasted for 450 days. The rate of organic loading was raised by increasing the content of FWS in the feed stock. During the experiment, the amount (volume%) of FWS was increased stepwise in the following order: 3% – 6% – 13% – 16%, and 19%. Measurements of methane production, and analysis of volatile fatty acids, ammonium and pH in the effluents were carried out. The highest methane production from co-digestion of FWS and CM was 0.400 L CH4 gVS{sup −1}, obtained during the period with loading of 16% FWS in R2. Compared to anaerobic digestion of CM only, the methane production was increased by 100% at most, when FWS was added to the feed stock. The biogas processes failed in R1 and R2 during the periods, with loadings of 16% and 19% FWS, respectively. In both reactors, the biogas processes failed due to overloading and accumulation of ammonia and volatile fatty acids.

  5. Development of a reliable, miniaturized hydrogen safety sensor prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekhar, Praveen K; Brosha, Eric L; Rangachary, Mukundan; Garzon, Fernando H; Williamson, Todd L

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the development and long-term testing of a hydrogen safety sensor for vehicle and infrastructure applications is presented. The working device is demonstrated through application of commercial and reproducible manufacturing methods and rigorous life testing results guided by materials selection, and sensor design. Fabricated using Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) as the sensing electrode, Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen ion conducting solid electrolyte and Platinum (Pt) as a pseudo-counter electrode, the device was subjected to interference studies, temperature cycling, and long-testing routine. The sensor responded in real time to varying concentrations of H{sub 2} (1000 to 20,000 ppm) monitored under a humidified condition. Among the interference gases tested such as nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), carbon monoxide (CO), and propylene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}), the sensor showed cross-sensitivity to C{sub 3}H{sub 6}. Analyzing the overall device performance over 4000 hrs of testing for 5000 ppm of H{sub 2}, (a) the sensitivity varied {+-}21% compared to response recorded at 0 hrs, and (c) the response rise time fluctuated between 3 to 46 s. The salient features of the H{sub 2} sensor prototype designed and co-developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are (a) stable three phase interface (electrode/electrolyte/gas) leading to reliable sensor operation, (b) low power consumption, (b) compactness to fit into critical areas of application, (c) simple operation, (d) fast response, (e) a direct voltage read-out circumventing the need for any additional conditioning circuitry, and (f) conducive to commercialization.

  6. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in landfill leachate during the combined treatment process of air stripping, Fenton, SBR and coagulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, ZhiPing; Wu, WenHui; Shi, Ping; Guo, JinSong; Cheng, Jin

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • DOM fractions spectra analysis during the whole treatment process. • Efficient method was achieved to remove organic matters in landfill leachate. • Molecular weight distribution and fractions were discussed. - Abstract: A combined treatment process of air stripping + Fenton + sequencing batch reactor (SBR)+ coagulation was performed to remove the pollutants in landfill leachate. Molecular weight (MW) distribution and fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were discussed to study the characteristics. The experiment showed that the removal rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD), five day biological oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}) and ammonia nitrogen (NH{sub 3}−N) by the combined process were 92.8%, 87.8% and 98.0%, respectively. Humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) were the main fractions in raw leachate with 81.8% of the total COD concentration, while hydrophilic organic matter (HyI) was the dominant fraction in the final effluent of the combined process with 63.5% of the total COD concentration. After the combined treatment process, the removal rate of DOM and fractions HA, FA, HyI were 91.9%, 97.1%, 95.8% and 71.7%, respectively. Organic matters of MW < 2 k and MW > 100 k were removed with 90.5% and 97.9% COD concentration after the treatment. The ultraviolet–visible spectra (UV–vis), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) and three-dimensional excitation-emission matrices spectra (EEMs) indicated that benzene materials and phenol compounds were preferentially removed in air stripping. High MW matters, aromatic rings, conjugated moieties and some functional groups were mainly removed by Fenton. While small MW fractions, carboxylic acids, alcohols and protein-like materials were preferentially biodegraded via SBR. Fulvic-like and humic-like materials were mainly destroyed via Fenton oxidation and coagulation.

  7. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaw, W.E.; Spenceley, R.M.; Teetzel, F.M.

