Sample records for analytical development wet

  1. Hydrogen Fuel Quality - Focus: Analytical Methods Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Quality - Focus: Analytical Methods Development & Hydrogen Fuel Quality Results Hydrogen Fuel Quality - Focus: Analytical Methods Development & Hydrogen Fuel Quality Results...

  2. Developer Dashboards: The Need For Qualitative Analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey, Michael W.

    Developer Dashboards: The Need For Qualitative Analytics Olga Baysal, Reid Holmes, and Michael W-to-day development tasks. I. SOFTWARE ANALYTICS IN PRACTICE Many organizations have adopted data-driven decision

  3. Development of a Wet Logistics System for Bulk Corn Stover

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S HBatteries1000: Development of a Wet Logistics

  4. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process. Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETOX{sup SM} is a catalyzed wet oxidation process which destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase 2 effort for this project is site selection and engineering design for a DETOX demonstration unit. Site selection was made using a set of site selection criteria and evaluation factors. A survey of mixed wastes at DOE sites was conducted using the Interim Mixed Waste Inventory Report. Sites with likely suitable waste types were identified. Potential demonstration sites were ranked based on waste types, interest, regulatory needs, scheduling, ability to provide support, and available facilities. Engineering design for the demonstration unit is in progress and is being performed by Jacobs Applied Technology. The engineering design proceeded through preliminary process flow diagrams (PFDs), calculation of mass and energy balances for representative waste types, process and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs), preparation of component specifications, and a firm cost estimate for fabrication of the demonstration unit.

  5. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests.

  6. Multimedia Analytics Canopy is a visual analytic software suite, developed by researchers at Battelle's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multimedia Analytics Canopy is a visual analytic software suite, developed by researchers to efficiently analyze massive amounts of multimedia data. Canopy incorporates cutting-edge extraction techniques is a multimedia analytics software platform that combines cutting-edge extraction techniques, state

  7. Analytical Tool Development for Aftertreatment Sub-Systems Integration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tool Development for Aftertreatment Sub-Systems Integration Analytical Tool Development for Aftertreatment Sub-Systems Integration 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Detroit Diesel...

  8. BUSINESS ANALYTICS CONCENTRATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES The business analytics concentration, like a major, focuses on using information to develop business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    their business models. Possible Job Titles Data scientist, business analytics specialist, customer relationshipBUSINESS ANALYTICS CONCENTRATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES The business analytics concentration, like a major, focuses on using information to develop business insights and influence decision

  9. Analytical Representation of the Longitudinal Hadronic Shower Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. A. Kulchitsky; V. B. Vinogradov

    1999-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical representation of the longitudinal hadronic shower development from the face of a calorimeter is presented and compared with experimental data. The suggested formula is particularly useful at designing, testing and calibration of huge calorimeter complex like in ATLAS at LHC.

  10. Analytical representation of the longitudinal hadronic shower development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulchitskii, Yu A

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical representation of the longitudinal hadronic shower development from the face of a calorimeter is presented and compared with experimental data. The suggested formula is particularly useful at designing, testing and calibration of huge calorimeter complex like in ATLAS at LHC.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF WET-OXIDATION TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR FILTER BACKWASH SLUDGE AND ION EXCHANGE RESINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, T.; Motoyama, M.; Shibuya, M.; Wada, H.; Yamazaki, K.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Decomposition of organic compounds contained in filter backwash sludge and spent ion exchange resins is considered effective in reducing the waste volume. A system using the wet-oxidation process has been studied for the treatment of the sludge and resins stored at Tsuruga Power Station Unit 1, 357MWe BWR, owned by The Japan Atomic Power Company. Compared with various processes for treating sludge and resin, the wet-oxidation system is rather simple and the process conditions are mild. Waste samples collected from storage tanks were processed by wet-oxidation and appropriate decomposition of the organic compounds was verified. After the decomposition the residue can be solidified with cement or bitumen for final disposal. When compared with direct solidification without decomposition, the number of waste packages can be reduced by a factor of a few dozens for the sludge and three for the resin. Additional measures for conditioning secondary waste products have also been studied, and their applicability to the Tsuruga Power Station was verified. Some of the conditions studied were specific to the Tsuruga Power Station, but it is expected that the system will provide an effective solution for sludge and resin treatment at other NPPs.

  12. 100-F Target Analyte List Development for Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovink, R.

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the process used to identify source area target analytes in support of the 100-F Area remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) addendum to the Integrated 100 Area Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan (DOE/RL-2008-46, Rev. 0).

  13. Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks Douglas C. Elliott,* Gary G. Neuenschwander, Todd R. Hart, R. Scott the preliminary results of continuous-flow reactor studies with wet biomass feedstocks using new catalyst systems of con- tinuous reactor tests with biomass feedstocks provide preliminary short-term processing results,8

  14. A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Investigator(s) George Danko, UNR Other Principal Investigators Jens Birkholzer, LBNL; Jaak Daemen, UNR Targets Milestones The model development work follows three main...

  15. 1 Copyright 2004 by ASME ANALYTICAL MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND MODEL REDUCTION FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Bin

    1 Copyright © 2004 by ASME ANALYTICAL MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND MODEL REDUCTION FOR ELECTROMECHANICAL becomes largely a matter of computer code, not of complex layers of addition hardware. However, the BBW

  16. Process reengineering for the product development process at an analytical instrument manufacturer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tandon, Shubhang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an analytical instrument manufacturing company, the new product development process was analyzed with the objective of reducing time to market, to full scale production of new products and to improve project management ...

  17. Development of an advanced concept of dry/wet cooling of power-generating plants. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, B.M. (ed.)

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale test of dry/wet cooling using the ammonia phase-charge system, designated the Advanced Concepts Test, is being constructed at Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Kern Station at Bakersfield. The test facility described in this document will be capable of condensing 60,000 lbs/h of steam from a small house turbine and will use only 25% of the water normally required to reject this heat load in evaporative cooling towers. Two different modes of combining dry and evaporative cooling are being tested. One uses deluge cooling in which water is allowed to flow over the heat exchanger on hot days. The other uses a separate evaporative condenser in parallel to the dry heat exchanger. The design of the cooling system and major components is described and the technology developed to support the design is summarized. The facility is scheduled for completion April 1981. An extensive period of operational acceptance tests will follow. Research testing is anticipated to begin about the middle of 1981.

  18. Development of an analytical model for organic-fluid fouling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.; Watkinson, A.P.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research goal of this project is to determine ways to effectively mitigate fouling in organic fluids: hydrocarbons and derived fluids. The fouling research focuses on the development of methodology for determining threshold conditions for fouling. Initially, fluid containing chemicals known to produce foulant is analyzed; subsequently, fouling of industrial fluids is investigated. The fouling model developed for determining the effects of physical parameters is the subject of this report. The fouling model is developed on the premise that the chemical reaction for generation of precursor can take place in the bulk fluid, in the thermal-boundary layer, or at the fluid/wall interface, depending upon the interactive effects of fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, and the controlling chemical reaction. In the analysis, the experimental data are examined for fouling deposition of polyperoxide produced by autoxidation of indene in kerosene. The effects of fluid and wall temperatures for two flow geometries are analyzed. The results show that the relative effects of physical parameters on the fouling rate differ for the three fouling mechanisms. Therefore, to apply the closed-flow-loop data to industrial conditions, the controlling mechanism must be identified.

  19. The development and application of advanced analytical methods to commercial ICF reactor chambers. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousseau, P.; Engelstad, R.; Henderson, D.L. [and others

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is summarized in this report for each of the following tasks: (1) multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics computer code development; (2) 2D radiation-hydrodynamic code development; (3) ALARA: analytic and Laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis -- a complete package for analysis of induced activation; (4) structural dynamics modeling of ICF reactor chambers; and (5) analysis of self-consistent target chamber clearing.

  20. Development of analytical cell support for vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, F.H.; Borek, T.T.; Christopher, J.Z. [and others

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical and Process Chemistry (A&PC) support is essential to the high-level waste vitrification campaign at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). A&PC characterizes the waste, providing information necessary to formulate the recipe for the target radioactive glass product. High-level waste (HLW) samples are prepared and analyzed in the analytical cells (ACs) and Sample Storage Cell (SSC) on the third floor of the main plant. The high levels of radioactivity in the samples require handling them in the shielded cells with remote manipulators. The analytical hot cells and third floor laboratories were refurbished to ensure optimal uninterrupted operation during the vitrification campaign. New and modified instrumentation, tools, sample preparation and analysis techniques, and equipment and training were required for A&PC to support vitrification. Analytical Cell Mockup Units (ACMUs) were designed to facilitate method development, scientist and technician training, and planning for analytical process flow. The ACMUs were fabricated and installed to simulate the analytical cell environment and dimensions. New techniques, equipment, and tools could be evaluated m in the ACMUs without the consequences of generating or handling radioactive waste. Tools were fabricated, handling and disposal of wastes was addressed, and spatial arrangements for equipment were refined. As a result of the work at the ACMUs the remote preparation and analysis methods and the equipment and tools were ready for installation into the ACs and SSC m in July 1995. Before use m in the hot cells, all remote methods had been validated and four to eight technicians were trained on each. Fine tuning of the procedures has been ongoing at the ACs based on input from A&PC technicians. Working at the ACs presents greater challenges than had development at the ACMUs. The ACMU work and further refinements m in the ACs have resulted m in a reduction m in analysis turnaround time (TAT).

  1. Conventional Wet Chemistry ICP-AES Development for RPP-WTP AY-102/C-106 Melter Feed Slurry Simulants - A Statistical Review of the Results from the Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Thomas B.

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The River Protection Project (RPP)--Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is to prepare and process High Level Waste (HLW) streams into glass waste forms that will meet HLW disposal requirements. Samples of HLW sludge and samples of this sludge mixed with glass-forming chemicals are to be taken and analyzed for process control. Glass characterization from the melter is not included in the scope. The development of viable analytical protocols to provide the required elemental analyses of these samples with rapid turnaround times (before and after addition of the glass-forming chemicals) has been defined as an RPP statement of work for the Analytical Development Section (ADS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Wet chemistry is serving as the baseline comparison to laser ablation for method development. One of the simulants used in this study by ADS was AY-102/C-106 melter feed slurry simulant, a simulant used to represent HLW samples after the addition of glass-forming chemicals. Several different dissolution methods were used by ADS in preparing samples of this simulant for elemental analyses by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The measurements generated by this process were provided to SRNL's Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) for analysis. The measurement data generated for samples of the RPP-WTP AY-102/C-106 melter feed slurry simulant are presented in this report and the different approaches used to prepare the samples are statistically compared. Comparisons among three of the dissolution methods are highlighted in this analysis. The methods are: sodium peroxide fusion in nickel crucibles, acidification with HNO{sub 3}/HCL at room temperature, and cesium carbonate fusion in zirconium crucibles. A summary table of the measurement averages generated by the three methods is presented. The cesium carbonate fusion method yielded measurements with significantly different mean values from the other two preparation methods for several of the elements.

