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1

Positron Emission Tomography (PET)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

Welch, M. J.

1990-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

2

Lawrence Co. Scioto Co. Greenup Co. Jack  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

COWEN COWEN BELLS F OR D FREDVILLE BIG CH IMNEY ALVIN N RPD-LAWRENC E-2 PEYTONA-EMMON S TOM PR ICE SCHOOL NE BREEDEN MAR E CREEK SCHOOL FAR LEY C HUR CH W LON G R UN LICKBURG RPD-GALLIA-1 MIMA LEF T F OR K RPD-MASON-1 MABSCOT T-CBM CON LEY MEAD E BR ANCH PET ERSBURG VAN LEAR SILVERTON RPD-SC IOT O-2 HURR ICANE CR EEK OT TER ROAD BRANCH SH AVERS FORK HAGERH ILL KEEL FORK CRAGER FORK CON TRARY BRAN CH HUNN EWELL S DUMPS CREEK DOBSON SCH OOL BU LAN DANIEL HINDMAN N LAU REL HILL CROOK PYR AMI D AU XIER LEF T F OR K B CUCU MBER CRK CHANEY CREEK DINGUS RPD-SC IOT O-3 MOORE BRANC H RPD-TAZ EWELL-1 PORT ER CAMP MOU SIE WILD CAT HOLLOW SPR ING CREEK RACCOON SCHOOL ALVIN W ROSC OE GEORGES F ORK DAVISPOR T N LEATH ER BAR K CRK MOON N RPD-673 RPD-678 RPD-520 RPD-334 RPD-335 RPD-510 RPD-100 RPD-333 RPD-509 RPD-280 MAL DEN SALYERSVILLE FAR LEY C HUR CH CEREDO LINCOLN ST RAT TON KNOB SALLY BR ANCH

3

Pet Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

About 1 million pounds of dog waste is deposited daily in North Texas alone. That's why proper disposal of pet waste can make a big difference in the environment. 5 photos, 2 pages

Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

4

Pet House Sparrow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pet House Sparrow Pet House Sparrow Name: mary Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I found a Baby House Sparrow and raised it. This Sparrow is a female and is about 5 months old and very tame. We are keeping this bird as a pet. We are interested in possibly breeding this bird and was wondering if you can mix breed the House Sparrow with a Finch or type of Sparrow that you could purchase at a pet store? What is the life expectancy of the House Sparrow? Replies: In the wild most small birds only live a year or two; well cared for in captivity they might be able to make it twice that long, but don't count on it. There are some records of exceptional life lengths for some species of small birds, 8 or 10 years, but I haven't heard of any for house sparrows. I don't think you would be able to cross breed house sparrows with any of the others, but I couldn't say for sure. Hybridization normally occurs only between very closely related species; I don't know enough about genetics.

5

microPET  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mona S. Rowe, 631 344-5056 go to home page November 5, 2002 Electronic newsroom 02-79 New Tool for Studying Animal Models of Neurological and Psychiatric Diseases Will allow non-invasive study of neurochemistry, behavior, and disease progression UPTON, NY — Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory have demonstrated that a miniature positron emission tomography (PET) scanner, known as microPET, and the chemical markers used in traditional PET scanning are sensitive enough to pick up subtle differences in neurochemistry between known genetic variants of mice. This “proof-of-principle” experiment, described in the November issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, “opens up a whole new, non-invasive way to study and follow transgenic or genetically engineered strains of mice that serve as animal models for human neurological diseases, such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease or psychiatric diseases such as substance abuse, depression, and anxiety disorders,” said Panayotis (Peter) Thanos, lead author of the paper. Studying animal models may help scientists better understand and develop treatments for the human diseases.

6

Rearranjo estrutural de PET durante compresso plana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As caractersticas da tenso deformao do Poli(tereftalato de etileno) (PET) durante o processo de deformao por compresso plana tem sido estudadas. Amostras de PET (more)

Elton Luis Gasparotto Denardin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

SynchroPET LLC | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SynchroPET SynchroPET LLC America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 665 likes SynchroPET LLC Brookhaven National Laboratory Two of our devices have pre-clinical applications that can be very useful for drug development and research The RatCAP is a miniature PET scanner allows whole brain imaging in fully conscious rats for the first time. By far the world's smallest and lightest PET scanner, it is the only PET system able to be mounted on the head of a lab rat, allowing for the first-time functional images of the whole brain during the rat's typical behavior. Research PET centers will be eager to acquire this unique tool, and pharmaceutical companies will be interested in using it in drug development, especially for neurological applications in which anesthesia can interfere with the results. Even universities

8

SynchroPET LLC | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SynchroPET SynchroPET LLC America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 665 likes SynchroPET LLC Brookhaven National Laboratory Two of our devices have pre-clinical applications that can be very useful for drug development and research The RatCAP is a miniature PET scanner allows whole brain imaging in fully conscious rats for the first time. By far the world's smallest and lightest PET scanner, it is the only PET system able to be mounted on the head of a lab rat, allowing for the first-time functional images of the whole brain during the rat's typical behavior. Research PET centers will be eager to acquire this unique tool, and pharmaceutical companies will be interested in using it in drug development, especially for neurological applications in which anesthesia can interfere with the results. Even universities

9

Nestle Purina PetCare Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is a consumer packaged goods company that manufactures, markets, and distributes pet food and snacks for dogs and cats and cat litter throughout ...

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

10

Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET  

SciTech Connect

Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding biologically distinct neurochemical systems that interact to produce a variety of behaviors and disorders. Neurotransmitters are neither static nor isolated in their distribution. In fact, it is through interactions with other neurochemically distinct systems that the central nervous system (CNS) performs its vital role in sustaining life. Exclusive quantitative capabilities intrinsic to PET make this technology a suitable experimental tool to measure not only the regional distribution of specific receptors and their subtypes, but also the dynamic properties of neuroreceptors and their inherent influence on related neurotransmitter pathways. The ability to investigate dynamic properties in a non-invasive and reproducible manner provides a powerful tool that can extend our current knowledge of these interactions. Coupled with innovative paradigms including pharmacologic manipulations, physiologic models and reconstruction theories, knowledge derived from PET studies can greatly advance our understanding of normal and abnormal brain function.

Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

2001-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

11

Radiopharmaceuticals in PET, Progress and Promise  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

It is the intention of this presentation to focus on the current state of radiopharmaceuticals for PET and where this is leading us. PET radiopharmaceuticals can be broken down into perhaps seven categories at present with each being applicable to a different aspect of human biochemistry. These are: metabolic probes, neurochemical probes, enzyme probes, ion channel blockers, blood flow agents, ethical drugs and other positron emitters.

Wolf, A. P.; Fowler, J. S.

1988-11-00T23:59:59.000Z

12

AAPM Task Group 108: PET and PET/CT Shielding Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The shielding of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT (computed tomography) facilities presents special challenges. The 0.511 MeV annihilation photons associated with positron decay are much higher energy than other diagnostic radiations. As a result, barrier shielding may be required in floors and ceilings as well as adjacent walls. Since the patient becomes the radioactive source after the radiopharmaceutical has been administered, one has to consider the entire time that the subject remains in the clinic. In this report we present methods for estimating the shielding requirements for PET and PET/CT facilities. Information about the physical properties of the most commonly used clinical PET radionuclides is summarized, although the report primarily refers to fluorine-18. Typical PET imaging protocols are reviewed and exposure rates from patients are estimated including self-attenuation by body tissues and physical decay of the radionuclide. Examples of barrier calculations are presented for controlled and noncontrolled areas. Shielding for adjacent rooms with scintillation cameras is also discussed. Tables and graphs of estimated transmission factors for lead, steel, and concrete at 0.511 MeV are also included. Meeting the regulatory limits for uncontrolled areas can be an expensive proposition. Careful planning with the equipment vendor, facility architect, and a qualified medical physicist is necessary to produce a cost effective design while maintaining radiation safety standards.

Madsen, Mark T.; Anderson, Jon A.; Halama, James R. [Radiology, University of Iowa (United States)] (and others)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE R&D Accomplishments DOE R&D Accomplishments Search All Database Web Pages for Go The Basics Home About What's New FAQ Contact Us Laureates Nobel Laureates Fermi Laureates Nobel Physicists Nobel Chemists Medicine Nobels Explore Insights SC Stories Snapshots R&D Nuggets Database Search Browse Reports Database Help Finding Aids Site Map A - Z Index Menu Synopsis Blog Archive QR Code RSS Archive Tag Cloud Videos Widget XML Bookmark and Share Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning Resources with Additional Information Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scanner Courtesy Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 'Positron Emission Tomography ... [is a medical imaging technique that] can track chemical reactions in living tissues and merges chemistry with biological imaging. Its strength has been in studies of the brain where there has been significant progress in investigations of drug addiction, aging, mental illness, and neurogenic disorders. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) had its genesis in hot-atom chemical research supported by the Chemical Sciences Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Through this research it was learned, over many years, how to prepare short-lived positron emitters such as 18F whose half-life is 110 minutes. In 1975, the molecule [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose was successfully synthesized at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and set the stage for Positron Emission Tomography of the human brain.'

14

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a long history of breakthrough developments in PET 2009: President Obama presents Dr. Fowler with the National Medal of Science Award for "exceptional accomplishments in the...

15

ACCORDO QUADRO UNIVERSITA' DEGLI STUDI DI GENOVA (di seguito anche "l'Universit"), codice fiscale e  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fiscale e partita iva 00754150100, con sede legale in Genova, Via Balbi 5, rappresentata dal Magnifico

Genova, Università degli Studi di

16

Sinking a Pet's Teeth into Energy Saving | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sinking a Pet's Teeth into Energy Saving Sinking a Pet's Teeth into Energy Saving Sinking a Pet's Teeth into Energy Saving August 28, 2012 - 11:23am Addthis Ernie Tucker Editor, National Renewable Energy Laboratory The Humane Society of the United States cites a recent national survey reporting that Americans own approximately 78 million dogs and 86 million cats. And while feline-lovers might see this as a reason to break out the tuna since they are, well, top cat, there's a more sobering statistic: more than half of our pets are overweight or obese. But such a large number of Fat Fidos and Tubby Tabbies could also give the nation's pet owners an incentive to be inventive Energy Savers. If these animals are important -- and judging from the sheer numbers they seem to be -- it makes sense for humans to help the four-legged stay in

17

Sinking a Pet's Teeth into Energy Saving | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sinking a Pet's Teeth into Energy Saving Sinking a Pet's Teeth into Energy Saving Sinking a Pet's Teeth into Energy Saving August 28, 2012 - 11:23am Addthis Ernie Tucker Editor, National Renewable Energy Laboratory The Humane Society of the United States cites a recent national survey reporting that Americans own approximately 78 million dogs and 86 million cats. And while feline-lovers might see this as a reason to break out the tuna since they are, well, top cat, there's a more sobering statistic: more than half of our pets are overweight or obese. But such a large number of Fat Fidos and Tubby Tabbies could also give the nation's pet owners an incentive to be inventive Energy Savers. If these animals are important -- and judging from the sheer numbers they seem to be -- it makes sense for humans to help the four-legged stay in

18

Induction of DNA Damage by Low Dose PET scans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induction of DNA Damage by Low Dose PET scans Induction of DNA Damage by Low Dose PET scans Douglas Boreham McMaster University Abstract This research is focused on assessing the radiation risk associated with positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It has been suggested that low dose medical imaging, such as PET scans, carry an added biological risk because they expose the patient to ionizing radiation. PET scanning is an increasingly used nuclear medicine procedure that requires the administration of isotope 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG, E=250 keV β and 511 keV γ) and results in an effective dose to the patient ranging from 7-22 mSv. The radiation induced DNA damage associated with a PET scan was studied in 7-9 week old female wild type Trp53 +/+ mice. Mice were given a PET scan with 18F-FDG and the biological response was assessed in bone marrow using

19

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Evaluation After Initial Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Predicts Local Control in Rhabdomyosarcoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) is already an integral part of staging in rhabdomyosarcoma. We investigated whether primary-site treatment response characterized by serial PET imaging at specific time points can be correlated with local control. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively examined 94 patients with rhabdomyosarcoma who received initial chemotherapy 15 weeks (median) before radiotherapy and underwent baseline, preradiation, and postradiation PET. Baseline PET standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and the presence or absence of abnormal uptake (termed PET-positive or PET-negative) both before and after radiation were examined for the primary site. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS) was calculated according to baseline SUVmax, PET-positive status, and PET-negative status by the Kaplan-Meier method, and comparisons were tested with the log-rank test. Results: The median patient age was 11 years. With 3-year median follow-up, LRFS was improved among postradiation PET-negative vs PET-positive patients: 94% vs 75%, P=.02. By contrast, on baseline PET, LRFS was not significantly different for primary-site SUVmax {7 (median), although the findings suggested a trend toward improved LRFS: 96% for SUVmax {7, P=.08. Preradiation PET also suggested a statistically insignificant trend toward improved LRFS for PET-negative (97%) vs PET-positive (81%) patients (P=.06). Conclusion: Negative postradiation PET predicted improved LRFS. Notably, 77% of patients with persistent postradiation uptake did not experience local failure, suggesting that these patients could be closely followed up rather than immediately referred for intervention. Negative baseline and preradiation PET findings suggested statistically insignificant trends toward improved LRFS. Additional study may further understanding of relationships between PET findings at these time points and outcome in rhabdomyosarcoma.

Dharmarajan, Kavita V., E-mail: dharmark@mskcc.org [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H.; Gavane, Somali; Fox, Josef J.; Schoder, Heiko; Tom, Ashlyn K.; Price, Alison N.; Meyers, Paul A.; Wolden, Suzanne L. [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States)] [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

PET examination in intracranial tumor diagnosis of a cat  

SciTech Connect

This paper shows the significance of the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in the veterinary medication through a case study of a cat brain tumor. A castrated male cat with bilateral mydriasis and blindness arrived at the veterinary clinic. After physical, laboratory and neurological investigations other sickness was ruled out and the inkling of the intracranial lesion had come to light. Brain tumor seemed the most likely to cause the illness because other symptoms appeared (for example: anorexia, depression) and they progrediated fast. PET examination, using {sup 18}F-FDG isotope, was performed to confirm the possible causes of the cat's symptoms.

Angyal, G. [Pavlov' s dog Veterinary Ambulance and Surgeon Center, Debrecen (Hungary); Csepura, G. [Public Health Service, Debrecen (Hungary); Balkay, L.; Galuska, L. [University Medical School of Debrecen, PET Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Molnar, J. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Valastyan, I. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

22

The significant human-animal bond: Pets with cancer  

SciTech Connect

Veterinarians have responsibilities to both the animal and its owner. In the past several years there has been an increased awareness and concern about human-animal bonds. As a result, we have begun to appreciate the nature, strength, and significance of bonds that develop between humans and companion animals. It is typical for a pet to be perceived as and treated as a member of the family and as a result, animals provide special and beneficial relationships for many years. It is partly because of this role of the pet in promoting human health and happiness that we as veterinarians have an obligation to assist both owner and animal. The mark of the good practitioner concerns not only the ability to diagnose and treat accurately, but also the ability to show understanding and compassionate judgement.

Weller, R.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

24

PET computer programs for use with the 88-inch cyclotron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes in detail several offline programs written for the PET computer which provide an efficient data management system to assist with the operation of the 88-Inch Cyclotron. This function includes the capability to predict settings for all cyclotron and beam line parameters for all beams within the present operating domain of the facility. The establishment of a data base for operational records is also described from which various aspects of the operating history can be projected.

Gough, R.A.; Chlosta, L.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Revive!: reactions to migration between different embodiments when playing with robotic pets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the issues that arise in the context of the migration of a robotic pet between different embodiments and the associated design challenges. In the following, we describe the perceptions that a group of children have of a dinosaur character ... Keywords: artificial pets, human-robot interaction, mobile and ubiquitous entertainment

Elena Mrquez Segura; Henriette Cramer; Paulo Fontanha Gomes; Stina Nylander; Ana Paiva

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

PET-CTi contribution in staging macronodular versus nodular non small cell lung carcinoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyzed through comparison 2 groups of patients first with nodules smaller than 3 cm (Luzern group) and the second one with nodules lerger than 3cm (Zurich) to assess the role of PET-CTi to the staging of the non small cell lung cancer and to demonstrate ... Keywords: PET-CTi, adenopathy, diagnosis accuracy, lung cancer, tumor staging

Dana Alexandrescu; Milena Man; Bogdan Ra?iu-Duma; Roxana Miclaus

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Five Years of Cyclotron Radioisotope Production Experiences at the First PET-CT in Venezuela  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five years operation of a compact cyclotron installed at PET-CT facility in Caracas, Venezuela is given. Production rate of {sup 18}F labeled FDG, operation and radiation monitoring experience are included. We conclude that {sup 18}FDG CT-PET is the most effective technique for patient diagnosis.

Colmenter, L.; Coelho, D.; Esteves, L. M.; Ruiz, N.; Morales, L.; Lugo, I. [Centro Diagnostico Docente, Las Mercedes, Caracas (Venezuela); Sajo-Bohus, L.; Liendo, J. A.; Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Seccion de Fisica Nuclear, Caracas (Venezuela); Castillo, J. [University of Applied Science of Aachen (Germany)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

28

A New Model and Reconstruction Method for 2D PET Based on Transforming Detector Tube Data into Detector Arc Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The popular Radon transform approximation used in the modeling and reconstruction of positron emission tomography (PET) images fails to account for the non-trivial size of PET detectors. Currently, all reconstruction algorithms which account for detector ... Keywords: PET, image reconstruction, mathematical model, positron emission tomography

R. B. Carroll; B. A. Mair

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

6.19 MicroPET Enhances Studies of Small Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 6/1/2011 8 6/1/2011 6.19 MicroPET Enhances Studies of Small Animals Positron emission tomography (PET), a tool for imaging the chemistry and biology of the living human body by monitoring ingested tracer molecules, is now a standard method for studying the metabolism of the brain, the heart, and cancer. PET is based on pioneering advances by the Office of Science and predecessor agencies in particle accelerators, biological radiotracer molecules, photodetectors, and high-speed computers. Recently, PET technology was reengineered by scientists at the University of California-Los Angeles to make a miniaturized version for imaging small animals. Developed with Office of Science support, MicroPET is a noninvasive system that eliminates the need for biopsies

30

A High Resolution Monolithic Crystal, DOI, MR Compatible, PET Detector  

SciTech Connect

The principle objective of this proposal is to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) detector with depth-of-interaction (DOI) positioning capability that will achieve state of the art spatial resolution and sensitivity performance for small animal PET imaging. When arranged in a ring or box detector geometry, the proposed detector module will support <1 mm3 image resolution and >15% absolute detection efficiency. The detector will also be compatible with operation in a MR scanner to support simultaneous multi-modality imaging. The detector design will utilize a thick, monolithic crystal scintillator readout by a two-dimensional array of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) devices using a novel sensor on the entrance surface (SES) design. Our hypothesis is that our single-ended readout SES design will provide an effective DOI positioning performance equivalent to more expensive dual-ended readout techniques and at a significantly lower cost. Our monolithic crystal design will also lead to a significantly lower cost system. It is our goal to design a detector with state of the art performance but at a price point that is affordable so the technology can be disseminated to many laboratories. A second hypothesis is that using SiPM arrays, the detector will be able to operate in a MR scanner without any degradation in performance to support simultaneous PET/MR imaging. Having a co-registered MR image will assist in radiotracer localization and may also be used for partial volume corrections to improve radiotracer uptake quantitation. The far reaching goal of this research is to develop technology for medical research that will lead to improvements in human health care.

Robert S Miyaoka

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

31

PET imaging predicts future body weight and cocaine preference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deficits in dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2R/D3R) binding availability using PET imaging have been reported in obese humans and rodents. Similar deficits have been reported in cocaine-addicts and cocaine-exposed primates. We found that D2R/D3R binding availability negatively correlated with measures of body weight at the time of scan (ventral striatum), at 1 (ventral striatum) and 2 months (dorsal and ventral striatum) post scan in rats. Cocaine preference was negatively correlated with D2R/D3R binding availability 2 months (ventral striatum) post scan. Our findings suggest that inherent deficits in striatal D2R/D3R signaling are related to obesity and drug addiction susceptibility and that ventral and dorsal striatum serve dissociable roles in maintaining weight gain and cocaine preference. Measuring D2R/D3R binding availability provides a way for assessing susceptibility to weight gain and cocaine abuse in rodents and given the translational nature of PET imaging, potentially primates and humans.

Michaelides M.; Wang G.; Michaelides M.; Thanos P.K. Kim R.; Cho J.; Ananth M.; Wang G.-J.; Volkow N.D.

2011-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

32

F-18-FDG-PET Confined Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced NSCLC With Concomitant Chemotherapy: Results of the PET-PLAN Pilot Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The integration of fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the process of radiotherapy (RT) planning of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may improve diagnostic accuracy and minimize interobserver variability compared with target volume definition solely based on computed tomography. Furthermore, irradiating only FDG-PET-positive findings and omitting elective nodal regions may allow dose escalation by treating smaller volumes. The aim of this prospective pilot trial was to evaluate the therapeutic safety of FDG-PET-based RT treatment planning with an autocontour-derived delineation of the primary tumor. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had Stages II-III inoperable NSCLC, and simultaneous, platinum-based radiochemotherapy was indicated. FDG-PET and computed tomography acquisitions in RT treatment planning position were coregistered. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the FDG-PET-defined primary tumor, which was autodelineated with a source-to-background algorithm, plus FDG-PET-positive lymph node stations. Limited by dose restrictions for normal tissues, prescribed total doses were in the range of 66.6 to 73.8 Gy. The primary endpoint was the rate of out-of-field isolated nodal recurrences (INR). Results: As per intent to treat, 32 patients received radiochemotherapy. In 15 of these patients, dose escalation above 66.6 Gy was achieved. No Grade 4 toxicities occurred. After a median follow-up time of 27.2 months, the estimated median survival time was 19.3 months. During the observation period, one INR was observed in 23 evaluable patients. Conclusions: FDG-PET-confined target volume definition in radiochemotherapy of NSCLC, based on a contrast-oriented source-to-background algorithm, was associated with a low risk of INR. It might provide improved tumor control because of dose escalation.

Fleckenstein, Jochen [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Hellwig, Dirk [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Kremp, Stephanie [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Grgic, Aleksandar [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Groeschel, Andreas [Department of Internal Medicine V, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Kirsch, Carl-Martin [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Nestle, Ursula [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Clinic for Radiotherapy, University Hospital, Freiburg (Germany); Ruebe, Christian, E-mail: christian.ruebe@uks.eu [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Pet-Fish problem on the World-Wide Web  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We identify the presence of Pet-Fish problem situations and the corresponding Guppy effect of concept theory on the World-Wide Web. For this purpose, we introduce absolute weights for words expressing concepts and relative weights between words expressing concepts, and the notion of 'meaning bound' between two words expressing concepts, making explicit use of the conceptual structure of the World-Wide Web. The Pet-Fish problem occurs whenever there are exemplars - in the case of Pet and Fish these can be Guppy or Goldfish - for which the meaning bound with respect to the conjunction is stronger than the meaning bounds with respect to the individual concepts.

Aerts, Diederik; D'Hooghe, Bart; Sozzo, Sandro

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

A Student Project to use Geant4 Simulations for a TMS-PET combination  

SciTech Connect

Geant4 is one of the most powerful tools for MC simulation of detectors and their applications. We present a student project to simulate a combined Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-Positron Emission Tomography (TMS-PET) system using Geant4. This project aims to study PET-TMS systems by implementing a model for the brain response to the TMS pulse and studying the simulated PET response. In order to increase the speed of the simulations we parallelise our programs and investigate the possibility of using GRID computing.

Altamirano, A.; Chamorro, A.; Hurtado, K.; Romero, C.; Wahl, D.; Zamudio, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria (Peru); Rueda, A. [Universidad Nacional del Callao (Peru); Solano Salinas, C. J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria (Peru); CINVESTAV Merida (Mexico)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

35

Pets and Smoking in the Home Associated with Asthma Symptoms and Asthma-Like Breathing Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

smoke exposures in the home. Allergy. Apr 2001;56(4):287-Pets and Smoking in the Home Associated with Asthma Symptomsenvironmental conditions in the homesuch as the presence of

Hastert, Theresa A.; Babey, Susan H.; Brown, E. Richard; Meng, Ying-Ying

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Development of a flexible optical fiber based high resolution integrated PET/MRI system  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The simultaneous measurement of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an emerging field for molecular imaging research. Although optical fiber based PET/MRI systems have advantages on less interference between PET and MRI, there is a drawback in reducing the scintillation light due to the fiber. To reduce the problem, the authors newly developed flexible optical fiber bundle based block detectors and employed them for a high resolution integrated PET/MRI system. Methods: The flexible optical fiber bundle used 0.5 mm diameter, 80 cm long double clad fibers which have dual 12 mm Multiplication-Sign 24 mm rectangular inputs and a single 24 mm Multiplication-Sign 24 mm rectangular output. In the input surface, LGSO scintillators of 0.025 mol.% (decay time: {approx}31 ns: 0.9 mm Multiplication-Sign 1.3 mm Multiplication-Sign 5 mm) and 0.75 mol.% (decay time: {approx}46 ns: 0.9 mm Multiplication-Sign 1.3 mm Multiplication-Sign 6 mm) were optically coupled in depth direction to form depth-of-interaction detector, arranged in 11 Multiplication-Sign 13 matrix and optically coupled to the fiber bundle. The two inputs of the bundle are bent for 90 Degree-Sign , bound to one, and are optically coupled to a Hamamatsu 1-in. square position sensitive photomultiplier tube. Results: Light loss due to the fiber bundle could be reduced and the performance of the block detectors was improved. Eight optical fiber based block detectors (16 LGSO blocks) were arranged in a 56 mm diameter ring to form a PET system. Spatial resolution and sensitivity were 1.2 mm full-width at half-maximum and 1.2% at the central field-of-view, respectively. Sensitivity change was less than 1% for 2 Degree-Sign C temperature changes. This PET system was integrated with a 0.3 T permanent magnet MRI system which has 17 cm diameter hole at the yoke area for insertion of the PET detector ring. There was no observable interference between PET and MRI. Simultaneous imaging of PET and MRI was successfully performed for small animal studies. Conclusions: The authors confirmed that the developed high resolution PET/MRI system is promising for molecular imaging research.

Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Watabe, Tadashi; Aoki, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Eiji; Kato, Katsuhiko; Hatazawa, Jun [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 565-0871 Osaka (Japan); Neomax Engineering, Takasaki 370-2115 (Japan); Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan) and Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Influence of content and particle size of waste pet bottles on concrete behavior at different w/c ratios  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this work was to study the mechanical behavior of concrete with recycled Polyethylene Therephtalate (PET), varying the water/cement ratio (0.50 and 0.60), PET content (10 and 20 vol%) and the particle size. Also, the influence of the thermal degradation of PET in the concrete was studied, when the blends were exposed to different temperatures (200, 400, 600 {sup o}C). Results indicate that PET-filled concrete, when volume proportion and particle size of PET increased, showed a decrease in compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and ultrasonic pulse velocity; however, the water absorption increased. On the other hand, the flexural strength of concrete-PET when exposed to a heat source was strongly dependent on the temperature, water/cement ratio, as well as on the PET content and particle size. Moreover, the activation energy was affected by the temperature, PET particles location on the slabs and water/cement ratio.

Albano, C. [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Facultad de Ingenieria, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: carmen.albano@ucv.ve; Camacho, N. [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Facultad de Ingenieria, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: nelsoncamachog@gmail.com; Hernandez, M. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Departamento de Mecanica, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Matheus, A.; Gutierrez, A. [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Facultad de Ingenieria, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Precise Measurement of Strontium-82 Radioactivity in the Sr-Rb PET  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Precise Measurement of Strontium-82 Precise Measurement of Strontium-82 Radioactivity in the Sr-Rb PET Generator Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Precise Measurement of Strontium-82 Radioactivity in the Sr-Rb PET Generator Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Precise measurement of 82Sr radioactivity in the Sr-Rb PET generatorm

39

A comprehensive plant-wide assessment of Amcor PET Packaging at Fairfield, California  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the results of the plant-wide assessment of AMCOR PET plants in Fairfield, City of Commerce, and Lathrop California. The project (except the assessment of Lathrop plant) was a cost shared effort between US Department of Energy through Golden Field Office, Golden CO and AMCOR PET Packaging Co. The DOE share of the plant-wide assessment cost was awarded to AMCOR PET in response to the RFP DE-PS36-05GO95009, the 2005 round of funding for Plant-Wide Energy Efficiency Opportunity Assessments. The plant-wide assessment included the processes, electrical and gas equipment. Current production practices have been evaluated against best practice standards, as well as utilization of modern technology to improve energy efficiency, reduce the wastes, and improve productivity.

Kevin Losh; Hui Choi; Yin Yin Wu; Bryan W. Hackett; Ahmad R. Ganji

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

PET: a statistical model for popular events tracking in social communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

User generated information in online communities has been characterized with the mixture of a text stream and a network structure both changing over time. A good example is a web-blogging community with the daily blog posts and a social network of bloggers. ... Keywords: PET, popular events tracking, social communities, topic modeling

Cindy Xide Lin; Bo Zhao; Qiaozhu Mei; Jiawei Han

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Factors affecting degradation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) during pre-flotation conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In general, plastics are exposed to different degrading agents in every procedure involved in their recovery from waste mixture and from subsequent recycling. In this study, two methods of pre-flotation conditioning were used to determine how these methods affect the general properties of the pre-conditioned PET particles to be recovered from the PET-PVC mixture. The first method comprised the conditioning of PET samples using an alkaline solution of nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) based on the patent by the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company. The second method, developed in this study, was a conditioning process which used an alkali-less solution of the same nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) used in the first method. The following analytical methods were used to characterize properties of the pre-conditioned PET samples that were correlated to relative degradation of the samples: differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), for thermal behavior of the samples; FT-IR spectroscopy, for functional groups present in the samples; and, Pohl's method, for carboxyl end-group concentration count. Results show that in addition to water the presence of NaOH in the conditioning solution contributes to the further degradation of the polymer.

Caparanga, Alvin R. [School of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Mapua Institute of Technology, Intramuros, Manila 1002 (Philippines); School of Graduate Studies, Mapua Institute of Technology, Intramuros, Manila 1002 (Philippines)], E-mail: arcaparanga@mapua.edu.ph; Basilia, Blessie A. [School of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Mapua Institute of Technology, Intramuros, Manila 1002 (Philippines); School of Graduate Studies, Mapua Institute of Technology, Intramuros, Manila 1002 (Philippines); Dagbay, Kevin B. [School of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Mapua Institute of Technology, Intramuros, Manila 1002 (Philippines); Salvacion, Jonathan W.L. [School of Graduate Studies, Mapua Institute of Technology, Intramuros, Manila 1002 (Philippines)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

ALGORITHMS FOR JOINT ESTIMATION OF ATTENUATION AND EMISSION IMAGES IN PET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALGORITHMS FOR JOINT ESTIMATION OF ATTENUATION AND EMISSION IMAGES IN PET Hakan Erdogan IBM TJ information about the at- tenuating medium. To use all the available information, we propose a joint in these two scans, one can derive a joint objective function based on both scans to jointly estimate attenu

Erdogan, Hakan

43

Joint Estimation of Attenuation and Emission Images from PET Scans Hakan Erdogan and Jeffrey A. Fessler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint Estimation of Attenuation and Emission Images from PET Scans Hakan Erdogan and Jeffrey A information about the attenuating medium. To use all the available information, we propose a joint estimation optimal use of the information in these two scans, one can derive a joint objective function based on both

Erdogan, Hakan

44

A PET/CT directed, 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system for prostate cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prostate cancer affects 1 in 6 men in the USA. Systematic transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy is the standard method for a definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, this "blind" biopsy approach can miss at least 20% of prostate cancers. ... Keywords: 3D ultrasound imaging, PET/CT, image segmentation, imageguided biopsy, molecular imaging, nonrigid image registration, prostate cancer, wavelet transform

Baowei Fei; Viraj Master; Peter Nieh; Hamed Akbari; Xiaofeng Yang; Aaron Fenster; David Schuster

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

18F-FDG PET imaging analysis for computer aided Alzheimer's diagnosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finding sensitive and appropriate technologies for non-invasive observation and early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of fundamental importance to develop early treatments. In this work we develop a fully automatic computer aided diagnosis (CAD) ... Keywords: Alzheimer's disease (AD), Computer aided diagnosis, FDG-PET, Independent component analysis (ICA), Principal component analysis (PCA), Supervised learning, Support vector machine (SVM)

I. A. Illn; J. M. Grriz; J. Ramrez; D. Salas-Gonzalez; M. M. Lpez; F. Segovia; R. Chaves; M. Gmez-Rio; C. G. Puntonet

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Implementation and optimization of a new super-resolution technique in PET imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Super-Resolution (SR) techniques are used in PET imaging to generate a high-resolution image by combining multiple low-resolution images that have been acquired from different points of view (POV). In this paper, we propose a new implementation of the ...

Guoping Chang; Tinsu Pan; John W. Clark; Osama R. Mawlawi

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

LITTLEWOOD-TYPE PROBLEMS ON [0,1] PEtER BoRwEin ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LITTLEWOOD-TYPE PROBLEMS ON [0,1]. PEtER BoRwEin, TAm bAs eRD bElyi , AnD u bExA ? bos. ?R????? ' ??????d?f gh ???d kl mopRC ?s C?h?f?t.