    1959-08-01

    A method is presented for producing uranium tetrafluoride from the gaseous hexafluoride by feeding the hexafluoride into a high temperature zone obtained by the recombination of molecularly dissociated hydrogen. The molal ratio of hydrogen to uranium hexnfluoride is preferably about 3 to 1. Uranium tetrafluoride is obtained in a finely divided, anhydrous state.

  8. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRACHLORIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Calkins, V.P.

    1958-12-16

    A process is descrlbed for the production of uranium tetrachloride by contacting uranlum values such as uranium hexafluoride, uranlum tetrafluoride, or uranium oxides with either aluminum chloride, boron chloride, or sodium alumlnum chloride under substantially anhydrous condltlons at such a temperature and pressure that the chlorldes are maintained in the molten form and until the uranium values are completely converted to uranlum tetrachloride.

  9. 1,"Seabrook","Nuclear","NextEra Energy Seabrook LLC",1246.2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Co of NH",472.1 5,"Newington","Petroleum","Public Service Co of NH",400.2 6,"S C Moore","Hydroelectric","TransCanada Hydro Northeast Inc.,",190.8 7,"Comerford","Hydroelectric...

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date:","12312015" ,"Next Release Date:","01292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3050nh3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghistn3050nh3m.htm"...

  11. Category:SmallHotel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cleveland OH Ohio Power Co.png SVSmallHotel Cleveland... 68 KB SVSmallHotel Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVSmallHotel Concord N... 71 KB SVSmallHotel Des Moines IA...

  12. EA-1801: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    01: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH EA-1801: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH June 25, 2010 EA-1801: Final Environmental ...

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    File Name:","n3020nh4m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghistn3020nh4m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help,...

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    File Name:","n3020nh2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghistn3020nh2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help,...

  15. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7 2 1 Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations NH 16 Awards Support Projects in 9 States MA

  16. ITP Chemicals: Final Report: Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ethylene, Caustic-Chlorine, Ethylene Oxide, Ammonia, and Terephthalic Acid, December 2007 | Department of Energy Final Report: Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Ethylene, Caustic-Chlorine, Ethylene Oxide, Ammonia, and Terephthalic Acid, December 2007 ITP Chemicals: Final Report: Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Ethylene, Caustic-Chlorine, Ethylene Oxide, Ammonia, and Terephthalic Acid, December 2007 PDF icon alt_tech_pub.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Chemicals:

  17. ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry (November 2007)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ethylene, Caustic-Chlorine, Ethylene Oxide, Ammonia, and Terephthalic Acid, December 2007 | Department of Energy Chemicals: Final Report: Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Ethylene, Caustic-Chlorine, Ethylene Oxide, Ammonia, and Terephthalic Acid, December 2007 ITP Chemicals: Final Report: Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Ethylene, Caustic-Chlorine, Ethylene Oxide, Ammonia, and Terephthalic Acid, December 2007 PDF icon alt_tech_pub.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP

  18. CX-009019: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DEVELOPMENT AND FULL-SCALE TESTING CX-009001: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ammonia Sensors Based on Doped-Sol-Gel-Tipped Optical Fibers for Catalyst System Diagnostics

  19. Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Eaton Aftertreatment System (EAS) for On-Highway Diesel Engines Diesel Reformers for On-board Hydrogen Applications Delphi On-board Ammonia Generation ...

  20. Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... modeling, statistical mechanical and coarse-grained ... of ammonia-based pretreatment strategies for ... chemicals using completely novel molecular pathways and ...

  1. Looking From A Hilltop: Automotive Propulsion System Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Engine Trends, Challenges and Opportunities Diesel Emission Control Review Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI ...

  2. Coking and gasification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Billimoria, Rustom M.; Tao, Frank F.

    1986-01-01

    An improved coking process for normally solid carbonaceous materials wherein the yield of liquid product from the coker is increased by adding ammonia or an ammonia precursor to the coker. The invention is particularly useful in a process wherein coal liquefaction bottoms are coked to produce both a liquid and a gaseous product. Broadly, ammonia or an ammonia precursor is added to the coker ranging from about 1 to about 60 weight percent based on normally solid carbonaceous material and is preferably added in an amount from about 2 to about 15 weight percent.