  2. Order of wetting transitions in electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibagon, Ingrid, E-mail: ingrid@is.mpg.de; Bier, Markus, E-mail: bier@is.mpg.de; Dietrich, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Intelligente Systeme, Heisenbergstr. 3, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany and IV. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Intelligente Systeme, Heisenbergstr. 3, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany and IV. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    For wetting films in dilute electrolyte solutions close to charged walls we present analytic expressions for their effective interface potentials. The analysis of these expressions renders the conditions under which corresponding wetting transitions can be first- or second-order. Within mean field theory we consider two models, one with short- and one with long-ranged solvent-solvent and solvent-wall interactions. The analytic results reveal in a transparent way that wetting transitions in electrolyte solutions, which occur far away from their critical point (i.e., the bulk correlation length is less than half of the Debye length) are always first-order if the solvent-solvent and solvent-wall interactions are short-ranged. In contrast, wetting transitions close to the bulk critical point of the solvent (i.e., the bulk correlation length is larger than the Debye length) exhibit the same wetting behavior as the pure, i.e., salt-free, solvent. If the salt-free solvent is governed by long-ranged solvent-solvent as well as long-ranged solvent-wall interactions and exhibits critical wetting, adding salt can cause the occurrence of an ion-induced first-order thin-thick transition which precedes the subsequent continuous wetting as for the salt-free solvent.

  3. Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.; Butner, Scott S.; Zacher, Alan H.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Young, James S.; McCready, David E.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the use of a metal catalyst, gasification of wet biomass can be accomplished with high levels of carbon conversion to gas at relatively low temperature (350 C). In the pressurized-water environment (20 MPa) near-total conversion of the organic structure of biomass to gases has been accomplished in the presence of a ruthenium metal catalyst. The process is essentially steam reforming as there is no added oxidizer or reagent other than water. In addition, the gas produced is a medium-heating value gas due to the synthesis of high-levels of methane, as dictated by thermodynamic equilibrium. Biomass trace components cause processing difficulties using the fixed catalyst bed tubular reactor system. Results are described for both bench-scale and scaled-up reactor systems.

  4. Development of bias in analytical predictions based on behavior of platforms during hurricanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aggarwal, R.K.; Dolan, D.K.; Cornell, C.A.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A Joint Industry Project (JIP) was initiated by 13 oil companies and the US Minerals Management Service (MMS), wherein a methodology was developed to use information from observed platform conditions resulting from Andrew and the hurricane hindcast data with capacity, reliability, and Bayesian updating analyses to determine a measure of differences (biases) in the analytical predictions and field observations. The procedures used for structural integrity analysis were also improved as a result of this study. Phase 1 of this project completed in October 1993 defined a global bias factor. A study of foundation behavior was completed following Phase 1 and determined bias factors specific to foundation failure modes. This paper presents the approach followed in the most recent phase of this project in which bias factors specific to jacket and two foundation failure modes (lateral and axial) were developed. This study utilized an updated storm hindcast, improved analysis models, and a more detailed calibration procedure. The three bias factors were developed and were found to differ significantly. The bias factors developed through this study have provided means to further improve procedures used in the assessment of existing platforms. The proper use of these new analytical methodologies and bias factors will produce more appropriate and cost-effective mitigation measures for safe platform operations. The methodology for establishing bias factors developed and proven in these projects is applicable to other offshore regions and production systems with specific environmental, geotechnical, material and structure features.

  5. Development of an analytic core flow approximation for a square duct in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, N.B.; Tillack, M.S.; Abdou, M.A.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The core flow approximation for liquid metal (LM), magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) duct flow is a method that ignores the contributions of viscous forces in the fluid. For a fully developed, steady state flow situation, this approximation leaves the magnetic forces to be balanced only by the pressure gradient and results in a greatly simplified momentum equation. The velocity field predicted by the core flow equations is obtained much more easily than that described by the full solution, which usually requires a numerical approach. For this reason it is desirable to use the core flow method for flow situations in which viscosity has little effect. Developed here is an analytic core flow solution for a square duct in an obliquely incident magnetic field which omits any special treatment of boundary layers. This solution is compared to the full solution method developed in the code MH2D and a parametric comparison is performed. This general analytic approach can be expanded to consider rectangular ducts or walls of different thickness and electrical conductivity. The latter, however, will greatly complicate the equations presented here.

  6. ASSESS (Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security) update: Current status and future developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Ayat, R.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Cousins, T.D. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA)); Hoover, E.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security (ASSESS) has been released for use by DOE field offices and their contractors. In October, 1989, we offered a prototype workshop to selected representatives of the DOE community. Based on the prototype results, we held the first training workshop at the Central Training Academy in January, 1990. Four additional workshops are scheduled for FY 1990. ASSESS is a state-of-the-art analytical tool for management to conduct integrated evaluation of safeguards systems at facilities handling facilities. Currently, ASSESS focuses on the threat of theft/diversion of special nuclear material by insiders, outsiders, and a special form of insider/outsider collusion. ASSESS also includes a neutralization module. Development of the tool is continuing. Plans are underway to expand the capabilities of ASSESS to evaluate against violent insiders, to validate the databases, to expand the neutralization module, and to assist in demonstrating compliance with DOE Material Control and Accountability (MC A) Order 5633.3. These new capabilities include the ability to: compute a weighted average for performance capability against a spectrum of insider adversaries; conduct defense-in-depth analyses; and analyze against protracted theft scenarios. As they become available, these capabilities will be incorporated in our training program. ASSESS is being developed jointly by Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safeguards and Security.

  7. Dynamic wetting on superhydrophobic surfaces: Droplet impact and wetting hysteresis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Katherine M.

    We study the wetting energetics and wetting hysteresis of sessile and impacting water droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces as a function of surface texture and surface energy. For sessile drops, we find three wetting ...

  8. Chaoticity of the Wet Granular Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus; V. Yu. Zaburdaev

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we derive an analytic expression for the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of dilute wet granular matter, valid for any spatial dimension. The grains are modelled as hard spheres and the influence of the wetting liquid is described according to the Capillary Model, in which dissipation is due to the hysteretic cohesion force of capillary bridges. The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy is expanded in a series with respect to density. We find a rapid increase of the leading term when liquid is added. This demonstrates the sensitivity of the granular dynamics to humidity, and shows that the liquid significantly increases the chaoticity of the granular gas.

  9. Breakdown in the Wetting Transparency of Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Chih-Jen

    We develop a theory to model the van der Waals interactions between liquid and graphene, including quantifying the wetting behavior of a graphene-coated surface. Molecular dynamics simulations and contact angle measurements ...

  10. Development of statistical wet weather model to evaluate frictional properties at the pavement-tire interface on hot mix asphalt concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedi, Harpreet

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Skid resistance on wet pavements is influenced by friction at the tire-pavement interface as well as overall hot mix asphalt (HMA) performance. It is important to control aggregate, asphalt, and mix properties to achieve desirable frictional...

  11. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg equivalents. AMS provides an sensitive, accurate and precise method of measuring drug compounds in biological matrices.

  12. Nanopeptamers for the Development of Small-Analyte Lateral Flow Tests with a Positive Readout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    -site for the detection of small analytes, such as pesticides, persistent organic pollutants, explosives, toxins- assays have been used in countless applications in pharmacol- ogy, food safety, environment, homeland

  13. Elucidating the mysteries of wetting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III (,; ); Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Sackinger, Philip A.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Emerson, John Allen; Ash, Benjamin Jesse; Heine, David R.; Brooks, Carlton, F.; Gorby, Allen D.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearly every manufacturing and many technologies central to Sandia's business involve physical processes controlled by interfacial wetting. Interfacial forces, e.g. conjoining/disjoining pressure, electrostatics, and capillary condensation, are ubiquitous and can surpass and even dominate bulk inertial or viscous effects on a continuum level. Moreover, the statics and dynamics of three-phase contact lines exhibit a wide range of complex behavior, such as contact angle hysteresis due to surface roughness, surface reaction, or compositional heterogeneities. These thermodynamically and kinetically driven interactions are essential to the development of new materials and processes. A detailed understanding was developed for the factors controlling wettability in multicomponent systems from computational modeling tools, and experimental diagnostics for systems, and processes dominated by interfacial effects. Wettability probed by dynamic advancing and receding contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, and direct determination of the capillary and disjoining forces. Molecular scale experiments determined the relationships between the fundamental interactions between molecular species and with the substrate. Atomistic simulations studied the equilibrium concentration profiles near the solid and vapor interfaces and tested the basic assumptions used in the continuum approaches. These simulations provide guidance in developing constitutive equations, which more accurately take into account the effects of surface induced phase separation and concentration gradients near the three-phase contact line. The development of these accurate models for dynamic multicomponent wetting allows improvement in science based engineering of manufacturing processes previously developed through costly trial and error by varying material formulation and geometry modification.

  14. 100-N Area Decision Unit Target Analyte List Development for Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovink, R.

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the process used to identify source area target analytes in support of the 100-N Area remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) addendum to the Integrated 100 Area Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan (DOE/RL-2008-46, Rev. 0).

  15. Analytical modeling in support of the development of fiber reinforced ceramic composite materials for re-heater burners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kibler, J.J. [Materials Sciences Corp., Fort Washington, PA (United States); DiPietro, S.G. [Textron Specialty Materials, Lowell, MA (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of Continuous Fiber reinforced Ceramic Composite (CFCC) materials is a process of identifying components which will benefit from CFCC properties, and defining appropriate composite constructions which will provide materials which will meet the structural and thermal requirements of the application. Materials Sciences Corporation (MSC) has been providing analytical support to Textron Specialty Materials in the development of re-heated tubes for metal reheating furnaces. As part of this support, a study has been made of the sensitivity of composite properties to fiber orientation as well as a number of matrix properties which control the stress-strain behavior of the composite.

  16. Analytical Development and Support Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1Albuquerque, NMPerformanceof Energy PistonAnalysis -Analytical

  17. The effect of imports on export development : a network analytical view of international trade in music

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu-Shore, Jesse Conan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What are the effects of imports on export development? Would low influence from imports provide more opportunity to local producers to develop radically new products that could later be exported as a uniquely local ...

