National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for andy oare andy

  1. Andy Oare | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| DepartmentAL/FALGeologic CO2Solutions |Lawrence - Director, OfficeAndy

  2. Sandia Energy - Andy Armstrong

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULI ProgramPhysical Society Names FourAndy Armstrong

  3. World's Fastest Network Controller --in Haskell Andi Voellmy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Switch Data plane Switch Controller data Control API data Sotware-Defined Network Control Programs Andi

  4. Research Opportunities 2015-16 Prof Andy Wilson Prof Andy Wilson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    Research Opportunities 2015-16 Prof Andy Wilson 1 Prof Andy Wilson A.J.Wilson@leeds.ac.uk phone details of active research projects, please visit our webpage at: http://www.chem.leeds the development of inhibitors that can be used for ligand directed labelling of the target proteins, so

  5. Cold War Entanglements of Social ANDY BYFORD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solovey, Mark

    REVIEW Cold War Entanglements of Social Science ANDY BYFORD MLAC, Durham University, UK Cold War.00. The Cold War era the three decades between the end of the Second World War and the end of the Vietnam War of `America' s Cold War' (Farish, 2010). More speci cally, it focuses on the multiple ambiguous `entanglements

  6. Ningbo Andy Optoelectronic | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to:Inc JumpNigeria:Andy

  7. Small Wind Turbines Taking Off: Q&A with Andy Kruse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We caught up with Andy Kruse in Dallas to learn about mass production for small wind turbines, who is buying these systems, and what lies ahead for the small wind industry.

  8. TEXT ANALYSIS FOR CONSTRUCTING DESIGN REPRESENTATIONS ANDY DONG, ALICE M AGOGINO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    designers, manufacturing engineers, process planning engineers, and sales and marketing professionals a considerable amount of effort in accessing and absorbing design information. One can characterize this scenario1 TEXT ANALYSIS FOR CONSTRUCTING DESIGN REPRESENTATIONS ANDY DONG, ALICE M AGOGINO University

  9. Propulsive Efficiency of Rowing Oars David S. Cabrera1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    Propulsive Efficiency of Rowing Oars David S. Cabrera1 Andy L. Ruina2 Department of Theoretical Is the common folklore, that oars are less efficient at propulsion than propellers, correct? Here we examine the propulsive efficiency of the oars used in competitive rowing. We take the propulsive efficiency of rowing

  10. Rapid gravity and gravity gradiometry terrain correction via adaptive quadtree mesh discretization Kristofer Davis, M. Andy Kass, and Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristofer Davis, M. Andy Kass, and Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical and Magnetic Studies, Colorado

  11. ON THE DIMENSION OF SOLAR ATTRACTOR V.M. OSTRYAKOV andI. G. USOSKIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    ., 1983). To construct a model of solar activity on a long time-scale one should take into accountON THE DIMENSION OF SOLAR ATTRACTOR V.M. OSTRYAKOV andI. G. USOSKIN A. F. loffe Physico numbers and radiocarbon data (c), we have obtained the dimensions d of the solar attractor which are: 3

  12. What do humans maximize? Claire El Mouden, Maxwell Burton-Chellew, Andy Gardner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Stuart

    , or anything else such as happiness or income. As natural selection does not maximize happiness (from23 chapter 2 What do humans maximize? Claire El Mouden, Maxwell Burton-Chellew, Andy Gardner organisms, behave in ways which reveal that their ultimate goal is inclusive fitness maximization. Saying

  13. UFO: A Resilient Layered Routing Architecture Yaping Zhu , Andy Bavier , Nick Feamster , Sampath Rangarajan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rexford, Jennifer

    UFO: A Resilient Layered Routing Architecture Yaping Zhu , Andy Bavier , Nick Feamster , Sampath topologies. The paper presents a layered routing architecture called UFO (Underlay Fused with Overlays overlays into the existing routing infrastructure. We call our system UFO (Underlay Fused with Overlays

  14. Some Results In Passive-Dynamic Walking Mariano Garcia Andy Ruina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    Some Results In Passive-Dynamic Walking Mariano Garcia Andy Ruina Michael Coleman Anindya it as a natural motion of a simple uncontrolled and unpowered dynamical system, or a passive-dynamic system walking is based on an uncontrolled mechanical process by designing, building, and studying uncontrolled

  15. Automated Support for Classifying Software Failure Reports Andy Podgurski, David Leon, Patrick Francis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jiayang

    Automated Support for Classifying Software Failure Reports Andy Podgurski, David Leon, Patrick automated support for classifying reported software failures in order to facilitate prioritizing them of three large subject programs are reported. These results indicate that the strategy can be effective. 1

  16. MONITORING LUNG DISEASE USING ELECTRONIC STETHOSCOPE ARRAYS Kyle Mulligan, Andy Adler, and Rafik Goubran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    MONITORING LUNG DISEASE USING ELECTRONIC STETHOSCOPE ARRAYS Kyle Mulligan, Andy Adler, and Rafik evidence has shown that lung protective ventilation strategies lead to dramatic improvements in patient health by reducing ventilator induced lung injury (VILI) 1 . To protect against VILI, many novel modes

  17. THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A COTS SOFTWARE COMPONENT: A Ljerka Beus-Dukic, Andy Wellings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beus-Dukic, Ljerka

    Department of Computer Science, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom E-mail: {ljerka,andy}@cs.york.ac.uk Abstract The goal of the GUARDS project is to design and develop a generic fault-tolerant computer of the underlying hardware and software. The GUARDS1 project is an ESPRIT project with an aim to design and develop

  18. The EMBERS Architecture for Streaming Predictive Analytics Andy Doyle, Graham Katz, Kristen Summers, Chris Ackermann, Ilya Zavorin, Zunsik Lim,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Naren

    The EMBERS Architecture for Streaming Predictive Analytics Andy Doyle, Graham Katz, Kristen Summers is built on a streaming, scalable, share-nothing architecture and is deployed on Amazon Web Services (AWS America and the Middle East and North Africa on the basis of publicly available (open-source) data. EMBERS

  19. The Use of Lime in Fish Ponds1 Andy M. Lazur, Charles E. Cichra and Craig Watson2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    FA38 The Use of Lime in Fish Ponds1 Andy M. Lazur, Charles E. Cichra and Craig Watson2 1. There are three main purposes for liming ponds: 1) to increase the availability of nutrients, 2) to increase pH and to buffer against daily pH fluctuations and 3) to steril- ize ponds prior to stocking. While these practices

  20. How do communication systems emerge? Thomas C. Scott-Phillips1,*, Richard A. Blythe2, Andy Gardner3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Stuart

    How do communication systems emerge? Thomas C. Scott-Phillips1,*, Richard A. Blythe2, Andy Gardner3--that are functionally interdepen- dent. Consequently, the emergence of communication involves a chicken-and-egg problem: if signals and responses are dependent on one another, then how does such a relationship emerge in the first

  1. A feasibility experiment at RHIC to measure the analyzing power for Drell-Yan production (ANDY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Nogach; for the ANDY collaboration

    2011-12-08

    Large transverse single spin asymmetries (SSA) were measured for pions produced in pp-collisions up to RHIC energies. Sizeable SSA were also found in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS). Theory can explain such spin effects by going beyond collinear leading-twist perturbative QCD (pQCD) to include transverse momentum dependent (TMD) distribution and fragmentation functions. One of the most interesting TMDs is the Sivers function, which provides information on the correlation between the transverse spin of the nucleon and the transverse momentum distributions of the partons in the nucleon. It is particularly intriguing that theory predicts the Sivers function will change sign from SIDIS to Drell-Yan (DY) production. ANDY is aiming to test that prediction and to establish requirements for future upgrades at RHIC to study DY production. The experiment configuration, achievements to date, status and plans are discussed.

  2. A feasibility experiment at RHIC to measure the analyzing power for Drell-Yan production (ANDY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nogach, L

    2011-01-01

    Large transverse single spin asymmetries (SSA) were measured for pions produced in pp-collisions up to RHIC energies. Sizeable SSA were also found in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS). Theory can explain such spin effects by going beyond collinear leading-twist perturbative QCD (pQCD) to include transverse momentum dependent (TMD) distribution and fragmentation functions. One of the most interesting TMDs is the Sivers function, which provides information on the correlation between the transverse spin of the nucleon and the transverse momentum distributions of the partons in the nucleon. It is particularly intriguing that theory predicts the Sivers function will change sign from SIDIS to Drell-Yan (DY) production. ANDY is aiming to test that prediction and to establish requirements for future upgrades at RHIC to study DY production. The experiment configuration, achievements to date, status and plans are discussed.

  3. PARAID: The Gear-Shifting Power-Aware RAID Charles Weddle, Mathew Oldham, Jin Qian, An-I Andy Wang, Florida State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Andy

    1 PARAID: The Gear-Shifting Power-Aware RAID Charles Weddle, Mathew Oldham, Jin Qian, An-I Andy of all the disks in the array for even light loads. This paper introduces the gear-shifting Power the performance demands. Based on our 4-gear PARAID prototype, PARAID consumes 19% less power than a conventional

  4. The Origins of Democracy: Study Abroad in Greece Spring 2009 This past May, Rob Fleck, Andy Hanssen, and eleven MSU students traveled to Greece, visiting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    The Origins of Democracy: Study Abroad in Greece Spring 2009 This past May, Rob Fleck, Andy Hanssen, and eleven MSU students traveled to Greece, visiting major ancient sites. The two-week trip was an integral, and the Origins of Democracy: Lessons from Ancient Greece." Throughout the spring semester, the class studied

  5. Andy Griffin: Mariquita Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabkin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    like a shopper was fairly alien. Greg was probably moreIt was totally, totally alien. So anyway, we got startedbut—the business stuff is alien. I mean, she grew up in

  6. Interview of Andy Hopper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Andy

    2008-09-12

    , the U.S.A., Canada, Europe, and with luck I'll take it to New Zealand as we are going there for three months next year; for Africa, in say Namibia, you can fly to Skeleton Coast which is 700-800 miles at 50 feet all the way down; I have all the ?coms... of the solution, and indispensable for solving some of these things; imagine observing the real physical world using sensors in great detail and then using that data to optimise some energy cost or something, then feeding that back as a pricing mechanism or just...

  7. Andy Griffin: Mariquita Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabkin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Farms was a loss. So the third year after Riverside, when—fifty at the end of the third year, and we had four hundredthird week in March until right before Thanksgiving. One year

  8. Andy Griffin: Mariquita Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabkin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    the absorption of the retail organic market by a handful offarmers’-market business, so that it was all direct-retail,retail opportunity for this stuff opening up. You couldn’t see the stuff in the farmers’ markets

  9. Andy Griffin: Mariquita Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabkin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    the organic model, the business model that had prevailed uplot to learn about that business model. We weren’t going toconstructed the business model for the farm around the idea

  10. ANDI~E TRETIAKOFF RESULTS OBTAINED WITH A NEW METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as it is based on a preliminary knowledge of the language. We will show later how the results of the analysis can are suppressed. We will call now "words" these symbols. 2. DICTIONARY OF STRINGS The second step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 04 Each string is obtained by suppressing the first word ·ing string. of the preced- #12;AUTOMATIC

  11. R&D Magazine's 2010 Scientist of the Year | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Magazine's 2010 Scientist of the Year November 15, 2010 - 2:35pm Addthis Dr. Richard Smith Dr. Richard Smith Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public...

  12. Introduction to Andy Ruina and Rudra Pratap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    the net force on system is zero. (Ic) II) Angular Momentum Balance (AMB)/Moment Balance Equation of motion) for finite time t2 t1 Qdt + t2 t1 Pdt = E The net energy flow going in is equal to the net change in energy Kinetic energy A scalar measure of net system motion. Eint = (heat-like terms) Internal energy The non

  13. Removing GC Synchronisation Andy C. King

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    . In the lat­ ter case, synchronisation is necessary between mutator (ap­ plication) and garbage collector state, i.e. that the location of all references be guaranteed, thus enabling the collector to accurately costly where thou­ sands of threads are involved. Table 1 demonstrates the cost for the Sun Labs Virtual

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Jordi Figuerola Andy J. Green

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figuerola, Jordi

    to the fitness of individuals (Rockwell et al. 1987; Briskie and Sealy 1989; but see Ho^ rak et al. 1997; Heusmann 1972; Rohwer 1988). Secondly, clutch size could be limited by predation pressure during nesting (1991a) for general analyses on precocial and altricial birds). Laurila (1988) reported a significant

  15. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Jordi Figuerola Andy J. Green

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Andy J.

    is an important factor related to the fitness of individuals (Rockwell et al. 1987; Briskie and Sealy 1989 1951; Hilden 1964; Fredrickson 1969; Heusmann 1972; Rohwer 1988). Secondly, clutch size could birds). Laurila (1988) reported a significant effect of nest placement on clutch size in waterfowl, due

  16. Mr. Andy Wall0 The Aerospace Corporation

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and MyersHr.EvaluationJune 20070.C. 20545 OCT'k.f'

  17. "Boredom's Erotics": Stillness and Duration in Andy Warhol's Empire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahng, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    antics—of Warhol’s cinematic practice. 3 SurreptitiouslyHorkheimer similarly compare cinematic spectatorship withprior to the advent of cinematic technology. 20 As Linda

  18. "Boredom's Erotics": Stillness and Duration in Andy Warhol's Empire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahng, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    That Old Thing, Art,” in Post-Pop, ed. Paul Taylor WarholThe First Pop Age: Painting and Subjectivity in the Art ofThat Old Thing, Art. ” In Post-Pop. Edited by Paul Taylor,

  19. Issue 3 August 2010 ProductsBy Andy Brice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Might, Matt

    .2 SOCIAL #12;influence 30,000programmers & startup founders Advertise with us To advertise with Hacker under hn.my. It is Hacker Monthly's own URL shortening service. Design-wise, the font is slightly (1pt. Hacker Monthly is slowly taking shape, one issue at a time. I need your feedback the most at this stage

  20. General Assembly of the National Industrial Association (ANDI) | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11, SolarMat 4" |a,- p^A CU ^ ^JL\WardNiketaof

  1. Sandia Energy - SSLS Scientist Andy Armstrong Receives 2013 Employee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygenLaboratory Fellows JerryPredictive4:

  2. OAR 340-120 - Additional Siting and Permitting Requirements for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Page Edit with form History OAR 340-120 - Additional Siting and Permitting Requirements for Hazardous Waste and PCB Treatment and Disposal Facilities Jump to: navigation, search...

  3. Living on the Edge: Agriculture in Periurban Mexico City Andy Wanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , rather than having to pay for 1) someone to truck out animal waste, 2) natural gas, and 3) chemical fertilizer, farmers can convert the waste to methane gas ­ and use the byproduct, organic fertilizer. Methane all of IU & SB's projects to date, as well as likely marketing targets for the future based

  4. A New Era of Climate Change Consciousness By: Andy Hoffman | February 17, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Andrew J.

    of the International Emissions Trading Association (IETA), as well as a collaborator with the World Business Council that path in the EU a decade ago - it didn't last and the EU Emissions Trading System was established

  5. The Echo Distributed File System Andrew D. Birrell, Andy Hisgen, Chuck Jerian,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Shiu-Kai

    . All rights reserved. #12;The Echo Distributed File System · 1 WHAT AND WHY? One of the holy grails systems with the virtues of distributed and personal computer systems. This grail is all the harder to capture the file system portion of this grail. We thought of the Echo file system as a crucial first piece

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - Andy Ronald.Finger Lakes NGL Storage Providence...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    opportunity for optimization, organic expansion, and strategic M&A ASSET SUMMARY (1) * Natural Gas - 1.3 Bcfd natural gas transportation capacity - 2.1+ Bcfd gathering...

  7. Elisa Carboni1, Roy Grainger1, Gareth Thomas1, Andy Sayer1,2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensitivity to the aerosol vertical distribution, surface temperature and atmospheric profile. and 0, extinction profile concentration) Sun-photometer: Plymouth, Chilbolton-Aeronet,Sun-photometer: Plymouth, Chilbolton-Aeronet, Cambridge-microtop. (AOD, size distribution) Radiosonde: particle profile ( ash

  8. Numerical simulation of an experimental analogue of a planetary magnetosphere Andy Sha Liaoa,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartigan, Patrick

    generated by a planetary dynamo deflect the solar wind high above the planet's surface. The interaction distributions of the plasma. When the magnetosphere analogue nears the steady state, the mid-plane altitude of the magnetopause from the wire surface scales as the one-half power of the ratio of the magnetic pressure

  9. The Brazen Nose Cover Images: Photography by Andy Spain, courtesy of Berman Guedes Stretton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Clubs BNCBC.......................................65 Ladies' Football Club ....................71 1st Team Football..........................72 HCR Football ..............................74 Rugby Football

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - 9_ANDY_IMBODEN_NMMSS_2014_Powerpoint_Waste...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Schedule Completed Activities Public Participation Public Input to Policy Issues Path Forward 2 Schedule 3 2012 2012 2013 2013 2014 2014 Scoping for GEIS...

  11. ANDY: A general, fault-tolerant tool for database searching oncomputer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    data and figures and amore detailed overview of thesoftware. Authors: Smith, Andrew ; Chandonia, John-Marc ; Brenner, Steven E. Publication Date: 2005-12-21 OSTI...

  12. Managing Secure Survivable Critical Infrastructures To Avoid Vulnerabilities Frederick Sheldon, Tom Potok, Andy Loebl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Axel W.

    for the strategic and economic well being of the Nation. The blackout of August 14, 2003 affected 8 states and fifty 3 The DOE/NERC reports are at https://reports.energy.gov/ and ftp://www.nerc.com/pub/sys/all_updl/docs/pressrel/Blackout

  13. Numerical and experimental investigation of laser induced tube bending Wenchuan Li andY. Lawrence Yao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    normally requires repeated annealing when mechanical bending is used. Silve, et a!. investigated procedures for laser bending ofsquare cross-section tubes ofmild steel1 · Different scanning sequences were compared

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - 6_Andy IMboden_Presentation to 2013 NMMSS...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Contact Info and Resources 2 Waste Confidence Generic "Findings" on Spent Fuel Storage and Repository Availability - Safety and environmental findings - Decision and...

  15. ANDY: A general, fault-tolerant tool for database searching oncomputer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL(Technicalentanglements forusingandclusters (Journal Article)

  16. ANDY: A general, fault-tolerant tool for database searching oncomputer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL(Technicalentanglements forusingandclusters (Journal

  17. SU-E-J-59: Effective Adaptive DMLC Gated Radiotherapy with OAR Sparing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y; Wu, H; Zhou, Z; Sandison, MinGeorge

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient respiratory motion degrades the effectiveness of cancer radiation treatment. Advanced respiratory gating delivers radiation dose accurately yet with elongated treatment time. The goal of this research is to propose a novel adaptive dMLC dynamic gating with high delivery efficiency and precision. Methods: The dose delivery of dMLC is aided by simultaneous tracking of tumor and organ at risk (OAR). The leaf opening/closing will follow the motion trajectory of the tumor while sparing the OAR. The treatment beam turns on only when there is no overlapping between OAR and tumor in BEV. A variety of evaluation metrics were considered and calculated, including duty cycle, beam toggling rate, and direct irradiation avoidance to OAR, under various combinations of different tumor margins and the distance between the centers of the tumor and OAR in BEV (expressed as dx). Results: Retrospective simulation was performed to investigate the feasibility and superiority of this technique using four groups of synchronized tumor and OAR motion data. The simulation results indicate that the tumor and OAR motion patterns and their relative positions are the dominant influential factors. The duty cycle can be greater than 96.71% yet can be as low as 6.69% depending different motion groups. This proposed technique provides good OAR protection, especially for such cases with low duty cycle for which as high as 77.71% maximal direct irradiation to OAR can be spared. Increasing dx improves the duty cycle (treatment efficiency) and provides better OAR volume sparing, whereas, that of the tumor margins has the opposite influence. Conclusion: This real-time adaptive dMLC gated radiation treatment with synchronous tumor and OAR tracking has inherent accurate dose delivery to tumor with reduced treatment time. In addition, the OAR protection capability make it an outstanding potential treatment strategy for mobile tumors.

  18. Alexandra C. Aaron Ashley O. Brooks Joshua I. Esezobor Afrah I. Abdullahi Jasmine N. Bui Andy J. Espinoza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    . Guilford Sadiyyah Bell Jared C. Davis Makda L. Habte Elyse R. Benjamin Julie A. Davis Hanna Haile Abiel. Bradley Jayla I. Embry Erin C. Hightower Caitlin Branson Mary Margaret J. Enrile Sarah E. Hill Zachary P

  19. Free Lunch: Exploiting Renewable Energy For Computing Sherif Akoush, Ripduman Sohan, Andrew Rice, Andrew W. Moore and Andy Hopper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    as an alternative energy source to fossil fuels in the hope of mitigating our ecolog- ical footprint [4 grid requires upgrading in order to collect, store and distribute this type of energy. Addition- allyFree Lunch: Exploiting Renewable Energy For Computing Sherif Akoush, Ripduman Sohan, Andrew Rice

  20. Enhancing impedance imaging through multi-modal Doga Gursoy, Member, IEEE, Yasin Mamatjan, Andy Adler and Hermann Scharfetter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    with respect to the basic principle of generating a current density distribution inside a body and recording the electrical conductivity distribution inside a human body. Figure 1 demonstrates the basic principles of three tomography (MIT). The common principles of those modalities are based on generating a current density

  1. Inversion of multi-channel data with rotated kernels M. Andy Kass, Trevor Irons, and Yaoguo Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    content into numerical interpretation, so must statistically rotated data include the rotation operator), seismic de-noising (Jackson et al., 1991; Jones and Levy, 1987), blind source separation for transient content, amplitude, etc.). If interpretation is to include numerical inversion, these effects must

  2. ENG BE 700 (A1-A2): Mathematical Methods in Biomedical Engineering Instructor: Andy Fan (fana@bu.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    . Matlab: Since matrix-dependent elements will be in no short supply in this class, we will adopt Matlab. Programming tips in Matlab will be provided throughout the course during recitations, office hours

  3. Fault Localization in Embedded Control System Kai Liang, Zhuofu Bai, M. Cenk avusoglu, Andy Podgurski and Soumya Ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Soumya

    Fault Localization in Embedded Control System Software Kai Liang, Zhuofu Bai, M. Cenk Ã?avu--We describe an approach to automatically locating faulty statements in control code in embedded systems. Our and presented to the developer. We evaluate our approach on the control systems for two prototype robotic

  4. A Real-World Attack Breaking A5/1 within Hours Timo Gendrullis, Martin Novotny, Andy Rupp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    /1 is a synchronous stream cipher accepting a 64-bit session key KS = (k0, . . . , k63) GF(2)64 and a 22-bit initial, and R3, respectively. The A5/1 keystream generator works as follows. First, an initialization phase/1 Based on this initial state Si the warm-up phase is performed where the generator is clocked for 100

  5. BEAT: Bio-Environmental Android Tracking Michael Mitchell, Frank Sposaro, An-I Andy Wang, Gary Tyson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Andy

    Tyson {mitchell,sposaro,awang,tyson}@cs.fsu.edu Department of Computer Science, Florida State University. MOTIVATION Heart disease is a leading cause of death in most developed nations. In the U.S., cardiac-related fatalities rank first, being responsible for 26% of all deaths [1]. The most common sub

  6. The EMBERS Architecture for Streaming Predictive Analytics Andy Doyle, Graham Katz, Kristen Summers, Chris Ackermann, Ilya Zavorin, Zunsik Lim,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Naren

    ] is an anticipatory intelligence system supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Project Activity (IARPA) OSI America and the Middle East and North Africa on the basis of publicly available (open-source) data. EMBERS. Architecturally EMBERS is closely related to the UIMA [3] model for pipeline processing of content and similar

  7. Free Lunch: Exploiting Renewable Energy For Computing Sherif Akoush, Ripduman Sohan, Andrew Rice, Andrew W. Moore and Andy Hopper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Free Lunch: Exploiting Renewable Energy For Computing Sherif Akoush, Ripduman Sohan, Andrew Rice renewable en- ergy by (i) colocating datacentres with these remote energy sources, (ii) connecting them over that period. In anticipation of this growth, our industry is begin- ning to explore renewable energy

  8. The Newsletter of the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory Graduate Association Governing Council: Chairman: Prof Andy Hopper (TH78)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    's Annual Dinner on March 19th 2007. The event will be held in Queens' Old Hall, one of Cambridge's most graduate and Chartered Accountant, joined the board of Sage in 1984 and became Chairman in 1997. Under his his energy as Chairman of Elderstreet Investments Limited, a venture capital and investment company

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - 6_Andy IMboden_Presentation to 2013 NMMSS Conference.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3Overview of DOEElectronic InputWaste

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - 9_ANDY_IMBODEN_NMMSS_2014_Powerpoint_Waste Confidence Update Imboden.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3Overview ofAgreementsMartynUse of

  11. Oregon - OAR 860-025-0030 - Petition for CPCN for Construction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon - OAR 860-025-0030 - Petition for CPCN for Construction of Overhead Transmission Lines Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  12. OAR 340-044 - Construction and Use of Waste Disposal Wells or...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OAR 340-044 - Construction and Use of Waste Disposal Wells or Other Underground Injection Activities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal...

  13. Bioavailability of Cadmium and Zin to Two Earthworm Species in High-metal Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    sources for Zn are electroplating industry, smelting andis commonly used in electroplating (Scoullos et al. , 2001).

  14. Computational Vision: Principles of Perceptual Inference Alan L. Yuille

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kersten, Dan

    /a Complete List of Authors: Smith, Andy; Royal Holloway, University of London, Psychology Wall, Matthew B

  15. StrategicPlan Strand Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmentallyfriendlyprocesses, fromsustainableandrenewable sources,andisECF-acidfreeand conforms to ISO 14001 certification

  16. ForPeerReview Vestibular inputs to human motion-sensitive visual cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    /a Complete List of Authors: Smith, Andy; Royal Holloway, University of London, Psychology Wall, Matthew B

  17. NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-121 ATLAS Module Temperature Bias Due to Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-121 ATLAS Module Temperature Bias Due to Solar Heating P.N. A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 Temperature time series from a 1 m Seacat, NX Modules at 1 m and 10 m, and downwelling solar values for a given day. . 6 #12;iv Contents #12;ATLAS Module Temperature Bias Due to Solar Heating P.N. A

  18. Western Nanofabrication Facility Dr. Jiajun Wang, PDF, supervisor: Prof. Andy X Sun. In collaboration with Ruying Li, Guoxian Liang and Michel Gauthier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    LiFePO4 material for future energy storage devices. Interaction of carbon coating on LiFePO4: Local of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, London, ON, Canada As a well-known positive the influencing factors from impurity phases on basic carbon-deposition process and on obtaining high- performance

  19. UO Department of Chemistry -Faculty Research Interests Berglund, Andy -The primary goals of the Berglund lab are to understand the molecular basis of the human disease myotonic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cina, Jeff

    measurement, and device fabrication to design, build and study new materials and structures that have applications in solar energy harvesting and electrochemical energy storage. Chartoff, Richard - The UO Polymer relevance to developing technologies. Pluth, Michael D. - Research in the Pluth group focuses on extending

  20. New Views of the U.S. Atlantic Margin Mapped for UNCLOS Applications. James V. Gardner, Larry A. Mayer, Andy Armstrong, University of New Hampshire,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    areas of the lower slope. The large-area mapping required to support an UNCLOS submission, generates for the next generation of continental-margin studies. As part of the U.S. UNCLOS effort, the entire U to channels farther upslope. #12;Failures are common in the northern 80\\% of the margin. Some failures

  1. UO Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry -Faculty Research Interests Berglund, Andy -The primary goals of the Berglund lab are to understand the molecular basis of the human disease myotonic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cina, Jeff

    , physical measurement, and device fabrication to design, build and study new materials and structures that have applications in solar energy harvesting and electrochemical energy storage Cina, Jeffrey A solids that permits them to prepare families of new nanostructured and kinetically stable compounds

  2. OAR 635-415 - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New JumpandInformation OAR

  3. A proposal for positive cooperativity in anion-cation binding in yttrium and lutetium complexes based on o-amino-substituted phenolate ligands. On the way to coordination polymers by self-assembly. Molecular structures of [ClLu(OAr){sub 3}Na] (X-ray) and [ClY(OAr{prime}){sub 3}Y(OAr{prime}){sub 3}Na] (X-ray and {sup 89}Y-NMR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogerheide, M.P.; Ringelberg, S.N.; Grove, D.M.