  3. On-board Measurement of NO and NO2 using Non-dispersive Ultraviolet...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications On-Board Measurement of Ammonia and Nitrous Oxide Using Feedback Absorption Laser Spectroscopy Combined with Amplified Resonance and Low Pressure ...

  4. Combining Feedback Absorption Spectroscopy, Amplified Resonance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications On-Board Measurement of Ammonia and Nitrous Oxide Using Feedback Absorption Laser Spectroscopy Combined with Amplified Resonance and Low Pressure ...

  5. Process for the treatment of lignocellulosic biomass (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The process preferably uses steam to strip ammonia from the biomass for recycling. The process yields of monosaccharides from the structural carbohydrates are good, particularly as ...

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (2) market (2) advances (1) ammonia (1) apoptosis (1) appendices (1) atlantic ocean (1) ... cell stress responses, apoptosis, proliferation, cell migration and hormone regulation. ...

  7. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Aqueous ammonia is neither a criteria pollutant nor a ... public facilities (landfill and waste management operations). ... is located at about 775 feet above mean sea level. ...

  8. In the field. Pilot project uses innovative process to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-04-01

    A pilot project at We Energies' Pleasant Prairie Power Plant uses chilled ammonia to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. 3 photos.

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Filter Results Filter by Subject ammonia (1) battery separators (1) brines (1) cathodes ... Channel flow cathode assembly and electrolyzer Larson, E. H. ; Fitch, R. H. ; Kurtz, B. E. ...

  10. Gokhan Barin | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Such features become particularly useful in challenging applications such as toxic gas (ammonia) removal from air and metal ion separations in aqueous media. My research...

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    idle since mid-December 2008. According to the companys press release, Terras methanol, ammonia, and nitrogen plants have resumed operations. Mosaic Company also restarted...

  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    idle since mid-December 2008. According to the companys press release, Terras methanol, ammonia, and nitrogen plants have resumed operations. Mosaic Company also restarted...

  13. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of ammonia diffusion in dense solid liquid slurries Revision Bobroff S Phillips R J Univ of California Davis CA United States Dept of...

  14. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... or any facilities upstream of Kingston, you will ... ammonia or steam methane reforming (SMR) of natural ... For air quality, emissions from the use of natural gas would ...

  15. Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ammonia to water bodies causes dead zones, but many wastewater treatment facilities do not have the current capability to economically meet the increasingly stringent standards. ...

  16. New Particle Formation Study Final Campaign Report (Program Document...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of ammonia and amines as well as organic and inorganic acids in both atmospheric nanoparticles and the gas phase; (3) investigate the contribution of other surface area or ...

  17. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Washington, DC (United States)","40 CHEMISTRY; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; LIQUID WASTES; AMMONIA; GAS ANALYSIS; HANFORD RESERVATION; RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE; DIFFUSION; NUCLEAR...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The ability to currently achieve the emission requirements specified in the deep sulfur ... oxygen plant, scrubber, ammonia absorber, water balance, combustion turbine-generator and ...

  19. Department of Energy Announces up to $40 Million in Available...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nuclear reactors will be used to power applications like advanced highly efficient turbines, manufacture plastic components from raw materials, or produce ammonia for fertilizer. ...

  20. Revised DOE sku calculations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ethylene Oxide, Ammonia, and Terephthalic Acid, December 2007 MotorMaster+ User Manual Fact 919: April 4, 2016 Plug-in Electric Vehicle Charging Options and Times Vary ...

  1. Integrated Boiler, Superheater & Decomposer Bayonet for Hydrogen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the production of hydrogen but a similar process can be applied to create ammonia and propane production.DescriptionOur technology integrates three main components in the...

  2. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Oil refining Gorgon Carbon Dioxide Injection Project Australia Natural gas processing ... Chemicals includes the manufacture of ammonia, methanol, and olefins, which rely on fossil ...

  3. Summary of the MECS 2002 User Needs Questionnaire

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    users provided very specific manufacturing types such as ammonia, methanol, and hydrogen in their responses, the NAICS does not allow for specific breakouts by product. The...