48

Comportamiento trmico y mecnico del poli(etiln tereftalato) (PET) modificado con resinas polimricas basadas en bisfenol-A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Se realiz el estudio de las propiedades trmicas y mecnicas de mezclas de Poli(Etiln Tereftalato) (PET) con resinas polimricas basadas enl Bisfenol-A: Poli(Carbonato de Bisfenol-A) (more)

Snchez Mora, Johan Jos

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Nucleation mechanisms of aromatic polyesters, PET, PBT, and PEN, on single-wall carbon nanotubes: early nucleation stages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nucleation mechanisms of poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET), poly (butylene terephthalate) (PBT), and poly (ethylene naphthalate) (PEN) on single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are proposed, based on experimental evidence, theoretical epitaxy analysis, ...

Adriana Espinoza-Martnez, Carlos Avila-Orta, Vctor Cruz-Delgado, Oscar Olvera-Neria, Julio Gonzlez-Torres, Francisco Medelln-Rodrguez

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Value of PET/CT and MR Lymphography in Treatment of Prostate Cancer Patients With Lymph Node Metastases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the clinical value of two novel molecular imaging techniques: {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and ferumoxtran-10 enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (magnetic resonance lymphography [MRL]) for lymph node (LN) treatment in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of PET/CT and MRL to assess the number, size, and location of LN metastases in patients with primary or recurrent PCa. Methods and Materials: A total of 29 patients underwent MRL and PET/CT for LN evaluation. The MRL and PET/CT data were analyzed independently. The number, size, and location of the LN metastases were determined. The location was described as within or outside the standard clinical target volume for elective pelvic irradiation as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Subsequently, the results from MRL and PET/CT were compared. Results: Of the 738 LNs visible on MRL, 151 were positive in 23 of 29 patients. Of the 132 LNs visible on PET/CT, 34 were positive in 13 of 29 patients. MRL detected significantly more positive LNs (p < 0.001) in more patients than PET/CT (p = 0.002). The mean diameter of the detected suspicious LNs on MRL was significantly smaller than those detected by PET/CT, 4.9 mm and 8.4 mm, respectively (p < 0.0001). In 14 (61%) of 23 patients, suspicious LNs were found outside the clinical target volume with MRL and in 4 (31%) of 13 patients with PET/CT. Conclusion: In patients with PCa, both molecular imaging techniques, MRL and {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT, can detect LNs suspicious for metastasis, irrespective of the existing size and shape criteria for CT and conventional magnetic resonance imaging. On MRL and PET/CT, 61% and 31% of the suspicious LNs were located outside the conventional clinical target volume. Therefore, these techniques could help to individualize treatment selection and enable image-guided radiotherapy for patients with PCa LN metastases.

Fortuin, Ansje S., E-mail: A.Fortuin@rad.umcn.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Deserno, Willem M.L.L.G. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meijer, Hanneke J.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jager, Gerrit J. [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital's, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital's, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Takahashi, Satoru; Debats, Oscar A. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Reske, Sven N.; Schick, Christian [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Krause, Bernd J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Oort, Inge van; Witjes, Alfred J. [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoogeveen, Yvonne L. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Barentsz, Jelle O. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Role of Pretreatment FDG-PET in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Pretreatment with 2- [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET) was evaluated as a predictor of local failure-free survival (LFFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with nonkeratinizing nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) alone or concurrently with chemotherapy (CCRT). Patients and Methods: Seventy-five M0 NPC patients who received FDG-PET before treatment were analyzed. The primary tumor FDG uptake was measured as the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax). The LFFS, DFS, and OS were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and the differences were evaluated on log-rank test. The prognostic significance was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Eighteen patients received IMRT alone and 57 received CCRT. The mean SUVmax was significantly higher in 12 patients with locoregional or distant failure than in those without failure (p 5) indicates poor outcome in patients with NPC.

Liu, Wen-Shan [School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University and Department of Radiation Oncology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Fang [School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University and Division of Medical Oncology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Hsien-Chun [School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University and Department of Radiation Oncology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Liu, Jung-Tung [School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University and Department of Surgery, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Weng, Jui-Hung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Li, Yueh-Chun [School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University and Department of Radiation Oncology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jong-Kang, E-mail: jongkanglee@hotmail.com [School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

How Much Water is Enough? Using PET to Develop Water Budgets for Residential landscapes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conserving and reducing the amount of water used for landscape irrigation continues to be a major issue for municipalities throughout Texas and the nation. Landscape irrigation increases dramatically during summer months and contributes substantially to peak demand placed on municipal water supplies. A survey of monthly water use during 2000 through 2002 for 800 residences of similar size and appraised value in College Station, Texas indicated that average peak water consumption increased as much as 3.3 fold during the summer compared to the nonpeak months of December, January, and February. Although conservation education programs typically suggest ways to reduce indoor and outdoor water use, information that can provide homeowners with a realistic estimate of the amount of water required to sustain their landscape at an acceptable quality is lacking. Potential evapotranspiration (PET) modified by the appropriate crop coefficient is commonly used to increase irrigation efficiency for crops and turf. However, very limited information exists about landscape coefficients (Lc) for use in PET based irrigation of landscapes with multiple plant species. Recent studies at Texas A&M University indicated that 0.70 appears to be a good estimate of Lc to use in PET based landscape irrigation during the summer months. Based on Lc, landscape size, and PET, water budgets were derived for 800 residential landscapes to predict monthly residential water consumption and then compared with actual monthly water used. These comparisons demonstrated seasonal water use patterns as well as the potential for very large reductions in landscape water use. In 2000, 2001, and 2002, an average of 347, 410, and 476 households, repectively, applied irrigation water in excess of PET. Had these households applied landscape irrigation during May through October at 100% of PET, which is equivalent to an Lc of 1.0, total predicted annual water savings for these households would have been 74, 104, and 85 acre feet in 2000, 2001, and 2002, respectively. Had irrigation been applied using an Lc of 0.7, the estimated savings would have totaled 92, 111, and 100 acre-feet during the same period. These data demonstrate the substantial potential that exists to conserve water used for landscape irrigation by using PET, Lc, and landscape size to derive realistic water budgets. If adopted and applied by homeowners, such budgets could result in very large reductions in landscape water use. Historically, tools available to help water utilities curb outdoor water use in high demand periods have included limitations on customers watering days and times and general recommendations on how much water a landscape needs. Using PET combined with Lc has the potential to provide realistic water budgets for residential landscapes and greatly reduce landscape water use. Quantitative data showing the amount of water that landscapes need, compared to how much water is typically applied to landscapes, will help utilities target their conservation efforts for maximum results.

White, R.; Havalak, R.; Nations, J.; Thomas, J.; Chalmers, D.; Dewey, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

55

Dosimetry of Y-90 Liquid Brachytherapy in a Dog with Osteosarcoma Using PET/CT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel Y-90 liquid brachytherapy strategy is currently being studied for the treatment of osteosarcoma using a preclinical translational model in dogs to assess its potential efficacy and toxicity. In this study, dosimetry calculations are performed for Y-90 liquid brachytherapy in a dog with osteosarcoma using the Geant4 Monte Carlo code. A total of 611.83 MBq Y-90 radiopharmaceutical is administered via direct injections, and the in vivo distribution of Y-90 is assessed using a time-of-flight (TOF) PET/CT scanner. A patient-specific geometry is built using anatomical data obtained from CT images. The material properties of tumor and surrounding tissues are calculated based on a CT number - electron density calibration. The Y-90 distribution is sampled in Geant4 from PET images using a collapsing 3-D rejection technique to determine the decay sites. Dose distributions in the tumor bed and surrounding tissues are calculated demonstrating significant heterogeneity with multiple hot spots at the injection sites. Dose volume histograms show about 33.9 percent of bone and tumor and 70.2 percent of bone marrow and trabecular bone receive a total dose over 200 Gy; about 3.2 percent of bone and tumor and 31.0 percent of bone marrow and trabecular bone receive a total dose of over 1000 Gy. Y-90 liquid brachytherapy has the potential to be used as an adjuvant therapy or for palliation purposes. Future work includes evaluation of pharmacokinetics of the Y-90 radiopharmaceutical, calibration of PET/CT scanners for the direct quantitative assessment of Y-90 activity concentration, and assessment of efficacy of the Y-90 liquid brachytherapy strategy.

Zhou, Jingjie

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

ACCORDO QUADRO COMUNE DI GENOVA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Balbi 5, Genova; (qui di seguito denominate singolarmente anche "parte" e congiuntamente anche "parti

Genova, Università degli Studi di

57

Macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates for stable radiometal antibody conjugates for therapy, SPECT and PET imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N{prime}N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy. 4 figs.

Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

58

Macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates for stable radiometal antibody conjugates for therapy, spect and pet imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N'N",N'"-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy.

Mease, Ronnie C. (Fairfax, VA); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY)

1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

59

The use of alternative forms of graphical analysis to balance bias and precision in PET images  

SciTech Connect

Graphical analysis (GA) is an efficient method for estimating total tissue distribution volume (V{sub T}) from positron emission tomography (PET) uptake data. The original GA produces a negative bias in V{sub T} in the presence of noise. Estimates of V{sub T} using other GA forms have less bias but less precision. Here, we show how the bias terms are related between the GA methods and how using an instrumental variable (IV) can also reduce bias. Results are based on simulations of a two-compartment model with V{sub T}'s ranging from 10.5 to 64 mL/cm{sub 3} and from PET image data with the tracer [{sup 11}C]DASB ([{sup 11}C]-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethyl-phenylsulfanyl) benzonitrile). Four estimates of V{sub T} (or distribution volume ratio (DVR) using a reference tissue) can be easily computed from different formulations of GA including the IV. As noise affects the estimates from all four differently, they generally do not provide the same estimates. By taking the median value of the four estimates, we can decrease the bias and reduce the effect of large values contributing to noisy images. The variance of the four estimates can serve as a guide to the reliability of the median estimate. This may provide a general method for the generation of parametric images with little bias and good precision.

Logan, J.; Logan, J.; Alexoff, D.; Fowler, J.S.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Design and evaluation of radiotracers for determination of regional cerebral blood flow with PET  

SciTech Connect

The tracer kinetics of 4-Fluoro(/sup 18/F)-, 4-Bromo(/sup 82/Br)- and 4-Iodo(/sup 125/I)-antipyrine and /sup 15/O-water were compared in a cat or baboon animal model. First-pass cerebral extraction and clearance with alterations in PaCO/sub 2/ were measured for whole brain. The Renkin/Crone model was used to evaluate brain capillary permeability-surface area product for 4-/sup 18/FAP in cats. Positron-emission-tomographic measurements required development of an instrument and technique for control of the arterial concentration of the radiotracer as a ramp function, so that tracer concentration changes due to radioactive decay or altered physiological processes could be accurately described with PET. Pharmacokinetic and tissue-distribution studies in cats were used to determine dosimetry for 4-/sup 18/FAP. 4-Bromoantipyrine labeled with /sup 78/Br (t = 6.5 m) is suggested as a tracer for determination of rCBF with PET.

Lambrecht, R.M.; Duncan, C.C.; Shiue, C.Y.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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61

Effect of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT Imaging in Patients With Clinical Stage II and III Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the potential effect of using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial assessment of patients with clinical Stage II or III breast cancer. Methods and Materials: During 14 consecutive months, 39 patients (40 tumors) who presented with Stage II or III breast cancer on the basis of a routine extension assessment were prospectively included in this study. PET/CT was performed in addition to the initial assessment. Results: In 3 cases, PET/CT showed extra-axillary lymph node involvement that had not been demonstrated with conventional techniques. Two of these patients had hypermetabolic lymph nodes in the subpectoral and infraclavicular regions, and the third had a hypermetabolic internal mammary node. PET/CT showed distant uptake in 4 women. Of these 4 women, 1 had pleural involvement and 3 had bone metastasis. Overall, of the 39 women, the PET/CT results modified the initial stage in 7 (18%). The modified staging altered the treatment plan for 5 patients (13%). It led to radiotherapy in 4 patients (bone metastasis, pleural lesion, subpectoral lymph nodes, and internal mammary nodes) and excision of, and radiotherapy to, the infraclavicular lymph nodes in 1 patient. Conclusions: PET/CT can provide information on extra-axillary lymph node involvement and can uncover occult distant metastases in a significant percentage of patients. Therefore, initial PET/CT could enable better treatment planning for patients with Stage II and III breast cancer.

Groheux, David [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France)], E-mail: dgroheux@yahoo.fr; Moretti, Jean-Luc [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Baillet, Georges [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Espie, Marc; Giacchetti, Sylvie [Department of Medical Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Hindie, Elif [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Hennequin, Christophe [EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Department of Radiation Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Vilcoq, Jacques-Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hartmann Hospital, Neuilly sur Seine (France); Cuvier, Caroline [Department of Medical Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Sarandi, Farid [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Misset, Jean-Louis [Department of Medical Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

A 3-D Model-Based Approach for the PET-Functional and MR-Anatomical Cardiac Imaging Data Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an approach for the assessment of 3-D functional maps of the heart is proposed. It relies on the model-based coregistration of MR anatomical and PET metabolic images and the extraction of an individualized anatomical heart model from MR ...

Timo Mkel; Quoc-Cuong Pham; Patrick Clarysse; Jyrki Ltjnen; Kirsi Lauerma; Helena Hnninen; Juhani Knuuti; Toivo Katila; Isabelle E. Magnin

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

High density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for solar disinfection of drinking water in northern region, Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of high density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for the solar disinfection of drinking water ...

Yazdani, Iman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Prognostic Utility of Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen in Carcinoma of the Cervix: Association With Pre- and Posttreatment FDG-PET  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC Ag) is a serum biomarker for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the cervix. We investigated the prognostic significance of SCC Ag levels before and at the completion of chemoradiotherapy and compared these levels with the results of pre- and posttreatment positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Methods and Materials: The records of 63 women who underwent definitive chemoradiotherapy for SCC of the cervix were reviewed. SCC Ag levels were obtained before and at the completion of radiotherapy. Patients were divided into two groups on the basis of their pretreatment SCC Ag level (>30 ng/mL vs. {<=}30 ng/mL). Pre- and posttreatment FDG-PET/CT characteristics and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed according to SCC Ag groups. Results: Median follow-up was 12 months. Women with SCC Ag >30 ng/mL at diagnosis had more advanced lymph node disease on pretreatment FDG-PET/CT than those with SCC Ag {<=}30 ng/mL (p = .002). Women whose SCC Ag normalized at the completion of chemoradiotherapy were more likely to have a complete metabolic response on their 3-month posttreatment FDG-PET/CT than those whose SCC Ag did not normalize (p = .006). The 2-year PFS was 73% for patients with a SCC Ag level {<=}30 ng/mL at diagnosis compared with 0% for those with a SCC Ag level >30 ng/mL at diagnosis (p < .0001). The 2-year PFS was 62% for patients whose SCC Ag normalized at the completion of chemoradiotherapy compared with 0% for those whose SCC Ag did not normalize (p = .0004). Conclusion: Elevated SCC Ag at diagnosis and failure of the SCC Ag to normalize at the completion of treatment are associated with incomplete metabolic response and decreased PFS.

Olsen, Jeffrey R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Dehdashti, Farrokh; Siegel, Barry A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Zighelboim, Israel [Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Grigsby, Perry W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Schwarz, Julie K., E-mail: jschwarz@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Departments of Cell Biology and Physiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

PET imaging of thin objects: measuring the effects of positron range and partial-volume averaging in the leag of Nicotiana Tabacum  

SciTech Connect

PET imaging in plants is receiving increased interest as a new strategy to measure plant responses to environmental stimuli and as a tool for phenotyping genetically engineered plants. PET imaging in plants, however, poses new challenges. In particular, the leaves of most plants are so thin that a large fraction of positrons emitted from PET isotopes ({sup 18}F, {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N) escape while even state-of-the-art PET cameras have significant partial-volume errors for such thin objects. Although these limitations are acknowledged by researchers, little data have been published on them. Here we measured the magnitude and distribution of escaping positrons from the leaf of Nicotiana tabacum for the radionuclides {sup 18}F, {sup 11}C and {sup 13}N using a commercial small-animal PET scanner. Imaging results were compared to radionuclide concentrations measured from dissection and counting and to a Monte Carlo simulation using GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission). Simulated and experimentally determined escape fractions were consistent. The fractions of positrons (mean {+-} S.D.) escaping the leaf parenchyma were measured to be 59 {+-} 1.1%, 64 {+-} 4.4% and 67 {+-} 1.9% for {sup 18}F, {sup 11}C and {sup 13}N, respectively. Escape fractions were lower in thicker leaf areas like the midrib. Partial-volume averaging underestimated activity concentrations in the leaf blade by a factor of 10 to 15. The foregoing effects combine to yield PET images whose contrast does not reflect the actual activity concentrations. These errors can be largely corrected by integrating activity along the PET axis perpendicular to the leaf surface, including detection of escaped positrons, and calculating concentration using a measured leaf thickness.

Alexoff, D.L.; Alexoff, D.L.; Dewey, S.L.; Vaska, P.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Ferrieri, R.; Schueller, M.; Schlyer, D.; Fowler, J.S.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

STRATEGIES FOR QUANTIFYING PET IMAGING DATA FROM TRACER STUDIES OF BRAIN RECEPTORS AND ENZYMES.  

SciTech Connect

A description of some of the methods used in neuroreceptor imaging to distinguish changes in receptor availability has been presented in this chapter. It is necessary to look beyond regional uptake of the tracer since uptake generally is affected by factors other than the number of receptors for which the tracer has affinity. An exception is the infusion method producing an equilibrium state. The techniques vary in complexity some requiring arterial blood measurements of unmetabolized tracer and multiple time uptake data. Others require only a few plasma and uptake measurements and those based on a reference region require no plasma measurements. We have outlined some of the limitations of the different methods. Laruelle (1999) has pointed out that test/retest studies to which various methods can be applied are crucial in determining the optimal method for a particular study. The choice of method will also depend upon the application. In a clinical setting, methods not involving arterial blood sampling are generally preferred. In the future techniques for externally measuring arterial plasma radioactivity with only a few blood samples for metabolite correction will extend the modeling options of clinical PET. Also since parametric images can provide information beyond that of ROI analysis, improved techniques for generating such images will be important, particularly for ligands requiring more than a one-compartment model. Techniques such as the wavelet transform proposed by Turkheimer et al. (2000) may prove to be important in reducing noise and improving quantitation.

Logan, J.

2001-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

67

A flexible high-rate USB2 data acquisition system for PET and SPECT imaging  

SciTech Connect

A new flexible data acquisition system has been developed to instrument gamma-ray imaging detectors designed by the Jefferson Lab Detector and Imaging Group. Hardware consists of 16-channel data acquisition modules installed on USB2 carrier boards. Carriers have been designed to accept one, two, and four modules. Application trigger rate and channel density determines the number of acquisition boards and readout computers used. Each channel has an independent trigger, gated integrator and a 2.5 MHz 12-bit ADC. Each module has an FPGA for analog control and signal processing. Processing includes a 5 ns 40-bit trigger time stamp and programmable triggering, gating, ADC timing, offset and gain correction, charge and pulse-width discrimination, sparsification, event counting, and event assembly. The carrier manages global triggering and transfers module data to a USB buffer. High-granularity time-stamped triggering is suitable for modular detectors. Time stamped events permit dynamic studies, complex offline event assembly, and high-rate distributed data acquisition. A sustained USB data rate of 20 Mbytes/s, a sustained trigger rate of 300 kHz for 32 channels, and a peak trigger rate of 2.5 MHz to FIFO memory were achieved. Different trigger, gating, processing, and event assembly techniques were explored. Target applications include >100 kHz coincidence rate PET detectors, dynamic SPECT detectors, miniature and portable gamma detectors for small-animal and clinical use.

J. Proffitt, W. Hammond, S. Majewski, V. Popov, R.R. Raylman, A.G. Weisenberger, R. Wojcik

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

FDG-PET Assessment of the Effect of Head and Neck Radiotherapy on Parotid Gland Glucose Metabolism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Functional imaging with [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) provides the opportunity to define the physiology of the major salivary glands before and after radiation therapy. The goal of this retrospective study was to identify the radiation dose-response relationship of parotid gland glucose metabolism in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Materials and Methods: Forty-nine adults with HNSCC were identified who had curative intent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and FDG-PET imaging before and after treatment. Using a graphical user interface, contours were delineated for the parotid glands on axial CT slices while all authors were blinded to paired PET slices. Average and maximal standard uptake values (SUV) were measured within these anatomic regions. Changes in SUV and volume after radiation therapy were correlated with parotid gland dose-volume histograms from IMRT plans. Results: The average parotid gland volume was 30.7 mL and contracted 3.9 {+-} 1.9% with every increase of 10 Gy in mean dose (p = 0.04). However, within the first 3 months after treatment, there was a uniform reduction of 16.5% {+-} 7.3% regardless of dose. The average SUV{sub mean} of the glands was 1.63 {+-} 0.48 pretreatment and declined by 5.2% {+-} 2.5% for every increase of 10 Gy in mean dose (p = 0.04). The average SUV{sub max} was 4.07 {+-} 2.85 pretreatment and decreased in a sigmoid manner with mean dose. A threshold of 32 Gy for mean dose existed, after which SUV{sub max} declined rapidly. Conclusion: Radiation dose responses of the parotid glands can be measured by integrated CT/FDG-PET scans. Retrospective analysis showed sigmoidal declines in the maximum metabolism but linear declines in the average metabolism of the glands with dose. Future studies should correlate this decline in FDG uptake with saliva production to improve treatment planning.

Roach, Michael C. [School of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Turkington, Timothy G. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Higgins, Kristin A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Hawk, Thomas C. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Hoang, Jenny K. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Brizel, David M., E-mail: david.brizel@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Synthesis of macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates and their use for preparing stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy, SPECT and PET imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N{prime}N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy. 4 figs.

Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

70

Dynamics of Motor Network Overactivation After Striatocapsular Stroke. A Longitudinal PET Study Using a Fixed-Performance Paradigm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, which otherwise induces complex activation patterns17,18; and a pilot clinical study showed that recovering hemiparetic patients were able to perform the TI tapping task at this rate (authors unpublished observations, 1998). The task lasted a total of 1... effort was needed, especially for PET1. Total whole body radiation exposure was kept below 5 mSv for both groups. In control subjects, and as described in detail elsewhere,14 this task induced activation mainly of the SM1, parietal operculum and anterior...

Calautti, Cinzia; Guincestre, Jean-Yves; Leroy, Franois; Baron, Jean-Claude

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Synthesis of macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates and their use for preparing stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy, spect and pet imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N'N",N'"-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy.

Mease, Ronnie C. (Fairfax, VA); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY)

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

72

Comparison of {sup 18}F-Fluorothymidine and {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in Delineating Gross Tumor Volume by Optimal Threshold in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Thoracic Esophagus  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the optimal method of using {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) simulation to delineate the gross tumor volume (GTV) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma verified by pathologic examination and compare the results with those using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT. Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients were enrolled and underwent both FLT and FDG PET/CT. The GTVs with biologic information were delineated using seven different methods in FLT PET/CT and three different methods in FDG PET/CT. The results were compared with the pathologic gross tumor length, and the optimal threshold was obtained. Next, we compared the simulation plans using the optimal threshold of FLT and FDG PET/CT. The radiation dose was prescribed as 60 Gy in 30 fractions with a precise radiotherapy technique. Results: The mean +- standard deviation pathologic gross tumor length was 4.94 +- 2.21 cm. On FLT PET/CT, the length of the standardized uptake value 1.4 was 4.91 +- 2.43 cm. On FDG PET/CT, the length of the standardized uptake value 2.5 was 5.10 +- 2.18 cm, both of which seemed more approximate to the pathologic gross tumor length. The differences in the bilateral lung volume receiving >=20 Gy, heart volume receiving >=40 Gy, and the maximal dose received by spinal cord between FLT and FDG were not significant. However, the values for mean lung dose, bilateral lung volume receiving >=5, >=10, >=30, >=40, and >=50 Gy, mean heart dose, and heart volume receiving >=30 Gy using FLT PET/CT-based planning were significant lower than those using FDG PET/CT. Conclusion: A standardized uptake value cutoff of 1.4 on FLT PET/CT and one of 2.5 on FDG PET/CT provided the closest estimation of GTV length. Finally, FLT PET/CT-based treatment planning provided potential benefits to the lungs and heart.

Han Dali [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); Yu Jinming, E-mail: yujmwin@yahoo.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); Yu Yonghua; Zhang Guifang; Zhong Xiaojun; Lu Jie; Yin Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); Fu Zheng [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); Mu Dianbin [Department of Pathology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); Zhang Baijiang [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); He Wei; Huo Zhijun; Liu Xijun; Kong Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); Zhao Shuqiang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong Province (China); Sun Xiangyu [Department of Pathology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong Province (China)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

A Prospective Randomized Trial to Study the Impact of Pretreatment FDG-PET for Cervical Cancer Patients With MRI-Detected Positive Pelvic but Negative Para-Aortic Lymphadenopathy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This prospective randomized study was undertaken to determine the possible impact of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) on extrapelvic metastasis detection, radiation field design, and survival outcome for cervical cancer patients with enlarged pelvic nodes on MRI image. Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria were patients with newly diagnosed Stage I-IVA cervical cancer and with positive pelvic but negative para-aortic lymph nodes (PALN) as detected by magnetic resonance image and good performance status for concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Eligible patients were randomized to receive either pretreatment FDG-PET (study group) or not (control group). Whole pelvis was the standard irradiation field for the control group and those with no extrapelvic findings on PET. The radiation fields for the rest of the study group were extended to include the PALN region or were modified according to the extrapelvic PET finding. Results: From January 2002 to April 2006, 129 patients were included, and 66 of them were randomized to receive FDG-PET. PET detected seven extrapelvic metastases (11%, 6 PALN and 1 omental node), and four of them remained disease-free after treatment modification. For patients who underwent PET compared with those who did not, there were no differences in the 4-year rates of overall survival (79% vs. 85%, p = 0.65), disease-free survival (75% vs. 77%, p = 0.64), and distant metastasis-free survival (82% vs. 78%, p = 0.83). Conclusions: Pretreatment FDG-PET in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging can improve the detection of extrapelvic metastasis, mainly PALN, and help select patients for extended-field radiotherapy. However, the addition of FDG-PET may not translate into survival benefit, even though PALN relapses are reduced.

Tsai, C.-S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, School of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lai, C.-H.; Chang, T.-C. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Yen, T.-C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Ng, K.-K. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Hsueh Swei [Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lee, Steve P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hong, J.-H., E-mail: jihong@adm.cgmh.org.t [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, School of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Comparison of Tumor Volumes as Determined by Pathologic Examination and FDG-PET/CT Images of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the cut-off standardized uptake value (SUV) on {sup 18}F fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) images that generates the best volumetric match to pathologic gross tumor volume (GTV{sub path}) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with NSCLC who underwent FDG-PET/CT scans followed by lobectomy were enrolled. The surgical specimen was dissected into 5-7-mum sections at approximately 4-mm intervals and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The tumor-containing area was outlined slice by slice and the GTV{sub path} determined by summing over all the slices, taking into account the interslice thickness and fixation-induced volume reduction. The gross tumor volume from the PET images, GTV{sub PET}, was determined as a function of cut-off SUV. The optimal threshold or optimal absolute SUV was defined as the value at which the GTV{sub PET} was the same as the GTV{sub path}. Results: The fixation process induced a volumetric reduction to 82% +- 10% (range, 62-100%) of the original. The maximal SUV was 10.1 +- 3.6 (range, 4.2-18.7). The optimal threshold and absolute SUV were 31% +- 11% and 3.0 +- 1.6, respectively. The optimal threshold was inversely correlated with GTV{sub path} and tumor diameter (p 0.05). Conclusion: This study evaluated the use of GTV{sub path} as a criterion for determining the optimal cut-off SUV for NSCLC target volume delineation. Confirmatory studies including more cases are being performed.

Yu Jinming, E-mail: jn7984729@public.jn.sd.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Li Xinke [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Xing Ligang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Mu Dianbin [Department of Pathology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Fu Zheng [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Sun Xiaorong [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Sun Xiangyu [Department of Pathology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Yang Guoren [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Zhang Baijiang [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Sun Xindong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Ling, C. Clifton [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Aging-Related Changes in Cardiac Sympathetic Function in Humans, Assessed by 6- 18 F-Fluorodopamine PET Scanning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sympathetic nerves play key roles in cardiac physiology and aging-related cardiovascular diseases. This study examined the effects of normal human aging on cardiac sympathetic innervation and function, including the neuronal uptake of catecholamines (uptake 1) via the cell membrane norepinephrine transporter. Methods: Thirty-three healthy volunteers, 17 under 40 and 16 over 50 y old, underwent thoracic PET scanning after injection of the sympathoneural imaging agent 6-18F-fluorodo pamine. Myocardial perfusion was estimated by 13NH3 scanning, and arterial blood was sampled for levels of 6-18F-fluoro dopamine and 6-18F-fluorodopaminederived radioactivity. Results: The older group had more myocardial 6-18F-fluorodo paminederived radioactivity than did the younger group. Myocardial perfusion was also greater in the older group, and arterial blood levels of 6-18F-fluorodopamine were also higher. After

Sheng-ting Li

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515  

SciTech Connect

Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer ({>=}60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7-22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

Bradley, Jeffrey, E-mail: jbradley@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Department of Statistics, RTOG, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Choi, Noah [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Forster, Ken [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Siegel, Barry A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Brunetti, Jacqueline [Holy Name Medical Center, Teaneck, NJ (United States); Purdy, James [University of California at Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Faria, Sergio [McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Vu, Toni [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal, Hospital Notre Dame, Montreal (Canada); Thorstad, Wade [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Choy, Hak [University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Building The Next Generation Of High Performance Computing Researchers In Engineering And Science: The Ncsa/arl Msrc Pet Summer Internship Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign (UIUC) is lead academic institution for the Army Research Laboratory Major Shared Resource Center Programming Environment and Training Program (ARL MSRC PET). This program is part of the Department of Defense (DoD) High Performance Computing Modernization Program. ARL MSRC PET has a scientific advancement, outreach and training mission. With US-wide faculty and ARL engineers and scientists, the ARL MSRC PET Training Team offered its Summer Intern Program in High Performance Computing (HPC) in 1998, 1999, and will again in 2000. It encourages young Americans to consider computer science and engineering careers in DoD and elsewhere. A program focus is outreach to underrepresented minorities and women. Mentors and program administrators play a crucial role. This paper discusses the development of this innovative governmentuniversity collaborative education program and lessons learned for those wishing to establish similar programs to introduce young Americans to real-life HPC research and applications.

Mary Bea Walker; Emma C. Grove; Virginia A. To

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

NEMA NU4-2008 performance evaluation for the microPET FOCUS 120 and iodine-124  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the microPET FOCUS 120 in terms of counting rate capability and image quality when using {sup 124}I. The noise equivalent count rate (NECR) index was defined as: NECR = R{sub T}{sup 2}/R{sub P} + R{sub GP} (T = true, P = prompt, GP = gamma prompt). The maximum NECR (48 kcps) value was obtained for the 250-590 keV energy window (EW) with 6 ns time window (TW). The two other EW (350-590 and 350-650 keV) gave comparable maximum NECR of 43 kcps for the 6 ns TW. The 2 ns TW reduced the NECR by 45 to 50 % Scatter and gamma plus scatter fractions were almost not TW dependent. The 250-590 keV window showed the largest scatter fraction with 23% For the NEMA NU4-2008 image quality phantom, coefficients of variation in the uniform part increased from about 8 to 12% when decreasing TW from 6 to 2 ns. The lowest spill-over-ratios (SOR) for the non emitting regions were obtained for the 350-590 and 350-650 keV EW. Recovery coefficients (RC) of the hot rods were the highest for the 350-590 keV EW and 2 ns TW. Scatter correction led to a decrease in RC and occasionally (with FBP or 3DRP) to a negative value for the SOR. The combination of the 350-590 keV energy window with 6 ns time window appeared to be a good compromise between counting rate capability and image quality for the FOCUS 120, especially when MAP reconstruction was used. The scatter correction algorithm provided by the constructor should be used with caution. (authors)

Taleb, D. [Experimental Medical Imaging Laboratory, Inst. of Physics B5, Univ. of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Bahri, M. A.; Warnock, G.; Salmon, E.; Luxen, A.; Plenevaux, A. [Cyclotron Research Center, Univ. of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Dartial, N. [Medical imaging laboratory ONIRIS, Nantes (France); Seret, A. [Experimental Medical Imaging Laboratory, Inst. of Physics B5, Univ. of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Analysis of Pretreatment FDG-PET SUV Parameters in Head-and-Neck Cancer: Tumor SUV{sub mean} Has Superior Prognostic Value  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic significance of different descriptive parameters in head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing pretreatment [F-18] fluoro-D-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging. Patients and Methods: Head-and-neck cancer patients who underwent FDG-PET before a course of curative intent radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. FDG-PET imaging parameters included maximum (SUV{sub max}), and mean (SUV{sub mean}) standard uptake values, and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). Tumors and lymph nodes were defined on co-registered axial computed tomography (CT) slices. SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} were measured within these anatomic regions. The relationships between pretreatment SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, and TLG for the primary site and lymph nodes were assessed using a univariate analysis for disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional control (LRC), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and compared via the log-rank method. SUV data were analyzed as continuous variables. Results: A total of 88 patients was assessed. Two-year OS, LRC, DMFS, and DFS for the entire cohort were 85%, 78%, 81%, and 70%, respectively. Median SUV{sub max} for the primary tumor and lymph nodes was 15.4 and 12.2, respectively. Median SUV{sub mean} for the primary tumor and lymph nodes was 7 and 5.2, respectively. Median TLG was 770. Increasing pretreatment SUV{sub mean} of the primary tumor was associated with decreased disease-free survival (p = 0.01). Neither SUV{sub max} in the primary tumor or lymph nodes nor TLG was prognostic for any of the clinical endpoints. Patients with pretreatment tumor SUV{sub mean} that exceeded the median value (7) of the cohort demonstrated inferior 2-year DFS relative to patients with SUV{sub mean} {<=} the median value of the cohort, 58% vs. 82%, respectively, p = 0.03. Conclusion: Increasing SUV{sub mean} in the primary tumor was associated with inferior DFS. Although not routinely reported, pretreatment SUV{sub mean} may be a useful prognostic FDG-PET parameter and should be further evaluated prospectively.