  18. EPA/600/R-99/029 Innovative Urban Wet-Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    EPA/600/R-99/029 Innovative Urban Wet-Weather Flow Management Systems By James P. Heaney Department Laboratory #12;iv Abstract This research project describes innovative methods to develop improved wet weather

  19. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

    1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

  20. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

  1. Analytical strategic environmental assessment (ANSEA) developing a new approach to SEA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalkmann, Holger; Herrera, Rodrigo Jiliberto; Bongardt, Daniel

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of analytical strategic environmental assessment (ANSEA) is to provide a decision-centred approach to the SEA process. The ANSEA project evolved from the realisation that, in many cases, SEA, as currently practised, is not able to ensure an appropriate integration of environmental values. The focus of SEA is on predicting impacts, but the tool takes no account of the decision-making processes it is trying to influence. At strategic decision-making levels, in turn, it is often difficult to predict impacts with the necessary exactitude. The decision-making sciences could teach some valuable lessons here. Instead of focusing on the quantitative prediction of environmental consequences, the ANSEA approach concentrates on the integration of environmental objectives into decision-making processes. Thus, the ANSEA approach provides a framework for analysing and assessing the decision-making processes of policies, plans and programmes (PPP). To enhance environmental integration into the decision-making process, decision windows (DW) can be identified. The approach is designed to be objective and transparent to ensure that environmental considerations are taken into account, or--from an ex-post perspective--to allow an evaluation of how far environmental considerations have been integrated into the decision-making process under assessment. The paper describes the concepts and the framework of the ANSEA approach and discusses its relation to SEA and the EC Directive.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The implementation and testing of a file-based CFD database was completed (Task 2.8). The capability for transferring temperature-dependent physical properties from Aspen Plus to Fluent was developed (Task 2.12). The GUI for enabling the process analyst to select models from the CFD database and edit certain CFD model parameters was developed and tested (Task 2.13). Work on developing a CO wrapper for the INDVU code was started (Task 2.15). A solution strategy capability for enabling the process analyst to switch between different models representing a unit operation block was developed and tested (Task 2.16). The development of the Configuration Wizard for converting a FLUENT CFD model into a CO UO model was completed (Task 2.18). A low-order model based on the multiple regression technique was developed and tested (Task 2.19). An installation kit for the V21 Controller was developed using the Installer Vise software (Task 2.24). A flow sheet model for Demo Case 2 was developed and tested for three loads (100%, 75%, and 50%). Documentation of Demo Case 2 was completed and submitted to DOE (Task 3.2). The debugging of the tube bank heat transfer model was completed. The model calibration for a range of loads was started. A problem of oscillating gas temperature was encountered. Work is underway to overcome this problem (Task 4.1).

  3. IN-SITU XRD OF OPERATING LSFC CATHODES: DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW ANALYTICAL CAPABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) research capability has been developed that facilitates measuring the electrochemical performance of an operating SOFC while simultaneously performing x-ray diffraction on its cathode. The evolution of this research tool’s development is discussed together with a description of the instrumentation used for in-situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of operating SOFC cathodes. The challenges that were overcome in the process of developing this capability, which included seals and cathode current collectors, are described together with the solutions that are presently being applied to mitigate them.

  4. A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project will develop an in depth model of EGS systems that will allow engineers, practitioners, and researchers to more accurately predict how new fluid technologies would work in a reservoir.

  5. An analytical framework for capacity development in EIA - The case of Yemen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loon, Louise van, E-mail: louise.van.loon@gmail.co [Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC (Netherlands); Driessen, Peter P.J., E-mail: p.driessen@geo.uu.n [Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC (Netherlands); Kolhoff, Arend, E-mail: akolhoff@eia.n [Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment, P.O. Box 2345, 3500 GH Utrecht (Netherlands); Runhaar, Hens A.C., E-mail: h.runhaar@geo.uu.n [Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC (Netherlands)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most countries worldwide nowadays apply Environmental Assessment (EA) as an ex ante tool to evaluate environmental impacts of policies, plans, programmes, and projects. However, the application and performance of EA differ significantly. Scientific analysis of how EA performs mainly focuses on two levels: the micro (or project) level and the macro (or system) level. Macro level analysis usually focuses on institutions for EA and the organisation of stakeholder interaction in EA. This article proposes a more comprehensive framework for analysing EA systems that combines other approaches with a capacity approach and an explicit consideration of the context in which EA systems are developed and performed. In order to illustrate the value of our framework, we apply it to the Republic of Yemen, where over the last decades many EA capacity development programmes have been executed; however, EA performance has not substantially improved. The Yemen case study illustrates that the capacity development approach allows an understanding of the historical process, the stakeholders, the knowledge component, and the material and technical aspects of EA, but perhaps more important is a systemic understanding of the outcomes: problems are not isolated, but influence and even maintain each other. In addition, by taking into account the context characteristics, our framework allows for the assessment of the feasibility of capacity development programmes that aim at improving EA system performance.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhava Syamlal; Maxwell Osawe; Stephen Zitney; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Frank Joop; Philip Simon; K. Joseph Cleetus

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To accelerate the development of advanced power plants, DOE's Vision 21 program identified the need for an integrated suite of software tools that could be used to simulate and visualize new plant concepts. Existing process simulation software did not meet this objective of virtual-plant simulation. Sophisticated models of many individual equipment items are available; however, a seamless coupling capability that would integrate the advanced equipment (component) models to the process (system) simulation software remained to be developed. The inability to use models in an integrated manner causes knowledge loss (e.g., knowledge captured in detailed equipment models is usually not available in process simulation) and modeling inconsistencies (e.g., physical properties and reaction kinetics data in different models are not the same). A team consisting of Fluent Inc., ALSTOM Power Inc., Aspen Technology Inc., Intergraph Corporation, and West Virginia University, in collaboration with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), addressed this challenge in a project performed over the period from October 2000 through December 2004. In this project the integration of the cycle analysis software was based on widely used commercial software: Aspen Plus{reg_sign} for process simulation and FLUENT{reg_sign} for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of equipment items. The integration software was designed to also include custom (in-house, proprietary, legacy) equipment models that often encapsulate the experience from the many years of designing and operating the equipment. The team adopted CAPE-OPEN (CO) interfaces, the de facto international standard for communication among process models, for exchanging information between software. The software developed in this project is the first demonstration of the use of CO interfaces to link CFD and custom equipment models with process simulators. New interface requirements identified during this project were communicated to the CO standard developers. The new software capability was designed to make the construction of integrated models fast and integrated simulations robust and user-friendly. Configuration wizards were developed to make CFD and custom models CO-compliant. An Integration Controller and CFD Model Database were developed to facilitate the exchange of information between equipment and process models. A reduced order model (ROM) framework and a solution strategy capability were incorporated in the Integration Controller to enable a flexible trade-off between simulation speed and complexity. A CFD viewer was developed so that process engineers can view CFD results from the process simulator interface.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR DETERMINING SUPPRESSOR CONCENTRATION IN THE MCU NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT (NGS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Fondeur, F.; White, T.; Diprete, D.; Milliken, C.

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with identifying and developing at least one, but preferably two methods for quantifying the suppressor in the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) system. The suppressor is a guanidine derivative, N,N',N"-tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG). A list of 10 possible methods was generated, and screening experiments were performed for 8 of the 10 methods. After completion of the screening experiments, the non-aqueous acid-base titration was determined to be the most promising, and was selected for further development as the primary method. {sup 1}H NMR also showed promising results from the screening experiments, and this method was selected for further development as the secondary method. Other methods, including {sup 36}Cl radiocounting and ion chromatography, also showed promise; however, due to the similarity to the primary method (titration) and the inability to differentiate between TiDG and TOA (tri-n-ocytlamine) in the blended solvent, {sup 1}H NMR was selected over these methods. Analysis of radioactive samples obtained from real waste ESS (extraction, scrub, strip) testing using the titration method showed good results. Based on these results, the titration method was selected as the method of choice for TiDG measurement. {sup 1}H NMR has been selected as the secondary (back-up) method, and additional work is planned to further develop this method and to verify the method using radioactive samples. Procedures for analyzing radioactive samples of both pure NGS and blended solvent were developed and issued for the both methods.

  8. Modeling the wet bulb globe temperature using standard meteorological measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liljegren, J. C.; Carhart, R. A.; Lawday, P.; Tschopp, S.; Sharp, R.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army has a need for continuous, accurate estimates of the wet bulb globe temperature to protect soldiers and civilian workers from heat-related injuries, including those involved in the storage and destruction of aging chemical munitions at depots across the United States. At these depots, workers must don protective clothing that increases their risk of heat-related injury. Because of the difficulty in making continuous, accurate measurements of wet bulb globe temperature outdoors, the authors have developed a model of the wet bulb globe temperature that relies only on standard meteorological data available at each storage depot for input. The model is composed of separate submodels of the natural wet bulb and globe temperatures that are based on fundamental principles of heat and mass transfer, has no site-dependent parameters, and achieves an accuracy of better than 1 C based on comparisons with wet bulb globe temperature measurements at all depots.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.`

    2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The project management plan was finalized during a project kick off meeting held on January 16, 2001 in Lebanon, NH, which was attended by all project participants. The project management plan was submitted to DOE and was revised based on comments from DOE (Task 1.0). A survey of the potential users of the integrated software was conducted. A web-based survey form was developed and was announced in the ProcessCity discussion forum and in AspenTech's e-mail digest Aspen e-Flash. Several Fluent clients were individually contacted. A user requirements document was written (Task 2.2). As a prototype of AspenPlus-Fluent integration, the flowsheet for allyl alcohol production via the isomerization of propylene oxide was developed. A stirred tank reactor in the flowsheet for converting the byproduct acetone into n-propyl propionate was modeled with Fluent, version 5.4. The convergence of the AspenPlus-Fluent integrated model was demonstrated, and a list of data exchanges required between AspenPlus and Fluent was developed (Task 2.6). As the first demonstration case, the RP and L power plant was selected. A planning meeting was held on February 13, 2001 in Cambridge, MA to discuss this demonstration case. It was decided that the steam-side of the power plant would be modeled with AspenPlus and the gas-side, with the ALSTOM Power in-house code INDVU. A flowsheet model of the power plant was developed (Task 3.1). Three positive responses were received for the invitation to join the project Advisory Board. It was decided to expand the membership on the Advisory Board to include other industrial users interested in integrating AspenPlus and Fluent. Additional invitations were sent out (Task 5.0). Integraph's role in the project was restructured based on discussions among the project participants. Fluent hired Dr. Maxwell Osawe to work on the project. Dr. Osawe brings to the project a unique combination of skills (expertise in CFD and object-oriented design and programming) required for the software integration task (Task 7.0).

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell Osawe; Madhava Syamlal; Krishna Thotapalli; and Stephen Zitney

    2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the twelfth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40954. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a software framework to enable virtual simulation of Vision 21 plants. During the last quarter the software development was completed and the testing of the integrated software was completed. A user manual was written to complete software documentation. An installation CD-ROM including the following items was written: software installer, controller source code, proprietary CORBA wrapper templates for building local and remote servers, publicly available source code of the ACE/TAO CORBA library that needs to be built before compiling the controller source code, pre-built binaries of the publicly available XERCES XML library, and a PDF version of the software user's manual. The software was delivered to DOE. During the last quarter software demonstration tasks were completed. A few additional load points of Demo Case 1 were solved. Integrated simulations of Demo Case 2 with the proprietary HRSGSIM code and FLUENT CFD model were completed. The final task report describing Demo Case1 and Demo Case 2 simulation results was written and delivered to DOE.

  11. Development of analytical techniques to study H2s poisoning of PEMFCs and components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uribe, Francisco A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garzon, Fernando H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells are sensitive to impurities that may be present in either the oxidizer or fuel. H{sub 2}S, even at the ppb level, will have a dramatic and adverse affect on fuel cell performance. Not only is it important to know a particular material's affinity to adsorb H{sub 2}S, when considering materials for PEMFC applications, issues such as permeation and crossover rates also become extremely important Several experimental methods have been developed to quantify H{sub 2}S adsorption onto surfaces and to quantify H{sub 2}S permeation through Nafion(reg.) membranes using readily available and inexpensive Ag/AgS ion probes. In addition to calculating the H{sub 2}S uptake on commonly used XC-72 carbon supports and PtlXC-72 catalysts, the H{sub 2}S permeability through dry and humidified Nafion(reg.) PEMFC membranes was also studied using these specialized techniques. In each ion probe experiment performed, a sulfide anti-oxidant buffer solution was used to trap and concentrate trace quantities of H{sub 2}S during the course of the measurement. Crossover experiments were conducted for up to 24 hours in order to achieve sulfide ion concentrations high enough to be precisely determined by subsequent titration with Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. By using these techniques, we have confirmed H{sub 2}S crossover in Nafion(reg.) membranes and have calculated preliminary rates of H{sub 2}S crossover.