  4. Controlling Foaming in Hydrogen Release from Boranes - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Foaming in Hydrogen Release from Boranes Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Contact PNNL About This Technology From left to right: 100mg ammonia borane (AB) pellet;...

  5. Amminex A S | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Amminex AS Place: Lyngby, Denmark Zip: DK-2800 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Developing ammonia and hydrogen storage systems. Coordinates: 56.866669,...

  6. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number ORNL00-0605: Advanced Engine/Aftertreatment System R&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pihl, Josh A; West, Brian H; Toops, Todd J; Adelman, Brad; Derybowski, Edward

    2011-10-01

    Navistar and ORNL established this CRADA to develop diesel engine aftertreatment configurations and control strategies that could meet emissions regulations while maintaining or improving vehicle efficiency. The early years of the project focused on reducing the fuel penalty associated with lean NOx trap (LNT), also known as NOx adsorber catalyst regeneration and desulfation. While Navistar pursued engine-based (in-cylinder) approaches to LNT regeneration, complementary experiments at ORNL focused on in-exhaust fuel injection. ORNL developed a PC-based controller for transient electronic control of EGR valve position, intake throttle position, and actuation of fuel injectors in the exhaust system of a Navistar engine installed at Oak Ridge. Aftertreatment systems consisting of different diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) in conjunction with a diesel particle filter and LNT were evaluated under quasi-steady-state conditions. Hydrocarbon (HC) species were measured at multiple locations in the exhaust system with Gas chromatograph mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Under full-load, rated speed conditions, injection of fuel upstream of the DOC reduced the fuel penalty for a given level of NOx reduction by 10-20%. GC-MS showed that fuel compounds were 'cracked' into smaller hydrocarbon species over the DOC, particularly light alkenes. GC-MS analysis of HC species entering and exiting the LNT showed high utilization of light alkenes, followed by mono-aromatics; branched alkanes passed through the LNT largely unreacted. Follow-on experiments at a 'road load' condition were conducted, revealing that the NOx reduction was better without the DOC at lower temperatures. The improved performance was attributed to the large swings in the NOx adsorber core temperature. Split-injection experiments were conducted with ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel and three pure HC compounds: 1-pentene, toluene, and iso-octane. The pure compound experiments confirmed the previous results regarding hydrocarbon reactivity: 1-pentene was the most efficient LNT reductant, followed by toluene. Injection location had minimal impact on the reactivity of these two compounds. Iso-octane was an ineffective LNT reductant, requiring high doses (resulting in high HC emissions) to achieve reasonable NOx conversions. Diesel fuel reactivity was sensitive to injection location, with the best performance achieved through fuel injection downstream of the DOC. This configuration generated large LNT temperature excursions, which probably improved the efficiency of the NOx storage/reduction process, but also resulted in very high HC emissions. The ORNL team demonstrated an LNT desulfation under 'road load' conditions using throttling, EGR, and in-pipe injection of diesel fuel. Flow reactor characterization of core samples cut from the front and rear of the engine-aged LNT revealed complex spatially dependent degradation mechanisms. The front of the catalyst contained residual sulfates, which impacted NOx storage and conversion efficiencies at high temperatures. The rear of the catalyst showed significant sintering of the washcoat and precious metal particles, resulting in lower NOx conversion efficiencies at low temperatures. Further flow reactor characterization of engine-aged LNT core samples established that low temperature performance was limited by slow release and reduction of stored NOx during regeneration. Carbon monoxide was only effective at regenerating the LNT at temperatures above 200 C; propene was unreactive even at 250 C. Low temperature operation also resulted in unselective NOx reduction, resulting in high emissions of both N{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3}. During the latter years of the CRADA, the focus was shifted from LNTs to other aftertreatment devices. Two years of the CRADA were spent developing detailed ammonia SCR device models with sufficient accuracy and computational efficiency to be used in development of model-based ammonia injection control algorithms.ORNL, working closely with partners at Navistar and Mi

  7. In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies of Complex Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yelon, William B.