    1996-02-28

    The authors prepared the hetero(poly)metallic complexes [ClM(OAr){sub 3}Na] (M = Lu (3a), Y (3b)) and [ClY(OAr`){sub 3}Y(OAR`){sub 3}Na] (4) (OAr = OC{sub 6}H{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-2,6,Me-4; OAr` = OC{sub 6}H{sub 4}(CH{sub 2}NMe{sub 2})-2). Structural analysis was afforded by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The structures show evidence for anion-cation cooperativity in bonding and are discussed in detail for the compounds in both the solid state and in solution.

  4. When and Why States Project Power /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markowitz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Home, Andy. "Will the Real Norilsk Owner Please Stand Up?"article/2012/12/07/column-home-norilsk-nickel-Andy Home, "Will the real Norilsk owner please stand up? ,"

  5. A. G. Walton October 1999 Civil Engineering CE201 Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, Andrew G

    Civil Engineering CE201 Mathematics Lecturers: Andy Walton, David Denison, Roy Jacobs Timetable. Advanced Engineering Mathematics, E. Kreyszig.

  6. Revue de presse ANGLAIS Semaine du 23 au 29 mai 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rennes, Université de

    Fukushima (by Andy Coghlan) : Why did one nuclear site in Fukushima escape damage from the earthquake? Mike

  7. Juridification and Democracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bevir, Mark

    2009-01-01

    matters because so many political actors believe in it andis typically a result of political actors taking the same

  8. 800,000 Jobs by 2012 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1 of 8 2 ofcontractors4/2014 DOEAndy Oare Andy

  9. Molecular pharmacology of an insect GABA receptor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGonigle, Ian Vincent

    2010-10-12

    and guided by Andy Thompson. Andy is an exceptional scientist and his electrophys expertise, his good company and his enthusiasm have made my PhD a truly enjoyable experience; thanks Andy. In moments of molecular biology crisis Kerry Price has always been... mention and thanks. They were always there to answer my questions about practical things and their knowledge and experience were greatly valued. The many students and visitors who have passed through ‘Skylab’ have enhanced the experience of my Ph...

  10. Thermochemical Interface

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermochemical Interface PNNL-SA-109025 DATE MARCH 24, 2015 TECHNOLOGY AREA REVIEW: ALGAE DAN ANDERSON DOUG ELLIOTT, ANDY SCHMIDT, KARL ALBRECHT, JON MAGNUSON PACIFIC NORTHWEST...

  11. Good Reception: Utilizing Mobile Media and Games to Develop Critical Inner-City Agents of Social Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Antero David

    2012-01-01

    tools (from computers and 3d printers to hammers, nails, andis devoid of power tools and 3d printers (it has mostly been

  12. Passive Solar Building Design and Solar Thermal Space Heating Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Senior Engineer Andy Walker's presentation about passive solar building design and solar thermal space heating technologies and applications.

  13. ORISE: Mosley selected as ORISE director of employee relations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to her new role at ORAU," said ORAU President and CEO Andy Page. "Her knowledge of strategic planning, diversity management systems, as well as internal and external...

  14. Educating The Local STEM Community On The Way To Institutional Transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilbury, Dawn

    and Distinguished Professor of Biochemistry ¡ Andy Hirsch, Professor of Physics Engineering and Associate Dean in the College of Engineering #12;¨ Diversity

  15. Volcanic, erosional, tectonic, and biogenic peaks on Guyot Summit Plains in the Louisville Seamount Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebuna, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    became submerged due to thermal subsidence of the underlyinginception to emergence and subsidence below sea level, andis the rapid change from subsidence to uplift as the guyot

  16. "We will die and become science" : the production of invisibility and public knowledge about Chernobyl radiation effects in Belarus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuchinskaya, Olga

    2007-01-01

    of health effects from low-dose radiation exposures, andis suggested. conditions of low-dose radiation is available,imperceptibility, low-dose radiation exposure is associated

  17. DOE Announces Webinars on the Buildings of the Future Research...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (in Buildings): Towards the Energy System of the Future - Andy Walker, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Forecasting Building Energy Demands from Very Dense Cities - Jorge...

  18. Between the poles : locating physics majors in the expert-novice continuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gire, Elizabeth Ellen

    2007-01-01

    these two [kinetic and potential energy] correspond andis the kinetic energy minus the potential energy and theyis the kinetic energy minus the potential energy and they

  19. Influence of argon and oxygen on charge-state-resolved ion energy distributions of filtered aluminum arcs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Johanna; Anders, Andre; Mraz, Stanislav; Atiser, Adil; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-01-01

    in filtered aluminum vacuum arc plasmas were measured andI. INTRODUCTION Vacuum arc plasma is well known to be highlymeasured for vacuum arc plasmas. Aluminum plasma, for

  20. School Teacher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, Daret Keith

    2015-01-01

    case full of championship football trophies, game balls andis interviewing Liberty City High football star RONNIE BLAKErepresents a hundred pro football players. (pause) Now I got

  1. Cap-and-Trade Modeling and Analysis: Congested Electricity Market Equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limpaitoon, Tanachai

    2012-01-01

    The case of wholesale power trading in Germany Power andY. (2011). Market power in emissions trading: strategicallyto model market power in permit trading. The conjectural

  2. Sub-nanometer Porous Membrane Based on Cyclic Peptide-Polymer Conjugate and Block Copolymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    in Polymeric Gas Separation Membranes. Macromolecules 1999,nano-composite gas separation membranes: Fabrication andY. Polymeric Gas Separation Membranes. Macromolecules 2012,

  3. Microsoft Word - AU Funtional Area Points of Contact by Office...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Reports Andy Lawrence Andrew.lawrence@hq.doe.gov (202) 586-6740 Arms control classification guidancetechnical support Andrew Weston-Dawkes Andrew.weston-dawkes@h...

  4. Guillermo Payet: Founder, LocalHarvest.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    they’ve got it all sewed up. Peak Oil, Energy Issues, andI believe in the whole peak-oil thing, but you read some

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - WIPPRecovery

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 14, 2014 Andy Walker, DOE Transportation Logistics Manager Stephen Casey, EngineerTRANSCOM Program Manager WIPP Overview America's...

  6. Genome sequence of Thermofilum pendens reveals an exceptional loss of biosynthetic pathways without genome reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenner, Marsha W

    2008-01-01

    glycolysis and gluconeogenesis pathways. Glyceraldehyde 3-glycolysis and/or in gluconeogenesis. Starch synthesis andis incorporated into the gluconeogenesis pathway, the AMP-

  7. Comics to Film (and Back Again): A Study in Stylistic Remediation from 1978-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, Drew Anthony

    2012-01-01

    latest manifestation in pop art (Andy Warhol was invited bysensibility. ” 116 By embracing pop art and camp (primarilyessence of comic book pop art. ”-Richard Roeper. 229 Under

  8. Metal Optics Based nanoLEDs: In Search of a Fast, Efficient, Nanoscale Light Emitter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggleston, Michael Scott

    2015-01-01

    is loaded into an atomic layer deposition (ALD) machine andis loaded into an atomic layer deposition (ALD) machine andsample into an atomic layer deposition (ALD) machine (such

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    J ; Worley, Patrick H ; Nichols, Dr Jeff A ; WhiteIII, James B ; Salinger, Andy ; Price, Stephen ; Lemieux, Jean-Francois ; Lipscomb, William ; Perego, Mauro ; Vertenstein,...

  10. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Pelargonium x hortorum: Or ganization and evolution of the largest and most highly rearranged chloroplast genome of land plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Kolodner, R. , and K. K. Tewari. 1972. Molecular size andI method (Kolodner and Tewari, 1972) from 500 g of fresh

  11. PROPOSAL TO NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION National Robotics Initiative (NRI "small")

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    , 2012 Reflex approximation of optimal control for an energy-efficient bipedal walking platform Andy;PROJECT SUMMARY. NRI-Small: Reflex approximation of optimal control for an energy-efficient bipedal walking platform -- Andy Ruina, Cornell University The goal of this proposal is to design, build and test

  12. Treebank of Chinese Bible Translations GrapeCity Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treebank of Chinese Bible Translations Andi Wu GrapeCity Inc. andi.wu@grapecity.com Abstract This paper reports on a treebanking project where eight different modern Chinese translations of the Bible. The tree structures essen- tially follow the guidelines of the Penn Chinese Treebank. The total number

  13. Economics 480: Economic Institutions and Economic Performance in a Global Context Montana State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    1 Economics 480: Economic Institutions and Economic Performance in a Global Context Montana State University Spring 2009 Rob Fleck Andy Hanssen Property Rights, Economic Performance, and the Origins of Democracy: Lessons from Ancient Greece Instructors: Rob Fleck and Andy Hanssen (professors of economics

  14. Scalable Networking for Cloud Datacenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Andy will discuss the architectural evolution of Ethernet networks and switch architectures as they are being designed to address much larger cloud networking applications that require predictable throughput and latency.About the speakerAs Chief Development Officer, Andy Bechtolsheim is responsible for the overall product development and technical direction of Arista Networks.Previously Andy was a Founder and Chief System Architect at Sun Microsystems, where most recently he was responsible for industry standard server architecture. Andy was also a Founder and President of Granite Systems, a Gigabit Ethernet startup acquired by Cisco Systems in 1996. From 1996 until 2003 Andy served as VP/GM of the Gigabit Systems Business Unit at Cisco that developed the very successful Catalyst 4500 family of switches. Andy was also a Founder and President of Kealia, a next generation server company acquired by Sun in 2004.Andy received an M.S. in Computer Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in 1976 and was a Ph.D. ...

  15. Administrator Asst. Admin.(OAR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's Guide to Radon (`86) > (`86) > RERP (`86) > (`87) > Air Concentration and Dose Conversion Factors for (`88) > Radionuclide NESHAPs (`89) > l I (`92) > l l (`93) > l (`93) > i (`94) > i ions i ites (`95) > Radiation Standards (87) > NAS BEIR IV - Health Risks of Radon and Other Internally Deposited Alpha

  16. Place Last Name First Name Gender Age Category Swim Yards Swim Distance Bike Distance Run Distance Overall Distance 1 Dykstra Andy M 18-24 1775.0 yards 1.009 miles 15.600 miles 3.790 miles 20.399 miles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Place Last Name First Name Gender Age Category Swim Yards Swim Distance Bike Distance Run Distance.597 miles 12.300 miles 2.230 miles 15.127 miles 20 Strom Thad M 30-39 1150.0 yards 0.653 miles 12.000 miles

  17. Is There a Shortage of Engineering Talent in the U.S.?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Clair; Linden, Greg

    2008-01-01

    2007. 2 Introduction High-tech companies have been issuingat what is happening to high-tech engineering employment andis generally the case in the high- tech engineering labor

  18. Functionalized nanopipettes: toward label-free, single cell biosensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Actis, Paolo; Mak, Andy C.; Pourmand, Nader

    2010-01-01

    label-free, single cell biosensors Paolo Actis & Andy C.1], carbon nanotube biosensors [2], nanowires [3], and nano-use of nano- pipettes as biosensors. The applications of

  19. THE RESPONSE OF SOLIDS TO ELASTIC/PLASTIC INDENTATION AND THE APPLICATION OF INDENTATION TO ADHESION MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Shu-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    s, and the elastic and plastic properties~ E andY, of theI. Normalized Plastic Zone Size (B) and Material Propertiesthe material properties are not compatible (the plastic zone

  20. The Paradox of the Primary-Secondary Quality Distinction and Husserl's Genealogy of the Mathematization of Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durt, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    feedback on earlier drafts David Carr, Andy Delunas, Lestershape. ” I thus follow David Carr’s translation of “Gestalt”picture of the world. David Carr suggests that ?usserl added

  1. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sessler, Andy

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe.

  2. Measuring Strong Nanostructures

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Andy Minor

    2010-01-08

    Andy Minor of Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy explains measuring stress and strain on nanostructures with the In Situ Microscope. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  3. Washington State 2010 Supplemental Budget Bottom Line: New Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jenny L; Lovrich, Nicholas P

    2011-01-01

    the Working Families Tax Rebate. ” Washing- ton State Budgetthe-working- families-tax-rebate-1>. Nicholas, Andy. 2010. “water will be eligible for rebates on bottled water sales

  4. UK and Republic of Ireland SIAM Section Annual Meeting January 10th, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    does not lead to the formation of a capsule (although tumour growth can be suppressed). She concluded with Andy King on Mathematical modelling of solid oxide fuel cells, which convert energy from combustion

  5. utomatic control is a "miracle"tech-nology that exploits feedback to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Dennis S.

    tools, ro- bots, power plants, materials processing, and many other applications. In many cases used to regulate virtually every system in the hu- manbody andis constantly atwork ineco- logical

  6. Jillian Gasiewicz, '07 Chiapas, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jillian Gasiewicz, '07 Chiapas, Mexico San Cristóbal de las Casas Cat, Andy and I posing with our" adventure to the city known as San Cristóbal de las Casas, in the Mexico's poorest state, Chiapas. We worked

  7. ent 263 May 2004 were not displayed)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Least (sma Phaceliall) phacelia minutissima B Rubus b usarton's raspberry artonian Spaldi Silene sp ing Ab andis Subalpine fir/ s lasi n bi isWhitebark pine Abi ocarpa/ Pi us al caul N h rass e ia

  8. Cary Forest APS DPP Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer Beck, Stas Boldyrev, Fausto Cattaneo, Sterling Colgate, Jan Egedal, Andrew Fletcher, Andy Jackson Sheckochihin, Erik Spence, Steve Tobias, and Ellen Zweibel Engineering John Wallace, Mike Clark Postdocs Chris

  9. Statistical algorithms in the study of mammalian DNA methylation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Meromit

    2012-01-01

    non-overlapping CCGIs: the algorithm 2.2.6 Running time andI Statistical algorithms in the study of mammalian DNAof the result of the CCGI algorithm. Nodes marked along the

  10. Chinese American Faculty Association of Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Tu-nan

    Chinese American Faculty Association of Southern California CAFA Fall Picnic Date: October 27 picnic. Sincerely, Andy Yao Cindy Fang President, CAFA Vice-President, CAFA #12;Chinese American Faculty

  11. Finance Director Beki Thomson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    Andy Goor Finance Director Beki Thomson Deputy Director of Finance Operations Eric Gillespie Finance Operations Manager Accounts Payable Karen Laing Supervisor Laura McArthur Finance Assistant VACANCY Finance Assistant Sarah Milne Finance Assistant Julie Smith Finance Assistant Karina Thomson

  12. A Taxonomy of Rerouting in Circuit-Switched Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Eric Wing-Ming

    A Taxonomy of Rerouting in Circuit-Switched Networks Eric W. M. Wong and Andy K. M. Chan, City presents a taxonomy of rerouting in circuit- switched networks showing the various ways rerouting can

  13. Predator-Prey Relations in Large South Dakota Job 1: Seasonal Walleye and Smallmouth Bass Diets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program Administrator Wildlife Division Director Geno Adams Tony Leif Grants Coordinator Aquatic Section Grote, Andy Jansen, Jessica Meisenholder, Ben Michaels, Nathan Poole, and Justin VanDeHey. We

  14. movingin.movingon. new starters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per-Olof Berggren, Medicine Mr Andy Blyth, Medicine Dr Lies Boelen, Medicine Mr Yakov Boglev, Faculty, Imperial College Union Mrs Grace Constantine, Medicine Dr Christopher Cordier, Chemistry Mr Gary Corrall

  15. ANALYSIS OF THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    since offshore oil production is expected to peak by 1990,a peak in production within California of both crude oil andis expected to peak in 1990. Additional oil requirements

  16. Organigramm Universittsrechenzentrum Heidelberg -Stand November 2013 Leitung Verwaltung Geschftsfhrung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    Abeln Michael Bauer Werner Günter Joachim Anhegger Johannes Brunner Jörg Bühler Christine Kinzinger Eduard Barth Joachim Deubler Klaus Kirchner Andy Lehmann Alessandro Buffarini Petra Lukan Horst Elfner Infoservice Auszubildende Vermittlung Christoph Zwerschke Renate Bauer Frida Ombrome Onkra Sven Eisenmann

  17. The Technical Specification for the Security Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Security Agency (NSA); Jeff Ito, Matt Kerr, Shane Shaffer, and Greg Witte of G2, Inc.; Andy Bove of Secure Thompson of Booz Allen Hamilton; Alan Peltzman of the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA); and Jon

  18. Evidence for a mechanism of phenotypic integration of behaviour and innate immunity in a wild rodent: implications for animal personality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    Evidence for a mechanism of phenotypic integration of behaviour and innate immunity in a wild rodent: implications for animal personality and ecological immunology Andy Dosmann* , Katherine C. Brooks: animal personality bacteria-killing ability behavioural syndrome ecological immunology glucocorticoid

  19. Dermoscopy of black-spot poison ivy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rader, Ryan K; Mu, Ruipu; Shi, Honglan; Stoecker, William V; Hinton, Kristen A

    2012-01-01

    CT, Bean AS. Black-spot poison ivy: A rare phenomenon. J AmJG, Lucky AW. Black spot poison ivy: A report of 5 cases andis unique for black-spot poison ivy. The UFLC-MS/MS urushiol

  20. International Builders' Show | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you, Andy, and thank you all for being here. The world has reached an energy crossroads. Rising global energy demand and the need for more...

  1. Black Radicals Make for Bad Citizens: Undoing the Myth of the School to Prison Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sojoyner, Damien M

    2013-01-01

    R. W. (2007). Golden gulag: Prisons, surplus, crisis, andI. (2012, December 13). Prison pipeline hits Black studentsT. (2010). The school-to-prison pipeline: Structuring legal

  2. The role of psychostimulants in addiction-related learning and memory in mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuman, Tristan

    2012-01-01

    also widely prescribed off-label to enhance alertness andis also widely prescribed off-label to enhance alertness,with a variety of approved and off-label applications. The

  3. Bioenergetics of marine mammals: the influence of body size, reproductive status, locomotion and phylogeny on metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maresh, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Dejours, P. (1987). Water and air: physical characteristicsangustirostris) pups in air and water. Physiological andY Y Y Y Arvicola richardsoni Water vole air Y Y Y Y Arvicola

  4. Can Public Research Universities Compete?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brint, Steven

    2006-01-01

    high volume/low cost business model that remains viable andI develop two ”business models” for higher education: theto two quite different “business models”—one based on high

  5. A modern solver framework to manage solution algorithms in the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patrick H 1 ; Nichols, Dr Jeff A 1 ; WhiteIII, James B 2 ; Salinger, Andy 3 ; Price, Stephen 4 ; Lemieux, Jean-Francois 5 ; Lipscomb, William 4 ; Perego, Mauro 6...

  6. Teacher and Students Bring Renewables to Utah | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new farm. He tells how the infamous wind swept up dirt from the field sandblasting the paint right off his barn. Most people would become frustrated but Andy felt differently, "I...

  7. DESIGNING AN ENVIRONMENTAL SHOWCASE: THE SAN FRANCISCO Dale Sartor, Rick Diamond, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Richard

    have conducted energy audits, reviewed retrofit design strategies and renovation plans and recommended, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Andy Walker, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Michael Giller, National Park Service Karl Brown, California Institute for Energy Efficiency Anne Sprunt Crawley, US

  8. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    storage, thermal storage, solar thermal collectors, PVs, andis disallowed; 5. a low storage, PV, and solar thermal priceW run 4 force low storage / PV and solar thermal results run

  9. The Future of Tax Privacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Commission. The Citizen As Taxpayer, Appendix 2. Washing­C-net News.com. (Jan. 2, Taxpayer Confidentiality andIs Not Adequately Protecting Taxpayer Data on Laptop Comput­

  10. Global Digital Library Development in the New Millennium: Fertile Ground for Distributed Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration, (Ching-chih Chen, Ed., Beijing, China: Tsinghua University Press), 2001, pp. 1-12. 2001, pp. 1-12.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    1 _______________________________________________________________________ Global Digital Library of a National Science, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology Education Digital Library Alice Agogino, Andy and Technology Education (SMETE) Digital Library at www.smete.org. This digital learning community will provide

  11. CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    the dynamics, composition, and abundance of nutrients in glacial melt water. Consequently, we must now consider, 78(1), 2008, pp. 41­67 Ó 2008 by the Ecological Society of America GLACIAL ECOSYSTEMS ANDY HODSON,1. Two key glacial ecosystems emerge, one inhabiting the glacier surface (the supraglacial ecosystem

  12. Mathematica Slovaca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-05-26

    Institute of Mathematics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic provides access to digitized documents ... these Terms of use. This paper has been ... Library http://project.dml.cz ... where te]0, 1] and/is a real valued continuous and bounded function defined on ]0,1] x R2. ... be the main subject of our study: (1.3).

  13. Operational analysis of the Port City Stockyards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Houston Edward

    1957-01-01

    of business~ andi in, some cases ec seniority, by the stacR- yards caner, Th" stockyards oMnsr has the right to c~? cr reassign inatians, Xsrdegs ~ collected by the msrhsting agencies sos the only charges sade for ths use oi' these fucdlities, ~ts pens...

  14. Secular changes in the importance of neritic carbonate deposition as a control on the magnitude and stability of Neoproterozoic ice ages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Martin J.

    and stability of Neoproterozoic ice ages Andy Ridgwell and Martin Kennedy Department of Earth Sciences PDB) [Hoffman et al., 1998; Jacobsen and Kaufman, 1999; Kennedy et al., 1998], and (iii) ubiquitous deposits [Williams, 1979; Hoffman and Schrag, 2002; James et al., 2001; Kennedy, 1996; Kennedy et al., 1998

  15. 228 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, VOL. 16, NO. 3, JUNE 2000 Design Lessons for Building Agile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merat, Francis L.

    228 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, VOL. 16, NO. 3, JUNE 2000 Design Lessons for Building Agile Manufacturing Systems Wyatt S. Newman, Member, IEEE, Andy Podgurski, Member, IEEE, Roger D--Agile manufacturing, automated assembly, flex- ible automation, rapid-response manufacturing, robotic assembly

  16. Design Principles for the Information Architecture of a SMET Education Digital Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    and technology education (SMETE), a library with an information architecture designed to meet learners to implementing the information architecture and its technology underpinnings. The authors proposeDesign Principles for the Information Architecture of a SMET Education Digital Library Andy Dong

  17. Image Enhancement and Understanding for Remote Visual Inspection of Aircraft Surface. Priyan Gunatilake * , M.W. Siegel ** , A.J. Jordan *,** , G. Podnar **

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Mel

    page 1 Image Enhancement and Understanding for Remote Visual Inspection of Aircraft Surface. Priyan and recognize surface defects from remote live imagery of an aircraft surface. Also described are the supporting, and speculate on their future application in aircraft inspec­ tion. Keywords: ANDI, CIMP, aircraft visual

  18. Image Enhancement and Understanding for Remote Visual Inspection of Aircraft Surface. Priyan Gunatilake*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Mel

    page 1 Image Enhancement and Understanding for Remote Visual Inspection of Aircraft Surface. Priyan and recognize surface defects from remote live imagery of an aircraft surface. Also described are the supporting, and speculate on their future application in aircraft inspec- tion. Keywords: ANDI, CIMP, aircraft visual

  19. Liquid Cooling for a SeaSonde Transmitter Acknowledgements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Liquid Cooling for a SeaSonde Transmitter Acknowledgements Thanks to Nelson Bednersh and Andy Weinberg at the UCSB College of Engineering Machine Shop Figure 4. The water cooling block with the cover will be monitored. Design Criteria No modification to the stock transmitter ­ cooling block fits between amplifier

  20. 1 Copyright 2003 by ASME A DOCUMENT ANALYSIS METHOD FOR CHARACTERIZING DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    1 Copyright © 2003 by ASME A DOCUMENT ANALYSIS METHOD FOR CHARACTERIZING DESIGN TEAM PERFORMANCE and events in design documentation is examined. Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) was used to analyze design Andy Dong Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition School of Architecture, Design Science

  1. PublicationsmailagreementNo.40014024 The University of Victoria's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    by Charles Elliott for First Peoples House. PhOTO: UVIC PhOTO SERVICES Indigenous celebration leaves legacy, jingle dresses and other traditional regalia, Chief Andy Thomas (Esquimalt Nation) welcomed the crowd pole that local WSÁNEC artist Charles Elliott (OBC, OC) was com- missioned to carve in 1990, the last

  2. Approved at Academic Board 17 December 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Monica A.

    Elliott Miss Kate English Mr John Fishwick Mr Andy Fiske-Jackson Dr Ali Fouladi-Nashta Dr Rob Fowkes Mrs Professor Hattie Syme Dr Balazs Szladovits Dr Carole Thomas Dr Christine Thuranira-McKeever Dr Lisa Thurston Whiting Mr Kim Whittlestone Professor Alan Wilson Dr Thomas Witte Dr R Woodroffe (MSc WAB, Institute

  3. A study of the effect of temperature on the rate of settling of crude cotton-seed oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey, Jack Cassels

    1933-01-01

    in Crude Cottonseed Oi1 " Cotton Oil ~'ress? V: &So? 6? ~Q 50? 19M ~ Jamieson, 0 F, andi B~u;~, '. P. 'C~sitioa of Credo CottoneeeC Oi1s; a Smamary. " Journal of Oi1 omK Fat Xnlustry 5: 547-bb? 1985? A14818787798 ...