Higgins, Kristin A., E-mail: kristin.higgins@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Hoang, Jenny K. [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Roach, Michael C.; Chino, Junzo; Yoo, David S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Turkington, Timothy G. [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Graduate Program in Medical Physics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Brizel, David M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Surgery, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

DOE SBIR Phase I Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER83067, ''A Flexible and Economical Automated Nucleophilic [{sup 18}F]Fluorination synthesis System for PET Radiopharmaceuticals.'' Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phase I Final Report. A prototype manual remote synthesis system based on the unit operations approach was designed, constructed, and functionally tested. This general-purpose system was validated by its configuration and initial use for the preparation of the PET radiopharmaceutical [F-18]FLT using [F-18]fluoride ion.

Padgett, Henry C.

2001-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Spatial correlation of proton irradiation-induced activity and dose in polymer gel phantoms for PET/CT delivery verification studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This work demonstrates a novel application of BANG3-Pro2 polymer gel dosimeter as a dosimetric phantom able to accurately capture both dose and induced activity. Methods: BANG3-Pro2 dosimeters were irradiated with a clinical proton beam using an unmodulated beam and a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) modulation, the latter with a Lucite compensator to introduce a range offset in one quadrant of the circular field. The dosimeters were imaged in a nearby positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) unit starting within 5 min of beam-off. Induced positron emission (PE) activity along the central axis of the beam was compared to analytical calculations. Dose distributions were read out using an optical CT scanner and were validated against ion chamber measurements and the treatment plan. The offset between the distal fall-off of dose and activity (50% level) was determined over the entire irradiated field. Lateral profiles of PE were correlated to measured dose for the unmodulated beam delivery. Results: Measured profiles of PE activity along the central beam axis were found to be within 10% of the predictions of analytical calculations. The depth-dose profiles agreed with the reference values (ion chamber or treatment plan) within 3%. The offset between the depth profiles of dose and activity for the unmodulated beam was 8.4 {+-} 1.4 mm. For the compensator-based SOBP delivery, the distribution of offsets throughout the field was found to be bimodal, with the mean of 8.9 {+-} 2.8 mm for the thinner region of the compensator and 4.3 {+-} 2.5 mm for the thicker region. For the pristine beam delivery, lateral profiles of dose and activity were found to exhibit fair spatial correlation throughout the beam range, with the mean 2D gamma index of 0.42 and 91% of the evaluated pixels passing the test. Conclusions: This work presents the first demonstration of simultaneous and accurate experimental measurement of three-dimensional distributions of dose and induced activity and lays the groundwork for further investigations using BANG3-Pro2 as a dosimetric phantom in PET/CT delivery verification studies.

Lopatiuk-Tirpak, Olena; Su Zhong; Li Zuofeng; Hsi Wen; Meeks, Sanford; Zeidan, Omar

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

BBOOLLLLEETTTTIINNOO NNOOVVIITT NNUUMMEERROO 5577 FFEEBBBBRRAAIIOO 22001111  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. FOLLA, Pornografia minorile: per la Cassazione, anche alla luce del diritto comunitario, costituisce

Romeo, Alessandro

83

Method for selective recovery of PET-usable quantities of [.sup.18 F] fluoride and [.sup.13 N] nitrate/nitrite from a single irradiation of low-enriched [.sup.18 O] water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- for radiotracer synthesis is disclosed. The process includes producing [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- simultaneously by exposing a low-enriched (20%-30%) [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target to proton irradiation, sequentially isolating the [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- from the [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target, and reducing the [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- to [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3. The [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- products are then conveyed to a laboratory for radiotracer applications. The process employs an anion exchange resin for isolation of the isotopes from the [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O, and sequential elution of [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [ .sup.18 F]F.sup.- fractions. Also the apparatus is disclosed for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- from a single irradiation of a single low-enriched [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target.

Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Shea, Colleen (Wading River, NY)

1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

84

Stampa l'articolo Chiudi 20 maggio 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tutto, ma c'era di tutto anche in edicola trent'anni fa, astrologia e pornografia incluse. La differenza

Floridi, Luciano

85

SynchroPET LLC | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc. Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 333 likes Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc., based in Belmont, California, uses Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopes (DTEM) to enable imaging of nanoscale objects, such as proteins, thin films and nanoparticles at unprecedented time scales and frame rates. By utilizing a laser-driven electron source, DTEMs are able to produce short bursts of electrons that can form an image with nanometer resolution in as little as 10 nanoseconds. This enables observation of dynamics in material systems that play an important role in a wide range of energy technologies, including battery electrodes, petroleum catalysts, solar cell materials, and organisms for bio fuel growth. Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions uses technology

86

SynchroPET LLC | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7AC Technologies, Inc. 7AC Technologies, Inc. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 498 likes 7AC Technologies, based in Woburn, Massachusetts, is developing Liquid Desiccant HVAC systems for Commercial and Industrial buildings using technology from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. These Liquid Desiccant HVAC systems deliver a 50 to 75 percent reduction in energy usage over conventional HVAC units. The system consists of a membrane conditioner responsible for drying and cooling the air and a heat-driven regenerator. The liquid desiccant design allows for the utilization of solar or waste heat sources, paving the way for net-zero energy retrofits to existing buildings with costs comparable to conventional HVAC. Learn More Borla Performance Industries, Inc. Oak Ridge National Laboratory

87

SynchroPET LLC | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Element One, Inc. Element One, Inc. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 191524 likes Element One, based in Boulder, Colorado, has created the only available coatings that change color when detecting hydrogen and other hazardous gas leaks, either reversibly or non-reversibly, to provide both current and historical information about leaks. Element One's patented gas indicators and sensors use catalyzed thin films or nanoparticles of a transition metal oxide to create very low cost sensors for use in industrial and consumer environments, greatly reducing the potential for undetected leaks and their cost and safety implications. This technology is also being integrated for use in refineries, industry gas and fuel cells systems and was developed using technology from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

88

Advanced Instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography [PET  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underlay modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost.

Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

1985-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

89

Felt PET: A material research project.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wool has long been used by nomadic Mongolian herds-people as a cladding for their traditional dwellings and as a material for crafting everyday objects. A (more)

Hohmann, Susanna

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

SynchroPET LLC | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is developing a low-cost, advanced lithium-ion battery that employs a novel silicon graphene composite material that will substantially improve battery cycle life. When combined...

91

Studi sui raggi di Rntgen - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

questi raggi. Applicando all' occhio il criptoscopto si pub ve- dere, anche in ambienti illuminati, la forma e la posizione di corpi metallici chiusi entro scatole di

92

OTTIMIZZAZIONE TECNICO FUNZIONALE DI UN IMPIANTO DI MICRO-COGENERAZIONE EFMGT-ORC ALIMENTATO A BIOMASSA SOLIDA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In questi ultimi anni vi stato un crescente interesse verso la produzione di energia da fonte rinnovabile e, in questo ambito, anche limpiego della (more)

LUDOVICI, GIULIA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Using Functional Languages in Formal Methods: The Pet System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

programming language TCL/TK. The interface between the two parts is done through a communication protocol minimal work left for the TCL/TK front­end (which is much slower than SML/NJ), besides the imperative

Peled, Doron A.

94

Speciation of Antimony in PET Bottles Produced in Japan and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systems Science, Hiroshima University Hiroshima 739-8526, Japan; Institute of Geology and Geophysics

Short, Daniel

95

Novel Gamma-ray Detector Approaches for PET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.J. Schlyer, C.L. Woody Medical Department Instrumentation Division Physics Department Nonproliferation

Homes, Christopher C.

96

Extruders & Expanders in Pet Food, Aquatic & Livestock Feeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book serves as a source of information to anyone involved with the feed industry as a guide for understanding extrusion, the proper selection of the raw ingredients, the operation of extrusion equipment, and the processes involved in running an extend

97

Microfluidic radiolabeling of biomolecules with PET radiometals Dexing Zeng a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

murine tumour models [3­5] and patient studies [5,6], with promising results. The prepara- tion to possibly more reactive minor impurities), product purification and product analysis can be prob- lematic or tall), mixing units, heaters, pumping sys- tems, are able to control and process chemical or biological

Kenis, Paul J. A.

98

Spatiotemporal reconstruction of list-mode PET data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a method for computing a continuous time estimate of tracer density using list-mode positron emission tomography data. The rate function in each voxel is modeled as an inhomogeneous Poisson process whose rate function can be represented using a cubic B-spline basis. The rate functions are estimated by maximizing the likelihood of the arrival times of detected photon pairs over the control vertices of the spline, modified by quadratic spatial and temporal smoothness penalties and a penalty term to enforce nonnegativity. Randoms rate functions are estimated by assuming independence between the spatial and temporal randoms distributions. Similarly, scatter rate functions are estimated by assuming spatiotemporal independence and that the temporal distribution of the scatter is proportional to the temporal distribution of the trues. A quantitative evaluation was performed using simulated data and the method is also demonstrated in a human study using 11C-raclopride.

Nichols, Thomas E.; Qi, Jinyi; Asma, Evren; Leahy, Richard M.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Dispersion of Cu and Au Nanoparticles into PET Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser pulses were focused using condenser lens (f=70 mm). We changed the defocus distance to change the energy density.The size and distribution area of...

100

Characterization of a PET Camera Optimized for Prostate Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was supported in part by the Director, Office of Science,by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Biological andOffice of Biological and Environmental Research, Medical Science

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Monitoraggio dell'attivit cerebrale tramite brain-computer-interface(BCI).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Uninterfaccia cervello-computer (in inglese, Brain-Computer Interface, abbreviato in BCI, o anche Brain-Machine Interface, BMI) un sistema di comunicazione in cui i messaggi o i (more)

Gnamteu Sottang, Fabrice

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

democrite-00024907,version2-23Nov2005 Experimental study of a liquid Xenon PET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-up Following the layout displayed on Fig. 3, the Xenon is liquefied in the com- pressor, then transferred nitrogen heat exchanger. The temperature is constant to better than a few tenths of a degree. The Xenon

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

103

Privacy is a process, not a PET: a theory for effective privacy practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Privacy research has not helped practitioners -- who struggle to reconcile users' demands for information privacy with information security, legislation, information management and use -- to improve privacy practice. Beginning with the principle that ... Keywords: framework, privacy, security, trust

Anthony Morton; M. Angela Sasse

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Improved Production and Separation Technologies for Non-standard PET Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Brief summary of activity issues, concerns, successes: Project 1 is completed. We have optimized plating parameters with the new target bodies and slanted target plating system. The target station has been mounted on the end of the beamline, service lines have been nstalled to allow for helium and water cooling. We have routinely produced copper-64 using the new slanted target system in conjunction with our automated system. In project 2, we successfully fabricated and tested microfluidic extraction devices made out of two organic solvent-resistant polymers, thiolene and SIFEL. Initially, we developed analytical and computational models to describe the extraction process, and used the model to design the microfluidic devices. Then we optimized the microfabrication procedures to manufacture microreactors, followed by optimization of the operational parameters to obtain a stable aqueous-organic interface, which is critical for efficient extraction. When we tested the thiolene devices for extraction of copper-64, we observed very low extraction efficiencies (less than 5%) due to adhesion of copper to thiolene. However, we observed very high extraction efficiencies with SIFEL devices (greater than 95%), which are due to the high interfacial area for extraction and shorter diffusion lengths.

Welch, Michael J. [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Lapi, Suzanne [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Polymeric Nanoparticle PET/MR Imaging Allows Macrophage Detection in Atherosclerotic Plaques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rationale: Myeloid cell content in atherosclerotic plaques associates with rupture and thrombosis. Thus, imaging of lesional monocytes and macrophages could serve as a biomarker of disease progression and therapeutic ...

Majmudar, M. D.

106

Graphical Analysis of PET Data Applied to Reversible and Irreversible Tracers  

SciTech Connect

Graphical analysis refers to the transformation of multiple time measurements of plasma and tissue uptake data into a linear plot, the slope of which is related to the number of available tracer binding sites. This type of analysis allows easy comparisons among experiments. No particular model structure is assumed, however it is assumed that the tracer is given by bolus injection and that both tissue uptake and the plasma concentration of unchanged tracer are monitored following tracer injection. The requirement of plasma measurements can be eliminated in some cases when a reference region is available. There are two categories of graphical methods which apply to two general types of ligands--those which bind reversibly during the scanning procedure and those which are irreversible or trapped during the time of the scanning procedure.

Logan, Jean

1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

107

PET Model v1.0 Read Me File March 28, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for electricity by each sector. Unit: billion $ c. og.txt: demand for oil and gas by each sector. Unit: billion: trillion $ e. tax.txt: Carbon tax rate. Unit: billion $/million ton of carbon 3. Demand: demand of inputs and 11*NR(=99) columns. a. coal.txt: demand for coal by each sector. Unit: billion $ b. elc.txt: demand

108

An investigation of temporal regularization techniques for dynamic PET reconstructions using temporal splines  

SciTech Connect

The use of a temporal B-spline basis for the reconstruction of dynamic positron emission tomography data was investigated. Maximum likelihood (ML) reconstructions using an expectation maximization framework and maximum A-posteriori (MAP) reconstructions using the generalized expectation maximization framework were evaluated. Different parameters of the B-spline basis of such as order, number of basis functions and knot placing were investigated in a reconstruction task using simulated dynamic list-mode data. We found that a higher order basis reduced both the bias and variance. Using a higher number of basis functions in the modeling of the time activity curves (TACs) allowed the algorithm to model faster changes of the TACs, however, the TACs became noisier. We have compared ML, Gaussian postsmoothed ML and MAP reconstructions. The noise level in the ML reconstructions was controlled by varying the number of basis functions. The MAP algorithm penalized the integrated squared curvature of the reconstructed TAC. The postsmoothed ML was always outperformed in terms of bias and variance properties by the MAP and ML reconstructions. A simple adaptive knot placing strategy was also developed and evaluated. It is based on an arc length redistribution scheme during the reconstruction. The free knot reconstruction allowed a more accurate reconstruction while reducing the noise level especially for fast changing TACs such as blood input functions. Limiting the number of temporal basis functions combined with the adaptive knot placing strategy is in this case advantageous for regularization purposes when compared to the other regularization techniques.

Verhaeghe, Jeroen; D'Asseler, Yves; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Staelens, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Medical Image and Signal Processing Group, Ghent University, Ghent, 9000 (Belgium)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography [PET] in Man Using Small Bismuth Germanate Crystals  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Primary considerations for the design of positron emission tomographs for medical studies in humans are the need for high imaging sensitivity, whole organ coverage, good spatial resolution, high maximum data rates, adequate spatial sampling with minimum mechanical motion, shielding against out of plane activity, pulse height discrimination against scattered photons, and timing discrimination against accidental coincidences. We discuss the choice of detectors, sampling motion, shielding, and electronics to meet these objectives.

Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.; Huesman, R. H.; Cahoon, J. L.

1982-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

110

B3: Fracture Mechanics of Composite Materials Recycled Pet-Based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

C19: Dissolution Behavior of Cu Under Bump Metallization in Ball Grid Array Structure .... H2: Triboluminescent Smart Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring

111

Technology Commercialization and Partnerships | BSA 06-08 ...  

Sponsored Research; Search Technologies; Patents; Contacts. TCP Director Connie Cleary. ... Tags: boron neutron capture, cancer, MRI, PET, PET/MRI. ...

112

T'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

j: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1 ,iu" I;ts'J-F.; +X'l'W 20, ,57 I::anch T;3 cl:l:i xi ,.&A O.Cfice J su T>J...

113

Gli interpreti degli interpreti  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?importanza attribuita da Platone all?arte, ma ? centrata in particolare sul mimetismo e sul mimo come pagliaccio e buffone. Cos?, attraverso Ficino, si vede bene che la critica severa, a volte spietata di Platone contro una forma di divertimento molto popolare ma anche...

Horvath, Agnes; Szakolczai, Arpad

2008-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

114

Biomasse, le ricerche presso l'Universit di Pavia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomasse, le ricerche presso l'Università di Pavia Rino Cella Dipartimento di Genetica e emissioni di CO2 Produrre il 20% di energia da fonti rinnovabili (di cui il 10% da biomasse) Obbiettivi da quantità e la qualità delle biomasse di interesse. Anche il miglioramento genetico tradizionale può dare

115

ProcessProcess EngineeringEngineering ThermodynamicsThermodynamics (PET) 424304 E(PET) 424304 E 20112011 rzrz ProcessProcess EngineeringEngineeringThermodynamicsThermodynamicsProcessProcess EngineeringEngineeringThermodynamicsThermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utility-Scale PV..................................... 221 A.2.4.2 Concentrating Solar Power-1. Regional PV Cell and Module Shipments, 2000­2010..........................4 Figure 1-2. Total Solar-3. Solar Variability: 100 Small PV Systems Throughout Germany, June 1995

Zevenhoven, Ron

116

ProcessProcess EngineeringEngineering ThermodynamicsThermodynamics (PET) 424304 E(PET) 424304 E 20112011 --rzrz ProcessProcess EngineeringEngineeringThermodynamicsThermodynamicsProcessProcess EngineeringEngineeringThermodynamicsThermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(OTEC), Osmotic power ("Saltkraft") 25.1.2011 ?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Energy Corporation (TREC) aims atgy p ( ) installing 400 GW concentrated solar power(CSP) power plant ifinancing, power grid, local electricity Pic: MPS June 2008 25.1.2011 ?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow

Zevenhoven, Ron

118

Lu1-xI3:Cex--A Scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy and time-of-flight PET  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention concerns very fast scintillator materials comprising lutetium iodide doped with Cerium Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x; LuI.sub.3:Ce). The LuI.sub.3 scintillator material has surprisingly good characteristics including high light output, high gamma ray stopping efficiency, fast response, low cost, good proportionality, and minimal afterglow that the material is useful for gamma ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, nuclear and high energy physics research, diffraction, non-destructive testing, nuclear treaty verification and safeguards, and geological exploration. The timing resolution of the scintillators of the present invention provide compositions capable of resolving the position of an annihilation event within a portion of a human body cross-section.

Shah, Kanai S. (Newton, MA)

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

119

Plasma 2D modeling and diagnostics of DLC deposition on PET E. Amanatides, P. Gkotsis, Ch. Syndrevelis, D. Mataras *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dimensional (2D) emission spectra of short-lived excited species for estimating the uniformity of production substrates was investigated. Images of the a- balmer line of atomic hydrogen in CH4/H2 discharges were and fast way control and optimization of such processes. In this direction, the present work is focused

120

Analysis of the mouse embryonic stem cell regulatory networks obtained by ChIP-chip and ChIP-PET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Genome-wide approaches have begun to reveal the transcriptional networks responsible for pluripotency in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed either by hybridization to a ...

Mathur, Divya

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Challenges in Improving Sensitivity for Quantification of PET Data in Alzheimer's Disease Studies: Image Restoration and Registration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Aging, [8], recently published recom- mendations for studies on aging that utilize imaging data, ac the lives of those with the disease and their care givers, as well as the entire medical infrastructure analysis · Utilizing Results: longitudinal, comparitive studies · Studies collect images, not original

Renaut, Rosemary

122

Anlise da utilizao de gargalos e fios de garrada pet como enchimento de torres de resfriamento.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In some industrial processes, as well as in air conditioning processes, there is the need for cooling of equipments that generate heat during his operation. (more)

Andrezza Carolina Carneiro Toms Oliveira

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Common and Contrasting Areas of Activation for Abstract and Concrete Concepts: An H215O PET Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lesion studies indicate that the lateral and inferior temporal cortex is a critical area of semantic memory storage, but little is known about the cortical organization of semantics within this area. One proposition has been that dominant physical characteristics ...

Christine Whatmough; Louis Verret; Dion Fung; Howard Chertkow

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Effect of nano-fibers on the stress-strain behavior of semi-crystalline poly(ethylene terephthalate) at different strain rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uniaxial compression tests were performed on amorphous poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), amorphous poly(ethylene terephthalate)- glycol (PETG), semi-crystalline PET, and semicrystalline PET with various amounts of ...

Cohen, Ellann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

F F F O O O R R R F F F A A A M M M I I I L L L Y Y Y F  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is a fair focused on pet ownersbreeders. The fair targets all types of pets - dogs, cats, exotic birds, terrarium animals, small mammals, rodents and aquarium animals....

126

On Developing a Microstructurally and Thermally Stable Iron-Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The samples were electropolished in a 5 pet HCl, 5 pet HC104, ethanol solution, and etched with Kalling's waterless reagent. The TEM specimens were jet...

127

Measuring Regional Changes in the Diastolic Deformation of the Left Ventricle of SHR Rats Using microPET Technology and Hyperelastic Warping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

slice taken from (A) the template image data set and (B) themid- diastolic image data set (target) and the (end-diastolic image data set (target) used in the validation

VERESS, ALEXANDER I.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Appears in 11th IEEE Intl. Workshop on Performance Evaluation of Tracking and Surveillance (PETS 2009), Miami, 2009. Analysis of Crowded Scenes using Holistic Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009), Miami, 2009. Analysis of Crowded Scenes using Holistic Properties Antoni B. Chan Mulloy Morrow

Vasconcelos, Nuno M.

129

Halide, Chromate, and Phosphate Impacts on LAW Glass for Dynamic Flowsheet 24590-WTP-MCR-PET-09-0037, Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect

Revision 1 of this Model Change Request changed Equation 6 in Attachment Al only. Melter studies have shown that halide, chromium, and phosphates can cause precipitation of solids that can interfer the melting process. Pilot melter data now shows what concentrations LAW glass can tolerate. These limits shall be incorporated into the existing LAW glass algorithm per Attachment Al.

Gimpel, Rodney F.; Kruger, Albert A.

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

130

Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x-a scintillator for gamma-ray spectroscopy and time-of-flight pet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes very fast scintillator materials including lutetium iodide doped with Cerium (Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x; LuI.sub.3:Ce). The LuI.sub.3 scintillator material has surprisingly good characteristics including high light output, high gamma-ray stopping efficiency, fast response, low cost, good proportionality, and minimal afterglow that the material is useful for gamma-ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, nuclear and high energy physics research, diffraction, non-destructive testing, nuclear treaty verification and safeguards, and geological exploration.

Shah, Kanai S. (Newton, MA)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

131

The effect of urbanization on energy use in India and China in the iPETS model Brian C. O'Neill a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in demand for modern fuels such as electricity (Fig. 6b) that is occurring at the same time. The ef- fect a potentially rapid transition away from traditional fuel use and toward modern fuels such as electricity demand necessary for planning supply options, depends on understanding the determi- nants

132

Synthesis of 4-substituted-trans-1, 2-diaminocyclohexyl polyaminocarboxylate metal chelating agents for the preparation of stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy and spect and pet imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cyclo agents useful in forming antibody-metal conjugates useful for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming these compounds are disclosed including 4-haloacetamido-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexyl polyaminocarboxylate and 4-isothiocyanato-trans-1,2-diamino cyclohexane-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid.

Mease, Ronnie C. (Coram, NY); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Synthesis of 4-substituted-trans-1, 2-diaminocyclohexyl polyaminocarboxylate metal chelating agents for the preparation of stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy and SPECT and PET imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cyclo agents are described which are useful in forming antibody-metal conjugates which are used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming these compounds are disclosed including 4-haloacetamido-trans-1,2diaminocyclohexyl polyaminocarboxylate and 4-isothiocyanato-trans-1,2diamino cyclohexane-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid. No Drawings

Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

134

Scaling Potential Evapotranspiration with Greenhouse Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is a supply-independent measure of the evaporative demand of a terrestrial climate, of basic importance in climatology, hydrology, and agriculture. Future increases in PET from greenhouse warming are often cited ...

Jacob Scheff; Dargan M. W. Frierson

135

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

placed in a PET bottle that are sensitive to UV light can be greatly affected. PET plastic that is targeted for packaging UV sensitive materials can be tinted andor have UV...

136

BSA 13-36: Clockless Time to Digital Converters  

... (PET) systems for medical imaging of tumors, cancer research, and certain medical conditions of the brain and the heart. ...

137

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO ENRICO FERMI INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from PET scans and MRIs to mapping the interior of the earth; from nuclear nonproliferation to cleaning

138

Non-Research Animals on Campus: SPS0005 Effective Date: June 10, 1997  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be collected immediately. Other small non-poisonous household pets may be allowed. b. Homeowners are also

California at Santa Cruz, University of

139

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EOR operations, natural gas storage, and acid gas disposal.on underground storage of natural gas. J Pet Technol (June

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Development of Energy Balances for the State of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Additives & Ethanol Crude Still Gas LPG Motor Gas Aviation Gas Jet Fuel Kerosene Dist Fuel Res Fuel Pet Coke Lubricants

Murtishaw, Scott; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Sahtaye, Jayant

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Profiles in garbage: Polyethylene terephthalate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is a plastic resin used primarily to make bottles. Soft drinks -- along with salad dressing, fruit juices, peanut butter, and other household and consumer products -- use PET bottles. PET also is used for film, sheeting for cups and food trays, oven-safe trays, and other uses. PET is a relatively new packaging resin, first commercialized in the early 1970s. Because it is an ``engineered`` resin, PET is more expensive than commodity resins such as high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and, for the same reason, it is usually the highest valued plastic recyclable.

Miller, C. [Environmental Industry Associations, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Positron emission tomography in the evaluation of subdural hematomas  

SciTech Connect

Fifteen patients with 21 subdural effusions were investigated both with transmission computer assisted tomography (CAT) and positron emission tomography (PET). The tracer in the emission studies was /sup 68/Ga-EDTA. Twelve lesions were visualized both with CAT and PET. Five lesions that were negative or doubtful on CAT were visualized with PET, whereas four lesions negative or doubtful on PET were demonstrated by CAT. The two methods complement each other due to the fact that they are based on different mechanisms: CAT mainly on attenuation of the fluid collection. PET on isotope accumulation, particularly in the hematoma membranes.

Ericson, K.; Bergstroem, M.; Eriksson, L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

PET 424304 2013 Exercises 1+2 of 4 12 Feb + 14 Feb 2013 1. ideal gas: s = s2-s1 = cpln(T2/T1) -R ln(p2/p1) (T << Tcrit; p << pcrit)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be 93% (see a.), effectiveness = 21/93 = 23% c. Heat from boiler to surroundings: 50,2 ··(7834 ­ 3004 = 11,5 kW/K Losses: collector 4,77 MW ­ 4,45 MW = 0,32 MW = 6,7% boiler radiation 1,05 MW = 22,0% Power

Zevenhoven, Ron

144

PET 424304 2011 Exercises 2 of 2 17Feb2011 1. ideal gas: s = s2-s1 = cpln(T2/T1) -R ln(p2/p1) (T << Tcrit; p << pcrit)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

condenser = liquid Lo G1 = Lo + D. & energy balance G1·HG1 = D·H´D +(G-D)·HLo G1 = D· (H'D-HLo)/(HG1-HLo dc c RL dx dT T L XLXLJ and dx dc c RL dx dT T L XLXLJ :givesThisA).pureforpotentialchemical( c c RTlnRTlnypotentialchemicalwith (Onsager)LL, dx T d X, dx T 1 d Xwhere dx dc D dx dT DXLXLJ and dx dc D

Zevenhoven, Ron

145

Synthesis of 4-substituted-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexyl polyaminocarboxylate metal chelating agents for the preparation of stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy and spect and pet imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cyclohexyl chelating agents useful in forming antibody-metal conjugates useful for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming these compounds are disclosed including 4-haloacetamido-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexyl polyaminocarboxylate and 4-isothiocyanato-trans-1,2-diamino cyclohexane-N, N, N', N'-tetra acetic acid.

Mease, Ronnie C. (2101 B. Ulster Pl., Coram, NY 11727); Kolsky, Kathryn L. (460 Harrison Ave., Miller Pl., NY 11764); Mausner, Leonard F. (16 Seville Ln., Stony Brook, NY 11790); Srivastava, Suresh C. (8 Penelope Dr., Setauket, NY 11733)

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

146

Synthesis of 4-substituted-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexyl polyaminocarboxylate metal chelating agents for the preparation of stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy and SPECT and PET imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cyclohexyl chelating agents useful in forming antibody-metal conjugates which are used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes are synthesized. New compounds and processes of forming these compounds are disclosed including 4-haloacetamido-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexyl polyaminocarboxylate and 4-isothiocyanato-trans-1,2-diamino cyclohexane-N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetra acetic acid.

Mease, R.C.; Kolsky, K.L.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

147

Plasma Surface Modification of Polymer Backsheets: Origins of Future Interfacial Barrier/Backsheet Failure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flexible polymer substrates coated with inorganic oxide moisture barriers are a potential replacement for glass backsheets in thin film PV modules. Silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy) deposited by PECVD on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) represents one potential new backsheet candidate. Barrier deposition runs at NREL have typically included a nitrogen-rich plasma pretreatment prior to actual barrier deposition with the intention of cleaning the PET surface as well as enhancing adhesion of the SiOxNy barrier film to PET; however, test coupons of PET/barrier/EVA/TPE failed after damp heat exposure. PET substrates exposed to plasma conditions similar to those used in pre-treatment were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to reveal new low molecular weight PET fragments are created which are volatile upon heating and water soluble. Failure analysis of the coupons determined that the moisture barrier is, in fact, transferred to the encapsulant side.

Pankow, J. W.; Glick, S. H.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Bio-medical Applications of Jefferson Lab's Nuclear Physics ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... contamination to crops Carbon sequestration Dual 15 cm x 20 cm Planar PET system ?3.03 mm step pixellated, 10 mm thick LGSO ...

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

149

A Profile of ATP Manufacturing Investments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... tylosin, an antibiotic used to treat livestock and household pets ... components to reduce the weight of vehicles, resulting in lower energy consumption. ...

2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

150

Available Technologies: Heart and Torso Phantom Model of ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Models the human torso, heart, and lungs for improving SPECT and PET imaging ; Develops and validates algorithms to ...

151

Positron emission tomography probes for imaging immune activation and selected cancers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compounds for use as PET probes and methods for synthesizing and using these, comprising [.sup.18F]D-FAC and other cytosine and adenosine analogs.

Radu, Caius G. (Los Angeles, CA); Witte, Owen N. (Los Angeles, CA); Nair-Gill, Evan David (Los Angeles, CA); Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar (Los Angeles, CA); Shu, Chengyi J. (Los Angeles, CA); Czernin, Johannes (Los Angeles, CA)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

152

BSA 11-29: Miniature system for Carbon-11 Cyanide Production ...  

he synthesis of carbon-11 labeled tracer compounds for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies is greatly limited by access to carbon-11 ...

153

New Methods in Motion Tracking to Generate Motion-Corrected Tomographic Images  

High quality three-dimensional images from conventional MRI, CT, PET, or SPECT scans require that the subject being imaged remain stationary during ...

154

Plasma Surface Modification of Polymer Backsheets: Origins of Future Interfacial Barrier/Backsheet Failure (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flexible polymer substrates coated with inorganic oxide moisture barriers are a potential replacement for glass backsheets in thin-film PV (photovoltaic) modules. Silicon oxynitride (SiO{sub x}N{sub y}) deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) represents one potential new backsheet candidate. Barrier deposition runs at NREL have included a nitrogen-rich plasma pretreatment prior to barrier deposition with the intention of cleaning the PET surface and enhancing adhesion of the SiO{sub x}N{sub y} barrier film to PET; however, test coupons of PET/barrier/EVA/TPE failed after damp-heat exposure. (EVA is ethylene vinyl acetate and TPE is Tedlar{reg_sign}-PET-EVA). PET substrates exposed to plasma conditions similar to those used in pretreatment were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to reveal that new low molecular weight PET fragments were created at the PET surface. These fragments are responsible for barrier/PET interfacial failure and barrier transfer to the EVA encapsulant side following damp heat exposure.

Pankow, J. W.; Glick, S. H.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Physostigmine results in an increased decrement in brain glucose ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and quantitated using the transmission scan (acquired before FDG injection using three rotating ... thomeatal line. The placebo and physostigmine PET scans

156

Recent Developments in Modeling Groundwater Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pet. Eng. J. ! ' 241. (1968). Jeppson, R.W. , "Seepage fromTaylor and Brown (1967), Jeppson (1968), Neuman and Wither-

Narasimhan, T.N.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the viscosity of crude oil systems, J. Pet. Tech. (Sep. ),gases released from the BP oil well blowout, Natureof reservoir depletion and oil flow from the Macondo well

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

CLIC RF High Power Production Testing Program  

SciTech Connect

The CLIC Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) is a passive microwave device in which bunches of the drive beam interact with the impedance of the periodically loaded waveguide and generate RF power for the main linac accelerating structure. The demands on the high power production ({approx} 150 MW) and the needs to transport the 100 A drive beam for about 1 km without losses, makes the PETS design rather unique and the operation very challenging. In the coming year, an intense PETS testing program will be implemented. The target is to demonstrate the full performance of the PETS operation. The testing program overview and test results available to date are presented.