    2013-05-13

    The thrust of this project was to investigate the structures of important materials with potential application to hydrogen storage, in an effort to meet the DOE goals for 2010 and 2015, namely 9% (wt) and 15% (wt) respectively. Unfortunately, no material has been found, despite the efforts of many laboratories, including our own, that achieves these goals in a reversible complex hydride such as ammonia borane (NH{sub 4}BH{sub 4}), and other ammonia based compounds, or with light hydrides such as LiBH{sub 4}, due either to their irreversibility or to the high decomposition temperatures and residual simple hydrides such as LiH from the decomposition of the last named compound. Nevertheless, several important technical goals have been accomplished that could be valuable to other DOE programs and would be available for collaborative research. These include the development of a high quality glove box with controlled (low) oxygen and water content, which we continue to employ for the synthesis of potential new materials (unfunded research) and the development of a high quality neutron diffraction furnace with controlled gas environment for studies of hydrogen uptake and loss as well as for studies with other gasses. This furnace was initially constructed with an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) center tube to contain the sample and the flowing gas. The heaters are located in the vacuum space outside the tube and it was found that, for the low temperatures required for the study of hydrogen storage materials, the heat transfer was too poor to allow good control. At temperatures in excess of about 400C (and up to more than 1200C) the heat transfer and control are excellent. For the lower temperatures, however, the center tube was replaced by stainless steel and temperature control to 1C became possible. The paired heaters, above and below the neutron beam window allowed control of the temperature gradient to a similar precision. The high temperature capability of the furnace should make it a very valuable resource for the study of oxides being considered for application to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), in that materials can be studied at potential operating temperatures in both reducing and oxidizing environments to determine their stoichiometry, and lattice parameters. Our research, which was predicated, in part, on the use of hydrogenous samples (as opposed to deuteration), demonstrated that such studies are feasible and can yield high quality, refinable data. The precision of the refined hydrogen positions appears to be more than adequate for theory calculations (molecular modeling-thermodynamics) and the uncertainty is certainly less than that achieved by attempting to extrapolate the hydrogen positions from refined deuterium positions. In fact the 2008 annual report from the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL), the world's premier neutron scattering laboratory, highlights: Another trend is the increasing interest in hydrogen. This defies the widespread assumption that neutron diffraction experiments need to be done at deuterated samples. In situ experiments on phase transitions involving hydrogen and in particular on the real time behaviour of hydrogen-storage systems increase in number and scope. Our work in this area predates the ILL efforts be several years. Unfortunately, the productivity of our program was significantly curtailed by the unavailability of the MURR powder diffractometer for almost all of the second years of the project. The diffractometer was disassembled to allow partial extraction of the beam tube and replacement of the graphite element that is penetrated by the beam tube. Re-commissioning of the instrument was substantially delayed by errors of the MURR engineering staff, which failed to properly reinstall the sapphire filter that conditions the beam prior to the neutron monochromator, and reduces the radiological background to acceptable levels.

  8. Method for Improving Mg Doping During Group-III Nitride MOCVD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creighton, J. Randall; Wang, George T.

    2008-11-11

    A method for improving Mg doping of Group III-N materials grown by MOCVD preventing condensation in the gas phase or on reactor surfaces of adducts of magnesocene and ammonia by suitably heating reactor surfaces between the location of mixing of the magnesocene and ammonia reactants and the Group III-nitride surface whereon growth is to occur.

  9. Method for preparing actinide nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, G.H.; Cleveland, J.M.; Heiple, C.R.

    1975-12-01

    Actinide nitrides, and particularly plutonium and uranium nitrides, are prepared by reacting an ammonia solution of an actinide compound with an ammonia solution of a reactant or reductant metal, to form finely divided actinide nitride precipitate which may then be appropriately separated from the solution. The actinide nitride precipitate is particularly suitable for forming nuclear fuels.