  4. RIPARIAN BIBLIOGRAPHY Abt, Steve R.; Clary, Warren P.; Thornton, Christopher I. 1992. Ability of streambed vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Stephen; Bursik, Robert J.; Moseley, Robert K.; Evenden, Angela G.; Mantas, Maria; Rabe, Fred; Heidel of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering. 120 (6): 1098-1111. Anderson, Allen E.; Bowden, David C.; Medin, Dean E(4): 550-556. Andy J.; Evans, Steven G.; Leiniger, Wayne C.; Clary, Warren P. 1996. The Relationship

  5. Department: Mathematics Course No: MATH 136Q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Department: Mathematics Course No: MATH 136Q Title: Honors Calculus II Credits: 4 Contact: Andy mathematical concepts. Q Criteria : The Department of Mathematics is replacing the honors sequence 120 is creating an honors program in mathematics for highly talented mathematics students seeking a rigorous

  6. Department: Mathematics Course No: MATH 246Q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Department: Mathematics Course No: MATH 246Q Title: Avanced Calculus IV Credits: 4 Contact: Andy of differential equations. Q Criteria : The Department of Mathematics is replacing the honors sequence 120 is that the department is creating an honors program in mathematics for highly talented mathematics students seeking

  7. Department: Mathematics Course No: 2142

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Department: Mathematics Course No: 2142 Title: Avanced Calculus II Credits: 4 Contact: Andy Haas WQ or 136. A rigorous treatment of the mathematics underlying the main results of one-variable calculus. Intended for students with strong interest and ability in mathematics who are already familiar

  8. Department: Mathematics Course No: MATH 243Q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Department: Mathematics Course No: MATH 243Q Title: Avanced Calculus I Credits: 4 Contact: Andy. A rigorous treatment of the mathematics underlying the main results of one-variable calculus. Intended for students with strong interest and ability in mathematics who are already familiar with the computational

  9. Department: Mathematics Course No: MATH 245Q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Department: Mathematics Course No: MATH 245Q Title: Avanced Calculus III Credits: 4 Contact: Andy of differential equations. Q Criteria : The Department of Mathematics is replacing the honors sequence 120 is that the department is creating an honors program in mathematics for highly talented mathematics students seeking

  10. Surface OceanLower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohfeld, Karen

    , British Columbia, Canada Andy Ridgwell Bristol Research Initiative for the Dynamic Global Environment251 Surface Ocean­Lower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187 Copyright 2009, and processes have been identified that have improved our understanding of the modern and future carbon cycle

  11. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Eco-Friendly Office the current status of the subject matter of a project/report. #12;APSC 261 Final Report Eco-Friendly Office Supplies: Post-it Notes Andy Kwan Arjan Dhaliwal Emmanuel Augustine #12;i ABSTRACT The purpose of the Eco-Friendly

  12. NASA/TP-2006-214203 Logistics Lessons Learned in NASA Space Flight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    NASA/TP-2006-214203 Logistics Lessons Learned in NASA Space Flight William A. (Andy) Evans, United 2006 #12;NASA STI Program ... in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA scientific and technical information (STI) program plays a key part

  13. The Marketing Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    The Marketing Concentration The Manning School of Business www.uml.edu/management Who We Are, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain and operations management we provide education possible." -- Andy Hwang Marketing Major "I chose UMass Lowell because of its high level

  14. 18 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 9, NO. 1, MARCH 1999 Tools for the Computer-Aided Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Eby G.

    18 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 9, NO. 1, MARCH 1999 Tools for the Computer-Aided Design of Multigigahertz Superconducting Digital Circuits Kris Gaj, Quentin P. Herr, Victor Adler, Andy the results of a survey of CAD tools target- ing superconducting digital electronics. Five categories of tools

  15. Plants & Animals Insects (and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reece, Sarah

    . However, what looks like a team effort is in fact each animal jostling to get to the middle of the group model citizens, too. Unlike herds of bison or shoals of fish -- where individuals may appear to be team involved are united in a common purpose. Dr Andy Gardner, from the School of Biological Sciences

  16. The Social Lives of Microbes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Stuart

    The Social Lives of Microbes Stuart A. West,1 Stephen P. Diggle,2 Angus Buckling,3 Andy Gardner,1 evolution Abstract Our understanding of the social lives of microbes has been revolu- tionized over the past that microbes indulge in a variety of social behaviors involving com- plex systems of cooperation, communication

  17. Electric and Hydrogen Vehicles Past and Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    in performance · Practical NiMH batteries did not yet exist · Production hybrid cars did not yet exist · Andy · Transportation Propulsion, Fuels, & Emissions ­ Electric-drive vehicles (including plug-in hybrid and fuel Research (IMR) · Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) ­ Smart cars, smart parking, goods movement

  18. Obstruction of Justice "You're Hannah, right?" Hannah Morgan, a 20-year old from Appalachia, Virginia, was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    of neighboring West Virginia asserted that if there were an alternative energy source, they would not need-up-dominion/). However, let me correct an error in a recent article by Andy Revkin in the New York Times. I have argued liability, it seems to me. Mountaintop removal is not the only potential source of energy. The governor

  19. Calabuig, C.P., Green, A.J., Menegheti, J.O., Muriel, R. y Patio, J. 2010. Fenologa del Coscoroba (Coscoroba coscoroba) en el sur de Brasil y sus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Andy J.

    (Coscoroba coscoroba) en el sur de Brasil y sus movimientos hacia Argentina (Phenology of Coscoroba Swan (COSCOROBA COSCOROBA) EN EL SUR DE BRASIL Y SUS MOVIMIENTOS HACIA ARGENTINA Cecilia P. Calabuig¹, ², Andy J João Paetzel 964/303, 91330ñ281- Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. E-mail: cecicalabuig

  20. While summer was winding down, expertise from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences was still hotly sought after on hot topics such as China's economic woes, the deadly shooting during a live TV news report in Virginia,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    TV news report in Virginia, methane release during fracking and much, much more. Food & Energy at Risk to Defend Family Dairies" 08.20.2015 Andy Novakovic,Dyson School, on the impacts the how their enzymes react together in the presence of magnesium,energy and oxygen. New Scientist

  1. Hybrid Rule-Based Example-Based MT: Feeding Apertium with Sub-sentential Translation Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Way, Andy

    Hybrid Rule-Based ­ Example-Based MT: Feeding Apertium with Sub-sentential Translation Units Felipe S´anchez-Mart´inez Mikel L. Forcada Andy Way Dept. Llenguatges i Sistemes Inform`atics Universitat University Dublin 9, Ireland {mforcada,away}@computing.dcu.ie Abstract This paper describes a hybrid machine

  2. GEOCHEMISTRY AND AR GEOCHRONOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Barbara Anne

    committee members ­ Tim Swindle, David Kring, Mike Drake, Bill Boynton, and Sue Baldwin ­ contributed officemates Mike, Bill, and Kim showed me how it was done, and Andy, Jen, Betty, Doug, Chris, David, and Nancy- tors there ­ Dan Davis and Don Lindsley ­ started me on my PhD pursuit, and indeed my career. Even

  3. Plant Pathology 290 Graduate Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Plant Pathology 290 Graduate Seminar Series Winter 2015, CRN 87368 Seminars: Mondays, 9:00am-10:00am 115 Hutchison Date Speaker Title January 5 Steve Whitham, Professor Department of Plant Pathology, Phakopsora pachyrhizi January 12 Andy Jackson, Professor Emeritus Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

  4. This chapter should be cited as: Ciais, P., C. Sabine, G. Bala, L. Bopp, V. Brovkin, J. Canadell, A. Chhabra, R. DeFries, J. Galloway, M. Heimann, C.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    Andrews (UK), David Archer (USA), Vivek Arora (Canada), Gordon Bonan (USA), Alberto Vieira Borges (Belgium), Gregg Marland (USA), H. Damon Matthews (Canada), Emilio Mayorga (USA), Joe R. Melton (Canada), Nicolas (Germany), Ben Poulter (France/USA), Peter A. Raymond (USA), Peter Rayner (Australia), Andy Ridgwell (UK

  5. This chapter should be cited as: Ciais, P., C. Sabine, G. Bala, L. Bopp, V. Brovkin, J. Canadell, A. Chhabra, R. DeFries, J. Galloway, M. Heimann, C.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    Andrews (UK), David Archer (USA), Vivek Arora (Canada), Gordon Bonan (USA), Alberto Vieira Borges (Belgium (Canada), Emilio Mayorga (USA), Joe R. Melton (Canada), Nicolas Metzl (France), Guy Munhoven (Belgium/USA), Peter A. Raymond (USA), Peter Rayner (Australia), Andy Ridgwell (UK), Bruno Ringeval (Netherlands

  6. Function allocation: A perspective from studies of work practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fields, Bob

    Function allocation: A perspective from studies of work practice Peter Wright1 , Andy Dearden2: ADearden@armature.com Tel: (+44) 113 259 5131 Fax: (+44) 113 259 5150 Abstract Function allocation which system-level functions should be carried out by humans and which by machines. Such allocation

  7. Finance Director Beki Thomson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    Andy Goor Finance Director Beki Thomson Deputy Director of Finance Operations Eric Gillespie Finance Operations Manager Accounts Payable Karen Laing Supervisor VACANCY Finance Assistant VACANCY Finance Assistant Sarah Milne Finance Assistant Julie Smith (0.6) Finance Assistant Karina Thomson Finance

  8. Finance & IT Operations June 2010 E-Newsletter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finance & IT Operations June 2010 E-Newsletter Dear Colleagues, Starting with the June 2010 issue Finance and IT. This publication continues to be a very useful tool for us to keep you informed/ Associate Dean for Finance and IT Operations Announcements Staffing Changes In Accounting Andy Cheng who has

  9. The Shallow-water Echinoderms of Yap Results of a Survey Performed 27 July to 9 August 2007,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcilwain, Jenny

    preliminary recommendations for a beche-de-mer management plan include: 1) Institute a moratorium on fishing, for making this survey a reality. We appreciate the efforts of the Chief of Marine Resource Management Division (MRMD), Andy Tafiliechig for overseeing our day-to-day planning and logistics, particularly his

  10. Acknowledgments My graduate school experience spanned a little over five years across five cities. I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wee, Hoeteck

    cities. I am extremely fortunate to have Luca Trevisan as an advisor and a friend throughout the entire at IPAM, all of which were wonderful learning experiences. I thank Cynthia Dwork, Andy Yao and my hosts and burrito. I refer to the occupants and affiliates of 587 Soda, FIT 1-280 and IPAM as well as all my friends

  11. Using personal computers for enhanced presence detection in building automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delbruck, Tobi

    .ini.unizh.ch/~tobi Effective building automation depends on reliable sensors, but the usual passive infrared (PIR) sensorsUsing personal computers for enhanced presence detection in building automation Tobi Delbrück, Andi are blind to occupants who do not move around and are not personalized. We improve building intelligence

  12. The CorporaTe examiner Vol. 37, No. 4-5, March 16, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Charles A.S.

    , lead- ing some to say that the long predicted "peak oil," the time of maximum global oil production is completing his doctorate in Natural Resources at the University of Vermont and is Editor of The Oil Drum. Hall and Andy Groat The summer of 2008 saw the third year in a row in which oil production did not rise

  13. Hand out at Final Review Session Dec 9, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    slide #20 from Dr. Keller's talk on Dec 7th about carbon sequestration. He explained that the CO2 would1 Andy Ford Hand out at Final Review Session ESRP 285, Dec 9, 2010 Carbon Prices Geological Storage of Carbon: Connecting Dr. Keller's Talk with Results from Carbon Market Analysis Figure 1 is the image from

  14. Copepods come in first: rapid colonization of new temporary ponds Dagmar Frisch1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Andy J.

    1 Copepods come in first: rapid colonization of new temporary ponds Dagmar Frisch1,2 Andy J. Green1 of new temporary ponds Abstract The sequence in which new colonists reach an empty habitat can be crucial on colonization of newly constructed temporary ponds in Doñana, Southwest Spain, created by removing 30 or 60 cm

  15. Motivation: Three primary means of bipedal balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    Motivation: · Three primary means of bipedal balance: · 1) Foot placement 2) Ankle torque 3) Body: · Attempt to balance the Cornell Ranger using only hip torque Theoretical Bound: · Find upper bound Bipedal Balance with Small Feet Matthew P. Kelly, Andy Ruina Mechanical Engineering, Cornell Realistic

  16. Computer Science at Kent On Modular Termination Proofs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    Computer Science at Kent On Modular Termination Proofs Jonathan C. Martin and Andy King Technical by the Computing Laboratory, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NF, UK. Abstract Reasoning about termination is a key issue in logic program development. One classic technique for proving termination is to construct

  17. Humanities Core 1C 15 June 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Kieron

    conjures up an image of Andy Warhol, one usually associates him with commercial art, mass production Americana, or artwork that although appealing seems as superficial and empty as the bright colors and Pop Art techniques suggest. The same superficiality can be seen when looking at The Last Supper (Dove

  18. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Andy Sessler

    2013-06-11

    Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe. His talk was presented July 26, 2006.

  19. Chinese Word Segmentation in MSR-NLP Microsoft Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinese Word Segmentation in MSR-NLP Andi Wu Microsoft Research One Microsoft Way, Redmond, WA 98052 andiwu@microsoft.com Abstract Word segmentation in MSR-NLP is an in- tegral part of a sentence analyzer which includes basic segmentation, derivational morphology, named entity recognition, new word

  20. IT Policy, Procedures and Guidance University College, Oxford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    IT Policy, Procedures and Guidance University College, Oxford Patrick Baird IT and Web Fellow Andy Hamilton IT Manager Helene Augar College Registrar #12;Summary This policy and guidance document. Transgressions (Junior Members) 14 14. Flexible Hours and Working at Home (Staff) 15 15. Revisions to this Policy

  1. Approximation Theory and Finite Element Analysis January 2014 Lecturer David Silvester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvester, David J.

    Approximation Theory and Finite Element Analysis January 2014 Lecturer David Silvester Office Alan Analysis, CUP, 2003. · Dietrich Braess, Finite Elements: Theory, Fast Solvers and Applications in Solid Mechanics, CUP, Third Edition, 2007. · Howard Elman, David Silvester and Andy Wathen, Finite Elements

  2. GREIT: towards a consensus EIT algorithm for lung images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    GREIT: towards a consensus EIT algorithm for lung images Andy Adler1 , John Arnold2 , Richard in the patient's lungs. However, most clinical and physiological research in lung EIT is done using older reconstruction algorithm for lung EIT, called GREIT (Graz consensus Reconstruc- tion algorithm for EIT

  3. Asymmetries in Electrical Impedance Tomography Lung Images Bartlomiej Grychtol1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Asymmetries in Electrical Impedance Tomography Lung Images Bartlomiej Grychtol1 and Andy Adler2 1, it has been used to image the thorax, to monitor the movement of blood and gas in the heart and lungs. One key application of EIT is to determine the distribution of ventilation within the lungs

  4. Lung EIT: Should we reconstruct resistivity or conductivity? Bartlomiej Grychtol1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Lung EIT: Should we reconstruct resistivity or conductivity? Bartlomiej Grychtol1 , Andy Adler2 1.grychtol@dkfz.de MOTIVATION: In lung EIT, the quantity of interest is the change in regional air volume in the lungs. However. The model contains two non-conductive objects that represent the lungs. Assuming that lung resistivity

  5. GREIT: a unified approach to 2D linear EIT reconstruction of lung images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    GREIT: a unified approach to 2D linear EIT reconstruction of lung images Andy Adler1 , John H the distribution of ventilation. However, most clinical and physiological research in lung EIT is done using older algorithm for lung EIT, called GREIT (Graz consensus Reconstruction algorithm for EIT). This paper describes

  6. EIT measurement of heart and lung perfusion Helga Ross1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    EIT measurement of heart and lung perfusion Helga Ross1 , Benjamin J.W. Chow2 , and Andy Adler1 1. Introduction Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) shows promise for monitoring a patient's heart and lungs matching in the lungs. The goal of this research is to determine the accuracy of EIT measurements of blood

  7. Whither lung EIT: where are we, where do we want to go, and what do we need to get there?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Whither lung EIT: where are we, where do we want to go, and what do we need to get there? Andy into and out of the lungs, producing conductivity changes which can be seen by electrical impedance tomography for lung EIT, by a synthesis of the presentations of the authors at the "special lung sessions

  8. UNBC Board of Governors Public Minutes March 29, 2014 Page 1 of 4 BOARD OF GOVERNORS -PUBLIC SESSION MINUTES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Burgart, Andy Clough, Mark Dale, Kimberly Lawyer, Kathy Lewis, John MacDonald, Judy Mason, Ryan Matheson, Glen Montgomery, John Turner, Gary Wilson, Simon Yu UNBC Representatives (Non-Voting): Ranjana Bird. The consent agenda is moved and approved as a group. The Chair will inquire whether there are any items

  9. UNBC Board of Governors Public Minutes June 14, 2014 Page 1 of 4 BOARD OF GOVERNORS -PUBLIC SESSION MINUTES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Bennett, Louise Burgart, Andy Clough, Mark Dale, Kathy Lewis, John MacDonald (regrets), Judy Mason, Ryan Matheson, Glen Montgomery, Shannon Norum, Harry Nyce Sr.(regrets), Don Prior (regrets), Jonathan Swainger as a group. The Chair will inquire whether there are any items that need to be removed from the consent

  10. Sex-biased dispersal of adults mediates the evolution of altruism among juveniles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Andy

    Sex-biased dispersal of adults mediates the evolution of altruism among juveniles Andy Gardner that dispersal does matter if there is a sex difference in dispersal rate, even when the expression of cooperation is not conditional upon the actor's dispersal status or sex. In particular, I show

  11. DNA and the 'magic rings' trick October 11, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    influences, such as radiation or chemicals, and also from normal cellular processes. Unrepaired, DNA damage in these patients. Holliday junctions were only definitively shown to exist in mitotically dividing cells in April Dorsey Griffith UC Davis Cancer Center dorsey.griffith@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu Phone: (916) 734-9118 Andy Fell

  12. ICS313 Game Demonstrations, POST 126 Monday, Dec. 2, 2013 (starting at1:30 pm)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Nancy E.

    Savior By Jaimar and Micah Code Monkey By Taylor, Alvin and Brent The Aragorn Trail By William G Sharknado By Michael W. and Steven R. Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2013 (starting at1:30 pm) Starbreak By Andy, Troy By Taylor, Alvin and Brent #12;The Aragorn Trail By William G. and Michael T. #12;Don't Die Day, a Zombie

  13. An R&D Guide and Multiyear Plan for Improving Energy Use in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-56173 An R&D Guide and Multiyear Plan for Improving Energy Use in Existing Commercial Buildings R. C. Diamond Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Chris Scruton, Diana Shankle, Sandy Smith, Ed Spivey, Steve Taylor, Malcolm Verdict, Bruce Vincent, Andy

  14. September 2007 www.seadiscovery.comMMAARRIINNEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    to attract a new generation of students to the subsea market. Navy Insights 24 Sonar Upgrades Clarify a Murky State University Subsea Security 38 The New Subsea Sentry Sonardyne's Sentinel is an innovative Intruder Detection Sonar designed to detect and identify subsea threats quickly and accurately. -- by Andy Meecham

  15. SANDIA REPORT SAND2002-0771

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2002-0771 Unlimited Release Printed March 2002 FATIGUE OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS;SAND2002-0771 Unlimited Release Printed March2002 Fatigue of Composite Materials and Substructures Materials Fatigue Program from 1997to 2001, andis intendedto be usedin conjunction with theDOEMSU Composite

  16. ue Ce ec o o es o a Energy Efficiency &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cell Bus Evaluation DOE (FCT-Tech .Val.), NREL, and FTA are working closely to evaluate fuel cell phenomena improving MEA and stack performance · Optimize fuel cells and systems for early market Fleets: Summary of Experiences andy y p Current Status (September 2007), NREL/TP-560-41967, http://www.nrel

  17. Website Customization: Exploring a tag-based approach in the Australian banking context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roe, Paul

    of information (service usage) car andy arizona auto books movies hotel federal energy airasia furniture guess://www.westernunion.com.au 30,000 $ 1200.00 Travelex http://www.travelex.com.au 10,000 $ 1100.00 car energy forex insurance out new transactions by selecting tags · Tag recommendation based on semantic analysis · Aggregation

  18. Version Date: December 22, 2014 National Weather Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Version Date: December 22, 2014 National Weather Service NWS Partners' and Family of Services, National Weather Service 9:00 ­ 9:15 Observation Systems John Murphy, Director, Office of Science Services Updates Andy Stern, Acting Director, Office of Climate, Water and Weather Services 9:45 ­ 10

  19. Supporting Ethnographic Studies of Ubiquitous Computing in the Wild

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalmers, Matthew

    1 Supporting Ethnographic Studies of Ubiquitous Computing in the Wild Andy Crabtree, Steve Benford their design in a wide variety of settings. The emergence of ubiquitous computing raises new challenges challenges that need to be met to support ethnographic study of ubiquitous computing in the wild. Author

  20. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN ICED 01 GLASGOW, AUGUST 21-23, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    a preference for formal company documents of past designs (e.g., technical memos) rather than informal design the information retrieval behaviour of the designer to information sources including the type, quality COMPOSITION OF XML DOCUMENTS TO EXPRESS DESIGN INFORMATION NEEDS Andy Dong, Shuang Song, Jialong Wu, and Alice

  1. Greenhouse Energy Extravaganza Participants September, 4 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Greenhouse Energy Extravaganza Participants September, 4 2014 Lynn Clohessy 603 Market Road Estabrook's Farm & Greenhouses 337 East Main Street Yarmouth, ME 04096 (207) 846-4398 andy@rimol.com #12;Greenhouse Energy Extravaganza Participants September, 4 2014 Josiah Krause & Lisa Barker Seedfolk

  2. UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA Santa Barbara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hespanha, João Pedro

    with Andy. Nathan introduce me to the tracking problem discussed in Chapter 7 during his sabbatical at UCSB, and Spedieh and my bother in laws, Alireza and Arta. I want to acknowledge my aunt Nosrat and her family who of Southern California, 2001 - 2002. R&D Engineer Heating Company, Iran, 1998 - 2000. R&D Engineer Sazeh

  3. Dong, A., E. Fixler and A.M. Agogino, "A Case Study of Policy Decisions for Federated Search Across Digital Libraries," Proceedings of ICDL 2004 (International Conference on Digital Libraries), The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    Case Study of Policy Decisions for Federated Search Across Digital Libraries," Proceedings of ICDL 2004 (International Conference on Digital Libraries), The Energy and Resources Institute, Vol. 2, 892- 898, 2004. A Case Study of Policy Decisions for Federated Search Across Digital Libraries Andy Dong University

  4. OAR 340-048 - Certification of Compliance with Water Quality...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8 - Certification of Compliance with Water Quality Requirements and Standards Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  5. O.A.R. 345-015 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New York:EnergyProcedures |

  6. O.A.R. 345-020 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New York:EnergyProcedures

  7. O.A.R. 345-021 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jump to: navigation,

  8. O.A.R. 660-006 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jump to: navigation,O.A.R.

  9. O.A.R. 660-033 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jump to:

  10. OAR - Division 100-Wildlife Diversity Plan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jump to:Medians |O2Diesel-

  11. OAR 141-075 - Geothermal Lease Regulations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jump to:Medians

  12. OAR 340-073 - Department of Environmental Quality Construction Standards |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jumpand Standards |Open

  13. OAR 340-106 - DEQ Permitting Procedures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jumpand Standards6 - DEQ

  14. OAR 340-209 - Department of Environmental Quality Public Participation |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jumpand Standards6 -150

  15. OAR 345 - Department of Energy, Energy Facility Siting Council | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jumpand Standards6

  16. OAR 632-020 - Geothermal Regulations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jumpand Standards6632-020

  17. OAR 635-100 - Wildlife Diversity Plans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jumpand

  18. OAR 736-051 - Archaeological Permits | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New

  19. Androgynous Beauty, Virtual Community: Stardom, Fandom and Chinese Reality Shows under Globalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Hui Faye

    2012-01-01

    the cultural binaries of “Chinese versus the foreign Other” as gender dichotomies. Th e warm reception of Li’s androgynous image among global Chinese communities revealed constant border-cross- ing cultural fl ows and integrations in the East Asian region... Androgynous Beauty, Virtual Sisterhood Stardom, Fandom, and Chinese Talent Shows under Globalization hui faye xiao In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes. —Andy Warhol, exhibition catalog (1968) [P]opular culture always has its base...

  20. 9/18/13 An art museum that has a conscience | www.thejewishadvocate.com | The Jewish Advocate www.thejewishadvocate.com//news/2013-09-20/Top_News/An_art_museum_that_has_a_conscience.html 1/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    9/18/13 An art museum that has a conscience | www.thejewishadvocate.com | The Jewish Advocate www.thejewishadvocate.com//news/2013-09-20/Top_News/An_art_museum_that_has_a_conscience.html 1/2 Get News Updates Logout Mobile Tablet displayed this fall at the Rose Art Museum. Rose Art Museum Director Chris Bedford stands next to Andy

  1. Implementing an Energy Management System at TOTAL Prot Arthur Refinery: The process to improving and sustaining energy efficiency performance at a facility. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoyle, A.

    2013-01-01

    INFORMATION? 2011 KBC Advanced Technologies plc. All Rights Reserved. Implementing an Energy Management System at TOTAL Port Arthur Refinery: The process to improving and sustaining energy efficiency performance at a facility May 2013 Andy Hoyle, Senior... ? Best Practices and Procedures ? Execute Opportunities ? Track Financial and Economic Benefits 6 weeks 12 weeks >12 weeks Implement Quick Wins OBJECTIVE: SUSTAINED IMPROVEMENT IN ENERGY EFFICIENCY May 2013 ESL-IE-13-05-14 Proceedings...

  2. 28/07/2010 10:43Evolution's parent trap -University of Oxford Page 1 of 2http://www.ox.ac.uk/media/science_blog/100728.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Andy

    28/07/2010 10:43Evolution's parent trap - University of Oxford Page 1 of 2http://www.ox.ac.uk/media/science_blog of these traits are related. I asked Andy about the costs and benefits of intensive parenting: OxSciBlog: What leave the #12;28/07/2010 10:43Evolution's parent trap - University of Oxford Page 2 of 2http://www.ox.ac.uk/media/science_blog

  3. Z .Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications 242, 75 92 2000 doi:10.1006rjmaa.1999.6655, available online at http:rrwww.idealibrary.com on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuang, Yang

    of the chemostat; each D s D q , i s 1, 2, where andi i 1 denote the specific death rates of organisms x and y, respectively. The2 values D s D and D s D result from assuming that the death rates of x1 2 and y is lost. If an organism's death rate is significant, the removal rate of this organism should be the sum

  4. Physical Security and Systems ACCESS REQUEST FORM: CNS and Animal Labs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonstra, Rudy

    -8pm 6th Floor - Rear 7th Floor - 24 hours 7th Floor - 7am-8pm CNS: SW227 SW227B SW234 SW235 SW235B SW235C SW235D SW235E SW236 SW236A SW624 Andy Gristock : Signature Required for Animal Facilities Rudy Boonstra : Signature Required for CNS All lab areas include Elevator #3 access Erb/Ito Lab: SW625 SW628 Erb

  5. An unusual xylan in Arabidopsis primary cell walls is synthesised by GUX3, IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortimer, Jenny; Blanc, Nuno; Yu, Xiaolan; Tryfona, Theodora; Sorieul, Mathias; Ng, Yao Zong; Zhang, Zhinong; Stott, Katherine; Anders, Nadine; Dupree, Paul

    2015-06-04

    complex phenolic network, is deposited (Scheller and Ulvskov 2010). Xylan is an essential component of these secondary cell walls, since Arabidopsis xylan biosynthesis mutants have collapsed xylem vessels and if there is a complete loss of xylan... .ac.uk Nadine Anders: na336@cam.ac.uk Mathias Sorieul: mrs66@cam.ac.uk Andy Ng: yn2231@columbia.edu Xiaolan Yu: xly20@cam.ac.uk Katherine Stott: ks123@cam.ac.uk Paul Dupree: p.dupree@bioc.cam.ac.uk Running title: Primary cell wall xylan biosynthesis...

