Sample records for anders plasma applications

  1. Merging Applicability Domains for in Silico Assessment of Chemical Mutagenicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    * and Anders Wallqvist* DoD Biotechnology High Performance Computing Software Applications Institute

  2. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  3. Dr. Anders Hansen, University of Cambridge, Homerton College ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 1, 2011 ... PURDUE UNIVERSITY. Special Colloquium. Speaker: Dr. Anders Hansen, University of Cambridge, Homerton College. Title: “Generalized ...

  4. Plasma transport in a converging magnetic field with applications to helicon plasma thrusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choueiri, Edgar

    .1, which represents a new design criteria for helicon plasma thrusters. I. Introduction ElectrodelessPlasma transport in a converging magnetic field with applications to helicon plasma thrusters IEPC University, Princeton, New Jersey, 08540, USA Plasma transport in the convergent magnetic field region

  5. Model-independent nonlinear control algorithm with application to a liquid bridge experiment Valery Petrov,* Anders Haaning, Kurt A. Muehlner, Stephen J. Van Hook, and Harry L. Swinney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    Model-independent nonlinear control algorithm with application to a liquid bridge experiment Valery-tension-driven convection experiment that models the float zone refining process. Control of the dynamics is achieved. A recently introduced model-independent algorithm 10 can control nonlinear systems even when the underlying

  6. ann norderhaug anders: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vice Chair Montana Henry Lorenzen Oregon W. Bill Booth Idaho James A. Yost Idaho Pat Smith Montana 2 Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants...

  7. Plasma-based localized defect for switchable coupling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varault, Stefan [ONERA/DEMR, 2, Avenue Edouard Belin, BP4025, 31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); LAboratoire PLAsma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE), UPS, CNRS, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Gabard, Benjamin [STAE, 4, rue Emile Monso, BP84234, 31030 Toulouse, Cedex 4 (France); Sokoloff, Jerome [LAboratoire PLAsma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE), UPS, CNRS, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Bolioli, Sylvain [ONERA/DEMR, 2, Avenue Edouard Belin, BP4025, 31055 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report in this paper experimental measurements in order to validate the concept of switchable electromagnetic band gap filters based on plasma capillaries in the microwave regime. The plasma tube is embedded inside the structure to create a bistable (plasma on or off) punctual defect. We first investigate two kinds of discharge tubes: Ar-Hg and pure Ne, which we then use to experimentally achieve plasma-based reconfigurable applications, namely, a two-port coupler and a two-port demultiplexer.

  8. Modulated optical solid-state spectrometer applications in plasma diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, John

    Modulated optical solid-state spectrometer applications in plasma diagnostics John Howard Plasma A new electro-optically modulated optical solid-state MOSS interferometer has been constructed for the measurement of the low order spectral moments of line emission from optically thin radiant media

  9. Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy: principles, methods and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazic, Violeta; Colao, Francesco; Fantoni, Roberta; Spizzichino, Valeria [ENEA, FIS-LAS, V. E. Fermi 45, Frascati (RM) (Italy); Jovicevic, Sonja [Institute of Physics, 11080 Belgrade, Pregrevica 118 (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Principles of the Laser Induced Plasma Spectroscopy and its advances are reported. Methods for obtaining quantitative analyses are described, together with discussion of some applications and the specific problems.

  10. Application of Nonlocalpp Electron Kinetics to Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    not captured in fluid models: · Explosive generation of cold electrons with power increase.Explosive generation-(EEDF) are non Maxwellian: ­ Parts of the EEDF are very flexible and almost independent. ­ An example of a EEDF, and C.E. Theodosiou, IEEE Trans ANODE CATHODE Plasma Sci. 33, 510 (2005). 7 #12;Explosive generation

  11. Laser produced plasma diagnostics by cavity ringdown spectroscopy and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milosevic, S. [Institute of Physics, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-produced plasmas have many applications for which detailed characterization of the plume is requested. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy is a versatile absorption method which provides data on the plume and its surroundings, with spatial and temporal resolution. The measured absorption line shapes contain information about angular and velocity distributions within the plume. In various plasmas we have observed molecules or metastable atoms which were not present in the emission spectra.

  12. Formation of Imploding Plasma Liners for HEDP and MIF Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Case, Andrew [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Brockington, Samuel [HyperV Technologies Corp.y; Messer, Sarah [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Bomgardner, Richard [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Phillips, Mike [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Wu, Linchun [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Elton, Ray [University of Maryland

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma jets with high density and velocity have a number of important applications in fusion energy and elsewhere, including plasma refueling, disruption mitigation in tokamaks, magnetized target fusion, injection of momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, plasma thrusters, and high energy density plasmas (HEDP). In Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF), for example, an imploding material liner is used to compress a magnetized plasma to fusion conditions and to confine the resulting burning plasma inertially to obtain the necessary energy gain. The imploding shell may be solid, liquid, gaseous, or a combination of these states. The presence of the magnetic field in the target plasma suppresses thermal transport to the plasma shell, thus lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target to fusion conditions. This allows the required imploding momentum flux to be generated electromagnetically using off-the-shelf pulsed power technology. Practical schemes for standoff delivery of the imploding momentum flux are required and are open topics for research. One approach for accomplishing this, called plasma jet driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF), uses a spherical array of pulsed plasma guns to create a spherically imploding shell of very high velocity, high momentum flux plasma. This approach requires development of plasma jet accelerators capable of achieving velocities of 50-200 km/s with very precise timing and density profiles, and with high total mass and density. Low-Z plasma jets would require the higher velocities, whereas very dense high-Z plasma shells could achieve the goal at velocities of only 50-100 km/s. In this report, we describe our work to develop the pulsed plasma gun technology needed for an experimental scientific exploration of the PJMIF concept, and also for the other applications mentioned earlier. The initial goal of a few hundred of hydrogen at 200 km/s was eventually replaced with accelerating 8000 ?g of argon or xenon to 50 km/s for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initial work used existing computational and analytical tools to develop and refine a specific plasma gun concept having a novel tapered coaxial electromagnetic accelerator contour with an array of symmetric ablative plasma injectors. The profile is designed to suppress the main barrier to success in coaxial guns, namely the blow-by instability in which the arc slips past and outruns the bulk of the plasma mass. Efforts to begin developing a set of annular non-ablative plasma injectors for the coaxial gun, in order to accelerate pure gases, resulted in development of linear parallel-plate MiniRailguns that turned out to work well as plasma guns in their own right and we subsequently chose them for an initial plasma liner experiment on the PLX facility at LANL. This choice was mainly driven by cost and schedule for that particular experiment, while longer term goals still projected use of coaxial guns for reactor-relevant applications for reasons of better symmetry, lower impurities, more compact plasma jet formation, and higher gun efficiency. Our efforts have focused mainly on 1) developing various plasma injection systems for both coax and linear railguns and ensuring they work reliably with the accelerator section, 2) developing a suite of plasma and gun diagnostics, 3) performing computational modeling to design and refine the plasma guns, 4) establishing a research facility dedicated to plasma gun development, and finally, 5) developing plasma guns and associated pulse power systems capable of achieving these goals and installing and testing the first two gun sets on the PLX facility at LANL. During the second funding cycle for this program, HyperV joined in a collaborative effort with LANL, the University of Alabama at Huntsville, and the University of New Mexico to perform a plasma liner experiment (PLX) to investigate the physics and technology of forming spherically imploding plasma liners. HyperV’s tasks focused on developing the plasma guns and associated pulse power syst

  13. Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Burning Plasma Diagnostic Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soukhanovskii, V A

    2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS, 200-750 nm) atomic spectroscopy of neutral and ion fuel species (H, D, T, Li) and impurities (e.g. He, Be, C, W) is a key element of plasma control and diagnosis on ITER and future magnetically confined burning plasma experiments (BPX). Spectroscopic diagnostic implementation and performance issues that arise in the BPX harsh nuclear environment in the UV-VIS range, e.g., degradation of first mirror reflectivity under charge-exchange atom bombardment (erosion) and impurity deposition, permanent and dynamic loss of window and optical fiber transmission under intense neutron and {gamma}-ray fluxes, are either absent or not as severe in the near-infrared (NIR, 750-2000 nm) range. An initial survey of NIR diagnostic applications has been undertaken on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. It is demonstrated that NIR spectroscopy can address machine protection and plasma control diagnostic tasks, as well as plasma performance evaluation and physics studies. Emission intensity estimates demonstrate that NIR measurements are possible in the BPX plasma operating parameter range. Complications in the NIR range due to parasitic background emissions are expected to occur at very high plasma densities, low impurity densities, and at high plasma facing component temperatures.

  14. MSc in Plasma Physics & Applications Laser Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    . Thermonuclear fusion provides unlimited energy for all the world which is clean from long lived radioactiveMSc in Plasma Physics & Applications Laser Fusion Energy Why laser fusionDescription of the course fusion for energy production. This unique training scheme involves eight leading European centres

  15. MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ME2132 - DDO MPS213 MPS213 A Non A Non - - Thermal Plasma Application for the Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy Royal Navy 29 August 2002 29 August 2002 DEER DEER Lt...

  16. Current and Perspective Applications of Dense Plasma Focus Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gribkov, V. A. [A.I. Alikhanov Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, ul. Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, ul. Hery 23, Warsaw 01-497 (Poland)

    2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices' applications, which are intended to support the main-stream large-scale nuclear fusion programs (NFP) from one side (both in fundamental problems of Dense Magnetized Plasma physics and in its engineering issues) as well as elaborated for an immediate use in a number of fields from the other one, are described. In the first direction such problems as self-generated magnetic fields, implosion stability of plasma shells having a high aspect ratio, etc. are important for the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) programs (e.g. as NIF), whereas different problems of current disruption phenomenon, plasma turbulence, mechanisms of generation of fast particles and neutrons in magnetized plasmas are of great interest for the large devices of the Magnetic Plasma Confinement--MPC (e.g. as ITER). In a sphere of the engineering problems of NFP it is shown that in particular the radiation material sciences have DPF as a very efficient tool for radiation tests of prospect materials and for improvement of their characteristics. In the field of broad-band current applications some results obtained in the fields of radiation material sciences, radiobiology, nuclear medicine, express Neutron Activation Analysis (including a single-shot interrogation of hidden illegal objects), dynamic non-destructive quality control, X-Ray microlithography and micromachining, and micro-radiography are presented. As the examples of the potential future applications it is proposed to use DPF as a powerful high-flux neutron source to generate very powerful pulses of neutrons in the nanosecond (ns) range of its duration for innovative experiments in nuclear physics, for the goals of radiation treatment of malignant tumors, for neutron tests of materials of the first wall, blankets and NFP device's constructions (with fluences up to 1 dpa per a year term), and ns pulses of fast electrons, neutrons and hard X-Rays for brachytherapy.

  17. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milchberg, Howard M

    2013-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The eventual success of laser-plasma based acceleration schemes for high-energy particle physics will require the focusing and stable guiding of short intense laser pulses in reproducible plasma channels. For this goal to be realized, many scientific issues need to be addressed. These issues include an understanding of the basic physics of, and an exploration of various schemes for, plasma channel formation. In addition, the coupling of intense laser pulses to these channels and the stable propagation of pulses in the channels require study. Finally, new theoretical and computational tools need to be developed to aid in the design and analysis of experiments and future accelerators. Here we propose a 3-year renewal of our combined theoretical and experimental program on the applications of plasma waveguides to high-energy accelerators. During the past grant period we have made a number of significant advances in the science of laser-plasma based acceleration. We pioneered the development of clustered gases as a new highly efficient medium for plasma channel formation. Our contributions here include theoretical and experimental studies of the physics of cluster ionization, heating, explosion, and channel formation. We have demonstrated for the first time the generation of and guiding in a corrugated plasma waveguide. The fine structure demonstrated in these guides is only possible with cluster jet heating by lasers. The corrugated guide is a slow wave structure operable at arbitrarily high laser intensities, allowing direct laser acceleration, a process we have explored in detail with simulations. The development of these guides opens the possibility of direct laser acceleration, a true miniature analogue of the SLAC RF-based accelerator. Our theoretical studies during this period have also contributed to the further development of the simulation codes, Wake and QuickPIC, which can be used for both laser driven and beam driven plasma based acceleration schemes. We will continue our development of advanced simulation tools by modifying the QuickPIC algorithm to allow for the simulation of plasma particle pick-up by the wake fields. We have also performed extensive simulations of plasma slow wave structures for efficient THz generation by guided laser beams or accelerated electron beams. We will pursue experimental studies of direct laser acceleration, and THz generation by two methods, ponderomotive-induced THz polarization, and THz radiation by laser accelerated electron beams. We also plan to study both conventional and corrugated plasma channels using our new 30 TW in our new lab facilities. We will investigate production of very long hydrogen plasma waveguides (5 cm). We will study guiding at increasing power levels through the onset of laser-induced cavitation (bubble regime) to assess the role played by the preformed channel. Experiments in direct acceleration will be performed, using laser plasma wakefields as the electron injector. Finally, we will use 2-colour ionization of gases as a high frequency THz source (<60 THz) in order for femtosecond measurements of low plasma densities in waveguides and beams.

  18. Prediction of biomass in Norwegian fish farms Anders Llanda,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrin, Magne

    involves systematic fluctuations in biomass and quantity of slaughtered fish. When the new fish have beenPrediction of biomass in Norwegian fish farms Anders Lølanda, , Magne Aldrina , Gunnhildur H). The model provided good predictions of future biomass of Norwegian farmed salmon and can also be used

  19. Heat transfer in proteinwater interfaces Anders Lervik,ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    Heat transfer in protein­water interfaces Anders Lervik,ab Fernando Bresme,*ac Signe Kjelstrup of the heat diffusion equation we compute the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the proteins by about 4 nm.4 It is expected that the energy transfer between these sites may involve the concerted

  20. Heat Plan DenmarkHeat Plan Denmark Anders Dyrelundy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the supply and the demand side · An eye-opener for the Danish politicians · Could be a model for otherHeat Plan DenmarkHeat Plan Denmark Anders Dyrelundy Market Manager for Energy and Climate Rambøll Möller · The first study in Denmark, really to integrate the energy and building sectors ­ to combine

  1. Remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of ZnO for thin film electronic applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    Remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of ZnO for thin film electronic applications S: Available online 28 May 2012 Keywords: Remote plasma Atomic layer deposition (ALD) ZnO Thin film transistor of various reactant plasma parameters of remote plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD) on the ZnO thin film properties

  2. Plasma Synthesis of Nanoparticles for Nanocomposite Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Kong; Alex W. Kawczak

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nanocomposite energy applications for plasma reactor produced nanoparticles are reviewed. Nanoparticles are commonly defined as particles less than 100 nm in diameter. Due to this small size, nanoparticles have a high surface-to-volume ratio. This increases the surface energy compared to the bulk material. The high surface-to-volume ratio and size effects (quantum effects) give nanoparticles distinctive chemical, electronic, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties from those of the bulk material. Nanoparticles synthesis can be grouped into 3 broad approaches. The first one is wet phase synthesis (sol-gel processing), the second is mechanical attrition, and the third is gas-phase synthesis (aerosol). The properties of the final product may differ significantly depending on the fabrication route. Currently, there are no economical large-scale production processes for nanoparticles. This hinders the widespread applications of nanomaterials in products. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is engaging in research and development of advanced modular hybrid plasma reactors for low cost production of nanoparticles that is predicted to accelerate application research and enable the formation of technology innovation alliances that will result in the commercial production of nanocomposites for alternative energy production devices such as fuel cells, photovoltaics and electrochemical double layer capacitors.

  3. Ris National Laboratory Optics and Plasma Reserch Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Anders Bjarklev, Peter E. Andersen Risø National Laboratory, Optics and Plasma Research Department, DK amplifier Frederik D. Nielsen and Lars Thrane Risø National Laboratory, Optics and Plasma Research. Lyngby, Denmark Peter E. Andersen (corresponding author) Risø National Laboratory, Optics and Plasma

  4. astrophysical applications plasma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)...

  5. Characteristics and potential applications of an ORNL microwave ECR multicusp plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source that has two ECR plasma production regions and uses multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasma over large areas of 300 to 400 cm{sup 2} and could be scaled up to produce uniform plasma over 700 cm{sup 2} or larger. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The working gases used were argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of the discharge parameters. The discharge characteristics and a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source are described and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam sources for manufacturing advanced microelectronics, for space electric propulsion, and for fusion research, are discussed. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Potential applications of a new microwave ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) multicusp plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source using two ECR plasma production regions and multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasmas over large areas of 300 to 400 cm{sup 2}. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of discharge parameters. Together with the discharge characteristics observed, a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source is reported and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam processing for manufacturing advanced microelectronics and for space electric propulsion, are discussed. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Effect of bias application to plasma density in weakly magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyuk; Lee, Woohyun; Park, Wanjae; Whang, Ki-Woong [Plasma Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-ro, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Independent control of the ion flux and energy can be achieved in a dual frequency inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system. Typically, the plasma density is controlled by the high-frequency antenna radio-frequency (RF) power and the ion energy is controlled by the low-frequency bias RF power. Increasing the bias power has been known to cause a decrease in the plasma density in capacitively coupled discharge systems as well as in ICP systems. However, an applied axial magnetic field was found to sustain or increase the plasma density as bias power is increased. Measurements show higher electron temperatures but lower plasma densities are obtained in ordinary ICP systems than in magnetized ICP systems under the same neutral gas pressure and RF power levels. Explanations for the difference in the behavior of plasma density with increasing bias power are given in terms of the difference in the heating mechanism in ordinary unmagnetized and magnetized ICP systems.

  8. Dielectric covered hairpin probe for its application in reactive plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M. [NCPST, School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Karkari, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research Center, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The hairpin probe is a well known technique for measuring local electron density in low temperature plasmas. In reactive plasmas, the probe characteristics are affected by surface sputtering, contamination, and secondary electron emission. At higher densities, the plasma absorbs the entire electromagnetic energy of hairpin and hence limits the density measurements. These issues can be resolved by covering the hairpin surface with a thin layer of dielectric. In this letter, the dielectric contribution to the probe characteristics is incorporated in a theory which is experimentally verified. The dielectric covering improves the performance of probe and also allows the hairpin tip to survive in reactive plasma where classical electrical probes are easily damaged.

  9. SUBMISSION TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPONENTS AND PACKAGING TECHNOLOGIES 1 Application of the Spark Plasma Sintering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    --semiconductor device packaging, power elec- tronics, Spark Plasma Sintering, Three-dimensional packaging. I Plasma Sintering Technique to Low-Temperature Copper Bonding Bassem Mouawad, Maher Soueidan, Damien FabrSUBMISSION TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPONENTS AND PACKAGING TECHNOLOGIES 1 Application of the Spark

  10. MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 3 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Marine Propulsion Systems - Integrated Project Team 2002deerhughes3.pdf...

  11. Application of a non-thermal plasma to combustion enhancement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosocha, L. A. (Louis A.); Kim, Y. (Yongho); Stange, Sabine

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a primary objective, researchers in Los Alamos National Laboratory's P-24 Plasma Physics group are aiming to minimize U.S. energy dependency on foreign resources through experiments incorporating a plasma assisted combustion unit. Under this broad category, researchers seek to increase efficiency and reduce NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} and unburned hydrocarbon emissions in IC-engines, gas-turbine engines, and burner units. To date, the existing lean burn operations, consisting of higher air to fuel ratio, have successfully operated in a regime where reduced NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} emissions are expected and have also shown increased combustion efficiency (less unburned hydrocarbon) for propane. By incorporating a lean burn operation assisted by a non-thermal plasma (NTP) reactor, the fracturing of hydrocarbons can occur with increased power (combustion, efficiency, and stability). Non-thermal plasma units produce energetic electrons, but avoid the high gas and ion temperatures involved in thermal plasmas. One non-thermal plasma method, known as silent discharge, allows free radicals to act in propagating combustion reactions, as well as intermediaries in hydrocarbon fracturing. Using non-thermal plasma units, researchers have developed a fuel activation/conversion system capable of decreasing pollutants while increasing fuel efficiency, providing a path toward future U.S. energy independence.

  12. List of Participants 1. Igor ANDERS (Institute for Low Temperature Physics, Kharkov, UKRAINE),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovych, Roman

    List of Participants 1. Igor ANDERS (Institute for Low Temperature Physics, Kharkov, UKRAINE), e Welding Institute of NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv, UKRAINE), e-mail: boris@consult.kiev.ua 24. Ivan FEDORCHUK

  13. Energetic particle physics with applications in fusion and space plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energetic particle physics is the study of the effects of energetic particles on collective electromagnetic (EM) instabilities and energetic particle transport in plasmas. Anomalously large energetic particle transport is often caused by low frequency MHD instabilities, which are driven by these energetic particles in the presence of a much denser background of thermal particles. The theory of collective energetic particle phenomena studies complex wave-particle interactions in which particle kinetic physics involving small spatial and fast temporal scales can strongly affect the MHD structure and long-time behavior of plasmas. The difficulty of modeling kinetic-MHD multiscale coupling processes stems from the disparate scales which are traditionally analyzed separately: the macroscale MHD phenomena are studied using the fluid MHD framework, while microscale kinetic phenomena are best described by complicated kinetic theories. The authors have developed a kinetic-MHD model that properly incorporates major particle kinetic effects into the MHD fluid description. For tokamak plasmas a nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code, the NOVA-K code, has been successfully developed and applied to study problems such as the excitation of fishbone and Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) and the sawtooth stabilization by energetic ions in tokamaks. In space plasmas the authors have employed the kinetic-MHD model to study the energetic particle effects on the ballooning-mirror instability which explains the multisatellite observation of the stability and field-aligned structure of compressional Pc 5 waves in the magnetospheric ring current plasma.

  14. A space-charge-neutralizing plasma for beam drift compression P.K. Roya,, P.A. Seidl a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    - long final focus solenoid (FFS). Measured data show that the plasma forms a thin column of diameter $5A space-charge-neutralizing plasma for beam drift compression P.K. Roya,Ã?, P.A. Seidl a , A. Anders of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA c Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543, USA d

  15. Rapid multiplexed data acquisition: Application to three-dimensional magnetic field measurements in a turbulent laboratory plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael R.

    acquisition at the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment SSX and Redmond Plasma Physics Laboratory. An application. The Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment SSX 3 has re- cently completed construction, calibration, and testing

  16. Characterization of SF6/Argon Plasmas for Microelectronics Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEBNER, GREGORY A.; ABRAHAM, ION C.; WOODWORTH, JOSEPH R.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents measurements in inductively driven plasmas containing SF{sub 6}/Argon gas mixtures. The data in this report is presented in a series of appendices with a minimum of interpretation. During the course of this work we investigated: the electron and negative ion density using microwave interferometry and laser photodetachment; the optical emission; plasma species using mass spectrometry, and the ion energy distributions at the surface of the rf biased electrode in several configurations. The goal of this work was to assemble a consistent set of data to understand the important chemical mechanisms in SF{sub 6} based processing of materials and to validate models of the gas and surface processes.

  17. Spark Plasma Sintering of Fuel Cermets for Nuclear Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Zhong; Robert C. O'Brien; Steven D. Howe; Nathan D. Jerred; Kristopher Schwinn; Laura Sudderth; Joshua Hundley

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of the fabrication of tungsten based nuclear fuel cermets via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) is investigated in this work. CeO2 is used to simulate fuel loadings of UO2 or Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuels within tungsten-based cermets due to the similar properties of these materials. This study shows that after a short time sintering, greater than 90 % density can be achieved, which is suitable to possess good strength as well as the ability to contain fission products. The mechanical properties and the densities of the samples are also investigated as functions of the applied pressures during the sintering.

  18. THE PLASMA WINDOW: A WINDOWLESS HIGH PRESSURE VACUUM INTERFACE FOR VARIOUS ACCELERATOR APPLICATIONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERSHCOVITCH,A.I.; JOHNSON,E.D.; LANZA,R.C.

    1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plasma Window is a stabilized plasma arc used as an interface between accelerator vacuum and pressurized targets. There is no solid material introduced into the beam and thus it is also capable of transmitting particle beams and electromagnetic radiation with low loss and of sustaining high beam currents without damage. Measurements on a prototype system with a 3 mm diameter opening have shown that pressure differences of more than 2.5 atmospheres can be sustained with an input pressure of {approx} 10{sup -6} Torr. The system is capable of scaling to higher-pressure differences and larger apertures. Various plasma window applications for synchrotron light sources, high power lasers, internal targets, high current accelerators such as the HAWK, ATW, APT, DARHT, spallation sources, as well as for a number of commercial applications, will be discussed.

  19. Similarity Parameter Evolution within a Magnetic Nozzle with Applications to Laboratory Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choueiri, Edgar

    by which ions are accelerated is fundamental to the understanding of magnetic nozzles for propulsionSimilarity Parameter Evolution within a Magnetic Nozzle with Applications to Laboratory Plasmas IEPC-2011-229 Presented at the 32nd International Electric Propulsion Conference, Wiesbaden, Germany

  20. Plasma mixing glow discharge device for analytical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinnaduwage, L.A.

    1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An instrument for analyzing a sample has an enclosure that forms a chamber containing an anode which divides the chamber into a discharge region and an analysis region. A gas inlet and outlet are provided to introduce and exhaust a rare gas into the discharge region. A cathode within the discharge region has a plurality of pins projecting in a geometric pattern toward the anode for exciting the gas and producing a plasma discharge between the cathode and the anode. Low energy electrons (e.g. <0.5 eV) pass into the analysis region through an aperture. The sample to be analyzed is placed into the analysis region and bombarded by the metastable rare gas atoms and the low energy electrons extracted into from the discharge region. A mass or optical spectrometer can be coupled to a port of the analysis region to analyze the resulting ions and light emission. 3 figs.

  1. Plasma mixing glow discharge device for analytical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An instrument for analyzing a sample has an enclosure that forms a chamber containing an anode which divides the chamber into a discharge region and an analysis region. A gas inlet and outlet are provided to introduce and exhaust a rare gas into the discharge region. A cathode within the discharge region has a plurality of pins projecting in a geometric pattern toward the anode for exciting the gas and producing a plasma discharge between the cathode and the anode. Low energy electrons (e.g. <0.5 eV) pass into the analysis region through an aperture. The sample to be analyzed is placed into the analysis region and bombarded by the metastable rare gas atoms and the low energy electrons extracted into from the discharge region. A mass or optical spectrometer can be coupled to a port of the analysis region to analyze the resulting ions and light emission.

  2. Flexible Calibration : Minimal Cases for Auto-calibration Anders Heyden, Kalle strm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet

    Flexible Calibration : Minimal Cases for Auto-calibration Anders Heyden, Kalle �ström Centre This paper deals with the concept of auto-calibration, i.e. methods to calibrate a camera on reconstruction, called flexible calibration. The main theoretical results are that it is only needed to know

  3. A Deformable Model for Bringing Particles in Anders Lindbjerg Dahl1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, Anders Lindbjerg

    about particle distribution, size and shape, and these parameters are often essential for system designA Deformable Model for Bringing Particles in Focus Anders Lindbjerg Dahl1 , Thomas Martini Abstract. We provide a deformable model for particle analysis. We in- vestigate particle images from

  4. Power Prediction on Broadband Channels Mikael Sternad, Torbjorn Ekman, Anders Ahl en

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Prediction on Broadband Channels Mikael Sternad, Torbjorn Ekman, Anders Ahl#19;en Signals resource allocation and planning require accurate predictions of the changing received power. To form a prediction of the fading power, the individual taps of the channel are here predicted and their squared

  5. MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    21 ME2132 - DDO NTP - The Way Ahead NTP Treatment of Particulates Inlet Outlet no plasma Outlet plasma 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Before After (no plasma) After (plasma) After (plasma) After...

  6. Extraction en ondelettes des fluctuations turbulentes coherentes : application au plasma de bord du tokamak Tore-Supra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    École Normale Supérieure

    du tokamak Tore-Supra Wavelet-based extraction of turbulent coherent fluctuations : application to the Tore-Supra tokamak edge plasma Romain Nguyen van yen, Marie Farge LMD-CNRS-IPSL, ´Ecole Normale Sup Extraction), is applied to density signals measured in the edge plasma of Tore-Supra tokamak (CEA

  7. Plasma-based ion implantation and deposition: A review of physics,technology, and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelletier, Jacques; Anders, Andre

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    After pioneering work in the 1980s, plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) and plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBIID) can now be considered mature technologies for surface modification and thin film deposition. This review starts by looking at the historical development and recalling the basic ideas of PBII. Advantages and disadvantages are compared to conventional ion beam implantation and physical vapor deposition for PBII and PBIID, respectively, followed by a summary of the physics of sheath dynamics, plasma and pulse specifications, plasma diagnostics, and process modeling. The review moves on to technology considerations for plasma sources and process reactors. PBII surface modification and PBIID coatings are applied in a wide range of situations. They include the by-now traditional tribological applications of reducing wear and corrosion through the formation of hard, tough, smooth, low-friction and chemically inert phases and coatings, e.g. for engine components. PBII has become viable for the formation of shallow junctions and other applications in microelectronics. More recently, the rapidly growing field of biomaterial synthesis makes used of PBII&D to produce surgical implants, bio- and blood-compatible surfaces and coatings, etc. With limitations, also non-conducting materials such as plastic sheets can be treated. The major interest in PBII processing originates from its flexibility in ion energy (from a few eV up to about 100 keV), and the capability to efficiently treat, or deposit on, large areas, and (within limits) to process non-flat, three-dimensional workpieces, including forming and modifying metastable phases and nanostructures. We use the acronym PBII&D when referring to both implantation and deposition, while PBIID implies that deposition is part of the process.

  8. Application of Spatially Resolved High Resolution Crystal Spectrometry to ICF Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth W. Hill, et. al.

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution (?/?#3;? ~ 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of micrometers, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments using a 250-?m 55 Fe source, and by ray-tracing calculations. Throughput calculations agree with measurements, and predict detector counts in the range 10-8 -10-6 times source x-rays, depending on crystal reflectivity and spectrometer geometry. Results of the lab demonstrations, application of the technique to the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and predictions of performance on NIF will be presented.

  9. Multi-dipolar microwave plasmas and their application to negative ion production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Béchu, S.; Bès, A.; Lacoste, A. [LPSC, Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble INP, 53, Avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France)] [LPSC, Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble INP, 53, Avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France); Soum-Glaude, A. [LPSC, Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble INP, 53, Avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France) [LPSC, Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble INP, 53, Avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France); PROMES/CNRS, Tecnosud, Rambla de la Thermodynamique, F-66100 Perpignan (France); Svarnas, P. [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Rion (Greece)] [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Rion (Greece); Aleiferis, S. [LPSC, Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble INP, 53, Avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France) [LPSC, Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble INP, 53, Avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France); High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Rion (Greece); Ivanov, A. A. Jr.; Bacal, M. [UPMC, LPP, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, Université PARIS-SUD 11, UMR CNRS 7648 (France)] [UPMC, LPP, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, Université PARIS-SUD 11, UMR CNRS 7648 (France)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past decade multi-dipolar plasmas have been employed for various purposes such as surface treatments in biomedicine, physical and chemical vapour deposition for hydrogen storage, and applications in mechanical engineering. On the other hand, due to the design and operational mode of these plasma sources (i.e., strong permanent magnets for the electron cyclotron resonance coupling, low working pressure, and high electron density achieved) they are suitable for studying fundamental mechanisms involved in negative ion sources used in magnetically confined fusion and particle accelerators. Thus, this study presents an overview of fundamental results obtained with: (i) a single dipolar source, (ii) a network of seven dipolar plasma sources inserted into a magnetic multipolar chamber (Camembert III), and (iii) four dipolar sources housed in a smaller metallic cylinder (ROSAE III). Investigations with Langmuir probes of electron energy probability functions revealed the variation of the plasma properties versus the radial distance from the axis of a dipolar source in its mid plane and allowed the determination of the proportion between hot and cold electron populations in both chambers. These results are compared with the density of hydrogen negative ions, measured using the photodetachment technique. Electron energy probability functions obtained in these different configurations show the possibility of both hot and cold electron production. The former is a prerequisite for increasing the vibrational level of molecules and the dissociation degree and the latter for producing negative ions via dissociative attachment of the cold electrons or via surface production induced by H atoms.

  10. Application of spatially resolved high resolution crystal spectrometry to inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Pablant, N. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Beiersdorfer, P.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043-Grenoble Cedex (France); Zhang, L. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}{approx} 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of micrometers, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments using a 250-{mu}m {sup 55}Fe source, and by ray-tracing calculations. Throughput calculations agree with measurements, and predict detector counts in the range 10{sup -8}-10{sup -6} times source x-rays, depending on crystal reflectivity and spectrometer geometry. Results of the lab demonstrations, application of the technique to the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and predictions of performance on NIF will be presented.

  11. The polyphase resonant converter modulator for pulse power and plasma applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reass, W. A. (William A.); Baca, D. M. (David M.); Doss, James D.; Gribble, R. (Robert F.); North, W. R.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new technique to generate high voltage pulses (100 kV and up) with high peak power (10 MW and up) and high average power (1 MW and up) from a low voltage input source (e.g. +/- 1.2 kV). This technology is presently being used to provide cathode pulse modulation for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator klystron RF amplifiers, which operate to 140 kV 11 MW peak power and 1.1 MW average power. The design of the modulator, referred to as the Polyphase Resonant Converter-Modulator takes advantage of high-power component advances, in response to the needs of the traction motor industry (in particular, railroad locomotives), such as Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBT's) and self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene capacitors. In addition, the use of amorphous nanocrystalline transformer core alloy permits high frequency voltage and current transformation with low loss and small size. Other unique concepts embodied in the converter-modulator topology are polyphase resonant voltage multiplication and resonant rectification. These techniques further reduce size and improve electrical efficiency. Because of the resonant conversion techniques, electronic 'crowbars' and other load protective networks are not required. A shorted load detunes the circuit resonance and little power transfer can occur. This yields a high-power, high-voltage system that is inherently self-protective. To provide regulated output voltages, Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) of the individual IGBT pulses is used. A Digital signal Processor (DSP) is used to control the IGBT's, with adaptive feed forward and feedback control algorithms that improve pulse fidelity. The converter-modulator has many attributes that make it attractive to various pulse power and plasma applications such as high power RF sources, neutral beam modulators, and various plasma applications. This paper will review the design as used for the SNS accelerator and speculate on related plasma applications.

  12. Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation with Solid Targets for Space and Aerospace Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, R. M.; Goncalves, J. A. N.; Ueda, M.; Silva, G. [National Institute for Space Research, PO Box 515, ZIP 12227-010 Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Baba, K. [Industrial Technology Center of Nagasaki, 2-1303-8, Ikeda, Omura Nagasaki 856-0026 (Japan)

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes successful results obtained by a new type of plasma source, named as Vaporization of Solid Targets (VAST), for treatment of materials for space and aerospace applications, by means of plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII and D). Here, the solid element is vaporized in a high pressure glow discharge, being further ionized and implanted/deposited in a low pressure cycle, with the aid of an extra electrode. First experiments in VAST were run using lithium as the solid target. Samples of silicon and aluminum alloy (2024) were immersed into highly ionized lithium plasma, whose density was measured by a double Langmuir probe. Measurements performed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed clear modification of the cross-sectioned treated silicon samples. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed that lithium was implanted/deposited into/onto the surface of the silicon. Implantation depth profiles may vary according to the condition of operation of VAST. One direct application of this treatment concerns the protection against radiation damage for silicon solar cells. For the case of the aluminum alloy, X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the appearance of prominent new peaks. Surface modification of A12024 by lithium implantation/deposition can lower the coefficient of friction and improve the resistance to fatigue of this alloy. Recently, cadmium was vaporized and ionized in VAST. The main benefit of this element is associated with the improvement of corrosion resistance of metallic substrates. Besides lithium and cadmium, VAST allows to performing PIII and D with other species, leading to the modification of the near-surface of materials for distinct purposes, including applications in the space and aerospace areas.