  12. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Abstract: The...

  13. Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

  14. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Progress Report for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L. [and others

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 (October 1993 through September 1994). This annual report is the eleventh for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has a research program in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL has four technical groups -- Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis -- which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL. The Chemical Analysis Group uses wet- chemical and instrumental methods for elemental, compositional, and isotopic determinations in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples and provides specialized analytical services. Major instruments in this group include an ion chromatograph (IC), an inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometer (ICP/AES), spectrophotometers, mass spectrometers (including gas-analysis and thermal-ionization mass spectrometers), emission spectrographs, autotitrators, sulfur and carbon determinators, and a kinetic phosphorescence uranium analyzer.

  15. IBM recently unveiled MobileFirst, a major initiative to develop mobile-related technologies and products that include security, analytics, mobile app development, and cloud-based backend services. MobileFirst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    IBM recently unveiled MobileFirst, a major initiative to develop mobile-related technologies and products that include security, analytics, mobile app development, and cloud-based backend services. Mobile lab has been asked to lead key portions of IBM's mobile research agenda. IBM Research-Austin has

  16. Assessment and development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low upgrade fuels. Final report, Phase 2B: Pilot demonstration of the MODAR supercritical water oxidation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation is Project Manager for the Development and Demonstration of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Wastes and Low Grade Fuel. This program has been ongoing through a Cooperative Agreement sponsored by the Department of Energy, initiated in June 1988. This report presents a comprehensive discussion of the results of the demonstration project conducted under this cooperative agreement with the overall goal of advancing the state-of-the-art in the practice of Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO). In recognition of the Government`s support of this project, we have endeavored to include all material and results that are not proprietary in as much detail as possible while still protecting MODAR`s proprietary technology. A specific example is in the discussion of materials of construction where results are presented while, in some cases, the specific materials are not identified. The report presents the results chronologically. Background material on the earlier phases (Section 2) provide an understanding of the evolution of the program, and bring all reviewers to a common starting point. Section 3 provides a discussion of activities from October 1991 through July 1992, during which the pilot plant was designed; and various studies including computational fluid dynamic modeling of the reactor vessel, and a process HAZOP analyses were conducted. Significant events during fabrication are presented in Section 4. The experimental results of the test program (December 1992--August 1993) are discussed in Section 5.

  17. Wetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubaud, Thomas

    , and silicone oils . Dynamic wetting transitions: a pearl flow thick lubricating film , b spider flow thinWetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels Thomas Cubaud Department of Mechanical of partially wetting threads in planar microchannels of height h=100 or 250 m fluids: ethanol, mineral oils

  18. The microrheology of wet forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraynik, A.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reinelt, D.A. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Mathematics

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kelvin cell is the only known topology for stable, perfectly ordered, dry foams. During topological transitions (T1s) associated with large elastic-plastic deformations, these cells switch neighbors and some faces gain or lose two sides, but the resulting bubbles with different shape are still Kelvin cells. The bubbles in a stable, perfectly ordered. wet foam are not limited to one topology (or even the two described here). The topological transitions considered here result in gain or loss of two dry films per bubble. The transition from Kelvin to RD topology is triggered by films shrinking in area, as in the dry case. However, the reverse transition from RD to Kelvin topology involves a different mechanism--opposite interfaces of an eight-way vertex touch and a new film grows from the point of contact as the foam is compressed. Microrheological analysis based on 2D models of foam structure has been useful preparation for 3D, despite obvious differences between 2D and 3D. Linear elastic behavior is anisotropic for perfectly ordered 3D foams--nonlinear elastic behavior is isotropic for 2D foams with polydisperse hexagonal structure. The shear moduli of a wet Kelvin foam decrease with increasing {phi}--the shear modulus of a wet 2D foam (with three-way Plateau borders) does not depend on {phi} at all. The effective isotropic shear moduli G of perfectly ordered wet foams tend to decrease with increasing {phi} but do not exhibit linear dependence, which may stem from the disorder of real systems.

  19. Development of an Integrated Micro-Analytical System for Lead in Saliva and Linkage to a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model Describing Lead Saliva Secretion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timchalk, Charles (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Poet, Torka S. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Lin, Yuehe (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Weitz, Karl K. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Zhao, Rui (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Thrall, Karla D. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a need to develop reliable portable analytical instruments for real-time monitoring of trace metals, such as lead (Pb) utilizing readily available non-invasive fluids like saliva. To interpret saliva results, an understanding of the pharmacokinetics of Pb secretion into the saliva is needed. A portable microfluidics/electrochemical device was developed for the rapid analysis of Pb based on square wave anodic stripping voltammetry, where a saliva sample flows over an electrode surface, Pb2+ is chemically reduced, accumulated, and the electric potential of the electrode scanned. To evaluate the relationship between saliva and blood Pb, rats were treated with single oral doses ranging from 20 to 500 mg Pb/kg of body weight, and 24 hours later salivation was induced by administering pilocarpine, a muscarinic agonist. Blood and saliva were collected and analyzed for Pb by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and by the micro-analytical system. The micro-analytical system was slightly less responsive ({approx}75-85%) than ICP-MS, however the response was linear over a concentration range of 1-2000 ppb suggesting that it can be utilized for the quantitation of salivary Pb. To relate saliva levels to internal dose of Pb (e.g. blood) and to total body burden, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for Pb was modified to incorporate a salivary gland compartment. The model was capable of predicting blood and saliva Pb concentration based on a limited data set. These preliminary results are encouraging and suggest that a fully developed, micro-analytical system can be utilized as an important tool for real-time biomonitoring of Pb for both occupational and environmental exposures.

  20. Dry purification of aspirational air in coke-sorting systems with wet slaking of coke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.F. Trembach; A.G. Klimenko [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coke transportation after wet slaking is accompanied by the release of dust in the production building and in the surrounding atmosphere. Wet methods are traditionally used to purify very humid air. Giprokoks has developed designs for highly efficient dry dust-removal methods in such conditions.

  1. Stochastic modeling of hourly dry-bulb and wet-bulb temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, D.E.; Woeste, F.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stochastic model of hourly dry-bulb and wet-bulb temperatures was developed. The periodic variations over the course of a year were estimated by least-square approximation. A multisite Markov model was used to simulate the stochastic nature of the data. These two models were combined to simulate years of hourly dry-bulb and wet-bulb temperatures.

  2. Coal combustion by wet oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

    1980-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

  3. Universal scaling of spontaneous imbibition for water-wet systems K. S. Schmid1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    -phase Darcy model. The group is derived rigorously from the only known exact analytical solution the validity of the group by applying it to 42 published SI studies for water-oil and water-air experiments length-scales. In all cases, water was the wetting phase. Our group serves as a ``master equation'' whose

  4. 'Elastic' fluctuation-induced effects in smectic wetting films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikina, E. S., E-mail: elena@ogri.r [Russian Academy of Sciences, Oil and Gas Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Li-Kardar field theory approach is generalized to wetting smectic films and the 'elastic' fluctuation-induced interaction is obtained between the external flat bounding surface and distorted IA (isotropic liquid-smectic A) interface acting as an 'internal' (bulk) boundary of the wetting smectic film under the assumption that the IA interface is essentially 'softer' than the surface smectic layer. This field theory approach allows calculating the fluctuation-induced corrections in Hamiltonians of the so-called 'correlated' liquids confined by two surfaces, in the case where one of the bounding surfaces is 'rough' and with different types of surface smectic layer anchoring. We obtain that in practice, the account of thermal displacements of the smectic layers in a wetting smectic film reduces to the addition of two contributions to the IA interface Hamiltonian. The first, so-called local contribution describes the long-range thermal 'elastic' repulsion of the fluctuating IA interface from the flat bounding surface. The second, so-called nonlocal contribution is connected with the occurrence of an 'elastic' fluctuation-induced correction to the stiffness of the IA interface. An analytic expression for this correction is obtained.

  5. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  6. Estimating Wet Bulb Globe Temperature Using Standard Meteorological Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, C.H.

    1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat stress management program at the Department of Energy''s Savannah River Site (SRS) requires implementation of protective controls on outdoor work based on observed values of wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT). To ensure continued compliance with heat stress program requirements, a computer algorithm was developed which calculates an estimate of WBGT using standard meteorological measurements. In addition, scripts were developed to generate a calculation every 15 minutes and post the results to an Intranet web site.

  7. Development and verification of new semi-analytical methods for the analysis and prediction of gas well performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, Robert Stephen

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . We have developed two new relations (p˛ and (p/z)˛ results) that predict gas well rate-time performance within engineering accuracy of the rigorous solution. Unlike the pseudopressure-pseudotime relation, our new solutions require only knowledge...

  8. Data Analytics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOfficeOctoberDaniel Wood DarkDataAnalytics

  9. Numerical study of perfect wetting in quenched QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brower, R. (Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)); Huang, S. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Potvin, J. (Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States) Department of Science and Mathematics, Parks College of Saint Louis University, Cahokia, Illinois 62206 (United States)); Rebbi, C.; Ross, J. (Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States))

    1992-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the quenched approximation of QCD, the high-temperature phase (or gluon plasma phase) will be found in one of three degenerate vacua characterized by the average value of the Polyakov loop. Such vacua can coexist separated by a sharp interface. As {ital T}{r arrow}{ital T}{sub {ital c}}{sup +} (the confinement temperature) confined or glueball matter may be able to grow as a layer along this interface. QCD is said to obey {ital perfect} {ital wetting} if these layers are planar, or {ital imperfect} {ital wetting} if they are shaped like lenses. Evidence for perfect wetting in quenched QCD is studied from a calculation of the surface tension {alpha}{sub {ital p},}{ital p}/{ital T}{sup 3} between two high-temperature plasma phases at {ital T}{sub {ital c}} on a 16{sup 2}{times}32{times}4 lattice. By comparison with the value of the surface tension of a hadron-plasma interface, the data suggest that planar slabs or at least very long lenses develop along the interface, implying that QCD obeys perfect wetting.

  10. Assessment of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Waste and Low-Grade Fuels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettinger, J.; Koppel, P.; Margulies, A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation, under Department of Energy sponsorship, is developing a wet oxidation system to generate steam for industrial processes by burning industrial waste materials and low-grade fuels. The program involves...

  11. Development of A Cryogenic Drift Cell Spectrometer and Methods for Improving the Analytical Figures of Merit for Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Jody C.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A cryogenic (325-80 K) ion mobility-mass spectrometer was designed and constructed in order to improve the analytical figures-of-merit for the chemical analysis of small mass analytes using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. ...