Syratchev, I.; Riddone, G.; /CERN; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

159

NIST SP 800-72 Revision 1, Codes for the Identification of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 89AL Albuquerque Operations Office (non-NNSA) (EM) 89CB Carlsbad Field Office 8981 Casper Naval Pet & Oil Shale Reserves 8955 ...

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

160

Lab Spotlight: Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven National Laboratory Pet Scans Show Brain Responses to Light, Electrical Stimulation A study measuring metabolic changes in the brains of sighted people is showing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Carbon Nanomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... The graphene film was spin-coated using carbon nanotubes to form the cathode of the field emission device. A phosphor coated graphene-PET...

162

TransForum v8n2 - GREET 1.8b  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrogenation, Coalbiomass co-feeding for Fitscher-Tropsch diesel production, Various corn ethanol plant types with different process fuels, and Pet coke to hydrogen...

163

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Computing: Project Execution Team (PET) The page for the U.S. CMS Project Execution Team. (Currently under development) Results of Census Broken Down by Category Management...

164

Improving Safety Measures and Measures of Safety for World ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST standards are used to calibrate millions of medical machines such as MRIs, PETs, CATs and X-rays to make sure patients are getting the ...

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

165

NEWTON's Veterinary Science References  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hospital Association presents HealthlyPet.com which gives detailed information about dog care, cat care, referral hospitals, and other resources. Is a link broken? Please let...

166

Development of an Alu-based, Real-Time PCR Method for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... or buccal swabs of pets of laboratory personnel using the organic ex- traction ... MN, Erickson AM, Kopp K, Krenke BE, Mandrekar PV, Nelson R ...

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

167

New NIST-Traceable Standard for Accuracy in Quantitative ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST-Traceable Standard for Accuracy in Quantitative Nuclear Medicine Imaging ... As the technology has matured, PET is increasingly being used a ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

168

BNL | Paul Vaska  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spatial resolution in PET, including a solid-state imager using cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) which achieves sub-mm resolution, and a monolithic scintillator detector with...

169

Mechanism of Sulfur-containing Aryl Polyphosphonate as Flame ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Mechanism of Sulfur-containing Aryl Polyphosphonate as Flame Retardant for PET. Author(s), Deng Yi. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Deng Yi.

170

Separation of packaging plastics by froth flotation in a continuous pilot plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the research was to apply froth flotation to separate post-consumer PET (Polyethylene Terephthalate) from other packaging plastics with similar density, in a continuously operated pilot plant. A representative sample composed of 85% PET, 2.5% PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride) and 11.9% PS (Polystyrene) was subjected to a combination of alkaline treatment and surfactant adsorption followed by froth flotation. A mineral processing pilot plant, owned by a Portuguese mining company, was adapted for this purpose. The experimentation showed that it is possible to produce an almost pure concentrate of PET, containing 83% of the PET in feed, in a single bank of mechanical flotation cells. The concentrate grade attained was 97.2% PET, 1.1% PVC and 1.1% PS. By simulation it was shown that the Portuguese recycling industry specifications can be attained if one cleaning and one scavenger stages are added to the circuit.

Carvalho, Teresa, E-mail: teresa.carvalho@ist.utl.p [CERENA, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Durao, Fernando; Ferreira, Celia [CERENA, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Evaluation of fly ash from co-combustion of coal and petroleum coke for use in concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation of fly ash (FA) produced from various blends of coal and petroleum coke (pet coke) fired at Belledune Generating Station, New Brunswick, Canada, was conducted to establish its performance relative to FA derived from coal-only combustion and its compliance with CSA A3000. The FA samples were beneficiated by an electrostatic separation process to produce samples for testing with a range of loss-on-ignition (LOI) values. The results of these studies indicate that the combustion of pet coke results in very little inorganic residue (for example, typically less than 0.5% ash) and the main impact on FA resulting from the co-combustion of coal and up to 25% pet coke is an increase in the unburned carbon content and LOI values. The testing of FA after beneficiation indicates that FA produced from fuels with up to 25% pet coke performs as good as FA produced from the same coal without pet coke.

Scott, A.N.; Thomas, M.D.A.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

A prospective evaluation of the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography staging on survival for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the staging and prognosis of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (LAEC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and October 2004, all patients with LAEC evaluated in the Department of Radiation Oncology were considered for enrollment into a Phase II trial of preoperative chemoradiation. Entry required a staging whole-body FDG-PET scan. Results: One hundred ten consecutive patients were evaluated; 38 were ineligible for reasons including treatment elsewhere, prior malignancy, or refusal of treatment. After conventional staging (clinical examination, endoscopic ultrasound, and chest/abdominal computerized tomography), 33 patients were ineligible because of metastatic disease or poor performance status. Of the remaining 39 patients, 23 were confirmed to have LAEC after FDG-PET staging and were treated in the Phase II trial (Cohort I). Sixteen patients, however, had FDG-PET findings consistent with occult metastatic disease and were deemed ineligible for the trial but were treated with curative intent (Cohort II). The 2-year survival rate for the 23 patients in Cohort I was 64%, compared with 17% (p = 0.003) for patients in Cohort II (FDG-PET positive). Conclusions: More than one-third of patients determined to have LAEC with conventional staging were upstaged with the use of FDG-PET. Despite comparable therapy, upstaging with FDG-PET predicts poor 2-year survival.

Blackstock, A. William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States)]. E-mail: ablackst@wfubmc.edu; Farmer, Michael R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Lovato, James [Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Mishra, Girish [Division of Gastroenterology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Melin, Susan A. [Division of Medical Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Oaks, Timothy [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Aklilu, Mabea [Division of Medical Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Clark, Paige B. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Levine, Edward A. [Department of Surgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC (United States)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Final Report 2007: DOE-FG02-87ER60561  

SciTech Connect

This project involved a multi-faceted approach to the improvement of techniques used in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), from radiochemistry to image processing and data analysis. New methods for radiochemical syntheses were examined, new radiochemicals prepared for evaluation and eventual use in human PET studies, and new pre-clinical methods examined for validation of biochemical parameters in animal studies. The value of small animal PET imaging in measuring small changes of in vivo biochemistry was examined and directly compared to traditional tissue sampling techniques. In human imaging studies, the ability to perform single experimental sessions utilizing two overlapping injections of radiopharmaceuticals was tested, and it was shown that valid biochemical measures for both radiotracers can be obtained through careful pharmacokinetic modeling of the PET emission data. Finally, improvements in reconstruction algorithms for PET data from small animal PET scanners was realized and these have been implemented in commercial releases. Together, the project represented an integrated effort to improve and extend all basic science aspects of PET imaging at both the animal and human level.

Kilbourn, Michael R

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

174

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Midwest (PADD 2) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",14,"Weekly","12/16/2013","5/11/1992" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_r20_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_r20_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

175

,"U.S. Working Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries",28,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capwork_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capwork_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

176

,"Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids " Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids ",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_gp_a_epl0_fpf_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_gp_a_epl0_fpf_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

177

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products",36,"Weekly","12/13/2013","8/20/1982" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_wstk_dcu_nus_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_wstk_dcu_nus_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

178

,"Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input" Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2010" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_dwns_a_(na)_ydr_mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_dwns_a_(na)_ydr_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

179

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",14,"Weekly","12/16/2013","5/11/1992" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_r30_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_r30_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

180

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" 4 Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","PADD 4 Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",10,"Weekly","12/16/2013","5/11/1992" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_r40_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_r40_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Production " Domestic Production " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Crude Oil Domestic Production ",3,"Weekly","12/13/2013","1/7/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_sndw_a_epc0_fpf_mbblpd_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_sndw_a_epc0_fpf_mbblpd_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

182

,"Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by Area"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area" Area" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by Area",35,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1974" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_dfp1_k_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_dfp1_k_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/2/2013 3:15:37 AM"

183

,"F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Selected Crude Streams" for Selected Crude Streams" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams",14,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_imc2_k_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_imc2_k_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

184

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Distillate Prices - Residential " Distillate Prices - Residential " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","No. 2 Distillate Prices - Residential ",33,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_dist_a_epd2_prt_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_dist_a_epd2_prt_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

185

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)" Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)",4,"Weekly","12/16/2013","10/1/1990" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_wfr_dcus_nus_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_wfr_dcus_nus_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

186

,"U.S. Aviation Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aviation Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" Aviation Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Aviation Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes",2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refoth_c_nus_eppv_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refoth_c_nus_eppv_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

187

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",8,"Weekly","12/16/2013","6/5/2000" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_smn_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_smn_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

188

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Selected Crude Streams" for Selected Crude Streams" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Landed Costs of Imported Crude for Selected Crude Streams",22,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_land2_k_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_land2_k_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

189

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

as Feedstock for Hydrogen Production" as Feedstock for Hydrogen Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas Used as Feedstock for Hydrogen Production",6,"Annual",2012,"6/30/2008" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_feedng_k_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_feedng_k_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"6/20/2013 4:26:21 PM"

190

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Propane/Propylene " Propane/Propylene " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Refiner and Blender Net Production of Propane/Propylene ",8,"Weekly","12/13/2013","3/5/1993" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_sndw_a_epllpz_ypa_mbblpd_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_sndw_a_epllpz_ypa_mbblpd_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

191

,"Aviation Gasoline Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aviation Gasoline Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes" Aviation Gasoline Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Aviation Gasoline Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refoth_a_eppv_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refoth_a_eppv_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

192

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area" Area" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Area",4,"Monthly","9/2013","10/15/1973" ,"Data 2","Selected Countries",7,"Monthly","9/2013","10/15/1973" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_imc1_k_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_imc1_k_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

193

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Propane/Propylene " Propane/Propylene " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Stocks of Propane/Propylene ",8,"Weekly","12/13/2013","3/5/1993" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_sndw_a_epllpz_sae_mbbl_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_sndw_a_epllpz_sae_mbbl_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

194

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices, Average - Sales to End Users " Prices, Average - Sales to End Users " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Residual Fuel Oil Prices, Average - Sales to End Users ",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_resid_a_eppr_pta_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_resid_a_eppr_pta_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

195

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",8,"Weekly","12/16/2013","6/5/2000" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_sco_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_sco_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

196

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

" " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Total Imports ",6,"Weekly","12/13/2013","2/8/1991" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_wkly_a_ep00_im0_mbblpd_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_wkly_a_ep00_im0_mbblpd_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 10:37:40 AM"

197

,"U.S. Refiner Petroleum Product Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Product Prices" Petroleum Product Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Sales to End Users",16,"Monthly","9/2013","7/15/1975" ,"Data 2","Sales for Resale",13,"Monthly","9/2013","7/15/1975" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_refoth_dcu_nus_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_refoth_dcu_nus_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

198

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area" Area" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area",4,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Data 2","Selected Countries",8,"Monthly","9/2013","10/15/1973" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_land1_k_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_land1_k_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

199

,"U.S. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries",11,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capprod_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capprod_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

200

,"U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821rsd_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821rsd_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Miami Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Miami Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Miami Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",8,"Weekly","12/16/2013","5/26/2003" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_ymia_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_ymia_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

202

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Houston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Houston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Houston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",8,"Weekly","12/16/2013","6/5/2000" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_y44ho_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_y44ho_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

203

,"Weekly Blender Net Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Blender Net Production" Blender Net Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Weekly Blender Net Production",20,"Weekly","12/13/2013","6/4/2010" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_wprodb_s1_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_wprodb_s1_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 10:39:19 AM"

204

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Propane/Propylene " Propane/Propylene " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Product Supplied for Propane/Propylene ",1,"Weekly","12/13/2013","4/9/2004" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_sndw_a_epllpz_vpp_mbblpd_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_sndw_a_epllpz_vpp_mbblpd_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

205

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Distillate and Kerosene " Total Distillate and Kerosene " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Total Distillate and Kerosene ",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","11/26/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_prim_a_epded_k_p00_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_prim_a_epded_k_p00_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

206

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",8,"Weekly","12/16/2013","5/26/2003" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_soh_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_soh_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

207

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Exports" & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Imports",35,"Weekly","12/13/2013","8/20/1982" ,"Data 2","Exports",9,"Weekly","12/13/2013","2/8/1991" ,"Data 3","Net Imports",3,"Weekly","12/13/2013","2/8/1991" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_wkly_dc_nus-z00_mbblpd_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_wkly_dc_nus-z00_mbblpd_w.htm"

208

,"U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries",32,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capchg_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capchg_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

209

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Distillate Fuel Oil " Distillate Fuel Oil " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Product Supplied for Distillate Fuel Oil ",1,"Weekly","12/13/2013","2/8/1991" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_sndw_a_epd0_vpp_mbblpd_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_sndw_a_epd0_vpp_mbblpd_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

210

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

API Gravity" API Gravity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Landed Costs of Imported Crude by API Gravity",7,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_land3_k_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_land3_k_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/2/2013 3:18:01 AM"

211

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chicago Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Chicago Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Chicago Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",8,"Weekly","12/16/2013","6/5/2000" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_yord_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_yord_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

212

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","East Coast (PADD 1) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",14,"Weekly","12/16/2013","5/11/1992" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_r10_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_r10_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

213

,"U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries",28,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capshell_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capshell_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

214

,"Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

API Gravity" API Gravity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity",6,"Monthly","9/2013","10/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_dfp3_k_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_dfp3_k_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/2/2013 3:15:39 AM"

215

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Motor Gasoline " Motor Gasoline " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline ",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","11/26/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_prim_a_epm0_p00_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_prim_a_epm0_p00_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

216

Impact of computed tomography and {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose coincidence detection emission tomography image fusion for optimization of conformal radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report a retrospective study concerning the impact of fused {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-hybrid positron emission tomography (PET) and CT images on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 101 patients consecutively treated for Stage I-III non-small-cell lung cancer were studied. Each patient underwent CT and FDG-hybrid PET for simulation treatment in the same treatment position. Images were coregistered using five fiducial markers. Target volume delineation was initially performed on the CT images, and the corresponding FDG-PET data were subsequently used as an overlay to the CT data to define the target volume. Results: {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose-PET identified previously undetected distant metastatic disease in 8 patients, making them ineligible for curative conformal radiotherapy (1 patient presented with some positive uptake corresponding to concomitant pulmonary tuberculosis). Another patient was ineligible for curative treatment because the fused PET-CT images demonstrated excessively extensive intrathoracic disease. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was decreased by CT-PET image fusion in 21 patients (23%) and was increased in 24 patients (26%). The GTV reduction was {>=}25% in 7 patients because CT-PET image fusion reduced the pulmonary GTV in 6 patients (3 patients with atelectasis) and the mediastinal nodal GTV in 1 patient. The GTV increase was {>=}25% in 14 patients owing to an increase in the pulmonary GTV in 11 patients (4 patients with atelectasis) and detection of occult mediastinal lymph node involvement in 3 patients. Of 81 patients receiving a total dose of {>=}60 Gy at the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements point, after CT-PET image fusion, the percentage of total lung volume receiving >20 Gy increased in 15 cases and decreased in 22. The percentage of total heart volume receiving >36 Gy increased in 8 patients and decreased in 14. The spinal cord volume receiving at least 45 Gy (2 patients) decreased. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor with atelectasis was the single independent factor that resulted in a significant effect on the modification of the size of the GTV by FDG-PET: tumor with atelectasis (with vs. without atelectasis, p = 0.0001). Conclusion: The results of our study have confirmed that integrated hybrid PET/CT in the treatment position and coregistered images have an impact on treatment planning and management of non-small-cell lung cancer. However, FDG images using dedicated PET scanners and respiration-gated acquisition protocols could improve the PET-CT image coregistration. Furthermore, the impact on treatment outcome remains to be demonstrated.

Deniaud-Alexandre, Elisabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Touboul, Emmanuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France)]. E-mail: emmanuel.touboul@tnn.aphp.fr; Lerouge, Delphine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Grahek, Dany [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Foulquier, Jean-Noel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Petegnief, Yolande [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Gres, Benoit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); El Balaa, Hanna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Keraudy, Katia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Kerrou, Kaldoun [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Montravers, Francoise [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Milleron, Bernard [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France); Lebeau, Bernard [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Saint-Antoine Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France) and Cancerest, Paris VI University, Paris (France); Talbot, Jean-Noel [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tenon Hospital A.P.-H.P., Paris (France)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in the Staging and Treatment of Anal Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study was intended to determine the role of PET/CT in the staging of anal cancer as a supplement to three-dimensional transanal ultrasound (TAUS) and inguinal ultrasound (US). The impact of the PET/CT on the initial stage and treatment plan proposed by TAUS/US was assessed. Methods and Materials: Ninety-five (95) patients referred to our clinic between July 1, 2005, and December 31, 2009, were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had biopsy-proven primary squamous cell cancer of the anal canal. There were 65 females (68%) and 30 males (32%), and the median age was 58 years (range, 35-88 years). Six (6%) of the patients were HIV positive. All patients were staged with TAUS/US and PET/CT. Results: Twenty-eight (28) patients were diagnosed with suspicious perirectal node metastases. TAUS visualized 24 of these, whereas PET/CT detected 15. Suspicious inguinal nodes were visualized on either US or PET/CT in 41 patients. Seventeen (17) of these had confirmed malignant disease on biopsy, and 15 had confirmed benign disease. All 17 patients (100%) with malignant inguinal nodes were diagnosed by PET/CT, whereas US identified 16 (94%). Ten patients were diagnosed with suspicious inguinal nodes on PET/CT that had not been seen on US. One of these was malignant, three were benign, and six were not biopsied. PET/CT diagnosed eight metastatic sites, whereas TAUS/US diagnosed three. PET/CT discovered three of the five synchronous cancers seen in this study. PET/CT upstaged the disease in 14% of the cases and changed the treatment plan proposed by TAUS/US in 17%. Conclusion: PET/CT has great potential influence on the staging and treatment of anal cancer. TAUS is important in the staging of the primary tumor and N1-stage, whereas PET/CT seems necessary for the N2/3-stage, the M-stage and synchronous cancers.

Sveistrup, Joen, E-mail: joensveistrup@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Loft, Annika [PET and Cyclotron Unit, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Diagnostic Investigations, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Berthelsen, Anne Kiil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); PET and Cyclotron Unit, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Diagnostic Investigations, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Henriksen, Birthe Merete; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann [Department of Radiology, Section of Ultrasound X4123, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Engelholm, Svend Aage [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

,"U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refiner Sales Volumes" Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Refiner Sales Volumes",2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refres_c_nus_eppr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refres_c_nus_eppr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

219

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",8,"Weekly","12/16/2013","5/26/2003" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_sfl_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_sfl_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

220

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products " Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Product Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_psup_a_ep00_vpp_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_psup_a_ep00_vpp_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

from All Countries" from All Countries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Imports from All Countries",40,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1920" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcus_d_nus_z00_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcus_d_nus_z00_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

222

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Weekly Inputs & Utilization" 3 Weekly Inputs & Utilization" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Refiner Inputs and Utilization",4,"Weekly","12/13/2013","1/5/1990" ,"Data 2","Refiner and Blender Net Inputs",6,"Weekly","12/13/2013","4/9/2004" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_wiup_dcu_r30_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_wiup_dcu_r30_w.htm"

223

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Seattle Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Seattle Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Seattle Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",8,"Weekly","12/16/2013","5/26/2003" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_y48se_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_y48se_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

224

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Users Prices " Users Prices " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Motor Gasoline Sales to End Users Prices ",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_allmg_a_epm0_pta_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_allmg_a_epm0_pta_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

225

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Motor Gasoline " Motor Gasoline " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Stocks of Total Motor Gasoline ",9,"Weekly","12/13/2013","1/5/1990" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_wstk_a_epm0_sae_mbbl_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_wstk_a_epm0_sae_mbbl_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

226

,"U.S. Crude Oil Imports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Imports" Imports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Crude Oil Imports",71,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1920" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcus_a2_nus_epc0_im0_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcus_a2_nus_epc0_im0_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

227

,"U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821rsda_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821rsda_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

228

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units " Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units ",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1985" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_unc_a_epxxx2_yiy_mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_unc_a_epxxx2_yiy_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

229

,"Weekly Refiner Net Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refiner Net Production" Refiner Net Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Weekly Refiner Net Production",21,"Weekly","12/13/2013","6/4/2010" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_wprodr_s1_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_wprodr_s1_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 10:39:21 AM"

230

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Propane Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)" Propane Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wholesale Propane Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)",21,"Weekly","12/16/2013","10/7/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_wfr_a_epllpa_pwr_dpgal_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_wfr_a_epllpa_pwr_dpgal_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

231

,"Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Exports" Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_exp_a_ep00_eex_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_exp_a_ep00_eex_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

232

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",8,"Weekly","12/16/2013","5/26/2003" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_swa_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_swa_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

233

,"New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",12,"Weekly","12/16/2013","6/5/2000" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_sny_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_sny_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

234

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices by Sales Type" Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices by Sales Type" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices by Sales Type",8,"Monthly","9/2013","10/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_prop_dcu_nus_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_prop_dcu_nus_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

235

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",12,"Weekly","12/16/2013","6/5/2000" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_stx_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_stx_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

236

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices - Sales to End Users " Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices - Sales to End Users " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices - Sales to End Users ",9,"Monthly","9/2013","10/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_prop_a_epllpa_pta_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_prop_a_epllpa_pta_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

237

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Massachusetts Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",8,"Weekly","12/16/2013","5/26/2003" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_sma_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_sma_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

238

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",10,"Weekly","12/16/2013","1/2/1995" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_sca_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_sca_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

239

,"New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

City Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" City Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",8,"Weekly","12/16/2013","6/5/2000" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_y35ny_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_y35ny_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

240

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Denver Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Denver Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Denver Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",8,"Weekly","12/16/2013","6/5/2000" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_yden_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_yden_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Boston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Boston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Boston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",8,"Weekly","12/16/2013","5/26/2003" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_ybos_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_ybos_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

242

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of Transportation" Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of Transportation" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Refinery Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of Transportation",18,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","6/22/2012" ,"Next Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_caprec_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_caprec_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

243

,"U.S. Motor Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refiner Sales Volumes" Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Motor Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refmg_c_nus_epm0_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refmg_c_nus_epm0_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

244

Evaluation of a MODIS-Based Potential Evapotranspiration Product at the Point Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines the development of a continuous, daily time series of potential evapotranspiration (PET) using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor data from the Terra satellite platform. The approach is based on the ...

Jongyoun Kim; Terri S. Hogue

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Neural Substrate of Orientation Working Memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have used positron emission tomography (PET) to identify the neural substrate of two major cognitive components of working memory (WM), maintenance and manipulation of a single elementary visual attribute, i.e., the orientation of a grating presented ...

L. Cornette; P. Dupont; E. Salmon; Guy A. Orban

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Mechanism of Low Dose Radiation Risk Associated with Diagnostic X-rays,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanism of Low Dose Radiation Risk Associated with Diagnostic X-rays, Mechanism of Low Dose Radiation Risk Associated with Diagnostic X-rays, PET, and Gamma-rays Douglas Boreham McMaster University Abstract The goal of this project was to investigate low dose ionizing radiation effects associated with exposure to diagnostic computed tomography (CT) or positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Biological effects were evaluated in wild type and Trp53+/- heterozygous females, following in vivo exposure to diagnostic CT (75kVp, 200µ) or PET (18F-FDG) scans. The short term biological effects following CT or PET scans were evaluated in order to understand biological modification of mechanisms, such as DNA repair processes and apoptosis, that might alter long term cancer risk. Corresponding life-time cancer risk studies are in progress. Short-term

247

Y High-Resolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Y Y High-Resolution . __ DO NOT M I C PET COVER for medical science studies Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory University of California September 1989 DlSTRlBUTlGN OF THIS DOCUMENT IS U#LIIY/ITEE Acknowledgments This booklet was prepared under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health Effects Research, the National Institutes of Health, and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division. We thank Sarah Cahn and Douglas Vaughan for coordination of this booklet. esolution PET for Medical Science Studies Thomas F. Budinger Stephen E. Derenzo Ronald H. Huesman William J. Jagust Peter E. Valk CONTENTS A PET Primer Positron Emission Tomography: Evolution of a Technology 7 PET Theory: Emission, Detection, and Reconstruction

248

Microsoft Word - 40851 NGTP Final Report.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for being fitted with combustion burners for different fuel types, such as natural gas, oil, and syngas derived from coal, refinery residuals, biomass, and pet coke. Use of a...

249

phillips1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Co. China 1998 vacuum residue Shell Rectisol ammonia ISAB Energy Italy 2000 heavy oil Texaco MDEA b IGCC, H 2 Motiva Delaware Refinery United States 2000 pet coke Texaco...

250

BSA 08-25: Simple and Rapid Preparation of Isotopically Labeled ...  

Its use as a precursor reagent in the synthesis of 11 C labeled positron emission ... provides a way to insert carbon-11 into compounds for use in PET imaging ...

251

Dewetting of silica surfaces upon reactions with supercritical CO2 and brine: Pore-scale studies in micromodels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Stability of Foamy Oil Flow. Pet. Sci. Technol. 2011,2 sequestration in depleted oil and gas reservoirs - caprockCapillarity of the Gas-Crude Oil-Reservoir Water System. J

Kim, Y.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% Energy Efficiency 16% Geothermal Petroleum & Pet Coke of regulation and carbon cost in the Council's Plan, the Council is also required to consider environmental costs more broadly. This presentation is intended to provide a foundation of facts from which discussion

253

UNITED STATES Calendar Year 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% Energy Efficiency 16% Geothermal Petroleum & Pet Coke of regulation and carbon cost in the Council's Plan, the Council is also required to consider environmental costs more broadly. This presentation is intended to provide a foundation of facts from which discussion

US Army Corps of Engineers

254

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% Biomass 1% Petroleum & Pet Coke of conservation savings, far exceeding the Council's target of 200 average megawatts. The levelized cost for energy efficiency achievements. In addition, the achievements were low cost, at or below what

255

Extending the Size Limits of Cast/Wrought Superalloy Ingots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

location of 305mm &ameter fire grain bPet Porn 508mm diameter Ingot. Fiqure 5: Typical carbide dis?ribu?ion for the bottom center. Another concern with larger...

256

Functional Anatomy of Perceptual and Semantic Processing for Odors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The functional anatomy of perceptual and semantic processings for odors was studied using positron emission tomography (PET). The first experiment was a pretest in which 71 normal subjects were asked to rate 185 odorants in terms of intensity, familiarity, ...

Jean-P. Royet; Olivier Koenig; Marie-C. Gregoire; Luc Cinotti; Frank Lavenne; Didier Le Bars; Nicolas Costes; Michel Vigouroux; Vincent Farget; Gilles Sicard; Andr Holley; Franois Mauguire; Dominique Comar; Jean-C. Froment

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Remez-type inequality for non-dense M?ntz spaces with ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMEZ-TYPE INEQUALITY FOR NON-DENSE. M8UNTZ SPACES WITH EXPLICIT BOUND. PEtER BoRwEin AnD TAm wAs ?RD wElyi. AbstRAct.

258

E/ii/e/is;o,40(2):170-1 78, 1999 Lippincott Williams & Wilkina, Inc., Philadelphia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-PET-Glucose-Ener gy . The energy requirements of interictal spike discharges remain incompletely understood and reprint requests to Dr. D. C. Reutens at Department of Neurology, Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre

Dumoulin, Serge O.

259

ANST 2011 Presentations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

to the Detection of Special Nuclear Material and PET Medical Imaging DestefanoMcKinsey .pdf file (2.7MB) YALE Development and applications of micropattern optical sensors...

260

Schoolroom Zoos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for and understand their pets. Frog tadpoles are favorites. Kept in a small aquarium or jar of water, they are hardy and easily fed on algae, bits of lettuce leaf and other plant...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

F12: Process and Mechanism of Producing Ferro-nickel Nuggets ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Softening properties of laterite nickel ore was studied, result showed that ... of Composite Materials Recycled Pet-Based Reinforced with Zinc Particles ... and Electrochemical Properties of the Mg-Mn-Si-O System for Mg Battery Application.

262

Radical reuse : from the superfluous to the exquisite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on the systematic possibilities for the intricate architectural reuse and reconfiguration of the radial tire and the PET plastic bottle. Both waste products demonstrate significant structural and ...

Marraccini, Marco

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Spatial Interpolation of Daily Potential Evapotranspiration for New Zealand Using a Spline Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is an important component of water balance calculations, and these calculations form an equally important role in applications such as irrigation scheduling, pasture productivity forecasts, and groundwater ...

Andrew Tait; Ross Woods

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Present and future climate resources for various types of tourism in the Bay of Palma, Spain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are obtained from standardized values provided by ASHRAE (ASHRAE 2004). These data characterizes the mean expressing PET as a thermal sensation by using the standard nine-point ASHRAE scale (ASHRAE 2004). #12

Romero, Romu

265

BNL | Richard Ferrieri  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biegon A., Ding Y.S., Fischer A., Ferrieri R.A.., Kim S.W., Pareto D., Schueller M.J., Fowler J.S Synthesis and PET studies of (11)C-cyanoletrozole (Femara), an aromatase...

266

FY09 LDRD Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A. E.Camarda, A. NNS197C 08-080 Tracer Development-Improving PET and MR Imaging Fowler, J. MED555A 08-081 Development of MR Research at BNL Henn, F. LIFE490 08-082...

267

Diagnosis of Parkinsonian disorders using a channelized Hotelling observer model: Proof of principle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Imaging dopamine transporters using PET and SPECT probes is a powerful technique for the early diagnosis of Parkinsonian disorders. In order to perform automated accurate diagnosis of these diseases

H. Bal; G. Bal; P. D. Acton

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Isotope Development & Production | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

palliation Ni-62 Precursor for Ni-63 radioisotope for drug and explosive detection, beta battery power sources Ni-64 Precursor for Cu-64 radioisotope for cancer PET imaging and...

269

Native American Cats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

realized that the native cats have a vital, useful place in nature. These members of the cat family have much in common with your pet pussycat. They purr when contented. They growl...

270

NEWTON's Zoology Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planet - Videos Section Animal Planet online lets you see videos about cat breeds, dog breeds, wild animals and pets and much more. See and learn about animals courtesy of...

271

Export.gov - Vellus of OH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the skin, tend to leave hair unmanageable and without the glamour needed for the show dog or pampered pet. Dr. David Tanner, Doherty's nephew, used his expertise as a chemist in...

272

Sub-millimeter nuclear medical imaging with reduced dose application in positron emission tomography using beta-gamma coincidences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) permits a functional understanding of the underlying causes of many diseases. Modern whole-body PET systems reach a spatial resolution of 2-6 mm (FWHM). A limitation of this technique occurs from the thermalization and diffusion of the positron before its annihilation, typically within the mm range. We present a nuclear medical imaging technique, able to reach sub-millimeter spatial resolution in 3 dimensions with a reduced effective dose application compared to conventional PET. This 'gamma-PET' technique draws on specific medical isotopes, simultaneously emitting an additional photon accompanying the beta^+ decay. Exploiting the triple coincidence between the positron annihilation and the third photon, it is possible to separate the reconstructed 'true' events from background. In order to characterize the potential of this technique, MC simulations and image reconstructions have been performed. The achievable spatial resolution has been found to reach ca. 0.4 mm (FWHM) in ...

Lang, C; Parodi, K; Thirolf, P G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A design of actuation mechanisms for use in 'huggable' robotic teddy bear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Silent, back drivable actuators were necessary for the Huggable teddy bear, a robotic companion for use in therapeutic applications. The benefits of pet therapy include a reduction in stress and an increase in rate of ...

Lalla, Levi (Levi J.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

FY 2007 funded projects for web  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Study Brain Connectivity E. de Castro Caparelli MED490 05-072 Feasibility of CZT for Next-Generation PET Performance P. Vaska MED490 05-074 Biology on Massively...

275

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pet-coke or biomass) is ?rst gasi?ed, creating syngas. Usingshift reac- tion, the syngas can be chemically shifted; theto further cool the syngas before entering the Selexol

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

CX-001909: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09: Categorical Exclusion Determination 09: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001909: Categorical Exclusion Determination MRC Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) Recycling Facility CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/20/2010 Location(s): Chicago, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity will use $1,637,750 in Recovery Act funds to establish a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic recycling facility at the MRC Polymer plant located at 3535 West 31st Street in Chicago. The grant will fund equipment and material purchases to allow the facility to recycle 35 million pounds (17,500 tons) of PET bottles annually. The MRC recycling facility intends to accept bales of whole PET bottles from municipal recycling facilities and upgrade them

277

Optimization of 2D image reconstruction for positron emission mammography using IDL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clear-PEM system is a prototype machine for Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) under development within the Portuguese PET-Mammography consortium. We have embedded 2D image reconstruction algorithms implemented in IDL within the prototype's image ... Keywords: ART, Computer implementation, Emission tomography, FDG, FOM, FOV, FWHM, GEANT, IDL, Image reconstruction, Iterative algorithms, LOR, MLEM, NCAT, NME, OSEM, PEM, PET, PSF, Positron emission mammography, ROI

N. Oliveira; N. Matela; R. Bugalho; N. Ferreira; P. Almeida

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

HV Plateau PM6591 Run 138 LED 98/03/02 21.20 750 100012501500  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 10 12 14 16 18 20 p [GeV] Q C [rad] p p e e K K p p Aerogel, n=1.03 C 4 F 10 , n=1.0014 µ Standard finish ­ Al coating Standard finish ­ UV280 coating Optimal finish Ag­PET foil SS­Ag­PET foil Alu ) 4 10 2 AEROGEL(SIO ) and

279

Role of Positron Emission Tomography in the Treatment of Occult Disease in Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Modeling Approach  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine under what conditions positron emission tomography (PET) imaging will be useful in decisions regarding the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of clinically occult lymph node metastases in head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: A decision model of PET imaging and its downstream effects on radiotherapy outcomes was constructed using an influence diagram. This model included the sensitivity and specificity of PET, as well as the type and stage of the primary tumor. These parameters were varied to determine the optimal strategy for imaging and therapy for different clinical situations. Maximum expected utility was the metric by which different actions were ranked. Results: For primary tumors with a low probability of lymph node metastases, the sensitivity of PET should be maximized, and 50 Gy should be delivered if PET is positive and 0 Gy if negative. As the probability for lymph node metastases increases, PET imaging becomes unnecessary in some situations, and the optimal dose to the lymph nodes increases. The model needed to include the causes of certain health states to predict current clinical practice. Conclusion: The model demonstrated the ability to reproduce expected outcomes for a range of tumors and provided recommendations for different clinical situations. The differences between the optimal policies and current clinical practice are likely due to a disparity between stated clinical decision processes and actual decision making by clinicians.