  13. Dust-acoustic shock waves in a charge varying electronegative magnetized dusty plasma with nonthermal ions: Application to Halley Comet plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Bacha, Mustapha [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B. P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)] [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B. P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Weak dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) are addressed in a nonthermal charge varying electronegative magnetized dusty plasmas with application to the Halley Comet. A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive a Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equation. The positive ion nonthermality, the obliqueness, and magnitude of the magnetic field are found to modify the dispersive and dissipative properties of the DA shock structure. Our results may aid to explain and interpret the nonlinear oscillations that may occur in the Halley Comet Plasma.

  14. applications plasma rate-coefficients: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel b Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College in plasmas have been developed, where the motion...

  15. CRYOGENIC 1.5-4.5 GHz ULTRA LOW NOISE AMPLIFIER Niklas Wadefalk*, Anders Mellberg, Iltcho Angelov, Emmanuil Choumas**, Erik Kollberg,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CRYOGENIC 1.5-4.5 GHz ULTRA LOW NOISE AMPLIFIER Niklas Wadefalk*, Anders Mellberg, Iltcho Angelov amplifiers with ultra-low noise and very low DC power dissipation. Amplifiers with ultra- low noise and low.5-4.5 GHz ULTRA LOW NOISE AMPLIFIER Niklas Wadefalk, Anders Mellberg, Iltcho Angelov, Emmanuil Choumas, Erik

  16. The PERC{trademark} process: Existing and potential applications for induction coupled plasma technology in hazardous and radioactive waste treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blutke, A.S.; Vavruska, J.S.; Serino, J.F. [Plasma Technology, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma Technology, Inc. (PTI), a Santa Fe, New Mexico corporation has developed the Plasma Energy Recycle and Conversion (PERC){trademark} treatment process as a safe and environmentally clean alternative to conventional thermal destruction technologies. The PERC{trademark} treatment process uses as its heat source an advanced Induction Coupled Plasma (ICP) torch connected to a reaction chamber system with an additional emission control system. For example, organic-based gas, liquid, slurry, and/or solid waste streams can be converted into usable or even salable products while residual emissions are reduced to an absolute minimum. In applications for treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste streams, the PERC system could be used for destruction of the hazardous organic constituents and/or significant waste volume reduction while capturing the radioactive fraction in a non-leachable form. Like Direct Current (DC) and Alternating Current (AC) arc plasma systems, ICP torches offer sufficient energy to decompose, melt and/or vitrify any waste stream. The decision for an arc plasma or an IC plasma system has to be made on a case by case evaluation and is highly dependent on the specific waste stream`s form and composition. Induction coupled plasma technology offers one simple, but significant difference compared to DC or AC arc plasma systems: the ICP torch is electrodeless. To date, enormous research effort has been spent to improve the lifetime of electrodes and the effectiveness of related cooling systems. Arc plasma systems are established in research laboratories worldwide and are approaching a broad use in commercial applications. ICP technology has been improved relatively recently, but nowadays offers complete new and beneficial approaches in the field of waste conversion and treatment.

  17. Extraction of a steady state electron beam from HCD plasmas for EBIS applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.; Prelec, K.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments to extract high brightness electron beams from hollow cathode discharge plasmas are now in progress. A unique feature of these plasmas, which in principle can facilitate the extraction of large current low emittance electron beams, is the existence of a relatively high energy electron population with a very narrow energy spread. This electron population was identified in a self-extraction experiment, which yielded a 35 eV, 600 mA electron beam with parallel energy spread of less than 0.5 eV. Application of a very modest extraction voltage yielded a steady state extracted electron beam current of 6.5 A of which 5.7 had a preacceleration parallel energy spread of no more than 0.25 eV. The end result of this endeavor would be an electron beam current to 6 A even though, preliminary results strongly suggest that much larger electron beam currents can be produced. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Relaxation of a two-species magnetofluid and application to finite-flowing plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    -field pinch RFP and spheromak plasmas. However, it has had less success pre- dicting tokamak behavior and does

  19. electric Probe Applications Laboratory, Hanyang University DiPS (Diversified Plasma Simulator)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    plasma source is also installed for the space propulsion study with magnetic expansion on Edge Plasma & Surface Interactions in S-S Magnetic Fusion May 20-22, 2007 National Institute of Fusion with magnetic field, collisionality, various particle sources, and wide range of plasma parameters, two

  20. Automated fungal DNA sequence comparison Dylan Glotzer `11, Anders Ohman `10, Darcy Young '11 Faculty Sponsor: David Hibbett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbett, David S.

    Automated fungal DNA sequence comparison Dylan Glotzer `11¹, Anders Ohman `10¹, Darcy Young '11 sequences were downloaded from the NCBI's GenBank, which is a database of publicly available DNA sequences. These sequences were categorized as "environmental" or "specimen-based" submissions based on a number of keywords

  1. Rapid Holocene Deglaciation of the Labrador Sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet ANDERS E. CARLSON* AND PETER U. CLARK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Bay 8.4 cal ka BP (Barber et al. 1999), which caused the LIS to fragment into three ice caps that wereRapid Holocene Deglaciation of the Labrador Sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet ANDERS E. CARLSON, in final form 31 January 2007) ABSTRACT Retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) following the Last

  2. Rapid Holocene Deglaciation of the Labrador Sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet ANDERS E. CARLSON* AND PETER U. CLARK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), which caused the LIS to fragment into three ice caps that were rem- nants of the three originallyRapid Holocene Deglaciation of the Labrador Sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet ANDERS E. CARLSON, in final form 31 January 2007) ABSTRACT Retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) following the Last

  3. Laser diagnostic experiments on KrF laser ablation plasma-plume dynamics relevant to manufacturing applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilgenbach, R.M.; Ching, C.H.; Lash, J.S.; Lindley, R.A. (Intense Energy Beam Interaction Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2104 (United States))

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review is given of the potential applications of laser ablation in the automotive and electronics manufacturing industries. Experiments are presented on KrF laser ablation of three materials relevant to manufacturing applications: aluminum metal vs aluminum--nitride (AlN) and alumina (Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) ceramics. Plasma and neutral-atom diagnostic data are presented from resonant-holographic-interferometry, dye-laser-resonance-absorption photography, and HeNe laser deflection. Data show that plasma electron densities in excess of 10[sup 18] cm[sup [minus]3] exist in the ablation of AlN, with lower densities in Al and Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Aluminum neutral and ion expansion velocities are in the range of cm/[mu]s. Ambipolar electric fields are estimated to be 5--50 V/cm.

  4. MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the combustion chamber Catalytic Subsequent Exhaust gas treatment SCR Non-Thermal Plasma AEA Technology Exhaust gas treatment outside the combustion chamber MEASURES Engine...

  5. Experimental studies of lithium-based surface chemistry for fusion plasma-facing materials applications q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    - ments of plasma-surface interactions in tokamaks such as NSTX. Results suggest that the lithium bondingExperimental studies of lithium-based surface chemistry for fusion plasma-facing materials.65.y a b s t r a c t Lithium has enhanced the operational performance of fusion devices such as: TFTR

  6. Applications of HUGIN to Diagnosis and Control of Autonomous Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applications of HUGIN to Diagnosis and Control of Autonomous Vehicles Anders L. Madsen1 and Uffe B of HUGIN to solve problems related to diag- nosis and control of autonomous vehicles. The application of diagnosis and con- trol of autonomous vehicles. Based on the HUGIN tool, limited memory influence diagrams

  7. Kinetic Modeling of Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Complex Oxide Films and its Application to Predictive Feature Profile Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchack, Nathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    model for Si etching by fluorocarbon plasmas." Journal Ofwith inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas." Journal ofwith inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas." Journal of

  8. MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    catalyst being analysed l Retest catalyst sample from trials l Engine noise reduced by plasma system l Electrical load is independent of frequency and engine mode Slide serial no...

  9. A plasma window for transmission of particle beams and radiation from vacuum to atmosphere for various applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York11973 (United States)] [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York11973 (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many industrial and scientific processes like ion material modification, electron beam melting, and welding, as well as generation of synchrotron radiation are performed exclusively in vacuum nowadays, since electron guns, ion guns, their extractors, and accelerators must be kept at a reasonably high vacuum. Consequently, there are numerous limitations, among which are low production rates due to required pumping time, limits on the size of target objects, and degradation of particle beams and radiation through foils or differentially pumped sections. A novel apparatus, which utilized a short plasma arc, was successfully used to provide a vacuum-atmosphere interface as an alternative to differential pumping. Successful transmission of charged particle beams from a vacuum through the plasma to atmosphere was accomplished. Included in the article are a theoretical framework, experimental results, and possible applications for this novel interface. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Extraction of a steady state electron beam from HCD (hollow cathode discharge) plasmas for EBIS (electron beam ion source) applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.; Prelec, K.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments to extract high brightness electron beams from hollow cathode discharge plasmas are now in progress. A unique feature of these plasmas, which in principle can facilitate the extraction of large current low emittance electron beams, is the existence of a relatively high energy electron population with a very narrow energy spread. This electron population was identified in a self-extraction experiment, which yielded a 35 eV, 600 mA electron beam with parallel energy spread of less than 0.5 eV. Preliminary, crude application of 2.5 kV extraction voltage yielded a steady state electron beam current of 1.2 A. The end result of this endeavor would be an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) with an electron beam current of 6 A. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Thermionic energy conversion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasor, N.S. (Rasor Associates, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the history, application options, and ideal basic performance of the thermionic energy converter are outlined. The basic plasma types associated with various modes of converter operation are described, with emphasis on identification and semi-quantitative characterization of the dominant physical processes and utility of each plasma type. The frontier plasma science issues in thermionic converter applications are briefly summarized.

  12. Plasma Processing of Large Surfaces with Application to SRF Cavity Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhyay, Janardan; Popovic, Svetozar; Vuskovic, Leposova; Im, Do; Valente, Anne-Marie; Phillips, H.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma based surface modifications of SRF cavities present promising alternatives to the wet etching technology currently applied. To understand and characterize the plasma properties and chemical kinetics of plasma etching processes inside a single cell cavity, we have built a specially-designed cylindrical cavity with 8 observation ports. These ports can be used for holding niobium samples and diagnostic purposes simultaneously. Two frequencies (13.56 MHz and 2.45 GHz) of power source are used for different pressure, power and gas compositions. The plasma parameters were evaluated by a Langmuir probe and by an optical emission spectroscopy technique based on the relative intensity of two Ar 5p-4s lines at 419.8 and 420.07 nm. Argon 5p-4s transition is chosen to determine electron temperature in order to optimize parameters for plasma processing. Chemical kinetics of the process was observed using real-time mass spectroscopy. The effect of these parameters on niobium surface would be measured, presented at this conference, and used as guidelines for optimal design of SRF etching process.

  13. RF Plasma Cathode-Neutralizer for Space Applications IEPC-2007-266

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is closed mainly by ion current to the cathode chamber surface. In contrast to thermionic plasma cathodes stainless steel chamber 75 mm ID and 100 mm length having two openings on the top and the bottom, the starting filament cathode and Langmuir probes were fixed at the top part of the chamber. The 30th

  14. Plasma fluorination of carbon-based materials for imprint and molding lithographic applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    to a fluorocarbon-based plasma, yielding an ultrathin layer of a fluorocarbon material on the surface which has alkyl silane self-assembled monolayer7­10 SAM with fluorocarbon tails at the outer surface either by im fluorocarbon functional groups provide a low energy to the modified sur- face, with surface energies

  15. A field-reversed magnetic configuration and applications of high-temperature FRC plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryzhkov, S. V., E-mail: ryzhkov@power.bmstu.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As applied to a tokomak, a magnetic trap for confinement of a plasma with an inverted field or a magnetic field reversed configuration (FRC) is one of the most promising alternatives of the systems with high {beta}. A brief review of the latest data on FRC and potential directions of using such configurations in addition to energy generation in thermonuclear reactors (TNRs) is proposed.

  16. Surface oxidation of GaN(0001): Nitrogen plasma-assisted cleaning for ultrahigh vacuum applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangopadhyay, Subhashis [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, P.O. Box 330440, 28334 Bremen, Germany and Department of Physics, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, 333031 Rajasthan (India); Schmidt, Thomas, E-mail: tschmidt@ifp.uni-bremen.de; Kruse, Carsten; Figge, Stephan; Hommel, Detlef; Falta, Jens [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, P.O. Box 330440, 28334 Bremen (Germany)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cleaning of metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxial GaN(0001) template layers grown on sapphire has been investigated. Different procedures, performed under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, including degassing and exposure to active nitrogen from a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source have been compared. For this purpose, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy have been employed in order to assess chemical as well as structural and morphological surface properties. Initial degassing at 600?°C under ultrahigh vacuum conditions only partially eliminates the surface contaminants. In contrast to plasma assisted nitrogen cleaning at temperatures as low as 300?°C, active-nitrogen exposure at temperatures as high as 700?°C removes the majority of oxide species from the surface. However, extended high-temperature active-nitrogen cleaning leads to severe surface roughening. Optimum results regarding both the removal of surface oxides as well as the surface structural and morphological quality have been achieved for a combination of initial low-temperature plasma-assisted cleaning, followed by a rapid nitrogen plasma-assisted cleaning at high temperature.

  17. Optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen plasma jet for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Nicula, Cosmina [Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory (PERL), College of Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University-Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 (United States)] [Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory (PERL), College of Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University-Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 (United States)

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we have applied optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to investigate the characteristics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The discharge characteristics in the active and afterglow region of the plasma jet, that are critical for biomedical applications, have been investigated. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma discharge were analyzed and the average plasma power was measured to be around 18 W. The effect of addition of small fractions of oxygen at 0.1%-0.5% on the plasma jet characteristics was studied. The addition of oxygen resulted in a decrease in plasma plume length due to the electronegativity property of oxygen. Atomic and molecular lines of selected reactive plasma species that are considered to be useful to induce biochemical reactions such as OH transitions A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({nu}=0,1){yields}X{sup 2}{Pi}({Delta}{nu}=0) at 308 nm and A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({nu}=0,1){yields}X{sup 2}{Pi}({Delta}{nu}=1) at 287 nm, O I transitions 3p{sup 5}P{yields}3s{sup 5}S{sup 0} at 777.41 nm, and 3p{sup 3}P{yields}3s{sup 3}S{sup 0} at 844.6 nm, N{sub 2}(C-B) second positive system with electronic transition C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}{sup {yields}}B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub g}'' in the range of 300-450 nm and N{sub 2}{sup +}(B-X) first negative system with electronic transition B{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}{yields}X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}({Delta}{nu}=0) at 391.4 nm have been studied. The atomic emission lines of helium were identified, including the He I transitions 3p{sup 3}P{sup 0}{yields}2s{sup 3}S at 388.8 nm, 3p{sup 1}P{sup 0}{yields} 2s{sup 1}S at 501.6 nm, 3d{sup 3}D{yields}2p{sup 3}P{sup 0} at 587.6 nm, 3d{sup 1}D{yields}2p{sup 1}P{sup 0} at 667.8 nm, 3s{sup 3}S{sup 1}{yields}2p{sup 3}P{sup 0} at 706.5 nm, 3s{sup 1}S{sup 0}{yields}2p{sup 1}P{sup 0} at 728.1 nm, and H{sub {alpha}} transition 2p-3d at 656.3 nm. Using a spectral fitting method, the OH radicals at 306-312 nm, the rotational and vibrational temperatures equivalent to gas temperatures of the discharge was measured and the effective non-equilibrium nature of the plasma jet was demonstrated. Our results show that, in the entire active plasma region, the gas temperature remains at 310 {+-} 25 K and 340 {+-} 25 K and it increases to 320 {+-} 25 K and 360 {+-} 25 K in the afterglow region of the plasma jet for pure helium and helium/oxygen (0.1%) mixture, respectively. Additionally, the vibrational temperatures range from 2200 {+-} 100 K and 2500 {+-} 100 K for pure helium and helium/oxygen (0.1%) mixture, respectively. The plasma jet was tested on heat sensitive polymer films used in biomedical applications such as polyethylene terephthalate and poly-L-lactide samples continuously for several minutes without causing any physical or thermal damage to the films. The plasma jet produces significant reactive species of interest while the gas temperatures remain very low demonstrating its potential for a range of biomedical applications.

  18. Michigan Institute for Plasma Sci-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    This talk will focus on the achievements of the Drexel Plasma Institute in direct application of plasmasMichigan Institute for Plasma Sci- ence and Engi- neering Seminar Plasma Medicine: Mechanisms of Direct Non-Thermal Plasma Interaction with Living Tissue Prof. Alexander Fridman Drexel University

  19. Application of Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed Ferrite Layers for Particle Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caspers, F; Federmann, S; Taborelli, M; Schulz, C; Bobzin, K; Wu, J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A common problem in all kinds of cavity-like structures in particle accelerators is the occurrence of RF-resonances. Typically, ferrite plates attached to the walls of such structures as diagnostic devices, kickers or collimators, are used to dampen those undesired modes. However, the heat transfer rate from these plates to the walls is rather limited. Brazing ferrite plates to the walls is not possible in most cases due to the different thermal expansion coefficients. To overcome those limitations, atmospheric plasma spraying techniques have been investigated. Ferrite layers with a thickness from 50 ?m to about 300 ?m can be deposited on metallic surfaces like stainless steel exhibiting good thermal contact and still reasonable absorption properties. In this paper the technological aspects of plasma deposition are discussed and results of specifically developed RF loss measurement procedures for such thin magnetically lossy layers on metal are presented.

  20. Application of Non-Thermal Plasma Assisted Catalyst Technology for Diesel Engine Emission Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herling, Darrell R.; Smith, Monty R.; Baskaran, Suresh; Kupe, J.

    2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of a non-thermal plasma assisted catalyst system as applied to a small displacement diesel powered vehicle. In addition to effectively reducing NOx emissions, it has been found that a non-thermal plasma can also destroy a portion of the particulate matter (PM) that is emitted from diesel engines. Delphi Automotive Systems in conjunction with Pacific Northwest National Laboratories has been developing such an exhaust aftertreatment system to reduce emissions form diesel vehicles. The results of testing and system evaluation will be discussed in general, and the effectiveness on reducing oxides of nitrogen and particulate matter emissions from diesel vehicles. Published in Future Engines-SP1559, SAW, Warrendale, PA

  1. Application of soft X-ray lasers for probing high density plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R. [and others

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reliability and characteristics of collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers make them ideal for a wide variety of plasma diagnostics. These systems now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35 to 400 {Angstrom} and have output energies as high as 10 mJ in 150 ps pulses. The beam divergence of these lasers is less than 15 mrad and they have a typical linewidth of {Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 10{sup -4} making them the brightest xuv sources available. In this paper we will describe the use of x-ray lasers to probe high density plasmas using a variety of diagnostic techniques. Using an x-ray laser and a multilayer mirror imaging system we have studied hydrodynamic imprinting of laser speckle pattern on directly driven thin foils with 1-2 {mu}m spatial resolution. Taking advantage of recently developed multilayer beamsplitters we have constructed and used a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating at 155 {Angstrom} to probe 1-3 mm size laser produced plasmas with peak electron densities of 4 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. A comparison of our results with computer simulations will be presented.

  2. Radiation from Ag high energy density Z-pinch plasmas and applications to lasing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, M. E., E-mail: mweller@unr.edu; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Shrestha, I.; Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Petkov, E. E. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Apruzese, J. P.; Giuliani, J. L. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia 20375 (United States)] [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia 20375 (United States); Chuvatin, A. S. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)] [Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Silver (Ag) wire arrays were recently introduced as efficient x-ray radiators and have been shown to create L-shell plasmas that have the highest electron temperature (>1.8?keV) observed on the Zebra generator so far and upwards of 30?kJ of energy output. In this paper, results of single planar wire arrays and double planar wire arrays of Ag and mixed Ag and Al that were tested on the UNR Zebra generator are presented and compared. To further understand how L-shell Ag plasma evolves in time, a time-gated x-ray spectrometer was designed and fielded, which has a spectral range of approximately 3.5–5.0?Å. With this, L-shell Ag as well as cold L{sub ?} and L{sub ?} Ag lines was captured and analyzed along with photoconducting diode (PCD) signals (>0.8?keV). Along with PCD signals, other signals, such as filtered XRD (>0.2?keV) and Si-diodes (SiD) (>9?keV), are analyzed covering a broad range of energies from a few eV to greater than 53?keV. The observation and analysis of cold L{sub ?} and L{sub ?} lines show possible correlations with electron beams and SiD signals. Recently, an interesting issue regarding these Ag plasmas is whether lasing occurs in the Ne-like soft x-ray range, and if so, at what gains? To help answer this question, a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) kinetic model was utilized to calculate theoretical lasing gains. It is shown that the Ag L-shell plasma conditions produced on the Zebra generator at 1.7 maximum current may be adequate to produce gains as high as 6?cm{sup ?1} for various 3p???3s transitions. Other potential lasing transitions, including higher Rydberg states, are also included in detail. The overall importance of Ag wire arrays and plasmas is discussed.

  3. Gravity compensation in dusty-plasmas by application of a temperature gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, H; Morfill, G E; Thomas, H

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Micron sized particles can be suspended or even lifted up in gas by the thermophoretic effect. This has many applications in physics and technology.

  4. A planar-type surface-wave plasma source with a subwavelength diffraction grating inclusion for large-area plasma applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Zhaoquan; Liu Minghai; Tang Liang; Hu Peng; Hu Xiwei [College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, HuaZhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, HuBei 430074 (China)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic wave through the subwavelength diffraction grating can be largely absorbed by surface-wave plasmas (SWPs). A SWP source is built with two slot-array antennas element. Due to the dissipation of surface waves in overdense plasmas, this source can provide remarkable discharge efficiency of 4.4 cm{sup 2}/W experimentally and 96% of incident power numerically. When the applied power as low as 200 W is supplied to the SWP source, a homogeneous plasma with the uniform area up to 14x36 cm{sup 2} and the plasma density up to 1.04x10{sup 18} m{sup -3} is generated under the quartz slab. By varying the incident power and gas pressure, the parameter of plasmas can be easily controlled without density jumping. Moreover, the characters of bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution prove that our SWP source yield plasmas by surface heating actually. These excellent performances make the proposed source meet the requirements in large-area plasma processing and also give its advices for plasmas heating in next meter-size SWP sources.

  5. MICROCAVITYMICROCAVITY PLASMA SCIENCE AND RECENTPLASMA SCIENCE AND RECENT APPLICATIONS: BOUNDAPPLICATIONS: BOUND--FREE COUPLING, TRANSISTORFREE COUPLING, TRANSISTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    Electrode Glass6 mm 250 m LED Backlight Microcavity Lamp #12;OPERATION OF MICROCAVITY PLASMA DEVICES Plasma Surface Treatment High Intensity Plasma Arc Lamp Spark Gap Plasma Display (150 inch Panasonic ) Ozone generator Fluorescent Lamp Gas Laser #12;University of Illinois Laboratory for Optical Physics

  6. Application of linear response theory to magnetotransport properties of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J. R.; Redmer, R. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Reinholz, H. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johannes-Kepler-Universitaet Linz, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear response theory, as developed within the Zubarev formalism, is a quantum statistical approach for describing systems out of but close to equilibrium, which has been successfully applied to a wide variety of plasmas in an external electric field and/or containing a temperature gradient. We present here an extension of linear response theory to include the effects of an external magnetic field. General expressions for the complete set of relevant transport properties are given. In particular, the Hall effect and the influence of a magnetic field on the dc electrical conductivity are discussed. Low-density limits including electron-electron scattering are presented as well as results for arbitrary degeneracy.

  7. Approximate models for the study of exponential changed quantities: Application on the plasma waves growth rate or damping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xaplanteris, C. L., E-mail: cxaplanteris@yahoo.com [Plasma Physics Laboratory, IMS, NCSR “Demokritos”, Athens, Greece and Hellenic Army Academy, Vari Attica (Greece); Xaplanteris, L. C. [School of Physics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens (Greece)] [School of Physics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Leousis, D. P. [Technical High School of Athens, Athens (Greece)] [Technical High School of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many physical phenomena that concern the research these days are basically complicated because of being multi-parametric. Thus, their study and understanding meets with big if not unsolved obstacles. Such complicated and multi-parametric is the plasmatic state as well, where the plasma and the physical quantities that appear along with it have chaotic behavior. Many of those physical quantities change exponentially and at most times they are stabilized by presenting wavy behavior. Mostly in the transitive state rather than the steady state, the exponentially changing quantities (Growth, Damping etc) depend on each other in most cases. Thus, it is difficult to distinguish the cause from the result. The present paper attempts to help this difficult study and understanding by proposing mathematical exponential models that could relate with the study and understanding of the plasmatic wavy instability behavior. Such instabilities are already detected, understood and presented in previous publications of our laboratory. In other words, our new contribution is the study of the already known plasmatic quantities by using mathematical models (modeling and simulation). These methods are both useful and applicable in the chaotic theory. In addition, our ambition is to also conduct a list of models useful for the study of chaotic problems, such as those that appear into the plasma, starting with this paper's examples.

  8. Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nocente, M., E-mail: massimo.nocente@mib.infn.it; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milano (Italy); Fazzi, A.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pirovano, C. [Dipartimento di Energia, CeSNEF, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milano (Italy); Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Uboldi, C.; Varoli, V. [Dipartimento di Energia, CeSNEF, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr{sub 3} crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%–4% in the energy range E{sub ?} = 3–5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields.

  9. External proton beam analysis of plasma facing materials for magnetic confinement fusion applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, Harold Salvadore

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1.7MV tandem accelerator was reconstructed and refurbished for this thesis and for surface science applications at the Cambridge laboratory for accelerator study of surfaces (CLASS). At CLASS, an external proton beam ...

  10. Non-invasive in situ plasma monitoring of reactive gases using the floating harmonic method for inductively coupled plasma etching application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Texas 75080 (United States); Yoon, Y. S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The floating harmonic method was developed for in situ plasma diagnostics of allowing real time measurement of electron temperature (T{sub e}) and ion flux (J{sub ion}) without contamination of the probe from surface modification by reactive species. In this study, this novel non-invasive diagnostic system was studied to characterize inductively coupled plasma of reactive gases monitoring T{sub e} and J{sub ion} for investigating the optimum plasma etching conditions and controlling of the real-time plasma surface reaction in the range of 200-900 W source power, 10-100 W bias power, and 3-15 mTorr chamber pressure, respectively.

  11. BROADBAND ANTENNA MATCHING NETWORK DESIGN AND APPLICATION FOR RF PLASMA ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Ki [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Piller, Chip [ORNL; Fathy, Aly [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RF ion source at Spallation Neutron Source has been upgraded to meet higher beam power requirement. One important subsystem for efficient operation of the ion source is the 2MHz RF impedance matching network. The real part of the antenna impedance is very small and is affected by plasma density for 2MHz operating frequency. Previous impedance matching network for the antenna has limited tuning capability to cover this potential variation of the antenna impedance since it employed a single tuning element and an impedance transformer. A new matching network with two tunable capacitors has been built and tested. This network can allow precision matching and increase the tunable range without using a transformer. A 5-element broadband matching network also has been designed, built and tested. The 5-element network allows wide band matching up to 50 kHz bandwidth from the resonance center of 2 MHz. The design procedure, simulation and test results are presented.

  12. Theory of heating of hot magnetized plasma by Alfven waves. Application for solar corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. M. Mishonov; M. V. Stoev; Y. G. Maneva

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The heating of magnetized plasma by propagation of Alfven waves is calculated as a function of the magnetic field spectral density. The results can be applied to evaluate the heating power of the solar corona at known data from satellites' magnetometers. This heating rate can be incorporated in global models for heating of the solar corona and creation of the solar wind. The final formula for the heating power is illustrated with a model spectral density of the magnetic field obtained by analysis of the Voyager 1 mission results. The influence of high frequency dissipative modes is also taken into account and it is concluded that for evaluation of the total coronal heating it is necessary to know the spectral density of the fluctuating component of the magnetic field up to the frequency of electron-proton collisions.

  13. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan Joe Saetveit

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 {micro}g L{sup -1} or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 {micro}L injection in a physiological saline matrix.

  14. Application of plasma shield technology to the reduction, treatment, and disposal of hazardous organic and/or mixed wastes with actinide recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, B.T.; Vaughan, L.L.; Joyce, E.L. Jr.; Bieniewski, T.M.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos research activities are currently directed at the application of the shielded hydrogen plasma torch to the direct production of actinide metals from a UF{sub 6} feedstock. Two broad classes of thermal plasma reactors are currently in widespread use: the direct current (dc) arc jet system and the radio frequency (rf) inductively coupled system. Los Alamos has improved upon the basic rf plasma tube design using the concept of a transformer. The unique feature of the Los Alamos tube is a segmented, cooled, internal radiation shield. The Los Alamos shielded plasma torch routinely achieves temperatures exceeding 10,000 K and electron densities of 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 3} when operated continuously at one atmosphere of argon. These highly energetic conditions are sufficient to dissociate most chemical compounds into their constituent atoms. Based upon these characteristics, Los Alamos is currently investigating the application of the shielded plasma torch technology to the destruction of organic and mixed hazardous wastes, as well as the direct production of actinide metals from the halides and oxides, without the cogeneration of contaminated wastes. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Fabrication of Tungsten-Rhenium Cladding materials via Spark Plasma Sintering for Ultra High Temperature Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charit, Indrajit; Butt, Darryl; Frary, Megan; Carroll, Mark

    2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This research will develop an optimized, cost-effective method for producing high-purity tungsten-rhenium alloyed fuel clad forms that are crucial for the development of a very high-temperature nuclear reactor. The study will provide critical insight into the fundamental behavior (processing-microstructure- property correlations) of W-Re alloys made using this new fabrication process comprising high-energy ball milling (HEBM) and spark plasma sintering (SPS). A broader goal is to re-establish the U.S. lead in the research field of refractory alloys, such as W-Re systems, with potential applications in very high-temperature nuclear reactors. An essential long-term goal for nuclear power is to develop the capability of operating nuclear reactors at temperatures in excess of 1,000K. This capability has applications in space exploration and some special terrestrial uses where high temperatures are needed in certain chemical or reforming processes. Refractory alloys have been identified as being capable of withstanding temperatures in excess of 1,000K and are considered critical for the development of ultra hightemperature reactors. Tungsten alloys are known to possess extraordinary properties, such as excellent high-temperature capability, including the ability to resist leakage of fissile materials when used as a fuel clad. However, there are difficulties with the development of refractory alloys: 1) lack of basic experimental data on thermodynamics and mechanical and physical properties, and 2) challenges associated with processing these alloys.

  16. EBT2 Dosimetry of X-rays produced by the electron beam from PFMA-3, a Plasma Focus for medical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elisa Ceccolini; Federico Rocchi; Domiziano Mostacci; Marco Sumini; Agostino Tartari

    2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron beam emitted from the back of Plasma Focus devices is being studied as a radiation source for IORT (IntraOperative Radiation Therapy) applications. A Plasma Focus device is being developed to this aim, to be utilized as an X-ray source. The electron beam is driven to impinge on 50 {\\mu}m brass foil, where conversion X-rays are generated. Measurements with gafchromic film are performed to analyse the attenuation of the X-rays beam and to predict the dose given to the culture cell in radiobiological experiments to follow.

  17. EBT2 Dosimetry of X-rays produced by the electron beam from PFMA-3, a Plasma Focus for medical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceccolini, Elisa; Mostacci, Domiziano; Sumini, Marco; Tartari, Agostino

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron beam emitted from the back of Plasma Focus devices is being studied as a radiation source for IORT (IntraOperative Radiation Therapy) applications. A Plasma Focus device is being developed to this aim, to be utilized as an X-ray source. The electron beam is driven to impinge on 50 {\\mu}m brass foil, where conversion X-rays are generated. Measurements with gafchromic film are performed to analyse the attenuation of the X-rays beam and to predict the dose given to the culture cell in radiobiological experiments to follow.

  18. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  19. Dynamical evolution of the chiral magnetic effect: applications to the quark-gluon plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristina Manuel; Juan M. Torres-Rincon

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamical evolution of the so-called chiral magnetic effect in an electromagnetic conductor. To this end, we consider the coupled set of corresponding Maxwell and chiral anomaly equations, and we prove that these can be derived from chiral kinetic theory. After integrating the chiral anomaly equation over space in a closed volume, it leads to a quantum conservation law of the total helicity of the system. A change in the magnetic helicity density comes together with a modification of the chiral fermion density. We study in Fourier space the coupled set of anomalous equations and we obtain the dynamical evolution of the magnetic fields, magnetic helicity density, and chiral fermion imbalance. Depending on the initial conditions we observe how the helicity might be transferred from the fermions to the magnetic fields, or vice versa, and find that the rate of this transfer also depends on the scale of wavelengths of the gauge fields in consideration. We then focus our attention on the quark-gluon plasma phase, and analyze the dynamical evolution of the chiral magnetic effect in a very simple toy model. We conclude that an existing chiral fermion imbalance in peripheral heavy ion collisions would affect the magnetic field dynamics, and consequently, the charge dependent correlations measured in these experiments.

  20. Induced Current Characteristics Due to Laser Induced Plasma and Its Application to Laser Processing Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madjid, Syahrun Nur; Idris, Nasrullah [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh (Indonesia); Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40/80 Srengseng Raya, Jakarta 11630 (Indonesia); Kagawa, Kiichiro [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education and Regional Studies, University of Fukui, 9-1 Bunkyo 3-chome, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In laser processing, suitable conditions for laser and gas play important role in ensuring a high quality of processing. To determine suitable conditions, we employed the electromagnetic phenomena associated with laser plasma generation. An electrode circuit was utilised to detect induced current due to the fast electrons propelled from the material during laser material processing. The characteristics of induced current were examined by changing parameters such as supplied voltage, laser pulse energy, number of laser shots, and type of ambient gas. These characteristics were compared with the optical emission characteristics. It was shown that the induced current technique proposed in this study is much more sensitive than the optical method in monitoring laser processing, that is to determine the precise focusing condition, and to accurately determine the moment of completion of laser beam penetration. In this study it was also shown that the induced current technique induced by CW CO{sub 2} laser can be applied in industrial material processing for monitoring the penetration completion in a stainless steel plate drilling process.

  1. Frontier of the physics of dense plasmas and planetary interiors: experiments, theory, applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saumon, Didier [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fortney, Jonathan J [UC SANTA CRUZ; Glenzer, Siegfried H [LLNL; Koenig, Michel [LULI (FRANCE); Brambrink, E [LULI(FRANCE); Militzer, Burkhard [UC BERKELEY; Valencia, Diana [HARVARD U

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments of dynamic x-ray characterization experiments of dense matter are reviewed, with particular emphasis on conditions relevant to interiors of terrestrial and gas giant planets. These studies include characterization of compressed states of matter in light elements by x-ray scattering and imaging of shocked iron by radiography. Several applications of this work are examined. These include the structure of massive 'super-Earth' terrestrial planets around other stars, the 40 known extrasolar gas giants with measured masses and radii, and Jupiter itself, which serves as the benchmark for giant planets.

  2. Frontiers of the Physics of Dense Plasmas and Planetary Interiors: Experiment, Theory, Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortney, J J; Glenzer, S H; Koenig, M; Brambrink, E; Militzer, B; Saumon, D; Valencia, D

    2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent developments of dynamic x-ray characterization experiments of dense matter, with particular emphasis on conditions relevant to interiors of terrestrial and gas giant planets. These studies include characterization of compressed states of matter in light elements by x-ray scattering and imaging of shocked iron by radiography. We examine several applications of this work. These include the structure of massive 'Super Earth' terrestrial planets around other stars, the 40 known extrasolar gas giants with measured masses and radii, and Jupiter itself, which serves as our benchmark for giant planets. We are now in an era of dramatic improvement in our knowledge of the physics of materials at high density. For light elements, this theoretical and experimental work has many applications, including internal confinement fusion as well as the interiors of gas giant planets. For heavy elements, experiments on silicates and iron at high pressure are helping to better understand the Earth, as well as terrestrial planets as a class of objects. In particular, the discovery of rocky and gaseous planets in other planetary systems has opened our imaginations to planets not found in our own solar system. While the fields of experiments of matter at high densities, first principles calculations of equations of state (EOS), planetary science, and astronomy do progress independently of each other, it is important for there to be communication between fields. For instance, in the realm of planets, physicists can learn of key problems that exist in the area of planetary structure, and how advances in our understanding of input physics could shed new light in this area. Astronomers and planetary scientists can learn where breakthroughs in physics of materials under extreme conditions are occurring, and be ready to apply these findings within their fields.