  10. Advanced Metal-Oxide based SCR Catalysts | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SCR with ammonia as reductant is an effective strategy being utilized to reduce NOx emissions to meet regulated levels. PDF icon deer10_adelmann.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydrocarbon fouling of SCR during Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) combustion Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI Aftertreatment System Looking From A Hilltop: Automotive Propulsion System Technology

  11. Application of a Diesel Fuel Reformer for Tier 2 Bin 5 Emissions |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_bonadies.pdf More Documents & Publications Application of a Diesel Fuel Reformer for Tier 2 Bin 5 Emissions Delphi On-board Ammonia Generation (OAG) On-Board Ammonia Generation Using Delphi Diesel Fuel Reformer

  12. Alternatives/action plan report for outfall 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-11-01

    This Document contains information pertaining to alternatives/action associated with controlling ammonia entering through outfall 17. This document identifies the location of contaminate source, the ammonia concentration levels entering East Fork Poplar Creek, and the action taken to reduce/eliminate the toxicity problem.

  13. Integration of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors into Industrial Process Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Nelson

    2009-10-01

    This report is a preliminary comparison of conventional and potential HTGR-integrated processesa in several common industrial areas: ? Producing electricity via a traditional power cycle ? Producing hydrogen ? Producing ammonia and ammonia-derived products, such as fertilizer ? Producing gasoline and diesel from natural gas or coal ? Producing substitute natural gas from coal, and ? Steam-assisted gravity drainage (extracting oil from tar sands).

  14. Diesel Reformers for On-board Hydrogen Applications | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 DEER Conference Presentation: Hydrogen Source PDF icon 2003_deer_mauss.pdf More Documents & Publications On-Board Ammonia Generation Using Delphi Diesel Fuel Reformer Application of a Diesel Fuel Reformer for Tier 2 Bin 5 Emissions Delphi On-board Ammonia Generation (OAG)

  15. Determination of the Effect of Coal/Biomass-Derived Syngas Contaminants on the Performance of Fischer-Tropsch and Water-Gas-Shift Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trembly, Jason; Cooper, Matthew; Farmer, Justin; Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir

    2010-12-31

    Today, nearly all liquid fuels and commodity chemicals are produced from non-renewable resources such as crude oil and natural gas. Because of increasing scrutiny of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions produced using traditional fossil-fuel resources, the utilization of alternative feedstocks for the production of power, hydrogen, value-added chemicals, and high-quality hydrocarbon fuels such as diesel and substitute natural gas (SNG) is critical to meeting the rapidly growing energy needs of modern society. Coal and biomass are particularly attractive as alternative feedstocks because of the abundant reserves of these resources worldwide. The strategy of co-gasification of coal/biomass (CB) mixtures to produce syngas for synthesis of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels offers distinct advantages over gasification of either coal or biomass alone. Co-feeding coal with biomass offers the opportunity to exploit economies of scale that are difficult to achieve in biomass gasification, while the addition of biomass to the coal gasifier feed leverages proven coal gasification technology and allows CO{sub 2} credit benefits. Syngas generated from CB mixtures will have a unique contaminant composition because coal and biomass possess different concentrations and types of contaminants, and the final syngas composition is also strongly influenced by the gasification technology used. Syngas cleanup for gasification of CB mixtures will need to address this unique contaminant composition to support downstream processing and equipment. To investigate the impact of CB gasification on the production of transportation fuels by FT synthesis, RTI International conducted thermodynamic studies to identify trace contaminants that will react with water-gas-shift and FT catalysts and built several automated microreactor systems to investigate the effect of single components and the synergistic effects of multiple contaminants on water-gas-shift and FT catalyst performance. The contaminants investigated were sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and combinations thereof. This report details the thermodynamic studies and the individual and multi-contaminant results from this testing program.

  16. Turbulent flame speeds and NOx kinetics of HHC fuels with contaminants and high dilution levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, Eric; Krejci, Michael; Mathieu, Olivier; Vissotski, Andrew; Ravi, Sankar; Plichta, Drew; Sikes, Travis; Levacque, Anthony; Aul, Christopher; Petersen, Eric