Phillips, Mark H., E-mail: markp@u.washington.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Smith, Wade P. [Department of Veterans Affairs, Albany, NY (United States); Parvathaneni, Upendra; Laramore, George E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

RU RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE MAYFIELD VANDERGRIF T GIRT Y SAY NEW SALEM WET MOR E COWANSHAN NOC K ST ILLWAT ER ELD ERS RIDGE BLAIR CARROLLT OWN BU RNIN G WELL COOKPORT MCCREA FU RNACE RIDGWAY NEW ALEXANDR IA IRISH RU N WILC OX PLU M CREEK PADDYTOWN KEATING HOR TON GUF FEY WH ITESBURG BET ULA SMELTZ ER ODONN ELL DECAT UR W HAZELHU RST ST RONGSTOWN COL EGROVE SH EFFIELD WERT Z H OLLOW RED HILL ULYSSES PLATT SVIL LE BR ANCH W LATR OBE LEID Y TRIU

282

LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

81 81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON STATE LINE ALLEN CHUR CHVILLE BATH ATT ICA ELLI COT VILLE ROU LETT E BR ADFORD BU FFALO CREEK PEN N YAN N BEECH HILL-INDEPENDENC E GERRY-CH ARLOTTE STAGECOACH CHIPMUN K HEBRON VIN CENT BALD WI NSVILLE AKELEY OLEAN COWLESVILLE AN NIN SMET HPORT BR ADLEY BR OOK BU STI FIVE MILE BLOOMFIELD W SEN EC A FALLS NILE STAGECOACH LEWIS R UN BR ADFORD CAMDEN VAN ETT EN ROAN OKE SH ARON RICHBU RG FULTON N FINN EGAN H ILL TONAWANDA

283

Patient self-attenuation and technologist dose in positron emission tomography  

SciTech Connect

Positron emission tomography (PET), with 511-keV radiation and long patient-uptake times, presents unique radiation safety concerns. This two-part study considers aspects of PET radiation safety as they relate to PET suite design, dose to the public, and technologist occupational dose. In the first part of the study, the self-attenuation of radiation by patients' bodies was quantified. The radiation exposure was measured at three positions from 64 patients injected with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) during the uptake period. Compared with an in vitro control used as a point source, a significant decrease in exposure (>40% at 1 m) was observed due to nonuniform distribution of FDG and attenuation within the patients. The attenuation data are consistent with results from simulations [M. E. Phelps, ''Comments and Perspectives,'' J. Nucl. Med. 45, 1601 (2004)] that treat the body as a uniform, water-filled cylinder. As distance is often the principal source of protection for 511-keV radiation, the considerable self-attenuation may allow for more compact PET suites. However, despite high patient self-attenuation, shielding, and standard precautionary measures, PET technologist occupational doses can remain quite high ({approx}12 mSv/year). The second part of this study tracked the daily dose received by PET technologists. Close technologist-patient interaction both during and following FDG administration, as much as 20 min/study, contribute to the high doses and point to the need for a more innovative approach to radiation protection for PET technologists.

Zeff, Benjamin W.; Yester, Michael V. [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35233 (United States)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Association Between Pulmonary Uptake of Fluorodeoxyglucose Detected by Positron Emission Tomography Scanning After Radiation Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Radiation Pneumonitis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To study the relationship between fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in pulmonary tissue after radical radiation therapy (RT) and the presence and severity of radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: In 88 consecutive patients, {sup 18}F-FDG-positron emission tomography was performed at a median of 70 days after completion of RT. Patients received 60 Gy in 30 fractions, and all but 15 had concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. RT-induced pulmonary inflammatory changes occurring within the radiation treatment volume were scored, using a visual (0 to 3) radiotoxicity grading scale, by an observer blinded to the presence or absence of clinical radiation pneumonitis. Radiation pneumonitis was retrospectively graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale by an observer blinded to the PET radiotoxicity score. Results: There was a significant association between the worst RTOG pneumonitis grade occurring at any time after RT and the positron emission tomograph (PET) radiotoxicity grade (one-sided p = 0.033). The worst RTOG pneumonitis grade occurring after the PET scan was also associated with the PET radiotoxicity grade (one-sided p = 0.035). For every one-level increase in the PET toxicity scale, the risk of a higher RTOG radiation pneumonitis score increased by approximately 40%. The PET radiotoxicity score showed no significant correlation with the duration of radiation pneumonitis. Conclusions: The intensity of FDG uptake in pulmonary tissue after RT determined using a simple visual scoring system showed significant correlation with the presence and severity of radiation pneumonitis. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET may be useful in the prediction, diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of radiation pneumonitis.

Mac Manus, Michael P., E-mail: michael.macmanus@petermac.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Ding Zhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of NingXia Medical University, YinChuan, NingXia (China); Hogg, Annette [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Herschtal, Alan [Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Binns, David [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Ball, David L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne (Australia)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Sub-millimeter nuclear medical imaging with reduced dose application in positron emission tomography using beta-gamma coincidences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) permits a functional understanding of the underlying causes of many diseases. Modern whole-body PET systems reach a spatial resolution of 2-6 mm (FWHM). A limitation of this technique occurs from the thermalization and diffusion of the positron before its annihilation, typically within the mm range. We present a nuclear medical imaging technique, able to reach sub-millimeter spatial resolution in 3 dimensions with a reduced effective dose application compared to conventional PET. This 'gamma-PET' technique draws on specific medical isotopes, simultaneously emitting an additional photon accompanying the beta^+ decay. Exploiting the triple coincidence between the positron annihilation and the third photon, it is possible to separate the reconstructed 'true' events from background. In order to characterize the potential of this technique, MC simulations and image reconstructions have been performed. The achievable spatial resolution has been found to reach ca. 0.4 mm (FWHM) in each direction for the visualization of a 22Na point source. Starting with a source activity of only 1.48 MBq for 89Zr, corresponding to ca. 130 - 270 times less compared to a conventional PET examination using 18F-FDG, about 40 intersections (sufficient for a reliable image reconstruction of a point source) can be identified after a typical examination time of 900 seconds. This results in a strongly reduced effective dose of, e.g., 0.785 mSv for 89Zr-cmAb-U36, compared to the applied effective dose in a typical human PET examination with 18F-FDG of about 7.5 mSv. Increasing the applied effective dose to 7.5 mSv, the examination time will be reduced to 94 s for only 14.2 MBq of 89Zr-cmAb-U36. The reduced effective dose, or, the reduced examination time, surpass the performance of a conventional PET device by more than one order of magnitude.

C. Lang; D. Habs; K. Parodi; P. G. Thirolf

2013-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

286

Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Dose Painting for Localized Prostate Cancer Using {sup 11}C-choline Positron Emission Tomography Scans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To demonstrate the technical feasibility of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose painting using {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography PET scans in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was an RT planning study of 8 patients with prostate cancer who had {sup 11}C-choline PET scans prior to radical prostatectomy. Two contours were semiautomatically generated on the basis of the PET scans for each patient: 60% and 70% of the maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub 60%} and SUV{sub 70%}). Three IMRT plans were generated for each patient: PLAN{sub 78}, which consisted of whole-prostate radiation therapy to 78 Gy; PLAN{sub 78-90}, which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 78 Gy, a boost to the SUV{sub 60%} to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV{sub 70%} to 90 Gy; and PLAN{sub 72-90}, which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 72 Gy, a boost to the SUV{sub 60%} to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV{sub 70%} to 90 Gy. The feasibility of these plans was judged by their ability to reach prescription doses while adhering to published dose constraints. Tumor control probabilities based on PET scan-defined volumes (TCP{sub PET}) and on prostatectomy-defined volumes (TCP{sub path}), and rectal normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were compared between the plans. Results: All plans for all patients reached prescription doses while adhering to dose constraints. TCP{sub PET} values for PLAN{sub 78}, PLAN{sub 78-90}, and PLAN{sub 72-90} were 65%, 97%, and 96%, respectively. TCP{sub path} values were 71%, 97%, and 89%, respectively. Both PLAN{sub 78-90} and PLAN{sub 72-90} had significantly higher TCP{sub PET} (P=.002 and .001) and TCP{sub path} (P<.001 and .014) values than PLAN{sub 78}. PLAN{sub 78-90} and PLAN{sub 72-90} were not significantly different in terms of TCP{sub PET} or TCP{sub path}. There were no significant differences in rectal NTCPs between the 3 plans. Conclusions: IMRT dose painting for localized prostate cancer using {sup 11}C-choline PET scans is technically feasible. Dose painting results in higher TCPs without higher NTCPs.

Chang, Joe H. [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia) [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Lim Joon, Daryl [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia)] [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Lee, Sze Ting [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia) [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Gong, Sylvia J. [Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia)] [Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Anderson, Nigel J. [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia)] [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Scott, Andrew M. [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia) [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Davis, Ian D. [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia) [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Clouston, David [Focus Pathology, Victoria (Australia)] [Focus Pathology, Victoria (Australia); Bolton, Damien [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia) [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Urology, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Hamilton, Christopher S. [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia)] [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Khoo, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.khoo@rmh.nhs.uk [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia) [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

2-Deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose Joint Uptake on Positron Emission Tomography Images: Rheumatoid Arthritis Versus Osteoarthritis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purpose: Previous positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown increased 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) uptake in joints of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and inflamed joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study compares FDG uptake in joints of RA and OA patients and FDG-uptake with clinical signs of inflammation. Procedures: FDG-PET scans of hands and wrists were performed in patients with RA and primary OA. PET data were compared with clinical data. Results: 29 % of RA joints and 6 % of OA joints showed elevated FDG-uptake. The level of uptake in PET-positive OA joints was not significantly different from that in RA joints. The majority of PET results of RA joints corresponded with clinical findings. Clinical synovitis was found some OA joints with FDG-uptake. Conclusions: FDG-uptake was observed in the majority of clinically inflamed RA joints and in a few OA joints with no significant difference in uptake level. The latter may be due to secondary synovitis.

E. H. Elzinga; B. A. C. Dijkmans; A. E. Voskuyl

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

[F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for targeting radiation dose escalation for patients with glioblastoma multiforme: Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging for brain tumors has been shown to identify areas of active disease. Radiation dose escalation in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme may lead to improved disease control. Based on these premises, we initiated a prospective study of FDG-PET for the treatment planning of radiation dose escalation for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Forty patients were enrolled. Patients were treated with standard conformal fractionated radiotherapy with volumes defined by MRI imaging. When patients reached a dose of 45-50.4 Gy, they underwent FDG-PET imaging for boost target delineation, for an additional 20 Gy (2 Gy per fraction) to a total dose of 79.4 Gy (n = 30). Results: The estimated 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) for the entire group was 70% and 17%, respectively, with a median overall survival of 70 weeks. The estimated 1-year and 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 18% and 3%, respectively, with a median of 24 weeks. No significant improvements in OS or PFS were observed for the study group in comparison to institutional historical controls. Conclusions: Radiation dose escalation to 79.4 Gy based on FDG-PET imaging demonstrated no improvement in OS or PFS. This study establishes the feasibility of integrating PET metabolic imaging into radiotherapy treatment planning.

Douglas, James G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States) and Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)]. E-mail: drjay@u.washington.edu; Stelzer, Keith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Celilo Radiation Therapy, Mid-Columbia Medical Center, The Dalles, OR (United States); Mankoff, David A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Tralins, Kevin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Krohn, Kenneth A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Muzi, Mark [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Silbergeld, Daniel L. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Rostomily, Robert C. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Scharnhorst, Jeffrey B.S. [Department of Neurology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Spence, Alexander M. [Department of Neurology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

,"Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities" Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1985" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_crq_a_epc0_ycs_pct_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_crq_a_epc0_ycs_pct_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

290

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 2","Crude Oil",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 3","Natural Gas and Petroleum Gases",57,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1986" ,"Data 4","Other Liquids",71,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 5","Finished Products",150,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_d_r40_mbblpd_a_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_r40_mbblpd_a_cur.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

291

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil Inputs " Crude Oil Inputs " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Refiner Crude Oil Inputs ",6,"Weekly","12/13/2013","8/20/1982" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_wiup_a_epc0_yiy_mbblpd_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_wiup_a_epc0_yiy_mbblpd_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 10:38:57 AM"

292

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 2","Crude Oil",9,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 3","Natural Gas and Petroleum Gases",64,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Data 4","Other Liquids",94,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 5","Finished Products",187,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_d_r10_mbbl_m_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_r10_mbbl_m_cur.htm"

293

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vacuum Distillation " Vacuum Distillation " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S., PAD Districts, and States",46,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 2","U.S. Territories (not included in U.S. Total)",3,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capchg_a_(na)_8cv0_bsd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capchg_a_(na)_8cv0_bsd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

294

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products " Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Total Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2005" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_inpt2_a_ep00_yiy_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_inpt2_a_ep00_yiy_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

295

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 2","Crude Oil",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 3","Natural Gas and Petroleum Gases",57,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1986" ,"Data 4","Other Liquids",86,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 5","Finished Products",162,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_d_r20_mbblpd_a_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_r20_mbblpd_a_cur.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

296

,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_gp_dc_nus_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_gp_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:17:57 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production" "Sourcekey","MNGFPUS1","MPPFPUS1","MLPFPUS1","METFPUS1","MPRFPUS1","MBNFPUS1","MBIFPUS1"

297

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Operable Refineries " Number of Operable Refineries " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S., PAD Districts, and States",46,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 2","U.S. Territories (not included in U.S. Total)",3,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_cap1_a_(na)_8o0_count_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_cap1_a_(na)_8o0_count_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

298

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kerosene by End Use" Kerosene by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Sales of Kerosene by End Use",6,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821ker_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821ker_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/14/2013 4:20:08 PM"

299

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ethanol (Renewable) Imports" Ethanol (Renewable) Imports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Imports",19,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcus_a2_nus_epooxe_im0_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcus_a2_nus_epooxe_im0_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

300

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products " Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Refinery Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products ",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2005" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_refp2_a_ep00_ypy_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_refp2_a_ep00_ypy_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reformulated Gasoline Sales to End Users Prices " Reformulated Gasoline Sales to End Users Prices " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Reformulated Gasoline Sales to End Users Prices ",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_allmg_a_epm0r_pta_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_allmg_a_epm0r_pta_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

302

,"San Francisco Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Francisco Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" San Francisco Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","San Francisco Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",8,"Weekly","12/16/2013","6/5/2000" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_y05sf_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_y05sf_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

303

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users " Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Prices of Refiner Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users ",60,"Monthly","9/2013","7/15/1975" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_refoth_a_epjk_ptg_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_refoth_a_epjk_ptg_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

304

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Imports from All Countries" Imports from All Countries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","East Coast (PADD 1) Imports from All Countries",40,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_d_r10_z00_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_d_r10_z00_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

305

,"Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes" Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refmg_a_epm0u_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refmg_a_epm0u_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

306

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge" Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge",3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_netr_c_r10-z0p_ep00_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_netr_c_r10-z0p_ep00_mbbl_m.htm"

307

,"U.S. Reformulated Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reformulated Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" Reformulated Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Reformulated Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refmg_c_nus_epm0r_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refmg_c_nus_epm0r_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

308

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 2","Crude Oil",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 3","Natural Gas and Petroleum Gases",57,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1986" ,"Data 4","Other Liquids",84,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 5","Finished Products",161,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_d_r10_mbblpd_a_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_r10_mbblpd_a_cur.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

309

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 2","Crude Oil",9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 3","Natural Gas and Petroleum Gases",64,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 4","Other Liquids",92,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 5","Finished Products",184,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_d_r50_mbbl_a_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_r50_mbbl_a_cur.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

310

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kerosene by End Use" Kerosene by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Adjusted Sales of Kerosene by End Use",6,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821kera_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821kera_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/14/2013 4:22:05 PM"

311

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil - Composite " Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil - Composite " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil - Composite ",6,"Monthly","10/2013","1/15/1974" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_rac2_a_epc0_pct_dpbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_rac2_a_epc0_pct_dpbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

312

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1956" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1956" ,"Data 2","Crude Oil",8,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1920" ,"Data 3","Natural Gas and Petroleum Gases",57,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1967" ,"Data 4","Other Liquids",92,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 5","Finished Products",165,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1936" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_d_nus_mbbl_m_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_nus_mbbl_m_cur.htm"

313

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 2","Crude Oil",8,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 3","Natural Gas and Petroleum Gases",57,"Monthly","9/2013","2/15/1973" ,"Data 4","Other Liquids",82,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 5","Finished Products",158,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_d_r50_mbblpd_m_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_r50_mbblpd_m_cur.htm"

314

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 2","Crude Oil",9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 3","Natural Gas and Petroleum Gases",64,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 4","Other Liquids",81,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Data 5","Finished Products",176,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_d_r40_mbbl_a_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_r40_mbbl_a_cur.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

315

,"U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1987" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1987" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_dwns_dc_nus_mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_dwns_dc_nus_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:17:28 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input" "Sourcekey","M_NA_YDR_NUS_MBBLD","MCRCCUS2","MCRCHUS2","MCRDFUS2"

316

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating Oil Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)" Heating Oil Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wholesale Heating Oil Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)",32,"Weekly","12/16/2013","10/7/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_wfr_a_epd2f_pwr_dpgal_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_wfr_a_epd2f_pwr_dpgal_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

317

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",14,"Weekly","12/16/2013","4/5/1993" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_r1y_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_r1y_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

318

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Preliminary Crude Imports by Top 10 Countries of Origin (based on 2012 Petroleum Supply Monthly data)" Preliminary Crude Imports by Top 10 Countries of Origin (based on 2012 Petroleum Supply Monthly data)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Weekly Preliminary Crude Imports by Top 10 Countries of Origin (based on 2012 Petroleum Supply Monthly data)",17,"Weekly","12/13/2013","6/4/2010" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_wimpc_s1_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_wimpc_s1_w.htm"

319

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Blenders Net Input of Crude Oil " Blenders Net Input of Crude Oil " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Crude Oil ",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_inpt_a_epc0_yir_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_inpt_a_epc0_yir_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

320

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating Oil Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)" Heating Oil Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Residential Heating Oil Weekly Heating Oil and Propane Prices (October - March)",29,"Weekly","12/16/2013","10/1/1990" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_wfr_a_epd2f_prs_dpgal_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_wfr_a_epd2f_prs_dpgal_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Imports by Area of Entry" Imports by Area of Entry" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Imports by Area of Entry",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_imp_a_ep00_im0_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_imp_a_ep00_im0_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

322

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 2","Crude Oil",8,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 3","Natural Gas and Petroleum Gases",57,"Monthly","9/2013","2/15/1973" ,"Data 4","Other Liquids",71,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 5","Finished Products",150,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_d_r40_mbblpd_m_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_r40_mbblpd_m_cur.htm"

323

ega3322.tmp  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

s,, s,, l,, BNL-68614 Automation for the Synthesis and Application of PET Radiopharmaceuticals David L. Alexoff, Department of Chemistry, Brookhaven Nfiticmal Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 Index Words: automation, laboratory robot, unit operations Introduction The development of automateds ystems supporting the production and application of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been an important focus of researchers since the first successes of using carbon-11 (Comar et al., 1979) and fluorine-18 (Reivich et al., 1979) labeled compounds to visualize functional activity of the human brain. These initial successes of imaging the human brain soon led to applications in the human heart (Schelbert et al., 1980), and quickly radiochemists began to see the importance of automation to support PET studies in humans (Lambrecht,1982; Langstrom et al., 1983). Driven by the necessity

324

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline " Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline ",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2005" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_refp3_a_epm0f_ypb_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_refp3_a_epm0f_ypb_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

325

,"U.S. Motor Gasoline Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices" Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Motor Gasoline Prices",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_allmg_c_nus_epm0_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_allmg_c_nus_epm0_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/2/2013 2:33:46 AM"

326

,"U.S. Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices" Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_refmg2_c_nus_epm0u_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_refmg2_c_nus_epm0u_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

327

,"U.S. Reformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices" Reformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Reformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_refmg2_c_nus_epm0r_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_refmg2_c_nus_epm0r_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

328

,"Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Stocks Stocks by Type" Total Stocks Stocks by Type" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1956" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_typ_a_ep00_sae_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_typ_a_ep00_sae_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

329

,"Motor Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes" Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Motor Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refmg_a_epm0_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refmg_a_epm0_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

330

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_pct_dc_nus_pct_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_pct_dc_nus_pct_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:23:48 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery Yield" "Sourcekey","MLRRYUS3","MGFRYUS3","MGARYUS3","MKJRYUS3","MKERYUS3","MDIRYUS3","MRERYUS3","MNFRYUS3","MOTRYUS3","MNSRYUS3","MLURYUS3","MWXRYUS3","MCKRYUS3","MAPRYUS3","MSGRYUS3","MMSRYUS3","MPGRYUS3"

331

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 2","Crude Oil",9,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 3","Natural Gas and Petroleum Gases",64,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Data 4","Other Liquids",81,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 5","Finished Products",176,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_d_r40_mbbl_m_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_r40_mbbl_m_cur.htm"

332

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1963" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1963" ,"Data 2","Crude Oil",7,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1920" ,"Data 3","Natural Gas and Petroleum Gases",50,"Monthly","9/2013","2/15/1971" ,"Data 4","Other Liquids",80,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 5","Finished Products",139,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1936" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_d_nus_mbblpd_m_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_nus_mbblpd_m_cur.htm"

333

,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_gp_dc_nus_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_gp_dc_nus_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:17:57 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production" "Sourcekey","MNGFPUS1","MPPFPUS1","MLPFPUS1","METFPUS1","MPRFPUS1","MBNFPUS1","MBIFPUS1"

334

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skn_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skn_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:41:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Processing Plant " "Sourcekey","MAOSNUS1","MPPSNUS1","MLPSNUS1","METSNUS1","MPRSNUS1","MBNSNUS1","MBISNUS1"

335

,"No. 2 Distillate Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes" Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","No. 2 Distillate Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refoth_a_epd2_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refoth_a_epd2_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

336

,"U.S. Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates" Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates",11,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refoth_d_nus_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refoth_d_nus_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm"

337

,"U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by Sales Type"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices by Sales Type" Prices by Sales Type" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Residual Fuel Oil Average",2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Data 2","Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1%",2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Data 3","Sulfur Greater Than 1%",2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_resid_dcu_nus_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_resid_dcu_nus_m.htm"

338

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel, Low-Sulfur Prices - Sales to End Users " Diesel, Low-Sulfur Prices - Sales to End Users " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","No. 2 Diesel, Low-Sulfur Prices - Sales to End Users ",9,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_dist_a_epd2dm10_pta_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_dist_a_epd2dm10_pta_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

339

,"U.S. Sales to End Users Refiner Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Sales Volumes" Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Sales to End Users Refiner Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Sales Volumes",4,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refres_d_nus_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refres_d_nus_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

340

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

API Gravity" API Gravity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity",7,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_imc3_k_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_imc3_k_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/2/2013 3:17:55 AM"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 2","Crude Oil",9,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 3","Natural Gas and Petroleum Gases",64,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Data 4","Other Liquids",96,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 5","Finished Products",185,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_d_r30_mbbl_m_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_r30_mbbl_m_cur.htm"

342

,"Residual Fuel Oil Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes" Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Residual Fuel Oil Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes",9,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refres_a_eppr_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refres_a_eppr_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

343

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Pipeline " by Pipeline " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Total Crude by Pipeline ",6,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","6/22/2012" ,"Next Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_caprec_a_(na)_8rp0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_caprec_a_(na)_8rp0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"7/30/2013 10:52:52 AM"

344

,"U.S. Sales for Resale Refiner Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Sales Volumes" Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Sales for Resale Refiner Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Sales Volumes",4,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refres_d_nus_vwr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refres_d_nus_vwr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

345

,"Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes" Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refoth_a_epjk_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refoth_a_epjk_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

346

,"U.S. Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refmg_c_nus_epm0u_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refmg_c_nus_epm0u_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

347

,"U.S. Sales for Resale Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates" Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Sales for Resale Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates",11,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refoth_d_nus_vwr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refoth_d_nus_vwr_mgalpd_m.htm"

348

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices - Sales to End Users " Prices - Sales to End Users " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices - Sales to End Users ",33,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_dist_a_epd2d_pta_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_dist_a_epd2d_pta_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

349

,"No. 2 Diesel Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes" Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","No. 2 Diesel Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refoth_a_epd2d_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refoth_a_epd2d_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

350

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S." Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S." ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.",35,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1920" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_neti_dc_nus-z00_mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_neti_dc_nus-z00_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

351

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 2","Crude Oil",9,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 3","Natural Gas and Petroleum Gases",64,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Data 4","Other Liquids",93,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 5","Finished Products",184,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_d_r50_mbbl_m_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_r50_mbbl_m_cur.htm"

352

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 2","Crude Oil",8,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 3","Natural Gas and Petroleum Gases",57,"Monthly","9/2013","2/15/1973" ,"Data 4","Other Liquids",84,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Data 5","Finished Products",161,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_d_r10_mbblpd_m_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_r10_mbblpd_m_cur.htm"

353

,"Los Angeles Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Los Angeles Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" Los Angeles Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Los Angeles Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices",8,"Weekly","12/16/2013","6/5/2000" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_dcus_y05la_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_y05la_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

354

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alkylate " Alkylate " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S., PAD Districts, and States",46,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Data 2","U.S. Territories (not included in U.S. Total)",3,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capprod_a_(na)_8pa_bsd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capprod_a_(na)_8pa_bsd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

355

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Petroleum Products Stocks by Type" and Petroleum Products Stocks by Type" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Stocks by Type",5,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1956" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_typ_c_nus_ep00_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_typ_c_nus_ep00_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

356

Neuroimaging Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neuroimaging Research Neuroimaging Research (NIAAA Intramural & NIH) Neuroimaging research at Brookhaven is a prime example of transdisciplinary research where the expertise of chemists, physicists, and biological and medical scientists blend to apply new imaging tools to problems in human health. Brookhaven has a network of complementary brain-imaging tools: PET Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Micro MRI MicroMRI Awake Animal Imaging Awake Animal Imaging Using these imaging tools, human neuroscience research has focused on understanding how the brain effects, and is affected by: obesity and eating disorders ADHD depression Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuroimaging, and Neuropsychoimaging enrich investigations of the relationships between brain chemistry and behavior. Top of Page

357

New Barrier Coating Materials for PV Module Backsheets: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the high moisture barrier high resistivity coatings on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) have been fabricated and characterized for use in PV module back sheet applications. These thin film barriers exhibit water vapor transmission rates (WVTR) as low as 0.1 g/m2-day at 37.8 C and have shown excellent adhesion (> 10 N/mm) to both ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and PET even after filtered xenon arc lamp UV exposure. The WVTR and adhesion values for this construction are compared to and shown to be superior to candidate polymeric backsheet materials.

Barber, G. D.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S. H.; Pern, J.; McMahon, T. J.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Molecular Medicine: Synthesis and In Vivo Detection of Agents for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the project was the development of in vivo methods for the detection and evaluation of tumors in humans. The project was focused on utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to monitor the distribution and pharamacokinetics of a current boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) by labeling it with a fluorine-18, a positron emitting isotope. The PET data was then used to develop enhanced treatment planning protocols. The study also involved the synthesis of new tumor selective BNCTagents that could be labeled with radioactive nuclides for the in vivo detection of boron.

Kabalka, G. W.

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

359

High-speed digitization readout of silicon photomultipliers for time of flight positron emission tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on work to develop a system with about 100 picoseconds (ps) time resolution for time of flight positron emission tomography [TOF-PET]. The chosen photo detectors for the study were Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM's). This study was based on extensive experience in studying timing properties of SiPM's. The readout of these devices used the commercial high speed digitizer DRS4. We applied different algorithms to get the best time resolution of 155 ps Guassian (sigma) for a LYSO crystal coupled to a SiPM. We consider the work as a first step in building a prototype TOF-PET module. The field of positron-emission-tomography (PET) has been rapidly developing. But there are significant limitations in how well current PET scanners can reconstruct images, related to how fast data can be acquired, how much volume they can image, and the spatial and temporal resolution of the generated photons. Typical modern scanners now include multiple rings of detectors, which can image a large volume of the patient. In this type of scanner, one can treat each ring as a separate detector and require coincidences only within the ring, or treat the entire region viewed by the scanner as a single 3 dimensional volume. This 3d technique has significantly better sensitivity since more photon pair trajectories are accepted. However, the scattering of photons within the volume of the patient, and the effect of random coincidences limits the technique. The advent of sub-nanosecond timing resolution detectors means that there is potentially much better rejection of scattered photon events and random coincidence events in the 3D technique. In addition, if the timing is good enough, then the origin of photons pairs can be determined better, resulting in improved spatial resolution - so called 'Time-of-Flight' PET, or TOF-PET. Currently a lot of activity has occurred in applications of SiPMs for TOF-PET. This is due to the devices very good time resolution, low profile, lack of high voltage needed, and their non-sensitivity to magnetic fields. While investigations into this technique have begun elsewhere, we feel that the extensive SiPM characterization and data acquisition expertise of Fermilab, and the historical in-depth research of PET imaging at University of Chicago will combine to make significant strides in this field. We also benefit by a working relationship with the SiPM producer STMicroelectronics (STM).

Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Martens, M.; Ramberg, E.; /Fermilab; Kim, H.; Chen, C.; Kao, C.; /Chicago U.; Niessen, K.; /SUNY, Buffalo; Zatserklyaniy, A.; /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez; Mazzillo, M.; Carbone, B.; /SGS Thomson, Catania

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Pretreatment Staging Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Patients With Inflammatory Breast Cancer Influences Radiation Treatment Field Designs  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is increasingly being utilized for staging of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The purpose of this study was to define how pretreatment PET/CT studies affected postmastectomy radiation treatment (PMRT) planning decisions for IBC. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of 62 patients diagnosed with IBC between 2004 and 2009, who were treated with PMRT in our institution and who had a staging PET/CT within 3 months of diagnosis. Patients received a baseline physical examination, staging mammography, ultrasonographic examination of breast and draining lymphatics, and chest radiography; most patients also had a bone scan (55 patients), liver imaging (52 patients), breast MRI (46 patients), and chest CT (25 patients). We compared how PET/CT findings affected PMRT, assuming that standard PMRT would target the chest wall, level III axilla, supraclavicular fossa, and internal mammary chain (IMC). Any modification of target volumes, field borders, or dose prescriptions was considered a change. Results: PET/CT detected new areas of disease in 27 of the 62 patients (44%). The areas of additional disease included the breast (1 patient), ipsilateral axilla (1 patient), ipsilateral supraclavicular (4 patients), ipsilateral infraclavicular (1 patient), ipsilateral IMC (5 patients), ipsilateral subpectoral (3 patients), mediastinal (8 patients), other distant/contralateral lymph nodes (15 patients), or bone (6 patients). One patient was found to have a non-breast second primary tumor. The findings of the PET/CT led to changes in PMRT in 11 of 62 patients (17.7%). These changes included additional fields in 5 patients, adjustment of fields in 2 patients, and higher doses to the supraclavicular fossa (2 patients) and IMC (5 patients). Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed IBC, pretreatment PET/CT provides important information concerning involvement of locoregional lymph nodes, mediastinal lymph nodes, and unsuspected sites of distant metastasis. This information is important in the design of radiotherapy treatment fields and, therefore, we recommend that PET/CT be a component of initial staging for IBC.

Walker, Gary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Niikura, Naoki [Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan)] [Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Yang Wei [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rohren, Eric [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Valero, Vicente [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Woodward, Wendy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Alvarez, Ricardo H. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lucci, Anthony [Department of Surgical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ueno, Naoto T. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A., E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Temporal and spatial blood information estimation using Bayesian ICA in dynamic cerebral positron emission tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine technique that provides tomographic images of the distribution of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. We have previously proposed a method for estimating an input blood curve based on a standard ... Keywords: Arterial blood sampling, Blood volume image, Ensemble learning, Independent component analysis, Positron emission tomography

Mika Naganawa; Yuichi Kimura; Kenji Ishii; Keiichi Oda; Kiichi Ishiwata

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Coling 2008: Proceedings of the workshop on Multi-source Multilingual Information Extraction and Summarization, pages 5764 Manchester, August 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Summarization, pages 57­64 Manchester, August 2008 Automatic Annotation of Bibliographical References harald2@chalmers.se Abstract In a large-scale project to list bibliograph- ical references to all Information Extrac- tion problem: to classify short text snip- pets in various languages into a large num- ber

363

Dynamics of hydrothermal seeps from the Salton Sea geothermal system (California, USA) constrained by temperature monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water. This model is consistent with data from seeping mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan, where water of the Azerbaijan SSR, (in Russian), Azerbaijan Acad. of Sci., Baku, Azerbaijan. Kerrick, D. M., M. A. McKibben, T volcano, Azerbaijan, Mar. Pet. Geol., in press. Melard, G. (1984), Algorithm AS 197: A fast algorithm

Mazzini, Adriano

364

High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

Levin, Craig S. (Santa Monica, CA); Hoffman, Edward J. (Los Angeles, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

An Introduction of Richard Heinberg New College of California, Santa Rosa, CA, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· US is the template #12;· after US peak in 1970... · change of lifestyle? no... · import more oil resources #12;· oil industry in 1859 · Rockefellers, Standard Oil · Rockefeller Foundation has funded pet projects: molecular biology alternative energy · oil and money Ameri- can history since 1850 #12;· work

Keeling, Stephen L.