  12. The Governance of Clean Development Working Paper 007 July 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Adrian

    Development Mechanism CERC Central Electricty Regulartory Commission C-WET Centre for Wind Energy Technology

  13. Identification of High Collision Concentration Locations Under Wet Weather Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Taesung; Chung, Koohong; Ragland, David; Chan, Chin-Yao

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conducted under wet weather conditions. Observations fromLeahy, M. , and Suggett, J. Weather as a Chronic Hazard forLocations Under Wet Weather Conditions Taesung Hwang,

  14. Epoxy Nanocomposites - Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilyin, S. O.; Kotomin, S. V.; Kulichikhin, V. G. [A.V.Topchiev Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis, 29, Leninskii Prospect, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Epoxy nanocomposites considered as challenging polymeric matrix for advanced reinforced plastics. Nanofillers change rheokinetics of epoxy resin curing, affect wetting and adhesion to aramid and carbon fibers. In all cases extreme dependence of adhesive strength vs filler content in the binder was observed. New experimental techniques were developed to study wettability and fiber-matrix adhesion interaction, using yarn penetration path length, aramid fiber knot pull-up test and electrical admittance of the fracture surface of CFRP.

  15. Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    constructed across North Carolina. OVERVIEW As its name implies, a stormwater wetland is a wetland system of stormwater wetlands and wet ponds is performed to achieve four goals: efficient hydraulic flow and pollutant

  16. FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

    2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

  17. Wet/dry cooling tower and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Rohsenow, Warren R. (Waban, MA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

  18. WETTABILITY AND IMBIBITION: MICROSCOPIC DISTRIBUTION OF WETTING AND ITS CONSEQUENCES AT THE CORE AND FIELD SCALES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow; Chris Palmer; Purnendu K. Dasgupta

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The questions of reservoir wettability have been approached in this project from three directions. First, we have studied the properties of crude oils that contribute to wetting alteration in a reservoir. A database of more than 150 different crude oil samples has been established to facilitate examination of the relationships between crude oil chemical and physical properties and their influence on reservoir wetting. In the course of this work an improved SARA analysis technique was developed and major advances were made in understanding asphaltene stability including development of a thermodynamic Asphaltene Solubility Model (ASM) and empirical methods for predicting the onset of instability. The CO-Wet database is a resource that will be used to guide wettability research in the future. The second approach is to study crude oil/brine/rock interactions on smooth surfaces. Contact angle measurements were made under controlled conditions on mica surfaces that had been exposed to many of the oils in the CO-Wet database. With this wealth of data, statistical tests can now be used to examine the relationships between crude oil properties and the tendencies of those oils to alter wetting. Traditionally, contact angles have been used as the primary wetting assessment tool on smooth surfaces. A new technique has been developed using an atomic forces microscope that adds a new dimension to the ability to characterize oil-treated surfaces. Ultimately we aim to understand wetting in porous media, the focus of the third approach taken in this project. Using oils from the CO-Wet database, experimental advances have been made in scaling the rate of imbibition, a sensitive measure of core wetting. Application of the scaling group to mixed-wet systems has been demonstrated for a range of core conditions. Investigations of imbibition in gas/liquid systems provided the motivation for theoretical advances as well. As a result of this project we have many new tools for studying wetting at microscopic and macroscopic scales and a library of well-characterized fluids for use in studies of crude oil/brine/rock interactions.

  19. Wet powder seal for gas containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stang, Louis G. (Sayville, NY)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

  20. Storm Water Analytical Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Individual Permit Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm...

  1. Controllable underwater anisotropic oil-wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yong, Jiale; Chen, Feng, E-mail: chenfeng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Yang, Qing; Farooq, Umar; Bian, Hao; Du, Guangqing; Hou, Xun [State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing System Engineering and Key Laboratory of Photonics Technology for Information of Shaanxi Province, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter demonstrates a simple method to achieve underwater anisotropic oil-wetting using silicon surfaces with a microgroove array produced by femtosecond laser ablation. The oil contact angles along the direction perpendicular to the grooves are consistently larger than those parallel to the microgroove arrays in water because the oil droplet is restricted by the energy barrier that exists between the non-irradiated domain and the trapped water in the laser-ablated microgrooves. This underwater anisotropic oil-wetting is able to be controlled, and the anisotropy can be tuned from 0° to ?20° by adjusting the period of the microgroove arrays.

  2. Ensuring message embedding in wet paper steganography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ensuring message embedding in wet paper steganography Daniel Augot1, Morgan Barbier1, and Caroline as a method to stealthily embed a message in a cover-medium through the use of bounded decoding. In 2005-medium and the message. Unfortunately, almost all existing methods solving the bounded decoding syndrome problem

  3. Use of roof temperature modeling to predict necessary conditions for locating wet insulation with infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In low-sloped roofing systems using porous insulation, the presence of water can significantly degrade thermal performance. For this reason, it is desirable to develop a reliable method for detecting the presence of water in a roofing system. Because of the different thermal characteristics of wet and dry insulation, there is often a surface temperature differential between areas containing wet insulation and areas containing dry insulation. Under the right circumstances, the areas of wet insulation can be detected by means of infrared sensing techniques. These techniques have already gained widespread acceptance, but there is still some uncertainty as to what are appropriate environmental conditions for viewing. To better define the conditions under which infrared techniques can distinguish between areas of wet and dry insulation, a one-dimensional, transient heat transfer model of a roofing system was developed. The model considers conduction through the roof, insolation on the surface, radiant exchange between the roof and sky, convective heat transfer between the roof and air, and the influence of trapped moisture on the thermal properties of the insulation. A study was undertaken using this model to develop an easily-applied technique for prediction of necessary conditions for locating wet roof insulation using infrared thermography.

  4. Analysis of Wet Weather Related Collision Concentration Locations: Empirical Assessment of Continuous Risk Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Soonmi; Chung, Koohong; Ragland, David R; Chan, Ching-Yao

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of Wet Weather Related Collision ConcentrationThe CRP plot displays wet weather related collision profilefactors responsible for wet weather related collisions is

  5. Evaporation-induced non-wetting droplets on superhydrophilic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adera, Solomon (Solomon E.)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A droplet deposited on a rough, lyophilic surface satisfying the imbibition condition, results in spontaneous spreading and hence complete wetting. However, in this thesis, we demonstrate that this wetting behavior can be ...

  6. Discussion of "Development and Verification of an Analytical Solution for Fore-casting Nonlinear Kinematic Flood Waves" by Sergio E. Serrano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Kinematic Flood Waves" by Sergio E. Serrano Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, July/August 2006, Vol. 11, No presents an interesting method to forecast nonlinear kinematic flood waves (Serrano, 2006). As a first to the Kinematic Wave Equation (KWE). The range of time lags for which this analytical solution is applicable being

  7. Bond anisotropy and cohesion of wet granular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -R, Domaine Universitaire, B.P. 53, 38041 Grenoble, Cedex 9, France. We analyze the Coulomb cohesion of wet. The contact dynamics simulations of a wet material, in which a capillary force law is prescribed, shear strength, Coulomb cohesion, jamming, fragile behavior 1. Introduction Wet granular materials

  8. Accepted Manuscript Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    Accepted Manuscript Variational formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting, Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg. (2011), doi: 10 formulations for surface tension, capillarity and wetting Gustavo C. Buscagliaa,b, , Roberto F. Ausasa,b a

  9. www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    1 www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Wet-Nanotechnology: nanofluids at NIU www.kostic.niu.edu/DRnanofluids Dry- vs. Wet-nanotechnology · Fluids (gases & liquids) vs. Solids in Nature and (Chemical & Bio, and processes · Synergy of dry-nanotechnology (solid-state) & wet-nanotechnology (POLY-nanofluids) #12;2 www

  10. Erosion dynamics of a wet granular medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gautier Lefebvre; Pierre Jop

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid may give strong cohesion properties to a granular medium, and confer a solid-like behavior. We study the erosion of a fixed circular aggregate of wet granular matter subjected to a flow of dry grains inside a half-filled rotating drum. During the rotation, the dry grains flow around the fixed obstacle. We show that its diameter decreases linearly with time for low liquid content, as wet grains are pulled-out of the aggregate. This erosion phenomenon is governed by the properties of the liquids. The erosion rate decreases exponentially with the surface tension while it depends on the viscosity to the power -1. We propose a model based on the force fluctuations arising inside the flow, explaining both dependencies: the capillary force acts as a threshold and the viscosity controls the erosion time scale. We also provide experiments using different flowing grains confirming our model.

  11. Notes on the efficacy of wet versus dry screening of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Flores, D.; Guedes, A. [Center and Department of Geology, Oporto (Portugal)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The methodology used to obtain fly ash subsamples of different sizes is generally based on wet or dry sieving methods. However, the worth of such methods is not certain if the methodology applied is not mentioned in the analytical procedure. After performing a fly ash mechanical dry, sieving, the authors compared those results with the ones obtained by laser diffraction on the same samples and found unacceptable discrepancies. A preliminary, study of a wet sieving analysis carried out on an economizer fly ash sample showed that this method was more effective than the dry sieving. The importance of standardizing the way samples are handled, pretreated and presented to the instrument of analysis are suggested and interlaboratory reproducibility trials are needed to create a common standard methodology to obtain large amounts of fly ash size fraction subsamples.

  12. Guide to Savannah River Laboratory Analytical Services Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Analytical Services Group (ASG) is to provide analytical support for Savannah River Laboratory Research and Development Programs using onsite and offsite analytical labs as resources. A second mission is to provide Savannah River Site (SRS) operations with analytical support for nonroutine material characterization or special chemical analyses. The ASG provides backup support for the SRS process control labs as necessary.

  13. Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery in Fractional-Wet Systems: A Pore-Scale Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Ryan T.; Wildenschild, Dorthe (Oregon State U.)

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a technology that could potentially increase the tertiary recovery of oil from mature oil formations. However, the efficacy of this technology in fractional-wet systems is unknown, and the mechanisms involved in oil mobilization therefore need further investigation. Our MEOR strategy consists of the injection of ex situ produced metabolic byproducts produced by Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 (which lower interfacial tension (IFT) via biosurfactant production) into fractional-wet cores containing residual oil. Two different MEOR flooding solutions were tested; one solution contained both microbes and metabolic byproducts while the other contained only the metabolic byproducts. The columns were imaged with X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) after water flooding, and after MEOR, which allowed for the evaluation of the pore-scale processes taking place during MEOR. Results indicate that the larger residual oil blobs and residual oil held under relatively low capillary pressures were the main fractions recovered during MEOR. Residual oil saturation, interfacial curvatures, and oil blob sizes were measured from the CMT images and used to develop a conceptual model for MEOR in fractional-wet systems. Overall, results indicate that MEOR was effective at recovering oil from fractional-wet systems with reported additional oil recovered (AOR) values between 44 and 80%; the highest AOR values were observed in the most oil-wet system.