  6. Understanding toughness and ductility in novel steels with mixed microstructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fielding, Lucy Chandra Devi

    2014-06-10

    Hamblin, Andy Bell, Jim Howard, Maurice Martin, Tony Thomas, Tim Wilkinson and Geoff Parks. Finally I would like to thank all my friends and family for their love, support and companionship, especially Richard Ingham, Fiona Llewellyn-Beard, Becky Jeffers... of controversy ever since the bainitic microstructure was identified by Davenport and Bain in 1930 [6]. Figure 2.3 is a reproduction of the ‘dark-etched, acicular microstructure’ they observed. It was suggested that such a phase transformation “would occur just a...

  7. Visions of a Semantic Molecular Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray-Rust, Peter; Brooks, Brian; Bolton, Charlotte

    2011-07-05

    unswerving support. Tony Hey, Andy Parker and others in eScience for a great opportunity to develop ideas in the context of an exciting national program. To Martin Dove and many colleagues in the eMinerals and MaterialsGrid projects (Mark Calleja, Toby White... . Many in JISC and collaborating projects (Brian Mathews, Jeremy Frey, Simon Coles) and now David Shotton. To Tony Hey, Alex Wade, Lee Dirks and others in Microsoft Research for a concerted and personal approach to making semantics a reality through Chem4...

  8. Underground house book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, S.

    1980-01-01

    Aesthetics, attitudes, and acceptance of earth-covered buildings are examined initially, followed by an examination of land, money, water, earth, design, heat, and interior factors. Contributions made by architect Frank Lloyd Wright are discussed and reviewed. Contemporary persons, mostly designers, who contribute from their experiences with underground structures are Andy Davis; Rob Roy; Malcolm Wells; John Barnard, Jr.; Jeff Sikora; and Don Metz. A case study to select the site, design, and prepare to construct Earthtech 6 is described. Information is given in appendices on earth-protected buildings and existing basements; financing earth-sheltered housing; heating-load calculations and life-cycle costing; and designer names and addresses. (MCW)

  9. Development of methods to objectively identify time spent using active and motorised modes of travel to work: how do self-reported measures compare?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panter, Jenna; Costa, Silvia; Dalton, Alice; Jones, Andy; Ogilvie, David

    2014-09-19

    to objectively identify time spent using active and motorised modes of travel to work: how do self-reported measures compare? Jenna Panter 1,2 , Silvia Costa 1,2 , Alice Dalton 2,3 , Andy Jones 2,3 and David Ogilvie 1,2 1 MRC Epidemiology Unit, School... , and surveillance. University of Chicago Law Review 2008, 75:47-74. 14. van Hees VT, Golubic R, Ekelund U, Brage S: Impact of study design on development and evaluation of an activity-type classifier. Journal of Applied Physiology 2013, 114:1042-1051. 15...

  10. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of the Fire Protection Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory, Building 3525 Â… September 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor InnovativeProcessing Facility Construction Quality andY-12

  11. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of the Paducah Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility Fire Protection Program Â… September 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor InnovativeProcessing Facility Construction Quality andY-12Paducah

  12. Ningbo Liaoyuan Lighting Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to:Inc JumpNigeria:AndyLiaoyuan

  13. Anion Exchange Membranes - Transport/Conductivity | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research at 1 Table ofDepartment of EnergyOperationsAndrewAndy-

  14. Sandia Energy - Ann Dallman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULI ProgramPhysical Society Names FourAndy

  15. Sandia Energy - Art Fischer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULI ProgramPhysical Society Names FourAndyArt Fischer

  16. Sandia Energy - Asian-American Engineer of the Year (AAEOY) Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULI ProgramPhysical Society Names FourAndyArt

  17. Sandia Energy - Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULIColin HumphreysDETLEC SSLS Scientist Andy Armstrong

  18. Sandia Energy - Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULIColin HumphreysDETLEC SSLS Scientist Andy

  19. Sandia Energy - Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULIColin HumphreysDETLEC SSLS Scientist AndyCINT

  20. Sandia Energy - Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULIColin HumphreysDETLEC SSLS Scientist AndyCINTEnergy

  1. High Metal Removal Rate Process for Machining Difficult Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to TappingWORK BREAKDOWNEnergy how toEM&High impactHighAndy

  2. LED Provides Effective and Efficient Parking Area Lighting at the NAVFAC

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safety Standards Implementation JulyTheKEY07-97# .Andy

  3. Making the "Best Place to Live" Even Better | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof Energy This RevisionMaking HydropowerDavidbuildingAndy

  4. The Hubble space telescope UV legacy survey of galactic globular clusters.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation FederatedInformationTITLE: AUTHOR(S)Patterns, andI. Overview of

  5. The Human Genome Project and other biological research efforts are creating an avalanche of new data about the chemical makeu

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation FederatedInformationTITLE: AUTHOR(S)Patterns, andI. Overview

  6. The ImDact of Taxation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation FederatedInformationTITLE: AUTHOR(S)Patterns, andI.

  7. DOE Connects with Higher Education Community | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pState Efficiency,Energy Newssuccessfully completed cleanupLabAndy

  8. The "God Particle": Have Your Cake and Eat It Too! | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S.Laclede GasEfficiency Maine BusinessSmallsuccessTerynandOn MarchPlatformsAndy

  9. Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report 2011

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailable forSite |n t eof Energy Program1183-20XX andi

  10. Slide 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003Summer 20132008 Dominion BuildingAndy S.

  11. Slide 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003Summer 20132008 Dominion BuildingAndy

  12. Slide 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996 2.003Summer 20132008 Dominion BuildingAndy©

  13. DOE F 470.6 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle10nominate an employee for anOfficeinAuthorization andis

  14. Salmon fishing boats of the North American Pacific Coast in the era of oar and sail 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Charles David

    1993-01-01

    for small craft identification by archaeologists working on the Pacific Coast. The information gained from studying various salmon fishing boats and their distribution reflects changing hull shape due to local sea conditions, competition amid diminishing...

  15. Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections Email: oar.cpo.mapp@noaa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth system models to better simulate the climate system? Can we improve intraseasonal to seasonal mission, MAPP supports the development of advanced Earth system models that can predict climate variations, and the external research community. MAPP Objectives · Improve Earth system models · Achieve an integrated Earth

  16. FINANCIAL TIMES FRIDAY FEBRUARY 18 2011 9 oaring commodities prices once

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    and energy prices now pose severe economic, political, and social risks in developing countries. Finance, is in a vertiginous political crisis. But there is hope. China, in particular, has reason to lead. It has nearly $3 a backdrop of rising hunger and political instability in food-scarce countries in Africa, the Middle East

  17. O.A.R. 734-055 - Pole Lines, Buried Cables, Pipe lines, Signs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Operations (1981). Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleO.A.R.734-055-PoleLines,BuriedCables,Pipelines,Signs,Misc.FacilitiesandOperations...

  18. O.A.R. 345-015 - Energy Facility Siting Council Site Certification...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Procedures (2014). Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleO.A.R.345-015-EnergyFacilitySitingCouncilSiteCertificationProcedures&oldid789924" ...

  19. O.A.R. 734-051 - Highway Approaches, Access Control, Spacing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Standards and Medians (2011). Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleO.A.R.734-051-HighwayApproaches,AccessControl,SpacingStandardsandMedians&oldid78995...

  20. O.A.R. 141-083 - Rules for Granting Easements for Fiber Optic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Optic and Other Cables (1999). Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleO.A.R.141-083-RulesforGrantingEasementsforFiberOpticandOtherCables&oldid789950"...

  1. Oa$RBbdxgeEOperatlons Oar; Ridge, Tennessee 37830 National Lead Company of Ohio

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700 GJO-2003-411-TAC GJO-PIN~$ .,2, 1990- .; i

  2. File:Original Rule from OAR 20.03.15.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages Recent Changes AllApschem.pdfgaspOregonSHPOClearanceForm.pdf Jump to:Original Rule

  3. O.A.R. 141-083 - Rules for Granting Easements for Fiber Optic and Other

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New York: EnergyGenCables |

  4. O.A.R. 245-023 - Need Standard for Non-generating Facilities | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New York:

  5. O.A.R. 340-045 - Regulations Pertaining to NPDES and WPCF Permits | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New York:Energy

  6. O.A.R. 345-015 - Energy Facility Siting Council Site Certification

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New York:EnergyProcedures |

  7. O.A.R. 345-020 - Notice of Intent | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New York:EnergyProcedures |20

  8. O.A.R. 345-021 - Application for Site Certification | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New

  9. O.A.R. 734-051 - Highway Approaches, Access Control, Spacing Standards and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jump to:Medians | Open

  10. O.A.R. 734-055 - Pole Lines, Buried Cables, Pipe lines, Signs, Misc.

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jump to:Medians |

  11. OAR 340-044 - Construction and Use of Waste Disposal Wells or Other

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jump to:MediansUnderground

  12. OAR 340-045 - Regulations Pertaining to NPDES and WPCF Permits | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jump

  13. OAR 340-048 - Certification of Compliance with Water Quality Requirements

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jumpand Standards | Open

  14. OAR 340-071 - On Site Wastewater Treatment Systems Definitions | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jumpand Standards |

  15. OAR 340-105 - DEQ Hazardous Management Facility Permits | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jumpand Standards

  16. OAR 340-120 - Additional Siting and Permitting Requirements for Hazardous

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jumpand Standards6 -

  17. OAR 340-150 - DEQ Underground Storage Tank Rules | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jumpand Standards6 -150 -

  18. OAR 340-216 - Air Contaminant Discharge Permits | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New Jumpand Standards6 -15016

  19. OAR 660-015 - Land Use Planning Statewide Planning Goals | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New JumpandInformation

  20. OAR 690 Standards and Procedures for Low-temperature Geothermal Production

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New JumpandInformation|

  1. Oregon - OAR 860-025-0030 - Petition for CPCN for Construction of Overhead

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt.InformationImprovementsTransmission Lines | Open Energy

  2. Department of Energy EPA\\OAR\\Office of Radiation and Indoor Air U. S. Environmental Protection Agency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) staff asked some additional questions concerning the Hanford Tank and K Cotsworth -2- 2) Does the K-Basin sludge contain chunks of spent nuclear fuel, or has all of the residue TRU waste inventory contains no "chunks" of spent nuclear fuel. Wastes generated from spent fuel

  3. O.A.R. 141-122 - Rules for Granting Easements on Trust and Non-Trust Land |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, New York: EnergyGenCables

  4. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassov's research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herring's group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  5. The systematics and distribution of Enoploteuthidae and Cranchiidae (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida) from the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipka, Douglas Arthur

    1970-01-01

    1970 AIISTI]ACT The Systematics and Di strih&ii ]o? nl I. ?op]o1&?t'?idee and Cranchiidae (Cepha] npnda ' . Dr g?ps I &la ) from the Gulf of M&xi. &o. (May 1&170) Douglas A. Lipka, B. A. , Aux& in Col. i&go Directed by: Dr. . 1, ?o 13?r?er, Jr... within the Gulf of Mexico are &lisc?ssed. AOKNOWI, riIOFNSN rS A special expression of grat i tude i s axtan&le&i to Dr, Leo Berner, Jr, for hi s guidance in my course of a(ndy and his constructive criticism an&1 advi. ce during the de- velopment...

  6. Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments Program http://cpo.noaa.gov/cpo_pa/risa Email: oar.cpo.risa@noaa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    infor- mation is being infused into public spheres in richer ways, placing more emphasis on innovative

  7. GFDL Laboratory Review, May 20 May 22, 2014 Stakeholders U.S.DOC/NOAA/OAR/GFDL 5/20/2014 5/22/2014 Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    science in China and the US Carbon Mitigation Initiative (Stephen Pacala) - The CMI is a partnership between Princeton University and BP with the goal of finding solutions to the carbon and climate problem://www.usclivar.org/working-groups/hurricane). Emory University (Eri Saikawa) - apply regional chemistry models to study the impact of anthropogenic

  8. GFDL Laboratory Review, June 30 July 2, 2009 Technology Transferred (1b) U.S.DOC/NOAA/OAR/GFDL 6/30/2009-7/2/2009 Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of National Centers for Environmental Prediction's (NCEP's) coupled Climate Forecast System (CFS) and Global Ocean Data Assimilation System (GODAS) since that time. The CFS became operational in 2004. NCEP's Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) has developed and is testing a new version of CFS (CFS-v2

  9. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Review of the Hanford K-West Annex Facility OAR EA-HANFORD-2014-09 thru 2015-06

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergyNatural GasDepartmentApril 13,truck carries<Lessons Learned

  10. Development of an optimal anisotropic responding (OAR) dosimeter for two-dosimeter dosimetry for better estimation of effective dose equivalent (He) and the impact of dosimeter misposition on estimating effective dose equivalent using isotropic dosimeters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Hsiang-Jung

    1998-01-01

    A single dosimeter is commonly worn on a radiation worker's chest to monitor radiation exposure. However, when a radiation worker is exposed to a posterior photon beam, effective dose equivalent (HE) can be severely underestimated using a single...

  11. GFDL Laboratory Review, June 30 July 2, 2009 Awards and Honors (1d) U.S.DOC/NOAA/OAR/GFDL 6/30/2009 7/2/2009 Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meteorological Organization V. Ramaswamy (2003) ­ for the research paper "Stratospheric Temperature Trends paper, A Search for Human Influences on the Thermal Structure of the Atmosphere, with B. D. Santer, et/30/2009 ­ 7/2/2009 Page 1 GFDL Awards and Honors ­ Research, Development, and/or Application 1998-2009 (1d

  12. Hollings Scholars -Class of 2005 Institution Major Mentor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher University of Alabama Biology Brad Hall OAR, ESRL/GMD, Boulder, CO Analysis of Air Samples Chandler

  13. 2014 PMEL Lab Review Committees, Leadership, Editorships, and Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Energy Center · Gregory Johnson ­ U.S. CLIVAR/CO2 Repeat Hydrography-present) · James Overland, OAR Representative and Sea Ice Lead, NOAA Arctic Task

  14. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Follow-Up Review of the Idaho Site Fire Protection Program as Implemented for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory and the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project, OAR # EA-ID-2015-10-22

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergyNatural GasDepartmentApril 13,truck carries<Lessons Learned EA

  15. College of Charleston Charleston, South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    OF DEFENSE 44,586 Genetic Risk Assessment Modeling for Offshore Marine Aquaculture Operations: COBIA 11.RD of Demographic Changes 11.RD NA10OAR4170073/M491 42,940 NA10OAR4170073/M391 823 Developing an Analysis Pipeline

  16. NTINSTITUTEFOR MARINE AND ATM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ~UH-NOAA~ JOI NTINSTITUTEFOR MARINE AND ATM O SPHERICRESEAR CH Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2010 Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research University of Hawai'i at Manoa 1000 Pope Road, MSB For Cooperative Agreements NA17RJ1230, NA09OAR4320075, and NA08OAR4320910 ~UH-NOAA~ JOI NTINSTITUTEFOR MARINE

  17. Tim Danielson Assoc Vice Chancellor &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Asst Adv ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Compliance ADA Criminal Background Checks FMLA I-9 OAR (Outside/TERs Scheduling/Meetings Exit Interviews Filing/Organization Records Management/Retention Public Records Requests

  18. NOAARESEARCHPROGRAMOVERVIEW SANDYSUPPLEMENTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mitigation reserve fund will be used by OAR to improve and increase high performance computing capacity in various important regions. 4.HighPerformanceComputing$24.5M NOAA will obtain high performance computer

  19. THE COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    THE COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA OMB CIRCULAR A; THE COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA CONTENTS Page Schedule,050 Bleaching of Oculina Varicosa a Temperate Zone Coral off South Carolina 11.RD NA06OAR4170015 4

  20. Potential Stream Density in Mid-Atlantic U.S. Watersheds Andrew J. Elmore1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution was prepared under award (NA05OAR4171042) from Maryland Sea Grant, National Oceanic and Atmospheric

  1. Learn More: www.glerl.noaa.gov economic value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : seagrant.noaa.gov23 ECONOMIC VITALITY Alternative Energy: Harvesting the Ocean's Potential One way to reduce carbon emissions is to replace carbon-based fuels with an alternative energy source. OAR's Sea the ocean for alternative energy to strengt

  2. SU-E-T-86: Comparison of Two Commercially Available Programs for the Evaluation of Delivered Daily Dose Using Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuohy, R; Bosse, C; Mavroidis, P; Shi, Z; Crownover, R; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, two commercially available programs were compared for the evaluation of delivered daily dose using cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: Thirty (n=30) patients previously treated in our clinic (10 prostate, 10 SBRT lung and 10 abdomen) were used in this study. The patients' plans were optimized and calculated using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. The daily CBCT scans were imported into Velocity and RayStation along with the corresponding planning CTs, structure sets and 3D dose distributions for each patient. The organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on each CBCT by the prescribing physician and were included in the evaluation of the daily delivered dose. Each CBCT was registered to the planning CT, once with rigid registration and then again, separately, with deformable registration. After registering each CBCT, the dose distribution from the planning CT was overlaid and the dose volume histograms (DVH) for the OAR and the planning target volumes (PTV) were calculated. Results: For prostate patients, we observed daily volume changes for the OARs. The DVH analysis for those patients showed variation in the sparing of the OARs while PTV coverage remained virtually unchanged using both Velocity and RayStation systems. Similar results were observed for abdominal patients. In contrast, for SBRT lung patients, the DVH for the OARs and target were comparable to those from the initial treatment plan. Differences in organ volume and organ doses were also observed when comparing the daily fractions using deformable and rigid registrations. Conclusion: By using daily CBCT dose reconstruction, we proved PTV coverage for prostate and abdominal targets is adequate. However, there is significant dosimetric change for the OARs. For lung SBRT patients, the delivered daily dose for both PTV and OAR is comparable to the planned dose with no significant differences.

  3. Modeling the dosimetry of organ-at-risk in head and neck IMRT planning: An intertechnique and interinstitutional study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lian, Jun, E-mail: jun-lian@med.unc.edu; Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Chang, Sha [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Yuan, Lulin, E-mail: lulin.yuan@duke.edu; Yoo, David P.; Yin, FangFang; Wu, Q. Jackie, E-mail: jackie.wu@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Ge, Yaorong [Department of Software and Information Systems, The University of North Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223 (United States)] [Department of Software and Information Systems, The University of North Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To build a statistical model to quantitatively correlate the anatomic features of structures and the corresponding dose-volume histogram (DVH) of head and neck (HN) Tomotherapy (Tomo) plans. To study if the model built upon one intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique (such as conventional Linac) can be used to predict anticipated organs-at-risk (OAR) DVH of patients treated with a different IMRT technique (such as Tomo). To study if the model built upon the clinical experience of one institution can be used to aid IMRT planning for another institution. Methods: Forty-four Tomotherapy intensity modulate radiotherapy plans of HN cases (Tomo-IMRT) from Institution A were included in the study. A different patient group of 53 HN fixed gantry IMRT (FG-IMRT) plans was selected from Institution B. The analyzed OARs included the parotid, larynx, spinal cord, brainstem, and submandibular gland. Two major groups of anatomical features were considered: the volumetric information and the spatial information. The volume information includes the volume of target, OAR, and overlapped volume between target and OAR. The spatial information of OARs relative to PTVs was represented by the distance-to-target histogram (DTH). Important anatomical and dosimetric features were extracted from DTH and DVH by principal component analysis. Two regression models, one for Tomotherapy plan and one for IMRT plan, were built independently. The accuracy of intratreatment-modality model prediction was validated by a leave one out cross-validation method. The intertechnique and interinstitution validations were performed by using the FG-IMRT model to predict the OAR dosimetry of Tomo-IMRT plans. The dosimetry of OARs, under the same and different institutional preferences, was analyzed to examine the correlation between the model prediction and planning protocol. Results: Significant patient anatomical factors contributing to OAR dose sparing in HN Tomotherapy plans have been analyzed and identified. For all the OARs, the discrepancies of dose indices between the model predicted values and the actual plan values were within 2.1%. Similar results were obtained from the modeling of FG-IMRT plans. The parotid gland was spared in a comparable fashion during the treatment planning of two institutions. The model based on FG-IMRT plans was found to predict the median dose of the parotid of Tomotherapy plans quite well, with a mean error of 2.6%. Predictions from the FG-IMRT model suggested the median dose of the larynx, median dose of the brainstem and D2 of the brainstem could be reduced by 10.5%, 12.8%, and 20.4%, respectively, in the Tomo-IMRT plans. This was found to be correlated to the institutional differences in OAR constraint settings. Re-planning of six Tomotherapy patients confirmed the potential of optimization improvement predicted by the FG-IMRT model was correct. Conclusions: The authors established a mathematical model to correlate the anatomical features and dosimetric indexes of OARs of HN patients in Tomotherapy plans. The model can be used for the setup of patient-specific OAR dose sparing goals and quality control of planning results. The institutional clinical experience was incorporated into the model which allows the model from one institution to generate a reference plan for another institution, or another IMRT technique.

  4. Consideration of Dose Limits for Organs at Risk of Thoracic Radiotherapy: Atlas for Lung, Proximal Bronchial Tree, Esophagus, Spinal Cord, Ribs, and Brachial Plexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Feng-Ming; Ritter, Timothy; Quint, Douglas J.; Senan, Suresh; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Timmerman, Robert; Bezjak, Andrea; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Movsas, Benjamin; Marsh, Lon; Okunieff, Paul; Choy, Hak; Curran, Walter J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results: Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions: We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT.

  5. SU-E-T-357: Semi-Automated Knowledge-Based Radiation Therapy (KBRT) Planning for Head-And-Neck Cancer (HNC): Can KBRT Plans Achieve Better Results Than Manual Planning?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutzky, C; Grzetic, S; Lo, J; Das, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Knowledge Based Radiation Therapy Treatment (KBRT) planning can be used to semi-automatically generate IMRT plans for new patients using constraints derived from previously manually-planned, geometrically similar patients. We investigate whether KBRT plans can achieve greater dose sparing than manual plans using optimized, organspecific constraint weighting factors. Methods: KBRT planning of HNC radiotherapy cases geometrically matched each new (query) case to one of the 105 clinically approved plans in our database. The dose distribution of the planned match was morphed to fit the querys geometry. Dose-volume constraints extracted from the morphed dose distribution were used to run the IMRT optimization with no user input. In the first version, all constraints were multiplied by a weighting factor of 0.7. The weighting factors were then systematically optimized (in order of OARs with increasing separation from the target) to maximize sparing to each OAR without compromising other OARs. The optimized, second version plans were compared against the first version plans and the clinically approved plans for 45 unilateral/bilateral target cases using the dose metrics: mean, median and maximum (brainstem and cord) doses. Results: Compared to the first version, the second version significantly reduced mean/median contralateral parotid doses (>2Gy) for bilateral cases. Other changes between the two versions were not clinically meaningful. Compared to the original clinical plans, both bilateral and unilateral plans in the second version had lower average dose metrics for 5 of the 6 OARs. Compared to the original plans, the second version achieved dose sparing that was at least as good for all OARs and better for the ipsilateral parotid (bilateral) and oral cavity (bilateral/unilateral). Differences in planning target volume coverage metrics were not clinically significant. Conclusion: HNC-KBRT planning generated IMRT plans with at least equivalent dose sparing to manually generated plans; greater dose sparing was achieved in selected OARs.

  6. Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER25579; Development of High-Order Accurate Interface Tracking Algorithms and Improved Constitutive Models for Problems in Continuum Mechanics with Applications to Jetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puckett, Elbridge Gerry; Miller, Gregory Hale

    2012-10-14

    Much of the work conducted under the auspices of DE-FG02-03ER25579 was characterized by an exceptionally close collaboration with researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). For example, Andy Nonaka, one of Professor Miller's graduate students in the Department of Applied Science at U. C. Davis (UCD) wrote his PhD thesis in an area of interest to researchers in the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG), which is a part of the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at LBNL. Dr. Nonaka collaborated closely with these researchers and subsequently published the results of this collaboration jointly with them, one article in a peer reviewed journal article and one paper in the proceedings of a conference. Dr. Nonaka is now a research scientist in the Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE), which is also part of the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at LBNL. This collaboration with researchers at LBNL also included having one of Professor Puckett's graduate students in the Graduate Group in Applied Mathematics (GGAM) at UCD, Sarah Williams, spend the summer working with Dr. Ann Almgren, who is a staff scientist in CCSE. As a result of this visit Sarah decided work on a problem suggested by the head of CCSE, Dr. John Bell, for her PhD thesis. Having finished all of the coursework and examinations required for a PhD, Sarah stayed at LBNL to work on her thesis under the guidance of Dr. Bell. Sarah finished her PhD thesis in June of 2007. Writing a PhD thesis while working at one of the University of California (UC) managed DOE laboratories is long established tradition at UC and Professor Puckett has always encouraged his students to consider doing this. Another one of Professor Puckett's graduate students in the GGAM at UCD, Christopher Algieri, was partially supported with funds from DE-FG02-03ER25579 while he wrote his MS thesis in which he analyzed and extended work originally published by Dr. Phillip Colella, the head of ANAG, and some of his colleagues. Chris Algieri is now employed as a staff member in Dr. Bill Collins' Climate Science Department in the Earth Sciences Division at LBNL working with computational models of climate change. Finally, it should be noted that the work conducted by Professor Puckett and his students Sarah Williams and Chris Algieri and described in this final report for DOE grant # DE-FC02-03ER25579 is closely related to work performed by Professor Puckett and his students under the auspices of Professor Puckett's DOE SciDAC grant DE-FC02-01ER25473 An Algorithmic and Software Framework for Applied Partial Differential Equations: A DOE SciDAC Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (ISIC). Dr. Colella was the lead PI for this SciDAC grant, which was comprised of several research groups from DOE national laboratories and five university PI's from five different universities. In theory Professor Puckett tried to use funds from the SciDAC grant to support work directly involved in implementing algorithms developed by members of his research group at UCD as software that might be of use to Puckett's SciDAC CoPIs. (For example, see the work reported in Section 2.2.2 of this final report.) However, since there is considerable lead time spent developing such algorithms before they are ready to become `software' and research plans and goals change as the research progresses, Professor Puckett supported each member of his research group partially with funds from the SciDAC APDEC ISIC DE-FC02-01ER25473 and partially with funds from this DOE MICS grant DE-FC02-03ER25579. This has necessarily resulted in a significant overlap of project areas that were funded by both grants. In particular, both Sarah Williams and Chris Algieri were supported partially with funds from grant # DE-FG02-03ER25579, for which this is the final report, and in part with funds from Professor Puckett's DOE SciDAC grant # DE-FC02-01ER25473. For example, Sarah Williams received support from DE-FC02- 01ER25473 and DE-FC02-03ER25579, both while at UCD taking cla

  7. A Statistical Approach for Achievable Dose Querying in IMRT Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazhdan, Michael

    Introduction We explore a data-driven approach for achievable dose querying in intensity- modulated radiation specifies too low a target dose to the OAR, the treatment plan may not be realiz- able and the treatmentA Statistical Approach for Achievable Dose Querying in IMRT Planning Patricio Simari1 , Binbin Wu2

  8. COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA OMB CIRCULAR A-133 REPORTS (WITH INDEPENDENT of Oculina Varicosa a Temperate Zone Coral off 11.RD NA06OAR4170015 245 (Continued) South Carolina Monitoring AUDITORS' REPORT THEREON) FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 #12;COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON CHARLESTON, SOUTH

  9. Retrospective Estimation of the Quality of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans for Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Jihye; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    This study estimated the planning quality of intensity-modulated radiotherapy in 42 lung cancer cases to provide preliminary data for the development of a planning quality assurance algorithm. Organs in or near the thoracic cavity (ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, heart, liver, esophagus, spinal cord, and bronchus) were selected as organs at risk (OARs). Radiotherapy plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), coverage index (CVI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), OAR-PTV distance and OAR-PTV overlap volume, and the V10Gy, V20Gy, and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of the OARs. The CI, CVI, and HI of the PTV were 0.54 - 0.89 , 0.90 - 1.00 , and 0.11 - 0.41, respectively. The mean EUDs (V10Gy, V20Gy) of the ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, esophagus, cord, liver, heart, and bronchus were 8.07 Gy (28.06, 13.17), 2.59 Gy (6.53, 1.18), 7.02 Gy (26.17, 12.32), 3.56 Gy (13.56, 4.48), 0.72 Gy (2.15, 0.91), 5.14 Gy (19.68, 8.62), and 10.56 Gy (36.08, 19.79), respectivel...