  3. Application of wavelet multiresolution analysis to the study of self-similarity and intermittency of plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Zhang, W. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiresolution property of wavelet analysis makes it a powerful tool in describing turbulent signals. Plasma turbulence similar to its fluid turbulence counterpart shows a degree of self-similarity, intermittency, and multifractal. The multiresolution analysis technique based on a biorthogonal wavelet was applied to the Langmuir probe data to study the self-similarity and the intermittency of plasma fluctuations. The data were collected in the plasma edge region of the HT-7 superconducting tokamak. It is found that plasma turbulence is composed of multiscale eddies; these eddies are similar in structure between different scales; the coexistence of multiscale eddies results in the self-similarity in plasma fluctuations. Large-scale turbulence eddies intermittently burst out; the superposition of these large-scale eddies with those small ones is found responsible for the intermittency behavior. Success of utilizing wavelet multiresolution analysis in the HT-7 tokamak suggests it is a promising technique in the understanding of the turbulence structures.

  4. Glow Discharge Characteristics of Non-thermal Microplasmas at above Atmospheric Pressures and their Applications in Microscale Plasma Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wakim, Dani Ghassan

    2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A microscale plasma transistor capable of high speed switching was manufactured using microfabrication techniques and operated using microplasma discharges. Such a device has feature sizes on the order of 25 ?m, is robust against spikes in power...

  5. Kinetic Modeling of Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Complex Oxide Films and its Application to Predictive Feature Profile Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchack, Nathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    calculations, it was predicted that at typical plasma reactorof calculation. The etch rate of HfO 2 in this reactor at -calculation to be valid, it must also be assumed that at the operating conditions of the ICP reactor,

  6. Phys780: Basic Plasma Physics 1 PHYS 780. Basic Plasma Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phys780: Basic Plasma Physics 1 PHYS 780. Basic Plasma Physics Course objective The course objective is to introduce students to basic concepts of plasma physics and magneto-hydrodynamics with applications to solar-terrestrial physics. The course topics include: plasma classification, basic plasma prop

  7. Controlled zone microwave plasma system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for initiating a process gas plasma. A conductive plate having a plurality of conductive fingers is positioned in a microwave applicator. An arc forms between the conductive fingers to initiate the formation of a plasma. A transport mechanism may convey process materials through the plasma. A spray port may be provided to expel processed materials.

  8. The interaction of two nonplanar solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas: An application in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EL-Labany, S. K.; Khedr, D. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, Damietta El-Gedida 34517 (Egypt); El-Shamy, E. F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, Damietta El-Gedida 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Sabry, R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, Damietta El-Gedida 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Salman bin Abdulaziz University, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present research paper, the effect of bounded nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) geometry on the interaction between two nonplanar electrostatic solitary waves (NESWs) in electron-positron-ion plasmas has been studied. The extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method is used to obtain nonplanar phase shifts after the interaction of the two NESWs. This study is a first attempt to investigate nonplanar phase shifts and trajectories for NESWs in a two-fluid plasma (a pair-plasma) consisting of electrons and positrons, as well as immobile background positive ions in nonplanar geometry. The change of phase shifts and trajectories for NESWs due to the effect of cylindrical geometry, spherical geometry, the physical processes (either isothermal or adiabatic), and the positions of two NESWs are discussed. The present investigation may be beneficial to understand the interaction between two NESWs that may occur in active galactic nuclei.

  9. Magnetoacoustic solitons in quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division (TPPD), PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics (DPAM), PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear magnetoacoustic waves in collisionless homogenous, magnetized quantum plasma is studied. Two fluid quantum magneto-hydrodynamic model (QMHD) is employed and reductive perturbation method is used to derive Korteweg de Vries (KdV) equation for magnetoacoustic waves. The effects of plasma density and magnetic field intensity are investigated on magnetoacoustic solitary structures in quantum plasma. The numerical results are also presented, which are applicable to explain some aspects of the propagation of nonlinear magnetoacosutic wave in dense astrophysical plasma situations.

  10. Publications Anders Lindquist Publications by Anders Lindquist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindquist, Anders

    . Automatic Control 58 (November 2013), to appear. 4. ARMA identification of graphical models (with E. Avventi and B. Wahlberg), IEEE Trans. Automatic Control 58 (May 2013), 1167­1178. 5. The separation principle in stochastic control, redux (with T.T. Georgiou), IEEE Trans. Automatic Control 58 (October 2013), to appear. 6

  11. Streaked spectrometry using multilayer x-ray-interference mirrors to investigate energy transport in laser-plasma applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stradling, G.L.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Henke, B.L.; Campbell, E.M.; Mead, W.C.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport of energy in laser-produced plasmas is scrutinized by devising spectrally and temporally identifiable characteristics in the x-ray emission history which identify the heat-front position at various times in the heating process. Measurements of the relative turn-on times of these characteristics show the rate of energy transport between various points. These measurements can in turn constrain models of energy transport phenomena. We are time-resolving spectrally distinguishable subkilovolt x-ray emissions from different layers of a disk target to examine the transport rate of energy into the target. A similar technique is used to measure the lateral expansion rate of the plasma spot. A soft x-ray streak camera with 15-psec temporal resolution is used to make the temporal measurements. Spectral discrimination of the incident signal is provided by multilayer x-ray interference mirrors.

  12. On description of quantum plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Vladimirov; Yu. O. Tyshetskiy

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma becomes quantum when the quantum nature of its particles significantly affects its macroscopic properties. To answer the question of when the collective quantum plasma effects are important, a proper description of such effects is necessary. We consider here the most common methods of description of quantum plasma, along with the related assumptions and applicability limits. In particular, we analyze in detail the hydrodynamic description of quantum plasma, as well as discuss some kinetic features of analytic properties of linear dielectric response function in quantum plasma. We point out the most important, in our view, fundamental problems occurring already in the linear approximation and requiring further investigation. (submitted to Physics-Uspekhi)

  13. 0.2 Hz Plasma-Focus-based source of fast neutrons and hard x rays for applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, C.; Raspa, V.; Di Lorenzo, F.; Lazarte, A.; Knoblauch, P. [Laboratorio Plasma Focus - Instituto de Fisica del Plasma - Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN - Universidad de Buenos Aires - PLADEMA (Argentina); Clausse, A. [PLADEMA - UNICEN - CNEA (Argentina)

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A small chamber Plasma Focus that operates at 0.2 Hz for several minutes is used as a source of hard x rays and fast neutrons. The device is powered by a microprocessor controlled capacitor charging power supply. The x rays are used for introspective imaging of metallic pieces, static and in motion, that allows for the detection of internal defects as small as 1 mm. The x ray radiation is able to produce clear images of objects placed behind several millimeters of iron and steel. The fast neutrons allow for the detection of hydrogenated substances and can discriminate between different concentrations of water located near the device.

  14. Finite Volume schemes on unstructured grids for non-local models: Application to the simulation of heat transport in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goudon, Thierry, E-mail: thierry.goudon@inria.fr [Team COFFEE, INRIA Sophia Antipolis Mediterranee (France) [Team COFFEE, INRIA Sophia Antipolis Mediterranee (France); Labo. J.A. Dieudonne CNRS and Univ. Nice-Sophia Antipolis (UMR 7351), Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 02 (France); Parisot, Martin, E-mail: martin.parisot@gmail.com [Project-Team SIMPAF, INRIA Lille Nord Europe, Park Plazza, 40 avenue Halley, F-59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq cedex (France)] [Project-Team SIMPAF, INRIA Lille Nord Europe, Park Plazza, 40 avenue Halley, F-59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq cedex (France)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the so-called Spitzer-Haerm regime, equations of plasma physics reduce to a nonlinear parabolic equation for the electronic temperature. Coming back to the derivation of this limiting equation through hydrodynamic regime arguments, one is led to construct a hierarchy of models where the heat fluxes are defined through a non-local relation which can be reinterpreted as well by introducing coupled diffusion equations. We address the question of designing numerical methods to simulate these equations. The basic requirement for the scheme is to be asymptotically consistent with the Spitzer-Haerm regime. Furthermore, the constraints of physically realistic simulations make the use of unstructured meshes unavoidable. We develop a Finite Volume scheme, based on Vertex-Based discretization, which reaches these objectives. We discuss on numerical grounds the efficiency of the method, and the ability of the generalized models in capturing relevant phenomena missed by the asymptotic problem.

  15. Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 4 MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 3...

  16. Coulomb scattering in plasma revised

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Gordienko; D. V. Fisher; J. Meyer-ter-Vehn

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A closed expression for the momentum evolution of a test particle in weakly-coupled plasma is derived, starting from quantum many particle theory. The particle scatters from charge fluctuations in the plasma rather than in a sequence of independent binary collisions. Contrary to general belief, Bohr's (rather than Bethe's) Coulomb logarithm is the relevant one in most plasma applications. A power-law tail in the distribution function is confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation.

  17. Parallel Object Oriented Implementation of a 2D Bounded Electrostatic Plasma PIC Simulation \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bystroff, Chris

    energy is an important application area of plasma physics research, but more familiar examples include

  18. ISRAELI PLASMA SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND APPLICATIONS H.I.T. ­ Holon Institute of Technology February 4th, 2013 BOOK OF ABSTRACTS http://plasma-gate.weizmann.ac.il/ipsta2013/ #12;15th Israeli Conference on Plasma Science and Applications, HIT, Holon, February 4th , 2013 2 Science and Applications, HIT, Holon, February 4th , 2013 3 PREFACE We are delighted to host the 15th

  19. Mathematical modeling and simulation in applications for safety and security in society,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    Communication Services Using Modelica David Broman, Peter Fritzson Anders Mattson Civil Security Solutions, SAAB

  20. Development of a Multiscale Ionized Gas (MIG) Flow Code for Plasma Applications Subrata Roy Datta V. Gaitonde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    Enterprises for developing high-power in-space electric propulsion systems; to the Air Force of Office Engineering Aeronautical Sciences Division Kettering University Air Vehicles Directorate Flint, Michigan 48504 applications including space propulsion thrusters and high-speed air vehicles. These are of considerable

  1. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    capacity needs and improve the consistency between the Council's GENESYS model. This logic will also permit

  2. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relevance: The development and tracking of HLIs for the Council's Power Plan would permit both the Council SIGNIFICANCE: The development and tracking of HLIs for the Council's Power Plan would permit both the Council

  3. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -frame) staff is considering the use of the AURORAxmp model, with 80 hydroelectric generation shapes (based into the Council's TRAP hourly hydroelectric model and its GENESYS model. Typically, the hydroelectric system has

  4. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " of the hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River or its tributaries; and to do so "while assuring the region, and opportunities presented by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River

  5. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Columbia River, Welch reported. Hydro system mitigation efforts may be ineffective if differential survival processes is important because hydro system operations can then be distinguished from poor ocean. There's a very small difference compared to what was expected, replied Welch. Ocean impacts are very

  6. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Updated Resource Needs Assessment Draft Resource and Action Plan Public Comment Q3 Q4 Q2 2015 Draft PlanForecast ModelModel EBaseline Energy Efficiency ResourceEnergy Efficiency Resource Potential AssessmentGenerating Resource Potential AssessmentAssessment Supply Side Resource Cost & Availability gygy efficiencyefficiency

  7. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Exports Wholesale Electricity Market Prices These These inputsinputs Wholesale Electricity Market Prices Including Market Price Caps on Wholesale Electricity Market Prices Annual Limits on Retrofit Conservation

  8. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    established by air quality regulators. There are four steps in the methodology (1) quantifying changes in wood emissions, (2) conducting dispersion modeling to quantify the resulting changes in pollutants, (3) quantifying the health effects from changes in pollutant levels, and (4) monetizing those health effects

  9. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . See Northwest Power Act, Sections 2(3) and 4(g). Among many other pieces of information, people Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Supplemental Statement June 2014 In September 2013, the Ninth Circuit remanded the Sixth Power Plan to the Council for the "limited purpose" of "reconsidering

  10. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 2014 MEMORANDUM TO: Fish and Wildlife Committee Members FROM: Laura Robinson, Program Implementation Summary: Council staff will brief the Fish and Wildlife Committee on the plan to pursue the program's first phase for a feasibility study for anadromous fish reintroduction above Chief Joseph and Grand

  11. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Fish and Wildlife Division Director John Shurts, General Counsel Laura Robinson, Program Implementation and Liaison Specialist SUBJECT: Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program amendment process 1. General approach to development of draft Program and draft schedule (page 2) 2. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife

  12. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3, 2014 MEMORANDUM TO: Council Members FROM: Council Staff SUBJECT: Fish and Wildlife Program , 2014 draft fish and wildlife program. Attached are staff proposed revisions to the draft. The staff and September 10th Council meetings with the goal of adopting and amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife

  13. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    90re (F) 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 age Regional Temperatur 2013 Average Daily Temperaure N l A D il T t 0

  14. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Forecast cost changes · Forecast consumer adoption rates under business as usual assumptions · Incorporate over 40 percent since 2009. Staff's initial estimate of the levelized cost of solar PV energy is $200 and PV costs. This forecast will address energy and peak impacts of solar PV. Consumer-side solar PV

  15. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from Salish Kootenai College will give a presentation on flowering rush. This aquatic invasive plant Power Planning Council, Missoula, MT June 11, 2014 #12;#12;· Fully Submerged Form · Emergent Form: Category A; Limited distribution and eradication Oregon: Category A; High threat, not known to exist Idaho

  16. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forecasts Natural gas, coal, oil Transmission, Integration Costs Reference Plant Key Attributes (1) Configuration ­ Technology, number of units, air emission controls, cooling (wet vs. dry), specifications Price&M · Construction Schedule GENESYS 5 · Levelized Cost of Energy · Levelized Fixed Cost (annual basis) Fuel Price

  17. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owned Utilities Popoff Phillip Puget Sound Energy Pope Maria Portland General Electric Hines John Gamponia Villamor Puget Sound Energy Brown Stefan Portland General Electric Bushnell John Northwestern meeting in Seattle. Under that charter, the Council chair will appoint the co-chairs for both the steering

  18. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is utilizing its network of experts by providing accurate and unbiased energy information and analysis by Governor Otter in 2007 to emphasize the importance of energy Administrator is a Cabinet level position & 9 Boardman to Hemmingway Transmission Line Project BLM has delayed the Administrative Draft

  19. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a performance period of March 1, 2014 to February 28, 2015. 1 The first project budget was established in FY for Fiscal Year 20081 through 2017. The Fiscal Year 2014 expense budget for the project is $229,182 and has, deliverable 1 only through completion and not beyond FY2017 (Analysis of Fall Walleye Index Netting Bycatch

  20. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    linked directly to this presentation. 1 The first project budget was establish in FY 2013. #12;LR Burbot for Fiscal Year 20081 through 2017. The Fiscal Year 2014 expense budget for the project is $229,182 and has a performance period of March 1, 2014 to February 28, 2015. Workplan: There are no 2014 division workplan tasks

  1. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is "Learning from Our Past to Shape Our Future. 1. Discussion of Draft Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Director, NEEA, presentation. Jim West, chair of the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) board at 1:35 pm on May 6th and adjourned it at 12:02 pm on May 7th . All members were present, except Jim

  2. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    business sensitive information 2 Lower Flathead River Before Kerr Dam Significant sight from cultural

  3. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    submitting study requests to WECC for the 2014 transmission case, Yost stated. We have also asked staff

  4. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and talked about submitting study requests to WECC for the 2014 transmission case, Yost stated. We have also

  5. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    16, 2014 MEMORANDUM TO: Interested Parties FROM: Council Staff SUBJECT: Council's Regional Hydropower hydropower scoping study. The Council selected a proposal by the Northwest Hydroelectric Association (NWHA potential for new hydropower development and for upgrades to existing units, and the costs associated

  6. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calculator 1) Fixed Levelized Cost $/kWyr 2) Full LCOE $/MWh (with energy production and variable costs, annualized payment (like a mortgage payment) ­ Levelized Cost. When divided by annual energy production

  7. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    adequate stock coverage to satisfy specific monitoring needs (under both the FCRPS BiOp and Fish as informing NOAA Sec. 10 take-permits. Workplan: Both the 2008 NOAA Fisheries FCRPS Biological Opinion

  8. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reduce wood heating. In 2013, the RTF developed energy savings estimates for converting residential zonal electric heating systems to ductless heat pumps. These savings estimates were based on an analysis that installed ductless heat pumps. The analysis demonstrated energy (electricity and supplemental fuels) savings

  9. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to lead to increases in power sector carbon emissions and that energy efficiency, new renewable generation's transmission plans, an update on what has been going on in the region with respect to generating resources and the Northwest Energy Coalition (NWEC) sent to the Council February 4 that says the spill test does not have

  10. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the 2014 amended fish and wildlife program PROPOSED ACTION: Council decision to adopt the proposed final fish and wildlife program SIGNIFICANCE: The Northwest Power Act calls for the Council to amend its Fish years. The Council called for recommendations to amend its Fish and Wildlife Program in March 2013. Over

  11. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    30, 2014 MEMORANDUM TO: Council Members FROM: Council Staff SUBJECT: Fish and Wildlife Program Council meeting with the goal of adopting an amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program at the October 10th Council meeting. Relevance: Amending the fish and wildlife program is called

  12. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 2014 MEMORANDUM TO: Fish and Wildlife Committee members FROM: Jim Ruff ­ Manager ­ Mainstem Passage and Wildlife Program. Specifically, the presentation will examine historic patterns in daily streamflow records of indirect links to the Program. For example, in the Data Management section of Part Four-Adaptive Management

  13. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forecast conditions, the CO2 emissions from regional power generation can be expected to decline as coal mix6. Generation resource mix 7. CO2 emission 8. Influence of natural gas prices 2 #12;10/28/2014 2 4 prices has been completed for use in the Draft Plan. Council staff uses the electric market model

  14. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? Financial Assumptions, Including Sponsor Profiles, and Treatment of State and Federal Tax Incentives;Council's Analytical Process Flow 2 Load Forecast Model Regional Portfolio Model Generating Resource Potential Assessment Energy Efficiency "Supply Curves" Load Forecast Range (without ef

  15. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /kg 11 Hourly Load profile of one indoor producer Producers do not have a flat profile 12 #12;9/3/2014 7 3, 2014 MEMORANDUM TO: Power Committee FROM: Massoud Jourabchi SUBJECT: Electrical load impacts load to the regional system. Relevance: Producing a long-term Load forecast is a requirement of the Act

  16. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an update on the region's Smart Grid pilot project, he continued. It will be 18 months before there is data Tagging Forum's 17 recommendations. Staff outlined a scenario for implementation and proposed a timeline support and adoption of both the Regional Technical Forum's proposed 2014 work plan and budget. Henry

  17. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to facilitate de-listing and to increase population abundance to levels that could support sport and tribal

  18. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission from 1975- 1978 as a rates analyst and the Federal Reserve Bank Communications, Inland Power & Light. Below are the panelists' bios. Attached are letters and comments River and Legislative Communications representative of Inland Power and Light, has been with the cooperative since 2003

  19. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Utilities BPA * Source: US National Science Foundation 2012 data #12;Technology Innovation&D portfolio as well as the process for managing research at BPA. He will also share his perspective may provide future resources and capabilities for the Council as well as others in the region

  20. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    group to define a methodology for addressing construction and inundation losses in the settlement experienced a slowdown due to technical issues that have been corrected, Lorenzen said, adding that a revision

  1. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    include technical testing and evaluation of operational loss models and methodologies, or other and inundation losses or strategies that will allow parties to reach long-term settlement agreements. Once on operational losses will create a need for employment of new methods and technologies. 3. Objectives and Scope

  2. Planar controlled zone microwave plasma system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxvlle, TN)

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for initiating a process gas plasma. A conductive plate having a plurality of conductive fingers is positioned in a microwave applicator. An arc forms between the conductive fingers to initiate the formation of a plasma. A transport mechanism may convey process materials through the plasma. A spray port may be provided to expel processed materials.

  3. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsai, C.C.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Berry, L.A.

    1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm[sup 2]. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity. 3 figures.

  4. Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsai, Chin-Chi (Oak Ridge, TN); Gorbatkin, Steven M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Berry, Lee A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm.sup.2. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity.

  5. PLASMA DYNAMICS AND PLASMA WALL INTERACTION 130 Problems of Atomic Science and Technology. 2006, 6. Series: Plasma Physics (12), p. 130-134

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    PLASMA DYNAMICS AND PLASMA WALL INTERACTION 130 Problems of Atomic Science and Technology. 2006, 6. Series: Plasma Physics (12), p. 130-134 SIMULATION OF HIGH POWER DEPOSITION ON TARGET MATERIALS: APPLICATIONS IN MAGNETIC, INERTIAL FUSION, AND HIGH POWER PLASMA LITHOGRAPHY DEVICES Ahmed Hassanein Argonne

  6. Plasma accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhehui (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, Cris W. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  7. Nonequilibrium lighting plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dakin, J.T. (GE Lighting, Nela Park, Cleveland, OH (US))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the science of a variety of devices employing nonequilibrium lighting plasmas is reviewed. The devices include the fluorescent lamp, the low-pressure sodium lamp, the neon sign, ultraviolet lamps, glow indicators, and a variety of devices used by spectroscopists, such as the hollow cathode light source. The plasma conditions in representative commercial devices are described. Recent research on the electron gas, the role of heavy particles, spatial and temporal inhomogeneities, and new electrodeless excitation schemes is reviewed. Areas of future activity are expected to be in new applications of high-frequency electronics to commercial devices, new laser-based diagnostics of plasma conditions, and more sophisticated models requiring more reliable and extensive rate coefficient data.

  8. Inductively coupled plasma spectrometry: Noise characteristics of aerosols, application of generalized standard additions method, and Mach disk as an emission source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Luan

    1995-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is focused on three problem areas in the performance of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The noise characteristics of aerosols produced by ICP nebulizers are investigated. A laser beam is scattered by aerosol and detected by a photomultiplier tube and the noise amplitude spectrum of the scattered radiation is measured by a spectrum analyzer. Discrete frequency noise in the aerosol generated by a Meinhard nebulizer or a direct injection nebulizer is primarily caused by pulsation in the liquid flow from the pump. A Scott-type spray chamber suppresses white noise, while a conical, straight-pass spray chamber enhances white noise, relative to the noise seen from the primary aerosol. Simultaneous correction for both spectral interferences and matrix effects in ICP atomic emission spectrometry (AES) can be accomplished by using the generalized standard additions method (GSAM). Results obtained with the application of the GSAM to the Perkin-Elmer Optima 3000 ICP atomic emission spectrometer are presented. The echelle-based polychromator with segmented-array charge-coupled device detectors enables the direct, visual examination of the overlapping lines Cd (1) 228.802 nm and As (1) 228.812 nm. The slit translation capability allows a large number of data points to be sampled, therefore, the advantage of noise averaging is gained. An ICP is extracted into a small quartz vacuum chamber through a sampling orifice in a water-cooled copper plate. Optical emission from the Mach disk region is measured with a new type of echelle spectrometer equipped with two segmented-array charge-coupled-device detectors, with an effort to improve the detection limits for simultaneous multielement analysis by ICP-AES.

  9. Study of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films and the application to p-channel thin film transistor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nominanda, Helinda

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The material and process characteristics of boron doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique (PECVD) have been studied. The goal is to apply the high quality films...

  10. Plasma Simulation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical impediment to successful operation of machines like ITER. If disruptions prove unable to be avoided, their associated dynamics and effects will be addressed in the next phase of the FSP.

  11. Dissipation in intercluster plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Lyutikov

    2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss dissipative processes in strongly gyrotropic, nearly collisionless plasma in clusters of galaxies (ICM). First, we point out that Braginsky theory, which assumes that collisions are more frequent that the system's dynamical time scale, is inapplicable to fast, sub-viscous ICM motion. Most importantly, the electron contribution to collisional magneto-viscosity dominates over that of ions for short-scale Alfvenic motions. Thus, if a turbulent cascade develops in the ICM and propagates down to scales $\\leq 1$ kpc, it is damped collisionally not on ions, but on electrons. Second, in high beta plasma of ICM, small variations of the magnetic field strength, of relative value $\\sim 1/\\beta$, lead to development of anisotropic pressure instabilities (firehose, mirror and cyclotron). Unstable wave modes may provide additional resonant scattering of particles, effectively keeping the plasma in a state of marginal stability. We show that in this case the dissipation rate of a laminar, subsonic, incompressible flows scales as inverse of plasma beta parameter. We discuss application to the problem of ICM heating.

  12. Plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas S.; Folser, George R.

    2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer is provided. The interlayer has particular application in connection with a solid oxide fuel cell used within a power generation system. The fuel cell advantageously comprises an air electrode, a plasma sprayed interlayer disposed on at least a portion of the air electrode, a plasma sprayed electrolyte disposed on at least a portion of the interlayer, and a fuel electrode applied on at least a portion of the electrolyte.

  13. Current drive in recombining plasma P. F. Schmit and N. J. Fisch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -variation on wave-particle processes in the plasma. Time variation in nei- ther the application of rf power nor

  14. Diagnostics for Burning Plasma Physics Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quality of data as in best present-day devices. · High quality, reliable information on many plasma parameters will have to provide control signals. · New information about the alpha-particles. · The neutron RESOLUTION ACCURACY Plasma current 0.1 ­ 17.5 MA Not applicable 1 ms 1% (Ip>1 MA) Total neutron flux 1x1014

  15. Laser Assisted Plasma Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.

    1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effecter to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (< 1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  16. atmospheric cold plasma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by more than an order of magnitude, which opens up a new regime for ultracold plasma research and cold ion-beam applications with readily available experimental techniques....

  17. Thermal Plasma Systems for Industrial Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fey, M. G.; Meyer, T. N.; Reed, W. H.; Philbrook, W. O.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    furnaces, extending from below 2000 F to almost any conceivably useful processing temperature, with efficiencies much higher than can be achieved with combustion heating equipment. Numerous applications for plasma systems exist in the chemical...

  18. Solar Physics & Space Plasma Research Center (SP2RC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Physics & Space Plasma Research Center (SP2RC) University of SheffieldSTFC SSP Intro Summer Plasma Research Center (SP2RC) http://robertus.staff.shef.ac.ukUniversity of SheffieldSTFC SSP Intro]solitons, applications) ·Conclusions #12;Solar Physics & Space Plasma Research Center (SP2RC) http

  19. Time resolved ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy of pulsed fluorocarbon plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleason, Karen K.

    Time resolved ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy of pulsed fluorocarbon plasmas Brett A. Cruden.1063/1.1334936 I. INTRODUCTION The study of fluorocarbon plasmas is of great interest for their applications in silicon dioxide etching.1,2 Recently, at- tention has been paid to using fluorocarbon plasmas to pro- duce

  20. Low-energy x-ray and electron physics and applications to diagnostics development for laser-produced plasma research. Final report, April 30, 1980-April 29, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henke, B.L.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes a collaborative extension of an ongoing research program in low-energy x-ray and electron physics into particular areas of immediate need for the diagnostics of plasmas as involved in laser-produced fusion research. It has been for the continued support for one year of a post-doctoral research associate and for three student research assistants who have been applied to the following specific efforts: (1) the continuation of our research on the absolute characterization of x-ray photocathode systems for the 0.1 to 10 keV photon energy region. The research results were applied collaboratively to the design, construction and calibration of photocathodes for time-resolved detection with the XRD and the streak and framing cameras; (2) the design, construction and absolute calibration of optimized, bolt-on spectrographs for the absolute measurement of laser-produced plasma spectra.

  1. FOCUSING AND NEUTRALIZATION OF INTENSE BEAMS Simon S. Yu, Andre Anders, F.M. Bieniosek, Shmuel Eylon, Enrique Henestroza, Prabir Roy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    sizes on the target. Effective plasma neutralization of intense ion beams through the target chamber HIF chamber with thick liquid walls has an equilibrium vapor of a millitorr. Heavy ion impact to the chamber. [3] The plasma plug provides a reservoir from which electrons are dragged along as the ion beam

  2. Oscillatory nonohomic current drive for maintaining a plasma current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisch, N.J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and methods are described for maintaining a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

  3. On interaction of large dust grains with fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Smirnov, R. D. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    So far the models used to study dust grain-plasma interactions in fusion plasmas neglect the effects of dust material vapor, which is always present around dust in rather hot and dense edge plasma environment in fusion devices. However, when the vapor density and/or the amount of ionized vapor atoms become large enough, they can alter the grain-plasma interactions. Somewhat similar processes occur during pellet injection in fusion plasma. In this brief communication the applicability limits of the models ignoring vapor effects in grain-plasma interactions are obtained.

  4. Nonlinear Plasma Waves Excitation by Intense Ion Beams in Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma neutralization of an intense ion pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, cosmic ray propagation, etc. An analytical electron fluid model has been developed to describe the plasma response to a propagating ion beam. The model predicts very good charge neutralization during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration {tau}{sub b} is much longer than the electron plasma period 2{pi}/{omega}{sub p}, where {omega}{sub p} = (4{pi}e{sup 2}n{sub p}/m){sup 1/2} is the electron plasma frequency and n{sub p} is the background plasma density. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. If the beam density is larger than the background plasma density, the plasma waves break. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of calculations utilizing a particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The cold electron fluid results agree well with the PIC simulations for ion beam propagation through a background plasma. The reduced fluid description derived in this paper can provide an important benchmark for numerical codes and yield scaling relations for different beam and plasma parameters. The visualization of numerical simulation data shows complex collective phenomena during beam entry and exit from the plasma.

  5. A Space-Charge-Neutralizing Plasma for Beam Drift Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, P.K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    beam drift compression P. K. Roy , P. A. Seidl , A. Anders ,45, 131 (2005). [3] P. K. Roy et al. , NIMA 544, 225 (the PAC05, p.4006. [10] P. K. Roy et al. , PRL, 95, (2005),

  6. US-Japan workshop Q-181 on high heat flux components and plasma-surface interactions for next devices: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrath, R.T. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [ed.; Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yamashina, T. [ed.] [Hokkadio Univ. (Japan)] [ed.; Hokkadio Univ. (Japan)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contain viewgraphs of papers from the following sessions: plasma facing components issues for future machines; recent PMI results from several tokamaks; high heat flux technology; plasma facing components design and applications; plasma facing component materials and irradiation damage; boundary layer plasma; plasma disruptions; conditioning and tritium; and erosion/redeposition.

  7. Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38 (1996) A213-A225. Printed in the UK4 Plasma

  8. Particle transport in plasma reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rader, D.J.; Geller, A.S.; Choi, Seung J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kushner, M.J. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEMATECH and the Department of Energy have established a Contamination Free Manufacturing Research Center (CFMRC) located at Sandia National Laboratories. One of the programs underway at the CFMRC is directed towards defect reduction in semiconductor process reactors by the application of computational modeling. The goal is to use fluid, thermal, plasma, and particle transport models to identify process conditions and tool designs that reduce the deposition rate of particles on wafers. The program is directed toward defect reduction in specific manufacturing tools, although some model development is undertaken when needed. The need to produce quantifiable improvements in tool defect performance requires the close cooperation among Sandia, universities, SEMATECH, SEMATECH member companies, and equipment manufacturers. Currently, both plasma (e.g., etch, PECVD) and nonplasma tools (e.g., LPCVD, rinse tanks) are being worked on under this program. In this paper the authors summarize their recent efforts to reduce particle deposition on wafers during plasma-based semiconductor manufacturing.

  9. Plasma Panel Based Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a gaseous micropattern radiation detector under current development. It has many operational and fabrication principles common to plasma display panels (PDPs). It comprises a dense matrix of small, gas plasma discharge cells within a hermetically sealed panel. As in PDPs, it uses non-reactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials such as glass substrates, refractory metal electrodes, and mostly inert gas mixtures. We are developing these devices primarily as thin, low-mass detectors with gas gaps from a few hundred microns to a few millimeters. The PPS is a high gain, inherently digital device with the potential for fast response times, fine position resolution (< 50 m RMS) and low cost. In this paper we report here on prototype PPS experimental results in detecting betas, protons and cosmic muons, and we extrapolate on the PPS potential for applications including detection of alphas, heavy-ions at low to medium energy, thermal neutrons and X-rays.

  10. Organization by Gordon Research Conferences of the 2012 Plasma Processing Science Conference 22-27 July 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jane Chang

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Plasma Processing Science will feature a comprehensive program that will highlight the most cutting edge scientific advances in plasma science and technology as well as explore the applications of this nonequilibrium medium in possible approaches relative to many grand societal challenges. Fundamental science sessions will focus on plasma kinetics and chemistry, plasma surface interactions, and recent trends in plasma generation and multi-phase plasmas. Application sessions will explore the impact of plasma technology in renewable energy, the production of fuels from renewable feedstocks and carbon dioxide neutral solar fuels (from carbon dioxide and water), and plasma-enabled medicine and sterilization.

  11. Microscopic Motion of Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Components In A Diverted Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaworski, M A; Morley, N B; Abrams, T; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Kugel, H; Majeski, R

    2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid metal plasma facing components (PFCs) have been identified as an alternative material for fusion plasma experiments. The use of a liquid conductor where significant magnetic fields are present is considered risky, with the possibility of macroscopic fluid motion and possible ejection into the plasma core. Analysis is carried out on thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic (TEMHD) forces caused by temperature gradients in the liquid-container system itself in addition to scrape-off-layer currents interacting with the PFC from a diverted plasma. Capillary effects at the liquid-container interface will be examined which govern droplet ejection criteria. Stability of the interface is determined using linear stability methods. In addition to application to liquidmetal PFCs, thin film liquidmetal effects have application to current and future devices where off-normal events may liquefy portions of the first wall and other plasma facing components.

  12. Plasma-based EUV light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shumlak, Uri (Seattle, WA); Golingo, Raymond (Seattle, WA); Nelson, Brian A. (Mountlake Terrace, WA)

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Various mechanisms are provided relating to plasma-based light source that may be used for lithography as well as other applications. For example, a device is disclosed for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light based on a sheared plasma flow. The device can produce a plasma pinch that can last several orders of magnitude longer than what is typically sustained in a Z-pinch, thus enabling the device to provide more power output than what has been hitherto predicted in theory or attained in practice. Such power output may be used in a lithography system for manufacturing integrated circuits, enabling the use of EUV wavelengths on the order of about 13.5 nm. Lastly, the process of manufacturing such a plasma pinch is discussed, where the process includes providing a sheared flow of plasma in order to stabilize it for long periods of time.

  13. Anomalous radial transport in tokamak edge plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodi, Vasudeva Raghavendra Kowsik

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport in tokamak plasma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Numerical simulations of tokamak plasma . . . . . . . . .of blobs in tokamak edge plasmas . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  14. Plasma PhysicsPlasma Physics Atoms Beams and PlasmasAtoms Beams and Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    of plasma research and understanding their dynamics is cutting edge topic in physics Small instabilities

  15. Tailored ion energy distributions on plasma electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Economou, Demetre J. [Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4004 (United States)] [Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4004 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As microelectronic device features continue to shrink approaching atomic dimensions, control of the ion energy distribution on the substrate during plasma etching and deposition becomes increasingly critical. The ion energy should be high enough to drive ion-assisted etching, but not too high to cause substrate damage or loss of selectivity. In many cases, a nearly monoenergetic ion energy distribution (IED) is desired to achieve highly selective etching. In this work, the author briefly reviews: (1) the fundamentals of development of the ion energy distribution in the sheath and (2) methods to control the IED on plasma electrodes. Such methods include the application of “tailored” voltage waveforms on an electrode in continuous wave plasmas, or the application of synchronous bias on a “boundary electrode” during a specified time window in the afterglow of pulsed plasmas.

  16. Plasma sweeper. [Patents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Motley, R.W.; Glanz, J.

    1982-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is described for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from RF power introducing means to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the RF power introducing means. Means are described for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

  17. Rapid plasma cleaning as a waste minimization tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, P.P.; Buss, R.J.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although plasma cleaning is a recognized substitute for solvent cleaning in removing organic contaminants, current cleaning rates are impractically low for many applications. A set of experiments is described which demonstrate that the rate of plasma removal of organic contaminants can be greatly increased by modification of the plasma chemistry. A comparison of plasma cleaning rates of argon, oxygen and oxygen/sulfur hexafluoride gases shows that the fluorine containing plasma is at least an order of magnitude faster at etching organics. Rates are reported for the removal of polymer films and of A-9 Aluminum cutting fluid. 7 refs.