366

2004 WoIk ~hop on the Nuclear Radiology <~Physica Medical, 9Vol. XXI, Supplement 1, 2006 of Breast C.ancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004 WoIk ~hop on the Nuclear Radiology and ultrasonography. Initial experiences with combined PET (physiological imaging) and CT (anatomical lo- calization (sensitivity 68-94%, specificity 73-100%) and MRI 3-D images (sensitivity 81-96%, specifi- city 67

367

Table of ConTenTs University Calendar ......................................4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Winters* Hippity Hoppity Happy Handlers Jenna Sweetman Sophie Winter Hoof Beats Elizabeth Bergen Michele Pellicone* Jennifer Versfelt* Kayla Versfelt Pocket Pet Rescue Chelsea Obermeier* People Pick Handlers Club, Hoof Beats 4-H Horse Club, Just Kidding Goat Club, K-9 Leaders, Mad Scientists Prep Club

Ronquist, Fredrik

368

Parallel Colt: A High-Performance Java Library for Scientific Computing and Image Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major breakthroughs in chip and software design have been observed for the last nine years. In October 2001, IBM released the worlds first multicore processor: POWER4. Six years later, in February 2007, NVIDIA made a public release of CUDA SDK, ... Keywords: Deconvolution, FFT, PET, inverse problems, iterative methods, motion correction, multithreading, regularization

Piotr Wendykier; James G. Nagy

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C8, suppl6ment au n012, Tome 48, decembre 1987  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

retrouve dans la chaleur de fusion et la temperature de fusion. Abstract - The effects of crystallization slightly. A similar decreasing trend is observed in the heat of fusion and the melting point. INTRODUCTION films were prepared by melt pressing of commercial PET pellets and quenching in cold water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

370

Conservation Accomplishments Conservation Resource Advisory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% Wind 4% Biomass 1% Petroleum & Pet Coke Savings(GWH/Year) #12;Sixth Plan Conservation § Accelerated Acquisition of Cost-Effective Conservation Reduces System Cost & Risk § Plan & Budget for 1200 MWa (Next 5 Years) ­ Expect 1100 to 1400 MWa ­ Depending­ Expect

371

Managing Suburban Coyotes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coyotes are increasingly found in suburban areas, where they may cause a variety of problems. One of the main concerns is the possible transfer of rabies from coyotes to people and pets. This publication explains coyote biology and ways to avoid problems with coyotes.

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

372

Determination of the effects caused by different polymers on coal fluidity during carbonization using high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry  

SciTech Connect

The effects of blending polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), poly(ethyleneterephthalate) (PET), a flexible polyurethane (FPU), and a car shredded fluff waste (CSF) on fluidity development of a bituminous coal during carbonization have been studied by means of high-torque, small-amplitude controlled-strain rheometry and in situ high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. The most detrimental effects were caused by PET and PS, which completely destroyed the fluidity of the coal. The CSF had a deleterious effect on coal fluidity similar to that of PET, although the deleterious effect on the viscoelastic properties of the coal were less pronounced than those of PET and PS. On the contrary, the addition of 10 wt % PE caused a slight reduction in the concentration of fluid hydrogen and an increase in the minimum complex viscosity, and the addition of 10 wt % FPU reduced the concentration of fluid hydrogen without changing the viscoelastic properties of the coal. Although these results suggest that these two plastics could potentially be used as additives in coking blends without compromising coke porosity, it was found that the semicoke strengths were reduced by adding 2 wt % FPU and 5 wt % PE. Therefore, it is unlikely that more than 2 wt % of a plastic waste could be added to a coal blend without deterioration in coke quality. 35 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Miguel Castro Diaz; Lucky Edecki; Karen M. Steel; John W. Patrick; Colin E. Snape [Nottingham University, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Synthesis and reactivity of sterically congested metallacyclobutenes and metal-mediated carbon-sulfur bond activation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O 120 C C-C Bond Cl L 1. [Ir(cod)Cl] 2 Ir L 2. PPh 3 L = PPh+ (n-2)R 3 P F F C-F Bond Ni(COD) 2 1. PEt 3 F F F Et 3 P 2.by NiEt 2 (bpy) and Ni(COD)(byp) (Scheme 2-4) has been

Vlez, Carmen L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Rhythmic perception and entrainment in 5-year-old children  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

numb pull come mud peel dark nap cool 3 cut beak chip neck nut pool lot palm tell park cod dip chill dad bean curl pork loop 4 turn pen bill dart mood lunch chart bed lid teach duck barn tick chop led ban pet...

Verney, John Parker

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

375

Cobalt and Nickel-Based Organometallic Chemistry of the [N]Phenylenes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Berkeley, 2008 90) Preferential displacement of COD by ?ligands from Ni(COD)(PMe 3 ) 2 is well documented. See, e.g.Thus, Ni(PEt 3 ) 433a and Ni(COD)(PMe 3 ) 2 , 33b begin with

Padilla, Robin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with diverse communities, but there are no cities, no buildings, no fields and no forests. You've probably Laboratory 2 Vibrio bacteria, Tina Carvalho, University of Hawaii at Manoa 3 G protein, Protein Data Bank 4 FAVORITE FOOD Chocolate PETS Two adopted shelter cats, Dolce and Gabbana FAVORITE CITY Athens, Greece

Bandettini, Peter A.

377

Conferences Individual papers and tables of contents from most conferences listed can be ordered  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discoveries are declin- ing rapidly · unconventional: deep water oil natural gas liquids tar sands from production has peaked · unconventional: deep water oil natural gas liquids tar sands from Alberta shale resources #12;· oil industry in 1859 · Rockefellers, Standard Oil · Rockefeller Foundation has funded pet

Reynolds, Albert C.

378

New Continuous Isosorbide Production from Sorbitol: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Agriculture Project Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Isosorbide is a new polymer additive derived from corn (via sorbitol) that when copolymerized with polyethylene terephthalate (PET), increases the strength and rigidity of the plastic. This project will develop an economically-viable, continuous catalytic process to convert sorbitol to isosorbide.

Carde, T.

2001-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

379

International Symposium on Materials and Energy Recovery Skellefte, Sweden, June 25-26, 2003 Minimising environmental impact and improving synergism between mechanical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Ekokem Oy Waste Plant in Finland, or contained after condensation process. After the vacuum crushing to liquid) and there are no transport costs for condensed CFC either. Other hand, mainly because intensive commercially utilized for separating PVC flakes from PET (Scheirs, 1998). In this method the surfaces

Zevenhoven, Ron

380

1D-3D registration for functional nuclear imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Functional nuclear imaging systems like PET or SPECT provide unique information that is used extensively in diagnosis, but it has also proven very useful for image-guided interventions. In the case of SPECT and radio-guided surgeries, 1D gamma detectors ...

Christoph Vetter; Tobias Lasser; Thomas Wendler; Nassir Navab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Back to Article page Steven Shapin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has a fishy tail'). At Harvard, the celebrations included `free drinks, science-themed rock bands magnets, mouse mats, scatter cushions and pet bowls; the `Darwin Loves You' bumper-stickers, the `Darwin Science and the Visual Arts (at the Fitzwilliam in Cambridge and the Yale Center for British Art), rightly

Shapin, Steven

382

Probabilistic graphical model of SPECT/MRI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of PET and SPECT with MRI is an area of active research at present time and will enable new biological and pathological analysis tools for clinical applications and pre-clinical research. Image processing and reconstruction in multi-modal ... Keywords: Bayesian networks, emission tomography, molecular imaging, multi-modality

Stefano Pedemonte; Alexandre Bousse; Brian F. Hutton; Simon Arridge; Sebastien Ourselin

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Investigating the pore-scale mechanisms of microbial enhanced oil recovery Ryan T. Armstrong, Dorthe Wildenschild n  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.E., Dennis, D.M., Hitzman, D.O., 1990. Microbial enhanced waterflooding: Mink Unit project. SPE Reservoir Eng-recovery by waterflooding. J. Can. Pet. Technol. 13 (4), 54­62. Mayer, A.S., Miller, C.T., 1992. The influence of porous

Wildenschild, Dorthe

384

GRACM International Congress on Computational Mechanics Thessaloniki, 19-21 June 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the hydrophilic ROC. The authors conducted waterflooding experiments on the ROC, a method of oil extraction of wettability on waterflood oil recovery, J. Pet. Sci. Eng., 2010, 71, 169­178. 9 S. Z. Rouhani and M. S. Sohal. J. Rathmell, P. H. Braun and T. K. Perkins, Reservoir Waterflood Residual Oil Saturation From

Zabaras, Nicholas J.

385

Phytologia (December 2012) 94(3)350 TAXONOMY OF THE MULTI-SEEDED, ENTIRE LEAF TAXA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear (nrDNA- ITS) and cpDNA regions (petN-psbM, trnS-trnG, trnD-trnT, trnL-trnF). The pseudo. seravschanica, Quetta, Pakistan (ex A. Hafeez Buzdar) Adams 8483, J. p. var. turcomanica, Kopet Mtns

Adams, Robert P.

386

Outcomes of Positron Emission Tomography-Staged Clinical N3 Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Surgery, and Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the treatment outcome and efficacy of regional lymph node irradiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) and surgery in positron emission tomography (PET)-positive clinical N3 (cN3) breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with ipsilateral infraclavicular (ICL), internal mammary (IMN), or supraclavicular (SCL) lymph node involvement in the absence of distant metastases, as revealed by an initial PET scan, were retrospectively analyzed. The clinical nodal stage at diagnosis (2002 AJCC) was cN3a in 14 patients (26%), cN3b in 12 patients (22%), and cN3c in 29 patients (53%). All patients were treated with NCT, followed by mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery and subsequent radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. Results: At the median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9-80 months), 20 patients (36%) had developed treatment failures, including distant metastases either alone or combined with locoregional recurrences that included one ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), six regional failures (RF), and one case of combined IBR and RF. Only 3 patients (5.5%) exhibited treatment failure at the initial PET-positive clinical N3 lymph node. The 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival rates were 80%, 60%, and 79%, respectively. RT delivered to PET-positive IMN regions in cN3b patients and at higher doses ({>=}55 Gy) to SCL regions in cN3c patients was not associated with improved 5-year IMN/SCL relapse-free survival or DFS. Conclusion: NCT followed by surgery and RT, including the regional lymph nodes, resulted in excellent locoregional control for patients with PET-positive cN3 breast cancer. The primary treatment failure in this group was due to distant metastasis rather than RF. Neither higher-dose RT directed at PET-positive SCL nodes nor coverage of PET-positive IMN nodes was associated with additional gains in locoregional control or DFS.

Park, Hae Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan, E-mail: radiat@ncc.re.kr [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kang, Han-Sung [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung Whan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Correlation of Molecular Response as Measured by 18-FDG Positron Emission Tomography With Outcome After Chemoradiotherapy in Patients with Esophageal Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) computed tomography scans predict the pathologic complete response and disease-free and overall survival in patients with esophageal carcinoma undergoing definitive or preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The records of patients with esophageal carcinoma presenting for definitive or preoperative treatment and undergoing pre- and post-treatment 18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET-computed tomography scans were retrospectively reviewed. The histologic type, T stage, and nodal status were the variables investigated to determine a relationship with the baseline standardized uptake value (SUV) of the primary tumor at diagnosis. We also attempted to determine whether a relationship exists between the percent decrease in SUV and a pathologic complete response, overall and disease-free survival. Results: A total of 81 patients, 14 women and 67 men, underwent 18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET-computed tomography scanning before treatment and 63 also had post-treatment scans. T stage and tumor location predicted in univariate, but not multivariate, analysis for the initial SUV. Of the patients with a postchemoradiotherapy SUV of <2.5, 66% had tumor in the surgical specimen and 64% of patients had positive lymph nodes at surgery that were not imaged on the postchemoradiotherapy PET scan. A trend existed for post-treatment SUV and the days from radiotherapy to surgery to predict for a pathologic complete response (p = 0.09 and p = 0.08, respectively). The post-treatment SUV predicted for disease-free survival in the definitive chemoradiotherapy group (p = 0.01). Conclusions: A correlation was found between the depth of tumor invasion and the baseline SUV. The post-treatment SUV predicted for disease-free survival in the definitive chemoradiotherapy group. Caution should be exercised in using post-treatment PET scans to determine the necessity for surgical resection.

Konski, Andre A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)], E-mail: andre.konski@fccc.edu; Cheng, Jonathan D. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Goldberg, Melvyn [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Maurer, Alan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia PA (United States); Yu, Jian Q. [Department of Radiology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Haluszka, Oleh [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Scott, Walter [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Meropol, Neal J.; Cohen, Steven J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Freedman, Gary [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Weiner, Louis M. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Use of Molecular Imaging to Predict Clinical Outcome in Patients With Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Radiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To correlate changes in 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) (18-FDG-PET) uptake with response and disease-free survival with combined modality neoadjuvant therapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Charts were reviewed for consecutive patients with ultrasound-staged T3x to T4Nx or TxN1 rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent preoperative chemoradiation therapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC) or Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University with 18-FDG-PET scanning before and after combined-modality neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy . The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) was measured from the tumor before and 3 to 4 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy preoperatively. Logistic regression was used to analyze the association of pretreatment SUV, posttreatment SUV, and % SUV decrease on pathologic complete response (pCR), and a Cox model was fitted to analyze disease-free survival. Results: A total of 53 patients (FCCC, n = 41, RLCCC, n = 12) underwent pre- and postchemoradiation PET scanning between September 2000 and June 2006. The pCR rate was 31%. Univariate analysis revealed that % SUV decrease showed a marginally trend in predicting pCR (p = 0.08). In the multivariable analysis, posttreatment SUV was shown a predictor of pCR (p = 0.07), but the test results did not reach statistical significance. None of the investigated variables were predictive of disease-free survival. Conclusions: A trend was observed for % SUV decrease and posttreatment SUV predicting pCR in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation therapy. Further prospective study with a larger sample size is warranted to better characterize the role of 18-FDG-PET for response prediction in patients with rectal cancer.

Konski, Andre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)], E-mail: andre.konski@fccc.edu; Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sigurdson, Elin [Department of Surgery, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cohen, Steven J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Small, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Spies, Stewart [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Yu, Jian Q. [Nuclear Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wahl, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Stryker, Steven [Department of Surgery, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Meropol, Neal J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Optimal Timing for Assessment of Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Patients With Rectal Cancer: Do All Patients Benefit From Waiting Longer Than 6 Weeks?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To estimate the metabolic activity of rectal cancers at 6 and 12 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography ([{sup 18}FDG]PET/CT) imaging and correlate with response to CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal adenocarcinoma treated with long-course neoadjuvant CRT (54 Gy, 5-fluouracil-based) were prospectively studied ( (ClinicalTrials.org) identifier (NCT00254683)). All patients underwent 3 PET/CT studies (at baseline and 6 and 12 weeks from CRT completion). Clinical assessment was at 12 weeks. Maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor was measured and recorded at each PET/CT study after 1 h (early) and 3 h (late) from {sup 18}FDG injection. Patients with an increase in early SUVmax between 6 and 12 weeks were considered 'bad' responders and the others as 'good' responders. Results: Ninety-one patients were included; 46 patients (51%) were 'bad' responders, whereas 45 (49%) patients were 'good' responders. 'Bad' responders were less likely to develop complete clinical response (6.5% vs. 37.8%, respectively; P=.001), less likely to develop significant histological tumor regression (complete or near-complete pathological response; 16% vs. 45%, respectively; P=.008) and exhibited greater final tumor dimension (4.3 cm vs. 3.3 cm; P=.03). Decrease between early (1 h) and late (3 h) SUVmax at 6-week PET/CT was a significant predictor of 'good' response (accuracy of 67%). Conclusions: Patients who developed an increase in SUVmax after 6 weeks were less likely to develop significant tumor downstaging. Early-late SUVmax variation at 6-week PET/CT may help identify these patients and allow tailored selection of CRT-surgery intervals for individual patients.

Perez, Rodrigo O. [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil) [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Habr-Gama, Angelita, E-mail: gamange@uol.com.br [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sao Juliao, Guilherme P. [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sousa, Afonso H.S.; Campos, Fabio Guilherme; Imperiale, Antonio R. [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lynn, Patricio B.; Proscurshim, Igor [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nahas, Sergio Carlos [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ono, Carla Rachel; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto [Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil) [Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hospital do Coracao, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Determination of Internal Target Volume From a Single Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Scan in Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The use of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) to determine the tumor internal target volume (ITV) is usually characterized by high patient radiation exposure. The objective of this study was to propose and evaluate an approach that relies on a single static positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan to determine the ITV, thereby eliminating the need for 4D-CT and thus reduce patient radiation dose. Methods and Materials: The proposed approach is based on the concept that the observed PET image is the result of a joint convolution of an ideal PET image (free from motion and partial volume effect) with a motion-blurring kernel (MBK) and partial volume effect. In this regard, the MBK and tumor ITV are then estimated from the deconvolution of this joint model. To test this technique, phantom and patient studies were performed using different sphere/tumor sizes and motion trajectories. In all studies, a 4D-CT and a PET/CT image of the sphere/tumor were acquired. The ITV from the proposed technique was then compared to the maximum intensity projection (MIP) volume of the 4D-CT images. A Dice coefficient of the two volumes was calculated to represent the similarity between the two ITVs. Results: The average ITVs of the proposed technique were 97.2% {+-} 0.3% and 81.0% {+-} 16.7% similar to the MIP volume in the phantom and patient studies, respectively. The average dice coefficients were 0.87 {+-} 0.05 and 0.73 {+-} 0.16, respectively, for the two studies. Conclusion: Using the proposed approach, a single static PET/CT scan has the potential to replace a 4D-CT to determine the tumor ITV. This approach has the added advantage of reducing patient radiation exposure and determining the tumor MBK compared to 4D-CT/MIP-CT.

Chang Guoping; Chang Tingting [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Pan Tinsu [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Clark, John W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Mawlawi, Osama R., E-mail: OMawlawi@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

APS News 2010 | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lahsen Assoufid Named Fellow of the Optical Society Lahsen Assoufid Named Fellow of the Optical Society Lahsen Assoufid Named Fellow of the Optical Society December 16, 2010 Lahsen Assoufid of the Argonne X-ray Science Division has been made a Fellow of the Optical Society "For contributions and leadership in x-ray optics, metrology, and nanofocusing optics development." George Srajer and Jin Wang Elected Fellows of the American Physical Society George Srajer and Jin Wang Elected Fellows of the American Physical Society December 16, 2010 George Srajer and Jin Wang, both of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, have been elected Fellows of the American Physical Society. Argonne-U. of C. Collaborative Seed Grant to Fund Novel PET System Argonne-U. of C. Collaborative Seed Grant to Fund Novel PET System

392

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbbl_a.xls" mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_crd_crpdn_adc_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/27/2013 9:07:23 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production" "Sourcekey","MCRFPUS1","MCRFPP11","MCRFPFL1","MCRFPNY1","MCRFPPA1","MCRFPVA1","MCRFPWV1","MCRFPP21","MCRFPIL1","MCRFPIN1","MCRFPKS1","MCRFPKY1","MCRFP_SMI_1","MCRFPMO1","MCRFPNE1","MCRFPND1","MCRFPOH1","MCRFPOK1","MCRFPSD1","MCRFPTN1","MCRFPP31","MCRFPAL1","MCRFPAR1","MCRFPLA1","MCRFPMS1","MCRFPNM1","MCRFPTX1","MCRFP3FM1","MCRFPP41","MCRFPCO1","MCRFPMT1","MCRFPUT1","MCRFPWY1","MCRFPP51","MCRFPAK1","MCRFPAKS1","MANFPAK1","MCRFPAZ1","MCRFPCA1","MCRFPNV1","MCRFP5F1"

393

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbblpd_a.xls" mbblpd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_crd_crpdn_adc_mbblpd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/27/2013 9:07:25 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production" "Sourcekey","MCRFPUS2","MCRFPP12","MCRFPFL2","MCRFPNY2","MCRFPPA2","MCRFPVA2","MCRFPWV2","MCRFPP22","MCRFPIL2","MCRFPIN2","MCRFPKS2","MCRFPKY2","MCRFP_SMI_2","MCRFPMO2","MCRFPNE2","MCRFPND2","MCRFPOH2","MCRFPOK2","MCRFPSD2","MCRFPTN2","MCRFPP32","MCRFPAL2","MCRFPAR2","MCRFPLA2","MCRFPMS2","MCRFPNM2","MCRFPTX2","MCRFP3FM2","MCRFPP42","MCRFPCO2","MCRFPMT2","MCRFPUT2","MCRFPWY2","MCRFPP52","MCRFPAK2","MCRFPAKS2","MANFPAK2","MCRFPAZ2","MCRFPCA2","MCRFPNV2","MCRFP5F2"

394

Citizens Advisory Board's Eco Fair Blends Fun and Facts for Schoolchildren  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Citizens Advisory Board's Eco Fair Blends Fun and Facts for Citizens Advisory Board's Eco Fair Blends Fun and Facts for Schoolchildren near Paducah Site Citizens Advisory Board's Eco Fair Blends Fun and Facts for Schoolchildren near Paducah Site June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Lone Oak Middle School sixth-graders pet a mallard hen at the third annual Eco Fair May 15 in West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area. Lone Oak Middle School sixth-graders pet a mallard hen at the third annual Eco Fair May 15 in West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area. Ralph Young of Recycle Now! explains to Eco Fair attendees the value of recycling. Young is chairman of the Paducah Citizens Advisory Board, which advises the Department of Energy regarding cleanup issues at the Paducah site. Ralph Young of Recycle Now! explains to Eco Fair attendees the value of

395

Open Data Winners from the SXSW Eco Hackathon | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Open Data Winners from the SXSW Eco Hackathon Open Data Winners from the SXSW Eco Hackathon Open Data Winners from the SXSW Eco Hackathon October 25, 2012 - 5:43pm Addthis The developers of HOMEee at SXSW. This android application helps homeowners track regular maintenance and opportunities for energy efficiency in a fun way, treating your home like a digital pet that gets happier as you make smarter energy choices. | Photo by Ian Kalin. The developers of HOMEee at SXSW. This android application helps homeowners track regular maintenance and opportunities for energy efficiency in a fun way, treating your home like a digital pet that gets happier as you make smarter energy choices. | Photo by Ian Kalin. The developers of Drive Better at SXSW. The Drive Better app uses GPS to track routes taken by drivers to their destinations to improve fuel efficiency. | Photo by Ian Kalin.

396

BNL | David Schlyer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David Schlyer David Schlyer Biosciences Chairman Research Interests Cyclotron targetry development; nuclear cross-section measurement; Biomedical imaging technology Recent News David Schlyer Named Chair of Brookhaven Lab's Biosciences Department Groundbreaking Portable PET Scanner Moves Closer to Market and Medical Applications Selected Publications Biegon A., Kim S.W., Alexoff D.L., Jayne M., Carter P., Hubbard B., King P., Logan J., Muench L., Pareto D., Schlyer D., Shea C., Telang F., Wang G.J., Xu Y., and Fowler J.S. Unique distribution of aromatase in the human brain: in vivo studies with PET and [N-methyl-11C]vorozole. Synapse, 64(11):801-807 (2010). PubMed Woody C., Schlyer D., Vaska P., Tomasi D., Solis-Najera S., Rooney W., Pratte J.F., Junnarkar S., Stoll S., Master Z., Purschke M., Park S.J.,

397

BNL | Panayotis (Peter) K. Thanos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Panayotis (Peter) K. Thanos Panayotis (Peter) K. Thanos Behavioral Pharmacology & Neuroimaging See Also: Thanos Lab and RCIBI- Behavioral Pharmacology & Neuroimaging Research Interests CNS mechanisms of addiction including alcohol, drugs and obesity. In-Vivo Imaging: MicroPET, MicroMRI , MicroCT, MRI, PET. In-Vitro Imaging: Autoradiography (Beta-Imager). Gene therapy techniques in preclinical models of addiction. Behavioral Neuropharmacology of dopamine. ADHD behavioral genetics. ADHD behavioral genetics. CNS mechanisms of stress and depression Neuronal injury, regeneration, growth factors. Neuronal injury, regeneration, growth factors. Our laboratory's main areas of interest are geared towards better understanding the mechanisms of addiction, including: alcohol, drug abuse and obesity. Understanding these mechanisms will help us develop better

398

Clinical cardiac positron emission tomography: State of the art  

SciTech Connect

Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) has evolved rapidly from a relatively esoteric research tool into clinical applications providing unique, quantitative information on myocardial perfusion, metabolism, and cell membrane function and having a potentially significant impact on cardiovascular medicine. Although there are many different positron radionuclides for imaging diverse myocardial behavior, three radionuclides have reached accepted clinical utility. Cardiac PET using nitrogen-13-ammonia, rubidium-82, and fluoro-18-deoxyglucose has proved accurate and definitive in multiple university and private-practice sites for diagnosing and assessing severity and location of coronary artery disease in symptomatic or asymptomatic patients, for identifying injured but viable myocardium potentially salvageable by revascularization, and for ruling out clinically significant coronary artery stenosis with a high specificity in patients who might otherwise undergo coronary arteriography to document the absence of significant disease. 89 references.

Gould, K.L. (Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Novel cell design for combined in situ acoustic emission and x-ray diffraction study during electrochemical cycling of batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and x-ray diffraction cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been designed and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk, which acts as both an x-ray window and a current collector. In this manner, the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazards is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles, which were previously studied by the AE technique, were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells, while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

Rhodes, Kevin; Meisner, Roberta; Daniel, Claus [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., MS 6083, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37931-6083 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, 434 Dougherty Hall, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States); Kirkham, Melanie; Parish, Chad M.; Dudney, Nancy [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., MS 6083, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37931-6083 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Novel Cell Design for Combined In Situ Acoustic Emission and X-ray Diffraction of Cycling Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been devised and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk which acts as both an X-ray window and a current collector. In this manner the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazard is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles which were previously studied by the AE technique were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

Rhodes, Kevin J [ORNL; Kirkham, Melanie J [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Daniel, Claus [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

[{sup 13}N] Ammonia Cardiac Program At West Virginia University Health Sciences  

SciTech Connect

Due to the shortage of the more traditional cardiac imagining isotopes, specifically, Technicium-99, the Cardiologists at WVU have had to look to alternative imagining techniques such as PET. This has led to a dramatic increase in the use of [{sup 13}N] Ammonia PET scans at the Health Sciences Center. The patient load has gone from one to two patients one day a week to typically two to three patients, two days a week, with occasional add-on in-house patients; each patient typically requiring two target irradiations. In this paper, we will discuss the process that is being used to meet this increased demand from the production of the isotope through the final result.

Armbruster, John M. [IBA Molecular, NA, 3601 Morgantown Industrial Park, Morgantown, WV 26501 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

CT-Guided Percutaneous Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Inferior Vena Cava Wall: A Posterior Coaxial Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 72-year-old man was referred to our department with an incidentally diagnosed bronchogenic carcinoma of the right upper lobe. Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) revealed an unexpected hot spot in the ventral wall of the infrarenal segment of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Diagnostic biopsy of this lesion was performed under CT guidance with semiautomated 20G fine-needle aspiration (FNA) through a 19G coaxial needle. Cytology revealed few carcinoma cells, which led to the remarkable diagnosis of a distant metastasis to the IVC wall. Both the immediate postinterventional CT control and the further surveillance period of the patient were unremarkable; in particular, no signs of bleeding complications were detected. We conclude that coaxial FNA of an IVC wall lesion is technically feasible and may even help diagnose distant metastasis.

Kos, Sebastian, E-mail: skos@gmx.de; Bilecen, Deniz [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Radiology (Switzerland); Baumhoer, Daniel [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Pathology (Switzerland); Guillaume, Nicolas [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Jacob, Augustinus L. [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Radiology (Switzerland)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Damage and repair of irradiated mammalian brain  

SciTech Connect

We have demonstrated that focal charged particle irradiation of the rabbit brain can create well-defined lesions which are observable by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques. These are similar, in terms of location and characteristic NMR and PET features, to those that occur in the brain of about 10% of clinical research human subjects, who have been treated for intracranial vascular malformations with stereotactic radiosurgery. These lesions have been described radiologically as vasogenic edema of the deep white matter,'' and the injury is of variable intensity and temporal duration, can recede or progress to serious neurologic sequelae, and persist for a considerable period of time, frequently 18 mon to 3 yr. 8 refs., 6 figs.

Frankel, K.; Lo, E.; Phillips, M.; Fabrikant, J.; Brennan, K.; Valk, P.; Poljak, A.; Delapaz, R.; Woodruff, K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Medical Center; Brookside Hospital, San Pablo, CA (USA))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Women @ Energy: Joanna Fowler | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joanna Fowler Joanna Fowler Women @ Energy: Joanna Fowler March 12, 2013 - 1:33pm Addthis Joanna Fowler works in the Biosciences Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory as a Senior Chemist. She also holds the positions of Director of Brookhaven’s PET Program, Adjunct Professor of the Chemistry Department at SUNY at Stony Brook, Adjunct Professor of the Biomedical Engineering Department, SUNY at Stony Brook, and Adjunct Professor of the Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Joanna Fowler works in the Biosciences Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory as a Senior Chemist. She also holds the positions of Director of Brookhaven's PET Program, Adjunct Professor of the Chemistry Department at SUNY at Stony Brook, Adjunct Professor of the Biomedical Engineering

405

Citizens Advisory Board's Eco Fair Blends Fun and Facts for Schoolchildren  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Citizens Advisory Board's Eco Fair Blends Fun and Facts for Citizens Advisory Board's Eco Fair Blends Fun and Facts for Schoolchildren near Paducah Site Citizens Advisory Board's Eco Fair Blends Fun and Facts for Schoolchildren near Paducah Site June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Lone Oak Middle School sixth-graders pet a mallard hen at the third annual Eco Fair May 15 in West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area. Lone Oak Middle School sixth-graders pet a mallard hen at the third annual Eco Fair May 15 in West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area. Ralph Young of Recycle Now! explains to Eco Fair attendees the value of recycling. Young is chairman of the Paducah Citizens Advisory Board, which advises the Department of Energy regarding cleanup issues at the Paducah site. Ralph Young of Recycle Now! explains to Eco Fair attendees the value of

406

Preparing for the Unexpected  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We can reduce the risk of injury or death from disasters by becoming informed and being prepared for them. This booklet explains how to make a family disaster plan, how to compile a disaster supplies kit, where to find help, and how to get involved in community efforts for disaster preparedness. It also includes special sections on children, food safety, pets, septic systems, and farms and ranches.

Harris, Janie; Norman, Lisa; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Smith, David

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

407

Assessment of Technology Used to Protect the Privacy of Energy Usage Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update Report discusses proposed privacy enhancing technologies (PETs) that are applicable to advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) deployments.BackgroundNew laws are beginning to come into effect in California and Colorado in the United States and in European countries such as Germany. Ohio and the European Commission are contemplating additional laws.Potential privacy problems arise from the granularity and detail of ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Simplified one-pot synthesis of [.sup.18F]SFB for radiolabeling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-aqueous single pot synthesis of [.sup.18F]SFB is set forth. The [.sup.18F]SFB produced with this method is then used, for example, to label a peptide or an engineered antibody fragment (diabody) targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) as representative examples of labeled compounds for use as an injectable composition to locate abnormal tissue, specifically tumors within an animal or human using a PET scan.

Olma, Sebastian; Shen, Clifton Kwang-Fu

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

409

Fluid and Particulate systems 424514 /2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developmentsTechnology developments /1/1 PET gy pgy p Wind turbines are getting larger and larger: Until 1970sW was considered to be a maximum ­ Mid 1990s: 1.5-2.5 MW, rotor size 60 ~ 90 m ­ Then: 2 5-3 MW 70 ~ 100 m, 3 5 Turbines.jpg Systems 0 Systems 012 Tip speed

Zevenhoven, Ron

410

Labeled ALPHA4BETA2 ligands and methods therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Contemplated compositions and methods are employed to bind in vitro and in vivo to an .alpha.4.beta.2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in a highly selective manner. Where such compounds are labeled, compositions and methods employing such compounds can be used for PET and SPECT analysis. Alternatively, and/or additionally contemplated compounds can be used as antagonists, partial agonists or agonists in the treatment of diseases or conditions associated with .alpha.4.beta..beta.2 dysfunction.

Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Pichika, Ramaiah; Potkin, Steven; Leslie, Frances; Chattopadhyay, Sankha

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

411

Program on Technology Innovation: Feasibility of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Fuel AnalysisPhase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the first phase of this project, researchers evaluated the capabilities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for fuel characterization in gasification applications. A LIBS system was assembled and optimized to identify and measure the elemental spectra from the following gasifier feedstocks: bituminous coal, lignite coal, and petroleum coke, including three blends of coal and pet coke as well as coal treated with limestone. Laboratory LIBS data were acquired and processed using artificial ne...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short.

Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short.

Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Positron emission tomography and optical tissue imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mobile compact imaging system that combines both PET imaging and optical imaging into a single system which can be located in the operating room (OR) and provides faster feedback to determine if a tumor has been fully resected and if there are adequate surgical margins. While final confirmation is obtained from the pathology lab, such a device can reduce the total time necessary for the procedure and the number of iterations required to achieve satisfactory resection of a tumor with good margins.

Falen, Steven W. (Carmichael, CA); Hoefer, Richard A. (Newport News, VA); Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); McKisson, John (Hampton, VA); Kross, Brian (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA); Stolin, Alexander (Newport News, VA); Weisenberger, Andrew G. (Yorktown, VA)

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

415

3D Visualization and interaction with spatiotemporal X-ray data to minimize radiation in image-guided surgery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Image-guided surgery (IGS) often depends on X-ray imaging, since pre-operative MRI, CT and PET scans do not provide an up-to-date internal patient view during the operation. X-rays introduce hazardous radiation, but long exposures for monitoring are ... Keywords: 3D cloud, 3D visualization, spatiotemporal X-ray data, radiation, image-guided surgery, X-ray imaging, prototype IGS system, motion tracking system, interactive visualization, 2D X-rays

F. Ioakeimidou; A. Olwal; A. Nordberg; H. von Holst

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Imaging atherosclerotic plaque inflammation with [18F]- fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tracer CI Confidence interval CO2 Carbon dioxide CRP C-reactive protein CT Computed tomography DPM Decays per minute eNOS Endothelial nitric oxide synthase EDTA Ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid ETL Echo train... rabbit p Probability PBMC Peripheral blood mononuclear cells PBS Phosphate-buffered saline PDGF Platelet-derived growth factor PDW Proton density-weighted PET Positron emission tomography PK11195 1-(2-chlorophenyl...

Rudd, James H. F.

2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

417

Sarcinia aurantiaca  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sarcinia aurantiaca Sarcinia aurantiaca Name: angela Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We are doing pet microbes in college and my pet is a bacteria. The name of it is Sarcinia aurantiaca. I was looking for any information about this bacteria. thank you Replies: Dear Angela, Great idea to have a pet microbe and do research on it, but how on earth did you pick yours? I could only find the name in one Russian publication (my russian isn't too good) and the name Sarcina aurantiaca in a few publications from the 70's. The organism must have switched names since then, and I can't find it in my lists right now. What made yo choose this one? Do you know anything about it? Do you have the option to choose another? You might want to browse around in the Virtual Museum of Bacteria, www.bacteriamuseum.org Come back to me if you need to know more.

418

,"U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1987" Annual",2012,"6/30/1987" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_dwns_dc_nus_mbblpd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_dwns_dc_nus_mbblpd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:17:28 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input" "Sourcekey","M_NA_YDR_NUS_MBBLD","MCRCCUS2","MCRCHUS2","MCRDFUS2" "Date","U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input by Catalytic Reforming Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)","U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input by Catalytic Cracking Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)","U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input by Catalytic Hydrocracking Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)","U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input by Delayed and Fluid Coking Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)"

419

,"U.S. Blender Net Input"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2005" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2005" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_inpt3_dc_nus_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_inpt3_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:22:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Blender Net Input" "Sourcekey","MTXRB_NUS_1","M_EPL0_YIB_NUS_MBBL","MPPRB_NUS_1","M_EPLL_YIB_NUS_MBBL","MBNRB_NUS_1","MBIRB_NUS_1","M_EPOL_YIB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXR_YIB_NUS_MBBL","MMTRB_NUS_1","M_EPOOR_YIB_NUS_MBBL","MFERB_NUS_1","M_EPOORD_YIB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOORO_YIB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPU_YIB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOUN_YIB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOUK_YIB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOUH_YIB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOUR_YIB_NUS_MBBL","MBCRB_NUS_1","MO1RB_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_YIB_NUS_MBBL","MO3RB_NUS_1","MO4RB_NUS_1","MO2RB_NUS_1","MO5RB_NUS_1","MO6RB_NUS_1","MO7RB_NUS_1","MO9RB_NUS_1"

420

,"Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_st_a_epm0f_str_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_st_a_epm0f_str_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:32:19 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks" "Sourcekey","MGFSXUS1","MGFSXP11","MGFSXCT1","MGFS3_SDE_1","MGFSXFL1","MGFSXGA1","MGFS3_SME_1","MGFS3_SMD_1","MGFSXMA1","MGFS3_SNH_1","MGFSXNJ1","MGFSXNY1","MGFSXNC1","MGFSXPA1","MGFSXRI1","MGFSXSC1","MGFS3_SVT_1","MGFSXVA1","MGFSXWV1","MGFSXP21","MGFSXIL1","MGFSXIN1","MGFSXIA1","MGFS3_SKS_1","MGFSXKY1","MGFSXMI1","MGFSXMN1","MGFSXMO1","MGFS3_SNE_1","MGFS3_SND_1","MGFSXOH1","MGFSXOK1","MGFS3_SSD_1","MGFSXTN1","MGFSXWI1","MGFSXP31","MGFSXAL1","MGFSXAR1","MGFSXLA1","MGFSXMS1","MGFSXNM1","MGFSXTX1","MGFSXP41","MGFSXCO1","MGFSXID1","MGFSXMT1","MGFSXUT1","MGFSXWY1","MGFSXP51","MGFSXAK1","MGFSXAZ1","MGFSXCA1","MGFSXHI1","MGFSXNV1","MGFSXOR1","MGFSXWA1"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

,"Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_st_a_epm0f_str_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_st_a_epm0f_str_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:32:18 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks" "Sourcekey","MGFSXUS1","MGFSXP11","MGFSXCT1","MGFS3_SDE_1","MGFSXFL1","MGFSXGA1","MGFS3_SME_1","MGFS3_SMD_1","MGFSXMA1","MGFS3_SNH_1","MGFSXNJ1","MGFSXNY1","MGFSXNC1","MGFSXPA1","MGFSXRI1","MGFSXSC1","MGFS3_SVT_1","MGFSXVA1","MGFSXWV1","MGFSXP21","MGFSXIL1","MGFSXIN1","MGFSXIA1","MGFS3_SKS_1","MGFSXKY1","MGFSXMI1","MGFSXMN1","MGFSXMO1","MGFS3_SNE_1","MGFS3_SND_1","MGFSXOH1","MGFSXOK1","MGFS3_SSD_1","MGFSXTN1","MGFSXWI1","MGFSXP31","MGFSXAL1","MGFSXAR1","MGFSXLA1","MGFSXMS1","MGFSXNM1","MGFSXTX1","MGFSXP41","MGFSXCO1","MGFSXID1","MGFSXMT1","MGFSXUT1","MGFSXWY1","MGFSXP51","MGFSXAK1","MGFSXAZ1","MGFSXCA1","MGFSXHI1","MGFSXNV1","MGFSXOR1","MGFSXWA1"

422

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1985" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1985" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_unc_dcu_nus_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_unc_dcu_nus_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:30:03 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery Utilization and Capacity" "Sourcekey","MGIRIUS2","MOCLEUS2","MOCGGUS2","MOCIDUS2","MOPUEUS2" "Date","U.S. Gross Inputs to Refineries (Thousand Barrels Per Day)","U. S. Operable Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (Thousand Barrels per Calendar Day)","U. S. Operating Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (Thousand Barrels per Day)","U. S. Idle Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (Thousand Barrels per Day)","U.S. Percent Utilization of Refinery Operable Capacity"

423

Durability of Solar Reflective Materials with an Alumina Hard Coat Produced by Ion-Beam-Assisted Deposition: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A promising low-cost reflector material for solar concentrating power (CSP) generation is a silvered substrate protected by an alumina coating several microns thick. The alumina hard coat is deposited under high vacuum by ion-beam-assisted-deposition (IBAD). Samples of this material have been produced both by batch and continuous roll-coating processes. The substrate materials investigated were polyethylene terephthalate (PET), PET laminated to stainless-steel foil, and chrome-plated carbon steel strip. The advantage of steel strip compared to PET is that it withstands a higher process temperature and lowers the final product installation costs. In this paper, we compare the durability of batch and roll-coated reflective materials with an alumina deposition rate as high as 10 nm/s. In general, the durability of the samples is found to be excellent. Comparisons between accelerated and outdoor exposure testing results indicate that these front-surface mirrors are more susceptible to weather conditions not simulated by accelerated tests (i.e., rain, sleet, snow, etc.) than other types of solar reflectors. For long-term durability, edge protection will be necessary, and durability could be improved by the addition of an adhesion-promoting layer between the silver and alumina.

Kennedy, C. E.; Smilgys, R. V.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Highly efficient blue organic light emitting devices with indium-free transparent anode on flexible substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indium-free transparent conducting oxides may provide a lower cost solution for the transparent anode in flexible displays and energy efficient solid state lighting. We report herein a near room temperature sputtering process for generating an indium-free transparent conductive oxide (TCO) coating on a flexible substrate. Specifically, we deposited gallium-doped zinc oxide (GZO) uniformly over a 12 diameter area at room temperature on polyethylene terephthalate (PET). During deposition, the system heats to about 60oC due to the energetic sputtering conditions, without any noticeable damage to the PET substrate. The GZO films exhibit excellent physical, optical and electrical properties: roughness ~7 nm, transmittance >85% and resistivity ~ 10-3 ohm cm. Phosphorescent blue organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) were fabricated on these substrates with comparable performance (16% external quantum efficiency and 33 lm/W power efficiency at 1mA/cm2) to that of devices fabricated on GZO (or ITO) deposited on glass substrates, suggesting flexible GZO/PET substrates may be used instead of high-cost and rigid ITO and glass for flexible displays and solid state lighting.

Wang, Liang; Swensen, James S.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Matson, Dean W.; Bonham, Charles C.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Cloning and expression of soluble truncated variants of Borrelia OspA, OspB and Vmp7  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided herein for preparing soluble recombinant variations of Borrelia lipoproteins such as Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein A (OspA) and outer surface protein B (OspB), and B. hermsii variable major protein 7 (Vmp7). The method includes synthesizing a set of oligonucleotide primers, amplifying the template DNA utilizing the PCR, purifying the amplification products, cloning the amplification products into a suitable expression vector, transforming a suitable host utilizing the cloned expression vector, cultivating the transformed host for protein production and subsequently isolating and purifying the resulting protein. Also provided are soluble, recombinant variations of Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein A (OspA), outer surface protein B (OspB), and B. hermsii variable major protein 7 (Vmp7). The expression vectors harboring DNA encoding the recombinant variations, pET9-OspA, pET9-OspB and pET9-Vmp7, as well as the E. coli host BL21(DE3)/pLysS transformed with each of these vectors, are also disclosed.

Dunn, John J. (Bellport, NY); Barbour, Alan G. (San Antonio, TX)

1996-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cloning and expression of soluble truncated variants of Borrelia OspA, OspB and Vmp7  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for preparing soluble recombinant variations of Borrelia lipoproteins such as Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein A (OspA) and outer surface protein B (OspB), and B. hermsii variable major protein 7 (Vmp7). The method includes synthesizing a set of oligonucleotide primers, amplifying the template DNA utilizing the PCR, purifying the amplification products, cloning the amplification products into a suitable expression vector, transforming a suitable host utilizing the cloned expression vector, cultivating the transformed host for protein production and subsequently isolating and purifying the resulting protein. Also provided are soluble, recombinant variations of Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein A (OspA), outer surface protein B (OspB), and B. hermsii variable major protein 7 (Vmp7). The expression vectors harboring DNA encoding the recombinant variations, pET9-OspA, pET9-OspB and pET9-Vmp7, as well as the E. coli host BL21(DE3)/pLysS transformed with each of these vectors, are also disclosed. 38 figs.

Dunn, J.J.; Barbour, A.G.

1996-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

427

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1936" Annual",2012,"6/30/1936" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_refp_dc_nus_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_refp_dc_nus_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:25:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production" "Sourcekey","MTTRPUS1","MLPRPUS1","METRPUS1","MENRPUS1","MEYRPUS1","MPRRPUS1","MPARP_NUS_1","MPLRPUS1","MBNRPUS1","MBURPUS1","MBYRPUS1","MBIRPUS1","MIIRPUS1","MIYRPUS1","MGFRPUS1","MGRRPUS1","MG1RP_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_YPR_NUS_MBBL","MG4RP_NUS_1","MG5RP_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_YPR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPM0CAG55_YPR_NUS_MBBL","MG6RP_NUS_1","MGARPUS1","MKJRPUS1","MKERPUS1","MDIRPUS1","MD0RP_NUS_1","MD1RP_NUS_1","MDGRPUS1","MRERPUS1","MRLRPUS1","MRMRPUS1","MRGRPUS1","MPCRPUS1","MNFRPUS1","MOTRPUS1","MNSRPUS1","MLURPUS1","MWXRPUS1","MCKRPUS1","MCMRPUS1","MCORPUS1","MAPRPUS1","MSGRPUS1","MMSRPUS1","MPGRPUS1"

428

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_inpt_dc_nus_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_inpt_dc_nus_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:19:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery & Blender Net Input" "Sourcekey","MTTRIUS1","MCRRIUS1","MNGRIUS1","MPPRIUS1","MLPRIUS1","METRIUS1","MBNRIUS1","MBIRIUS1","MOLRIUS1","MOHRIUS1","M_EPOOOH_YIR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_YIR_NUS_MBBL","MMTRIUS1","MOORIUS1","M_EPOOR_YIR_NUS_MBBL","MFERIUS1","M_EPOORD_YIR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOORO_YIR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOOXH_YIR_NUS_MBBL","MUORIUS1","MNLRI_NUS_1","MKORI_NUS_1","MH1RI_NUS_1","MRURI_NUS_1","MBCRIUS1","MO1RI_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_YIR_NUS_MBBL","MO3RI_NUS_1","MO4RI_NUS_1","MO2RI_NUS_1","MO5RI_NUS_1","MO6RI_NUS_1","MO7RI_NUS_1","MO9RI_NUS_1","MBARIUS1"

429

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1936" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1936" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_refp_dc_nus_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_refp_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:25:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production" "Sourcekey","MTTRPUS1","MLPRPUS1","METRPUS1","MENRPUS1","MEYRPUS1","MPRRPUS1","MPARP_NUS_1","MPLRPUS1","MBNRPUS1","MBURPUS1","MBYRPUS1","MBIRPUS1","MIIRPUS1","MIYRPUS1","MGFRPUS1","MGRRPUS1","MG1RP_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_YPR_NUS_MBBL","MG4RP_NUS_1","MG5RP_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_YPR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPM0CAG55_YPR_NUS_MBBL","MG6RP_NUS_1","MGARPUS1","MKJRPUS1","MKERPUS1","MDIRPUS1","MD0RP_NUS_1","MD1RP_NUS_1","MDGRPUS1","MRERPUS1","MRLRPUS1","MRMRPUS1","MRGRPUS1","MPCRPUS1","MNFRPUS1","MOTRPUS1","MNSRPUS1","MLURPUS1","MWXRPUS1","MCKRPUS1","MCMRPUS1","MCORPUS1","MAPRPUS1","MSGRPUS1","MMSRPUS1","MPGRPUS1"

430

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

65,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1956" 65,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1956" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_a_ep00_mbbl_m_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_a_ep00_mbbl_m_cur.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/27/2013 6:57:53 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Supply and Disposition" "Sourcekey","MTTFPUS1","M_EP00_YNP_NUS_MBBL","MTTRPUS1","MTTIMUS1","MTTUA_NUS_1","MTTSCUS1","MTTRIUS1","MTTEXUS1","MTTUPUS1","MTTSTUS1","MTTFPP11","M_EP00_YNP_R10_MBBL","MTTRPP11","MTTIMP11","MTTNRP11","MTTUA_R10_1","MTTSCP11","MTTRIP11","MTTEXP11","MTTUPP11","MTTSTP11","MTTFPP21","M_EP00_YNP_R20_MBBL","MTTRPP21","MTTIMP21","MTTNRP21","MTTUA_R20_1","MTTSCP21","MTTRIP21","MTTEXP21","MTTUPP21","MTTSTP21","MTTFPP31","M_EP00_YNP_R30_MBBL","MTTRPP31","MTTIMP31","MTTNRP31","MTTUA_R30_1","MTTSCP31","MTTRIP31","MTTEXP31","MTTUPP31","MTTSTP31","MTTFPP41","M_EP00_YNP_R40_MBBL","MTTRPP41","MTTIMP41","MTTNRP41","MTTUA_R40_1","MTTSCP41","MTTRIP41","MTTEXP41","MTTUPP41","MTTSTP41","MTTFPP51","M_EP00_YNP_R50_MBBL","MTTRPP51","MTTIMP51","MTTNRP51","MTTUA_R50_1","MTTSCP51","MTTRIP51","MTTEXP51","MTTUPP51","MTTSTP51"

431

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

59,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1963" 59,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1963" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_sum_snd_a_ep00_mbblpd_m_cur.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_a_ep00_mbblpd_m_cur.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/27/2013 6:57:55 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Supply and Disposition" "Sourcekey","MTTFPUS2","M_EP00_YNP_NUS_MBBLD","MTTRPUS2","MTTIMUS2","MTTUA_NUS_2","MTTSCUS2","MTTRIUS2","MTTEXUS2","MTTUPUS2","MTTFPP12","M_EP00_YNP_R10_MBBLD","MTTRPP12","MTTIMP12","MTTNRP12","MTTUA_R10_2","MTTSCP12","MTTRIP12","MTTEXP12","MTTUPP12","MTTFPP22","M_EP00_YNP_R20_MBBLD","MTTRPP22","MTTIMP22","MTTNRP22","MTTUA_R20_2","MTTSCP22","MTTRIP22","MTTEXP22","MTTUPP22","MTTFPP32","M_EP00_YNP_R30_MBBLD","MTTRPP32","MTTIMP32","MTTNRP32","MTTUA_R30_2","MTTSCP32","MTTRIP32","MTTEXP32","MTTUPP32","MTTFPP42","M_EP00_YNP_R40_MBBLD","MTTRPP42","MTTIMP42","MTTNRP42","MTTUA_R40_2","MTTSCP42","MTTRIP42","MTTEXP42","MTTUPP42","MTTFPP52","M_EP00_YNP_R50_MBBLD","MTTRPP52","MTTIMP52","MTTNRP52","MTTUA_R50_2","MTTSCP52","MTTRIP52","MTTEXP52","MTTUPP52"

432

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_pipe_dc_r20-r10_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_pipe_dc_r20-r10_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:11:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Pipeline" "Sourcekey","MTTMPP2P11","MCRMPP2P11","MPEMPP2P11","MPPMP_R20-R10_1","MLPMPP2P11","MBCMPP2P11","MO5MP_R20-R10_1","MO6MP_R20-R10_1","MO7MP_R20-R10_1","MO9MP_R20-R10_1","M_EPOOR_LMV_R20-R10_MBBL","M_EPOORD_LMV_R20-R10_MBBL","MGFMPP2P11","MGRMPP2P11","MG4MP_R20-R10_1","MG6MP_R20-R10_1","MKJMPP2P11","MKEMPP2P11","MDIMPP2P11","MD0MP_R20-R10_1","MD1MP_R20-R10_1","MDGMPP2P11"

433

,"U.S. Refinery Net Input"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/2005" 2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/2005" ,"Data 2","Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts",1,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1986" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_inpt2_dc_nus_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_inpt2_dc_nus_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:21:04 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Refinery Net Input" "Sourcekey","MTTRO_NUS_1","MCRRO_NUS_1","MNGRO_NUS_1","MPPRO_NUS_1","MLPRO_NUS_1","MBNRO_NUS_1","MBIRO_NUS_1","MOLRO_NUS_1","MOHRO_NUS_1","M_EPOOOH_YIY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MMTRO_NUS_1","MOORO_NUS_1","M_EPOOR_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MFERO_NUS_1","M_EPOORD_YIY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOOXH_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MUORO_NUS_1","MNLRO_NUS_1","MKORO_NUS_1","MH1RO_NUS_1","MRURO_NUS_1","MBCRO_NUS_1","MO1RO_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MO3RO_NUS_1","MO4RO_NUS_1","MO5RO_NUS_1","MO6RO_NUS_1","MO7RO_NUS_1","MO9RO_NUS_1","MBARO_NUS_1"

434

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1870" Annual",2012,"6/30/1870" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_exp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_exp_dc_nus-z00_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:27:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTEXUS1","MCREXUS1","MNGEXUS1","MPPEXUS1","MLPEXUS1","METEXUS1","MPREXUS1","MBNEXUS1","MBIEXUS1","MOLEXUS1","MOHEXUS1","M_EPOOXXFE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MMTEX_NUS-Z00_1","MOOEX_NUS-Z00_1","M_EPOOR_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOOXE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","M_EPOORDB_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MBCEXUS1","MO1EX_NUS-Z00_1","MO5EX_NUS-Z00_1","MBAEXUS1","MTPEXUS1","MGFEXUS1","MGREXUS1","MG4EX_NUS-Z00_1","MGAEXUS1","MKJEXUS1","MKEEXUS1","MDIEXUS1","M_EPDXL0_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBL","MD1EX_NUS-Z00_1","MDGEXUS1","MREEXUS1","MNFEXUS1","MOTEXUS1","MNSEXUS1","MLUEXUS1","MWXEXUS1","MCKEXUS1","MAPEXUS1","MMSEXUS1"

435

,"U.S. Refinery Net Input"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2005" 3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2005" ,"Data 2","Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts",1,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1986" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_inpt2_dc_nus_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_inpt2_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:21:05 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Refinery Net Input" "Sourcekey","MTTRO_NUS_1","MCRRO_NUS_1","MNGRO_NUS_1","MPPRO_NUS_1","MLPRO_NUS_1","MBNRO_NUS_1","MBIRO_NUS_1","MOLRO_NUS_1","MOHRO_NUS_1","M_EPOOOH_YIY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MMTRO_NUS_1","MOORO_NUS_1","M_EPOOR_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MFERO_NUS_1","M_EPOORD_YIY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOORO_YIY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOOXH_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MUORO_NUS_1","MNLRO_NUS_1","MKORO_NUS_1","MH1RO_NUS_1","MRURO_NUS_1","MBCRO_NUS_1","MO1RO_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MO3RO_NUS_1","MO4RO_NUS_1","MO5RO_NUS_1","MO6RO_NUS_1","MO7RO_NUS_1","MO9RO_NUS_1","MBARO_NUS_1"

436

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" 60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skr_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skr_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:41:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery " "Sourcekey","MTTRSUS1","MCRRSUS1","MPERSUS1","MPPRSUS1","MLPRSUS1","METRSUS1","MPRRSUS1","MBNRSUS1","MBIRSUS1","M_EPOOOXH_SKR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MMTRSUS1","MOORSUS1","M_EPOOR_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MFERSUS1","M_EPOORD_SKR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOORO_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MUORSUS1","MNLRSUS1","MKORSUS1","MH1RSUS1","MRURSUS1","MBCRSUS1","MO1RS_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MO3RS_NUS_1","MO4RS_NUS_1","MO5RS_NUS_1","MO6RS_NUS_1","MO7RS_NUS_1","MO9RS_NUS_1","MBARSUS1","MGFRSUS1","MGRRSUS1","MG1RS_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MG4RS_NUS_1","MG5RS_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MG6RS_NUS_1","MGARSUS1","MKJRSUS1","MKERSUS1","MDIRSUS1","MD0RS_NUS_1","MD1RS_NUS_1","MDGRSUS1","MRERSUS1","MRLRSUS1","MRMRSUS1","MRGRSUS1","MPCRS_NUS_1","MNFRSUS1","MOTRSUS1","MNSRSUS1","MLURSUS1","MWXRSUS1","MCKRSUS1","MAPRSUS1","MMSRSUS1"

437

,"U.S. Blender Net Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2005" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2005" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_refp3_dc_nus_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_refp3_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:29:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Blender Net Production" "Sourcekey","M_EP00_YPB_NUS_MBBL","MGFRZ_NUS_1","MGRRZ_NUS_1","MG1RZ_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_YPB_NUS_MBBL","MG4RZ_NUS_1","MG5RZ_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPM0CAG55_YPB_NUS_MBBL","MG6RZ_NUS_1","M_EPPV_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPJK_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPK_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPD0_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPDXL0_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPDM10_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPD00H_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPR_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPRX_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPRY_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPRH_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPNS_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPL_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPA_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPM_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPG_YPB_NUS_MBBL"

438

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

56,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" 56,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skr_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skr_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:41:31 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery " "Sourcekey","MTTRSUS1","MCRRSUS1","MPERSUS1","MPPRSUS1","MLPRSUS1","METRSUS1","MPRRSUS1","MBNRSUS1","MBIRSUS1","M_EPOOOXH_SKR_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MMTRSUS1","MOORSUS1","M_EPOOR_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MFERSUS1","M_EPOORD_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MUORSUS1","MNLRSUS1","MKORSUS1","MH1RSUS1","MRURSUS1","MBCRSUS1","MO1RS_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MO3RS_NUS_1","MO5RS_NUS_1","MO6RS_NUS_1","MO9RS_NUS_1","MBARSUS1","MGFRSUS1","MGRRSUS1","MG1RS_NUS_1","MG4RS_NUS_1","MG5RS_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_SKR_NUS_MBBL","MG6RS_NUS_1","MGARSUS1","MKJRSUS1","MKERSUS1","MDIRSUS1","MD0RS_NUS_1","MD1RS_NUS_1","MDGRSUS1","MRERSUS1","MRLRSUS1","MRMRSUS1","MRGRSUS1","MPCRS_NUS_1","MNFRSUS1","MOTRSUS1","MNSRSUS1","MLURSUS1","MWXRSUS1","MCKRSUS1","MAPRSUS1","MMSRSUS1"

439

,"U.S. Blender Net Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/2005" Annual",2012,"6/30/2005" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_refp3_dc_nus_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_refp3_dc_nus_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:29:28 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Blender Net Production" "Sourcekey","M_EP00_YPB_NUS_MBBL","MGFRZ_NUS_1","MGRRZ_NUS_1","MG1RZ_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_YPB_NUS_MBBL","MG4RZ_NUS_1","MG5RZ_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPM0CAG55_YPB_NUS_MBBL","MG6RZ_NUS_1","M_EPPV_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPJK_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPK_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPD0_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPDXL0_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPDM10_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPD00H_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPR_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPRX_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPRY_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPRH_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPNS_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPL_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPA_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPM_YPB_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPG_YPB_NUS_MBBL"

440

Pelvic Lymph Node Status Assessed by 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Predicts Low-Risk Group for Distant Recurrence in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: A Prospective Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop a prediction model to identify a low-risk group for distant recurrence in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated by concurrent chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Prospectively, 62 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were recruited as a training cohort. Clinical variables and parameters obtained from positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging were analyzed by logistic regression. For the test set, 54 patients were recruited independently. To identify the low-risk group, negative likelihood ratio (LR) less than 0.2 was set to be a cutoff. Results: Among the training cohort, multivariate logistic analysis revealed that advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage and a high serum squamous cancer cell (SCC) antigen level were significant risk factors (p = 0.015 and 0.025, respectively). Using the two parameters, criteria to determine a low-risk subset for distant recurrence were postulated: (1) FIGO Stage IIB or less and (2) pretreatment SCC < 2.4 (Model A). Positive pelvic node on PET completely predicted all cases with distant recurrence and thus was considered as another prediction model (Model B). In the test cohort, although Model A did not showed diagnostic performance, Model B completely predicted all cases with distant recurrence and showed a sensitivity of 100% with negative LR of 0. Across the training and test cohort (n = 116), the false negative rate was 0 (95% confidence interval 0%-7.6%). Conclusions: Positive pelvic node on PET is a useful marker in prediction of distant recurrence in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who are treated with concurrent chemoradiation.

Kang, Sokbom, E-mail: sokbom@ncc.re.k [Center for Uterine Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jung-Yeol; Lim, Myung-Chul; Song, Yong-Joong; Park, Se-Hyun [Center for Uterine Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok-Ki [Center for Diagnostic Oncology, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Dae-Chul; Seo, Sang-Soo; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Sang-Yoon [Center for Uterine Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Polysiloxane Encapsulation of High Level Calcine Waste for Transportation or Disposal  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an experimental study investigating the potential uses for silicon-polymer encapsulation of High Level Calcine Waste currently stored within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The study investigated two different applications of silicon polymer encapsulation. One application uses silicon polymer to produce a waste form suitable for disposal at a High Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility directly, and the other application encapsulates the calcine material for transportation to an offsite melter for further processing. A simulated waste material from INTEC, called pilot scale calcine, which contained hazardous materials but no radioactive isotopes was used for the study, which was performed at the University of Akron under special arrangement with Orbit Technologies, the originators of the silicon polymer process called Polymer Encapsulation Technology (PET). This document first discusses the PET process, followed by a presentation of past studies involving PET applications to waste problems. Next, the results of an experimental study are presented on encapsulation of the INTEC calcine waste as it applies to transportation or disposal of calcine waste. Results relating to long-term disposal include: 1) a characterization of the pilot calcine waste; 2) Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing of an optimum mixture of pilot calcine, polysiloxane and special additives; and, 3) Material Characterization Center testing MCC-1P evaluation of the optimum waste form. Results relating to transportation of the calcine material for a mixture of maximum waste loading include: compressive strength testing, 10-m drop test, melt testing, and a Department of Transportation (DOT) oxidizer test.

Loomis, Guy George

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Silicon-Polymer Encapsulation of High-Level Calcine Waste for Transportation or Disposal  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an experimental study investigating the potential uses for silicon-polymer encapsulation of High Level Calcine Waste currently stored within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The study investigated two different applications of silicon polymer encapsulation. One application uses silicon polymer to produce a waste form suitable for disposal at a High Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility directly, and the other application encapsulates the calcine material for transportation to an offsite melter for further processing. A simulated waste material from INTEC, called pilot scale calcine, which contained hazardous materials but no radioactive isotopes was used for the study, which was performed at the University of Akron under special arrangement with Orbit Technologies, the originators of the silicon polymer process called Polymer Encapsulation Technology (PET). This document first discusses the PET process, followed by a presentation of past studies involving PET applications to waste problems. Next, the results of an experimental study are presented on encapsulation of the INTEC calcine waste as it applies to transportation or disposal of calcine waste. Results relating to long-term disposal include: (1) a characterization of the pilot calcine waste; (2) Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing of an optimum mixture of pilot calcine, polysiloxane and special additives; and, (3) Material Characterization Center testing MCC-1P evaluation of the optimum waste form. Results relating to transportation of the calcine material for a mixture of maximum waste loading include: compressive strength testing, 10-m drop test, melt testing, and a Department of Transportation (DOT) oxidizer test.

G. G. Loomis; C. M. Miller; J. A. Giansiracusa; R. Kimmel; S. V. Prewett

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Metabolic Imaging Biomarkers of Postradiotherapy Xerostomia  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Xerostomia is a major complication of head and neck radiotherapy (RT). Available xerostomia measures remain flawed. [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET-CT) is routinely used for staging and response assessment of head and neck cancer. We investigated quantitative measurement of parotid gland FDG uptake as a potential biomarker for post-RT xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Ninety-eight locally advanced head and neck cancer patients receiving definitive RT underwent baseline and post-RT FDG-PET-CT on a prospective imaging trial. A separate validation cohort of 14 patients underwent identical imaging while prospectively enrolled in a second trial collecting sialometry and patient-reported outcomes. Radiation dose and pre- and post-RT standard uptake values (SUVs) for all voxels contained within parotid gland ROI were deformably registered. Results: Average whole-gland or voxel-by-voxel models incorporating parotid D{sub Met} (defined as the pretreatment parotid SUV weighted by dose) accurately predicted posttreatment changes in parotid FDG uptake (e.g., fractional parotid SUV). Fractional loss of parotid FDG uptake closely paralleled early parotid toxicity defined by posttreatment salivary output (p < 0.01) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer xerostomia scores (p < 0.01). Conclusions: In this pilot series, loss of parotid FDG uptake was strongly associated with acute clinical post-RT parotid toxicity. D{sub Met} may potentially be used to guide function-sparing treatment planning. Prospective validation of FDG-PET-CT as a convenient, quantifiable imaging biomarker of parotid function is warranted and ongoing.