  10. Proceedings of ASME-IMECE'04 2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and RD&D Expo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    an object, and in as- sisting in bearing static loads. 1 Introduction Human power amplifiers or extenders [1 in Fall 2004). The main advantage of the oar concept over an exoskeleton con- cept is that of safety during constrained motion, and in sharing in static loads bearing during unconstrained motion. The rest

  11. NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Earth System Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Earth System Modeling in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, centered on Earth System Modeling and OAR's role develop and/or can use accurate and timely predictions of the Earth system that come from modeling. The 18

  12. NOAA 2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook Dr. Gerry Bell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    NOAA 2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook Dr. Gerry Bell Lead Seasonal Forecaster Climate Prediction Center NOAA/ NWS/ NCEP Collaboration With National Hurricane Center/ NOAA/ NWS/ NCEP Hurricane Research Division/ NOAA/ OAR/ AOML/ HRD www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/hurricane #12;Outline 1. Features

  13. MO-C-17A-10: Comparison of Dose Deformable Accumulation by Using Parallel and Serial Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Z; Li, M; Wong, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The uncertainty of dose accumulation over multiple CT datasets with deformable fusion may have significant impact on clinical decisions. In this study, we investigate the difference of two dose summation approaches involving deformable fusion. Methods: Five patients, four external beam and one brachytherapy(BT), were chosen for the study. The BT patient was treated with CT-based HDR. The CT image sets acquired in the imageguidance process (8-11 CTs/patient) were used to determine the dose delivered to the four external beam patients. (prostate, pelvis, lung and head and neck). For the HDR patient (cervix), five CT image sets and the corresponding BT plans were used. In total 44 CT datasets and RT dose/plans were imported into the image fusion software MiM (6.0.4) for analysis.For each of the five clinical cases, the dose from each fraction was accumulated into the primary CT dataset by using both Parallel and Serial approaches. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) for CTV and selected organs-at-risks (OAR) were generated. The D95(CTV), OAR(mean) and OAR(max) for the four external beam cases the D90(CTV), and the max dose to bladder and rectum for the BT case were compared. Results: For the four external beam patients, the difference in D95(CTV) were <1.2% PD between the parallel and the serial approaches. The differences of the OAR(mean) and the OAR(max ) range from 0 to 3.7% and <1% PD respectively. For the HDR patient, the dose difference for D90 is 11% PD while that of the max dose to bladder and rectum were 11.5% and 23.3% respectively. Conclusion: For external beam treatments, the parallel and serial approaches have <5% difference probably because tumor volume and OAR have less changes from fraction to fraction. For the brachytherapy case, >10% dose difference between the two approaches was observed as significant volume changes of tumor and OAR were observed among treatment fractions.

  14. Development of a system for quantifying the rate of spread of oak wilt using remote sensing and geographic information systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ware, Charles William

    1990-01-01

    DEVELOPMENT OF A SYSTEM FOR QUANTIFYING THE RATE OF SPREAD OF OAR WILT USING REMOTE SENSING AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS A Thesis by CHARLES WILLIAM WARE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial... of Spread of Oak Wilt Using Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems. (December 1990) Charles William Ware, B. S. , Stephen F. Austin St. Univ. Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Robert Maggio Oak wilt, caused by the fungus Ce atoc st's fa...

  15. SU-E-T-371: Validation of Organ Doses Delivered During Craniospinal Irradiation with Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Andujar, A; Chen, J; Garcia, A; Haas-Kogan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: New techniques have been developed to deliver more conformal treatments to the craniospinal axis. One concern, however, is the widespread low dose delivered and implications for possible late effects. The purpose of this work is for the first time to validate the organ doses calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS), including out-of-field doses for a pediatric craniospinal treatment (CSI). Methods: A CSI plan prescribed to 23.4 Gy and a posterior fossa boost plan to 30.6 Gy (total dose 54.0 Gy) was developed for a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom representing a 13 yearold- child. For the CSI plan, the planning target volumes (PTV) consisted of the brain and spinal cord with 2 mm and 5 mm expansions, respectively. Organs at risk (OAR) were contoured and included in the plan optimization. The plans were delivered on a helical tomotherapy unit. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the dose at 54 positions within the PTV and OARs. Results: For the CSI treatment, the mean percent difference between TPS dose calculations and measurements was 5% for the PTV and 10% for the OARs. For the boost, the average was 3% for the PTV. The percent difference for the OARs, which lie outside the field and received a small fraction of the prescription dose, varied from 15% to 200%. However in terms of absolute dose, the average difference between measurement and TPS per treatment Gy was 2 cGy/Gy and 3 mGy/Gy for the CSI and boost plans, respectively. Conclusion: There was good agreement between doses calculated by the TPS and measurements for the CSI treatment. Higher percent differences were observed for out-of-field doses in the boost plan, but absolute dose differences were very small compared to the prescription dose. These findings can help in the estimation of late effects after radiotherapy for pediatric patients.

  16. Villa's Army 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    1914-01-01

    of the Sea Peoples Ship Depiction....................?......... 10 II CENTRAL EUROPEAN-GREEK BRONZE AGE EXCHANGE AND THE ORIGINS OF THE VOGELBARKE??????????.??? 13 Chronology?????????????????????.?. 16 Central Europe and Mycenaean Greece... expeditions. 10 of a grapnel during the battle as a ?strong argument? for artists accompanying the Egyptian army on their campaign.18 In terms of ship construction, the Sea People?s ship at Medinet Habu appears to be a partially decked oared warship...

  17. Validating the RTOG-Endorsed Brachial Plexus Contouring Atlas: An Evaluation of Reproducibility Among Patients Treated by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Sun K.; Hall, William H.; Mathai, Mathew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Dublin, Arthur B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Gupta, Vishal; Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate interobserver variability for contouring the brachial plexus as an organ-at-risk (OAR) and to analyze its potential dosimetric consequences in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed brachial plexus contouring atlas, three radiation oncologists independently delineated the OAR on treatment planning computed-tomography (CT) axial scans from 5 representative patients undergoing IMRT to a prescribed dose of 70 Gy for head-and-neck cancer. Dose-volume histograms for the brachial plexus were calculated, and interobserver differences were quantified by comparing various dosimetric statistics. Qualitative analysis was performed by visually assessing the overlapping contours on a single beam's eye view. Results: Brachial plexus volumes for the 5 patients across observers were 26 cc (18-35 cc), 25 cc (21-30 cc), 29 cc (28-32 cc), 29 cc (23-38 cc), and 29 cc (23-34 cc). On qualitative analysis, minimal variability existed except at the inferolateral portion of the OAR, where slight discrepancies were noted among the physicians. Maximum doses to the brachial plexus ranged from 71.6 to 72.6 Gy, 75.2 to 75.8 Gy, 69.1 to 71.0 Gy, 76.4 to 76.9 Gy, and 70.6 to 71.4 Gy. Respective volumes receiving doses greater than 60 Gy (V60) were 8.6 to 10.9 cc, 6.2 to 8.1 cc, 8.2 to 11.6 cc, 8.3 to 10.5 cc, and 5.6 to 9.8 cc. Conclusion: The RTOG-endorsed brachial plexus atlas provides a consistent set of guidelines for contouring this OAR with essentially no learning curve. Adoption of these contouring guidelines in the clinical setting is encouraged.

  18. A Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy and Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Frontal and Temporal High-Grade Gliomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaffer, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Nichol, Alan M., E-mail: anichol@bccancer.bc.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Vollans, Emily [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Fong Ming; Nakano, Sandy [Department of Radiation Therapy, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali; Schmuland, Moira [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Ma, Roy; McKenzie, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Otto, Karl [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), the predecessor to Varian's RapidArc, is a novel extension of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) wherein the dose is delivered in a single gantry rotation while the multileaf collimator leaves are in motion. Leaf positions and the weights of field samples along the arc are directly optimized, and a variable dose rate is used. This planning study compared seven-field coplanar IMRT (cIMRT) with VMAT for high-grade gliomas that had planning target volumes (PTVs) overlapping organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: 10 previously treated patients were replanned to 60 Gy in 30 fractions with cIMRT and VMAT using the following planning objectives: 98% of PTV covered by 95% isodose without violating OAR and hotspot dose constraints. Mean OAR doses were maximally decreased without reducing PTV coverage or violating hotspot constraints. We compared dose-volume histogram data, monitor units, and treatment times. Results: There was equivalent PTV coverage, homogeneity, and conformality. VMAT significantly reduced maximum and mean retinal, lens, and contralateral optic nerve doses compared with IMRT (p < 0.05). Brainstem, chiasm, and ipsilateral optic nerve doses were similar. For 2-Gy fractions, mean monitor units were as follows: cIMRT = 789 +- 112 and VMAT = 363 +- 45 (relative reduction 54%, p = 0.002), and mean treatment times (min) were as follows: cIMRT = 5.1 +- 0.4 and VMAT = 1.8 +- 0.1 (relative reduction 65%, p = 0.002). Conclusions: Compared with cIMRT, VMAT achieved equal or better PTV coverage and OAR sparing while using fewer monitor units and less time to treat high-grade gliomas.

  19. Clinical experience transitioning from IMRT to VMAT for head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studenski, Matthew T.; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Siglin, Joshua; Cognetti, David; Curry, Joseph; Tuluc, Madalina; Harrison, Amy S.

    2013-07-01

    To quantify clinical differences for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in terms of dosimetric endpoints and planning and delivery time, twenty head and neck cancer patients have been considered for VMAT using Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan delivered via an Elekta linear accelerator. Differences in planning time between IMRT and VMAT were estimated accounting for both optimization and calculation. The average delivery time per patient was obtained retrospectively using the record and verify software. For the dosimetric comparison, all contoured organs at risk (OARs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were evaluated. Of the 20 cases considered, 14 had VMAT plans approved. Six VMAT plans were rejected due to unacceptable dose to OARs. In terms of optimization time, there was minimal difference between the two modalities. The dose calculation time was significantly longer for VMAT, 4 minutes per 358 degree arc versus 2 minutes for an entire IMRT plan. The overall delivery time was reduced by 9.2 ± 3.9 minutes for VMAT (51.4 ± 15.6%). For the dosimetric comparison of the 14 clinically acceptable plans, there was almost no statistical difference between the VMAT and IMRT. There was also a reduction in monitor units of approximately 32% from IMRT to VMAT with both modalities demonstrating comparable quality assurance results. VMAT provides comparable coverage of target volumes while sparing OARs for the majority of head and neck cases. In cases where high dose modulation was required for OARs, a clinically acceptable plan was only achievable with IMRT. Due to the long calculation times, VMAT plans can cause delays during planning but marked improvements in delivery time reduce patient treatment times and the risk of intra-fraction motion.

  20. A comparative analysis of early Medieval shipwrecks from the southern shores of the Baltic Sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indruszewski, George

    1996-01-01

    and sail 10. Oar power 11. Steering system. Page iX xi xi if 9 13 20 30 34 37 49 60 64 67 70 70 82 88 100 107 113 115 118 123 125 126 CHAPTER IV SCANDINAVIAN PARALLELS. 1. Keels. 2. Stem and sternpost. . . . . . . . . . . . 3... COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF PRINCIPAL MEMBERS. . 1. Keel 2. Stem and sternpost. . . . . . . . . . . . 3. Hull planking. 4. Floor timbers. 5. Beams and bulkheads. . . . . . . . . . . 6. Knees. 7. Stringers. 8. Mast and its support system. . . 9. Rigging...

  1. SU-D-19A-06: The Effect of Beam Parameters On Very High-Energy Electron Radiotherapy: A Planning Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palma, B; Bazalova, M; Qu, B; Loo, B; Maxim, P; Hardemark, B; Hynning, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the effect of very high-energy electron (VHEE) beam parameters on the planning of a lung cancer case by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: We simulated VHEE radiotherapy plans using the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc-DOSXYZnrc code. We selected a lung cancer case that was treated with 6MV photon VMAT to be planned with VHEE. We studied the effect of beam energy (80 MeV, 100 MeV, and 120 MeV), number of equidistant beams (16 or 32), and beamlets sizes (3 mm, 5 mm or 7 mm) on PTV coverage, sparing of organs at risk (OARs) and dose conformity. Inverse-planning optimization was performed in a research version of RayStation (RaySearch Laboratories AB) using identical objective functions and constraints for all VHEE plans. Results: Similar PTV coverage and dose conformity was achieved by all the VHEE plans. The 100 MeV and 120 MeV VHEE plans were equivalent amongst them and were superior to the 80 MeV plan in terms of OARs sparing. The effect of using 16 or 32 equidistant beams was a mean difference in average dose of 2.4% (0%–7.7%) between the two plans. The use of 3 mm beamlet size systematically reduced the dose to all the OARs. Based on these results we selected the 100MeV-16beams-3mm-beamlet-size plan to compare it against VMAT. The selected VHEE plan was more conformal than VMAT and improved OAR sparing (heart and trachea received 125% and 177% lower dose, respectively) especially in the low-dose region. Conclusion: We determined the VHEE beam parameters that maximized the OAR dose sparing and dose conformity of the actually delivered VMAT plan of a lung cancer case. The selected parameters could be used for the planning of other treatment sites with similar size, shape, and location. For larger targets, a larger beamlet size might be used without significantly increasing the dose. B Palma: None. M Bazalova: None. B Hardemark: Employee, RaySearch Americas. E Hynning: Employee, RaySearch Americas. B Qu: None. B Loo Jr.: Research support, RaySearch, Varian. P Maxim: Research support, RaySearch, Varian.

  2. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of Four Consensus Guidelines and Dosimetric Evaluation of 3D-CRT Versus Tomotherapy IMRT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Shawn; Croke, Jennifer; Roustan-Delatour, Nicolas; Belanger, Eric; Avruch, Leonard; Malone, Colin; Morash, Christopher; Kayser, Cathleen; Underhill, Kathryn; Li Yan; Malone, Kyle; Nyiri, Balazs; Spaans, Johanna

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Despite the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy, approximately one-half of patients relapse. Four consensus guidelines have been published (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group, Princess Margaret Hospital, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) with the aim of standardizing the clinical target volume (CTV) delineation and improve outcomes. To date, no attempt has been made to compare these guidelines in terms of treatment volumes or organ at risk (OAR) irradiation. The extent to which the guideline-derived plans meet the dosimetric constraints of present trials or of the Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) trial is also unknown. Our study also explored the dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients treated with postoperative RT were included. The three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans were applied to cover the guideline-generated planning target volumes (66 Gy in 33 fractions). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for CTV/planning target volume coverage and to evaluate OAR irradiation. The OAR DVHs were compared with the constraints proposed in the QUANTEC and Radiotherapy and Androgen Deprivation In Combination After Local Surgery (RADICALS) trials. 3D-CRT plans were compared with the tomotherapy plans for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group planning target volume to evaluate the advantages of IMRT. Results: The CTV differed significantly between guidelines (p < 0.001). The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-CTVs were significantly smaller than the other CTVs (p < 0.001). Differences in prostate bed coverage superiorly accounted for the major volumetric differences between the guidelines. Using 3D-CRT, the DVHs rarely met the QUANTEC or RADICALS rectal constraints, independent of the guideline used. The RADICALS bladder constraints were met most often by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer consensus guideline (14 of 20). The tomotherapy IMRT plans resulted in significant OAR sparing compared with the 3D-CRT plans; however, the RADICALS and QUANTEC criteria were still missed in a large percentage of cases. Conclusion: Treatment volumes using the current consensus guidelines differ significantly. For the four CTV guidelines, the rectal and bladder DVH constraints proposed in the QUANTEC and RADICALS trials are rarely met with 3D-CRT. IMRT results in significant OAR sparing; however, the RADICALS dose constraints are still missed for a large percentage of cases. The rectal and bladder constraints of RADICALS should be modified to avoid a reduction in the CTVs.

  3. Anterior Myocardial Territory May Replace the Heart as Organ at Risk in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan Wenyong; Liu Dong; Xue Chenbin; Xu Jiaozhen; Li Beihui; Chen Zhengwang; Hu Desheng; Wang Xionghong

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether the heart could be replaced by the anterior myocardial territory (AMT) as the organ at risk (OAR) in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of the breast for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with left-sided breast cancer who received postoperative radiation after breast-conserving surgery were studied. For each patient, we generated five IMRT plans including heart (H), left ventricle (LV), AMT, LV+AMT, and H+LV as the primary OARs, respectively, except both lungs and right breast, which corresponded to IMRT(H), IMRT(LV), IMRT(AMT), IMRT(LV+AMT), and IMRT(H+LV). For the planning target volumes and OARs, the parameters of dose-volume histograms were compared. Results: The homogeneity index, conformity index, and coverage index were not compromised significantly in IMRT(AMT), IMRT(LV) and IMRT(LV+ AMT), respectively, when compared with IMRT(H). The mean dose to the heart, LV, and AMT decreased 5.3-21.5% (p < 0.05), 19.9-29.5% (p < 0.05), and 13.3-24.5% (p < 0.05), respectively. Similarly, the low (e.g., V5%), middle (e.g., V20%), and high (e.g., V30%) dose-volume of the heart, LV, and AMT decreased with different levels. The mean dose and V10% of the right lung increased by 9.2% (p < 0.05) and 27.6% (p < 0.05), respectively, in IMRT(LV), and the mean dose and V5% of the right breast decreased significantly in IMRT(AMT) and IMRT(LV+AMT). IMRT(AMT) was the preferred plan and was then compared with IMRT(H+LV); the majority of dose-volume histogram parameters of OARs including the heart, LV, AMT, both lungs, and the right breast were not statistically different. However, the low dose-volume of LV increased and the middle dose-volume decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in IMRT(AMT). Also, those of the right lung (V10%, V15%) and right breast (V5%, V10%) decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The AMT may replace the heart as the OAR in left-sided breast IMRT after breast-conserving surgery to decrease the radiation dose to the heart.

  4. SU-E-T-234: Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT):The Impact of Incorporating Energy Modulation Into Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGeachy, P; Khan, R [University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a new radiotherapy plan optimization technique that, for a given organ geometry, will find the optimal photon beam energies and fluences to produce a desirable dose distribution. This new modulated (both in energy and fluence) photon radiotherapy (XMRT) was compared with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for a simple organ geometry. Methods: The XMRT optimization was formulated using a linear programming approach where the objective function is the mean dose to the healthy organs and dose-point constraints were assigned to each organ of interest. The organ geometry consisted of a target, two organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue. A seven-equispaced-coplanar beam arrangement was used. For conventional IMRT, only 6 MV beams were available, while XMRT was optimized using 6 and 18 MV beams. A prescribed dose (PD) of 72 GY was assigned to the target, with upper and lower bounds of 110% and 95% of the PD, respectively. Both OARs were assigned a maximum dose of 64 Gy, while the normal tissue was assigned a maximum dose of 66 Gy. A numerical solver, Gurobi, generated solutions for the XMRT and IMRT problems. The dose-volume histograms from IMRT and XMRT solutions were compared. Results: The maximum, minimum, mean, and homogeneity of the dose to the target were comparable between IMRT and XMRT. Though IMRT had improved dose conformity relative to XMRT, XMRT reduced the mean dose to both OARs by more than 1 Gy. For normal tissue, an increase of 5 Gy in mean dose and 27 percent in integral dose was seen for IMRT relative to XMRT. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the benefits of simultaneously modulating photon beam energy and fluence using our XMRT approach in a given phantom geometry. While target coverage was comparable, dose to healthy structures was reduced using XMRT.

  5. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Strigari, Lidia; Benassi, Marcello; Caivano, Rocchina; Fiorentino, Alba; Nappi, Antonio; Salvatore, Marco; Storto, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  6. The Residual Setup Errors of Different IGRT Alignment Procedures for Head and Neck IMRT and the Resulting Dosimetric Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graff, Pierre [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Radiation-Oncology, Alexis Vautrin Cancer Center, Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France); Doctoral School BioSE (EA4360), Nancy (France); Kirby, Neil [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Biostatistics, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chen, Josephine; Yom, Sue S. [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Lambert, Louise [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Radiation-Oncology, Montreal University Centre, Montreal (Canada); Pouliot, Jean, E-mail: jpouliot@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To assess residual setup errors during head and neck radiation therapy and the resulting consequences for the delivered dose for various patient alignment procedures. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) scans from 11 head and neck patients who underwent intensity modulated radiation therapy were used to assess setup errors. Each MVCBCT scan was registered to its reference planning kVCT, with seven different alignment procedures: automatic alignment and manual registration to 6 separate bony landmarks (sphenoid, left/right maxillary sinuses, mandible, cervical 1 [C1]-C2, and C7-thoracic 1 [T1] vertebrae). Shifts in the different alignments were compared with each other to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences. Then, the dose distribution was recalculated on 3 MVCBCT images per patient for every alignment procedure. The resulting dose-volume histograms for targets and organs at risk (OARs) were compared to those from the planning kVCTs. Results: The registration procedures produced statistically significant global differences in patient alignment and actual dose distribution, calling for a need for standardization of patient positioning. Vertically, the automatic, sphenoid, and maxillary sinuses alignments mainly generated posterior shifts and resulted in mean increases in maximal dose to OARs of >3% of the planned dose. The suggested choice of C1-C2 as a reference landmark appears valid, combining both OAR sparing and target coverage. Assuming this choice, relevant margins to apply around volumes of interest at the time of planning to take into account for the relative mobility of other regions are discussed. Conclusions: Use of different alignment procedures for treating head and neck patients produced variations in patient setup and dose distribution. With concern for standardizing practice, C1-C2 reference alignment with relevant margins around planning volumes seems to be a valid option.

  7. SU-E-T-398: Feasibility of Automated Tools for Robustness Evaluation of Advanced Photon and Proton Techniques in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H; Liang, X; Kalbasi, A; Lin, A; Ahn, P; Both, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Advanced radiotherapy (RT) techniques such as proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) and photon-based volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) have dosimetric advantages in the treatment of head and neck malignancies. However, anatomic or alignment changes during treatment may limit robustness of PBS and VMAT plans. We assess the feasibility of automated deformable registration tools for robustness evaluation in adaptive PBS and VMAT RT of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods: We treated 10 patients with bilateral OPC with advanced RT techniques and obtained verification CT scans with physician-reviewed target and OAR contours. We generated 3 advanced RT plans for each patient: proton PBS plan using 2 posterior oblique fields (2F), proton PBS plan using an additional third low-anterior field (3F), and a photon VMAT plan using 2 arcs (Arc). For each of the planning techniques, we forward calculated initial (Ini) plans on the verification scans to create verification (V) plans. We extracted DVH indicators based on physician-generated contours for 2 target and 14 OAR structures to investigate the feasibility of two automated tools (contour propagation (CP) and dose deformation (DD)) as surrogates for routine clinical plan robustness evaluation. For each verification scan, we compared DVH indicators of V, CP and DD plans in a head-to-head fashion using Student's t-test. Results: We performed 39 verification scans; each patient underwent 3 to 6 verification scan. We found no differences in doses to target or OAR structures between V and CP, V and DD, and CP and DD plans across all patients (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Automated robustness evaluation tools, CP and DD, accurately predicted dose distributions of verification (V) plans using physician-generated contours. These tools may be further developed as a potential robustness screening tool in the workflow for adaptive treatment of OPC using advanced RT techniques, reducing the need for physician-generated contours.

  8. Effects of a nonrigid, impermeable bottom on plane surface waves in shallow water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gade, Herman Gerhard

    1957-01-01

    *a aa tt oaa ot Cue p per. Wee ~ haws besa asdsc sad oar haeakedge et the pbsaoaeaoa te date hag beta daadecpcateo Direst obeervatioas of aaf aetaal ?ave oa the iatcsrfhee betwssa ths water sa4 the eodiaeat eee Oeepkksated by tb? fast tbN whore each... the wave& but at the earns time the wave he1ght was reduoo4 considerably? If a complete filtering to a yare s@smeidal fnga hag been yarfegssd~ the yaws' heights wnnt4 have beeeao he sdatl 'ae te anno eeewsate aonearsaeats iayesgNAoa Therofereq the fi...

  9. Strategies for automatic online treatment plan reoptimization using clinical treatment planning system: A planning parameters study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Taoran; Wu, Qiuwen; Zhang, You; Vergalasova, Irina; Lee, W. Robert; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Q. Jackie

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Adaptive radiation therapy for prostate cancer using online reoptimization provides an improved control of interfractional anatomy variations. However, the clinical implementation of online reoptimization is currently limited by the low efficiency of current strategies and the difficulties associated with integration into the current treatment planning system. This study investigates the strategies for performing fast (?2 min) automatic online reoptimization with a clinical fluence-map-based treatment planning system; and explores the performance with different input parameters settings: dose-volume histogram (DVH) objective settings, starting stage, and iteration number (in the context of real time planning).Methods: Simulated treatments of 10 patients were reoptimized daily for the first week of treatment (5 fractions) using 12 different combinations of optimization strategies. Options for objective settings included guideline-based RTOG objectives, patient-specific objectives based on anatomy on the planning CT, and daily-CBCT anatomy-based objectives adapted from planning CT objectives. Options for starting stages involved starting reoptimization with and without the original plan's fluence map. Options for iteration numbers were 50 and 100. The adapted plans were then analyzed by statistical modeling, and compared both in terms of dosimetry and delivery efficiency.Results: All online reoptimized plans were finished within ?2 min with excellent coverage and conformity to the daily target. The three input parameters, i.e., DVH objectives, starting stage, and iteration number, contributed to the outcome of optimization nearly independently. Patient-specific objectives generally provided better OAR sparing compared to guideline-based objectives. The benefit in high-dose sparing from incorporating daily anatomy into objective settings was positively correlated with the relative change in OAR volumes from planning CT to daily CBCT. The use of the original plan fluence map as the starting stage reduced OAR dose at the mid-dose region, but increased the monitor units by 17%. Differences of only 2cc or less in OAR V50%/V70Gy/V76Gy were observed between 100 and 50 iterations.Conclusions: It is feasible to perform automatic online reoptimization in ?2 min using a clinical treatment planning system. Selecting optimal sets of input parameters is the key to achieving high quality reoptimized plans, and should be based on the individual patient's daily anatomy, delivery efficiency, and time allowed for plan adaptation.