  18. Controlling charge and current neutralization of an ion beam pulse in a background plasma by application of a solenoidal magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    . This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields about 100 G . Analytical formulas are derived,8 magnetic fusion based on field reversed configura- tions fueled by energetic ion beams,9 the physics by application of a solenoidal magnetic field: Weak magnetic field limit I. D. Kaganovich, E. A. Startsev, A. B

  19. CHAPTER 7. BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS BY NON-PLASMA BASED METHODS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekechukwu, A

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The most common method of analysis for beryllium is inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). This method, along with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), is discussed in Chapter 6. However, other methods exist and have been used for different applications. These methods include spectroscopic, chromatographic, colorimetric, and electrochemical. This chapter provides an overview of beryllium analysis methods other than plasma spectrometry (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry or mass spectrometry). The basic methods, detection limits and interferences are described. Specific applications from the literature are also presented.

  20. Laser Plasma Material Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaaf, Peter; Carpene, Ettore [Universitaet Goettingen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface treatment by means of pulsed laser beams in reactive atmospheres is an attractive technique to enhance the surface features, such as corrosion and wear resistance or the hardness. Many carbides and nitrides play an important role for technological applications, requiring the mentioned property improvements. Here we present a new promising fast, flexible and clean technique for a direct laser synthesis of carbide and nitride surface films by short pulsed laser irradiation in reactive atmospheres (e.g. methane, nitrogen). The corresponding material is treated by short intense laser pulses involving plasma formation just above the irradiated surface. Gas-Plasma-Surface reactions lead to a fast incorporation of the gas species into the material and subsequently the desired coating formation if the treatment parameters are chosen properly. A number of laser types have been used for that (Excimer Laser, Nd:YAG, Ti:sapphire, Free Electron Laser) and a number of different nitride and carbide films have been successfully produced. The mechanisms and some examples will be presented for Fe treated in nitrogen and Si irradiated in methane.

  1. Cold atmospheric plasma in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alex; Volotskova, Olga [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)] [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States); Ann Stepp, Mary [Medical School, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)] [Medical School, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States); Srinivasan, Priya; Sandler, Anthony [Childrens National Medical Center, Washington DC 20010 (United States)] [Childrens National Medical Center, Washington DC 20010 (United States); Trink, Barry [Head and Neck Cancer Research Division, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)] [Head and Neck Cancer Research Division, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas has led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. This paper outlines recent progress in understanding of cold plasma physics as well as application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) in cancer therapy. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were developed recently in a quest to understand physics of CAP. It was established that the streamer head charge is about 10{sup 8} electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 10{sup 7} V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies of CAP action on cancer were performed. It was shown that the cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in-vitro without damaging normal cells and significantly reduces tumor size in-vivo. Studies indicate that the mechanism of action of cold plasma on cancer cells is related to generation of reactive oxygen species with possible induction of the apoptosis pathway. It is also shown that the cancer cells are more susceptible to the effects of CAP because a greater percentage of cells are in the S phase of the cell cycle.

  2. Thermoelectric and Thermomagnetic Effects in Dilute Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Garcia-Colin; A. L. Garcia-Perciante; A. Sandoval-Villalbazo

    2006-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    When an electrically charged system is subjected to the action of an electromagnetic field, it responds by generating an electrical current. In the case of a multicomponent plasma other effects, the so called cross effects, influence the flow of charge as well as the heat flow. In this paper we discuss these effects and their corresponding transport coefficients in a fully ionized plasma using Boltzmann's equation. Applications to non-confined plasmas, specially to those prevailing in astrophysical systems are highlighted. Also, a detailed comparison is given with other available results.

  3. Control of focusing forces and emittances in plasma-based accelerators using near-hollow plasma channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A near-hollow plasma channel, where the plasma density in the channel is much less than the plasma density in the walls, is proposed to provide independent control over the focusing and accelerating forces in a plasma accelerator. In this geometry the low density in the channel contributes to the focusing forces, while the accelerating fields are determined by the high density in the channel walls. The channel also provides guiding for intense laser pulses used for wakefield excitation. Both electron and positron beams can be accelerated in a nearly symmetric fashion. Near-hollow plasma channels can effectively mitigate emittance growth due to Coulomb scattering for high energy physics applications.

  4. The effect of PECVD plasma decomposition on the wettability and dielectric constant changes in silicon modified DLC films for potential MEMS and low stiction applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogwu, A. A. [Thin Film Centre, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley Campus, High Street, Paisley PA1 2BE, Scotland (United Kingdom); Okpalugo, T. I. T. [Thin Film Centre, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley Campus, High Street, Paisley PA1 2BE, Scotland (United Kingdom); Nanotechnology Institute, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McLaughlin, J. A. D. [Nanotechnology Institute, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out investigations aimed at understanding the mechanism responsible for a water contact angle increase of up to ten degrees and a decrease in dielectric constant in silicon modified hydrogenated amorphous carbon films compared to unmodified hydrogenated amorphous carbon films. Our investigations based on surface chemical constituent analysis using Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), SIMS, FTIR, contact angle / surface energy measurements and spectroscopic ellipsometry suggests the presence of hydrophobic chemical entities on the surface of the films. This observation is consistent with earlier theoretical plasma chemistry predictions and observed Raman peak shifts in the films. These surface hydrophobic entities also have a lower polarizability than the bonds in the un-modified films thereby reducing the dielectric constant of the silicon modified films measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Ellipsometric dielectric constant measurement is directly related to the surface energy through Hamaker's constant. Our current finding is expected to be of benefit to understanding stiction, friction and lubrication in areas that range from nano-tribology to microfluidics.

  5. The Absence of Plasma in "Spark Plasma Sintering"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulbert, Dustin M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    investigations on the spark plasma sintering/synthesisinvestigations on the spark plasma sintering/synthesisenhancement in spark-plasma sintering: Impact of high

  6. How to model quantum plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Manfredi

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional plasma physics has mainly focused on regimes characterized by high temperatures and low densities, for which quantum-mechanical effects have virtually no impact. However, recent technological advances (particularly on miniaturized semiconductor devices and nanoscale objects) have made it possible to envisage practical applications of plasma physics where the quantum nature of the particles plays a crucial role. Here, I shall review different approaches to the modeling of quantum effects in electrostatic collisionless plasmas. The full kinetic model is provided by the Wigner equation, which is the quantum analog of the Vlasov equation. The Wigner formalism is particularly attractive, as it recasts quantum mechanics in the familiar classical phase space, although this comes at the cost of dealing with negative distribution functions. Equivalently, the Wigner model can be expressed in terms of $N$ one-particle Schr{\\"o}dinger equations, coupled by Poisson's equation: this is the Hartree formalism, which is related to the `multi-stream' approach of classical plasma physics. In order to reduce the complexity of the above approaches, it is possible to develop a quantum fluid model by taking velocity-space moments of the Wigner equation. Finally, certain regimes at large excitation energies can be described by semiclassical kinetic models (Vlasov-Poisson), provided that the initial ground-state equilibrium is treated quantum-mechanically. The above models are validated and compared both in the linear and nonlinear regimes.

  7. Tailoring the air plasma with a double laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-5263 (United States); Zheltikov, A. M. [Physics Department, International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4242 (United States)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comprehensive model of plasma dynamics that enables a detailed understanding of the ways the air plasma induced in the atmosphere in the wake of a laser-induced filament can be controlled by an additional laser pulse. Our model self-consistently integrates plasma-kinetic, Navier-Stokes, electron heat conduction, and electron-vibration energy transfer equations, serving to reveal laser-plasma interaction regimes where the plasma lifetime can be substantially increased through an efficient control over plasma temperature, as well as suppression of attachment and recombination processes. The model is used to quantify the limitations on the length of uniform laser-filament heating due to the self-defocusing of laser radiation by the radial profile of electron density. The envisaged applications include sustaining plasma guides for long-distance transmission of microwaves, standoff detection of impurities and potentially hazardous agents, as well as lightning control and protection.

  8. Radiofrequency plasma antenna generated by femtosecond laser filaments in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brelet, Y.; Houard, A.; Point, G.; Prade, B.; Carbonnel, J.; Andre, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA ParisTech, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Arantchouk, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France); Pellet, M. [Etat-major de la Marine Nationale, Paris (France)

    2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate tunable radiofrequency emission from a meter-long linear plasma column produced in air at atmospheric pressure. A short-lived plasma column is initially produced by femtosecond filamentation and subsequently converted into a long-lived discharge column by application of an external high voltage field. Radiofrequency excitation is fed to the plasma by induction and detected remotely as electromagnetic radiation by a classical antenna.

  9. oxygen-plasma | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oxygen-plasma oxygen-plasma Leads No leads are available at this time. Conversion of 1,2-Propylene Glycol on Rutile TiO2(110). Abstract: We have studied the reactions of...

  10. A plasma process monitor/control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, J.O.; Ward, P.P.; Smith, M.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Markle, R.J. [Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a system to monitor plasma processes for control of industrial applications. The system is designed to act as a fully automated, sand-alone process monitor during printed wiring board and semiconductor production runs. The monitor routinely performs data collection, analysis, process identification, and error detection/correction without the need for human intervention. The monitor can also be used in research mode to allow process engineers to gather additional information about plasma processes. The plasma monitor can perform real-time control of support systems known to influence plasma behavior. The monitor can also signal personnel to modify plasma parameters when the system is operating outside of desired specifications and requires human assistance. A notification protocol can be selected for conditions detected in the plasma process. The Plasma Process Monitor/Control System consists of a computer running software developed by Sandia National Laboratories, a commercially available spectrophotometer equipped with a charge-coupled device camera, an input/output device, and a fiber optic cable.

  11. Professor (Open Rank) Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yi

    Professor (Open Rank) Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign The Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering-qualified candidates with background in areas related to reactor power engineering and other nuclear applications

  12. Advances in Magnetized Plasma Propulsion and Radiation Shielding Robert Winglee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, Simon

    Advances in Magnetized Plasma Propulsion and Radiation Shielding Robert Winglee Department of Earth Propulsion (M2P2)3,4 . In this scheme a magnetic field attached to the spacecraft is expanded-mangetosphere, that is magnetic field inflated by the injection of plasma have several applications key to the exploration

  13. 2810 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 39, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2011 The Effect of Critical Plasma Densities of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    -produced plasma (LPP) for various applications should consider details of spatial and temporal input power de in hydro- dynamic evolution of the produced plasma sources. Index Terms--CO2 laser, critical density and optimization of radiation sources for the next generation of nanolithography, i.e., the extreme ultravi- olet

  14. Plasmas in Multiphase Media: Bubble Enhanced Discharges in Liquids and Plasma/Liquid Phase Boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kushner, Mark Jay [University of Michigan] [University of Michigan

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this research project, the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with multi-phase media was computationally investigated. Multi-phase media includes liquids, particles, complex materials and porous surfaces. Although this investigation addressed fundamental plasma transport and chemical processes, the outcomes directly and beneficially affected applications including biotechnology, medicine and environmental remediation (e.g., water purification). During this project, we made advances in our understanding of the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas in the form of dielectric barrier discharges and plasma jets with organic materials and liquids. We also made advances in our ability to use computer modeling to represent these complex processes. We determined the method that atmospheric pressure plasmas flow along solid and liquid surfaces, and through endoscopic like tubes, deliver optical and high energy ion activation energy to organic and liquid surfaces, and produce reactivity in thin liquid layers, as might cover a wound. We determined the mechanisms whereby plasmas can deliver activation energy to the inside of liquids by sustaining plasmas in bubbles. These findings are important to the advancement of new technology areas such as plasma medicine

  15. NSTX Weekly Report (December 17, 2010) FY 2011 NSTX plasma operations started on October 4, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    . This symposium will include sessions for: 1. Lithium effects on edge and core plasma properties in magnetic confinement devices; 2. Laboratory experiments on plasma-lithium interactions; 3. Technologies for handling and 839 plasma shots The 2nd International Symposium on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices

  16. Magnetohydrodynamics of Plasmas Author: Daniel Groselj

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    for controlled thermonuclear1 fusion is [1] 2 1D + 3 1T 4 2He + n. (1) The total energy output2 (17.5 Me use-cases of MHD is the application to fusion plasmas, where the model can be used to accurately thermonuclear reactors. One of the most fundamental challenges of this field of reasearch is the study

  17. Inductively generated streaming plasma ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.; Greenly, John B.

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel pulsed, neutralized ion beam source is provided. The source uses pulsed inductive breakdown of neutral gas, and magnetic acceleration and control of the resulting plasma, to form a beam. The beam supplies ions for applications requiring excellent control of ion species, low remittance, high current density, and spatial uniformity.

  18. Plasma emission spectroscopy method of tumor therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, K.J.

    1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for performing photon diagnostics using a portable and durable apparatus which incorporates the use of a remote sensing probe in fiberoptic communication with an interferometer or spectrometer. Also disclosed are applications for the apparatus including optically measuring high velocities and analyzing plasma/emission spectral characteristics. 6 figs.

  19. Strongly Coupled Plasmas via Rydberg-Blockade of Cold Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bannasch, G; Pohl, T

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and analyze a new scheme to produce ultracold neutral plasmas deep in the strongly coupled regime. The method exploits the interaction blockade between cold atoms excited to high-lying Rydberg states and therefore does not require substantial extensions of current ultracold plasma experiments. Extensive simulations reveal a universal behavior of the resulting Coulomb coupling parameter, providing a direct connection between the physics of strongly correlated Rydberg gases and ultracold plasmas. The approach is shown to reduce currently accessible temperatures by more than an order of magnitude, which opens up a new regime for ultracold plasma research and cold ion-beam applications with readily available experimental techniques.

  20. Large ELMs Triggered by MHD in JET Advanced Tokamak Plasmas: Impact on Plasmas Profiles, Plasmas Facing Components and Heating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Large ELMs Triggered by MHD in JET Advanced Tokamak Plasmas: Impact on Plasmas Profiles, Plasmas Facing Components and Heating Systems

  1. Plasma Response to Lithium-Coated Plasma-Facing Components in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.G. Bell, H.W. Kugel, R. Kaita, L.E. Zakharov, H. Schneider, B.P. LeBlanc, D. Mansfield, R.E. Bell, R. Maingi, S. Ding, S.M. Kaye, S.F. Paul, S.P. Gerhardt, J.M. Canik, J.C. Hosea, G. Taylor and the NSTX Research Team

    2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have shown beneficial effects on the performance of divertor plasmas as a result of applying lithium coatings on the graphite and carbonfiber- composite plasma-facing components. These coatings have mostly been applied by a pair of lithium evaporators mounted at the top of the vacuum vessel which inject collimated streams of lithium vapor towards the lower divertor. In NBI-heated, deuterium H-mode plasmas run immediately after the application of lithium, performance modifications included decreases in the plasma density, particularly in the edge, and inductive flux consumption, and increases in the electron and ion temperatures and the energy confinement time. Reductions in the number and amplitude of ELMs were observed, including complete ELM suppression for periods up to 1.2 s, apparently as a result of altering the stability of the edge. However, in the plasmas where ELMs were suppressed, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities, although not of lithium itself which remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. The impurity buildup could be inhibited by repetitively triggering ELMs with the application of brief pulses of an n = 3 radial field perturbation. The reduction in the edge density by lithium also inhibited parasitic losses through the scrape-off layer of ICRF power coupled to the plasma, enabling the waves to heat electrons in the core of H-mode plasmas produced by NBI. Lithium has also been introduced by injecting a stream of chemically stabilized, fine lithium powder directly into the scrape-off layer of NBI-heated plasmas. The lithium was ionized in the SOL and appeared to flow along the magnetic field to the divertor plates. This method of coating produced similar effects to the evaporated lithium but at lower amounts.

  2. Plasma-Therm Workshop: Fundamentals of Plasma Processing (Etching & Deposition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jan M.L.

    The workshop will focus on the fundamentals of plasma etching and deposition. Lectures will includePlasma-Therm Workshop: Fundamentals of Plasma Processing (Etching & Deposition) Nanofabrication an introduction to vacuum technology, the basics of plasma and plasma reactors and an overview of mechanisms

  3. Computational Methods for Collisional Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasinski, B F; Larson, D J; Hewett, D W; Langdon, A B; Still, C H

    2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling the high density, high temperature plasmas produced by intense laser or particle beams requires accurate simulation of a large range of plasma collisionality. Current simulation algorithms accurately and efficiently model collisionless and collision-dominated plasmas. The important parameter regime between these extremes, semi-collisional plasmas, has been inadequately addressed to date. LLNL efforts to understand and harness high energy-density physics phenomena for stockpile stewardship require accurate simulation of such plasmas. We have made significant progress towards our goal: building a new modeling capability to accurately simulate the full range of collisional plasma physics phenomena. Our project has developed a computer model using a two-pronged approach that involves a new adaptive-resolution, ''smart'' particle-in-cell algorithm: complex particle kinetics (CPK); and developing a robust 3D massively parallel plasma production code Z3 with collisional extensions. Our new CPK algorithms expand the function of point particles in traditional plasma PIC models by including finite size and internal dynamics. This project has enhanced LLNL's competency in computational plasma physics and contributed to LLNL's expertise and forefront position in plasma modeling. The computational models developed will be applied to plasma problems of interest to LLNL's stockpile stewardship mission. Such problems include semi-collisional behavior in hohlraums, high-energy-density physics experiments, and the physics of high altitude nuclear explosions (HANE). Over the course of this LDRD project, the world's largest fully electromagnetic PIC calculation was run, enabled by the adaptation of Z3 to the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) White system. This milestone calculation simulated an entire laser illumination speckle, brought new realism to laser-plasma interaction simulations, and was directly applicable to laser target physics. For the first time, magnetic fields driven by Raman scatter have been observed. Also, Raman rescatter was observed in 2D. This code and its increased suite of dedicated diagnostics are now playing a key role in studies of short-pulse, high-intensity laser matter interactions. In addition, a momentum-conserving electron collision algorithm was incorporated into Z3. Finally, Z3's portability across diverse MPP platforms enabled it to serve the LLNL computing community as a tool for effectively utilizing new machines.

  4. Plasma etching: Yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, Vincent M.; Kornblit, Avinoam [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)] [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of plasma etching is reviewed. Plasma etching, a revolutionary extension of the technique of physical sputtering, was introduced to integrated circuit manufacturing as early as the mid 1960s and more widely in the early 1970s, in an effort to reduce liquid waste disposal in manufacturing and achieve selectivities that were difficult to obtain with wet chemistry. Quickly, the ability to anisotropically etch silicon, aluminum, and silicon dioxide in plasmas became the breakthrough that allowed the features in integrated circuits to continue to shrink over the next 40 years. Some of this early history is reviewed, and a discussion of the evolution in plasma reactor design is included. Some basic principles related to plasma etching such as evaporation rates and Langmuir–Hinshelwood adsorption are introduced. Etching mechanisms of selected materials, silicon, silicon dioxide, and low dielectric-constant materials are discussed in detail. A detailed treatment is presented of applications in current silicon integrated circuit fabrication. Finally, some predictions are offered for future needs and advances in plasma etching for silicon and nonsilicon-based devices.

  5. Application APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papautsky, Ian

    in the CCM Bulletin which can be downloaded from ccm.uc.edu/admissions/ application. You will automatically be considered for a talent-based scholarship when you audition/ interview for entrance into CCM. These awards would also like to invite you to tour CCM's excellent facilities and observe some classes and ensemble

  6. Decay of a low-pressure oxygen magnetized and unmagnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levko, Dmitry [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Extraction of negative ions from electronegative plasmas is one of the key issues addressed during the study of these plasmas. One of the widely used methods is the turn off of the electron heating power. This results in the escape of electrons from the plasma and results in the formation of almost pure ion-ion plasma. In the latter case, the plasma sheath collapses, which enables the extraction of negative ions from the plasma. Another method is the application of a large magnetic field to the plasma. If the electrons become magnetized and trapped near the center of discharge chamber, the plasma sheaths near the walls collapse. This also enables the negative ion extraction from the plasma even during the power-on stage. The aim of the present paper is the comparison of these two methods.

  7. PLASMA PHYSICS PPPL UC Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL UC Davis PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL UC Davis. Domier and N.C. Luhmann, Jr. UC at Davis at Workshop on Long Time Simulations of Kinetic Plasmas April 21, 2006 Hyatt Regency, Dallas, TX #12;PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL UC Davis PRINCETON PLASMA

  8. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  9. BNL | ATF Plasma Diagnostics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diagnostic enables measurement of plasma wakefields on the picosecond timescale using ultrafast optical probe pulses. Although in this frequency domain interferometry has yet...

  10. Self-consistent resonance in a plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evangelos Chaliasos

    2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As an application of the solution of the equations of electromagnetic self-consistency in a plasma, found in a previous paper, the study of controlled thermo-nuclear fusion is undertaken. This study utilizes the resonance which can be developed in the plasma, as indicated by the above solution, and is based to an analysis of the underlying forced oscillation under friction. As a consequence, we find that, in this way, controlled thermonuclear fusion seems now to be feasible in principle. The treatment is rather elementary, and it may serve as a guide for more detailed calculations.

  11. Measuring the plasma density of a ferroelectric plasma source in an expanding plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measuring the plasma density of a ferroelectric plasma source in an expanding plasma A. Dunaevsky and N. J. Fisch Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements

  12. High-Energy Plasma Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guruangan, Karthik

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Z-Pinch Devices.pdfSimulations of Dense-Plasma Focus Z-Pinch Device. Physicalplasmas and dense-plasma focus (DPF) Z-Pinch devices. DPF

  13. Electrical Power Supply Applications Engineer | Princeton Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the services of an Electrical Engineer with experience in the design, procurement, commissioning, and operation of large electrical power systems and associated equipment for use...

  14. Fundamentals of Plasma Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callen, James D.

    of students (from physics, engineering physics, elec- trical engineering, nuclear engineering and other un;PREFACE Plasma physics is a relatively new branch of physics that became a mature science over the last). Thus, plasma physics has developed in large part as a branch of applied or engineering physics

  15. Plasma technology directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, P.P.; Dybwad, G.L.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plasma Technology Directory has two main goals: (1) promote, coordinate, and share plasma technology experience and equipment within the Department of Energy; and (2) facilitate technology transfer to the commercial sector where appropriate. Personnel are averaged first by Laboratory and next by technology area. The technology areas are accelerators, cleaning and etching deposition, diagnostics, and modeling.

  16. Diamagnetism of rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, W. C.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Ellis, R. F.; Teodorescu, C. [IREAP, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Diamagnetism and magnetic measurements of a supersonically rotating plasma in a shaped magnetic field demonstrate confinement of plasma pressure along the magnetic field resulting from centrifugal force. The Grad-Shafranov equation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic force balance, including supersonic rotation, is solved to confirm that the predicted angular velocity is in agreement with spectroscopic measurements of the Doppler shifts.

  17. Plasma opening switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Savage, Mark E. (Albuquerque, NM); Mendel, Jr., Clifford W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A command triggered plasma opening switch assembly using an amplification stage. The assembly surrounds a coaxial transmission line and has a main plasma opening switch (POS) close to the load and a trigger POS upstream from the main POS. The trigger POS establishes two different current pathways through the assembly depended on whether it has received a trigger current pulse. The initial pathway has both POS's with plasma between their anodes and cathodes to form a short across the transmission line and isolating the load. The final current pathway is formed when the trigger POS receives a trigger current pulse which energizes its fast coil to push the conductive plasma out from between its anode and cathode, allowing the main transmission line current to pass to the fast coil of the main POS, thus pushing its plasma out the way so as to establish a direct current pathway to the load.

  18. THz time-domain spectroscopy for tokamak plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Causa, F.; Zerbini, M.; Buratti, P.; Gabellieri, L.; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O. [ASSOCIAZIONE EURATOM ENEA sulla Fusione, C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Johnston, M. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E. [ENEA C.R. Frascati UTAPRAD, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology is now becoming mature for diagnostics using large portions of the electromagnetic spectrum simultaneously, in the form of THz pulses. THz radiation-based techniques have become feasible for a variety of applications, e.g., spectroscopy, imaging for security, medicine and pharmaceutical industry. In particular, time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) is now being used also for plasma diagnostics in various fields of application. This technique is promising also for plasmas for fusion applications, where plasma characteristics are non-uniform and/or evolve during the discharge This is because THz pulses produced with femtosecond mode-locked lasers conveniently span the spectrum above and below the plasma frequency and, thus, can be used as very sensitive and versatile probes of widely varying plasma parameters. The short pulse duration permits time resolving plasma characteristics while the large frequency span permits a large dynamic range. The focus of this work is to present preliminary experimental and simulation results demonstrating that THz TDS can be realistically adapted as a versatile tokamak plasma diagnostic technique.

  19. Kinetics of complex plasma with liquid droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Shikha; Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India); Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a theoretical basis for the reduction of electron density by spray of water (or other liquids) in hot plasma. This phenomenon has been observed in a hypersonic flight experiment for relief of radio black out, caused by high ionization in the plasma sheath of a hypersonic vehicle, re-entering the atmosphere. The analysis incorporates a rather little known phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of ions from the surface and includes the charge balance on the droplets and number cum energy balance of electrons, ions, and neutral molecules; the energy balance of the evaporating droplets has also been taken into account. The analysis has been applied to a realistic situation and the transient variations of the charge and radius of water droplets, and other plasma parameters have been obtained and discussed. The analysis through made in the context of water droplets is applicable to all liquids.

  20. Electron Cyclotron Heating in RFP plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilato, R.; Poli, E. [MPI fuer Plasmaphysik-Euratom Association Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Volpe, F. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Koehn, A. [Institut fuer Plasmaforschung, Universitaet Stuttgart-Stuttgart (Germany); Cavazzana, R.; Paccagnella, R. [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla fusione-Padova (Italy); Farina, D. [IFP-CNR, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association-Milano (Italy)

    2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Reversed field pinches (RFP) plasmas are typically overdense ({omega}{sub pe}>{omega}{sub ce}) and thus not suitable for conventional electron cyclotron (EC) heating and current drive. In recent high plasma current discharges (I{sub p}>1.5 MA), however, the RFX-mod device was operated in underdense conditions ({omega}{sub pe}<{omega}{sub ce}) for the first time in an RFP. Thus, it is now possible to envisage heating the RFP plasma core by conventional EC at the 2nd harmonic, in the ordinary or extraordinary mode. We present a preliminary study of EC-heating feasibility in RFX-mod with the use of beam-tracing and full-wave codes. Although not competitive - as a heating system - with multi-MW Ohmic heating in an RFP, EC might be useful for perturbative transport studies, even at moderate power (hundreds of kW), and, more generally, for applications requiring localized power deposition.

  1. Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface Interactions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titus, Monica Joy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    intensities for pure Ar plasmas focus on the dominant 104.8emitted from pure A r plasmas focus on the intensities ofdissertation work focuses on plasma and wafer diagnostics as

  2. Application ApplicAtion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papautsky, Ian

    in the CCM Bulletin which can be downloaded from http://ccm.uc.edu/ admissions/application.html. You will automatically be considered for a talent-based scholarship when you audition/ interview for entrance into CCM is made. We would also like to invite you to tour CCM's excellent facilities and observe some classes

  3. Optimization Online Digest -- January 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online Digest — January 2011. Applications — OR and ... Anders Skajaa, John Bagterp Jørgensen, Per Christian Hansen Double Smoothing ...

  4. Plasma Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer for Elemental and Isotopic Measurements: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chuji; Winstead, Christopher B.; Duan, Yixiang; Scherrer, Susan T.; Koirala, Sudip P.; Jang, Ping-Rey; Miller, George P.; Mazzotti, Fabio J.

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies using Plasma Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (plasma-CRDS) show much promise of this newly developed technique for ultra-sensitive elemental/isotopic measurements. Plasma-CRDS, since its introduction in 1997, has experienced three major stages: (i) the early stage demonstration of the technical feasibility, (ii) the recent advancement on its technical improvements and extensive applications for elemental/isotopic measurements as well as plasma diagnostics and (iii) the most recent progress on the improvement of the instrument configurations based on a diode laser-compact microwave plasma-CRDS. Research and development in many aspects of this technique is vigorously under processing in our laboratories. This paper reports a brief review on the plasma-CRDS technique, its applications and the most recent advancement. Discussions on future developments toward a new generation of plasma- CRDS-based spectrometers for ultra-sensitive elemental/isotopic measurements are also presented.

  5. Current-Driven Filament Instabilities in Relativistic Plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang Ren

    2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant has supported a study of some fundamental problems in current- and flow-driven instabilities in plasmas and their applications in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and astrophysics. It addressed current-driven instabilities and their roles in fast ignition, and flow-driven instabilities and their applications in astrophysics.

  6. PulsedPower Transient Plasma: Energy, Engines, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Anthony F. J.

    1Gundersen PulsedPower USC Transient Plasma: Energy, Engines, and Aerospace Applications USC: Dan phase prior to equilibration of the electron energy distribution It is studied for applications Biomedical (Cancer) A Little Wine Catalyst Yung-Hsu Andy Kuthi #12;3Gundersen PulsedPower USC Transient

  7. Proposal for PLASMA LENS EXPERIMENT AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proposal for PLASMA LENS EXPERIMENT AT THE FINAL FOCUS TEST BEAM April 1, 1997 THE PLASMA LENS.....................................................................................3 1.1 Plasma Focusing ......................................................................3 1.2 Previous Plasma Lens Experiments.................................................4 1.3 Plasma Lens

  8. CHAPTER 1. COLLECTIVE PLASMA PHENOMENA 1 Collective Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callen, James D.

    CHAPTER 1. COLLECTIVE PLASMA PHENOMENA 1 Chapter 1 Collective Plasma Phenomena The properties of a medium are determined by the microscopic processes in it. In a plasma the microscopic processes is actually limited to a distance of order the Debye length in a plasma. On length scales longer than

  9. Time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters by means of triple probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qayyum, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, S.; Deeba, Farah; Ali, Rafaqat; Hussain, S. [National Tokamak Fusion Program, 3329 Islamabad (Pakistan)] [National Tokamak Fusion Program, 3329 Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Triple Langmuir probe (TLP) diagnostic system with its necessary driving circuit is developed and successfully applies for time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters in the negative glow region of pulsating-dc discharge. This technique allows the instantaneous measurement of electron temperature [T{sub ?}], electron number density [n{sub ?}] as well as plasma fluctuations without any voltage or frequency sweep. In TLP configuration two probes are differentially biased and serve as a floating symmetric double probe whereas the third probe is simply floating into plasma to measure floating potential as a function of time and thus incorporates the effect of plasma fluctuations. As an example of the application to time-dependent plasmas, basic plasma parameters such as floating potential, electron temperature, and electron number density in low pressure air discharge are determined as a function of time for different fill pressure. The results demonstrate temporal evolution of plasma parameters and thus plasma generation progression for different fill pressures.

  10. Measuring the Plasma Density of a Ferroelectric Plasma Source in an Expanding Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

    2003-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements in an expanding plasma. The method exploits negative charging of the floating probe capacitance by fast flows before the expanding plasma reaches the probe. The temporal profiles of the plasma density can be obtained from the voltage traces of the discharge of the charged probe capacitance by the ion current from the expanding plasma. The temporal profiles of the plasma density, at two different distances from the surface of the ferroelectric plasma source, could be further fitted by using the density profiles for the expanding plasma. This gives the initial values of the plasma density and electron temperature at the surface. The method could be useful for any pulsed discharge, which is accompanied by considerable electromagnetic noise, if the initial plasma parameters might be deduced from measurements in expanding plasma.

  11. Inductively coupled helium plasma torch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montaser, Akbar (Potomac, MD); Chan, Shi-Kit (Washington, DC); Van Hoven, Raymond L. (Alexandria, VA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inductively coupled plasma torch including a base member, a plasma tube and a threaded insert member within the plasma tube for directing the plasma gas in a tangential flow pattern. The design of the torch eliminates the need for a separate coolant gas tube. The torch can be readily assembled and disassembled with a high degree of alignment accuracy.

  12. Plasma-Ion Processing of Three-Dimensional Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yukimura, Ken [Department of Electrical Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe 610-0321 (Japan); Wei Ronghua [Surface Engineering Section, Materials Engineering Department, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas 78238-5166 (United States)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBII and D) technology has been developed rapidly in the past decade. This technique is especially promising for modifying three-dimensional components. In PBII and D, plasma is generated in the entire processing chamber and then surrounds the components. When a train of negative voltage pulses are applied to the parts, ions are drawn to all the surfaces exposed to the plasma. At a high energy, ions are implanted to the surfaces, but at a low energy and with a proper precursor gases, ions are deposited to form a film. This technology has found applications in many areas including semiconductors, automotive, aerospace, energy and biomedical. This article reviews PBII and D fundamentals, describes features of various PBII and D systems and plasma sources, and discusses implantation and deposition techniques. The paper will also present application examples of this technology.

  13. Superconducting Magnet for Non-Neutral Plasma Research Alexei V. Dudarev, Victor E. Keilin, Nicolai Ph. Kopeikin, Igor O. Shugaev,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fajans, Joel

    Superconducting Magnet for Non-Neutral Plasma Research Alexei V. Dudarev, Victor E. Keilin, Nicolai-7300 Abstract -- A superconducting magnet intended for non- neutral electron plasma research has been developed. Non-neutral plasma research is applicable to several other physics disciplines, such as two

  14. EMSL - oxygen-plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oxygen-plasma en Conversion of 1,2-Propylene Glycol on Rutile TiO2(110). http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsconversion-12-propylene-glycol-rutile-tio2110

  15. Induction plasma tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, D.E.

    1982-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  16. Induction plasma tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, Donald E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  17. Simulation of Fusion Plasmas

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chris Holland

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The upcoming ITER experiment (www.iter.org) represents the next major milestone in realizing the promise of using nuclear fusion as a commercial energy source, by moving into the ?burning plasma? regime where the dominant heat source is the internal fusion reactions. As part of its support for the ITER mission, the US fusion community is actively developing validated predictive models of the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. In this talk, I will describe how the plasma community is using the latest high performance computing facilities to develop and refine our models of the nonlinear, multiscale plasma dynamics, and how recent advances in experimental diagnostics are allowing us to directly test and validate these models at an unprecedented level.

  18. Laser Plasma Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processes. A typical configuration uses a low intensity laser beam (2nd, 3rd, or 4th harmonic of 1054-nm) to probe a plasma volume. The Thomson scattered light is collected by a...

  19. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  20. Electrostatics of moving plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignatov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of charge distribution over the surface of a conducting body in moving plasma is analyzed. Using a finite-width plate streamlined by a cold neutralized electron flow as an example, it is shown that an electrically neutral body can be unstable against the development of spontaneous polarization. The plasma parameters at which such instability takes place, as well as the frequency and growth rate of the fundamental mode of instability, are determined.

  1. Plasma Screen Floating Mount

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eakle, Robert F. (New Ellenton, SC); Pak, Donald J. (Martine, GA)

    2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A mounting system for a flat display screen, particularly a plasma display screen, suspends the screen separately in each of the x-, y- and z-directions. A series of frames located by linear bearings and isolated by springs and dampers allows separate controlled movement in each axis. The system enables the use of relatively larger display screens in vehicles in which plasma screen are subject to damage from vibration.

  2. JOURnAL DE PHYSIQUE CoZZoque C7, suppZIment au n07, Tome 40, JuiZZet 1979, page C7-507 APPLICATION OF THE MAGNETICFLUX PLASMA TRAP TO GENERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , and synchronization is effected without electric circuits - by variation of gas pressure in the ignition interspace OF THE MAGNETICFLUX PLASMA TRAP TO GENERATION OF CURRENT SHEETSIN A RAREFIEDWASMA N.A. Koshilev, N.A. Strokin, A cm, L2= -100 cm) provide working 2 and annular 1 vblumes, each having an independent gas out

  3. applications laboratory colorado: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Laboratory 13 O:CSUEHorticultureNative Plant Masters20132013 NPM Application.doc432013 Colorado State University Extension 2009 Geosciences Websites...