  14. Selenium Speciation and Management in Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Searcy, K; Richardson, M; Blythe, G; Wallschlaeger, D; Chu, P; Dene, C

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses results from bench- and pilot-scale simulation tests conducted to determine the factors that impact selenium speciation and phase partitioning in wet FGD systems. The selenium chemistry in wet FGD systems is highly complex and not completely understood, thus extrapolation and scale-up of these results may be uncertain. Control of operating parameters and application of scrubber additives have successfully demonstrated the avoidance or decrease of selenite oxidation at the bench and pilot scale. Ongoing efforts to improve sample handling methods for selenium speciation measurements are also discussed. Bench-scale scrubber tests explored the impacts of oxidation air rate, trace metals, scrubber additives, and natural limestone on selenium speciation in synthetic and field-generated full-scale FGD liquors. The presence and concentration of redox-active chemical species as well as the oxidation air rate contribute to the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) conditions in FGD scrubbers. Selenite oxidation to the undesirable selenate form increases with increasing ORP conditions, and decreases with decreasing ORP conditions. Solid-phase manganese [Mn(IV)] appeared to be the significant metal impacting the oxidation of selenite to selenate. Scrubber additives were tested for their ability to inhibit selenite oxidation. Although dibasic acid and other scrubber additives showed promise in early clear liquor (sodium based and without calcium solids) bench-scale tests, these additives did not show strong inhibition of selenite oxidation in tests with higher manganese concentrations and with slurries from full-scale wet FGD systems. In bench-tests with field liquors, addition of ferric chloride at a 250:1 iron-to-selenium mass ratio sorbed all incoming selenite to the solid phase, although addition of ferric salts had no impact on native selenate that already existed in the field slurry liquor sample. As ORP increases, selenite may oxidize to selenate more rapidly than it sorbs to ferric solids. Though it was not possible to demonstrate a decrease in selenium concentrations to levels below the project�¢����s target of 50 ���µg/L during pilot testing, some trends observed in bench-scale testing were evident at the pilot scale. Specifically, reducing oxidation air rate and ORP tends to either retain selenium as selenite in the liquor or shift selenium phase partitioning to the solid phase. Oxidation air flow rate control may be one option for managing selenium behavior in FGD scrubbers. Units that cycle load widely may find it more difficult to impact ORP conditions with oxidation air flow rate control alone. Because decreasing oxidation air rates to the reaction tank showed that all �¢����new�¢��� selenium reported to the solids, the addition of ferric chloride to the pilot scrubber could not show further improvements in selenium behavior. Ferric chloride addition did shift mercury to the slurry solids, specifically to the fine particles. Several competing pathways may govern the reporting of selenium to the slurry solids: co-precipitation with gypsum into the bulk solids and sorption or co-precipitation with iron into the fine particles. Simultaneous measurement of selenium and mercury behavior suggests a holistic management strategy is best to optimize the fate of both of these elements in FGD waters. Work conducted under this project evaluated sample handling and analytical methods for selenium speciation in FGD waters. Three analytical techniques and several preservation methods were employed. Measurements of selenium speciation over time indicated that for accurate selenium speciation, it is best to conduct measurements on unpreserved, filtered samples as soon after sampling as possible. The capital and operating costs for two selenium management strategies were considered: ferric chloride addition and oxidation air flow rate control. For ferric chloride addition, as migh

  15. Analytical Solutions for 1D Countercurrent Imbibition in Water-Wet Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    are thin. The imbibition of water in the matrix block of a fractured reservoir when immersed in water is often important in two-phase flow in fractured porous media and in layered media where individual layers

  16. Wet-dry cooling demonstration. Test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allemann, R.T.; DeBellis, D.E.; Werry, E.V.; Johnson, B.M.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale test of dry/wet cooling using the ammonia phase-change system, designated the Advanced Concepts Test (ACT), has been operated at Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Kern Station at Bakersfield, California. The facility is capable of condensing 60,000 lbs/h of steam from a small house turbine. Two different modes of combining dry and evaporative cooling have been tested. One uses deluge cooling in which water is allowed to flow over the fins of the dry (air-cooled) heat exchanger on hot days; the other uses a separate evaporative condenser in parallel to the dry heat exchanger. A third mode of enhancing the dry cooling system, termed capacitive cooling has been tested. In this system, the ammonia-cooled steam condenser is supplemented by a parallel conventional water-cooled condenser with water supplied from a closed system. This water is cooled during off-peak hours each night by an ammonia heat pump which rejects heat through the ACT Cooling Tower. If operated over the period of a year, each of the wet/dry systems would use only 25% of the water normally required to reject this heat load in an evaporative cooling tower. The third would consume no water, the evaporative cooling being replaced by the delayed cooling of the closed system water supply.

  17. MORT User's Manual for use with the Management Oversight and Risk Tree analytical logic diagram. [Contains a list of System Safety Development Center publications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, N.W.; Eicher, R.W.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the User's Manual for MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree), a logic diagram in the form of a work sheet'' that illustrates a long series of interrelated questions. MORT is a comprehensive analytical procedure that provides a disciplined method for determining the causes and contributing factors of major accidents. Alternatively, it serves as a tool to evaluate the quality of an existing system. While similar in many respects to fault tree analysis, MORT is more generalized and presents over 1,500 specific elements of an ideal universal'' management program for optimizing environment, safety and health, and other programs. This User's Manual is intended to be used with the MORT diagram dated February 1992.

  18. A round robin evaluation of the corrosiveness of wet residential insulation by electrochemical measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stansbury, E.E. (Stansbury (E.E.), Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a round cabin evaluation of the use of an electrochemical method of calculating the corrosion rate of low carbon steel in environments related to cellulosic building insulations are reported. Environments included the leachate from a wet cellulosic insulation and solutions based on pure and commercial grades of borax, ammonium sulfate and aluminum sulfate. The pH values of these environments were in the range of 2.5 to 9.5. Electrochemical measurements were made using a direct reading corrosion rate instrument. The calculated corrosion rates were compared with those determined directly by weight loss measurements. Electrochemical measurements were made over a period of 48 hours and weight loss exposures were for two weeks. Poor agreement was observed for the corrosion rates determined electrochemically and the values were consistently larger than those based on weight loss. Reasons proposed for these results included the complex nature of the corrosion product deposits and the control these deposits have on oxygen diffusion to the metal interface. Both factors influence the validity of the calculation of the corrosion rate by the direct reading instrument. It was concluded that development of a viable electrochemical method of general applicability to the evaluation of the corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulations were doubtful. Because of the controlling influence of dissolved oxygen on the corrosion rate in the insulation leachate, an alternate evaluation method is proposed in which a thin steel specimen is partially immersed in wet insulation for three weeks. The corrosiveness of the wet insulation is evaluated in terms of the severity of attack near the metal-air-wet insulation interface. With thin metal specimens, complete penetration along the interface is proposed as a pass/fail criterion. An environment of sterile cotton wet with distilled water is proposed as a comparative standard. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

  20. Optimizing wettability of externally wetted microfabricated silicon electrospray thrusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, Tanya Cruz

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrospray propulsion devices with externally wetted architectures have shown favorable performance. The design of microfabricated silicon thrusters and their feed systems requires an understanding of propellant flow ...

  1. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  2. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  3. Wetting of metals and glasses on Mo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Saiz, Eduardo; Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Benhassine, Mehdi; de Coninck, Joel; Rauch, Nicole; Ruehle, Manfred

    2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The wetting of low melting point metals and Si-Ca-Al-Ti-O glasses on molybdenum has been investigated. The selected metals (Au, Cu, Ag) form a simple eutectic with Mo. Metal spreading occurs under nonreactive conditions without interdiffusion or ridge formation. The metals exhibit low (non-zero) contact angles on Mo but this requires temperatures higher than 1100 C in reducing atmospheres in order to eliminate a layer of adsorbed impurities on the molybdenum surface. By controlling the oxygen activity in the furnace, glass spreading can take place under reactive or nonreactive conditions. We have found that in the glass/Mo system the contact angle does not decrease under reactive conditions. In all cases, adsorption from the liquid seems to accelerate the diffusivity on the free molybdenum surface.

  4. Development and Analytical Validation of an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for the Measurement of Feline Alpha1-proteinase Inhibitor (fa1-PI) in Serum and Feces and the Evaluation of Fecal fa1-PI Concentrations in Cats with Idiopathic Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Gastrointestinal Neoplasia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Kathrin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-PI) has been shown to be a useful marker of gastrointestinal protein loss in some species. The objectives of this study were, first, to develop and analytically validate an ELISA for the ...

  5. Method for wetting a boron alloy to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Storms, E.K.

    1987-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for wetting a graphite substrate and spreading a a boron alloy over the substrate. The wetted substrate may be in the form of a needle for an effective ion emission source. The method may also be used to wet a graphite substrate for subsequent joining with another graphite substrate or other metal, or to form a protective coating over a graphite substrate. A noneutectic alloy of boron is formed with a metal selected from the group consisting of nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), and platinum (Pt) with excess boron, i.e., and atomic percentage of boron effective to precipitate boron at a wetting temperature of less than the liquid-phase boundary temperature of the alloy. The alloy is applied to the substrate and the graphite substrate is then heated to the wetting temperature and maintained at the wetting temperature for a time effective for the alloy to wet and spread over the substrate. The excess boron is evenly dispersed in the alloy and is readily available to promote the wetting and spreading action of the alloy. 1 fig.

  6. Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Alexandra DeVisser, NAVFAC-EXWC Brian June 10, 2013 #12;Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Objective: Provide location for year-long in Cable, Sound & Sea Technology (SST) Luis A. Vega, HNEI-University of Hawaii Energy Ocean International

  7. Extreme Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad A [ORNL] [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL] [ORNL; Pullum, Laura L [ORNL] [ORNL; Ramanathan, Arvind [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the scale and complexity of today s data, visual analytics is rapidly becoming a necessity rather than an option for comprehensive exploratory analysis. In this paper, we provide an overview of three applications of visual analytics for addressing the challenges of analyzing climate, text streams, and biosurveilance data. These systems feature varying levels of interaction and high performance computing technology integration to permit exploratory analysis of large and complex data of global significance.

  8. Wetting heterogeneity in mixed-wet porous media controls flow dissipation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julie Murison; Benoît Semin; Jean-Christophe Baret; Stephan Herminghaus; Matthias Schröter; Martin Brinkmann

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressure controlled displacement of an oil/water interface is studied in dense packings of functionalized glass beads with well-defined spatial wettability correlations. An enhanced dissipation is observed if the typical extension $\\xi$ of the same-type wetting domains is smaller than the average bead diameter $d$. Three dimensional imaging using X-ray microtomography shows that the frequency $n(s)$ of residual droplet volumes $s$ for different $\\xi$ collapse onto the same curve. This indicates that the additional dissipation for small $\\xi$ is due to contact line pinning rather than an increase of capillary break-up/coalescence events.

  9. analytical modeling approach: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nonperturbative analytical relativistic models of magnetars. With this purpose in mind we first develop a method for generating exact interior solutions to the static and...

  10. analytical resources securely: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: An Analytical Model of Logic Resource Utilization for FPGA Architecture Development by Andrew H Designers constantly...

  11. ames wet oxidation process: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ZnO thin films using wet-chemical etching processes on application for organic light emitting diode (OLED) devices Engineering Websites Summary: Fabrication of the ZnO thin films...

  12. assessment meca wet: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the variation of the surface Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 216 Wireless Engineering and Technology, 2013, 4, 117-123 doi:10.4236wet.2013.420018 Published Online April 2013...