  10. Automated treatment planning for a dedicated multi-source intra-cranial radiosurgery treatment unit accounting for overlapping structures and dose homogeneity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghobadi, Kimia; Ghaffari, Hamid R.; Aleman, Dionne M.; Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Ontario M5T 3M6; Techna Institute, University Health Network, Ontario M5G 1P5 ; Jaffray, David A.; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9; Institute of Biomaterial and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Ontario M5S 2J7; Techna Institute, University Health Network, Ontario M5G 1P5; Ontario Cancer Institute, Ontario M5G 0A3 ; Ruschin, Mark; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to advance the two-step approach for Gamma Knife{sup ®} Perfexion™ (PFX) optimization to account for dose homogeneity and overlap between the planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs).Methods: In the first step, a geometry-based algorithm is used to quickly select isocentre locations while explicitly accounting for PTV-OARs overlaps. In this approach, the PTV is divided into subvolumes based on the PTV-OARs overlaps and the distance of voxels to the overlaps. Only a few isocentres are selected in the overlap volume, and a higher number of isocentres are carefully selected among voxels that are immediately close to the overlap volume. In the second step, a convex optimization is solved to find the optimal combination of collimator sizes and their radiation duration for each isocentre location.Results: This two-step approach is tested on seven clinical cases (comprising 11 targets) for which the authors assess coverage, OARs dose, and homogeneity index and relate these parameters to the overlap fraction for each case. In terms of coverage, the mean V{sub 99} for the gross target volume (GTV) was 99.8% while the V{sub 95} for the PTV averaged at 94.6%, thus satisfying the clinical objectives of 99% for GTV and 95% for PTV, respectively. The mean relative dose to the brainstem was 87.7% of the prescription dose (with maximum 108%), while on average, 11.3% of the PTV overlapped with the brainstem. The mean beam-on time per fraction per dose was 8.6 min with calibration dose rate of 3.5 Gy/min, and the computational time averaged at 205 min. Compared with previous work involving single-fraction radiosurgery, the resulting plans were more homogeneous with average homogeneity index of 1.18 compared to 1.47.Conclusions: PFX treatment plans with homogeneous dose distribution can be achieved by inverse planning using geometric isocentre selection and mathematical modeling and optimization techniques. The quality of the obtained treatment plans are clinically satisfactory while the homogeneity index is improved compared to conventional PFX plans.

  11. Genetic variation in post-epidemic and pre-epidemic live oak populations subject to oak wilt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellamy, Brenda Kay

    1992-01-01

    GENETIC VARIATION IN POST-EPIDEMIC AND PRE-EPIDEMIC LIVE OAK POPULATIONS SUBJECT TO OAR WILT A Thesis by BRENDA KAY BELLAMY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Plant Pathology GENETIC VARIATION XN POST-EPIDEMIC AND PRE-EPXDENIC LIVE OAK POPULATXONS SUBJECT TO OAE WILT A Thesis by BRENDA KAY BELLAMY Approved as to style and content by: David N. Ap...

  12. APPENDIX G : SCATTER PLOTS OF FINAL TEST RESULT S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O o c ca - E a O 7 O Z O w 10' o II z Z = Occ, O· x o O U rM n O p n C ., O = 0 0 I- 0 O a. ¢ W W 0 0 O n 0 M J W Ua) a- a N 0 Oar°" · MIa) L (.5 O (C 0) 0 i C u cc E O 0 E c aso ` E - -a 0 0 U) 0 d O E O i 0 O n u) U O O > C C n > Z ~ y m n O E to d ~o -- C) «30 o n W

  13. A study of histological and histochemical changes in the reproductive organs of male rats fed on riboflavin deficient diets of known concentration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeilinga de Boer, Jelle

    1956-01-01

    ON RIBQFlkVIN DEFICIENT DIETS OF ENONN CONCENTRATION A Theele Jelle de Boer Ayyroved aa to otyle and coateat bye (Chal rmaa the ceaal thee) ( ead of the departeumt Auguet 19/6 l nish to express sy gratitude to Dr. Sidney 0. green, Professor... eliot and acre ln)ected 'pageategaig ?1th hasen ecsscgto ci' i lheflavin varIlaN froa Q to LB @lcrogreas psr dng, lllatilogica1 etadlee cere sado of tho, gate in the flget too oier~? vhego ths rata oars fed a ccatro1 dicta a restricted diet ead a...

  14. High-moisture grain and high-moisture hay (haylage) for growing and fattening beef cattle and the value of pelleting coastal bermuda hay for growing beef cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, Harold William

    1961-01-01

    WC space, reduces feedlot losses, eiaplifieo feed baadliag, reduces traaaportatioa seato, reduces duet, asd elisiaetse selective feedlot. ws aloe hase that che swuipsoat aseeoaary fer pallet isg io bulhy asd quite eapeaoivs aed that it ie the esaeumdsg... tests with cattle several years sgs. These tests vere conducted due to early frosts ia Cbs cora belt which kille4 the plants thus eausiag s delay of tha senal 4rying process of Che oars. Seisture coateat of this corn vas too high for ncrketing...

  15. 9-10-09_Final_Testimony_(Palmisano).pdf

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1 of 8 2 ofcontractors4/2014 DOEAndy Oare

  16. 9-11-2012_Lauren_Azar_FT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1 of 8 2 ofcontractors4/2014 DOEAndy Oare2

  17. 9-26 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastru

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1 of 8 2 ofcontractors4/2014 DOEAndy Oare2 QER

  18. 935

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1 of 8 2 ofcontractors4/2014 DOEAndy Oare2

  19. SU-E-J-250: A Methodology for Active Bone Marrow Protection for Cervical Cancer Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Using 18F-FLT PET/CT Image

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, C; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare a radiation therapy treatment planning that would spare active bone marrow and whole pelvic bone marrow using 18F FLT PET/CT image. Methods: We have developed an IMRT planning methodology to incorporate functional PET imaging using 18F FLT/CT scans. Plans were generated for two cervical cancer patients, where pelvicactive bone marrow region was incorporated as avoidance regions based on the range: SUV>2., another region was whole pelvic bone marrow. Dose objectives were set to reduce the volume of active bone marrow and whole bone marraw. The volumes of received 10 (V10) and 20 (V20) Gy for active bone marrow were evaluated. Results: Active bone marrow regions identified by 18F FLT with an SUV>2 represented an average of 48.0% of the total osseous pelvis for the two cases studied. Improved dose volume histograms for identified bone marrow SUV volumes and decreases in V10(average 18%), and V20(average 14%) were achieved without clinically significant changes to PTV or OAR doses. Conclusion: Incorporation of 18F FLT/CT PET in IMRT planning provides a methodology to reduce radiation dose to active bone marrow without compromising PTV or OAR dose objectives in cervical cancer.

  20. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 05: Unified Optimization and Delivery of Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy and Volume-modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J; Hoover, D; MacFarlane, M; Wong, E

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of a unified intensity-modulated arc therapy (UIMAT) that combines IMRT and VMAT optimization and delivery in order to produce efficient and superior radiation treatment plans. Methods: Inverse planning for UIMAT was prototyped on the Pinnacle treatment planning system (Philips Medical Systems). UIMAT integrates IMRT and VMAT delivery in the same arc where IMRT was delivered with gantry speed close to zero. Optimal gantry angles for the IMRT phases were selected automatically by the inverse optimization algorithm. Optimization of the VMAT phases and IMRT phases were done simultaneously using Pinnacle's direct machine parameter optimization algorithm. Five treatment plans each for prostate, head and neck, and lung were generated using our unified technique and compared with clinical VMAT or IMRT plans. Delivery verification was performed on an ArcCheck phantom (Sun Nuclear) and delivered in clinical mode on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. Results: In this prototype implementation, compared to the VMAT or IMRT plans, with the plans normalized to the same dose coverage to the planning target volumes, the UIMAT plans produced improved OAR sparing for head and neck cases, while for lung and prostate cases, the dosimetric improvements for OARs were not as significant. In this proof-of-concept work, we demonstrated that a novel radiation therapy delivery technique combining VMAT and IMRT delivery in the same arc is feasible. Initial results showed UIMAT has the potential to be superior to either standard IMRT or VMAT.

  1. Video-rate optical dosimetry and dynamic visualization of IMRT and VMAT treatment plans in water using Cherenkov radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaser, Adam K. E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Davis, Scott C.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Pogue, Brian W. E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu; Fox, Colleen J.; Gladstone, David J.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A novel technique for optical dosimetry of dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans was investigated for the first time by capturing images of the induced Cherenkov radiation in water. Methods: A high-sensitivity, intensified CCD camera (ICCD) was configured to acquire a two-dimensional (2D) projection image of the Cherenkov radiation induced by IMRT and VMAT plans, based on the Task Group 119 (TG-119) C-Shape geometry. Plans were generated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) and delivered using 6 MV x-rays from a Varian TrueBeam Linear Accelerator (Linac) incident on a water tank doped with the fluorophore quinine sulfate. The ICCD acquisition was gated to the Linac target trigger pulse to reduce background light artifacts, read out for a single radiation pulse, and binned to a resolution of 512 × 512 pixels. The resulting videos were analyzed temporally for various regions of interest (ROI) covering the planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR), and summed to obtain an overall light intensity distribution, which was compared to the expected dose distribution from the TPS using a gamma-index analysis. Results: The chosen camera settings resulted in 23.5 frames per second dosimetry videos. Temporal intensity plots of the PTV and OAR ROIs confirmed the preferential delivery of dose to the PTV versus the OAR, and the gamma analysis yielded 95.9% and 96.2% agreement between the experimentally captured Cherenkov light distribution and expected TPS dose distribution based upon a 3%/3 mm dose difference and distance-to-agreement criterion for the IMRT and VMAT plans, respectively. Conclusions: The results from this initial study demonstrate the first documented use of Cherenkov radiation for video-rate optical dosimetry of dynamic IMRT and VMAT treatment plans. The proposed modality has several potential advantages over alternative methods including the real-time nature of the acquisition, and upon future refinement may prove to be a robust and novel dosimetry method with both research and clinical applications.

  2. Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivekanandan, Nagarajan, E-mail: viveknaren@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute, Chennai (India); Sriram, Padmanaban; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Bhuvaneswari, Narayanan; Saranya, Kamalakannan [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute, Chennai (India)

    2012-04-01

    A treatment planning study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc (RA) against 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for esophageal cancer. Computed tomgraphy scans of 10 patients were included in the study. 3D-CRT, 4-field IMRT, and single-arc and double-arc RA plans were generated with the aim to spare organs at risk (OAR) and healthy tissue while enforcing highly conformal target coverage. The planning objective was to deliver 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 30 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on target conformity and dose-volume histograms of organs at risk (lung, spinal cord, and heart). The monitor unit (MU) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated to measure the treatment efficiency. The IMRT plan improves target conformity and spares OAR when compared with 3D-CRT. Target conformity improved with RA plans compared with IMRT. The mean lung dose was similar in all techniques. However, RA plans showed a reduction in the volume of the lung irradiated at V{sub 20Gy} and V{sub 30Gy} dose levels (range, 4.62-17.98%) compared with IMRT plans. The mean dose and D{sub 35%} of heart for the RA plans were better than the IMRT by 0.5-5.8%. Mean V{sub 10Gy} and integral dose to healthy tissue were almost similar in all techniques. But RA plans resulted in a reduced low-level dose bath (15-20 Gy) in the range of 14-16% compared with IMRT plans. The average MU needed to deliver the prescribed dose by RA technique was reduced by 20-25% compared with IMRT technique. The preliminary study on RA for esophageal cancers showed improvements in sparing OAR and healthy tissue with reduced beam-on time, whereas only double-arc RA offered improved target coverage compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT plans.

  3. Predicting cutability of lamb carcasses from easily obtainable carcass measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, William McCoy

    1967-01-01

    to style and content by: t, . C, / ~ C, - /4 Cljaiiiaan of Conic tl. ee He a d o Ti e e a r t ii: e n i ( ~~g~g~ cM e lani oar An~~est 196/ 428807 AC KNOWLE D GME tiT S The staff and personnel of the Meats Laboratory of the Animal Science... snail be eternally grateful. W. M. Oliver August, 1967 TABLE OF COXTEJ'JTS Chapter IETRO DUCT I 0 && . II OBJECTl'&9"'. S. RZ I E'v' OF I, ITERATURE . Pea?urea of Carcass Merit Variables Used for Predic ion TV VI Differences in Cutabiiity...

  4. SU-E-T-510: Mathematical Analysis of Approximate Biological Effective Dose (BED) Calculation for Multi-Phase Radiotherapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauweloa, K; Gutierrez, A; Bergamo, A; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Mavroidis, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is growing interest about biological effective dose (BED) and its application in treatment plan evaluation due to its stronger correlation with treatment outcome. An approximate biological effective dose (BEDA) equation was introduced to simplify BED calculations by treatment planning systems in multi-phase treatments. The purpose of this work is to reveal its mathematical properties relative to the true, multi-phase BED (BEDT) equation. Methods: The BEDT equation was derived and used to reveal the mathematical properties of BEDA. MATLAB (MathWorks, Natick, MA) was used to simulate and analyze common and extreme clinical multi-phase cases. In those cases, percent error (Perror) and Bland-Altman analysis were used to study the significance of the inaccuracies of BEDA for different combinations of total doses, numbers of fractions, doses per fractions and ? over ? values. All the calculations were performed on a voxel-basis in order to study how dose distributions would affect the accuracy of BEDA. Results: When the voxel dose-per-fractions (DPF) delivered by both phases are equal, BEDA and BEDT are equal. In heterogeneous dose distributions, which significantly vary between the phases, there are fewer occurrences of equal DPFs and hence the imprecision of BEDA is greater. It was shown that as the ? over ? ratio increased the accuracy of BEDA would improve. Examining twenty-four cases, it was shown that the range of DPF ratios for a 3 Perror varied from 0.32 to 7.50Gy, whereas for Perror of 1 the range varied from 0.50 to 2.96Gy. Conclusion: The DPF between the different phases should be equal in order to render BEDA accurate. OARs typically receive heterogeneous dose distributions hence the probability of equal DPFs is low. Consequently, the BEDA equation should only be used for targets or OARs that receive uniform or very similar dose distributions by the different treatment phases.

  5. SU-E-T-138: Dosimetric Verification For Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Cranio-Spinal Irradiation Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goksel, E; Bilge, H; Yildiz, Yarar

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric feasibility of cranio-spinal irradiation with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT-CSI) technique in terms of dose distribution accuracy was investigated using a humanlike phantom. Methods: The OARs and PTV volumes for the Rando phantom were generated on supine CT images. Eclipse (version 8.6) TPS with AAA algorithm was used to create the treatment plan with VMAT-CSI technique. RapidArc plan consisted of cranial, upper spinal (US) and lower spinal (LS) regions that were optimized in the same plan. US field was overlapped by 3cm with cranial and LS fields. Three partial arcs for cranium and 1 full arc for each US and LS region were used. The VMAT-CSI dose distribution inside the Rando phantom was measured with thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) and film dosimetry, and was compared to the calculated doses of field junctions, target and OARs. TLDs were placed at 24 positions throughout the phantom. The measured TLD doses were compared to the calculated point doses. Planar doses for field junctions were verified with Gafchromic films. Films were analyzed in PTW Verisoft application software using gamma analysis method with the 4 mm distance to agreement (DTA) and 4% dose agreement criteria. Results: TLD readings demonstrated accurate dose delivery, with a median dose difference of -0.3% (range: -8% and 12%) when compared with calculated doses for the areas inside the treatment portal. The maximum dose difference was 12% higher in testicals that are outside the treatment region and 8% lower in lungs where the heterogeinity was higher. All planar dose verifications for field junctions passed the gamma analysis and measured planar dose distributions demonstrated average 97% agreement with calculated doses. Conclusion: The dosimetric data verified with TLD and film dosimetry shows that VMAT-CSI technique provides accurate dose distribution and can be delivered safely.

  6. SU-E-T-06: A Comparison of IMRT Treatment of Esophageal Carcinoma in Elekta-Precise and Varian23EX Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, W; Fan, X; Qiu, R; Qiao, X; Zhang, R [Hebei Medical University Fourth Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare and analyze the characteristics of static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans designed on Elekta and Varian Linac in different esophageal cancer(EC), exploring advantages and disadvantages of different vendor Linac, thus can be better serve for clinical. Methods: Twenty-four patients with EC were selected, including 6 cases located in the cervical, upper, middle and the lower thorax, respectively. Two IMRT plans were generated with the Oncentra planning system: in Elekta and Varian Linac, prescription dose of 60Gy in 30 fractions to the PTV. We examined the dose-volume histogram parameters of PTV and the organs at risk (OAR) such as lungs, spinal cord and heart, and additional Monitor units(MU), treatment time, Homogeneity index(HI), Conformity index(CI) and Gamma index comparisons were performed. Results: All plans resulted in abundant dose coverage of PTV for EC of different locations. The doses to PTV, HI and OAR in Elekta plans were not statistically different in comparison with Varian plans, with the following exceptions: in cervical, upper and lower thoracic EC the PTV's CI, and in middle thorax EC PTV's D2, D50, V105 and PTV-average were better in Elekta plans than in Varian plans. In the cervical, upper and the middle thorax EC, treatment time were significantly decreased in Varian plans as against Elekta plans, while in the lower thoracic EC treatment time were no striking difference. MUs and gamma index were similar between the two Linac plans. Conclusion: For the the middle thorax EC Varian plans is better than Elekta plans, not only in treatment time but in the PTV dose; while for the lower thorax EC Elekta plans is the first choice for better CI; for the other part of the EC usually Elekta plans can increase the CI, while Varian plans can reduce treatment time, can be selected according to the actual situation of the patient treatment.

  7. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 01: 3D Pre-treatment Dose Verification for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asuni, G; Beek, T van; Van Utyven, E; McCowan, P; McCurdy, B.M.C.

    2014-08-15

    Radical treatment techniques such as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are becoming popular and they involve delivery of large doses in fewer fractions. Due to this feature of SBRT, a high-resolution, pre-treatment dose verification method that makes use of a 3D patient representation would be appropriate. Such a technique will provide additional information about dose delivered to the target volume(s) and organs-at-risk (OARs) in the patient volume compared to 2D verification methods. In this work, we investigate an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based pre-treatment QA method which provides an accurate reconstruction of the 3D-dose distribution in the patient model. Customized patient plans are delivered ‘in air’ and the portal images are collected using the EPID in cine mode. The images are then analysed to determine an estimate of the incident energy fluence. This is then passed to a collapsed-cone convolution dose algorithm which reconstructs a 3D patient dose estimate on the CT imaging dataset. To date, the method has been applied to 5 SBRT patient plans. Reconstructed doses were compared to those calculated by the TPS. Reconstructed mean doses were mostly within 3% of those in the TPS. DVHs of target volumes and OARs compared well. The Chi pass rates using 3%/3mm in the high dose region are greater than 97% in all cases. These initial results demonstrate clinical feasibility and utility of a robust, efficient, effective and convenient pre-treatment QA method using EPID. Research sponsored in part by Varian Medical Systems.

  8. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy for whole breast irradiation: a comparative dosimetric study and introduction of a novel qualitative index for plan evaluation, the normal tissue index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yim, Jackie; Suttie, Clare; Bromley, Regina; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-09-15

    We report on a retrospective dosimetric study, comparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (hIMRT). We evaluated plans based on their planning target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, dose to organs at risk (OARs) and exposure of normal tissue to radiation. The Homogeneity Index (HI) was used to assess the dose homogeneity in the target region, and we describe a new index, the normal tissue index (NTI), to assess the dose in the normal tissue inside the tangent treatment portal. Plans were generated for 25 early-stage breast cancer patients, using a hIMRT technique. These were compared with the 3DCRT plans of the treatment previously received by the patients. Plan quality was evaluated using the HI, NTI and dose to OARs. The hIMRT technique was significantly more homogenous than the 3DCRT technique, while maintaining target coverage. The hIMRT technique was also superior at minimising the amount of tissue receiving D{sub 105%} and above (P < 0.0001). The ipsilateral lung and contralateral breast maximum were significantly lower in the hIMRT plans (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005), but the 3DCRT technique achieved a lower mean heart dose in left-sided breast cancer patients (P < 0.05). Hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy plans achieved improved dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT plans and superior outcome with regard to dose to normal tissues. We propose that the addition of both HI and NTI in evaluating the quality of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) breast plans provides clinically relevant comparators which more accurately reflect the new paradigm of treatment goals and outcomes in the era of breast IMRT.

  9. Poster — Thur Eve — 36: Implementation of constant dose rate and gantry speed arc therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) for thoracic esophageal carcinoma on Varian 23EX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ruohui; Fan, Xiaomei; Bai, Wenwen; Han, Chun

    2014-08-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to propose an alternative planning approach for VMAT using constant dose rate and gantry speed arc therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) implementation on conventional Linac Varian 23EX and used IMRT as a benchmark to evaluate the performance. Methods and materials: Eighteen patients with thoracic esophageal carcinoma who were previously treated with IMRT on Varian 23EX were retrospectively planned for CDR-CAS-IMAT plans. Dose prescription was set to 60 Gy to PTVs in 30 fractions. The planning objectives for PTVs and OAR were corresponding with the IMRT plans. Dose to the PTVs and OAR were compared to IMRT with respect to plan quality, MU, treatment time and delivery accuracy. Results: CDR-CAS-IMAT plans led to equivalent or superior plan quality as compared to IMRT, PTV's CI relative increased 16.2%, while small deviations were observed on minimum dose for PTV. Volumes in the cord receiving 40Gy were increased from 3.6% with IMRT to 7.0%. Treatment times were reduced significantly with CDR-CAS-IMAT(mean 85.7s vs. 232.1s, p < .05), however, MU increased by a factor of 1.3 and lung V10/5/3.5/aver were relative increase 6.7%,12%,17.9%,4.2%, respectively. And increased the E-P low dose area volume decreased the hight dose area. There were no significant difference in Delta4 measurements results between both planning techniques. Conclusion: CDR-CAS-IMAT plans can be implemented smoothly and quickly into a busy cancer center, which improved PTV CI and reduces treatment time but increased the MU and low dose irradiated area. An evaluation of weight loss must be performed during treatment for CDR-CAS-IMAT patients.

  10. SU-E-T-157: Evaluation and Comparison of Doses to Pelvic Lymph Nodes and to Point B with 3D Image Guided Treatment Planning for High Dose Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhandare, N.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate and compare the doses received by the obturator, external and internal iliac lymph nodes and point Methods: CT-MR fused image sets of 15 patients obtained for each of 5 fractions of HDR brachytherapy using tandem and ring applicator, were used to generate treatment plans optimized to deliver a prescription dose to HRCTV-D90 and to minimize the doses to organs at risk (OARs). For each set of image, target volume (GTV, HRCTV) OARs (Bladder, Rectum, Sigmoid), and both left and right pelvic lymph nodes (obturator, external and internal iliac lymph nodes) were delineated. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were generated for pelvic nodal groups (left and right obturator group, internal and external iliac chains) Per fraction DVH parameters used for dose comparison included dose to 100% volume (D100), and dose received by 2cc (D2cc), 1cc (D1cc) and 0.1 cc (D0.1cc) of nodal volume. Dose to point B was compared with each DVH parameter using 2 sided t-test. Pearson correlation were determined to examine relationship of point B dose with nodal DVH parameters. Results: FIGO clinical stage varied from 1B1 to IIIB. The median pretreatment tumor diameter measured on MRI was 4.5 cm (2.7– 6.4cm).The median dose to bilateral point B was 1.20 Gy ± 0.12 or 20% of the prescription dose. The correlation coefficients were all <0.60 for all nodal DVH parameters indicating low degree of correlation. Only 2 cc of obturator nodes was not significantly different from point B dose on t-test. Conclusion: Dose to point B does not adequately represent the dose to any specific pelvic nodal group. When using image guided 3D dose-volume optimized treatment nodal groups should be individually identified and delineated to obtain the doses received by pelvic nodes.

  11. SU-E-J-137: Incorporating Tumor Regression Into Robust Plan Optimization for Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, P; Hu, J; Tyagi, N; Mageras, G; Lee, N; Hunt, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a robust planning paradigm which incorporates a tumor regression model into the optimization process to ensure tumor coverage in head and neck radiotherapy. Methods: Simulation and weekly MR images were acquired for a group of head and neck patients to characterize tumor regression during radiotherapy. For each patient, the tumor and parotid glands were segmented on the MR images and the weekly changes were formulated with an affine transformation, where morphological shrinkage and positional changes are modeled by a scaling factor, and centroid shifts, respectively. The tumor and parotid contours were also transferred to the planning CT via rigid registration. To perform the robust planning, weekly predicted PTV and parotid structures were created by transforming the corresponding simulation structures according to the weekly affine transformation matrix averaged over patients other than him/herself. Next, robust PTV and parotid structures were generated as the union of the simulation and weekly prediction contours. In the subsequent robust optimization process, attainment of the clinical dose objectives was required for the robust PTV and parotids, as well as other organs at risk (OAR). The resulting robust plans were evaluated by looking at the weekly and total accumulated dose to the actual weekly PTV and parotid structures. The robust plan was compared with the original plan based on the planning CT to determine its potential clinical benefit. Results: For four patients, the average weekly change to tumor volume and position was ?4% and 1.2 mm laterally-posteriorly. Due to these temporal changes, the robust plans resulted in an accumulated PTV D95 that was, on average, 2.7 Gy higher than the plan created from the planning CT. OAR doses were similar. Conclusion: Integration of a tumor regression model into target delineation and plan robust optimization is feasible and may yield improved tumor coverage. Part of this research is supported by Varian Medical System.

  12. SU-E-J-193: Feasibility of MRI-Only Based IMRT Planning for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prior, P; Botros, M; Chen, X; Paulson, E; Erickson, B; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: With the increasing use of MRI simulation and the advent of MRI-guided delivery, it is desirable to use MRI only for treatment planning. In this study, we assess the dosimetric difference between MRI- and CTbased IMRT planning for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Planning CTs and MRIs acquired for a representative pancreatic cancer patient were used. MRI-based planning utilized forced relative electron density (rED) assignment of organ specific values from IRCU report 46, where rED = 1.029 for PTV and a rED = 1.036 for non-specified tissue (NST). Six IMRT plans were generated with clinical dose-volume (DV) constraints using a research Monaco planning system employing Monte Carlo dose calculation with optional perpendicular magnetic field (MF) of 1.5T. The following five plans were generated and compared with the planning CT: 1.) CT plan with MF and dose recalculation without optimization; 2.) MRI (T2) plan with target and OARs redrawn based on MRI, forced rED, no MF, and recalculation without optimization; 3.) Similar as in 2 but with MF; 4.) MRI plan with MF but without optimization; and 5.) Similar as in 4 but with optimization. Results: Generally, noticeable differences in PTV point doses and DV parameters (DVPs) between the CT-and MRI-based plans with and without the MF were observed. These differences between the optimized plans were generally small, mostly within 2%. Larger differences were observed in point doses and mean doses for certain OARs between the CT and MRI plan, mostly due to differences between image acquisition times. Conclusion: MRI only based IMRT planning for pancreatic cancer is feasible. The differences observed between the optimized CT and MRI plans with or without the MF were practically negligible if excluding the differences between MRI and CT defined structures.