Cannon, Blake [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Schwartz, David L., E-mail: dschwartz3@nshs.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, New York (United States); Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York (United States); Dong Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1913" Annual",2012,"6/30/1913" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_sae_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_sae_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:41:10 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Total Stocks " "Sourcekey","MTTSTUS1","MCRSTUS1","MAOSTUS1","MPPSTUS1","MLPSTUS1","METSTUS1","MPRSTUS1","MBNSTUS1","MBISTUS1","M_EPOOOXH_SAE_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_SAE_NUS_MBBL","MMTSTUS1","MOOSTUS1","M_EPOOR_SAE_NUS_MBBL","MFESTUS1","M_EPOORD_SAE_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOORO_SAE_NUS_MBBL","MUOSTUS1","MNLST_NUS_1","MKOST_NUS_1","MH1ST_NUS_1","MRUST_NUS_1","MBCSTUS1","MO1ST_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_SAE_NUS_MBBL","MO3ST_NUS_1","MO4ST_NUS_1","MO2ST_NUS_1","MO5ST_NUS_1","MO6ST_NUS_1","MO7ST_NUS_1","MO9ST_NUS_1","MBASTUS1","MGFSTUS1","MGRSTUS1","MG1ST_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_SAE_NUS_MBBL","MG4ST_NUS_1","MG5ST_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_SAE_NUS_MBBL","MG6ST_NUS_1","MGASTUS1","MKJSTUS1","MKESTUS1","MDISTUS1","MD0ST_NUS_1","MD1ST_NUS_1","MDGSTUS1","MRESTUS1","MRLSTUS1","MRMSTUS1","MRGSTUS1","MPCST_NUS_1","MNFSTUS1","MOTSTUS1","MNSSTUS1","MLUSTUS1","MWXSTUS1","MCKSTUS1","MAPSTUS1","MMSSTUS1"

445

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1986" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1986" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_pipe_dc_r20-r10_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_pipe_dc_r20-r10_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:11:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Pipeline" "Sourcekey","MTTMPP2P11","MCRMPP2P11","MPEMPP2P11","MPPMP_R20-R10_1","MLPMPP2P11","MBCMPP2P11","MO5MP_R20-R10_1","MO6MP_R20-R10_1","MO7MP_R20-R10_1","MO9MP_R20-R10_1","M_EPOOR_LMV_R20-R10_MBBL","M_EPOORD_LMV_R20-R10_MBBL","MGFMPP2P11","MGRMPP2P11","MG4MP_R20-R10_1","MG6MP_R20-R10_1","MKJMPP2P11","MKEMPP2P11","MDIMPP2P11","MD0MP_R20-R10_1","MD1MP_R20-R10_1","MDGMPP2P11"

446

Physics Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications Applications Technetium-99m radioisotope generator developed at Brookhaven. Numerous physics-related programs at Brookhaven have yielded major advances in medicine and various technologies. Brookhaven's nuclear medicine program, which began in the 1950s, uses the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer to make radioisotopes for nuclear medicine diagnostics and treatment throughout the world. Today, more than 85 percent of all imaging examinations worldwide use one of the radioisotopes developed at Brookhaven. At Brookhaven's Center for Translational Neuroimaging, researchers can peer into a living brain through the use of various imaging modalities, including positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and optical imaging. Such research has led to a new understanding of

447

Components of the E. coli envelope are affected by and can react to protein over-production in the cytoplasm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.Page 1 of 11 (page number not for citation purposes) protein and further contribute to changes in cellular exchanges... fluorescent protein (GFP) were expressed from the pET-19b plasmid (Novagen, US). Standard growth medium was 0.5% NaCl Luria broth [LB] supplemented with 100 ?g/ml ampicillin [LB-amp] and agar (18 g/l), when requested. Protein pro- duction was carried out...

Villa, Riccardo; Lotti, Marina; Gatti-Lafranconi, Pietro

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

448

Synthesis and magnetic reversal of bi-conical Ni nanostructures  

SciTech Connect

Template synthesis in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes has been used to grow hour glass shaped nickel nanowires with a constriction in the range of tens of nanometers at the center. Anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements have been performed on a single nanowire to follow magnetization reversal of the structure. The results are explained via 3D micromagnetic simulations showing the appearance of a complex vortex state close to the constriction whose propagation depends on the angle between the cone axis and the applied field. The interest of this original growth process for spintronics is discussed.

Biziere, N. [Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, CEA/CNRS/Ecole Polytechnique, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Lassalle Ballier, R.; Viret, M. [Service de Physique de l' Etat Condense, DSM/IRAMIS/SPEC, CEA Saclay URA CNRS 2464, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Clochard, M. C.; Wade, T. L.; Wegrowe, J. E. [Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, CEA/CNRS/Ecole Polytechnique, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Balanzat, E. [CIMAP, Unite Mixte CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN, F-14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer Detection August 05, 2013 Researcher Maria Cekanova analyzes the neutron radiographs of a canine breast tumor (black color in top image of monitor screen) using the software to visualize in color the various intensities of neutron transmissions through the breast tissue. ORNL and University of Tennessee collaboration now analyzing first results from neutron radiographs of cancerous tissue samples Today's range of techniques for detection of breast and other cancers include mammography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, positron emission tomography (PET), and optical imaging. Each technology has advantages and disadvantages, with limitations either

450

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline, All Grades " Gasoline, All Grades " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Retail",1,"Weekly","12/16/2013","4/5/1993" ,"Data 2","Regions",9,"Weekly","12/16/2013","4/5/1993" ,"Data 3","States",9,"Weekly","12/16/2013","5/22/2000" ,"Data 4","Cities",10,"Weekly","12/16/2013","6/5/2000" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_a_epm0_pte_dpgal_w.xls"

451

,"U.S. Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Motor Gasoline Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Users, Total Refiner Motor Gasoline Sales Volumes" Users, Total Refiner Motor Gasoline Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Products for Refiner Gasoline Volumes",1,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Data 2","by Grade",3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Data 3","by Formulation",3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refmg_d_nus_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls"

452

,"U.S. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products" Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Motor Gasoline by Grade and Formulation",13,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Data 2","Motor Gasoline by Formulation",3,"Monthly","9/2013","10/15/1993" ,"Data 3","Other Products",17,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","11/26/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_prim_dcu_nus_m.xls"

453

Positron Emission Tomography for Assessing Local Failure After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We analyzed whether positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography standardized uptake values (SUVs) after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) could predict local recurrence (LR) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: This study comprised 128 patients with Stage I (n = 68) or isolated recurrent/secondary parenchymal (n = 60) NSCLC treated with image-guided SBRT to 50 Gy over 4 consecutive days; prior radiotherapy was allowed. PET/computed tomography scans were obtained before therapy and at 1 to 6 months after therapy, as well as subsequently as clinically indicated. Continuous variables were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis tests and categorical variables with Pearson chi-square or Fisher exact tests. Actuarial local failure rates were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 6-71 months), the actuarial 1-, 2-, and 3-year local control rates were 100%, 98.5%, and 98.5%, respectively, in the Stage I group and 95.8%, 87.6%, and 85.8%, respectively, in the recurrent group. The cumulative rates of regional nodal recurrence and distant metastasis were 8.8% (6 of 68) and 14.7% (10 of 68), respectively, for the Stage I group and 11.7% (7 of 60) and 16.7% (10 of 60), respectively, for the recurrent group. Univariate analysis showed that SUVs obtained 12.1 to 24 months after treatment for the Stage I group (p = 0.007) and 6.1 to 12 months and 12.1 to 24 months after treatment for the recurrent group were associated with LR (p < 0.001 for both). Of the 128 patients, 17 (13.3%) had ipsilateral consolidation after SBRT but no elevated metabolic activity on PET; none had LR. The cutoff maximum SUV of 5 was found to have 100% sensitivity, 91% specificity, a 50% positive predictive value, and a 100% negative predictive value for predicting LR. Conclusions: PET was helpful for distinguishing SBRT-induced consolidation from LR. SUVs obtained more than 6 months after SBRT for NSCLC were associated with local failure. A maximum SUV greater than 5, especially at more than 6 months after SBRT, should prompt biopsy to rule out LR.

Zhang Xu; Liu Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pan, Tinsu [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chuang, Hubert H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

New Cyclotron Targetry to Enhance F-18 clinical Position Emission Tomography  

SciTech Connect

This project proposes to develop cyclotron targets that produce F-18 for clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) at significantly higher rates than that available from current targetry. This production rate of 18F is directly proportional to the beam current. Higher beam currents would result in increased 18F production but would be accompanied by higher heat loads to the target. The beam power available in most commercial cyclotrons exceeds the heat removal capacity of current target technology by a factor of two to four, significantly limiting the production rate of Fluorine-18.

J. Michael Doster

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

E.A. Gilbert Generating Unit, Maysville, Kentucky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new, 368-MW E.A. Gilbert Generating Unit at the H.L. Spurlock Power Station in Maysville isn't just the cleanest coal-burning plant in Kentucky. Thanks to its circulating liquidized bed boiler from Alstom, it is one of the cleanest in the US. The boiler's ability to burn a wide variety of coals and even pet coke, biomass, or tire-derived fuels - also was a factor in Power's decision to name E.A. Gilbert a Top Plant of 2005. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Wicker, K.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Symmetric and asymmetric halogen-containing metallocarboranylporphyrins and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to low toxicity boronated compounds and methods for their use in the treatment, visualization, and diagnosis of tumors. More specifically, the present invention is directed to low toxicity halogenated, carborane-containing 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin compounds and methods for their use particularly in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of tumors of the brain, head and neck, and surrounding tissue. The invention is also directed to using these halogenated, carborane-containing tetraphenylporphyrin compounds in methods of tumor imaging and/or diagnosis such as MRI, SPECT, or PET.

Miura, Michiko; Wu, Haitao

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

457

Carboranylporphyrins and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to low toxicity boronated compounds and methods for their use in the treatment, visualization, and diagnosis of tumors. More specifically, the present invention is directed to low toxicity carborane-containing porphyrin compounds with halide, amine, or nitro groups and methods for their use particularly in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), X-ray radiation therapy (XRT), and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of tumors of the brain, head and neck, and surrounding tissue. The invention is also directed to using these carborane-containing porphyrin compounds in methods of tumor imaging and/or diagnosis such as MRI, SPECT, or PET.

Miura, Michiko; Renner, Mark W

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

458

Plant maintenance and outage management issue, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the January-February issue is on plant maintenance and outage managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Dawn of a new era, by Joe Colvin, Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI); Plant profile: Beloyarsk NPP, Russia, by Nikolai Oshkanov, Beloyarsk NPP, Russia; Improving economic performance, by R. Spiegelberg-Planner, John De Mella, and Marius Condu, IAEA; A model for improving performance, by Pet Karns, MRO Software; ASME codes and standards, by Shannon Burke, ASME International; and, Refurbishment programs, by Craig S. Irish, Nuclear Logistics, Inc.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Using Advanced Imaging to Study Fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although mammals are the most commonly utilized laboratory animal, laboratory animal medicine continually seeks to replace them with animals of lower phylogenic classification. Fish are becoming increasingly important as investigators seek alternative animal models for research. Fish can provide an economical and feasible alternative to typical mammalian models; moreover, many fish, which have comparatively short life spans, can easily reproduce in the laboratory. One key area of animal health research in which fish have been underutilized is the field of advanced imaging. Although many images of fish have been captured through the use of computed tomography (CT), radiography, and ultrasonography, these images have been primarily utilized for anatomical study. In addition, fish have never before been studied with positron emission tomography/ computed tomography (PET/CT). My objectives were to determine if these imaging techniques can be used to obtain physiological information from fish, therefore making it more likely that fish can be utilized as replacement animals using these new imaging techniques (CT, PET/CT). I performed two different types of studies to assess the potential application of advanced imaging techniques to fish. In the first experiment, microCT was used to characterize otolith deformity in vitamin C deficient captive-raised red drum and relate the deformity to behavioral and physiological changes. I found that the normal and abnormal fish had statistically significant differences in behavior, cortisol levels, and otolith volume and density. MicroCT assessment of abnormal fish revealed operculum abnormalities, malocclusions, and several types of otolith malformations. Therefore, the affected fish had not only an abnormal skeletal appearance but also significantly abnormal behavior and cortisol responses. In the second experiment, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/ computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) was used to quantify glucose uptake in select organs prior to carcinogenesis studies in fish. The quantified glucose uptake was compared to published data on humans, mice, and dogs. Rapid, quantifiable glucose uptake was demonstrated, particularly in brain, kidneys, and liver in all imaged fish species. Glucose uptake in the major organ systems of fish was closer to that in humans than uptake in mice or dogs, indicating that fish may serve as an effective alternative animal model for tumor studies using this technology. Other applications for this technique in fish may include metabolism studies and screening for environmental carcinogenesis. I found that both microCT and PET/CT imaging provided useful and meaningful results. In addition, the use of non-invasive scanning allows for re-use of fish, thus reducing the number of animal models used in experiments. These experiments suggest that fish will be good replacement models for mammals using these advanced imaging techniques.

Browning, Zoe Swezy

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

Anderson, David F. (630 Sylvan Pl., Batavia, IL 60510); Sparrow, Robert W. (28 Woodlawn Dr., Sturbridge, MA 01566)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anch pet ersburg" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Pd modified Au on carbon as an effective and durable catalyst for the direct oxidation of HMF to FDCA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that the modification of a gold/carbon catalyst with Pt or Pd produces stable and recyclable catalysts for the selective oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA). This finding is a significant advance over current conversion technology because of the technological importance of FDCA. Indeed, FDCA has been identified as one of twelve potential building blocks for the production of value added chemicals derived from biosources.1 FDCA is a potential replacement source of terephthalic acid, the monomer presently used for the production of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and derived from hydrocarbon sources.2

Villa, Alberto [Universita di Milano, Italy; Schiavoni, Marco [University of Milan and INFN, Milano, Italy; Campisi, Sebastiano [University of Milan and INFN, Milano, Italy; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Prati, Laura [Universita di Milano, Italy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

4-fluoroalkyl-3-halophenyl nortropanes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A series of compounds in the 4-fluoroalkyl-3-halophenyl nortropanes family are described as diagnostic and therapeutic agents for diseases associated with serotonin transporter dysfunction. These compounds bind to serotonin transporter protein with high affinity and selectivity. The invention provides methods of synthesis which incorporate radioisotopic halogens at a last step which permit high radiochemical yield and maximum usable product life. The radiolabeled compounds of the invention are useful as imaging agents for visualizing the location and density of serotonin transporter by PET and SPECT imaging.

Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Chen, Ping (Indianapolis, IN)

2002-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

463

Changes in Cervical Cancer FDG Uptake During Chemoradiation and Association With Response  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Previous research showed that pretreatment uptake of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), as assessed by the maximal standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and the variability of uptake (FDG{sub hetero}), predicted for posttreatment response in cervical cancer. In this pilot study, we evaluated the changes in SUV{sub max} and FDG{sub hetero} during concurrent chemoradiation for cervical cancer and their association with post-treatment response. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with stage Ib1-IVa cervical cancer were enrolled. SUV{sub max}, FDG{sub hetero}, and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) were recorded from FDG-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans performed pretreatment and during weeks 2 and 4 of treatment and were evaluated for changes and association with response assessed on 3-month post-treatment FDG-PET/CT. Results: For all patients, the average pretreatment SUV{sub max} was 17.8, MTV was 55.4 cm{sup 3}, and FDG{sub hetero} was -1.33. A similar decline in SUV{sub max} was seen at week 2 compared with baseline and week 4 compared with week 2 (34%). The areas of highest FDG uptake in the tumor remained relatively consistent on serial scans. Mean FDG{sub hetero} decreased during treatment. For all patients, MTV decreased more from week 2 to week 4 than from pretreatment to week 2. By week 4, the average SUV{sub max} had decreased by 57% and the MTV had decreased by 30%. Five patients showed persistent or new disease on 3-month post-treatment PET. These poor responders showed a higher average SUV{sub max}, larger MTV, and greater heterogeneity at all 3 times. Week 4 SUV{sub max} (P=.037), week 4 FDG{sub hetero} (P=.005), pretreatment MTV (P=.008), and pretreatment FDG{sub hetero} (P=.008) were all significantly associated with post-treatment PET response. Conclusions: SUV{sub max} shows a consistent rate of decline during treatment and declines at a faster rate than MTV regresses. Based on this pilot study, pretreatment and week 4 of treatment represent the best time points for prediction of response.

Kidd, Elizabeth A., E-mail: ekidd@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Thomas, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh [Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States) [Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Grigsby, Perry W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

A survey of shaped-based registration and segmentation techniques for cardiac images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the modern world. Cardiac imaging is routinely applied for assessment and diagnosis of cardiac diseases. Computerized image analysis methods are now widely applied to cardiac segmentation and registration ... Keywords: AAM, ASM, CT, CVD, Cardiac CT, Cardiac MR, Cardiac motion, Cardiac registration, Cardiac segmentation, EB, EDV, EF, EFFD, EM, ESV, Echocardiography, Endo, Epi, FE, FFD, Four CH, GMM, GRPM, LA, LADA, LAX, LCX, LV, MI, MIA, MRF, MRI, N, N/A, NMI, NURBS, P, PCA, PET, PM, RA, RPM, RV, Review article, SAD, SAX, SM, SPECT, SSD, TDI, TEE, TMI, US

Vahid Tavakoli, Amir A. Amini

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Spatial emission tomography reconstruction using Pitman-Yor process  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we address the problem of emission tomography spatial reconstruction in three dimensions following a Bayesian nonparametric approach. Our model makes use of a generalization of the Dirichlet process called Pitman-Yor process. The problem in this approach is to deal with the infinite representation of the distribution in the inference. So we propose an efficient Markov Chain Monte-Carlo sampling scheme which is able to generate samples from the posterior distribution of the activity distribution. An application to 3D-PET reconstruction is presented.

Fall, Mame Diarra; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali [L2S, Supelec, 3 rue Joliot-Curie, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Barat, Eric [CEA-LIST, LPSS, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Comtat, Claude [SHFJ, CEA/DSV/I2BM, F-91401 Orsay (France)

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

466

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Regular Gasoline " Regular Gasoline " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Retail",1,"Weekly","12/16/2013","8/20/1990" ,"Data 2","Regions",9,"Weekly","12/16/2013","5/11/1992" ,"Data 3","States",9,"Weekly","12/16/2013","5/22/2000" ,"Data 4","Cities",10,"Weekly","12/16/2013","6/5/2000" ,"Release Date:","12/16/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_gnd_a_epmr_pte_dpgal_w.xls"

467

Producing radiometals in liquid targets: Proof of feasibility with {sup 94m}Tc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

{sup 94m}Tc was produced in a liquid target loaded with a molybdenum-salt solution. This novel technique allows for the irradiation of metals dissolved in a liquid solution, normally only available in metal powder or foil form. By using this approach, the existing liquid targets and transfer infrastructure of many PET cyclotrons can be used to produce radiometals, avoiding the need, expense and challenges of operating solid targets. Such an approach allows for rapid testing of new isotopes for proof of feasibility studies. Different concentrations of Mo solution and their effect on the target performance were tested. Sufficient quantities to allow for preclinical studies were produced.

Hoehr, C.; Badesso, B.; Morley, T.; Trinczek, M.; Buckley, K.; Klug, J.; Zeisler, S.; Hanemaayer, V.; Ruth, T. R.; Benard, F.; Schaffer, P. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, V6T 2A3 Vancouver, BC (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, V6T 2A3 Vancouver, BC (Canada) and BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Avenue, V5Z 4E6 Vancouver, BC (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, V6T 2A3 Vancouver, BC (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, V6T 2A3 Vancouver, BC (Canada) and BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Avenue, V5Z 4E6 Vancouver, BC (Canada); BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Avenue, V5Z 4E6 Vancouver, BC (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, V6T 2A3 Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

468

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

capwork_a_(na)_8sw0_mbbl_a.xls" capwork_a_(na)_8sw0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capwork_a_(na)_8sw0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"6/20/2013 4:20:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total " "Sourcekey","8_NA_8SW0_NUS_MBBL","8_NA_8SW0_R10_MBBL","8_NA_8SW0_R20_MBBL","8_NA_8SW0_R30_MBBL","8_NA_8SW0_R40_MBBL","8_NA_8SW0_R50_MBBL" "Date","U.S. Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","East Coast (PADD 1) Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","West Coast (PADD 5) Refinery Working Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)"

469

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbblpd_m.xls" mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_psup_dc_nus_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:26:11 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTUPUS2","MCRUPUS2","MNGUPUS2","MPPUPUS2","MLPUPUS2","METUPUS2","MPRUPUS2","MBNUPUS2","MBIUPUS2","MOLUPUS2","MOHUPUS2","MUOUPUS2","MBCUPUS2","MO1UP_NUS_2","MO5UP_NUS_2","MBAUPUS2","MTPUPUS2","MGFUPUS2","MGRUPUS2","MG4UP_NUS_2","MGAUPUS2","MKJUPUS2","MKEUPUS2","MDIUPUS2","MD0UP_NUS_2","MD1UP_NUS_2","MDGUPUS2","MREUPUS2","MPCUP_NUS_2","MNFUPUS2","MOTUPUS2","MNSUPUS2","MLUUPUS2","MWXUPUS2","MCKUPUS2","MCMUP_NUS_2","MCOUP_NUS_2","MAPUPUS2","MSGUPUS2","MMSUPUS2"

470

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

capshell_a_(na)_8ss0_mbbl_a.xls" capshell_a_(na)_8ss0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capshell_a_(na)_8ss0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"6/20/2013 4:17:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total " "Sourcekey","8_NA_8SS0_NUS_MBBL","8_NA_8SS0_R10_MBBL","8_NA_8SS0_R20_MBBL","8_NA_8SS0_R30_MBBL","8_NA_8SS0_R40_MBBL","8_NA_8SS0_R50_MBBL" "Date","U.S. Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","East Coast (PADD 1) Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)","West Coast (PADD 5) Refinery Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels)"

471

Chain Confinement in Electrospun Nanocomposites: using Thermal Analysis to Investigate Polymer-Filler Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the interaction of the polymer matrix and filler in electrospun nanofibers using advanced thermal analysis methods. In particular, we study the ability of silicon dioxide nanoparticles to affect the phase structure of poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET. SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (either unmodified or modified with silane) ranging from 0 to 2.0 wt% in PET were electrospun from hexafluoro-2-propanol solutions. The morphologies of both the electrospun (ES) nanofibers and the SiO{sub 2} powders were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, while the amorphous or crystalline nature of the fibers was determined by real-time wide-angle X-ray scattering. The fractions of the crystal, mobile amorphous, and rigid amorphous phases of the non-woven, nanofibrous composite mats were quantified by using heat capacity measurements. The amount of the immobilized polymer layer, the rigid amorphous fraction, was obtained from the specific reversing heat capacity for both as-spun amorphous fibers and isothermally crystallized fibers. Existence of the rigid amorphous phase in the absence of crystallinity was verified in nanocomposite fibers, and two origins for confinement of the rigid amorphous fraction are proposed. Thermal analysis of electrospun fibers, including quasi-isothermal methods, provides new insights to quantitatively characterize the polymer matrix phase structure and thermal transitions, such as devitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction.

Q Ma; B Mao; P Cebe

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

472

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbblpd_m.xls" mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_exp_dc_nus-z00_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:27:48 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTEXUS2","MCREXUS2","MNGEXUS2","MPPEXUS2","MLPEXUS2","METEXUS2","MPREXUS2","MBNEXUS2","MBIEXUS2","MOLEXUS2","MOHEXUS2","M_EPOOXXFE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","MMTEX_NUS-Z00_2","MOOEX_NUS-Z00_2","M_EPOOR_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","M_EPOOXE_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","M_EPOORDB_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","MBCEXUS2","MO1EX_NUS-Z00_2","MO5EX_NUS-Z00_2","MBAEXUS2","MTPEXUS2","MGFEXUS2","MGREXUS2","MG4EX_NUS-Z00_2","MGAEXUS2","MKJEXUS2","MKEEXUS2","MDIEXUS2","M_EPDXL0_EEX_NUS-Z00_MBBLD","MD1EX_NUS-Z00_2","MDGEXUS2","MREEXUS2","MNFEXUS2","MOTEXUS2","MNSEXUS2","MLUEXUS2","MWXEXUS2","MCKEXUS2","MAPEXUS2","MMSEXUS2"

473

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbbl_m.xls" mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_psup_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:26:09 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products" "Sourcekey","MTTUPUS1","MCRUPUS1","MNGUPUS1","MPPUPUS1","MLPUPUS1","METUPUS1","MPRUPUS1","MBNUPUS1","MBIUPUS1","MOLUPUS1","MOHUPUS1","MUOUPUS1","MBCUPUS1","MO1UP_NUS_1","MO5UP_NUS_1","MBAUPUS1","MTPUPUS1","MGFUPUS1","MGRUPUS1","MG4UP_NUS_1","MGAUPUS1","MKJUPUS1","MKEUPUS1","MDIUPUS1","MD0UP_NUS_1","MD1UP_NUS_1","MDGUPUS1","MREUPUS1","MPCUP_NUS_1","MNFUPUS1","MOTUPUS1","MNSUPUS1","MLUUPUS1","MWXUPUS1","MCKUPUS1","MCMUP_NUS_1","MCOUP_NUS_1","MAPUPUS1","MSGUPUS1","MMSUPUS1"

474

Highly Responsive Ultrathin GaS Nanosheet Photodetectors on Rigid and Flexible Substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first GaS nanosheet-based photodetectors are demonstrated on both mechanically rigid and flexible substrates. Highly-crystalline, exfoliated GaS nanosheets are promising for optoelectronics due to strong absorption in the UV-visible wavelength region. Photocurrent measurements of GaS nanosheet photodetectors made on SiO2/Si substrates and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates exhibit a photo-responsivity at 254nm up to 4.2 AW-1 and 19.2 AW-1, respectively, which exceeds that of graphene, MoS2, or other 2D materials-based devices. Additionally, the linear dynamic range of the devices on SiO2/Si and PET substrates are 97.7dB and 78.73 dB, respectively. Both surpass that of currently-exploited InGaAs photodetectors (66 dB). Theoretical modeling of the electronic structures indicates that the reduction of the effective mass at the valence band maximum (VBM) with decreasing sheet thickness enhances the carrier mobility of the GaS nanosheets, contributing to the high photocurrents. Double-peak VBMs are theoretically predicted for ultrathin GaS nanosheets (thickness less than 5 monolayers), which is found to promote photon absorption. These theoretical and experimental results show that GaS nanosheets are promising materials for high performance photodetectors on both conventional silicon and flexible substrates.

Hu, Prof Pingan [Harbin Institute of Technology; Wang, Lifeng [Harbin Institute of Technology; Yoon, Mina [ORNL; Zhang, Jia [Harbin Institute of Technology; Feng, Wei [Harbin Institute of Technology; Wang, Xiaona [Harbin Institute of Technology; Wen, Zhenzhong [Harbin Institute of Technology; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C [ORNL; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Xiao, Kai [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

X-ray and gamma ray detector readout system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A readout electronics scheme is under development for high resolution, compact PET (positron emission tomography) imagers based on LSO (lutetium ortho-oxysilicate, Lu.sub.2SiO.sub.5) scintillator and avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays. The key is to obtain sufficient timing and energy resolution at a low power level, less than about 30 mW per channel, including all required functions. To this end, a simple leading edge level crossing discriminator is used, in combination with a transimpedance preamplifier. The APD used has a gain of order 1,000, and an output noise current of several pA/ Hz, allowing bipolar technology to be used instead of CMOS, for increased speed and power efficiency. A prototype of the preamplifier and discriminator has been constructed, achieving timing resolution of 1.5 ns FWHM, 2.7 ns full width at one tenth maximum, relative to an LSO/PMT detector, and an energy resolution of 13.6% FWHM at 511 keV, while operating at a power level of 22 mW per channel. Work is in progress towards integration of this preamplifier and discriminator with appropriate coincidence logic and amplitude measurement circuits in an ASIC suitable for a high resolution compact PET instrument. The detector system and/or ASIC can also be used for many other applications for medical to industrial imaging.

Tumer, Tumay O (Riverside, CA); Clajus, Martin (Los Angeles, CA); Visser, Gerard (Bloomington, IN)

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

476

Environmental tobacco smoke and canine urinary cotinine level  

SciTech Connect

Epidemiologic studies of companion animals such as dogs have been established as models for the relationship between exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and cancer risk in humans. While results from these studies are provocative, pet owner report of a dog's ETS exposure has not yet been validated. We have evaluated the relationship between dog owner's report of household smoking by questionnaire and dog's urinary cotinine level. Between January and October 2005, dog owners presenting their pet for non-emergency veterinary care at the Foster Hospital for Small Animals at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, were asked to complete a 10-page questionnaire measuring exposure to household ETS in the previous 24 h and other factors. A free-catch urine sample was also collected from dogs. Urinary cotinine level was assayed for 63 dogs, including 30 whose owners reported household smoking and 33 unexposed dogs matched on age and month of enrollment. Urinary cotinine level was significantly higher in dogs exposed to household smoking in the 24 h before urine collection compared to unexposed dogs (14.6 ng/ml vs. 7.4 ng/ml; P=0.02). After adjustment for other factors, cotinine level increased linearly with number of cigarettes smoked by all household members (P=0.004). Other canine characteristics including age, body composition and nose length were also associated with cotinine level. Findings from our study suggest that household smoking levels as assessed by questionnaire are significantly associated with canine cotinine levels.

Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth R. [Department of Public Health, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA (United States)], E-mail: ebertone@schoolph.umass.edu; Procter-Gray, Elizabeth; Gollenberg, Audra L. [Department of Public Health, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Ryan, Michele B. [Department of Public Health, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endoscopy, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Barber, Lisa G. [Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA (United States)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Tearing resistance of some co-polyester sheets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-zone model consisting of initial, evolutionary and stabilised plastic zones for tearing resistance was proposed for polymer sheets. An analysis with the model, based on the essential work of fracture (EWF) approach, was demonstrated to be capable for predicting specific total work of fracture along the tear path across all the plastic zones although accuracy of specific essential work of fracture is subject to improvement. Photo-elastic images were used for identification of plastic deformation sizes and profiles. Fracture mode change during loading was described in relation with the three zones. Tearing fracture behaviour of extruded mono- and bi-layer sheets of different types of amorphous co-polyesters and different thicknesses was investigated. Thick material exhibited higher specific total work of tear fracture than thin mono-layer sheet in the case of amorphous polyethylene terephthalate (PET). This finding was explained in terms of plastic zone size formed along the tear path, i.e., thick material underwent larger plastic deformation than thin material. When PET and polyethylene terephthalate glycol (PETG) were laminated with each other, specific total work of fracture of the bi-layer sheets was not noticeably improved over that of the constituent materials.

Kim, Ho Sung; Karger-Kocsis, Jozsef

2004-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

478

Compact Beta Particle/Positron Imager for Plant Biology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 11CO2 tracer is used to facilitate plant biology research towards optimization of plant productivity, biofuel development and carbon sequestration in biomass. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using 11CO2. Plants typically have very thin leaves resulting in little medium for the emitted positrons to undergo an annihilation event. For the emitted positron from 11C decay approximately 1mm of water equivalent material is needed for positron annihilation. Thus most of the positrons do not annihilate inside the leaf, resulting in limited sensitivity for PET imaging. To address this problem we have developed a compact beta-positive beta-minus particle (BPBM) imager for 11CO2 leaf imaging. The detector is based on a Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tube optically coupled via optical grease and a 3mm thick glass plate to a 0.5mm thick Eljin EJ-212 plastic scintillator. The detector is equipped with a flexible arm to allow its placement and orientation on the leaf of the plant of interest while maintaining the leaf's original orientation. We are planning to utilize the imaging device at the Duke University Phytotron to investigate dynamic carbon transport differences between invasive and native species.

Weisenberger, Andrew; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Xi, Wenze; Zorn, Carl; Stolin, Alexander; Majewski, Stan; Majewski, Stanislaw; Howell, Calvin; Crowell, Alec

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Performance Evaluation of a Bedside Cardiac SPECT System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the initial performance evaluation of a bedside cardiac PET/SPECT system. The system was designed to move within a hospital to image critically-ill patients, for example, those in intensive care unit (ICU) or emergency room settings, who cannot easily be transported to a conventional SPECT or PET facility. The system uses two compact (25 cm times 25 cm) detectors with pixilated NaI crystals and position sensitive PMTs. The performance is evaluated for both 140 keV (Tc-99m) and 511 keV (F-18) emitters with the system operating in single photon counting (SPECT) mode. The imaging performance metrics for both 140 keV and 511 keV included intrinsic energy resolution, spatial resolution (intrinsic, system, and reconstructed SPECT), detection sensitivity, count rate capability, and uniformity. Results demonstrated an intrinsic energy resolution of 31% at 140 keV and 23% at 511 keV, a planar intrinsic spatial resolution of 5.6 mm full width half-maximum (FWHM) at 140 keV and 6.3 mm FWHM at 511 keV, and a sensitivity of 4.15 countsmiddotmuCi-1 ldr s-1 at 140 keV and 0.67 counts ldr muCi-1 ldr s-1 at 511 keV. To further the study, a SPECT acquisition using a dynamic cardiac phantom was performed, and the resulting reconstructed images are presented.

M.T. Studenski, D.R. Gilland, J.G. Parker, B. Hammond, S. Majewski, A.G. Weisenberger, V. Popov

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Evaluation of positron emission tomography as a method to visualize subsurface microbial processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) provides spatiotemporal monitoring in a nondestructive manner and has higher sensitivity and resolution relative to other tomographic methods. Therefore, this technology was evaluated for its application to monitor in situ subsurface bacterial activity. To date, however, it has not been used to monitor or image soil microbial processes. In this study, PET imaging was applied as a 'proof-of-principle' method to assess the feasibility of visualizing a radiotracer labeled subsurface bacterial strain (Rahnella sp. Y9602), previously isolated from uranium contaminated soils and shown to promote uranium phosphate precipitation. Soil columns packed with acid-purified simulated mineral soils were seeded with 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-d-glucose ({sup 18}FDG) labeled Rahnella sp. Y9602. The applicability of [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion as a tracer for measuring hydraulic conductivity and {sup 18}FDG as a tracer to identify subsurface metabolically active bacteria was successful in our soil column studies. Our findings indicate that positron-emitting isotopes can be utilized for studies aimed at elucidating subsurface microbiology and geochemical processes important in contaminant remediation.

Kinsella K.; Schlyer D.; Kinsella, K.; Schlyer, D.J.; Fowler, J.S.; Martinez, R.J.; Sobecky, P.A.

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z