  13. An Analytic Holographic Superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher P. Herzog

    2011-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate a holographic superconductor that admits an analytic treatment near the phase transition. In the dual 3+1 dimensional field theory, the phase transition occurs when a scalar operator of scaling dimension two gets a vacuum expectation value. We calculate current-current correlation functions along with the speed of second sound near the critical temperature. We also make some remarks about critical exponents. An analytic treatment is possible because an underlying Heun equation describing the zero mode of the phase transition has a polynomial solution. Amusingly, the treatment here may generalize for an order parameter with any integer spin, and we propose a Lagrangian for a spin two holographic superconductor.

  14. New MV cable design for wet environments in underground distribution systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teixeira, M.D.R. Jr. (Ficap Fios e Cabos Plasticos do Brasil SA, Rio De Janeiro (BR))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of new wet design MV power cables, up to 35 kV, using EPDM compound as insulation and longitudinal water tightness. The combination of the cable design and the type of insulation compound allow for reduction of the insulation thickness in such a way, as to have an electrical stress at the conductor of 4 kV/mm which is significantly greater than used in MV distribution cables. Following a methodology established, at the author's company, the reliability of this design, cable and EPDM's formulation, in wet location, without metallic water barriers, was well demonstrated. Mini-installation of model cables in service-like conditions, to estimate the ageing rate, are presented and discussed.

  15. Jacob P. Brenner Design Specifications for Wet-Bulb Aspirator Apparatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Jacob P. Brenner Thesis: Design Specifications for Wet-Bulb Aspirator Apparatus Project Description the concentration of water vapor in the air is the wet-bulb temperature. The wet-bulb temperature along with the dry-bulb for the testing of HVAC&R equipment. The focus of this research is on the accurate measurement of the wet-bulb

  16. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

  17. Requirements for Predictive Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Hiltbrand

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important to have a clear understanding of how traditional Business Intelligence (BI) and analytics are different and how they fit together in optimizing organizational decision making. With tradition BI, activities are focused primarily on providing context to enhance a known set of information through aggregation, data cleansing and delivery mechanisms. As these organizations mature their BI ecosystems, they achieve a clearer picture of the key performance indicators signaling the relative health of their operations. Organizations that embark on activities surrounding predictive analytics and data mining go beyond simply presenting the data in a manner that will allow decisions makers to have a complete context around the information. These organizations generate models based on known information and then apply other organizational data against these models to reveal unknown information.

  18. Development of Analytical Methodology for Neurochemical Investigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, David John

    2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    for simultaneous immunological and enzymatic assays. Figure 2.19 Microchip device for point-of-care analysis of lithium with integrated sampling from a glass capillary. Figure 2.20 Picture of a three electrode paper-based microfluidic device with EC... modes of EC detection, fabrication strategies for electrodes and microchips, and 5 integration of electrodes into microfluidic devices are detailed. In addition, the use of microchip electrophoresis with EC detection for a variety of applications...

  19. Advanced wet-dry cooling tower concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Troxell Kimmel

    The purpose of this years' work has been to test and analyze the new dry cooling tower surface previously developed. The model heat transfer test apparatus built last year has been instrumented for temperature, humidity ...

  20. ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY a post graduate course (doktorandkurs) when: February 10 ­ 28, 2014 where: Chemical Ecology, Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agriculture (SLU to modern analytical methods used in Chemical Ecological and Ecotoxicological research, such as: methods

  1. NERSC Job Logs and Analytics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For Users Job Logs & Analytics Job Logs & Analytics Queue Status A listing of jobs running and waiting in the queues (NERSC login required). Queue Wait Times Batch Queue Wait...

  2. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory: Progress report for FY 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Graczyk, D.G.; Lindahl, P.C.; Erickson, M.D.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for fiscal year 1988 (October 1987 through September 1988). The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, the ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques.

  3. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Graczyk, D.G.; Lindahl, P.C.; Boparai, A.S.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year 1991 (October 1990 through September 1991). This is the eighth annual report for the ACL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, the ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques.

  4. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Graczyk, D.G.; Lindahl, P.C.; Erickson, M.D.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year 1989 (October 1988 through September 1989). The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, the ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques.

  5. Wetting of soap bubbles on hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steve Arscott

    2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetting of sessile bubbles on solid and liquid surfaces has been studied. A model is presented for the contact angle of a sessile bubble based on a modified Young equation - the experimental results agree with the model. A hydrophilic surface results in a bubble contact angle of 90 deg whereas on a superhydrophobic surface one observes 134 deg. For hydrophilic surfaces, the bubble angle diminishes with bubble radius - whereas on a superhydrophobic surface, the bubble angle increases. The size of the Plateau borders governs the bubble contact angle - depending on the wetting of the surface.

  6. Wetting of soap bubbles on hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arscott, Steve

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetting of sessile bubbles on solid and liquid surfaces has been studied. A model is presented for the contact angle of a sessile bubble based on a modified Young equation - the experimental results agree with the model. A hydrophilic surface results in a bubble contact angle of 90 deg whereas on a superhydrophobic surface one observes 134 deg. For hydrophilic surfaces, the bubble angle diminishes with bubble radius - whereas on a superhydrophobic surface, the bubble angle increases. The size of the Plateau borders governs the bubble contact angle - depending on the wetting of the surface.

  7. Enhancing Law Enforcement Using Data & Visual Analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authority of New York and New Jersey (PA NY/NJ), Pacific Northwest National Labs (PNNL), Intuidex will integrate visual analytics methods developed at PNNL to mine valuable links between entities in order Authority of New York and New Jersey (PA NY/NJ) · Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) · Intuidex

  8. Data and Analytics Strategy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OFSupplementalC. L. Martin andand Analytics Strategy --- 1

  9. Comparison of analytical methods for percent phosphorous determination in electroless nickel plate. [UCC-ND alkalimetric method; UCC-ND Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) method; ASTM-E39 gravimetric method; development colorimetric method; independent colorimetric method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, W.W.; Sullivan, H.H.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroless nicke-plate characteristics are substantially influenced by percent phosphorous concentrations. Available ASTM analytical methods are designed for phosphorous concentrations of less than one percent compared to the 4.0 to 20.0% concentrations common in electroless nickel plate. A variety of analytical adaptations are applied through the industry resulting in poor data continuity. This paper presents a statistical comparison of five analytical methods and recommends accurate and precise procedures for use in percent phosphorous determinations in electroless nickel plate. 2 figures, 1 table.

  10. Graph Analytics for Signature Discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Lo, Chaomei

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within large amounts of seemingly unstructured data it can be diffcult to find signatures of events. In our work we transform unstructured data into a graph representation. By doing this we expose underlying structure in the data and can take advantage of existing graph analytics capabilities, as well as develop new capabilities. Currently we focus on applications in cybersecurity and communication domains. Within cybersecurity we aim to find signatures for perpetrators using the pass-the-hash attack, and in communications we look for emails or phone calls going up or down a chain of command. In both of these areas, and in many others, the signature we look for is a path with certain temporal properties. In this paper we discuss our methodology for finding these temporal paths within large graphs.

  11. Development and Analytical Validation of an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for the Measurement of Feline Alpha1-proteinase Inhibitor (fa1-PI) in Serum and Feces and the Evaluation of Fecal fa1-PI Concentrations in Cats with Idiopathic Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Gastrointestinal Neoplasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Kathrin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-PI) has been shown to be a useful marker of gastrointestinal protein loss in some species. The objectives of this study were, first, to develop and analytically validate an ELISA for the measurement of alpha1-PI...

  12. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and discusses the status of the pilot unit at Monticello.

  13. Directional Wetting in Anisotropic Inverse Opals Katherine R. Phillips,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenberg, Joanna

    the nano- to microscale voids. Here, we investigate how liquid wetting in highly ordered inverse opals template of colloidal particles. This highly ordered structure acts as a photonic crystal, strongly or not a given liquid will fill the structure spontaneously upon contact. Using alkylchlorosi- lanes,18 silica

  14. Interference evaluation between manifold and wet Christmas tree CP systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brasil, S.L.D.C.; Baptista, W.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore production wells are controlled by valves installed in the marine soil, called wet Christmas trees (WCTs). A manifold receives the production of several wells and transports it to the platform. The manifold is cathodically protected by Al anodes and the WCT by Zn anodes. A computer simulation was carried out to evaluate the interference between the equipment cathodic protection systems.

  15. Thermo-Wetting and Friction Reduction Characterization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidrovo, Carlos H.

    such surfaces include frost prevention on aircraft flight surfaces to self-cleaning features on solar energy panels [1,5]. One way to achieve superhydrophobicity is through the micro- geometry modification of low energy surfaces. Two models repre- sent the wetting behavior of such microtextured surfaces: the Wenzel

  16. The Analytical Sciences Digital Library (ASDL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larive, Cynthia K.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical Sciences Digital Library (http://www.asdlib.org).Analytical Sciences Digital Library (ASDL) Cynthia K. LariveAnalytical Sciences Digital Library (ASDL) is a collection

  17. Dry/wet performance of a plate-fin air-cooled heat exchanger with continuous corrugated fins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, S.G.; Kreid, D.K.; Johnson, B.M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance and operating characteristics of a plate-fin heat exchanger in dry/wet or deluge operations was experimentally determined. Development of the deluge heat/mass transfer model continued. The experiments were conducted in a specially-designed wind tunnel at the PNL. Air that was first heated and humidified to specified conditions was circulated at a controlled rate through a 2 ft x 6 ft heat exchanger module. The heat exchanger used in the tests was a wavy surface, plate fin on tube configuration. Hot water was circulated through the tubes at high flow rates to maintain an essentially isothermal condition on the tube side. Deionized water sprayed on the top of the vertically oriented plate fins was collected at the bottom of the core and recirculated. Instrumentation was provided for measurement of flow rates and thermodynamic conditions in the air, in the core circulation water, and in the deluge water. Measurements of the air side pressure drop and heat rejection rate were made as a function of air flow rate, air inlet temperature and humidity, deluge water flow rate, and the core inclination from the vertical. An overall heat transfer coefficient and an effective deluge film convective coefficient was determined. The deluge model, for predicting heat transfer from a wet finned heat exchanger was further developed and refined, and a major extension of the model was formulated that permits simultaneous calculation of both the heat transfer and evaporation rates from the wetted surface. The experiments showed an increase in the heat rejection rate due to wetting, accompanied by a proportional increase in the air side pressure drop. For operation at the same air side pressure drop, the enhancement ratio Q/sub w//Q/sub d/ varied between 2 and 5 for the conditions tested. Thus, the potential enhancement of heat transfer due to wetting can be substantial.