  13. SU-E-T-56: Brain Metastasis Treatment Plans for Contrast-Enhanced Synchrotron Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obeid, L; Adam, J; Tessier, A; Vautrin, M; Benkebil, M; Sihanath, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Iodine-enhanced radiotherapy is an innovative treatment combining the selective accumulation of an iodinated contrast agent in brain tumors with irradiations using monochromatic medium energy x-rays. The aim of this study is to compare dynamic stereotactic arc-therapy and iodineenhanced SSRT. Methods: Five patients bearing brain metastasis received a standard helical 3D-scan without iodine. A second scan was acquired 13 min after an 80 g iodine infusion. Two SSRT treatment plans (with/without iodine) were performed for each patient using a dedicated Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning system (TPS) based on the ISOgray TPS. Ten coplanar beams (6×6 cm2, shaped with collimator) were simulated. MC statistical error objective was less than 5% in the 50% isodose. The dynamic arc-therapy plan was achieved on the Iplan Brainlab TPS. The treatment plan validation criteria were fixed such that 100% of the prescribed dose is delivered at the beam isocentre and the 70% isodose contains the whole target volume. The comparison elements were the 70% isodose volume, the average and maximum doses delivered to organs at risk (OAR): brainstem, optical nerves, chiasma, eyes, skull bone and healthy brain parenchyma. Results: The stereotactic dynamic arc-therapy remains the best technique in terms of dose conformation. Iodine-enhanced SSRT presents similar performances to dynamic arc-therapy with increased brainstem and brain parenchyma sparing. One disadvantage of SSRT is the high dose to the skull bone. Iodine accumulation in metastasis may increase the dose by 20–30%, allowing a normal tissue sparing effect at constant prescribed dose. Treatment without any iodine enhancement (medium-energy stereotactic radiotherapy) is not relevant with degraded HDVs (brain, parenchyma and skull bone) comparing to stereotactic dynamic arc-therapy. Conclusion: Iodine-enhanced SSRT exhibits a good potential for brain metastasis treatment regarding the dose distribution and OAR criteria.

  14. Limitations of the planning organ at risk volume (PRV) concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stroom, Joep C. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: j.stroom@nki.nl; Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: Previously, we determined a planning target volume (PTV) margin recipe for geometrical errors in radiotherapy equal to M{sub T} = 2{sigma} + 0.7{sigma}, with {sigma} and {sigma} standard deviations describing systematic and random errors, respectively. In this paper, we investigated margins for organs at risk (OAR), yielding the so-called planning organ at risk volume (PRV). Methods and Materials: For critical organs with a maximum dose (D{sub max}) constraint, we calculated margins such that D{sub max} in the PRV is equal to the motion averaged D{sub max} in the (moving) clinical target volume (CTV). We studied margins for the spinal cord in 10 head-and-neck cases and 10 lung cases, each with two different clinical plans. For critical organs with a dose-volume constraint, we also investigated whether a margin recipe was feasible. Results: For the 20 spinal cords considered, the average margin recipe found was: M{sub R} = 1.6{sigma} + 0.2{sigma} with variations for systematic and random errors of 1.2{sigma} to 1.8{sigma} and -0.2{sigma} to 0.6{sigma}, respectively. The variations were due to differences in shape and position of the dose distributions with respect to the cords. The recipe also depended significantly on the volume definition of D{sub max}. For critical organs with a dose-volume constraint, the PRV concept appears even less useful because a margin around, e.g., the rectum changes the volume in such a manner that dose-volume constraints stop making sense. Conclusion: The concept of PRV for planning of radiotherapy is of limited use. Therefore, alternative ways should be developed to include geometric uncertainties of OARs in radiotherapy planning.

  15. Tolerances on MLC leaf position accuracy for IMRT delivery with a dynamic MLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangel, Alejandra; Dunscombe, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada) and Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada)

    2009-07-15

    The objective determination of performance standards for radiation therapy equipment requires, ideally, establishing the quantitative relationship between performance deviations and clinical outcome or some acceptable surrogate. In this simulation study the authors analyzed the dosimetric impact of random (leaf by leaf) and systematic (entire leaf bank) errors in the position of the MLC leaves on seven clinical prostate and seven clinical head and neck IMRT plans delivered using a dynamic MLC. In-house software was developed to incorporate normally distributed errors of up to {+-}2 mm in individual leaf position or systematic errors ({+-}1 and {+-}0.5 mm in all leaves of both leaf banks or +1 mm in one bank only) into the 14 plans, thus simulating treatment delivery using a suboptimally performing MLC. The dosimetric consequences of suboptimal MLC performance were quantified using the equivalent uniform doses (EUDs) of the clinical target volumes and important organs at risk (OARs). The deviation of the EUDs of the selected structures as the performance of the MLC deteriorated was used as the objective surrogate of clinical outcome. Random errors of 2 mm resulted in negligible changes for all structures of interest in both sites. In contrast, systematic errors can lead to potentially significant dosimetric changes that may compromise clinical outcome. If a 2% change in EUD of the target and 2 Gy for the OARs were adopted as acceptable levels of deviation in dose due to MLC effects alone, then systematic errors in leaf position will need to be limited to 0.3 mm. This study provides guidance, based on a dosimetric surrogate of clinical outcome, for the development of one component, leaf position accuracy of performance standards for multileaf collimators.

  16. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated Arc therapy, step-and-shoot, and sliding window IMRT for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnell, Erich; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Young, Julie; Hildebrand, Kim; Algan, Ozer; Syzek, Elizabeth; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center 800 N.E. 10th St., OKCC L100, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study aims to evaluate treatment plans generated by Step-and-Shoot (SS), Sliding Window (SW) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) in order to assess the differences in dose volume histograms of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR), conformity indices, radiobiological evaluations, and plan quality for prostate cancer cases. Six prostate cancer patients treated in our center were selected for this retrospective study. Treatment plans were generated with Eclipse version 8.9 using 10 MV photon beams. For VMAT, Varian Rapid Arc with 1 or 2 arcs, and for SS and SW IMRT, 7-9 fields were used. Each plan had three PTVs with prescription doses of 81, 59.4, and 45 Gy to prostate, to prostate and lymph nodes, and to pelvis, respectively. Doses to PTV and OAR and the conformal indices (COIN) were compared among three techniques. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD), tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were calculated and compared. The mean doses to the PTV prostate on average were 83 Gy and the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 0.28. For bladder and rectum, the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 2.2. The COIN did not favour any particular delivery method over the other. The TCP was higher with SS and SW for four patients and higher with VMAT for two patients. The NTCP for the rectum was the lowest with VMAT in five out of the six patients. The results show similar target coverage in general.

  17. Predictive Treatment Management: Incorporating a Predictive Tumor Response Model Into Robust Prospective Treatment Planning for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Yorke, Ellen; Hu, Yu-Chi; Mageras, Gig; Rimner, Andreas; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: We hypothesized that a treatment planning technique that incorporates predicted lung tumor regression into optimization, predictive treatment planning (PTP), could allow dose escalation to the residual tumor while maintaining coverage of the initial target without increasing dose to surrounding organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: We created a model to estimate the geometric presence of residual tumors after radiation therapy using planning computed tomography (CT) and weekly cone beam CT scans of 5 lung cancer patients. For planning purposes, we modeled the dynamic process of tumor shrinkage by morphing the original planning target volume (PTV{sub orig}) in 3 equispaced steps to the predicted residue (PTV{sub pred}). Patients were treated with a uniform prescription dose to PTV{sub orig}. By contrast, PTP optimization started with the same prescription dose to PTV{sub orig} but linearly increased the dose at each step, until reaching the highest dose achievable to PTV{sub pred} consistent with OAR limits. This method is compared with midcourse adaptive replanning. Results: Initial parenchymal gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 3.6 to 186.5 cm{sup 3}. On average, the primary GTV and PTV decreased by 39% and 27%, respectively, at the end of treatment. The PTP approach gave PTV{sub orig} at least the prescription dose, and it increased the mean dose of the true residual tumor by an average of 6.0 Gy above the adaptive approach. Conclusions: PTP, incorporating a tumor regression model from the start, represents a new approach to increase tumor dose without increasing toxicities, and reduce clinical workload compared with the adaptive approach, although model verification using per-patient midcourse imaging would be prudent.

  18. SU-E-T-28: A Treatment Planning Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Vs. Proton Therapy for Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, M; Zhang, R; Sanders, M; Newhauser, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The delivery of post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) can be challenging for patients with left-sided breast cancer due to the PTV size and proximity to critical organs. This study investigates the use of protons for PMRT in a clinically-representative cohort of patients, and quantitatively compares volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to proton therapy to have an evidence-based rationale for selecting a treatment modality for these patients. Methods: Eight left-sided PMRT patients previously treated at our clinic with VMAT were identified for the study. PTVs included the chest wall and regional lymph nodes. Passively scattered (PS) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were constructed using the Eclipse proton planning system. The resulting plans were compared to the original VMAT plan on the basis of PTV coverage; dose homogeneity index (DHI) and conformity index (CI); dose to organs at risk (OAR); tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and secondary cancer complication probability (SCCP). Differences were tested for significance using the paired Student's t-test (p<0.01). Results: All modalities produced clinically acceptable PMRT plans. The comparison demonstrated proton treatment plans provide significantly lower NTCP values for the heart and the lung while maintaining significantly better CI and DHI. At a prescribed dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in the PTV, the calculated mean NTCP value for the patients decreased from 1.3% to 0.05% for the whole heart (cardiac mortality) and from 3.8% to 1.1% for the lungs (radiation pneumonitis) for both proton therapy plans from VMAT plans. Both proton modalities showed a significantly lower SCCP for the contralateral breast compared to VMAT. Conclusion: All three plans (VMAT, PS, and IMPT) provide acceptable treatment plans for PMRT. However, proton therapy shows a significant advantage over VMAT with regards to sparing OARs and may be more advantageous for patients with unfavorable anatomy.

  19. Forward treatment planning for modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) employing Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henzen, D. Manser, P.; Frei, D.; Volken, W.; Born, E. J.; Lössl, K.; Aebersold, D. M.; Fix, M. K.; Neuenschwander, H.; Stampanoni, M. F. M.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: This paper describes the development of a forward planning process for modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT). The approach is based on a previously developed electron beam model used to calculate dose distributions of electron beams shaped by a photon multi leaf collimator (pMLC). Methods: As the electron beam model has already been implemented into the Swiss Monte Carlo Plan environment, the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) can be included in the planning process for MERT. In a first step, CT data are imported into Eclipse and a pMLC shaped electron beam is set up. This initial electron beam is then divided into segments, with the electron energy in each segment chosen according to the distal depth of the planning target volume (PTV) in beam direction. In order to improve the homogeneity of the dose distribution in the PTV, a feathering process (Gaussian edge feathering) is launched, which results in a number of feathered segments. For each of these segments a dose calculation is performed employing the in-house developed electron beam model along with the macro Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. Finally, an automated weight optimization of all segments is carried out and the total dose distribution is read back into Eclipse for display and evaluation. One academic and two clinical situations are investigated for possible benefits of MERT treatment compared to standard treatments performed in our clinics and treatment with a bolus electron conformal (BolusECT) method. Results: The MERT treatment plan of the academic case was superior to the standard single segment electron treatment plan in terms of organs at risk (OAR) sparing. Further, a comparison between an unfeathered and a feathered MERT plan showed better PTV coverage and homogeneity for the feathered plan, with V{sub 95%} increased from 90% to 96% and V{sub 107%} decreased from 8% to nearly 0%. For a clinical breast boost irradiation, the MERT plan led to a similar homogeneity in the PTV compared to the standard treatment plan while the mean body dose was lower for the MERT plan. Regarding the second clinical case, a whole breast treatment, MERT resulted in a reduction of the lung volume receiving more than 45% of the prescribed dose when compared to the standard plan. On the other hand, the MERT plan leads to a larger low-dose lung volume and a degraded dose homogeneity in the PTV. For the clinical cases evaluated in this work, treatment plans using the BolusECT technique resulted in a more homogenous PTV and CTV coverage but higher doses to the OARs than the MERT plans. Conclusions: MERT treatments were successfully planned for phantom and clinical cases, applying a newly developed intuitive and efficient forward planning strategy that employs a MC based electron beam model for pMLC shaped electron beams. It is shown that MERT can lead to a dose reduction in OARs compared to other methods. The process of feathering MERT segments results in an improvement of the dose homogeneity in the PTV.

  20. Beamlet based direct aperture optimization for MERT using a photon MLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henzen, D. Manser, P.; Frei, D.; Volken, W.; Born, E. J.; Joosten, A.; Lössl, K.; Aebersold, D. M.; Chatelain, C.; Fix, M. K.; Neuenschwander, H.; Stampanoni, M. F. M.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: A beamlet based direct aperture optimization (DAO) for modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) using photon multileaf collimator (pMLC) shaped electron fields is developed and investigated. Methods: The Swiss Monte Carlo Plan (SMCP) allows the calculation of dose distributions for pMLC shaped electron beams. SMCP is interfaced with the Eclipse TPS (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) which can thus be included into the inverse treatment planning process for MERT. This process starts with the import of a CT-scan into Eclipse, the contouring of the target and the organs at risk (OARs), and the choice of the initial electron beam directions. For each electron beam, the number of apertures, their energy, and initial shape are defined. Furthermore, the DAO requires dose–volume constraints for the structures contoured. In order to carry out the DAO efficiently, the initial electron beams are divided into a grid of beamlets. For each of those, the dose distribution is precalculated using a modified electron beam model, resulting in a dose list for each beamlet and energy. Then the DAO is carried out, leading to a set of optimal apertures and corresponding weights. These optimal apertures are now converted into pMLC shaped segments and the dose calculation for each segment is performed. For these dose distributions, a weight optimization process is launched in order to minimize the differences between the dose distribution using the optimal apertures and the pMLC segments. Finally, a deliverable dose distribution for the MERT plan is obtained and loaded back into Eclipse for evaluation. For an idealized water phantom geometry, a MERT treatment plan is created and compared to the plan obtained using a previously developed forward planning strategy. Further, MERT treatment plans for three clinical situations (breast, chest wall, and parotid metastasis of a squamous cell skin carcinoma) are created using the developed inverse planning strategy. The MERT plans are compared to clinical standard treatment plans using photon beams and the differences between the optimal and the deliverable dose distributions are determined. Results: For the idealized water phantom geometry, the inversely optimized MERT plan is able to obtain the same PTV coverage, but with an improved OAR sparing compared to the forwardly optimized plan. Regarding the right-sided breast case, the MERT plan is able to reduce the lung volume receiving more than 30% of the prescribed dose and the mean lung dose compared to the standard plan. However, the standard plan leads to a better homogeneity within the CTV. The results for the left-sided thorax wall are similar but also the dose to the heart is reduced comparing MERT to the standard treatment plan. For the parotid case, MERT leads to lower doses for almost all OARs but to a less homogeneous dose distribution for the PTV when compared to a standard plan. For all cases, the weight optimization successfully minimized the differences between the optimal and the deliverable dose distribution. Conclusions: A beamlet based DAO using multiple beam angles is implemented and successfully tested for an idealized water phantom geometry and clinical situations.

  1. SU-E-T-481: Dosimetric Comparison of Acuros XB and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm with Commercial Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculation Algorithm for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, M; Tenn, S; Lee, C; Yang, Y; Lamb, J; Agazaryan, N; Lee, P; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate performance of three commercially available treatment planning systems for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer using the following algorithms: Boltzmann transport equation based algorithm (AcurosXB AXB), convolution based algorithm Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA); and Monte Carlo based algorithm (XVMC). Methods: A total of 10 patients with early stage non-small cell peripheral lung cancer were included. The initial clinical plans were generated using the XVMC based treatment planning system with a prescription of 54Gy in 3 fractions following RTOG0613 protocol. The plans were recalculated with the same beam parameters and monitor units using AAA and AXB algorithms. A calculation grid size of 2mm was used for all algorithms. The dose distribution, conformity, and dosimetric parameters for the targets and organs at risk (OAR) are compared between the algorithms. Results: The average PTV volume was 19.6mL (range 4.2–47.2mL). The volume of PTV covered by the prescribed dose (PTV-V100) were 93.97±2.00%, 95.07±2.07% and 95.10±2.97% for XVMC, AXB and AAA algorithms, respectively. There was no significant difference in high dose conformity index; however, XVMC predicted slightly higher values (p=0.04) for the ratio of 50% prescription isodose volume to PTV (R50%). The percentage volume of total lungs receiving dose >20Gy (LungV20Gy) were 4.03±2.26%, 3.86±2.22% and 3.85±2.21% for XVMC, AXB and AAA algorithms. Examination of dose volume histograms (DVH) revealed small differences in targets and OARs for most patients. However, the AAA algorithm was found to predict considerable higher PTV coverage compared with AXB and XVMC algorithms in two cases. The dose difference was found to be primarily located at the periphery region of the target. Conclusion: For clinical SBRT lung treatment planning, the dosimetric differences between three commercially available algorithms are generally small except at target periphery. XVMC and AXB algorithms are recommended for accurate dose estimation at tissue boundaries.

  2. SU-E-T-489: Plan Comparisons of Re-Irradiation Treatment of Three Intensity Modulated Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lian, J; Tang, X; Liu, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There have been controversial reports on the comparison of dosimetric quality of TomoTherapy (Tomo), VMAT and IMRT. One of the main reasons is the sampled cases are often not dosimetrically challenging enough to test the limit of optimization/delivery modalities. We chose difficult re-irradiation cases when certain organ at risk (OAR) requires extremely low dose to examine the ability of OAR sparing of three main intensity modulated techniques. Methods: Three previous treated patients with disease site on head and neck (HN), brain and lung are planned for reirradiation treatment. The Tomo planning used jaw 2.5cm and pitch 0.3. VMAT and IMRT were planned on Pinnacle for a Varian 21iX Linac with MLC leaf width 5mm. VMAT plan used 2 Arcs and IMRT plan had beams 11–13. The dosimetric endpoints and treatment time were compared for each technique of each patient. Results: Plans of three techniques cover PTV similarly. The HN case requires PTV dose 60Gy but to limit dose of cord which is 8mm away <12Gy. The cord dose of Tomo, VMAT and IMRT plan is 11.6Gy, 11.3Gy and 11.0Gy, respectively. The brain case has PTV prescription 50.4 Gy while requiring the dose of brainstem < 28Gy. Tomo, VMAT and IMRT plan generate brainstem dose 27.6Gy, 27.6Gy and 27.1Gy respectively. For the lung case, PTV was prescribed 42.5Gy but cord dose constraint was 22.5Gy. The cord dose is optimized to 22.3Gy, 20.8Gy and 21.4Gy by Tomo, VMAT and IMRT, respectively. The delivery time if normalized to Tomo is 47.0%/145.6% (VMAT/IMRT), 33.3%/106.3% and 74.1%/245.4% for HN, brain and lung case, respectively. Conclusion: Difficult re-irradiation cases were used to test the limit of three intensity modulated techniques. Tomo, VMAT and IMRT show similar dosimetry while VMAT is the most efficient one and IMRT is the least.

  3. Impact of Immobilization on Intrafraction Motion for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Winnie; Sahgal, Arjun; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Foote, Matthew; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Jaffray, David A.; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Letourneau, Daniel; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) involves tight planning margins and steep dose gradients to the surrounding organs at risk (OAR). This study aimed to assess intrafraction motion using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for spine SBRT patients treated using three immobilization devices. Methods and Materials: Setup accuracy using CBCT was retrospectively analyzed for 102 treated spinal metastases in 84 patients. Thoracic and lumbar spine patients were immobilized with either an evacuated cushion (EC, n = 24) or a semirigid vacuum body fixation (BF, n = 60). For cases treated at cervical/upper thoracic (thoracic [T]1-T3) vertebrae, a thermoplastic S-frame (SF) mask (n = 18) was used. Patient setup was corrected by using bony anatomy image registration and couch translations only (no rotation corrections) with shifts confirmed on verification CBCTs. Repeat imaging was performed mid- and post-treatment. Patient translational and rotational positioning data were recorded to calculate means, standard deviations (SD), and corresponding margins {+-} 2 SD for residual setup errors and intrafraction motion. Results: A total of 355 localizations, 333 verifications, and 248 mid- and 280 post-treatment CBCTs were analyzed. Residual translations and rotations after couch corrections (verification scans) were similar for all immobilization systems, with SDs of 0.6 to 0.9 mm in any direction and 0.9 Degree-Sign to 1.6 Degree-Sign , respectively. Margins to encompass residual setup errors after couch corrections were within 2 mm. Including intrafraction motion, as measured on post-treatment CBCTs, SDs for total setup error in the left-right, cranial-caudal, and anterior-posterior directions were 1.3, 1.2, and 1.0 mm for EC; 0.9, 0.7, and 0.9 mm for BF; and 1.3, 0.9, and 1.1 mm for SF, respectively. The calculated margins required to encompass total setup error increased to 3 mm for EC and SF and remained within 2 mm for BF. Conclusion: Following image guidance, residual setup errors for spine SBRT were similar across three immobilization systems. The BF device resulted in the least amount of intrafraction motion, and based on this device, we justify a 2-mm margin for the planning OAR and target volume.

  4. A Dosimetric Comparison of Tomotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in the Treatment of High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasquier, David; Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille; Centre Galilee, Clinique de la Louviere, Lille ; Cavillon, Fabrice; Faculte Libre de Medecine, Lille ; Lacornerie, Thomas; Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille ; Touzeau, Claire; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Lartigau, Eric; Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric results of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with pelvic nodal radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans were generated for 10 consecutive patients treated for high-risk prostate cancer with prophylactic whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) using VMAT and HT. After WPRT, a sequential boost was delivered to the prostate. Plan quality was assessed according to the criteria of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 83 report: the near-minimal (D98%), near-maximal (D2%), and median (D50%) doses; the homogeneity index (HI); and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Beam-on time, integral dose, and several organs at risk (OAR) dosimetric indexes were also compared. Results: For WPRT, HT was able to provide a higher D98% than VMAT (44.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 43.9 {+-} 0.5 Gy, respectively; P=.032) and a lower D2% than VMAT (47.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 49.1 {+-} 0.7 Gy, respectively; P=.005), leading to a better HI. The DSC was better for WPRT with HT (0.89 {+-} 0.009) than with VMAT (0.80 {+-} 0.02; P=.002). The dosimetric indexes for the prostate boost did not differ significantly. VMAT provided better rectum wall sparing at higher doses (V70, V75, D2%). Conversely, HT provided better bladder wall sparing (V50, V60, V70), except at lower doses (V20). The beam-on times for WPRT and prostate boost were shorter with VMAT than with HT (3.1 {+-} 0.1 vs 7.4 {+-} 0.6 min, respectively; P=.002, and 1.5 {+-} 0.05 vs 3.7 {+-} 0.3 min, respectively; P=.002). The integral dose was slightly lower for VMAT. Conclusion: VMAT and HT provided very similar and highly conformal plans that complied well with OAR dose-volume constraints. Although some dosimetric differences were statistically significant, they remained small. HT provided a more homogeneous dose distribution, whereas VMAT enabled a shorter delivery time.

  5. SU-E-T-617: A Feasibility Study of Navigation Based Multi Criteria Optimization for Advanced Cervical Cancer IMRT Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study aims to validate multi-criteria optimization (MCO) against standard intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization for advanced cervical cancer in RayStation (v2.4, RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden). Methods: 10 advanced cervical cancer patients IMRT plans were randomly selected, these plans were designed with step and shoot optimization, new plans were then designed with MCO based on these plans,while keeping optimization conditions unchanged,comparison was made between both kinds of plans including the dose volume histogram parameters of PTV and OAR,and were analysed by pairing-t test. Results: We normalize the plan so that 95% volume of PTV achieved the prescribed dose(50Gy). The volume of radiation 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy of the rectum were reduced by 14.7%,26.8%,21.1%,10.5% respectively(P?0.05). The mean dose of rectum were reduced by 7.2Gy(P?0.05). There were no significant differences for the dosimetric parameters for the bladder. Conclusion: In comparision with standard IMRT optimization, MCO reduces the dose of organs at risk with the same PTV coverage,but the result needs further clinical evalution.

  6. SU-E-J-267: Weekly Volumetric and Dosimetric Changes in Adaptive Conformal Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell-Lung Cancer Using 4D CT and Gating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z [the 6th People's Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shang, Q [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Xiong, F; Zhang, X; Zhang, Q; Fu, S [the 6th People's Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study was to evaluate the significance of weekly imageguided patient setup and to assess the volumetric and dosimetric changes in no-small-cell-lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with adaptive conformal radiotherapy (CRT). Methods: 9 NSCLC patients treated with 3D CRT underwent 4D CT-on-rail every five fractions. ITV was generated from three phases of the 4DCT (the end of exhalation, 25% before and after the end of exhalation). The margin of ITV to PTV is 5mm. 6 weekly CTs were acquired for each patient. The weekly CTs were fused with the planning CT by vertebrae. The couch shift was recorded for each weekly CT to evaluate the setup error. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on weekly CT images by a physician. Beams from the original plans were applied to weekly CTs to calculate the delivered doses. All patients underwent replanning after 20 fractions. Results: Among the total 54 CTs, the average setup error was 2.0± 1.7, 2.6± 2.1, 2.7± 2.2 mm in X, Y, and Z direction, respectively. The average volume of the primary GTV was reduced from 42.45 cc to 22.78 cc (47.04%) after 6 weeks. The maximal volume regression occurred between 15 and 20 fractions. Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) reduced the V20 and V5 of the lung by 33.5% and 16.89%, respectively. ART also reduced Dmean and D1/3 of the heart by 31.7% and 32.32%, respectively. Dmax of the spinal cord did not vary much during the treatment course. Conclusion: 5 mm margin is sufficient for 4D weekly CTguided radiotherapy in lung cancer. Tumor regression was observed in the majority of patients. ART significantly reduced the OARs dose. Our preliminary results indicated that an off-line ART approach is appropriate in clinical practice.

  7. Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubiak, C.P.

    1992-11-01

    Aryl carbon-oxygen bond cleavage is a chemical transformation of importance in coal liquefaction and the upgrading of coal liquids as well as in the synthesis of natural products. There have been numerous attempts to discover general methods for the cleavage of aryl carbon-oxygen bonds. All the stoichiometric organic methods for phenol deoxygenation have limited applications and involve expensive reagents. Catalytic method, for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of phenols involve supported transition metal oxides, such as Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni-MO/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2}. Typical phenol hydrodeoxygenation conditions involve hydrogen pressures in excess of 100 atm and temperatures in excess of 200{degrees}C. Under these conditions arene ring hydrogenation is generally found to compete with phenol deoxygenation; and the coproduct water is found to impair the activity of the catalysts. This proposed research offers the possibility of effecting the selective catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups using CO. The deoxygenation of phenols by carbon monoxide mediated by Ir(triphos)OAr has provided us with a catalytic Phenol deoxygenation pathway, through the elimination of CO{sub 2} and formation of a benzyne intermediate. Although the [Pt(triphos)(O-Ph-Me)]PF{sub 6} system is not expected to be as efficient a catalyst as some of the other transition metals systems we are currently exploring, it will provide more information about the deoxygenation mechanism in these triphos complexes. This is due to the presence of the structurally sensitive {sup 3l}P--{sup 195}Pt coupling constant and comparisons to the extensively studied Pt(dppe)(O-Ph){sub 2} systems.