  4. Influence of Penning effect on the plasma features in a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Zhengshi; Zhang, Guanjun [School of Electrical Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Jiang, Nan; Cao, Zexian, E-mail: zxcao@iphy.ac.cn [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a cold plasma source that promises various innovative applications. The influence of Penning effect on the formation, propagation, and other physical properties of the plasma bullets in APPJ remains a debatable topic. By using a 10?cm wide active electrode and a frequency of applied voltage down to 0.5?Hz, the Penning effect caused by preceding discharges can be excluded. It was found that the Penning effect originating in a preceding discharge helps build a conductive channel in the gas flow and provide seed electrons, thus the discharge can be maintained at a low voltage which in turn leads to a smaller propagation speed for the plasma bullet. Photographs from an intensified charge coupled device reveal that the annular structure of the plasma plume for He is irrelevant to the Penning ionization process arising from preceding discharges. By adding NH{sub 3} into Ar to introduce Penning effect, the originally filamentous discharge of Ar can display a rather extensive plasma plume in ambient as He. These results are helpful for the understanding of the behaviors of non-equilibrium APPJs generated under distinct conditions and for the design of plasma jet features, especially the spatial distribution and propagation speed, which are essential for application.

  5. Simulating Magnetized Laboratory Plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J N

    2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The creation of plasmas in the laboratory continues to generate excitement in the physics community. Despite the best efforts of the intrepid plasma diagnostics community, the dynamics of these plasmas remains a difficult challenge to both the theorist and the experimentalist. This dissertation describes the simulation of strongly magnetized laboratory plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), a method born of astrophysics but gaining broad support in the engineering community. We describe the mathematical formulation that best characterizes a strongly magnetized plasma under our circumstances of interest, and we review the SPH method and its application to astrophysical plasmas based on research by Phillips [1], Buerve [2], and Price and Monaghan [3]. Some modifications and extensions to this method are necessary to simulate terrestrial plasmas, such as a treatment of magnetic diffusion based on work by Brookshaw [4] and by Atluri [5]; we describe these changes as we turn our attention toward laboratory experiments. Test problems that verify the method are provided throughout the discussion. Finally, we apply our method to the compression of a magnetized plasma performed by the Compact Toroid Injection eXperiment (CTIX) [6] and show that the experimental results support our computed predictions.

  6. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA SOURCES SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 16 (2007) 9096 doi:10.1088/0963-0252/16/1/012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Demetre J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -dimensional simulation of the plasma reactor was coupled with a two-dimensional simulation of the sheath region overIEDisdeterminedbythedifferenceinpotentialbetweenthe plasma and the substrate, as well as ion collisions with the background neutral gas. For radio frequency were then neutralized to become fast neutrals in neutral beam applications [12,13]. In all

  7. Energetic Particle Physics with Applications in Fusion and Space C. Z. Cheng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plasma Physics Laboratory Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 Abstract Energetic particle their energy to the thermal plasma, and did not create new plasma instabili­ ties. Major energetic particleEnergetic Particle Physics with Applications in Fusion and Space Plasmas C. Z. Cheng Princeton

  8. Energetic Particle Physics with Applications in Fusion and Space C. Z. Cheng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plasma Physics Laboratory Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 Abstract Energetic particle to transfer their energy to the thermal plasma, and did not create new plasma instabili- ties. Major energeticEnergetic Particle Physics with Applications in Fusion and Space Plasmas C. Z. Cheng Princeton

  9. Plasma jet ignition device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIlwain, Michael E. (Franklin, MA); Grant, Jonathan F. (Wayland, MA); Golenko, Zsolt (North Reading, MA); Wittstein, Alan D. (Fairfield, CT)

    1985-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ignition device of the plasma jet type is disclosed. The device has a cylindrical cavity formed in insulating material with an electrode at one end. The other end of the cylindrical cavity is closed by a metal plate with a small orifice in the center which plate serves as a second electrode. An arc jumping between the first electrode and the orifice plate causes the formation of a highly-ionized plasma in the cavity which is ejected through the orifice into the engine cylinder area to ignite the main fuel mixture. Two improvements are disclosed to enhance the operation of the device and the length of the plasma plume. One improvement is a metal hydride ring which is inserted in the cavity next to the first electrode. During operation, the high temperature in the cavity and the highly excited nature of the plasma breaks down the metal hydride, liberating hydrogen which acts as an additional fuel to help plasma formation. A second improvement consists of a cavity insert containing a plurality of spaced, metal rings. The rings act as secondary spark gap electrodes reducing the voltage needed to maintain the initial arc in the cavity.

  10. Plasma Astrophysics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear AstrophysicsPayroll,Physics Physics An errorPlantPlasma

  11. Perturbations in a plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evangelos Chaliasos

    2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The perturbations of a homogeneous non-relativistic two-component plasma are studied in the Coulomb gauge. Starting from the solution found [2] of the equations of electromagnetic self consistency in a plasma [1], we add small perturbations to all quantities involved, and we enter the perturbed quantities in the equations, keeping only the first order terms in the perturbations. Because the unperturbed quantities are solutions of the equations, they cancel each other, and we are left with a set of 12 linear equations for the 12 perturbations (unknown quantities). Then we solve this set of linearized equations, in the approximation of small ratio of the masses of electrons over those of ions, and under the assumption that the plasma remains homogeneous.

  12. QED Plasma and Magnetars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freytsis, Marat

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetars are surrounded by diffuse plasma in magnetic field strengths well above the quantum electrodynamic critical value. We derive equations of "quantum force-free electrodynamics" for this plasma using an effective field theory arguments. We argue that quantum effects do not modify the large scale structure of the magnetosphere, and in particular that the spin-down rate does not deviate significantly from the classical result. We provide definite evolution equations that can be used to explore potentially important small-scale corrections, such as shock formation, which has been proposed as a mechanism for both burst and quiescent emission from magnetars.

  13. Plasma diagnostic reflectometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, B.I.; Afeyan, B.B.; Garrison, J.C.; Kaiser, T.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Domier, C.W.; Chou, A.E.; Baang, S. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

    1996-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical and experimental studies of plasma diagnostic reflectometry have been undertaken as a collaborative research project between the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California Department of Applied Science Plasma Diagnostics Group under the auspices of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL. Theoretical analyses have explored the basic principles of reflectometry to understand its limitations, to address specific gaps in the understanding of reflectometry measurements in laboratory experiments, and to explore extensions of reflectometry such as ultra-short-pulse reflectometry. The theory has supported basic laboratory reflectometry experiments where reflectometry measurements can be corroborated by independent diagnostic measurements.

  14. Instabilities and pattern formation in lowtemperature plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the plasma region is approximately 20cm. (Produced by the Plasma Research Laboratory, Dublin City University

  15. Surface Plasma Arc by Radio-Frequency Control Study (SPARCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruzic, David N. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is to summarize the work carried out between April 2012 and April 2013 for development of an experimental device to simulate interactions of o#11;-normal detrimental events in a tokamak and ICRF antenna. The work was mainly focused on development of a pulsed plasma source using theta pinch and coaxial plasma gun. This device, once completed, will have a possible application as a test stand for high voltage breakdown of an ICRF antenna in extreme events in a tokamak such as edge-localized modes or disruption. Currently, DEVeX does not produce plasma with high temperature enough to requirement for an ELM simulator. However, theta pinch is a good way to produce high temperature ions. The unique characteristic of plasma heating by a theta pinch is advantageous for an ELM simulator due to its effective ion heating. The objective of the proposed work, therefore, is to build a test facility using the existing theta pinch facility in addition to a coaxial plasma gun. It is expected to produce a similar pulsed-plasma heat load to the extreme events in tokamaks and to be applied for studying interactions of hot plasma and ICRF antennas.

  16. Low frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic modes in nonuniform cold quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleem, H.; Ahmad, Ali [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, S. A. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Government College Bagh AJK (Pakistan)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The low frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic linear modes in a nonuniform cold quantum electron-ion plasma are studied. The effect of stationary dust on an electrostatic mode is also investigated. The quantum corrections in the linear dispersion relations of a cold dense plasma are presented with possible applications.

  17. Short-Pulse Laser-Produced Plasmas Jean-Claude Gauthier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Short-Pulse Laser-Produced Plasmas Jean-Claude Gauthier Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications Summary. In this review, the physics of short-pulse laser-produced plasmas at moderate intensities-ray sources [14]. In this short review, we concentrate on "low" (non-relativistic) laser in- tensities, i.e. I

  18. Use of plasma fuel systems at thermal power plants in Russia, Kazakhstan, China, and Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpenko, E.I.; Karpenko, Y.E.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ulan Ude (Russian Federation). Institute of Thermal Physics

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology of plasma ignition of solid fuels is described, as well as its creation and development steps, the technoeconomic characteristics of plasma igniter systems, schemes of their installation in pulverized-coal boilers, and results of their application at pulverized coal-fired power plants.

  19. The Influence of Induced Currents on Magnetic Nozzle Acceleration and Plasma Detachment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choueiri, Edgar

    of plasma propulsion concepts currently being investigated rely on the use of applied magnetic fields the magnetic nozzle thus becomes paramount for the potential application of such concepts to space propulsionThe Influence of Induced Currents on Magnetic Nozzle Acceleration and Plasma Detachment Justin M

  20. Divergence of a Propulsive Plasma Flow Expanding through a Magnetic Nozzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choueiri, Edgar

    Divergence of a Propulsive Plasma Flow Expanding through a Magnetic Nozzle IEPC-2009-260 Presented frequency waves have renewed interest in magnetic nozzles for plasma propulsion applications in space.1 at the 31st International Electric Propulsion Conference, University of Michigan · Ann Arbor, Michigan · USA

  1. Theory of asymmetry-induced transport in a non-neutral plasma D. L. Eggleston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Theory of asymmetry-induced transport in a non-neutral plasma D. L. Eggleston Occidental College. A theoretical model of such transport is presented which is appropriate for long, thin plasmas. The theory that move in resonance with the asymmetry. Possible applications of the theory to several experiments

  2. Tunable Laser Plasma Accelerator based on Longitudinal Density Tailoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shiraishi, Satomi; Sokollik, Thomas; Benedetti, Carlo; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser plasma accelerators have produced high-quality electron beams with GeV energies from cm-scale devices and are being investigated as hyperspectral fs light sources producing THz to {gamma}-ray radiation and as drivers for future high-energy colliders. These applications require a high degree of stability, beam quality and tunability. Here we report on a technique to inject electrons into the accelerating field of a laser-driven plasma wave and coupling of this injector to a lower-density, separately tunable plasma for further acceleration. The technique relies on a single laser pulse powering a plasma structure with a tailored longitudinal density profile, to produce beams that can be tuned in the range of 100-400 MeV with percent-level stability, using laser pulses of less than 40 TW. The resulting device is a simple stand-alone accelerator or the front end for a multistage higher-energy accelerator.

  3. COMPUTING APPLICATIONS APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bader, David A.

    COMPUTING APPLICATIONS APPLICATIONS APPLICATIONS David A. Bader NEW MEXICO, USA Robert Pennington of the interconnect net- work and related software is shown by comparing the same application running on a large

  4. Plasma density from Cerenkov radiation, betatron oscillations, and beam steering in a plasma wakefield experiment at 30 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catravas, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Assmann, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Whittum, D.; Blue, B.; Clayton, C.; Joshi, C.; Marsh, K.; Mori, W.B.; Wang, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S.; Muggli, P.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for using Cerenkov radiation near atomic spectral lines to measure plasma source properties for plasma wakefield applications has been discussed and experimentally verified. Because the radiation co-propagates with the electron beam, the radiation samples the source properties exactly along the path of interest with perfect temporal synchronization. Observation wavelengths were chosen with respect to the atomic resonances of the plasma source, where the relative change in the index of refraction strongly affects the Cerenkov cone angle, and permits flexible diagnostic design. The Cerenkov spatial profiles were systematically studied for a Lithium heat pipe oven as a function of oven temperature and observation wavelength. Neutral densities and plasma densities were extracted from the measurements.

  5. Influence of electron injection into 27 cm audio plasma cell on the plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haleem, N. A.; Ragheb, M. S.; Zakhary, S. G. [Accelerators Department, Nuclear Research Center, AEA, Cairo 13759 (Egypt)] [Accelerators Department, Nuclear Research Center, AEA, Cairo 13759 (Egypt); El Fiki, S. A.; Nouh, S. A. [Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt)] [Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); El Disoki, T. M. [Faculty of Girls, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt)] [Faculty of Girls, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, the plasma is created in a Pyrex tube (L = 27 cm, ?= 4 cm) as a single cell, by a capacitive audio frequency (AF) discharge (f = 10–100 kHz), at a definite pressure of ?0.2 Torr. A couple of tube linear and deviating arrangements show plasma characteristic conformity. The applied AF plasma and the injection of electrons into two gas mediums Ar and N{sub 2} revealed the increase of electron density at distinct tube regions by one order to attain 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 3}. The electrons temperature and density strengths are in contrast to each other. While their distributions differ along the plasma tube length, they show a decaying sinusoidal shape where their peaks position varies by the gas type. The electrons injection moderates electron temperature and expands their density. The later highest peak holds for the N{sub 2} gas, at electrons injection it changes to hold for the Ar. The sinusoidal decaying density behavior generates electric fields depending on the gas used and independent of tube geometry. The effect of the injected electrons performs a responsive impact on electrons density not attributed to the gas discharge. Analytical tools investigate the interaction of the plasma, the discharge current, and the gas used on the electrodes. It points to the emigration of atoms from each one but for greater majority they behave to a preferred direction. Meanwhile, only in the linear regime, small percentage of atoms still moves in reverse direction. Traces of gas atoms revealed on both electrodes due to sheath regions denote lack of their participation in the discharge current. In addition, atoms travel from one electrode to the other by overcoming the sheaths regions occurring transportation of particles agglomeration from one electrode to the other. The electrons injection has contributed to increase the plasma electron density peaks. These electrons populations have raised the generated electrostatic fields assisting the elemental ions emigration to a preferred electrode direction. Regardless of plasma electrodes positions and plasma shape, ions can be departed from one electrode to deposit on the other one. In consequence, as an application the AF plasma type can enhance the metal deposition from one electrode to the other.

  6. A study of the formation of cluster ions from metal acetates using plasma desorption mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendez Silvagnoli, Winston Reinaldo

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel application of desorption/ionization methods of mass spectrometry, e. g. plasma desorption mass spectrometry (PDMS), is the analysis of both the composition and structure of solid materials in one experiment. Cluster ions emitted from...

  7. 1 A Grid based distributed simulation of Plasma Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vlad, Gregorio

    1 A Grid based distributed simulation of Plasma Turbulence Beniamino Di Martino and Salvatore- cati, Rome, Italy Grid technology is widespreading, but most grid-enabled applications just exploit of Grid platforms. In this paper the porting on a Globus equipped platform of a hierarchically distributed

  8. The Statistical Upper Mantle Assemblage Anders Meibom*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Don L.

    Mantle Assemblage', which forms as the result of long-term plate tectonic recycling of sedimentary-3] and noble gases [4] has led to the notion that the source region for "normal" MORB (N-MORB), referred

  9. THE FEDERAL ENERGY ADMINISTRATION By Roger Anders

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success Stories Systems AnalysisTESTIMONY OF WILLIAM

  10. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 34, NO. 3, JUNE 2006 825 Nonlocal Effects in a Bounded Afterglow Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    excitation, supply additional heating to slow electrons and reduce their diffu- sion cooling rate. Altering research and technical applications. Index Terms--Afterglow plasma, diffusion cooling, electron energy and diffusion cooling, much faster than the characteristic recombination time of the electrons. Due

  12. A Monte Carlo algorithm for degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turrell, A.E., E-mail: a.turrell09@imperial.ac.uk; Sherlock, M.; Rose, S.J.

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure for performing Monte Carlo calculations of plasmas with an arbitrary level of degeneracy is outlined. It has possible applications in inertial confinement fusion and astrophysics. Degenerate particles are initialised according to the Fermi–Dirac distribution function, and scattering is via a Pauli blocked binary collision approximation. The algorithm is tested against degenerate electron–ion equilibration, and the degenerate resistivity transport coefficient from unmagnetised first order transport theory. The code is applied to the cold fuel shell and alpha particle equilibration problem of inertial confinement fusion.

  13. Plasma gasification of coal in different oxidants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matveev, I.B.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B. [Applied Plasma Technology, Mclean, VA (USA)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxidant selection is the highest priority for advanced coal gasification-process development. This paper presents comparative analysis of the Powder River Basin bituminous-coal gasification processes for entrained-flow plasma gasifier. Several oxidants, which might be employed for perspective commercial applications, have been chosen, including air, steam/carbon-dioxide blend, carbon dioxide, steam, steam/air, steam/oxygen, and oxygen. Synthesis gas composition, carbon gasification degree, specific power consumptions, and power efficiency for these processes were determined. The influence of the selected oxidant composition on the gasification-process main characteristics have been investigated.

  14. Lithium plasma emitter for collisionless magnetized plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Huang, Yi-Jue; Song, Sung-Xuang; Hsieh, Tung-Yuan [Institute of Space, Astrophysical and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jyun-Yi; Syugu, Wun-Jheng [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Cheng, C. Z. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a newly developed lithium plasma emitter, which can provide quiescent and low-temperature collisionless conditions for magnetized plasma experiments. This plasma emitter generates thermal emissions of lithium ions and electrons to produce a lithium plasma. Lithium type beta-eucryptite and lanthanum-hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}) powders were mixed and directly heated with a tungsten heater to synthesize ion and electron emissions. As a result, a plasma with a diameter of {approx}15 cm was obtained in a magnetic mirror configuration. The typical range of electron density was 10{sup 12}-10{sup 13} m{sup -3} and that of electron temperature was 0.1-0.8 eV with the emitter operation temperature of about 1500 K. The amplitude fluctuations for the plasma density were lower than 1%.

  15. Low frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic modes of ultracold magnetized nonuniform dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleem, H. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmad, Ali [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, S. A. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Government College Bagh AJK (Pakistan)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A coupled linear dispersion relation for the basic electrostatic and electromagnetic waves in the ultracold nonuniform magnetized dense plasmas has been obtained which interestingly is analogous to the classical case. The scales of macroscopic phenomena and the interparticle quantum interactions are discussed. It is important to point out that hydrodynamic models cannot take into account strong quantum effects and they are not applicable to very dense plasmas. The analysis is presented with applications to dense plasmas which are relevant to both laboratory and astrophysical environments.

  16. Self-consistent electrodynamics of large-area high-frequency capacitive plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Zhigang; Rauf, Shahid; Collins, Ken [Applied Materials, Inc., 974 E. Arques Avenue, Sunnyvale, California 94085 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) generated using high frequency (3-30 MHz) and very high frequency (30-300 MHz) radio-frequency (rf) sources are used for many plasma processing applications including thin film etching and deposition. When chamber dimensions become commensurate with the effective rf wavelength in the plasma, electromagnetic wave effects impose a significant influence on plasma behavior. Because the effective rf wavelength in plasma depends upon both rf and plasma process conditions (e.g., rf power and gas pressure), a self-consistent model including both the rf power delivery system and the plasma discharge is highly desirable to capture a more complete physical picture of the plasma behavior. A three-dimensional model for self-consistently studying both electrodynamic and plasma dynamic behavior of large-area (Gen 10, >8 m{sup 2}) CCP is described in this paper. This model includes Maxwell's equations and transport equations for charged and neutral species, which are coupled and solved in the time domain. The complete rf plasma discharge chamber including the rf power delivery subsystem, rf feed, electrodes, and the plasma domain is modeled as an integrated system. Based on this full-wave solution model, important limitations for processing uniformity imposed by electromagnetic wave propagation effects in a large-area CCP (3.05x2.85 m{sup 2} electrode size) are studied. The behavior of H{sub 2} plasmas in such a reactor is examined from 13.56 to 200 MHz. It is shown that various rectangular harmonics of electromagnetic fields can be excited in a large-area rectangular reactor as the rf or power is increased. The rectangular harmonics can create not only center-high plasma distribution but also high plasma density at the corners and along the edges of the reactor.

  17. Towards Plasma Surgery: Plasma Treatment of Living Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffels, E.; Kieft, I.E.; Sladek, R.E.J.; Slaaf, D.W.; Laan, E.P. van der; Jimenez-Moreno, P.; Steinbuch, M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical, biological and technical background for high-precision plasma surgery is prepared in a multi-disciplinary team. The aim of the research is to achieve controlled removal of diseased cells and bacteria without harming the healthy rest of the tissue. For this purpose, a small, cold, flexible and non-toxic plasma is developed (the plasma needle) and tested on cultured cells and bacterial samples. The needle is an atmospheric discharge induced by a radio-frequency voltage applied to a metal pin. This plasma operates at room temperature, in the milliwatt power regime; it poses no risk of thermal or electrical damage to living tissues. Several beneficial responses of living cells to plasma treatment have been already identified. Plasma does not cause accidental cell death (necrosis), which leads to inflammation and tissue damage. Instead, it allows to detach cells from each other and from the scaffold, and thus to remove them in a non-destructive way. Moreover, plasma is capable of bacterial inactivation. I parallel, we have determined the electrical and optical properties of the plasma and found a method of precise positioning of the plasma needle with respect to the treated tissue.

  18. Competition between pressure effects and airflow influence for the performance of plasma actuators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegseis, J., E-mail: kriegseis@kit.edu [Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Barckmann, K.; Grundmann, S., E-mail: grundmann@csi.tu-darmstadt.de [Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Frey, J. [Institute for Aerospace Engineering, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Tropea, C. [Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work addresses the combined influence of pressure variations and different airflow velocities on the discharge intensity of plasma actuators. Power consumption, plasma length, and discharge capacitance were investigated systematically for varying pressure levels (p?=?0.1–1 bar) and airflow velocities (U{sub ?}=0?100 m/s) to characterize and quantify the favorable and adverse effects on the discharge intensity. In accordance with previous reports, an increasing plasma actuator discharge intensity is observed for decreasing pressure levels. At constant pressure levels, an adverse airflow influence on the electric actuator performance is demonstrated. Despite the improved discharge intensity at lower pressure levels, the seemingly improved performance of the plasma actuators is accompanied with a more pronounced drop of the relative performance. These findings demonstrate the dependency of the (kinematic and thermodynamic) environmental conditions on the electric performance of plasma actuators, which in turn affects the control authority of plasma actuators for flow control applications.

  19. On vapor shielding of dust grains of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, B. T.; Smirnov, R. D., E-mail: rsmirnov@ucsd.edu; Krasheninnikov, S. I. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0411 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0411 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The shielding effects of ablation cloud around a small dust grain composed of iron, molybdenum, or tungsten in fusion plasmas are considered. These include collisional dissipation of momentum flux of impinging plasma ions, heat transfer by secondary plasma created due to electron impact ionization of the ablated atoms, and radiative plasma power losses in the ablation cloud. The maximum radius, which limits applicability of existing dust-plasma interaction models neglecting the cloud shielding effects, for dust grains of the considered high-Z metals is calculated as function of plasma parameters. The thermal bifurcation triggered by thermionic electron emission from dust grains, observed for some of the considered materials, is analyzed. The results are compared with previous calculations for dust composed of low-Z fusion related materials, i.e., lithium, beryllium, and carbon.

  20. Surface Modification of Material by Irradiation of Low Power Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akamatsu, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Kazunori [Kobe City College of Technology, 8-3 Gakuenhigashimachi, Kobe, Hyogo, 651-2194 (Japan); Azuma, Kingo [University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosya, Himeji, Hyogo, 671-2280 (Japan); Onoi, Masahiro [Metal Technology Co., Ltd., 713 Shake Aza Narihira, Ebina, Kanagawa, 243-0424 (Japan)

    2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet for surface modifications of acrylic, aluminum, and highly crystalline graphite has been carried out experimentally. The plasma jet was generated with batteries-driven high voltage modulator. The power consumed for the plasma generation was estimated to be 0.12 W. The plasma had hydroxyl radicals, which is known as a strong oxider from an observation of optical emission spectrum. After the irradiation of the plasma, the surfaces of acrylic and aluminum became to be hydrophilic from the compartment of contact angle of water on these surfaces. The surface of highly crystalline graphite irradiated by the plasma jet had oxygen-rich functional groups such as C-O, C = O, and O = C-O.

  1. 2110 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 37, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2009 Low-Pressure Helicon-Plasma Discharge Initiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharer, John E.

    -temperature plasma research. Low- pressure (as low as 1 millitorr) inductively coupled plasmas are used for plasma

  2. Kinematics of Nonlinearly Interacting MHD Instabilities in a Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Alexander K.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmas play host to a wide variety of instabilities. For example, tearing instabilities use finite plasma resistivity to exploit the free energy provided by plasma currents parallel to the magnetic field to alter the magnetic topology of the plasma through a process known as reconnection. These instabilities frequently make themselves known in magnetic confinement experiments such as tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFPs). In RFP plasmas, in fact, several tearing instabilities (modes) are simultaneously active, and are of large amplitude. Theory predicts that in addition to interacting linearly with magnetic perturbations from outside the plasma, such as field errors or as resistive wall, the modes in the RFP can interact nonlinearly with each other through a three-wave interaction. In the current work investigations of both the linear (external) and nonlinear contributions to the kinematics of the tearing modes in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) RFP are reported Theory predicts that tearing modes will respond only to magnetic perturbations that are spatially resonant with them, and was supported by experimental work done on tokamak devices. The results in this work verified that the theory is still applicable to the RFP, in spite of its more complicated magnetic mode structure, involving perturbations of a single poloidal mode number.

  3. The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coverdale, C.A.

    1995-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by L{sub plasma} {ge} 2L{sub Rayleigh} > c{tau}. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (n{sub o} {le} 0.05n{sub cr}). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in {omega}-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

  4. Electron energy distributions in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Sang-Heon, E-mail: ssongs@umich.edu, E-mail: Sang-Heon.Song@us.tel.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2104 (United States); Yang, Yang, E-mail: yang-yang@amat.com [Applied Materials Inc., 974 E. Arques Avenue, M/S 81312, Sunnyvale, California 94085 (United States); Chabert, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.chabert@lpp.polytechnique.fr [LPP, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC, Paris XI, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Kushner, Mark J., E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimizing and controlling electron energy distributions (EEDs) is a continuing goal in plasma materials processing as EEDs determine the rate coefficients for electron impact processes. There are many strategies to customize EEDs in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), for example, pulsing and choice of frequency, to produce the desired plasma properties. Recent experiments have shown that EEDs in low pressure ICPs can be manipulated through the use of static magnetic fields of sufficient magnitudes to magnetize the electrons and confine them to the electromagnetic skin depth. The EED is then a function of the local magnetic field as opposed to having non-local properties in the absence of the magnetic field. In this paper, EEDs in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma (mICP) sustained in Ar are discussed with results from a two-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model. Results are compared with experimental measurements. We found that the character of the EED transitions from non-local to local with application of the static magnetic field. The reduction in cross-field mobility increases local electron heating in the skin depth and decreases the transport of these hot electrons to larger radii. The tail of the EED is therefore enhanced in the skin depth and depressed at large radii. Plasmas densities are non-monotonic with increasing pressure with the external magnetic field due to transitions between local and non-local kinetics.

  5. Progress on laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, P.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several laser plasma accelerator schemes are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA). Theory indicates that a very high acceleration gradient, of order 1 GeV/m, can exist in the plasma wave driven by the beating lasers. Experimental results obtained on the PBWA experiment at UCLA confirms this. Parameters related to the PBWA as an accelerator system are derived, among them issues concerning the efficiency and the laser power and energy requirements are discussed.

  6. Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Korzekwa, Deniece R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

  7. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C.B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by a self- modulated intense short laser pulse”. Phys. Rev.High Intensity Short Pulse Laser Plasma Experiments”. [39]Instabilities of Short-Pulse Laser Propagation through

  8. Hollow Plasma in a Solenoid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kauffeldt, E. M. Oks, and P. K. Roy, "Dense metal plasma inREFERENCES [1] P. K. Roy, S. S. Yu, E. Henestroza, A.

  9. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C.B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    significant in such ultra-short laser-plasma interactions.of ultra-short electron bunches by using colliding laser

  10. Charging and Heating Dynamics of Nanoparticles in Nonthermal Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kortshagen, Uwe R.

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this award was to understand the interactions of nanometer-sized particles with ionized gases, also called plasmas. Plasmas are widely used in the fabrication of electronic circuits such as microprocessors and memory devices, in plasma display panels, as well as in medical applications. Recently, these ionized gases are finding applications in the synthesis of advanced nanomaterials with novel properties, which are based on nanometer-sized particulate (nanoparticles) building blocks. As these nanoparticles grow in the plasma environment, they interact with the plasmas species such as electrons and ions which critically determines the nanoparticle properties. The University of Minnesota researchers conducting this project performed numerical simulations and developed analytical models that described the interaction of plasma-bound nanoparticles with the plasma ions. The plasma ions bombard the nanoparticle surface with substantial energy, which can result in the rearrangement of the nanoparticles’ atoms, giving them often desirable structures at the atomic scale. Being able to tune the ion energies allows to control the properties of nanoparticles produced in order to tailor their attributes for certain applications. For instance, when used in high efficiency light emitting devices, nanoparticles produced under high fluxes of highly energetic ions may show superior light emission to particles produced under low fluxes of less energetic ions. The analytical models developed by the University of Minnesota researchers enable the research community to easily determine the energy of ions bombarding the nanoparticles. The researchers extensively tested the validity of the analytical models by comparing them to sophisticated computer simulations based on stochastic particle modeling, also called Monte Carlo modeling, which simulated the motion of hundreds of thousands of ions and their interaction with the nanoparticle surfaces. Beyond the scientific intellectual merits, this award had significant broader impacts. Two graduate students received their doctoral degrees and both have joined a U.S. manufacturer of plasma-based semiconductor processing equipment. Four undergraduate students participated in research conducted under this grant and gained valuable hands-on laboratory experience. A middle school science teacher observed research conducted under this grant and developed three new course modules that introduce middle school students to the concepts of nanometer scale, the atomic structure of matter, and the composition of matter of different chemical elements.

  11. Tritium Plasma Experiment and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation Work Package|DepartmenttheJuly 11,Plasma

  12. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niranjan, Ram, E-mail: niranjan@barc.gov.in; Rout, R. K., E-mail: niranjan@barc.gov.in; Srivastava, R., E-mail: niranjan@barc.gov.in; Gupta, Satish C. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Chakravarthy, Y. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Patel, N. N. [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Alex, P. [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  13. Helicon Plasma Source Configuration Analysis by Means of Density Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angrilli, F.; Barber, G.C.; Carter, M.D.; Goulding, R.H.; Maggiora, R.; Pavarin, D.; Sparks, D.O.

    1999-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial results have been obtained from operation of a helicon plasma source built to conduct optimization studies for space propulsion applications. The source features an easily reconfigurable antenna to test different geometries. Operating with He as the source gas, peak densities >= 1.6X10{sup 19} m{sup -3} have been achieved. Radial and axial plasma profiles have been obtained using a microwave interferometer that can be scanned axially and a Langmuir probe. The source will be used to investigate operation at high magnetic field, frequency, and input power.

  14. On the drift magnetosonic waves in anisotropic low beta plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naim, Hafsa, E-mail: roohi-phy@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, G. C. University Lahore, Katchery Road, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Bashir, M. F., E-mail: frazbashir@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Visiting Professor, Department of Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized dispersion relation of obliquely propagating drift magnetosonic waves is derived by using the gyrokinetic theory for anisotropic low beta plasmas. The stability analysis applicable to a wide range of plasma parameters is performed to understand the stabilization mechanism of the drift magnetosonic instability and the estimation of the growth rate is also presented. It is noted that the growth rate of the drift instability enhances for small anisotropy (A{sub e,i}?=?T{sub ?e,i}/T{sub ?e,i}??1)

  15. Analysis of plasma waves observed within local plasma injections seen in Saturn's magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    Analysis of plasma waves observed within local plasma injections seen in Saturn's magnetosphere J; published 17 May 2008. [1] Plasma injections or density depletion regions have been reported plasma in a cooler, locally produced plasma background. The injected plasma undergoes dispersion

  16. A dusty plasma device for producing extended, steady state, magnetized, dusty plasma columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    A dusty plasma device for producing extended, steady state, magnetized, dusty plasma columns Wenjun with an existing Q machine, to produce extended, steady state, magnetized plasma columns. The dusty plasma device (DPD) is to be used for the investigation of waves in dusty plasmas and of other plasma/dust aspects

  17. Ion plasma wave and its instability in interpenetrating plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vranjes, J., E-mail: jvranjes@yahoo.com [Institute of Physics Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Zemun (Serbia); Kono, M., E-mail: kono@fps.chuo-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Policy Studies, Chuo University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Some essential features of the ion plasma wave in both kinetic and fluid descriptions are presented. The wave develops at wavelengths shorter than the electron Debye radius. Thermal motion of electrons at this scale is such that they overshoot the electrostatic potential perturbation caused by ion bunching, which consequently propagates as an unshielded wave, completely unaffected by electron dynamics. So in the simplest fluid description, the electrons can be taken as a fixed background. However, in the presence of magnetic field and for the electron gyro-radius shorter than the Debye radius, electrons can participate in the wave and can increase its damping rate. This is determined by the ratio of the electron gyro-radius and the Debye radius. In interpenetrating plasmas (when one plasma drifts through another), the ion plasma wave can easily become growing and this growth rate is quantitatively presented for the case of an argon plasma.

  18. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA SOURCES SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 11 (2002) 273278 PII: S0963-0252(02)35617-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Francis F.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of semiconductors, ionospheric plasma research, ion lasers, general plasma physics experiments, and plasma thruster

  19. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, W.C.

    1983-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the confinement of field reversed plasma rings and, more particularly, to the steady state maintainance of field reversed plasma rings produced by coaxial plasma guns.

  20. Control of impurities in toroidal plasma devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohkawa, Tihiro (La Jolla, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for plasma impurity control in closed flux plasma systems such as Tokamak reactors is disclosed. Local axisymmetrical injection of hydrogen gas is employed to reverse the normally inward flow of impurities into the plasma.

  1. Hollow Plasma in a Solenoid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A ring cathode for a pulsed, high-current, multi-spot cathodic arc discharge was placed inside a pulsed magnetic solenoid. Photography is used to evaluate the plasma distribution. The plasma appears hollow for cathode positions close the center of the solenoid, and it is guided closer to the axis when the cathode is away from the center.

  2. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, F.W. Jr.; Chiu, S.C.; Parks, P.; Rawls, J.M.

    1984-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for transferring energy to a plasma immersed in a magnetic field, and relates particularly to an apparatus for heating a plasma of low atomic number ions to high temperatures by transfer of energy to plasma resonances, particularly the fundamental and harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency of the plasma ions. This invention transfers energy from an oscillating radio-frequency field to a plasma resonance of a plasma immersed in a magnetic field.

  3. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA); Bilek, Marcela M. M. (Engadine, AU); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  4. Quantitative proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins classifies nanoparticles with different surface properties and size Quantitative proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins...

  5. Method & apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane; Ward, Pamela Denise; Stevenson, Joel O'Don

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process and, more specifically, to the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates to a plasma monitoring module that may be adjusted in at least some manner so as to re-evaluate a previously monitored plasma process. For instance, optical emissions data on a plasma process that was previously monitored by the plasma monitoring module may be replayed through the plasma monitoring module after making at least one adjustment in relation to the plasma monitoring module.

  6. Perpendicular Diffusion of Energetic Particles in Collisionless Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shalchi, Andreas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental problem in plasma and astrophysics is the interaction between energetic particles and magnetized plasmas. In the current paper we focus on particle diffusion across the guide magnetic field. It is shown that the perpendicular diffusion coefficient depends only on the parallel diffusion coefficient and the Kubo number. Therefore, one can find four asymptotic limits depending on the values of these two parameters. These regimes are the quasilinear limit, the Kadomtsev & Pogutse limit, the scaling of Rechester & Rosenbluth, and the scaling found by Zybin & Istomin. In the current article we focus on the Rechester & Rosenbluth scenario because this was not discovered before in the context of collisionless plasmas. Examples and applications are discussed as well. We show that an energy independent ratio of perpendicular and parallel diffusion coefficients can be found and that this ratio can be very small but also close to unity. This is exactly what one observes in the solar wind.