    2012-09-30

    This progress report documents the second year of the project, from October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012. Characterization of the new turbulent flame speed vessel design was completed. Turbulence statistics of three impellers with different geometric features were measured using particle image velocimetry inside a Plexiglas model (~1:1 scale) of a cylindrical flame speed vessel (30.5 cm ID 35.6 cm L). With four impellers arranged in a central-symmetric configuration, turbulence intensities between 1.2 and 1.7 m/s with negligible mean flow (0.1u) were attained at the lowest fan speeds. Acceptable ranges for homogeneity and isotropy ratios of the velocity fields were set within a narrow bandwidth near unity (0.9-1.1). Homogeneity ratios were unaffected by changes to the impeller geometry, and the prototype with the higher number of blades caused the flow to become anisotropic. The integral length scale of the flow fields varied between 27 and 20 mm, which correlates well with those typically observed inside a gas turbine combustor. The mechanism to independently vary the intensity level and the integral length scale was established, where turbulence intensity level was dependent on the rotational speed of the fan, and the integral length scale decreased with increasing blade pitch angle. Ignition delay times of H?/O? mixtures highly diluted with Ar and doped with various amounts of N?O (100, 400, 1600, 3200 ppm) were measured in a shock tube behind reflected shock waves over a wide range of temperatures (940-1675 K). The pressure range investigated during this work (around 1.6, 13, and 30 atm) allows studying the effect of N?O on hydrogen ignition at pressure conditions that have never been heretofore investigated. Ignition delay times were decreased when N?O was added to the mixture only for the higher nitrous oxide concentrations, and some changes in the activation energy were also observed at 1.5 and 30 atm. When it occurred, the decrease in the ignition delay time was proportional to the amount of N?O added and depended on pressure and temperature conditions. A detailed chemical kinetics model was developed using kinetic mechanisms from the literature. This model predicts well the experimental data obtained during this study and from the literature. The chemical analysis using this model showed that the decrease in the ignition delay time was mainly due to the reaction N?O +M ? N? + O +M which provides O atoms to strengthen the channel O + H? ? OH + H. Ignition delay times have been measured behind reflected shock waves at 1.5, 12 and 30 atm for a mixture representative of a syngas produced from biomass (0.29659% CO / 0.29659% H? / 0.15748% CO? / 0.08924% CH? / 0.20997% H?O / 0.95013% O? in 98% Ar (mol.%)) and for the same biomass-derived syngas mixture doped with 200 ppm of NH?. The importance of the various constituents on the ignition delay time was investigated by comparing the results with data from various baseline mixtures (H?/O?/Ar, H?/CO/O?/Ar and H?/CO/O?/Ar with one of the other constituent of the syngas (i.e. CO?, H?O, CH? or NH?)). The equivalence ratio was set to 0.5 during this study. Several recent detailed kinetics mechanisms from the literature were computed against these data, with fair agreement. Results showed that the mixture composition can have an important effect on the ignition delay time, with most of the effect being due to CH? addition through the reaction CH?+OH?CH?+H?O. The ammonia impurity had very little effect on the ignition delay time over the range of conditions studied.

  17. George Andrew Olah - Patents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patents - George Andrew Olah Olah Page * Resources with Additional Information US 4,394,247 LIQUEFACTION OF COALS USING RECYCLABLE SUPERACID CATALYST - Olah, George A.; July 19, 1983 This invention discloses a process for the liquefaction of coals and other predominantly hydrocarbonaceous materials by treating the same with a superacidic catalyst system consisting of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride and boron trifluoride in the presence of super-atmospheric hydrogen. US 4,433,192 CONDENSATION OF

  18. Interfacial Electron-Phonon Coupling as the Cause of Enhanced Tc in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration We have approached the long-standing geochemical question why anhydrous high-Mg carbonate minerals (i.e., magnesite and dolomite) cannot be formed at

  19. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration We have approached the long-standing geochemical question why anhydrous high-Mg carbonate minerals (i.e., magnesite and dolomite) cannot be formed at

  20. Method for the synthesis of chlorosilanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheeler, David R.; Pollagi, Timothy P.

    1999-01-01

    A novel method for the synthesis of chlorinated or partially chlorinated organosilanes and organopolysilanes. The chlorination is effected by contacting an organosilanes or organopolysilanes with anhydrous CuCl.sub.2 in a nonpolar alkane solvent, preferably pentane or hexadecane, without the use of a catalyst. Copper metal, which is easily filtered, is a reaction product. The filtrate containing the chlorinated organosilane or organopolysilane can be used directly as a reactant to produce, for example, aminoorganosilanes.