  8. SU-E-T-131: Dosimetric Impact and Evaluation of Different Heterogenity Algorithm in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Lung Treatment with the Flattening Filter Free Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, J; Kim, J; Lee, J; Kim, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the dosimetric impacts of the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros XB (AXB) plan for lung stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. The dosimetric parameters for the target and organs at risk (OARs) from the treatment plans calculated with these dose calculation algorithms were compared. The technical parameters, such as the computation times and the total monitor units (MUs), were also evaluated. Results: A comparison of DVHs from AXB and AAA showed that the AXB plan produced a high maximum PTV dose by average 4.40% with a statistical significance but slightly lower mean PTV dose by average 5.20% compared to the AAA plans. The maximum dose to the lung was slightly higher in the AXB compared to the AAA. For both algorithms, the values of V5, V10 and V20 for ipsilateral lung were higher in the AXB plan more than those of AAA. However, these parameters for contralateral lung were comparable. The differences of maximum dose for the spinal cord and heart were also small. The computation time of AXB was found fast with the relative difference of 13.7% than those of AAA. The average of monitor units (MUs) for all patients was higher in AXB plans than in the AAA plans. These results indicated that the difference between AXB and AAA are large in heterogeneous region with low density. Conclusion: The AXB provided the advantages such as the accuracy of calculations and the reduction of the computation time in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with using FFF beam, especially for VMAT planning. In dose calculation with the media of different density, therefore, the careful attention should be taken regarding the impacts of different heterogeneity correction algorithms. The authors report no conflicts of interest.

  9. A dosimetric comparison of proton and photon therapy in unresectable cancers of the head of pancreas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Reid F.; Zhai, Huifang; Both, Stefan; Metz, James M.; Plastaras, John P.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Mayekar, Sonal U.; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Uncontrolled local growth is the cause of death in ?30% of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancers. The addition of standard-dose radiotherapy to gemcitabine has been shown to confer a modest survival benefit in this population. Radiation dose escalation with three-dimensional planning is not feasible, but high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been shown to improve local control. Still, dose-escalation remains limited by gastrointestinal toxicity. In this study, the authors investigate the potential use of double scattering (DS) and pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy in limiting dose to critical organs at risk. Methods: The authors compared DS, PBS, and IMRT plans in 13 patients with unresectable cancer of the pancreatic head, paying particular attention to duodenum, small intestine, stomach, liver, kidney, and cord constraints in addition to target volume coverage. All plans were calculated to 5500 cGy in 25 fractions with equivalent constraints and normalized to prescription dose. All statistics were by two-tailed paired t-test. Results: Both DS and PBS decreased stomach, duodenum, and small bowel dose in low-dose regions compared to IMRT (p < 0.01). However, protons yielded increased doses in the mid to high dose regions (e.g., 23.6–53.8 and 34.9–52.4 Gy for duodenum using DS and PBS, respectively; p < 0.05). Protons also increased generalized equivalent uniform dose to duodenum and stomach, however these differences were small (<5% and 10%, respectively; p < 0.01). Doses to other organs-at-risk were within institutional constraints and placed no obvious limitations on treatment planning. Conclusions: Proton therapy does not appear to reduce OAR volumes receiving high dose. Protons are able to reduce the treated volume receiving low-intermediate doses, however the clinical significance of this remains to be determined in future investigations.

  10. Optical emission spectroscopy and Langmuir probe diagnostics of CH{sub 3}F/O{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karakas, Erdinc; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J. [Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4004 (United States)] [Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4004 (United States)

    2013-06-07

    A CH{sub 3}F:O{sub 2} (50%:50%) inductively coupled discharge, sustained in a compact plasma reactor, was investigated as a function of power (20-400 W) and pressure (9-30 mTorr), using optical emission spectroscopy and Langmuir probe measurements. The electron density increased linearly with power but only weakly with pressure. The effective electron temperature was nearly independent of power and pressure. The gas temperature, obtained from the rotational structure of N{sub 2} (C {yields} B) optical emission, increased from 400 to 900 K as a function of inductive mode power between 75 and 400 W at 10 mTorr. For constant feed gas flow, the absolute H, F, and O atom densities, estimated by optical emission rare gas actinometry, increased linearly with power. The absolute number density ratios H/Ar, F/Ar, and O/Ar, increased, decreased, and remained constant, respectively, with pressure. The H-atom density was estimated to be 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} at 400 W and 10 mTorr (gas temperature = 900 K), implying a high degree of dissociation of the CH{sub 3}F feedstock gas. The F and O atom number densities were much lower (8.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} and 5.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}, respectively) for the same conditions, suggesting that most of the fluorine and oxygen is contained in reaction products HF, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and OH. The relative number densities of HF, CO, and CO{sub 2} were observed to first rapidly increase with power, and then reach a plateau or decay slightly at higher power. Reaction mechanisms were proposed to explain the observed behavior of the number density of F and HF vs. power and pressure.

  11. Beyond Scheme F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, C.J.; Fisher, H.; Pepin, J.; Gillmann, R.

    1996-07-01

    Traffic classification techniques were evaluated using data from a 1993 investigation of the traffic flow patterns on I-20 in Georgia. First we improved the data by sifting through the data base, checking against the original video for questionable events and removing and/or repairing questionable events. We used this data base to critique the performance quantitatively of a classification method known as Scheme F. As a context for improving the approach, we show in this paper that scheme F can be represented as a McCullogh-Pitts neural network, oar as an equivalent decomposition of the plane. We found that Scheme F, among other things, severely misrepresents the number of vehicles in Class 3 by labeling them as Class 2. After discussing the basic classification problem in terms of what is measured, and what is the desired prediction goal, we set forth desirable characteristics of the classification scheme and describe a recurrent neural network system that partitions the high dimensional space up into bins for each axle separation. the collection of bin numbers, one for each of the axle separations, specifies a region in the axle space called a hyper-bin. All the vehicles counted that have the same set of in numbers are in the same hyper-bin. The probability of the occurrence of a particular class in that hyper- bin is the relative frequency with which that class occurs in that set of bin numbers. This type of algorithm produces classification results that are much more balanced and uniform with respect to Classes 2 and 3 and Class 10. In particular, the cancellation of errors of classification that occurs is for many applications the ideal classification scenario. The neural network results are presented in the form of a primary classification network and a reclassification network, the performance matrices for which are presented.

  12. SU-E-T-575: Isocenter Shifts in Treatment Planning and Its Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, Y; Damiani, S; Cao, Y; Jamshidi, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate causes of isocenter shifts in treatment planning and its clinical impact on patient treatment efficiency and safety. Methods/Materials: Treatment planning data of 340 patients under treatment over 8 weeks period were gathered to identify isocenter shifts according to site of the treatment, types of treatment plan or types of the machine used. Treatment plans included inversed and forward IMRT, as well as 3D plans. Treatment sites included pelvis, chest, abdomen, breasts, head and necks and extremities. Re-planning were performed without the isocenter shift for pelvis and chest plans, the dosimetric parameters such as PTV coverage, and dose sparing of OARs of these plans were analyzed and compared. Results/Discussions: Results showed that the isocenter shift was always necessary for some of sites such as breasts, two or more distinctive PTVs, or special cases such as large PTV treated with enhanced dynamic wedge. Many other cases, the re-planning results indicated 53% of the plans that the same quality of the plan can be achieved without the shift of the isocenter. Repositioning patients on a daily basis demanded unambiguous instructions for therapists for patient setups, and additional time to perform the shifts before treatment. Opportunities for error propagation exist during the communication and hand-over of such plans. Conclusion: Isocenter shifts demanded unambiguous instructions and times for therapists for daily patient setups, therefore it impacted both safety and efficiency of the patient treatment. Based on the analysis, the isocenter shifts were unavoidable for cases such as treatment of multiple sites, overcoming limitations of treatment machines, and/or sometime better dosimetry. However, we found many initially proposed shifts may have been eliminated either by careful planning or by improved CT simulation process such as detailed review of the images and localization of the PTV during simulation.

  13. SU-E-T-413: Experience-Based VMAT Plan Quality Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, K; Kalach, N; Wolthuis, B; Tai, C; Kravchuk, A; Bernstein, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify VMAT plan quality using a retrospective study of over 200 clinical treated VMAT plans created using the Eclipse Treatment Planning System to create benchmarks of plan quality for a few categories of treatment sites. Methods: Using a controlled phantom geometry, various dosimetric indices were investigated to quantify dosimetric plan quality as a function of isocenter displacement from center of mass, average path length, number of arcs and PTV proximity to critical structures. Beginning with published dosimetry indices from SRS and SBRT evaluations, UDI (Unified Dosimetry Index) and modified UDI were tested before creating a new factor VMAT-DI. VMAT-DI was developed within boundaries of this project and it includes renormalized factors of conformity index, coverage index, modified gradient index and homogeneity index as well as indices based on routine clinical practice such as absolute dose max index. The plans were then evaluated using the VMAT-DI such that benchmarks for planning could be created. Results: The majority of the plans evaluated could be assigned VMAT-DI values within a range for each treatment site. However, the outliers were results of difficult planning parameters such as very irregular targets, inhomogeneities or difficult to achieve critical structure constraints. To effectively use VMAT-DI for guidance, especially for prediction of the plan quality for body sites new to the practice, VMATDI database needs to be subdivided by target complexity and by body site index/average path length factor. Conclusion: An experienced-based VMAT-DI database can be used to help analyze plans before evaluation by the physician to show that it adheres to the clinical standards of previously treated VMAT plans which will make a guideline for concluding the optimization. The introduction of institution-wide clinical planning protocols, standardizing OAR naming and constraints will make it possible to incorporate a cumulative critical structure dosimetry index such as NTCP.

  14. SU-E-T-593: Clinical Evaluation of Direct Aperture Optimization in Head/Neck and Prostate IMRT Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosini, M; GALAL, M; Emam, I; Kamal, G; Algohary, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the planning and dosimetric advantages of direct aperture optimization (DAO) over beam-let optimization in IMRT treatment of head and neck (H/N) and prostate cancers. Methods: Five Head and Neck as well as five prostate patients were planned using the beamlet optimizer in Elekta-Xio ver 4.6 IMRT treatment planning system. Based on our experience in beamlet IMRT optimization, PTVs in H/N plans were prescribed to 70 Gy delivered by 7 fields. While prostate PTVs were prescribed to 76 Gy with 9 fields. In all plans, fields were set to be equally spaced. All cases were re-planed using Direct Aperture optimizer in Prowess Panther ver 5.01 IMRT planning system at same configurations and dose constraints. Plans were evaluated according to ICRU criteria, number of segments, number of monitor units and planning time. Results: For H/N plans, the near maximum dose (D2) and the dose that covers 95% D95 of PTV has improved by 4% in DAO. For organs at risk (OAR), DAO reduced the volume covered by 30% (V30) in spinal cord, right parotid, and left parotid by 60%, 54%, and 53% respectively. This considerable dosimetric quality improvement achieved using 25% less planning time and lower number of segments and monitor units by 46% and 51% respectively. In DAO prostate plans, Both D2 and D95 for the PTV were improved by only 2%. The V30 of the right femur, left femur and bladder were improved by 35%, 15% and 3% respectively. On the contrary, the rectum V30 got even worse by 9%. However, number of monitor units, and number of segments decreased by 20% and 25% respectively. Moreover the planning time reduced significantly too. Conclusion: DAO introduces considerable advantages over the beamlet optimization in regards to organs at risk sparing. However, no significant improvement occurred in most studied PTVs.

  15. SU-E-T-85: Comparison of Treatment Plans Calculated Using Ray Tracing and Monte Carlo Algorithms for Lung Cancer Patients Having Undergone Radiotherapy with Cyberknife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennington, A; Selvaraj, R; Kirkpatrick, S; Oliveira, S [21st Century Oncology, Deerfield Beach, FL (United States); Leventouri, T [Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The latest publications indicate that the Ray Tracing algorithm significantly overestimates the dose delivered as compared to the Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm. The purpose of this study is to quantify this overestimation and to identify significant correlations between the RT and MC calculated dose distributions. Methods: Preliminary results are based on 50 preexisting RT algorithm dose optimization and calculation treatment plans prepared on the Multiplan treatment planning system (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA). The analysis will be expanded to include 100 plans. These plans are recalculated using the MC algorithm, with high resolution and 1% uncertainty. The geometry and number of beams for a given plan, as well as the number of monitor units, is constant for the calculations for both algorithms and normalized differences are compared. Results: MC calculated doses were significantly smaller than RT doses. The D95 of the PTV was 27% lower for the MC calculation. The GTV and PTV mean coverage were 13 and 39% less for MC calculation. The first parameter of conformality, as defined as the ratio of the Prescription Isodose Volume to the PTV Volume was on average 1.18 for RT and 0.62 for MC. Maximum doses delivered to OARs was reduced in the MC plans. The doses for 1000 and 1500 cc of total lung minus PTV, respectively were reduced by 39% and 53% for the MC plans. The correlation of the ratio of air in PTV to the PTV with the difference in PTV coverage had a coefficient of ?0.54. Conclusion: The preliminary results confirm that the RT algorithm significantly overestimates the dosages delivered confirming previous analyses. Finally, subdividing the data into different size regimes increased the correlation for the smaller size PTVs indicating the MC algorithm improvement verses the RT algorithm is dependent upon the size of the PTV.

  16. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry of the head and neck: A comparison of treatment plans using linear accelerator-based IMRT and helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng Ke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)]. E-mail: ks2mc@virginia.edu; Molloy, Janelle A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Read, Paul W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To date, most intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery has occurred using linear accelerators (linacs), although helical tomotherapy has become commercially available. To quantify the dosimetric difference, we compared linac-based and helical tomotherapy-based treatment plans for IMRT of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: We compared the dosimetry findings of 10 patients who had oropharyngeal carcinoma. Five patients each had cancers in the base of the tongue and tonsil. Each plan was independently optimized using either the CORVUS planning system (Nomos Corporation, Sewickly, PA), commissioned for a Varian 2300 CD linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 1-cm multileaf collimator leaves, or helical tomotherapy. The resulting treatment plans were evaluated by comparing the dose-volume histograms, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), dose uniformity, and normal tissue complication probabilities. Results: Helical tomotherapy plans showed improvement of critical structure avoidance and target dose uniformity for all patients. The average equivalent uniform dose reduction for organs at risk (OARs) surrounding the base of tongue and the tonsil were 17.4% and 27.14% respectively. An 80% reduction in normal tissue complication probabilities for the parotid glands was observed in the tomotherapy plans relative to the linac-based plans. The standard deviation of the planning target volume dose was reduced by 71%. In our clinic, we use the combined dose-volume histograms for each class of plans as a reference goal for helical tomotherapy treatment planning optimization. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy provides improved dose homogeneity and normal structure dose compared with linac-based IMRT in the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma resulting in a reduced risk for complications from focal hotspots within the planning target volume and for the adjacent parotid glands.

  17. Clinical Application of High-Dose, Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayley, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.Bayley@rmp.uhn.on.c [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Rosewall, Tara; Craig, Tim; Bristow, Rob; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility and early toxicity of dose-escalated image-guided IMRT to the pelvic lymph nodes (LN), prostate (P), and seminal vesicles (SV). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 high-risk prostate cancer patients received two-phase, dose-escalated, image-guided IMRT with 3 years of androgen deprivation therapy. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) were delineated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance co-registration and included the prostate, portions of the SV, and the LN. Planning target volume margins (PTV) used were as follows: P (10 mm, 7 mm posteriorly), SV (10 mm), and LN (5 mm). Organs at risk (OaR) were the rectal and bladder walls, femoral heads, and large and small bowel. The IMRT was planned with an intended dose of 55.1 Gy in 29 fractions to all CTVs (Phase 1), with P+SV consecutive boost of 24.7 Gy in 13 fractions. Daily online image guidance was performed using bony landmarks and intraprostatic markers. Feasibility criteria included delivery of intended doses in 80% of patients, 95% of CTV displacements incorporated within PTV during Phase 1, and acute toxicity rate comparable to that of lower-dose pelvic techniques. Results: A total of 91 patients (88%) received the total prescription dose. All patients received at least 72 Gy. In Phase 1, 63 patients (61%) received the intended 55.1 Gy, whereas 87% of patients received at least 50 Gy. Dose reductions were caused by small bowel and rectal wall constraints. All CTVs received the planned dose in >95% of treatment fractions. There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicities greater than Grade 3, although there were five incidences equivalent to Grade 3 within a median follow-up of 23 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that dose escalation to the PLN+P+SV using IMRT is feasible, with acceptable rates of acute toxicity.

  18. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  19. Dose Uncertainties in IMPT for Oropharyngeal Cancer in the Presence of Anatomical, Range, and Setup Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraan, Aafke C., E-mail: aafke.kraan@pi.infn.it [Erasmus MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Water, Steven van de; Teguh, David N.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Erasmus MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Madden, Tom; Kooy, Hanne M. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S. [Erasmus MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties influence the dose delivered with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), but clinical quantification of these errors for oropharyngeal cancer is lacking. We quantified these factors and investigated treatment fidelity, that is, robustness, as influenced by adaptive planning and by applying more beam directions. Methods and Materials: We used an in-house treatment planning system with multicriteria optimization of pencil beam energies, directions, and weights to create treatment plans for 3-, 5-, and 7-beam directions for 10 oropharyngeal cancer patients. The dose prescription was a simultaneously integrated boost scheme, prescribing 66 Gy to primary tumor and positive neck levels (clinical target volume-66 Gy; CTV-66 Gy) and 54 Gy to elective neck levels (CTV-54 Gy). Doses were recalculated in 3700 simulations of setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties. Repeat computed tomography (CT) scans were used to evaluate an adaptive planning strategy using nonrigid registration for dose accumulation. Results: For the recalculated 3-beam plans including all treatment uncertainty sources, only 69% (CTV-66 Gy) and 88% (CTV-54 Gy) of the simulations had a dose received by 98% of the target volume (D98%) >95% of the prescription dose. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed considerable spread around planned values. Causes for major deviations were mixed. Adaptive planning based on repeat imaging positively affected dose delivery accuracy: in the presence of the other errors, percentages of treatments with D98% >95% increased to 96% (CTV-66 Gy) and 100% (CTV-54 Gy). Plans with more beam directions were not more robust. Conclusions: For oropharyngeal cancer patients, treatment uncertainties can result in significant differences between planned and delivered IMPT doses. Given the mixed causes for major deviations, we advise repeat diagnostic CT scans during treatment, recalculation of the dose, and if required, adaptive planning to improve adequate IMPT dose delivery.

  20. SU-E-T-317: The Development of a DIBH Technique for Left Sided Breast Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy Utilizing Varians RPM System in a Community Hospital

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasson, B; Young, M; Workie, D; Geraghty, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop and implement a Deep Inhalation Breath Hold program (DIBH) for treatment of patients with Left-sided breast cancer in a community hospital. Methods: All patients with left sided breast cancer underwent a screening free breathing CT. Evaluation of the conventional tangent treatment fields and the heart was conducted. If the heart would not be excluded using tangents, the patient then received DIBH breathe coaching. The patients returned for a 4D CT simulation. The patients breathing cycle was monitored using the Varian Real-Time position ManagementTM (RPM) system to assess duration of DIBH, amplitude, phase and recovery time to normal breathing. Then a DIBH CT was obtained at the desired amplitude. Duplicate plans were developed for both free breathing and DIBH on the Eclipse planning system and comparison DVH's were created. The plan that provided the prescribed treatment coverage and the least doses to the OAR (heart, Lt. Lung) was determined. Those patients selected to receive treatment with DIBH were set up for treatment, and breathing was monitored using the RPM system. Practice trials were used to confirm that the amplitude, phase and recovery were consistent with findings from simulation. Results: 10 patients have been treated using the DIBH procedure in our clinic. The DIBH patients had an average increase of 80% lung volume on DIBH, decreased lung volume receiving 50% of the dose, and decreases in the V20 dose. Significant reduction in the maximum and mean dose to the heart, as well as the dose to 1CC of the volume for the DIBH plans. Conclusion: Using the RPM system already available in the clinic, staff training, and patient coaching a simple DIBH program was setup. The use of DIBH has shown promise in reducing doses to the critical organs while maintaining PTV coverage for left sided breast treatments.

  1. SU-D-9A-07: Imaging Dose and Cancer Risk in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Cancers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, L; Bai, S; Zhang, Y; Ming, X; Zhang, Y; Deng, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To systematically evaluate the imaging doses and cancer risks associated with various imaging procedures involving ionizing radiation during image-guided radiotherapy of an increasingly large number of cancer patients. Methods: 141 patients (52 brain cases, 47 thoracic cases, 42 abdominal cases, aged 3 to 91 years old) treated between October 2009 and March 2010 were included in this IRB-approved retrospective study. During the whole radiotherapy course, each patient underwent at least one type of imaging procedures, i.e., kV portal, MV portal and kVCBCT, besides CT simulations. Based on Monte Carlo modeling and particle transport in human anatomy of various dimensions, the correlations between the radiation doses to the various organs-at-risk (OARs) at the head, the thoracic and the abdominal regions and one's weight, circumference, scan mAs and kVp have been obtained and used to estimate the radiation dose from a specific imaging procedure. The radiation-induced excess relative risk (ERR) was then estimated with BEIR VII formulism based on one's gender, age and radiation dose. 1+ ERR was reported in this study as relative cancer risk. Results: For the whole cohort of 141 patients, the mean imaging doses from various imaging procedures were 8.3 cGy to the brain, 10.5 cGy to the lungs and 19.2 cGy to the red bone marrow, respectively. Accordingly, the cancer risks were 1.140, 1.369 and 2.671, respectively. In comparison, MV portal deposited largest doses to the lungs while kVCBCT delivered the highest doses to the red bone marrow. Conclusion: The compiled imaging doses to a patient during his/her treatment course were patient-specific and site-dependent, varying from 1.2 to 263.5 cGy on average, which were clinically significant and should be included in the treatment planning and overall decision-making. Our results indicated the necessity of personalized imaging to maximize its clinical benefits while reducing the associated cancer risks. Sichuan University Scholarship.

  2. SU-E-T-183: Feasibility of Extreme Dose Escalation for Glioblastoma Multiforme Using 4? Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, D; Rwigema, J; Yu, V; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Selch, M; Low, D; Sheng, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: GBM recurrence primarily occurs inside or near the high-dose radiation field of original tumor site requiring greater than 100 Gy to significantly improve local control. We utilize 4? non-coplanar radiotherapy to test the feasibility of planning target volume (PTV) margin expansions or extreme dose escalations without incurring additional radiation toxicities. Methods: 11 GBM patients treated with VMAT to a prescription dose of 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy were replanned with 4?. Original VMAT plans were created with 2 to 4 coplanar or non-coplanar arcs using 3 mm hi-res MLC. The 4? optimization, using 5 mm MLC, selected and inverse optimized 30 beams from a candidate pool of 1162 beams evenly distributed through 4? steradians. 4? plans were first compared to clinical plans using the same prescription dose. Two more studies were then performed to respectively escalate the GTV and PTV doses to 100 Gy, followed by a fourth plan expanding the PTV by 5 mm and maintaining the prescription dose. Results: The standard 4? plan significantly reduced (p<0.01) max and mean doses to critical structures by a range of 47.0–98.4% and 61.0–99.2%, respectively. The high dose PTV/high dose GTV/expanded PTV studies showed a reduction (p<0.05) or unchanged* (p>0.05) maximum dose of 72.1%/86.7%/77.1% (chiasm), 7.2%*/27.7%*/30.7% (brainstem), 39.8%*/84.2%/51.9%* (spinal cord), 69.0%/87.0%/66.9% (L eye), 76.2%/88.1%/84.1% (R eye), 95.0%/98.6%/97.5% (L lens), 93.9%/98.8%/97.6% (R lens), 74.3%/88.5%/72.4% (L optical nerve), 80.4%/91.3%/75.7% (R optical nerve), 64.8%/84.2%/44.9%* (L cochlea), and 85.2%/93.0%/78.0% (R cochlea), respectively. V30 and V36 for both brain and (brain - PTV) were reduced for all cases except the high dose PTV plan. PTV dose coverage increased for all 4? plans. Conclusion: Extreme dose escalation or further margin expansion is achievable using 4?, maintaining or reducing OAR doses. This study indicates that clinical trials employing 4? delivery using prescription doses up to 100 Gy are feasible. Funding support partially contributed by Varian.

  3. SU-E-J-229: Quantitative Assessment for Timely Adaptive Re-Planning Using Weekly Dose Monitoring for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, Q; Liu, H; Greskovich, J; Koyfman, S; Xia, P; Li, Z

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For patients with head and neck (HN) cancer, mid-course adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is a common practice in our institution to accommodate anatomic changes. The aim of the study is to evaluate whether dose re-calculation on weekly verification images can provide quantitative assessment for timely adaptive re-planning with daily image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: We retrospectively selected sixty daily verification images acquired on CT-on-rail/CBCT from ten HN patients. These image sets were typically a week apart. Among these patients, six patients received a mid-course ART. Contours of the tumors and organ-at-risks (OARs) were manually delineated by a physician on each verification CT. After placing the treatment iso-center on the verification CTs according to the recorded clinical shifts, daily dose was re-calculated with the same beam configuration as the original plan. For the purpose of this study, electron densities for both verification CTs and planning CTs were set to 1.0 g/cm3. Results: Two patients had D99 of the CTV < 97% of the planned dose for more than three fractions due to remarkable tumor volume shrinkages. D-max of the spinal cord exceeded a tolerance of 45 Gy for four fractions in additional two patients. D-mean of the parotid increased within 25% of the planned value. D-max of the brainstem and D-mean of the oral cavity did not show significant variation. If the re-planning criteria included D99 of the CTV < 97% of the planned dose and D-max of the spinal cord > 45 Gy, two out ten patients required ART at week 2 and two patients required ART at week 3, respectively. Conclusion: Weekly dose monitoring with re-calculation on verification images can provide quantitative dose guidance for timely adaptive re-planning. Future work will include accumulative dose analysis for the decision of adaptive re-planning. The study is supported in part by Siemens Medical Solutions.

  4. SU-E-T-215: Interactive Dose Shaping: Proof of Concept Study for Six Prostate Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamerling, CP [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Ziegenhein, P; Oelfke, U [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Sterzing, F [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide a proof of concept study for IMRT treatment planning through interactive dose shaping (IDS) by utilising the respective tools to create IMRT treatment plans for six prostate patients. Methods: The IDS planning paradigm aims to perform interactive local dose adaptations of an IMRT plan without compromising already established valuable dose features in real-time. Various IDS tools are available in our in-house treatment planning software Dynaplan and were utilised to create IMRT treatment plans for six patients with an adeno-carcinoma of the prostate. The sequenced IDS treatment plans were compared to conventionally optimised clinically approved plans (9 beams, co-planar). The starting point consisted of open fields. The IDS tools were utilised to sculpt dose out of the rectum and bladder. For each patient, several IDS plans were created, with different trade-offs between organ sparing and target coverage. The reference dose distributions were imported into Dynaplan. For each patient, the IDS treatment plan with a similar or better trade-off between target coverage and OAR sparing was selected for plan evaluation, guided by a physician. Pencil beam dose calculation was performed on a grid with a voxel size of 1.95×1.95×2.0 mm{sup 3}. D98%, D2%, mean dose and dose-volume indicators as specified by Quantec were calculated for plan evaluation. Results: It was possible to utilise the software prototype to generate treatment plans for prostate patient geometries in 15–45 minutes. Individual local dose adaptations could be performed in less than one second. The average differences compared to the reference plans were for the mean dose: 0.0 Gy (boost) and 1.2 Gy (CTV), for D98%: ?1.1 Gy and for D2%: 1.1 Gy (both target volumes). The dose-volume quality indicators were well below the Quantec constraints. Conclusion: Real-time treatment planning utilising IDS is feasible and has the potential to be implemented clinically. Research at The Institute of Cancer Research is supported by Cancer Research UK under Programme C46/A10588.