  7. Stable laser–plasma accelerators at low densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Song; Hafz, Nasr A. M., E-mail: nasr@sjtu.edu.cn; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Ge, Xulei; Sokollik, Thomas; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report stable laser wakefield acceleration using 17–50 TW laser pulses interacting with 4?mm-long helium gas jet. The initial laser spot size was relatively large (28??m) and the plasma densities were 0.48–2.0?×?10{sup 19?}cm{sup ?3}. High-quality 100–MeV electron beams were generated at the plasma density of 7.5?×?10{sup 18?}cm{sup ?3}, at which the beam parameters (pointing angle, energy spectrum, charge, and divergence angle) were measured and stabilized. At higher densities, filamentation instability of the laser-plasma interaction was observed and it has led to multiple wakefield accelerated electron beams. The experimental results are supported by 2D particle-in-cell simulations. The achievement presented here is an important step toward the use of laser-driven accelerators in real applications.

  8. On the ordinary mode instability for low beta plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadi, F.; Qamar, A. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar (Pakistan); Bashir, M. F. [Department of Physics, G. C. University, Lahore (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, G. C. University, Lahore (Pakistan); Yoon, P. H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-2431 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Schlickeiser, R. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- and Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universität, Bochum (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability, first discussed by Davidson and Wu [Phys. Fluids 13, 1407 (1970)], has recently received renewed attention owing to its potential applicability to the solar wind plasma. In a series of papers, Ibscher, Schlickeiser, and their colleagues [Phys. Plasmas 19, 072116 (2012); ibid. 20, 012103 (2013); ibid. 20, 042121 (2013); ibid. 21, 022110 (2014)] revisited the O mode instability and extended it to the low-beta plasma regime by considering a counter-streaming bi-Maxwellian model. However, the O-mode instability is, thus, far discussed only on the basis of the marginal stability condition rather than actual numerical solutions of the dispersion relation. The present paper revisits the O-mode instability by considering the actual complex roots. The marginal stability condition as a function of the (electron) temperature anisotropy and beta naturally emerges in such a scheme.

  9. Meter scale plasma source for plasma wakefield experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Hogan, M. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High accelerating gradients generated by a high density electron beam moving through plasma has been used to double the energy of the SLAC electron beam [1]. During that experiment, the electron current density was high enough to generate its own plasma without significant head erosion. In the newly commissioned FACET facility at SLAC, the peak current will be lower and without pre-ionization, head erosion will be a significant challenge for the planned experiments. In this work we report on our design of a meter scale plasma source for these experiments to effectively avoid the problem of head erosion. The plasma source is based on a homogeneous metal vapor gas column that is generated in a heat pipe oven [2]. A lithium oven over 30 cm long at densities over 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} has been constructed and tested at UCLA. The plasma is then generated by coupling a 10 TW short pulse Ti:Sapphire laser into the gas column using an axicon lens setup. The Bessel profile of the axicon setup creates a region of high intensity that can stretch over the full length of the gas column with approximately constant diameter. In this region of high intensity, the alkali metal vapor is ionized through multi-photon ionization process. In this manner, a fully ionized meter scale plasma of uniform density can be formed. Methods for controlling the plasma diameter and length will also be discussed.

  10. Plasma/liquid metal interactions during tokamak operation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassanein, A.; Allain, J. P.; Insepov, Z.; Konkashbaev, I.; Energy Technology

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the critical technological challenges of future tokamak fusion devices is the ability for plasma-facing components to handle both normal and abnormal plasma/surface interaction events that compromise their lifetime and operation of the machine. Under normal operation plasma/surface interactions that are important include: sputtering, particle implantation and recycling, He pumping and ELM (edge localized modes)-induced erosion. In abnormal or off-normal operation: disruptions and vertical displacement events (VDEs) are important. To extend PFC lifetime under these conditions, liquid-metals have been considered as candidate PFCs (Plasma-Facing Components), including: liquid lithium, tin-lithium, gallium and tin. Liquid lithium has been measured to have nonlinear increase of physical sputtering with rise in temperature. Such increase can be a result of exposure to ELM-level particle fluxes. The significant increase in particle flux to the divertor and nearby PFCs can enhance sputtering erosion by an order of magnitude or more. In addition from the standpoint of hydrogen recycling and helium pumping liquid lithium appears to be a good candidate plasma-facing material (PFM). Advanced designs of first wall and divertor systems propose the application of liquid-metals as an alternate PFC to contend with high-heat flux constraints of large-scale tokamak devices. Additional issues include PFC operation under disruptions and long temporal instabilities such as VDEs. A comprehensive two-fluid model is developed to integrate core and SOL (scrape-off layer) parameters during ELMs with PFC surface evolution using the HEIGHTS package. Special emphasis is made on the application of lithium as a candidate plasma-facing liquid-metal.

  11. Plasma/Liquid-Metal Interactions During Tokamak Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassanein, A.; Allain, J.P.; Insepov, Z.; Konkashbaev, I. [Argonne National Laboratory (United States)

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the critical technological challenges of future tokamak fusion devices is the ability for plasma-facing components to handle both normal and abnormal plasma/surface interaction events that compromise their lifetime and operation of the machine. Under normal operation plasma/surface interactions that are important include: sputtering, particle implantation and recycling, He pumping and ELM (edge localized modes)-induced erosion. In abnormal or off-normal operation: disruptions and vertical displacement events (VDEs) are important. To extend PFC lifetime under these conditions, liquid-metals have been considered as candidate PFCs (Plasma-Facing Components), including: liquid lithium, tin-lithium, gallium and tin.Liquid lithium has been measured to have nonlinear increase of physical sputtering with rise in temperature. Such increase can be a result of exposure to ELM-level particle fluxes. The significant increase in particle flux to the divertor and nearby PFCs can enhance sputtering erosion by an order of magnitude or more. In addition from the standpoint of hydrogen recycling and helium pumping liquid lithium appears to be a good candidate plasma-facing material (PFM). Advanced designs of first wall and divertor systems propose the application of liquid-metals as an alternate PFC to contend with high-heat flux constraints of large-scale tokamak devices. Additional issues include PFC operation under disruptions and long temporal instabilities such as VDEs. A comprehensive two-fluid model is developed to integrate core and SOL (scrape-off layer) parameters during ELMs with PFC surface evolution using the HEIGHTS package. Special emphasis is made on the application of lithium as a candidate plasma-facing liquid-metal.

  12. Liquid injection plasma deposition method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid injection plasma torch deposition apparatus for depositing material onto a surface of a substrate may comprise a plasma torch for producing a jet of plasma from an outlet nozzle. A plasma confinement tube having an inlet end and an outlet end and a central bore therethrough is aligned with the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch so that the plasma jet is directed into the inlet end of the plasma confinement tube and emerges from the outlet end of the plasma confinement tube. The plasma confinement tube also includes an injection port transverse to the central bore. A liquid injection device connected to the injection port of the plasma confinement tube injects a liquid reactant mixture containing the material to be deposited onto the surface of the substrate through the injection port and into the central bore of the plasma confinement tube.

  13. Liquid injection plasma deposition method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, P.C.; Watkins, A.D.

    1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid injection plasma torch deposition apparatus for depositing material onto a surface of a substrate may comprise a plasma torch for producing a jet of plasma from an outlet nozzle. A plasma confinement tube having an inlet end and an outlet end and a central bore therethrough is aligned with the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch so that the plasma jet is directed into the inlet end of the plasma confinement tube and emerges from the outlet end of the plasma confinement tube. The plasma confinement tube also includes an injection port transverse to the central bore. A liquid injection device connected to the injection port of the plasma confinement tube injects a liquid reactant mixture containing the material to be deposited onto the surface of the substrate through the injection port and into the central bore of the plasma confinement tube. 8 figs.

  14. Aerospace & Energetics Research Program -University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumlak, Uri

    - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group q The Boltzmann equation is seven dimensional. qAerospace & Energetics Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Plasma Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Abstract Many current plasma simulation

  15. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A .gamma.-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  16. Plasma relaxation mechanics of pulsed high power microwave surface flashover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beeson, S.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A. [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)] [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave transmission and reflection characteristics of pulsed radio frequency field generated plasmas are elucidated for air, N{sub 2}, and He environments under pressure conditions ranging from 10 to 600 torr. The pulsed, low temperature plasma is generated along the atmospheric side of the dielectric boundary between the source (under vacuum) and the radiating environment with a thickness on the order of 5 mm and a cross sectional area just smaller than that of the waveguide. Utilizing custom multi-standard waveguide couplers and a continuous low power probing source, the scattering parameters were measured before, during, and after the high power microwave pulse with emphasis on the latter. From these scattering parameters, temporal electron density estimations (specifically the longitudinal integral of the density) were calculated using a 1D plane wave-excited model for analysis of the relaxation processes associated. These relaxation characteristics ultimately determine the maximum repetition rate for many pulsed electric field applications and thus are applicable to a much larger scope in the plasma community than just those related to high power microwaves. This manuscript discusses the diagnostic setup for acquiring the power measurements along with a detailed description of the kinematic and chemical behavior of the plasma as it decays down to its undisturbed state under various gas type and pressure conditions.

  17. Multilayered and complex nanoparticle architectures through plasma synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wakeland, Stephen [UNM MECH.ENG.; Cui, Yuehua [UNM MECH.ENG.; Knapp, Angela [TOYOTA USA; Richard, Monique [TOYOTA USA; Luhrs, Claudia [UNM MECH.ENG.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Aerosol Through Plasma (ATP) method in conjunction with simple chemical techniques a variety of complex and novel nanoparticle architectures were created. A TP was used to make metal-core/carbon shell nanoparticles (ca. 50 nm diameter) of SnlCarbon and AI/Carbon. These have, respectively, potential for application as battery anode (for hybrid and electric vehicles) and high energy fuel In one example of post processing, the Sn-core/carbon-shell material is treated in acidic solution and yields a true nano-sized hollow carbon shell. These shells have potential application as catalyst supports, gas storage, a neutral buoyancy material for applications as varied as proppants, and slow release capsules for pharmaceutical or agricultural applications. A different set of post-A-T-P processes were used to make three layer nanoparticles with a metal core, graphite inner shell and ceramic outer shell. This method extends the range of achievable nanoparticles architectures, hence enabling new applications.

  18. Fast pulse nonthermal plasma reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosocha, Louis A.

    2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast pulsed nonthermal plasma reactor includes a discharge cell and a charging assembly electrically connected thereto. The charging assembly provides plural high voltage pulses to the discharge cell. Each pulse has a rise time between one and ten nanoseconds and a duration of three to twenty nanoseconds. The pulses create nonthermal plasma discharge within the discharge cell. Accordingly, the nonthermal plasma discharge can be used to remove pollutants from gases or break the gases into smaller molecules so that they can be more efficiently combusted.

  19. Lithium As Plasma Facing Component for Magnetic Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masayuki Ono

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of lithium in magnetic fusion confinement experiments started in the 1990's in order to improve tokamak plasma performance as a low-recycling plasma-facing component (PFC). Lithium is the lightest alkali metal and it is highly chemically reactive with relevant ion species in fusion plasmas including hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, carbon, and oxygen. Because of the reactive properties, lithium can provide strong pumping for those ions. It was indeed a spectacular success in TFTR where a very small amount (~ 0.02 gram) of lithium coating of the PFCs resulted in the fusion power output to improve by nearly a factor of two. The plasma confinement also improved by a factor of two. This success was attributed to the reduced recycling of cold gas surrounding the fusion plasma due to highly reactive lithium on the wall. The plasma confinement and performance improvements have since been confirmed in a large number of fusion devices with various magnetic configurations including CDX-U/LTX (US), CPD (Japan), HT-7 (China), EAST (China), FTU (Italy), NSTX (US), T-10, T-11M (Russia), TJ-II (Spain), and RFX (Italy). Additionally, lithium was shown to broaden the plasma pressure profile in NSTX, which is advantageous in achieving high performance H-mode operation for tokamak reactors. It is also noted that even with significant applications (up to 1,000 grams in NSTX) of lithium on PFCs, very little contamination (< 0.1%) of lithium fraction in main fusion plasma core was observed even during high confinement modes. The lithium therefore appears to be a highly desirable material to be used as a plasma PFC material from the magnetic fusion plasma performance and operational point of view. An exciting development in recent years is the growing realization of lithium as a potential solution to solve the exceptionally challenging need to handle the fusion reactor divertor heat flux, which could reach 60 MW/m2 . By placing the liquid lithium (LL) surface in the path of the main divertor heat flux (divertor strike point), the lithium is evaporated from the surface. The evaporated lithium is quickly ionized by the plasma and the ionized lithium ions can provide a strongly radiative layer of plasma ("radiative mantle"), thus could significantly reduce the heat flux to the divertor strike point surfaces, thus protecting the divertor surface. The protective effects of LL have been observed in many experiments and test stands. As a possible reactor divertor candidate, a closed LL divertor system is described. Finally, it is noted that the lithium applications as a PFC can be quite flexible and broad. The lithium application should be quite compatible with various divertor configurations, and it can be also applied to protecting the presently envisioned tungsten based solid PFC surfaces such as the ones for ITER. Lithium based PFCs therefore have the exciting prospect of providing a cost effective flexible means to improve the fusion reactor performance, while providing a practical solution to the highly challenging divertor heat handling issue confronting the steadystate magnetic fusion reactors.

  20. Error Field Correction in DIII-D Ohmic Plasmas With Either Handedness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jong-Kyu Park, Michael J. Schaffer, Robert J. La Haye,Timothy J. Scoville and Jonathan E. Menard

    2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Error field correction results in DIII-D plasmas are presented in various configurations. In both left-handed and right-handed plasma configurations, where the intrinsic error fields become different due to the opposite helical twist (handedness) of the magnetic field, the optimal error correction currents and the toroidal phases of internal(I)-coils are empirically established. Applications of the Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code to these results demonstrate that the field component to be minimized is not the resonant component of the external field, but the total field including ideal plasma responses. Consistency between experiment and theory has been greatly improved along with the understanding of ideal plasma responses, but non-ideal plasma responses still need to be understood to achieve the reliable predictability in tokamak error field correction.

  1. Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 23, No. 1, March 2003 ( 2003) Model of the Negative DC Corona Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 23, No. 1, March 2003 ( 2003) Model of the Negative DC Corona Plasma: Comparison to the Positive DC Corona Plasma Junhong Chen1 and Jane H. Davidson1,2 Receiûed March 26, 2002, reûised June 14, 2002 A numerical model of the negatiûe DC corona plasma along a thin

  2. Thermal plasma chemical synthesis of powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogt, G.J.; Newkirk, L.R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal plasma processing has been increasingly used to synthesize submicron powders of high-purity ceramics and metals. The high temperatures generated with the plasma provide a vapor phase reaction zone for elements with high boiling points and refractory materials. An overview is presented on the general plasma technology used in synthesis and on the properties of plasma powders.

  3. ASSOCIATED LABORATORY PLASMA PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisboa, Universidade Técnica de

    ASSOCIATED LABORATORY ON PLASMA PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING Centro de Fusão Nuclear Centro de Física dos PlasmasCentro de Fusão Nuclear INSTITUTO SUPERIOR TÉCNICO Centro de Física dos Plasmas WORK Units of excellence in Europe, in the fields of Nuclear Fusion, Plasma Physics and Technologies

  4. Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the after-treatment of automotive exhaust particulates and marine diesel exhaust NOx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAdams, R; Beech, P; Gillespie, R; Guy, C; Jones,S; Liddell, T; Morgan, R; Shawcross, J; Weeks, D; Hughes, D; Oesterle, J; Eberspdcher,

    2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The trend in environmental legislation is such that primary engine modifications will not be sufficient to meet all future emissions requirements and exhaust aftertreatment technologies will need to be employed. One potential solution that is well placed to meet those requirements is non-thermal plasma technology. This paper will describe our work with some of our partners in the development of a plasma based diesel particulate filter (DPF) and plasma assisted catalytic reduction (PACR) for NOx removal. This paper describes the development of non-thermal plasma technology for the aftertreatment of particulates from a passenger car engine and NOx from a marine diesel exhaust application.

  5. Penetration of plasma into the wafer-focus ring gap in capacitively coupled plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Penetration of plasma into the wafer-focus ring gap in capacitively coupled plasmas Natalia Y of capacitively coupled plasma reactors with a wafer-focus ring gap. The penetration of plasma generated species i.e., ions and radicals into the wafer-focus ring gap is discussed. We found that the penetration of plasma

  6. Nonlinear plasma waves excitation by intense ion beams in background plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    describe the plasma perturbations well.5 Here, we focus on the general case where the plasma density hasNonlinear plasma waves excitation by intense ion beams in background plasma Igor D. Kaganovich, Edward A. Startsev, and Ronald C. Davidson Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton

  7. CHAPTER 5. PLASMA DESCRIPTIONS I: KINETIC, TWO-FLUID 1 Plasma Descriptions I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callen, James D.

    CHAPTER 5. PLASMA DESCRIPTIONS I: KINETIC, TWO-FLUID 1 Chapter 5 Plasma Descriptions I: Kinetic, Two-Fluid Descriptions of plasmas are obtained from extensions of the kinetic theory of gases of charged particles in the plasma, and because the electric and magnetic fields in the plasma must

  8. Experimental Investigation of Non-Thermal Electric Fields and Plasma Waves in Pulsed-Power Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -field-plasma interaction, particle accelera- tion, growth of instabilities and plasma waves. As yet, to the hest of our and the properties of plasmas under high-power pulses at the nanosecond time scale. The method is based on resonant in a coaxial-pulsed-plasma configura- tion. The plasma is doped with a laser-produced lithium heam, fol- lowed

  9. Atomic phenomena in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisheit, J.C.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following chapters are included: (1) the plasma environment, (2) perturbations of atomic structure, (3) perturbations of atomic collisions, (4) formation of spectral lines, and (5) dielectronic recombination. (MOW)

  10. Coherent control of plasma dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Z -H; Lebailly, V; Nees, J A; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent control of a system involves steering an interaction to a final coherent state by controlling the phase of an applied field. Plasmas support coherent wave structures that can be generated by intense laser fields. Here, we demonstrate the coherent control of plasma dynamics in a laser wakefield electron acceleration experiment. A genetic algorithm is implemented using a deformable mirror with the electron beam signal as feedback, which allows a heuristic search for the optimal wavefront under laser-plasma conditions that is not known a priori. We are able to improve both the electron beam charge and angular distribution by an order of magnitude. These improvements do not simply correlate with having the `best' focal spot, since the highest quality vacuum focal spot produces a greatly inferior electron beam, but instead correspond to the particular laser phase that steers the plasma wave to a final state with optimal accelerating fields.

  11. Quark-gluon plasma paradox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dariusz Miskowiec

    2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on simple physics arguments it is shown that the concept of quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter consisting of uncorrelated quarks, antiquarks, and gluons, has a fundamental problem.

  12. Mobile inductively coupled plasma system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D'Silva, Arthur P. (Ames, IA); Jaselskis, Edward J. (Ames, IA)

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for sampling and analyzing a material located at a hazardous site. A laser located remote from the hazardous site is connected to an optical fiber, which directs laser radiation proximate the material at the hazardous site. The laser radiation abates a sample of the material. An inductively coupled plasma is located remotely from the material. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated particles to a plasma, where they are dissociated, atomized and excited to provide characteristic optical reduction of the elemental constituents of the sample. An optical spectrometer is located remotely from the site. A second optical fiber is connected to the optical spectrometer at one end and the plasma source at the other end to carry the optical radiation from the plasma source to the spectrometer.

  13. Mobile inductively coupled plasma system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D`Silva, A.P.; Jaselskis, E.J.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for sampling and analyzing a material located at a hazardous site. A laser located remotely from the hazardous site is connected to an optical fiber, which directs laser radiation proximate the material at the hazardous site. The laser radiation abates a sample of the material. An inductively coupled plasma is located remotely from the material. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated particles to a plasma, where they are dissociated, atomized and excited to provide characteristic optical reduction of the elemental constituents of the sample. An optical spectrometer is located remotely from the site. A second optical fiber is connected to the optical spectrometer at one end and the plasma source at the other end to carry the optical radiation from the plasma source to the spectrometer. 10 figs.

  14. The Plasma Magnet John Slough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, Simon

    windmill) Two polyphase magnetic coils (stator) are used to drive steady ring currents in the local plasma representation in the ring currents formed when the magnetosphere is compressed by the solar wind. The process

  15. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    after tests at PPPL. (Photo by Elle StarkmanPPPL Office of Communications) The titanium coupon being treated in the oxygen plasma. (Photo by Elle StarkmanPPPL Office of...

  16. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Babcock, W.C.

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

  17. Plasma Arc Technology Dedicated to Solving Military Waste Problems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, E. D.; Zaghloul, H. H.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    discussion of various basic research programs conducted to address some of the research needs as identified during the feasibility phase will be presented. An overview of some of the industrial applications of plasma waste treatment will follow. Finally..., a discussion highlighting the research and development (R&D) needs of the technology will be presented. 205 ESL-IE-97-04-33 Proceedings from the Nineteenth Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 23-24, 1997 The projects...

  18. Neutrino dispersion in magnetized plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. V. Mikheev; E. N. Narynskaya

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino dispersion in the charge symmetric magnetized plasma is investigated. We have studied the plasma contribution into the additional energy of neutrino and obtained the simple expression for it. We consider in detail the neutrino self-energy under physical conditions of weak field, moderate field and strong field limits. It is shown that our result for neutrino dispersion in moderate magnetic field differ substantially from the previous one in the literature.

  19. Flavors in an expanding plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes Große; Romuald A. Janik; Piotr Surówka

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the effect of an expanding plasma on probe matter by determining time-dependent D7 embeddings in the holographic dual of an expanding viscous plasma. We calculate the chiral condensate and meson spectra including contributions of viscosity. The chiral condensate essentially confirms the expectation from the static black hole. For the meson spectra we propose a scheme that is in agreement with the adiabatic approximation. New contributions arise for the vector mesons at the order of the viscosity terms.

  20. Chaos in a complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheridan, T.E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio Northern University, Ada, Ohio 45810 (United States)

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Chaotic dynamics is observed experimentally in a complex (dusty) plasma of three particles. A low-frequency sinusoidal modulation of the plasma density excites both the center-of-mass and breathing modes. Low-dimensional chaos is seen for a 1:2 resonance between these modes. A strange attractor with a dimension of 2.48{+-}0.05 is observed. The largest Lyapunov exponent is positive.

  1. Magnetic reconnection in nontoroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boozer, Allen H. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic reconnection is a major issue in solar and astrophysical plasmas. The mathematical result that the evolution of a magnetic field with only point nulls is always locally ideal limits the nature of reconnection in nontoroidal plasmas. Here it is shown that the exponentially increasing separation of neighboring magnetic field lines, which is generic, tends to produce rapid magnetic reconnection if the length of the field lines is greater than about 20 times the exponentiation, or Lyapunov, length.

  2. Geometric Phase Of The Faraday Rotation Of Electromagnetic Waves In Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Liu and Hong Qin

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The geometric phase of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied theoretically. The variation of the propagation direction of circularly polarized waves results in a geometric phase, which also contributes to the Faraday rotation, in addition to the standard dynamical phase. The origin and properties of the geometric phase is investigated. The in uence of the geometric phase to plasma diagnostics using Faraday rotation is also discussed as an application of the theory.

  3. RF laser plasma measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollen, W.M.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major difficulties with excimer lasers has been the presence of impurities, introduced, for example, by the electrodes present in the D.C. discharge approach. Use of microwave excitation makes possible an electrodeless discharge, thereby reducing the risk of introducing impurities into the laser mix. In this approach a tube containing the laser mix is inserted in a waveguide or microwave cavity; the microwaves then break down the laser mix to form a discharge and further interact to heat that discharge. In such microwave discharges, strong fluorescence seems limited to approximately 100 ns. In the same time frame, the fluorescence has also been observed to collapse to the wall. The wall collapse may be related to the reduced fluorescence (reduced radiation area), although burn-up of the lasing components seems more likely. The collapse to the wall reduces the ability to lase by decreasing the active volume. A better understanding of this effect needs to be obtained before a microwave-driven laser can be further developed. This research effort was directed towards obtaining a fundamental understanding of the collapse of the fluorescence to the tube walls. The ultimate goal is to understand the collapse sufficiently to prevent or reduce its effects; to this end, a number of basic plasma physics experiments have been carried out. A complete understanding has not yet been reached.

  4. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak, or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode, which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum or other duct near the electrode includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode is insulated laterally with insulators, one of which is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode and a vacuum vessel wall, with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E [times] B/B[sup 2] drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable. 11 figs.

  5. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffer, Michael J. (San Diego, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode (56) positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak (20), or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix (40) of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode (56), which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum (54) or other duct near the electrode (56) includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode (56) is insulated laterally with insulators (63,64), one of which (64) is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode (56) and a vacuum vessel wall (22), with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E.times.B/B.sup.2 drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable.

  6. Multibubble plasma production and solvent decomposition in water by slot-excited microwave discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishijima, T.; Hotta, H.; Sugai, H.; Sato, M. [Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Honda Electronics Corporation, 20 Oyamazuka, Oiwa-cho, Toyohashi 441-3193 (Japan)

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense microwaves are injected from a slot antenna into water partly filling a metal vessel. When the vessel is evacuated to saturated vapor pressure ({approx}5x10{sup 3} Pa) of water, microwave breakdown gives rise to plasmas in many bubbles in the boiling water. Gas bubbling technique enables production of multibubble plasmas in water even at atmospheric pressure. Optical emissions from the exited species are investigated to identify radical species in water. In order to demonstrate application to purification of polluted water, methylene blue and trichlorethylene solution in 8 l water were observed to rapidly decrease with multibubble plasma treatment.

  7. Patterned graphene functionalization via mask-free scanning of micro-plasma jet under ambient condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Dong; Yu, Yao, E-mail: ensiyu@mail.hust.edu.cn; Liu, Lin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Wu, Shu-Qun; Lu, Xin-Pei [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Wu, Yue [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a mask-free method is introduced for patterned nitrogen doping of graphene using a micro-plasma jet under ambient condition. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra indicate that nitrogen atoms are incorporated into the graphene lattice with the two-dimensional spatial distribution precisely controlled in the range of mm down to 10??m. Since the chemistry of the micro-plasma jet can be controlled by the choice of the gas mixture, this direct writing process with micro-plasma jet can be a versatile approach for patterned functionalization of graphene with high spatial resolution. This could have promising applications in graphene-based electronics.

  8. A plasma needle for generating homogeneous discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xuechen; Yuan Ning; Jia Pengying; Chen Junying [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Homogeneous discharge in air is often considered to be the ultimate low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas for industrial applications. In this paper, we present a method whereby stable homogeneous discharge in open air can be generated by a simple plasma needle. The discharge mechanism is discussed based on the spatially resolved light emission waveforms from the plasma. Optical emission spectroscopy is used to determine electron energy and rotational temperature, and results indicate that both electron energy and rotational temperature increase with increasing the applied voltage. The results are analyzed qualitatively based on the discharge mechanism.

  9. Relation between Lyapunov Exponent and Dielectric Response Function in Dilute One Component Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueshima, Y.; Nishihara, K. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan)] [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan); Barnett, D.M.; Tajima, T. [Department of Physics and Institute of Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Institute of Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Furukawa, H. [Institute for Laser Technology, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan)] [Institute for Laser Technology, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical model is developed for the N -body largest Lyapunov exponent in the dilute plasma, and it is shown that the Lyapunov exponent relates to the dielectric response function. The relation provides a bridge between microscopic mechanical and macroscopic statistical quantities and it is expected to also be applicable for a weakly nonequilibrium system. In thermal equilibrium, the model shows that the Lyapunov exponent of dilute one component plasmas is of the same order as the plasma frequency and independent of the Coulomb coupling constant. These results agree fairly well with three dimensional particle simulations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Development and Benchmarking of a Hybrid PIC Code For Dense Plasmas and Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Welch, Dale R. [Voss Scientific, LLC; Thompson, John R. [FAR-TECH, Inc.; MacFarlane, Joeseph J. [Prism Computational Sciences Inc.; Phillips, Michael W. [Advanced Energy Systems, Inc.; Bruner, Nicki [Voss Scientific, LLC; Mostrom, Chris [Voss Scientific, LLC; Thoma, Carsten [Voss Scientific, LLC; Clark, R. E. [Voss Scientific, LLC; Bogatu, Nick [FAR-TECH, Inc.; Kim, Jin-Soo [FAR-TECH, Inc.; Galkin, Sergei [FAR-TECH, Inc.; Golovkin, Igor E. [Prism Computational Sciences, Inc.; Woodruff, P. R. [Prism Computational Sciences, Inc.; Wu, Linchun [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Messer, Sarah J. [HyperV Technologies Corp.

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation processes play an important role in the study of both fast ignition and other inertial confinement schemes, such as plasma jet driven magneto-inertial fusion, both in their effect on energy balance, and in generating diagnostic signals. In the latter case, warm and hot dense matter may be produced by the convergence of a plasma shell formed by the merging of an assembly of high Mach number plasma jets. This innovative approach has the potential advantage of creating matter of high energy densities in voluminous amount compared with high power lasers or particle beams. An important application of this technology is as a plasma liner for the flux compression of magnetized plasma to create ultra-high magnetic fields and burning plasmas. HyperV Technologies Corp. has been developing plasma jet accelerator technology in both coaxial and linear railgun geometries to produce plasma jets of sufficient mass, density, and velocity to create such imploding plasma liners. An enabling tool for the development of this technology is the ability to model the plasma dynamics, not only in the accelerators themselves, but also in the resulting magnetized target plasma and within the merging/interacting plasma jets during transport to the target. Welch pioneered numerical modeling of such plasmas (including for fast ignition) using the LSP simulation code. Lsp is an electromagnetic, parallelized, plasma simulation code under development since 1995. It has a number of innovative features making it uniquely suitable for modeling high energy density plasmas including a hybrid fluid model for electrons that allows electrons in dense plasmas to be modeled with a kinetic or fluid treatment as appropriate. In addition to in-house use at Voss Scientific, several groups carrying out research in Fast Ignition (LLNL, SNL, UCSD, AWE (UK), and Imperial College (UK)) also use LSP. A collaborative team consisting of HyperV Technologies Corp., Voss Scientific LLC, FAR-TECH, Inc., Prism Computational Sciences, Inc. and Advanced Energy Systems Inc. joined efforts to develop new physics and numerical models for LSP in several key areas to enhance the ability of LSP to model high energy density plasmas (HEDP). This final report details those efforts. Areas addressed in this research effort include: adding radiation transport to LSP, first in 2D and then fully 3D, extending the EMHD model to 3D, implementing more advanced radiation and electrode plasma boundary conditions, and installing more efficient implicit numerical algorithms to speed complex 2-D and 3-D computations. The new capabilities allow modeling of the dominant processes in high energy density plasmas, and further assist the development and optimization of plasma jet accelerators, with particular attention to MHD instabilities and plasma/wall interaction (based on physical models for ion drag friction and ablation/erosion of the electrodes). In the first funding cycle we implemented a solver for the radiation diffusion equation. To solve this equation in 2-D, we used finite-differencing and applied the parallelized sparse-matrix solvers in the PETSc library (Argonne National Laboratory) to the resulting system of equations. A database of the necessary coefficients for materials of interest was assembled using the PROPACEOS and ATBASE codes from Prism. The model was benchmarked against Prism's 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code HELIOS, and against experimental data obtained from HyperV's separately funded plasma jet accelerator development program. Work in the second funding cycle focused on extending the radiation diffusion model to full 3-D, continued development of the EMHD model, optimizing the direct-implicit model to speed up calculations, add in multiply ionized atoms, and improved the way boundary conditions are handled in LSP. These new LSP capabilities were then used, along with analytic calculations and Mach2 runs, to investigate plasma jet merging, plasma detachment and transport, restrike and advanced jet accelerator design. In addition, a strong linkage to diagnostic measureme

  11. A two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence diagnostic for fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E. [Physics Department, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Boivin, R. L.; Brooks, N. H.; Groebner, R. J.; Hill, D. N. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Porter, G. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The quality of plasma produced in a magnetic confinement fusion device is influenced to a large extent by the neutral gas surrounding the plasma. The plasma is fueled by the ionization of neutrals, and charge exchange interactions between edge neutrals and plasma ions are a sink of energy and momentum. Here we describe a diagnostic capable of measuring the spatial distribution of neutral gas in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. A high intensity (5 MW/cm{sup 2}), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm{sup -1}) laser is injected into a hydrogen plasma to excite the Lyman {beta} transition via the simultaneous absorption of two 205 nm photons. The absorption rate, determined by measurement of subsequent Balmer {alpha} emission, is proportional to the number of particles with a given velocity. Calibration is performed in situ by filling the chamber to a known pressure of neutral krypton and exciting a transition close in wavelength to that used in hydrogen. We present details of the calibration procedure, including a technique for identifying saturation broadening, measurements of the neutral density profile in a hydrogen helicon plasma, and discuss the application of the diagnostic to plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak.

  12. Influence of finite geometrical asymmetry of the electrodes in capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bora, B., E-mail: bbora@cchen.cl; Soto, L. [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Santiago, Chile and Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4 (Chile)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) plasmas are widely studied in last decades due to the versatile applicability of energetic ions, chemically active species, radicals, and also energetic neutral species in many material processing fields including microelectronics, aerospace, and biology. A dc self-bias is known to generate naturally in geometrically asymmetric CCRF plasma because of the difference in electrode sizes known as geometrical asymmetry of the electrodes in order to compensate electron and ion flux to each electrode within one rf period. The plasma series resonance effect is also come into play due to the geometrical asymmetry and excited several harmonics of the fundamental in low pressure CCRF plasma. In this work, a 13.56?MHz CCRF plasma is studied on the based on the nonlinear global model of asymmetric CCRF discharge to understand the influences of finite geometrical asymmetry of the electrodes in terms of generation of dc self-bias and plasma heating. The nonlinear global model on asymmetric discharge has been modified by considering the sheath at the grounded electrode to taking account the finite geometrical asymmetry of the electrodes. The ion density inside both the sheaths has been taken into account by incorporating the steady-state fluid equations for ions considering that the applied rf frequency is higher than the typical ion plasma frequency. Details results on the influences of geometrical asymmetry on the generation of dc self-bias and plasma heating are discussed.

  13. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: A facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, C. M.

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and other high-? phenomena with astrophysically relevant ...

  14. atmospheric plasma sources: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in active plasma region and plasma parameters (electron density and electron distribution function) are determined. Concentrations of oxygen atoms and ozone in the plasma...

  15. atazanavir plasma concentrations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: The Workshop will concentrate on burning plasma research in the areas of Plasma Transport and Confinement, MHD plasma research; ...

  16. affects plasma concentrations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: The Workshop will concentrate on burning plasma research in the areas of Plasma Transport and Confinement, MHD plasma research; ...

  17. aiv plasma concentrations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics and Fusion Websites Summary: The Workshop will concentrate on burning plasma research in the areas of Plasma Transport and Confinement, MHD plasma research; ...

  18. LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED ?? COLLIDERS ? C. B.linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators arediscussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-

  19. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of high- gradient, laser plasma particle accelerators.accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. Theseleft) showing the laser (red), plasma wake density (purple-

  20. Tailored net-shape powder composites by spark plasma sintering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khaleghi, Evan Aryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    produced by spark plasma sintering”, Powder Metall. , 51, 59nanoparticles in spark plasma sintering. Mater. Sci. Eng. ,Evolution During Spark Plasma Sintering,” Ceram. Int. , 35,

  1. Extreme hydrogen plasma densities achieved in a linear plasma generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rooij, G. J. van; Veremiyenko, V. P.; Goedheer, W. J.; de Groot, B.; Kleyn, A. W.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Versloot, T. W.; Whyte, D. G.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D. C.; Cardozo, N. J. Lopes [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Nieuwegein, Uthrecht 3430BE (Netherlands); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Nieuwegein, Uthrecht 3430BE (NL) and Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetized hydrogen plasma beam was generated with a cascaded arc, expanding in a vacuum vessel at an axial magnetic field of up to 1.6 T. Its characteristics were measured at a distance of 4 cm from the nozzle: up to a 2 cm beam diameter, 7.5x10{sup 20} m{sup -3} electron density, {approx}2 eV electron and ion temperatures, and 3.5 km/s axial plasma velocity. This gives a 2.6x10{sup 24} H{sup +} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} peak ion flux density, which is unprecedented in linear plasma generators. The high efficiency of the source is obtained by the combined action of the magnetic field and an optimized nozzle geometry. This is interpreted as a cross-field return current that leads to power dissipation in the beam just outside the source.

  2. Recent Advances in Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, Mark

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The costs and the time scales of colliders intended to reach the energy frontier are such that it is important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators a drive beam, either laser or particle, produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultra-high accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. More than 42 GeV energy gain was achieved in an 85 cm long plasma wakefield accelerator driven by a 42 GeV electron drive beam in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) Facility at SLAC. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx}52 GV/m. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3 km long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. Prospects for a drive-witness bunch configuration and high-gradient positron acceleration experiments planned for the SABER facility will be discussed.

  3. Momentum, Heat, and Neutral Mass Transport in Convective Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Liquid Systems and Implications for Aqueous Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Alexander; Slikboer, Elmar; Shannon, Steven; Graves, David

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing interest in the study of plasma-liquid interactions with application to biomedicine, chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other fields. This work models the momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer between gas and aqueous phases in the context of a streamer discharge; the qualitative conclusions are generally applicable to plasma-liquid systems. The problem domain is discretized using the finite element method. The most interesting and relevant model result for application purposes is the steep gradients in reactive species at the interface. At the center of where the reactive gas stream impinges on the water surface, the aqueous concentrations of OH and ONOOH decrease by roughly 9 and 4 orders of magnitude respectively within 50 $\\mu$m of the interface. Recognizing the limited penetration of reactive plasma species into the aqueous phase is critical to discussions about the therapeutic mechanisms for direct plasma treatment of biological solutions. Other interesting results fro...

  4. Plasma instrumentation for fusion power reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sager, G.T.; Bauer, J.F.; Maya, I.; Miley, G.H.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback control will be implemented in fusion power reactors to guard against unpredicted behavior of the plant and to assure desirable operation. In this study, plasma state feedback requirements for plasma control by systems strongly coupled to the plasma (magnet sets, RF, and neutral beam heating systems, and refueling systems) are estimated. Generic considerations regarding the impact of the power reactor environment on plasma instrumentation are outlined. Solutions are proposed to minimize the impact of the power reactor environment on plasma instrumentation. Key plasma diagnostics are evaluated with respect to their potential for upgrade and implementation as power reactor instruments.

  5. Global parameter optimization of Mather type plasma focus in the framework of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional snowplow model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auluck, S K H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) is known to produce highly energetic ions, electrons and plasma environment which can be used for breeding of short-lived isotopes, plasma nanotechnology and other material processing applications. Commercial utilization of DPF in such areas would need a design tool which can be deployed in an automatic search for the best possible device configuration for a given application. The recently revisited [S K H Auluck, Physics of Plasmas 20, 112501 (2013)] Gratton-Vargas (GV) two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus provides a numerical formula for dynamic inductance of a Mather type plasma focus fitted to thousands of automated computations, which enables construction of such design tool. This inductance formula is utilized in the present work to explore global optimization, based on first-principles optimality criteria, in a 4-dimensional parameter-subspace of the zero-resistance GV model. The optimization process is shown to reproduce the empirically observed constancy ...

  6. Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsai, C.C.; Haselton, H.H.

    1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm[sup 2] at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance. 4 figures.

  7. Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsai, Chin-Chi (Oak Ridge, TN); Haselton, Halsey H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm.sup.2 at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance.

  8. Plasma-catalyzed fuel reformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartvigsen, Joseph J.; Elangovan, S.; Czernichowski, Piotr; Hollist, Michele

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A reformer is disclosed that includes a plasma zone to receive a pre-heated mixture of reactants and ionize the reactants by applying an electrical potential thereto. A first thermally conductive surface surrounds the plasma zone and is configured to transfer heat from an external heat source into the plasma zone. The reformer further includes a reaction zone to chemically transform the ionized reactants into synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A second thermally conductive surface surrounds the reaction zone and is configured to transfer heat from the external heat source into the reaction zone. The first thermally conductive surface and second thermally conductive surface are both directly exposed to the external heat source. A corresponding method and system are also disclosed and claimed herein.

  9. Constricted glow discharge plasma source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Anders, Simone (Albany, CA); Dickinson, Michael (San Leandro, CA); Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Winnetka, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

  10. Plasma Production via Field Ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, C.L.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu,; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam's bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

  11. Bi-Plasma Interactions on Femtosecond Time-Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast THz radiation has important applications in materials science studies, such as characterizing transport properties, studying the vibrational response of materials, and in recent years, controlling materials and elucidating their response in intense electromagnetic fields. THz fields can be generated in a lab setting using various plasma-based techniques. This study seeks to examine the interaction of two plasmas in order to better understand the fundamental physics associated with femtosecond filamentation processes and to achieve more efficient THz generation in a lab setting. The intensity of fluorescence in the region of overlap was measured as a function of polarization, power, and relative time delay of the two plasma-generating laser beams. Results of time dependent intensity studies indicate strikingly similar behaviors across polarizations and power levels; a sudden intensity spike was observed at time-zero, followed by a secondary maxima and subsequent decay to the initial plasma intensity. Dependence of the intensity on the power through either beam arm was also observed. Spectral studies of the enhanced emission were also carried out. Although this physical phenomenon is still not fully understood, future studies, including further spectral analysis of the fluorescence overlap, could yield new insight into the ultrafast processes occurring at the intersection of femtosecond filaments, and would provide a better understanding of the mechanisms for enhanced THz production.

  12. Beyond injection: Trojan horse underdense photocathode plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hidding, B.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Xi, Y.; O'Shea, B.; Andonian, G.; Schiller, D.; Barber, S.; Williams, O.; Pretzler, G.; Koenigstein, T.; Kleeschulte, F.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Corde, S.; White, W. W.; Muggli, P.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Lotov, K. [Institut fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany) and Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, Department for Physics and Astronomy, UCLA (United States); Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, Department for Physics and Astronomy, UCLA (United States); Institut fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado (United States) and 1348 Redwood Ave., Boulder, Colorado 80304 (United States); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation) and Novosibirsk State University, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview on the underlying principles of the hybrid plasma wakefield acceleration scheme dubbed 'Trojan Horse' acceleration is given. The concept is based on laser-controlled release of electrons directly into a particle-beam-driven plasma blowout, paving the way for controlled, shapeable electron bunches with ultralow emittance and ultrahigh brightness. Combining the virtues of a low-ionization-threshold underdense photocathode with the GV/m-scale electric fields of a practically dephasing-free beam-driven plasma blowout, this constitutes a 4th generation electron acceleration scheme. It is applicable as a beam brightness transformer for electron bunches from LWFA and PWFA systems alike. At FACET, the proof-of-concept experiment 'E-210: Trojan Horse Plasma Wakefield Acceleration' has recently been approved and is in preparation. At the same time, various LWFA facilities are currently considered to host experiments aiming at stabilizing and boosting the electron bunch output quality via a trojan horse afterburner stage. Since normalized emittance and brightness can be improved by many orders of magnitude, the scheme is an ideal candidate for light sources such as free-electron-lasers and those based on Thomson scattering and betatron radiation alike.

  13. Exploring the limits of cooperative phenomena using complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwabe, M.; Zhdanov, S.; Ivlev, A. V.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E. [Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching (Germany)

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advancing miniaturization of technological applications, processes on the mesoscale become increasingly important. This is the scale where the individual movement of particles transforms into cooperative behavior-behavior that cannot be explained by investigating the motion of individual particles alone.Complex plasmas are ideally suited to study the limits of cooperative behavior. The time scales of the dynamics of the microparticles embedded in the plasma are such that their movement can be fully resolved, and an investigation on the atomistic (kinetic) level is possible. In addition, complex plasmas can be considered a model system for ordinary fluids: The internal microparticle dynamics is basically undamped and is characterized by the similarity parameters matching those of other fluids. This similarity does not break down even at small scales: For instance, in [2], microparticle droplets comprised of only a few 1000-10000 particles were examined. In these experiments, the Weber number (the ratio of inertia to surface tension forces) matches that of falling water drops. As another example, the onset of a Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a complex plasma can be described by the ordinary dispersion relation, even at scales of only few particle layers. This allows investigating the 'nanoscale' of fluid flows, and, hence, the limits of cooperative behavior.

  14. The hydrogen atom in plasmas with an external electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahar, M. K. [Department of Physics, Karamano?lu Mehmetbey University, 70100 Karaman (Turkey); Soylu, A. [Department of Physics, Ni?de University, 51240 Ni?de (Turkey)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We numerically solve the Schrödinger equation, using a more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential with an electric field, in order to investigate the screening and weak external electric field effects on the hydrogen atom in plasmas. The MGECSC potential is examined for four different cases, corresponding to different screening parameters of the potential and the external electric field. The influences of the different screening parameters and the weak external electric field on the energy eigenvalues are determined by solving the corresponding equations using the asymptotic iteration method (AIM). It is found that the corresponding energy values shift when a weak external electric field is applied to the hydrogen atom in a plasma. This study shows that a more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential allows the influence of an applied, weak, external electric field on the hydrogen atom to be investigated in detail, for both Debye and quantum plasmas simultaneously. This suggests that such a potential would be useful in modeling similar effects in other applications of plasma physics, and that AIM is an appropriate method for solving the Schrödinger equation, the solution of which becomes more complex due to the use of the MGECSC potential with an applied external electric field.

  15. Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, M.J.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Hast, C.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; /UCLA; Muggli, P.; Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; /Southern California U.

    2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to {approx}20{micro}m long and focused to {approx}10{micro}m wide. The intense fields of the FACET bunches will be used to field ionize neutral lithium or cesium vapor produced in a heat pipe oven. Previous experiments at the SLAC FFTB facility demonstrated 50GeV/m gradients in an 85cm field ionized lithium plasma where the interaction distance was limited by head erosion. Simulations indicate the lower ionization potential of cesium will decrease the rate of head erosion and increase single stage performance. The initial experimental program will compare the performance of lithium and cesium plasma sources with single and double bunches. Later experiments will investigate improved performance with a pre-ionized cesium plasma. The status of the experiments and expected performance are reviewed. The FACET Facility is being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The facility will begin commissioning in summer 2011 and conduct an experimental program over the coming five years to study electron and positron beam driven plasma acceleration with strong wake loading in the non-linear regime. The FACET experiments aim to demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of electron and positron beams with high efficiency and negligible emittance growth.

  16. Relativistic effects on plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benkhelifa, El-Amine; Djebli, Mourad, E-mail: mdjebli@usthb.dz [USTHB, Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, B.P. 32 Bab-Ezzouar, 16079 Algiers (Algeria)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The expansion of electron-ion plasma is studied through a fully relativistic multi-fluids plasma model which includes thermal pressure, ambipolar electrostatic potential, and internal energy conversion. Numerical investigation, based on quasi-neutral assumption, is performed for three different regimes: nonrelativistic, weakly relativistic, and relativistic. Ions' front in weakly relativistic regime exhibits spiky structure associated with a break-down of quasi-neutrality at the expanding front. In the relativistic regime, ion velocity is found to reach a saturation limit which occurs at earlier stages of the expansion. This limit is enhanced by higher electron velocity.

  17. Plasma Facing Component Science and Technology for Burning Plasma Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HeatFlux(MW/m2 ) Disruptions Reentry Vehicles Fusion Divertor Fusion First Wall Fast Breeder Fission Reactor Radiant Flux at Sun Surface Rocket Nozzles Comparison Relative Heat Fluxes Fusion Plasma #12;MAU prediction of disruptions about 50 ms before they occur with a >90% accuracy ­ Massive gas puffing

  18. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion via Advanced Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samulyak, Roman V. [SUNY Stony Brook; Parks, Paul [General Atomics

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  19. Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 12, No.4, 1992 Infrared Radiation from an Arc Plasma and Its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    in the electric field of a charged particle, radiation is emitted. In terms of radiation intensity, electronB ) Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 12, No.4, 1992 Infrared Radiation from an Arc ifinfraredradiation from an arc plasma can fie used for diagnostic purposes. Tire properties of IR radiation

  20. Rotation generation and transport in tokamak plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podpaly, Yuri Anatoly

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma toroidal rotation is a factor important for plasma stability and transport, but it is still a fairly poorly understood area of physics. This thesis focuses on three aspects of rotation: momentum transport, Ohmic ...

  1. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode pockels cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Mark A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating. pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal.

  2. Methane Conversion by Plasma Assisted Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Helge Egsgaard2 1Optics and Plasma Research Department 2Biosystems Department Risø National Laboratory

  3. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration: How it Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This animation explains how electrons can be efficiently accelerated to high energy using wakes created in a plasma.

  4. Characterization of the conduction phase of a plasma opening switch using a hydrogen plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization of the conduction phase of a plasma opening switch using a hydrogen plasma J. J Pulsed Power Physics Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 Y 2004; published online 7 January 2005) Plasma opening switch (POS) experiments were conducted

  5. Laser-plasma diamagnetism in the presence of an ambient magnetized plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angles, University of

    Laser-plasma diamagnetism in the presence of an ambient magnetized plasma M. VanZeelanda) and W cavity created by a dense laser-produced plasma initially, nlpp /n0 1) expanding into an ambient magnetized background plasma (n0 2 1012 cm 3 ) capable of supporting Alfve´n waves. The experiments

  6. High-beta plasma blobs in the morningside plasma sheet G. Haerendel1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    High-beta plasma blobs in the morningside plasma sheet G. Haerendel1 , W. Baumjohann1 , E about 9i during the late-night/early-morning hours. Very high-plasma beta values were found, varying is known about the origin of the high-beta plasma. It is speculated that the morningside boundary layer

  7. Plasma sweeper to control the coupling of RF power to a magnetically confined plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Motley, Robert W. (Princeton, NJ); Glanz, James (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from a phased waveguide array for introducing RF power to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the phased waveguide array; and a potential source coupled to the electrode for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

  8. THE SOLAR WIND PLASMA Dr. Joe Borovsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    involved multidipole plasma devices. Current research interests focus on structure in the solar wind THE SOLAR WIND PLASMA Dr. Joe Borovsky Los Alamos National Laboratory and University, magnetized, collisionless plasma, important for the geomagnetic activity that it drives at Earth and for its

  9. Burning Plasma Experiment Requirements Presented to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -heating(self-organization?) · Test techniques to control and optimize alpha-dominated plasmas. · Sustain alpha-dominated plasmas ? Test Control and Optimization Techniques >0.5 0.4 to 0.6 10 >3 1 Sustain Alpha Dominated Plasmas >0, possible guided slower speed pellets) First wall materials Be tiles, no carbon First wall cooling

  10. Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmas are Hot and Fusion is Cold. The DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) collaborates to develop fusion as a safe, clean and abundant energy source for the future. This video discusses PPPL's research and development on plasma, the fourth state of matter.

  11. Hydrodynamics of the cascading plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Buchel

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The cascading gauge theory of Klebanov et.al realizes a soluble example of gauge/string correspondence in a non-conformal setting. Such a gauge theory has a strong coupling scale Lambda, below which it confines with a chiral symmetry breaking. A holographic description of a strongly coupled cascading gauge theory plasma is represented by a black brane solution of type IIB supergravity on a conifold with fluxes. A characteristic parameter controlling the high temperature expansion of such plasma is 1/ln(T/Lambda). In this paper we study the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of the cascading gauge theory plasma to order 1/ln(T/Lambda)^4. We find that the bulk viscosity satisfies the bound conjectured in arXiv:0708.3459. We comment on difficulties of computing the transport coefficients to all orders in T/Lambda. Previously, it was shown that a cascading gauge theory plasma undergoes a first-order deconfinement transition with unbroken chiral symmetry at T_c=0.6141111(3) Lambda. We show here that a deconfined chirally symmetric phase becomes perturbatively unstable at T_u=0.8749(0) T_c. Near the unstable point the specific heat diverges as c_V ~ |1-T_u/T|^(-1/2).

  12. Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Manickam, J., McGuire, K.M., Monticello, D., Nagayama, Y., Park, W., Taylor, G., Drake, J.F., Kleva, R Simulations of Beam­Fueled Supershot­like Plasmas Budny, R.V. 14 pgs. Near Ignition Preprint: March 1993, S.A., Scott, S.D., Stotler, D., Wieland, R., Zarnstorff, M., Zweben, S.J. #12; ­3­ PPPL­2880

  13. Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Manickam, J., McGuire, K.M., Monticello, D., Nagayama, Y., Park, W., Taylor, G., Drake, J.F., Kleva, R Simulations of Beam-Fueled Supershot-like Plasmas Budny, R.V. 14 pgs. Near Ignition Preprint: March 1993, S.A., Scott, S.D., Stotler, D., Wieland, R., Zarnstorff, M., Zweben, S.J. #12;-3- PPPL-2880

  14. VISUALIZATION OF MAGNETICALLY CONFINED PLASMAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the fusion energy research community. There is presently a great imbalance in the world energy consumption. As an example, in 1990, the per capita consumption of energy in India and China were 1/6 and 1/3 of the world Plasma Physics Laboratory Princeton NJ 08543, USA December 3, 1999 Abstract With the rapid developments

  15. VISUALIZATION OF MAGNETICALLY CONFINED PLASMAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    imbalance in the world energy consumption. As an example, in 1990, the per capita consumption of energy, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Princeton NJ 08543, USA November 30, 1999 Abstract With the rapid developments in experimental and theoretical fu- sion energy research towards more geometric details

  16. Exhaust aftertreatment using plasma-assisted catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penetrante, B

    2000-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the field of catalysis, one application that has been classified as a breakthrough technology is the catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} in oxygen-rich environments using hydrocarbons. This breakthrough will require dramatic improvements in both catalyst and engine technology, but the benefits will be substantial for energy efficiency and a cleaner environment. Engine and automobile companies are placing greater emphasis on the diesel engine because of its potential for saving fuel resources and reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. The modern direct-injection diesel engine offers demonstrated fuel economy advantages unmatched by any other commercially-viable engine. The main drawback of diesel engines is exhaust emissions. A modification of existing oxidation catalyst/engine technology is being used to address the CO, hydrocarbon and particulates. However, no satisfactory solution currently exists for NO{sub x}. Diesel engines operate under net oxidizing conditions, thus rendering conventional three-way catalytic converters ineffective for the controlling the NO{sub x} emission. NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, using ammonia as a reductant, do exist for oxygen-rich exhausts; however, for transportation applications, the use of on-board hydrocarbon fuels is a more feasible, cost-effective, and environmentally-sound approach. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) by hydrocarbons is one of the leading catalytic aftertreatment technologies for the reduction of NO{sub x} in lean-burn engine exhaust (often referred to as lean-NO{sub x}). The objective is to chemically reduce the pollutant molecules of NO{sub x} to benign molecules such as N{sub 2}. Aftertreatment schemes have focused a great deal on the reduction of NO because the NO{sub x} in engine exhaust is composed primarily of NO. Recent studies, however, have shown that the oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} serves an important role in enhancing the efficiency for reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. It has become apparent that preconverting NO to NO{sub 2} could improve both the efficiency and durability of lean-NO{sub x} catalysts. A non-thermal plasma is an efficient means for selective partial oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. The use of a non-thermal plasma in combination with a lean-NO{sub x} catalyst opens the opportunity for catalysts that are more efficient and more durable compared to conventional catalysts. In the absence of hydrocarbons, the O radicals will oxidize NO to NO{sub 2}, and the OH radicals will further oxidize NO{sub 2} to nitric acid. In plasma-assisted catalysis it is important that the plasma oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} without further producing acids.

  17. Microwave remote plasma enhanced-atomic layer deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dechana, A. [Program of Physics and General Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Songkhla Rajabhat University, Songkhla 90000 (Thailand); Thamboon, P. [Science and Technology Research Institute, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Boonyawan, D., E-mail: dheerawan.b@cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave remote Plasma Enhanced-Atomic Layer Deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber is established at the Plasma and Beam Physics research facilities, Chiang Mai, Thailand. The system produces highly-reactive plasma species in order to enhance the deposition process of thin films. The addition of the multicusp magnetic fields further improves the plasma density and uniformity in the reaction chamber. Thus, the system is more favorable to temperature-sensitive substrates when heating becomes unwanted. Furthermore, the remote-plasma feature, which is generated via microwave power source, offers tunability of the plasma properties separately from the process. As a result, the system provides high flexibility in choice of materials and design experiments, particularly for low-temperature applications. Performance evaluations of the system were carried on coating experiments of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers onto a silicon wafer. The plasma characteristics in the chamber will be described. The resulted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films—analyzed by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry in channeling mode and by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy techniques—will be discussed.

  18. Feasibility Study for a Plasma Dynamo Facility to Investigate Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forest, Cary B.

    2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The scientific equipment purchased on this grant was used on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment as part of Professor Forest's feasibility study for determining if it would be worthwhile to propose building a larger plasma physics experiment to investigate various fundamental processes in plasma astrophysics. The initial research on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment was successful so Professor Forest and Professor Ellen Zweibel at UW-Madison submitted an NSF Major Research Instrumentation proposal titled "ARRA MRI: Development of a Plasma Dynamo Facility for Experimental Investigations of Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics." They received funding for this project and the Plasma Dynamo Facility also known as the "Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment" was constructed. This experiment achieved its first plasma in the fall of 2012 and U.S. Dept. of Energy Grant No. DE-SC0008709 "Experimental Studies of Plasma Dynamos," now supports the research.

  19. Aerospace & Energetics Research Program -University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumlak, Uri

    of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group q The Boltzmann equation is seven dimensional. q As a consequence plasmaAerospace & Energetics Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Plasma Plasma Dynamics Group Abstract Many current plasma simulation codes are based on the magnetohydrodynamic

  20. Modeling non local thermodynamic equilibrium plasma using the Flexible Atomic Code data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Bo; Salzmann, David; Zhao, Gang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new code, RCF("Radiative-Collisional code based on FAC"), which is used to simulate steady-state plasmas under non local thermodynamic equilibrium condition, especially photoinization dominated plasmas. RCF takes almost all of the radiative and collisional atomic processes into rate equation to interpret the plasmas systematically. The Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) supplies all the atomic data RCF needed, which insures calculating completeness and consistency of atomic data. With four input parameters relating to the radiation source and target plasma, RCF calculates the population of levels and charge states, as well as potentially emission spectrum. In preliminary application, RCF successfully reproduces the results of a photoionization experiment with reliable atomic data. The effects of the most important atomic processes on the charge state distribution are also discussed.

  1. Porcelain-coated antenna for radio-frequency driven plasma source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Wells, Russell P. (Kensington, CA); Craven, Glen E. (Fremont, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new porcelain-enamel coated antenna creates a clean plasma for volume or surface-conversion ion sources. The porcelain-enamel coating is hard, electrically insulating, long lasting, non fragile, and resistant to puncture by high energy ions in the plasma. Plasma and ion production using the porcelain enamel coated antenna is uncontaminated with filament or extraneous metal ion because the porcelain does not evaporate and is not sputtered into the plasma during operation. Ion beams produced using the new porcelain-enamel coated antenna are useful in ion implantation, high energy accelerators, negative, positive, or neutral beam applications, fusion, and treatment of chemical or radioactive waste for disposal. For ion implantation, the appropriate species ion beam generated with the inventive antenna will penetrate large or small, irregularly shaped conducting objects with a narrow implantation profile.

  2. A Compact Disk Type Plasma Propulsion System with Modulated Magnetic Field for Nanoscale Space Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukuda, Takeshi; Ueda, Satoshi; Ohnishi, Yukihiro; Inomoto, Michiaki [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, 565-0871 Osaka (Japan)

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact 5 mm disk type plasma thruster simply composed of only a set of antenna windings and bias field coil which produces significant thrust of 0.74 mN with rotating magnetic field has been proposed and successfully developed for future applications to low altitude nanosatellites. The key technology issue is that the rotating speed is set above the ion plasma frequency but far below the electron plasma frequency, in order to produce the electron drag current and axial electric field as a consequence of the interaction with the bias field. The formation of axial electric field was confirmed and the produced plasma density was >6x10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, whereas the power consumption is 500 W in the inductively coupled mode of operation. The anticipated thrust density and specific thrust could potentially be extended to 7.64 Nm{sup -2} and 850 s, respectively, which is comparable to conventional Hall effect thrusters.

  3. Porcelain-coated antenna for radio-frequency driven plasma source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.; Wells, R.P.; Craven, G.E.

    1996-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new porcelain-enamel coated antenna creates a clean plasma for volume or surface-conversion ion sources. The porcelain-enamel coating is hard, electrically insulating, long lasting, non fragile, and resistant to puncture by high energy ions in the plasma. Plasma and ion production using the porcelain enamel coated antenna is uncontaminated with filament or extraneous metal ions because the porcelain does not evaporate and is not sputtered into the plasma during operation. Ion beams produced using the new porcelain-enamel coated antenna are useful in ion implantation, high energy accelerators, negative, positive, or neutral beam applications, fusion, and treatment of chemical or radioactive waste for disposal. For ion implantation, the appropriate species ion beam generated with the inventive antenna will penetrate large or small, irregularly shaped conducting objects with a narrow implantation profile. 8 figs.

  4. Plasma Equilibrium in a Magnetic Field with Stochastic Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Krommes and Allan H. Reiman

    2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of plasma equilibrium in a magnetic field with stochastic regions is examined. It is shown that the magnetic differential equation that determines the equilibrium Pfirsch-Schluter currents can be cast in a form similar to various nonlinear equations for a turbulent plasma, allowing application of the mathematical methods of statistical turbulence theory. An analytically tractable model, previously studied in the context of resonance-broadening theory, is applied with particular attention paid to the periodicity constraints required in toroidal configurations. It is shown that even a very weak radial diffusion of the magnetic field lines can have a significant effect on the equilibrium in the neighborhood of the rational surfaces, strongly modifying the near-resonant Pfirsch-Schluter currents. Implications for the numerical calculation of 3D equilibria are discussed

  5. Ultrahigh performance three-dimensional electromagnetic relativistic kinetic plasma simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowers, K. J.; Albright, B. J.; Yin, L.; Bergen, B.; Kwan, T. J. T. [Plasma Theory and Applications (X-1-PTA), Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS F699, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The algorithms, implementation details, and applications of VPIC, a state-of-the-art first principles 3D electromagnetic relativistic kinetic particle-in-cell code, are discussed. Unlike most codes, VPIC is designed to minimize data motion, as, due to physical limitations (including the speed of light{exclamation_point}), moving data between and even within modern microprocessors is more time consuming than performing computations. As a result, VPIC has achieved unprecedented levels of performance. For example, VPIC can perform {approx}0.17 billion cold particles pushed and charge conserving accumulated per second per processor on IBM's Cell microprocessor--equivalent to sustaining Los Alamos's planned Roadrunner supercomputer at {approx}0.56 petaflop (quadrillion floating point operations per second). VPIC has enabled previously intractable simulations in numerous areas of plasma physics, including magnetic reconnection and laser plasma interactions; next generation supercomputers like Roadrunner will enable further advances.

  6. Plasma effect in Silicon Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Estrada; Jorge Molina; J. Blostein; G. Fernandez

    2011-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma effect is observed in CCDs exposed to heavy ionizing alpha-particles with energies in the range 0.5 - 5.5 MeV. The results obtained for the size of the charge clusters reconstructed on the CCD pixels agrees with previous measurements in the high energy region (>3.5 MeV). The measurements were extended to lower energies using alpha-particles produced by (n,alpha) reactions of neutrons in a Boron-10 target. The effective linear charge density for the plasma column is measured as a function of energy. The results demonstrate the potential for high position resolution in the reconstruction of alpha particles, which opens an interesting possibility for using these detectors in neutron imaging applications.

  7. Effect of high-voltage nanosecond pulses on complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pustylnik, M. Y.; Ivlev, A. V.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85741 Garching (Germany); Vasilyak, L. M.; Vetchinin, S. P.; Polyakov, D. N.; Fortov, V. E. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13/19, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Influence of high-voltage (1-11 kV) pulses of nanosecond (20 ns) duration on microparticles levitating in a rf plasma is studied. It is shown that the pulses produce significant influence on the plasma, causing perturbations with the relaxation time of the order of 10{sup -4} s. This time is sufficient for the microparticle to acquire significant kinetic energy. Application of repetitive pulses leads to the vertical oscillations of the microparticles. Clusters, consisting of small number of microparticles, exhibit parametric instabilities of horizontal modes under the effect of repetitive pulses. It was shown that the parametric instability is caused by the vertical oscillations of the microparticles in the nonuniform environment of the sheath.

  8. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  9. Nuclear Probing of Dense Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Petrasso

    2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The object of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is to compress a fuel capsule to a state with high enough density and temperature to ignite, starting a self-sustaining fusion burn that consumes much of the fuel and releases a large amount of energy. The national ICF research program is trying to reach this goal, especially through experiments at the OMEGA laser facility of the University of Rochester Laboratory of Laser Energetics (LLE), planned experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and experimental and theoretical work at other national laboratories. The work by MIT reported here has played several important roles in this national program. First, the development of new and improved charged-particle-based plasma diagnostics has allowed the gathering of new and unique diagnostic information about the implosions of fuel capsules in ICF experiments, providing new means for evaluating experiments and for studying capsule implosion dynamics. Proton spectrometers have become the standard for evaluating the mass assembly in compressed capsules in experiments at OMEGA; the measured energy downshift of either primary or secondary D3He fusion protons to determines the areal density, or ?R, of imploded capsules. The Proton Temporal Diagnostic measures the time history of fusion burn, and multiple proton emission imaging cameras reveal the 3-D spatial distribution of fusion burn. A new compact neutron spectrometer, for measuring fusion yield, is described here for the first time. And of especially high importance to future work is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS), which is a neutron spectrometer that will be used to study a range of important performance parameters in future experiments at the NIF. A prototype is currently being prepared for testing at OMEGA, using a magnet funded by this grant. Second, MIT has used these diagnostic instruments to perform its own physics experiments and analysis with implosions at OMEGA, to provide essential data to other experimenters at LLE, and to work collaboratively with researchers from all the national laboratories (including LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory). Some of the implosion dynamics physics studies reported here involve the relationships between drive asymmetries and implosion asymmetries (in terms of both mass assembly and fusion burn); the time evolution of mass assembly and mass asymmetries; the behavior of shock coalescence; and the nature of fuel-shell mix. Third, the MIT program has provided unique educational and research opportunities for both graduate and undergraduate students. The graduate students are deeply engaged in every aspect of our research program, and spend considerable time at OMEGA working on experiments and working with our collaborators from OMEGA and from the National Labs. Many undergraduates have gotten a taste of ICF research, sometimes making significant contributions. We believe that the introduction of energetic and gifted students to the challenging problems of this field and the excitement of the national lab environment leads naturally to the infusion of bright, talented young scientists into our field, and several PhD recipients from this group have become important forces in the field. Finally, this work has provided the foundation for continuing advances during upcoming research, with other experimental and theoretical studies of implosion dynamics. In addition to the continuing application of diagnostic instrumentation used during this grant, important contributions will be made with new diagnostics such as the MRS and with new techniques based on the knowledge obtained here, such as proton radiography.

  10. Evidence cross-validation and Bayesian inference of MAST plasma equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nessi, G. T. von; Hole, M. J. [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Svensson, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Appel, L. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, current profiles for plasma discharges on the mega-ampere spherical tokamak are directly calculated from pickup coil, flux loop, and motional-Stark effect observations via methods based in the statistical theory of Bayesian analysis. By representing toroidal plasma current as a series of axisymmetric current beams with rectangular cross-section and inferring the current for each one of these beams, flux-surface geometry and q-profiles are subsequently calculated by elementary application of Biot-Savart's law. The use of this plasma model in the context of Bayesian analysis was pioneered by Svensson and Werner on the joint-European tokamak [Svensson and Werner,Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50(8), 085002 (2008)]. In this framework, linear forward models are used to generate diagnostic predictions, and the probability distribution for the currents in the collection of plasma beams was subsequently calculated directly via application of Bayes' formula. In this work, we introduce a new diagnostic technique to identify and remove outlier observations associated with diagnostics falling out of calibration or suffering from an unidentified malfunction. These modifications enable a good agreement between Bayesian inference of the last-closed flux-surface with other corroborating data, such as that from force balance considerations using EFIT++[Appel et al., ''A unified approach to equilibrium reconstruction'' Proceedings of the 33rd EPS Conference on Plasma Physics (Rome, Italy, 2006)]. In addition, this analysis also yields errors on the plasma current profile and flux-surface geometry as well as directly predicting the Shafranov shift of the plasma core.

  11. Plasma Basics Plasma is often called the "Fourth State of Matter". Although found in virtually every home and business,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plasma Basics Plasma is often called the "Fourth State of Matter". Although found in virtually every home and business, gas plasma is not well known. In fact, plasma is quite common - it is estimated that 99% of the visible universe consists of plasma. Earthbound plasmas include lightning, fluorescent

  12. Diagnostic applications of transient synchrotron radiation in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, N.J. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Kritz, A.H. (Hunter Coll., New York, NY (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transient radiation, resulting from a brief, deliberate perturbation of the velocity distribution of superthermal tokamak electrons, can be more informative than the steady background radiation that is present in the absence of the perturbation. It is possible to define a number of interesting inverse problems, which exploit the two-dimensional frequency-time data of the transient radiation signal. 17 refs.

  13. Fractional derivatives and CTRWs: applications to plasma turbulent transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín-Solís, José Ramón

    ? Use experimental scaling-laws as engineers do to build aeroplanes. · Energy confinement time does not scale with size or forcing as expected: - extE SL Bohm scaling, =1 Power degradation, =0.5 · Up not be diffusive: scale-free transport · Why? Quantitative modelling of transport and losses in these systems

  14. Electrical Power Supply Applications Engineer | Princeton Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater Use Goal 4:Administration826Vehicles and

  15. Fall high school internship application is open | Princeton Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFYRANDOMFailure Modes and Causes5Fall

  16. Israeli Conference on Plasma Science and Applications Israel Plasma Science and Technology Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Association H.I.T. ­ Holon Institute of Technology, February 4th , 2013 Program 08:15 - 08:45 Registration

  17. Interpenetration and stagnation in colliding laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Shboul, K. F. [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 22110 (Jordan); Harilal, S. S., E-mail: hari@purdue.edu; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Costello, J. T. [School of Physical Sciences and NCPST, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)] [School of Physical Sciences and NCPST, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 5650871 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 5650871 (Japan); Hirooka, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated plasma stagnation and interaction effects in colliding laser-produced plasmas. For generating colliding plasmas, two split laser beams were line-focused onto a hemi-circular target and the seed plasmas so produced were allowed to expand in mutually orthogonal directions. This experimental setup forced the expanding seed plasmas to come to a focus at the center of the chamber. The interpenetration and stagnation of plasmas of candidate fusion wall materials, viz., carbon and tungsten, and other materials, viz., aluminum, and molybdenum were investigated in this study. Fast-gated imaging, Faraday cup ion analysis, and optical emission spectroscopy were used for diagnosing seed and colliding plasma plumes. Our results show that high-Z target (W, Mo) plasma ions interpenetrate each other, while low-Z (C, Al) plasmas stagnate at the collision plane. For carbon seed plasmas, an intense stagnation was observed resulting in longer plasma lifetime; in addition, the stagnation layer was found to be rich with C{sub 2} dimers.

  18. Oscillating plasma bubbles. II. Pulsed experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-dependent phenomena have been investigated in plasma bubbles which are created by inserting spherical grids into an ambient plasma and letting electrons and ions form a plasma of different parameters than the ambient one. There are no plasma sources inside the bubble. The grid bias controls the particle flux. There are sheaths on both sides of the grid, each of which passes particle flows in both directions. The inner sheath or plasma potential develops self consistently to establish charge neutrality and divergence free charge and mass flows. When the electron supply is restricted, the inner sheath exhibits oscillations near the ion plasma frequency. When all electrons are excluded, a virtual anode forms on the inside sheath, reflects all ions such that the bubble is empty. By pulsing the ambient plasma, the lifetime of the bubble plasma has been measured. In an afterglow, plasma electrons are trapped inside the bubble and the bubble decays as slow as the ambient plasma. Pulsing the grid voltage yields the time scale for filling and emptying the bubble. Probes have been shown to modify the plasma potential. Using pulsed probes, transient ringing on the time scale of ion transit times through the bubble has been observed. The start of sheath oscillations has been investigated. The instability mechanism has been qualitatively explained. The dependence of the oscillation frequency on electrons in the sheath has been clarified.

  19. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammer, James H. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly-conducting plasma plumes are ejected across the interplanetary magnetic field from a situs that is moving relative to the solar wind, such as a spacecraft or an astral body, such as the moon, having no magnetosphere that excludes the solar wind. Discrete plasma plumes are generated by plasma guns at the situs extending in opposite directions to one another and at an angle, preferably orthogonal, to the magnetic field direction of the solar wind plasma. The opposed plumes are separately electrically connected to their source by a low impedance connection. The relative movement between the plasma plumes and the solar wind plasma creates a voltage drop across the plumes which is tapped by placing the desired electrical load between the electrical connections of the plumes to their sources. A portion of the energy produced may be used in generating the plasma plumes for sustained operation.

  20. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  1. Neutral-plasma interactions are expected to have a significant influence on edge plasma conditions in the edge region of a tokamak plasma, and thus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Jerry

    Neutral-plasma interactions are expected to have a significant influence on edge plasma conditions in the edge region of a tokamak plasma, and thus on global plasma confinement. In particular, the particle source from ionization should be considered in the study of plasma transport within the H-mode pedestal

  2. Redshift of photons penetrating a hot plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Brynjolfsson

    2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A new interaction, plasma redshift, is derived, which is important only when photons penetrate a hot, sparse electron plasma. The derivation of plasma redshift is based entirely on conventional axioms of physics. When photons penetrate a cold and dense plasma, they lose energy through ionization and excitation, Compton scattering on the individual electrons, and Raman scattering on the plasma frequency. But in sparse hot plasma, such as in the solar corona, the photons lose energy also in plasma redshift. The energy loss per electron in the plasma redshift is about equal to the product of the photon's energy and one half of the Compton cross-section per electron. In quiescent solar corona, this heating starts in the transition zone to the corona and is a major fraction of the coronal heating. Plasma redshift contributes also to the heating of the interstellar plasma, the galactic corona, and the intergalactic plasma. Plasma redshift explains the solar redshifts, the redshifts of the galactic corona, the cosmological redshifts, the cosmic microwave background, and the X-ray background. The plasma redshift explains the observed magnitude-redshift relation for supernovae SNe Ia without the big bang, dark matter, or dark energy. There is no cosmic time dilation. The universe is not expanding. The plasma redshift, when compared with experiments, shows that the photons' classical gravitational redshifts are reversed as the photons move from the Sun to the Earth. This is a quantum mechanical effect. As seen from the Earth, a repulsion force acts on the photons. This means that there is no need for Einstein's Lambda term. The universe is quasi-static, infinite, and everlasting.

  3. Alternating fluxes of positive and negative ions from an ionion plasma Sivananda K. Kanakasabapathya)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Demetre J.

    of pulsed-power Cl2 discharges. The application of a low-frequency 20 kHz bias voltage phase locked flux density.8 It turns out that pulsing the plasma excitation in the presence of an attaching gas can

  4. COLLIDING PULSE INJECTION EXPERIMENTS IN NON-COLLINEAR GEOMETRY FOR CONTROLLED LASER PLASMA WAKEFIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    emittance) is important for future plasma based accelerators and for applications. In any particle accelerator, particle injection into the accelerating structure is a key technology. In all cur- rent laser with acceler- Work supported by DOE grant DE-AC02-05CH11231, DARPA, and INCITE computational grant. CToth

  5. Detection of Ionizing Radiation by Plasma-Panel Sensors: Cosmic Muons, Ion Beams, and Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The plasma panel sensor is an ionizing photon and particle radiation detector derived from PDP technology with high gain and nanosecond response. Experimental results in detecting cosmic ray muons and beta particles from radioactive sources are described along with applications including high energy and nuclear physics, homeland security and cancer therapeutics.

  6. Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef* and J. M applications (1, 2) . Synthesis gas or syngas (mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) are used as a major. The conventional reformers allowing syngas production are based on steam reforming of hydrocarbons (3) following

  7. CO-IMPLANTATION AND DRY-ETCH DAMAGE RECOVERY BY PLASMA NITRIDATION IN GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearton, Stephen J.

    CO-IMPLANTATION AND DRY-ETCH DAMAGE RECOVERY BY PLASMA NITRIDATION IN GaN BY DONALD G. KENT III ............................................................................ x CHAPTERS 1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................. 1 1.1 GaN Applications ........................................................ 1 1.2 GaN Material Issues

  8. Implementation Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazhdan, Michael

    ;Outline Theory Implementation Applications Background Intuition Definition Delaunay Triangulation Shape-Dimensional Shapes #12;Outline Theory Implementation Applications Background Intuition Definition Delaunay;Outline Theory Implementation Applications Background Intuition Definition Delaunay Triangulation Shape

  9. Plasma conductivity at finite coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babiker Hassanain; Martin Schvellinger

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    By taking into account the full order(\\alpha'^3) type IIB string theory corrections to the supergravity action, we compute the leading finite 't Hooft coupling order(\\lambda^{-3/2}) corrections to the conductivity of strongly-coupled SU(N) {\\cal {N}}=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma in the large N limit. We find that the conductivity is enhanced by the corrections, in agreement with the trend expected from previous perturbative weak-coupling computations.

  10. Cyclotron resonance in plasma flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V. [LPC2E/CNRS-University of Orleans, Orleans (France)] [LPC2E/CNRS-University of Orleans, Orleans (France)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to the mechanism of particle acceleration via resonant interaction with the electromagnetic circular wave propagating along the inhomogeneous background magnetic field in the presence of a plasma flow. We consider the system where the plasma flow velocity is large enough to change the direction of wave propagation in the rest frame. This system mimics a magnetic field configuration typical for inner structure of a quasi-parallel shock wave. We consider conditions of gyroresonant interaction when the force corresponding to an inhomogeneity of the background magnetic field is compensated by the Lorentz force of the wave-magnetic field. The wave-amplitude is assumed to be about 10% of the background magnetic field. We show that particles can gain energy if kv{sub sw}>?>kv{sub sw}??{sub c} where k is the wave number, v{sub sw} is a plasma flow velocity, and ? and ?{sub c} are the wave frequency and the particle gyrofrequency, respectively. This mechanism of acceleration resembles the gyrosurfing mechanism, but the effect of the electrostatic field is replaced by the effect of the magnetic field inhomogeneity.

  11. Compact disposal of high-energy electron beams using passive or laser-driven plasma decelerating stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey and, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2014-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma decelerating stage is investigated as a compact alternative for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). This could benefit the design of laser-driven plasma accelerator (LPA) applications that require transportability and or high-repetition-rate operation regimes. Passive and laser-driven (active) plasma-based beam dumps are studied analytically and with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in a 1D geometry. Analytical estimates for the beam energy loss are compared to and extended by the PIC simulations, showing that with the proposed schemes a beam can be efficiently decelerated in a centimeter-scale distance.

  12. Production of stable, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive plasmas using gases other than helium or neon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Jaeyoung; Henins, Ivars

    2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention enables the production of stable, steady state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive .alpha.-mode plasmas using gases other than helium and neon. In particular, the current invention generates and maintains stable, steady-state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas using pure argon or argon with reactive gas mixtures, pure oxygen or air. By replacing rare and expensive helium with more readily available gases, this invention makes it more economical to use atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas for various materials processing applications.

  13. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKechnie, Timothy N. (Brownsboro, AL); Antony, Leo V. M. (Huntsville, AL); O'Dell, Scott (Arab, AL); Power, Chris (Guntersville, AL); Tabor, Terry (Huntsville, AL)

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  14. Bulk viscosity in a plasma of confining gluons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Florkowski; Radoslaw Ryblewski; Nan Su; Konrad Tywoniuk

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate dynamic properties of a plasma whose constituents are confining gluons resulting from the Gribov quantization. In a static formulation, this system reproduces qualitatively the pure-glue equation of state and thereby encodes crucial features of the phase transition. The dynamic description proposed in this work allows us to study non-equilibrium transport phenomena with the inclusion of confinement effects. In particular, we determine the non-equilibrium behaviour of the interaction measure (trace anomaly) and find the form of the bulk viscosity coefficient. The latter may be used in phenomenological applications to heavy-ion collisions.

  15. Bulk viscosity in a plasma of confining gluons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Su, Nan; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate dynamic properties of a plasma whose constituents are confining gluons resulting from the Gribov quantization. In a static formulation, this system reproduces qualitatively the pure-glue equation of state and thereby encodes crucial features of the phase transition. The dynamic description proposed in this work allows us to study non-equilibrium transport phenomena with the inclusion of confinement effects. In particular, we determine the non-equilibrium behaviour of the interaction measure (trace anomaly) and find the form of the bulk viscosity coefficient. The latter may be used in phenomenological applications to heavy-ion collisions.

  16. Front surface thermal property measurements of air plasma spray coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, Ted; Kakuda, Tyler [University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5070 (United States); Kulkarni, Anand [Siemens Energy, Orlando, Florida 32826-2399 (United States)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A front-surface measurement for determining the thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings has been applied to air plasma spray coatings. The measurement is used to determine all independent thermal properties of the coating simultaneously. Furthermore, with minimal requirements placed on the sample and zero sample preparation, measurements can be made under previously impossible conditions, such as on serviceable engine parts. Previous application of this technique was limited to relatively thin coatings, where a one-dimensional heat transfer model is applied. In this paper, the influence of heat spreading on the measurement of thicker coatings is investigated with the development of a two-dimensional heat transfer model.

  17. Stability of plasma oscillations in hot gluonic matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobes, R.; Kunstatter, G.

    1988-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that the high-temperature gluon-plasma damping constants previously calculated by use of the background-field method and the Vilkovisky-DeWitt effective action do not have a physical interpretation since they are not derived from correlation functions relevant to linear-response theory. A correct application of the gauge- and parametrization-independent formalism does not affect the plasmon frequency, but yields the following modified results for the longitudinal and transverse damping constants: ..gamma../sub L/ = ..gamma../sub T/ = -(9/32..pi..)g/sup 2/NT. .AE

  18. Characterization of jovian plasma embedded dust particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amara L. Graps

    2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    As the data from space missions and laboratories improve, a research domain combining plasmas and charged dust is gaining in prominence. Our solar system provides many natural laboratories such as planetary rings, comet comae and tails, ejecta clouds around moons and asteroids, and Earth's noctilucent clouds for which to closely study plasma-embedded cosmic dust. One natural laboratory to study electromagnetically-controlled cosmic dust has been provided by the Jovian dust streams and the data from the instruments which were on board the Galileo spacecraft. Given the prodigious quantity of dust poured into the Jovian magnetosphere by Io and its volcanoes resulting in the dust streams, the possibility of dusty plasma conditions exist. This paper characterizes the main parameters for those interested in studying dust embedded in a plasma with a focus on the Jupiter environment. I show how to distinguish between dust-in-plasma and dusty-plasma and how the Havnes parameter P can be used to support or negate the possibility of collective behavior of the dusty plasma. The result of applying these tools to the Jovian dust streams reveals mostly dust-in-plasma behavior. In the orbits displaying the highest dust stream fluxes, portions of orbits E4, G7, G8, C21 satisfy the minimum requirements for a dusty plasma. However, the P parameter demonstrates that these mild dusty plasma conditions do not lead to collective behavior of the dust stream particles.

  19. Re-appraisal and extension of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus evolution in the context of contemporary research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auluck, S. K. H. [Physics Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India)] [Physics Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent resurgence of interest in applications of dense plasma focus and doubts about the conventional view of dense plasma focus as a purely irrotational compressive flow have re-opened questions concerning device optimization. In this context, this paper re-appraises and extends the analytical snowplow model of plasma focus sheath evolution developed by F. Gratton and J. M. Vargas [Energy Storage, Compression and Switching, edited by V. Nardi, H. Sahlin, and W. H. Bostick (Plenum, New York, 1983), Vol. 2, p. 353)] and shows its relevance to contemporary research. The Gratton-Vargas (GV) model enables construction of a special orthogonal coordinate system in which the plasma flow problem can be simplified and a model of sheath structure can be formulated. The Lawrenceville Plasma Physics (LPP) plasma focus facility, which reports neutron yield better than global scaling law, is shown to be operating closer to an optimum operating point of the GV model as compared with PF-1000.

  20. Etching process of silicon dioxide with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamakawa, Koji; Hori, Masaru; Goto, Toshio; Den, Shoji; Katagiri, Toshirou; Kano, Hiroyuki [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-Cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Nagoya University, Furo-Cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-Cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Department of Engineering, Katagiri Engineering Co., Ltd., Minamikase Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki 661-8661 (Japan); NU-EcoEngineering Co., Ltd., Ooaza, Kurozasa Aza, Umazutsumi, Miyoshi-cho, Nishikamo-gun, Aichi 470-0201 (Japan)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrahigh etch rate (14 {mu}m/min) of SiO{sub 2} and a high selectivity of SiO{sub 2}/Si over 200 were achieved using a microwave-excited nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma source employing He, NF{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O gases, which have been developed for application to microelectromechanical systems and other bionanotechnology fields. In order to clarify the etching mechanism, two diagnostic methods have been performed: (1) imaging of plasma emission with an intensified charge-coupled device camera, and (2) absorption measurements using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The etching characteristics are discussed in relation to the spatial distributions of the species involved. The etch rate depended considerably on the distance between the plasma and the substrate. Some radicals generated from the feed gases reached the substrate directly, while other radicals recombined into different species, which reached the substrate. An abundance of HF molecules were produced through a reaction between radicals generated by the atmospheric pressure discharge of NF{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O. From these measurements, it has been found that the HF molecules generated played a role in producing the high etch rate of SiO{sub 2} and high etch selectivity of SiO{sub 2}/Si.

  1. Short pulse laser train for laser plasma interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, J. L.; Shimada, T.; Johnson, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Hegelich, B. M.; Esquibel, D. M.; Flippo, K. A.; Gonzales, R. P.; Hurry, T. R.; Reid, S. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiframe, high-time resolution pump-probe diagnostic consisting of a consecutive train of ultrashort laser pulses ({approx}ps) has been developed for use with a chirped pulse amplification (CPA) system. A system of high quality windows is used to create a series of 1054 nm picosecond-laser pulses which are injected into the CPA system before the pulse stretcher and amplifiers. By adding or removing windows in the pulse train forming optics, the number of pulses can be varied. By varying the distance and thickness of the respective optical elements, the time in between the pulses, i.e., the time in between frames, can be set. In our example application, the CPA pulse train is converted to 527 nm using a KDP crystal and focused into a preformed plasma and the reflected laser light due to stimulated Raman scattering is measured. Each pulse samples different plasma conditions as the plasma evolves in time, producing more data on each laser shot than with a single short pulse probe. This novel technique could potentially be implemented to obtain multiple high-time resolution measurements of the dynamics of physical processes over hundreds of picoseconds or even nanoseconds with picosecond resolution on a single shot.

  2. Shock waves in strongly coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khlebnikov, Sergei; Kruczenski, Martin; Michalogiorgakis, Georgios [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Shock waves are supersonic disturbances propagating in a fluid and giving rise to dissipation and drag. Weak shocks, i.e., those of small amplitude, can be well described within the hydrodynamic approximation. On the other hand, strong shocks are discontinuous within hydrodynamics and therefore probe the microscopics of the theory. In this paper, we consider the case of the strongly coupled N=4 plasma whose microscopic description, applicable for scales smaller than the inverse temperature, is given in terms of gravity in an asymptotically AdS{sub 5} space. In the gravity approximation, weak and strong shocks should be described by smooth metrics with no discontinuities. For weak shocks, we find the dual metric in a derivative expansion, and for strong shocks we use linearized gravity to find the exponential tail that determines the width of the shock. In particular, we find that, when the velocity of the fluid relative to the shock approaches the speed of light v{yields}1 the penetration depth l scales as l{approx}(1-v{sup 2}){sup 1/4}. We compare the results with second-order hydrodynamics and the Israel-Stewart approximation. Although they all agree in the hydrodynamic regime of weak shocks, we show that there is not even qualitative agreement for strong shocks. For the gravity side, the existence of shock waves implies that there are disturbances of constant shape propagating on the horizon of the dual black holes.

  3. Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hooper, Frederick M (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

  4. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  5. Reduced electron temperature in a magnetized inductively-coupled plasma with internal coil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arancibia Monreal, J.; Chabert, P. [LPP, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC, Paris XI, 91128 Palaiseau (France)] [LPP, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC, Paris XI, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Godyak, V. [RF Plasma Consulting, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States) [RF Plasma Consulting, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States); Michigan Institute for Plasma Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of magnetic filtering on the electron energy distribution function is studied in an inductive discharge with internal coil coupling. The coil is placed inside the plasma and driven by a low-frequency power supply (5.8 MHz) which leads to a very high power transfer efficiency. A permanent dipole magnet may be placed inside the internal coil to produce a static magnetic field around 100 Gauss. The coil and the matching system are designed to minimize the capacitive coupling to the plasma. Capacitive coupling is quantified by measuring the radiofrequency (rf) plasma potential with a capacitive probe. Without the permanent magnet, the rf plasma potential is significantly smaller than the electron temperature. When the magnet is present, the rf plasma potential increases. The electron energy distribution function is measured as a function of space with and without the permanent magnet. When the magnet is present, electrons are cooled down to low temperature in the downstream region. This region of low electron temperature may be useful for plasma processing applications, as well as for efficient negative ion production.

  6. Transport of low pressure electronegative SF{sub 6} plasma through a localized magnetic filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levko, D.; Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G. J. M. [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9, France and CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The generation of an ion-ion plasma where only few electrons are present in the discharge could be appropriated in the context of ion plasma source applications. We present in this paper results obtained with a one-dimensional fluid model in the context of low pressure electronegative SF{sub 6} plasma. Without magnetic field, results show that the electron density is still large in the discharge. With a localized magnetic filter, where the magnetic field strength is such that the transport of the electrons is affected while the transport of ion species remains unmagnetized, we show that a region with a negative–positive ion plasma is found downstream the magnetic filter. The negative ions are produced in the filter due to the decrease of electron temperature. We also find conditions when the plasma sheath near the biased electrode collapses and the negative ion extraction from the plasma becomes possible. In addition, the influence of E?×?B electron transport on the one-dimensional model results is discussed.

  7. Resonant- and avalanche-ionization amplification of laser-induced plasma in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yue; Zhang, Zhili, E-mail: zzhang24@utk.edu [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Jiang, Naibo; Roy, Sukesh [Spectral Energies, LLC, 5100 Springfield St., Suite 301, Dayton, Ohio 45431 (United States); Gord, James R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Aerospace Systems Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Amplification of laser-induced plasma in air is demonstrated utilizing resonant laser ionization and avalanche ionization. Molecular oxygen in air is ionized by a low-energy laser pulse employing (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) to generate seed electrons. Subsequent avalanche ionization of molecular oxygen and nitrogen significantly amplifies the laser-induced plasma. In this plasma-amplification effect, three-body attachments to molecular oxygen dominate the electron-generation and -loss processes, while either nitrogen or argon acts as the third body with low electron affinity. Contour maps of the electron density within the plasma obtained in O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}/Ar gas mixtures are provided to show relative degrees of plasma amplification with respect to gas pressure and to verify that the seed electrons generated by O{sub 2} 2 + 1 REMPI are selectively amplified by avalanche ionization of molecular nitrogen in a relatively low-pressure condition (?100?Torr). Such plasma amplification occurring in air could be useful in aerospace applications at high altitude.

  8. The Development of RF Heating of Magnetically Confined Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.P. LeBlanc; C.K. Phillips; J.C. Hosea; R. Majeski; S. Bernabei [and others

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q = 0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed.

  9. Possible applications of powerful pulsed CO{sub 2}-lasers in tokamak reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nastoyashchii, A.F.; Morozov, I.N. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Hassanein, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications of powerful pulsed CO{sub 2}-lasers for injection of fuel tablets or creation of a protective screen from the vapor of light elements to protect against the destruction of plasma-facing components are discussed, and the corresponding laser parameters are determined. The possibility of using CO{sub 2}-lasers in modeling the phenomena of powerful and energetic plasma fluxes interaction with a wall, as in the case of a plasma disruption, is considered.

  10. Magnetic field distribution in the plasma flow generated by a plasma focus discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitrofanov, K. N., E-mail: mitrofan@triniti.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovaiton and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Krauz, V. I., E-mail: krauz_vi@nrcki.ru; Myalton, V. V.; Velikhov, E. P.; Vinogradov, V. P.; Vinogradova, Yu. V. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic field in the plasma jet propagating from the plasma pinch region along the axis of the chamber in a megajoule PF-3 plasma focus facility is studied. The dynamics of plasma with a trapped magnetic flow is analyzed. The spatial sizes of the plasma jet region in which the magnetic field concentrates are determined in the radial and axial directions. The magnetic field configuration in the plasma jet is investigated: the radial distribution of the azimuthal component of the magnetic field inside the jet is determined. It is shown that the magnetic induction vector at a given point in space can change its direction during the plasma flight. Conclusions regarding the symmetry of the plasma flow propagation relative to the chamber axis are drawn.

  11. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, Jr., Francis W. (Princeton, NJ); Chiu, Shiu-Chu (San Diego, CA); Parks, Paul (San Diego, CA); Rawls, John M. (Del Mar, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a resonant coil cavity wave launcher for energizing a plasma immersed in a magnetic field. Energization includes launching fast Alfven waves to excite ion cyclotron frequency resonances in the plasma. The cavity includes inductive and capacitive reactive members spaced no further than one-quarter wavelength from a first wall confinement chamber of the plasma. The cavity wave launcher is energized by connection to a waveguide or transmission line carrying forward power from a remote radio frequency energy source.

  12. Neutrino magnetic moment in a magnetized plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. V. Mikheev; E. N. Narynskaya

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution of a magnetized plasma to the neutrino magnetic moment is calculated. It is shown that only part of the additional neutrino energy in magnetized plasma connecting with its spin and magnetic field strength defines the neutrino magnetic moment. It is found that the presence of magnetized plasma does not lead to the considerable increase of the neutrino magnetic moment in contrast to the results presented in literature previously.

  13. Nonabelian plasma instabilities in Bjorken expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Rebhan

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma instabilities are parametrically the dominant nonequilibrium dynamics of a weakly coupled quark-gluon plasma. In recent years the time evolution of the corresponding collective colour fields has been studied in stationary anisotropic situations. Here I report on recent numerical results on the time evolution of the most unstable modes in a longitudinally expanding plasma as they grow from small rapidity fluctuations to amplitudes where non-Abelian self-interactions become important.

  14. Hydrophilization of Liquid Surfaces by Plasma Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Multanen; Gilad Chaniel; Roman Grynyov; Ron Yosef Loew; Naor Siany; Edward Bormashenko

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of the cold radiofrequency air plasma on the surface properties of silicone oils (polydimethylsiloxane) was studied. Silicone oils of various molecular masses were markedly hydrophilized by the cold air plasma treatment. A pronounced decrease of the apparent water contact angles was observed after plasma treatment. A general theoretical approach to the calculation of apparent contact angles is proposed. The treated liquid surfaces demonstrated hydrophobic recovery. The characteristic time of the hydrophobic recovery grew with the molecular mass of the silicone oil.

  15. Plasma enhancement of combustion of solid fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askarova, A.S.; Karpenko, E.I.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B. [Institute of Combustion Problems, Alma Ata (Kazakhstan)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma fuel systems that increase the coal burning efficiency are discussed. The systems were tested for fuel oil-free startup of boilers and stabilizating a pulverized-coal flame in power-generating boilers equipped with different types of burner and burning all types of power-generating coal. Plasma ignition, thermochemical treatment of an air-fuel mixture prior to combustion, and its burning in a power-generating boiler were numerically simulated. Environmental friendliness of the plasma technology was demonstrated.

  16. Quantum Electrodynamical Effects in Dusty Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Marklund; L. Stenflo; P. K. Shukla; G. Brodin

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new nonlinear electromagnetic wave mode in a magnetized dusty plasma is predicted. Its existence depends on the interaction of an intense circularly polarized electromagnetic wave with a dusty plasma, where quantum electrodynamical photon-photon scattering is taken into account. Specifically, we consider a dusty electron-positron-ion plasma, and show that the propagation of the new mode is admitted. It could be of significance for the physics of supernova remnants and in neutron star formation.

  17. Sensitivity of transient synchrotron radiation to tokamak plasma parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, N.J.; Kritz, A.H.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation from a hot plasma can inform on certain plasma parameters. The dependence on plasma parameters is particularly sensitive for the transient radiation response to a brief, deliberate, perturbation of hot plasma electrons. We investigate how such a radiation response can be used to diagnose a variety of plasma parameters in a tokamak. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  18. James W. Van Dam US Burning Plasma Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    focus: magnetically confined plasmas #12;Page 5 USBPO What is a "burning" plasma? · "Burning" plasmaJames W. Van Dam US Burning Plasma Organization US ITER Project Office Institute for Fusion Studies Plasmas -- A Tutorial -- Supported by Office of Science #12;Page 2 USBPO The next frontier · Understanding

  19. Progress on a New RF Plasma Generator a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    source goal: produce high-recycling, strongly coupled PMI regime, guided by ITER divertor plasma Divertor Plasma Heat & Particle Fluxes ITER divertor channel What source plasma parameters are required? High-recycling plasmas led to new understanding · SOLPS (B2-Eirene) (Jülich; Garching; U. Paris) ­ Models for plasma

  20. Plasma Assisted Catalysis System for NOx Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 NOXTECH NOXTECH PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYSIS SYSTEM FOR NOx REDUCTION BY NOXTECH With the Support & Cooperation of DOE Noxtech, Inc. *Delaware Corporation registered to do business...

  1. Plasma planar filament instability and Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia de Andrade

    2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Inhomogeneous plasmas filaments instabilities are investigated by using the techniques of classical differential geometry of curves where Frenet torsion and curvature describe completely the motion of curves. In our case the Frenet frame changes in time and also depends upon the other coordinates taking into account the inhomogeneity of the plasma. The exponential perturbation method so commonly used to describe cosmological perturbatons is applied to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma equations to find longitudinal modes describing Alfven waves propagation modes describing plasma waves in the medium. Stability is investigated in the imaginary axis of the spectra of complex frequencies ${\\omega}$ or $Im(\\omega)\

  2. Electrostatic supersolitons in three-species plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verheest, Frank [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Hellberg, Manfred A. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Kourakis, Ioannis [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Centre for Plasma Physics, Queen's University Belfast, BT7 1NN Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Superficially, electrostatic potential profiles of supersolitons look like those of traditional solitons. However, their electric field profiles are markedly different, having additional extrema on the wings of the standard bipolar structure. This new concept was recently pointed out in the literature for a plasma model with five species. Here, it is shown that electrostatic supersolitons are not an artefact of exotic, complicated plasma models, but can exist even in three-species plasmas and are likely to occur in space plasmas. Further, a methodology is given to delineate their existence domains in a systematic fashion by determining the specific limiting factors.

  3. Metrics For Comparing Plasma Mass Filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter. __________________________________________________

  4. Metrics for comparing plasma mass filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter.

  5. Plasma-assisted catalytic reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogtlin, G.E.; Merritt, B.T.; Hsiao, M.C.; Wallman, P.H.; Penetrante, B.M.

    1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-thermal plasma gas treatment is combined with selective catalytic reduction to enhance NO{sub x} reduction in oxygen-rich vehicle engine exhausts. 8 figs.

  6. Plasma heating in a variable magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kichigin, G. N., E-mail: king@iszf.irk.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of particle acceleration in a periodically variable magnetic field that either takes a zero value or passes through zero is considered. It is shown that, each time the field [0]passes through zero, the particle energy increases abruptly. This process can be regarded as heating in the course of which plasma particles acquire significant energy within one field period. This mechanism of plasma heating takes place in the absence of collisions between plasma particles and is analogous to the mechanism of magnetic pumping in collisional plasma considered by Alfven.

  7. A Relativistic-Plasma Compton Maser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James C. Weatherall

    2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic pair-plasma which contains a high excitation of electrostatic turbulence could produce intense radiation at brightness temperature in excess of 10^22 K by stimulated scattering. Important relativistic effects would include the broadband frequency response of the plasma and Compton-boosting of the scattered radiation. In radio-frequency relativistic plasma, the optical depth can be as small as hundreds of meters. When the plasma wave excitation and particle distributions are one-dimensional, the frequency-dependent angular distribution of the emission exhibits characteristics of pulsar emission.

  8. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Messer, S. J.; et al

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: ne ? ni ~ 10¹? cm?³, Te ? Ti ? 1.4 eV, Vjet ? 30–100 km/s, mean charge $\\bar{Z}$ ? 1, sonic Mach number Ms ? Vjet/Cs > 10, jet diameter = 5 cm, and jet length ? 20 cm. Experiments to date have focused on themore »study of merging-jet dynamics and the shocks that form as a result of the interaction, in both collisional and collisionless regimes with respect to the inter-jet classical ion mean free path, and with and without an applied magnetic field. However, many other studies are also possible, as discussed in this paper.« less

  9. Field simulation of axisymmetric plasma screw pinches by alternating-direction-implicit methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, M.A.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An axisymmetric plasma screw pinch is an axisymmetric column of ionized gaseous plasma radially confined by forces from axial and azimuthal currents driven in the plasma and its surroundings. This dissertation is a contribution to detailed, high resolution computer simulation of dynamic plasma screw pinches in 2-d {ital rz}-coordinates. The simulation algorithm combines electron fluid and particle-in-cell (PIC) ion models to represent the plasma in a hybrid fashion. The plasma is assumed to be quasineutral; along with the Darwin approximation to the Maxwell equations, this implies application of Ampere`s law without displacement current. Electron inertia is assumed negligible so that advective terms in the electron momentum equation are ignored. Electrons and ions have separate scalar temperatures, and a scalar plasma electrical resistivity is assumed. Altemating-direction-implicit (ADI) methods are used to advance the electron fluid drift velocity and the magnetic fields in the simulation. The ADI methods allow time steps larger than allowed by explicit methods. Spatial regions where vacuum field equations have validity are determined by a cutoff density that invokes the quasineutral vacuum Maxwell equations (Darwin approximation). In this dissertation, the algorithm was first checked against ideal MM stability theory, and agreement was nicely demonstrated. However, such agreement is not a new contribution to the research field. Contributions to the research field include new treatments of the fields in vacuum regions of the pinch simulation. The new treatments predict a level of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence near the bulk plasma surface that is higher than predicted by other methods.

  10. Surface kinetics and plasma equipment model for Si etching by fluorocarbon plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Surface kinetics and plasma equipment model for Si etching by fluorocarbon plasmas Da Zhanga of fluorocarbon radicals on the reactor walls, polymer erosion rates and F atom diffusion through the polymer during Si etching using fluorocarbon gases in an induc- tively coupled plasma ICP reactor.4 They observed

  11. PUBLISHED VERSION Structure of micro-instabilities in tokamak plasmas: Stiff transport or plasma eruptions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    eruptions? D. Dickinson, C. M. Roach, J. M. Skipp, and H. R. Wilson © 2013 UNITED KINGDOM ATOMIC ENERGY plasmas: Stiff transport or plasma eruptions? D. Dickinson, C. M. Roach, J. M. Skipp, and H. R. Wilson transport or plasma eruptions? D. Dickinson,1,2,a) C. M. Roach,2 J. M. Skipp,1 and H. R. Wilson1 1 York

  12. SJTU Plasma Physics Seminar, April 10.th 2009 1 Physics of Burning Plasmas in Toroidal Magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zonca, Fulvio

    plasma without appreciable degradation due to collective modes. The identification of burning plasma materials. Such analyses can be performed, at least in part, in present day experiments and provide nice examples of mutual positive feedbacks between theory, simulation and experiment. In a burning plasma

  13. Equilibration in Quark Gluon Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santosh K Das; Jan-e Alam; Payal Mohanty

    2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrodynamic expansion rate of quark gluon plasma (QGP) is evaluated and compared with the scattering rate of quarks and gluons within the system. Partonic scattering rates evaluated within the ambit of perturbative Quantum Choromodynamics (pQCD) are found to be smaller than the expansion rate evaluated with ideal equation of state (EoS) for the QGP. This indicate that during the space-time evolution the system remains out of equilibrium. Enhancement of pQCD cross sections and a more realistic EoS keep the partons closer to the equilibrium.

  14. Plasma arc melting of zirconium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tubesing, P.K.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Dunn, P.S.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Zirconium, like some other refractory metals, has an undesirable sensitivity to interstitials such as oxygen. Traditionally, zirconium is processed by electron beam melting to maintain minimum interstitial contamination. Electron beam melted zirconium, however, does not respond positively to mechanical processing due to its large grain size. The authors undertook a study to determine if plasma arc melting (PAM) technology could be utilized to maintain low interstitial concentrations and improve the response of zirconium to subsequent mechanical processing. The PAM process enabled them to control and maintain low interstitial levels of oxygen and carbon, produce a more favorable grain structure, and with supplementary off-gassing, improve the response to mechanical forming.

  15. Feedback enhanced plasma spray tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gevelber, Michael Alan; Wroblewski, Donald Edward; Fincke, James Russell; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C.; Bewley, Randy Lee

    2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved automatic feedback control scheme enhances plasma spraying of powdered material through reduction of process variability and providing better ability to engineer coating structure. The present inventors discovered that controlling centroid position of the spatial distribution along with other output parameters, such as particle temperature, particle velocity, and molten mass flux rate, vastly increases control over the sprayed coating structure, including vertical and horizontal cracks, voids, and porosity. It also allows improved control over graded layers or compositionally varying layers of material, reduces variations, including variation in coating thickness, and allows increasing deposition rate. Various measurement and system control schemes are provided.

  16. Plasma vitrification of waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, David F. (Oakmont, PA); Dighe, Shyam V. (North Huntingdon, PA); Gass, William R. (Plum Boro, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a process wherein hazardous or radioactive wastes in the form of liquids, slurries, or finely divided solids are mixed with finely divided glassformers (silica, alumina, soda, etc.) and injected directly into the plume of a non-transferred arc plasma torch. The extremely high temperatures and heat transfer rates makes it possible to convert the waste-glassformer mixture into a fully vitrified molten glass product in a matter of milliseconds. The molten product may then be collected in a crucible for casting into final wasteform geometry, quenching in water, or further holding time to improve homogeneity and eliminate bubbles.

  17. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory News

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, information andNetarchive Princeton Plasma Physics

  18. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, information andNetarchive Princeton Plasma Physics

  19. New developments in plasma-activated high-rate EB evaporation for metal strip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiller, S.; Goedicke, K.; Hoetzsch, G. [Fraunhofer Institute, Dresden (Germany)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The coating of metal strips by EB evaporation is well known since many years. But up to now the application on an industrial scale is very limited. One of the reasons are the costs and the progress of ECD technologies in the last ten years. But there are opportunities for the evaporation technology if layers with new properties can be produced. One way to meet this target is the application of a plasma-activated and ion-assisted process. However, the plasma density and the ion current density on the substrate must fit the high deposition rates. Many efforts in our institute are dedicated to the development of appropriate plasma sources. The systems are explained and main parameters are given. Using a plasma the layer properties can be improved remarkably. Therefore new applications come into play. First results are shown. Layers consisting of compounds will play a growing role for corrosion and abrasion protection. The technologies are explained and important film properties are presented.

  20. Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum ReservesThrustBonnevillePlans arePlants