  18. Adsorption calorimetry of water-wet and oil-wet minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noll, L.A.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is a continuation of a research program designed to understand and model adsorption of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) chemical flooding material onto reservoir minerals. The understanding and modeling of adsorption will ultimately lead to an effective way to select EOR chemicals which are most cost effective. This report describes progress made from October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. It is divided into three parts: (1) modeling of adsorption, (2) adsorption of surfactants from solutions of brine and aqueous cosurfactant, and (3) proving the usefulness of titration calorimetry. In the first part, the surface described was water-wet; in the other parts, surfaces of different wettability were used in the investigations. The adsorption of cosurfactant from hydrocarbon onto silica is modeled by a Langmuir isotherm. This model indicates that the adsorption is driven by enthalpy, taking place with an unfavorable entropy change. It is physical adsorption and does not exceed monolayer coverage. Strong brine seems to have little effect on the adsorption of nonionic surfactant, except in the case of Florisil, a magnesia containing silica. In the presence of cosurfactant, the energy of adsorption is in general higher than that from pure water. All of these enthalpies of adsorption are negative, thus implying lower adsorption as temperature is raised. The titration calorimeter has proved to be a useful instrument for studying adsorption. The measurement of the interaction of nonionic surfactant with silica show satisfactory agreement with the results of the flow calorimeter. Adsorption on kaolin, bentonite, and sandstone can be measured with this instrument, whereas these solids are not amenable to flow calorimetry. 10 figs. 6 tabs.

  19. Photo courtesy of Justin Reuter Dynamic Data Analytics (CDDA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    the emerging importance of Dynamic Data Analytics (DDA) so that the U.S. is able to leverage its intellectual in an emerging field ­ Industry members select the projects Dynamic Data Analytics is a prime candidate · NSF ­ Center for Information Protection ­ working on Cyber-security ­ Bioenergy Research and Development

  20. Comparison of open source visual analytics toolkits.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crossno, Patricia Joyce; Harger, John R.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the first stage of a two-stage evaluation of open source visual analytics packages. This stage is a broad feature comparison over a range of open source toolkits. Although we had originally intended to restrict ourselves to comparing visual analytics toolkits, we quickly found that very few were available. So we expanded our study to include information visualization, graph analysis, and statistical packages. We examine three aspects of each toolkit: visualization functions, analysis capabilities, and development environments. With respect to development environments, we look at platforms, language bindings, multi-threading/parallelism, user interface frameworks, ease of installation, documentation, and whether the package is still being actively developed.

  1. Forsterite [Mg2SiO4)] Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forsterite Mg2SiO4) Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Study. Forsterite Mg2SiO4) Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2: An in situ...

  2. STRICTLY CONVERGENT ANALYTIC STRUCTURES 1 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a new notion of strictly convergent analytic structure (consisting of .... the solutions of certain systems of equations may have power series solutions ...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: advanced analytics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analytics Caterpillar, Sandia CRADA Opens Door to Multiple Research Projects On April 17, 2013, in Capabilities, Computational Modeling & Simulation, CRF, Materials Science,...

  4. Gaseous analytes of concern at Hanford Tank Farms. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large amounts of toxic and radioactive waste materials are stored in underground tanks at DOE sites. When the vapors in the tank headspaces vent to the open atmosphere a potentially dangerous situation can occur for personnel in the area. An open-path atmospheric pollution monitor is being developed for DOE to monitor the open air space above these tanks. In developing this monitor it is important to know what hazardous gases are most likely to be found in dangerous concentrations. These gases are called the Analytes of Concern. At the present time, measurements in eight tanks have detected thirty-one analytes in at least two tanks and fifteen analytes in only one tank. In addition to these gases, Carbon tetrachloride is considered to be an Analyte of Concern because it permeates the ground around the tanks. These Analytes are described and ranked according to a Hazard Index which combines their vapor pressure, density, and approximate danger level. The top sixteen ranked analytes which have been detected in at least two tanks comprise an {open_quotes}Analytes of Concern Test List{close_quotes} for determining the system performance of the atmospheric pollution monitor under development. A preliminary examination of the infrared spectra, barring atmospheric interferences, indicates that: The pollution monitor will detect all forty-seven Analytes!

  5. Computer simulations of the wetting properties of neon on heterogeneous surfaces Stefano Curtarolo,1,2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    Computer simulations of the wetting properties of neon on heterogeneous surfaces Stefano Curtarolo Received 31 August 1998 We use the grand canonical Monte Carlo method to study the nature of wetting the grand canonical Monte Carlo method of statistical mechanics to compute the nature of wetting transitions

  6. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Jensen, K.J.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of technical support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques. The purpose of this report is to summarize the technical and administrative activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year 1985 (October 1984 through September 1985). This is the second annual report for the ACL. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Investigation of combined heat and mass transfer from a wet heat exchanger. Part 2. Experimental results and operational characteristics of heat exchangers in dry/wet operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, S.G.; Kreid, D.K.; Johnson, B.M.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This second part of a two-part paper summarizes the experimental evaluation of a plate finned heat exchanger both with and without the surface wetted by a flowing film of water. The results indicate an increase in heat transfer during wet operation of two to five times over that of dry operation for the same meteorological conditions. The deluge model is shown to accurately predict the wet performance using an experimentally determined deluge film coefficient and the dry performance characteristics.

  8. Direct Use of Wet Ethanol in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine: Experimental and Numerical Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L; Aceves, Salvador M; Dibble, Robert W

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy balance of corn ethanol revisited, Transaction offor autoignition. The wet ethanol modeling study [REF] usedengine running on wet ethanol. Fuel mixtures studied range

  9. Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Graham, Alan Lyman (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Noble, David F. (David Frederick) (.; )); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James (Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

  10. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time period January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the sixth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the pilot unit with three catalysts, conducting catalyst activity measurements, and procuring the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek pilot unit site. Laboratory efforts were also conducted to support catalyst selection for the second pilot unit site, at CPS' Spruce Plant. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  11. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The coprecipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fourth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to completing, installing and starting up the pilot unit, completing laboratory runs to size catalysts, and procuring catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  12. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period April 1, 2003 through June 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the seventh full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit, conducting catalyst activity measurements, installing sonic horns for on-line catalyst cleaning, and installing the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek site. CPS began installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter. Laboratory efforts were conducted to support catalyst selection for that second pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  13. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the third full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to constructing the pilot unit and conducting laboratory runs to help size catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts.

  14. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  15. Data Analytics Methods in Wind Turbine Design and Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Giwhyun

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation develops sophisticated data analytic methods to analyze structural loads on, and power generation of, wind turbines. Wind turbines, which convert the kinetic energy in wind into electrical power, are operated within stochastic...

  16. Data Analytics Methods in Wind Turbine Design and Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Giwhyun

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation develops sophisticated data analytic methods to analyze structural loads on, and power generation of, wind turbines. Wind turbines, which convert the kinetic energy in wind into electrical power, are operated within stochastic...

  17. Wetting of mercury electrode by crude oil in surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuvshinov, V.A.; Altumina, L.K.; Genkina, L.F.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study has been made of electrosurface phenomena in the system consisting of crude oil, mercury, and a surfactant solution. The type of relationship between the wetting of mercury by oil in surfactant solutions and the electric potential of the mercury has been determined. Feasibility has been demonstrated for the use of the mercury/oil/surfactant solution system as a model in studying the oil-displacing capabilities of various surfactants.

  18. The Fernald wet records recovery project: A case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, H.J.; Devir, B.R.; Hawley, R.A. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Freesmeyer, M.T. [USDOE Ohio Field Office (United States)

    1995-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a project performed to recover wet records discovered in January 1995 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This paper discusses the emergency and record recovery phases of the project, the technical options considered for records recovery, and special measures which were required due to radiological contamination of the records. Also, the root causes and lessons learned from the incident, and path forward for future records management operations at Fernald, are discussed.

  19. Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averkina, N. V. [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Zheleznyak, I. V. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation); Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G., E-mail: orlikvg@mail.ru [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Shishkin, V. I. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

  20. ANALYTIC COMPLETION (DRAFT) CHARLES REZK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezk, Charles

    "Ext-p completion", and is well-known to be closely linked to computing the homotopy groups of p-completionsANALYTIC COMPLETION (DRAFT) CHARLES REZK Abstract. This is an expository treatment of what we call "analytic completion" of R- modules, which is a kind of completion defined in terms of quotients of power

  1. Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amrhein, Gerald T. (Louisville, OH)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

  2. Wetting kinetics of water nano-droplet containing non-surfactant nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Gui [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Hu, Han; Sun, Ying, E-mail: yyduan@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Duan, Yuanyuan, E-mail: yyduan@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Beijing Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, dynamic wetting of water nano-droplets containing non-surfactant gold nanoparticles on a gold substrate is examined via molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the addition of non-surfactant nanoparticles hinders the nano-second droplet wetting process, attributed to the increases in both surface tension of the nanofluid and friction between nanofluid and substrate. The droplet wetting kinetics decreases with increasing nanoparticle loading and water-particle interaction energy. The observed wetting suppression and the absence of nanoparticle ordering near the contact line of nano-sized droplets differ from the wetting behaviors reported from nanofluid droplets of micron size or larger.

  3. Storage option an Analytic approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Lesnik

    2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The mathematical problem of the static storage optimisation is formulated and solved by means of a variational analysis. The solution obtained in implicit form is shedding light on the most important features of the optimal exercise strategy. We show how the solution depends on different constraint types including carry cost and cycling constraint. We investigate the relation between intrinsic and stochastic solutions. In particular we give another proof that the stochastic problem has a "bang-bang" optimal exercise strategy. We also show why the optimal stochastic exercise decision is always close to the intrinsic one. In the second half we develop a perturbation analysis to solve the stochastic optimisation problem. The obtained approximate solution allows us to estimate the time value of the storage option. In particular we find an answer to rather academic question of asymptotic time value for the mean reversion parameter approaching zero or infinity. We also investigate the differences between swing and storage problems. The analytical results are compared with numerical valuations and found to be in a good agreement.

  4. Comparison of thermoelectric and permeation dryers for sulfur dioxide removal during sample conditioning of wet gas streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunder, T.A. [Entropy, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Research Div.; Leighty, D.A. [Perma Pure, Inc., Toms River, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Flue gas conditioning for moisture removal is commonly performed for criteria pollutant measurements, in particular for extractive CEM systems at combustion sources. An implicit assumption is that conditioning systems specifically remove moisture without affecting pollutant and diluent concentrations. Gas conditioning is usually performed by passing the flue gas through a cold trap (Peltier or thermoelectric dryer) to remove moisture by condensation, which is subsequently extracted by a peristaltic pump. Many air pollutants are water-soluble and potentially susceptible to removal in a condensation dryer from gas interaction with liquid water. An alternative technology for gas conditioning is the permeation dryer, where the flue gas passes through a selectively permeable membrane for moisture removal. In this case water is transferred through the membrane while other pollutants are excluded, and the gas does not contact condensed liquid. Laboratory experiments were performed to measure the relative removal of a water-soluble pollutant (sulfur dioxide, SO{sub 2}) by the two conditioning techniques. A wet gas generating system was used to create hot, wet gas streams of known composition (15% and 30% moisture, balance nitrogen) and flow rate. Pre-heated SO{sub 2} was dynamically spiked into the wet stream using mass flow meters to achieve concentrations of 20, 50, and 100 ppm. The spiked gas was directed through a heated sample line to either a thermoelectric or a permeation conditioning system. Two gas analyzers (Western Research UV gas monitor, KVB/Analect FTIR spectrometer) were used to measure the SO{sub 2} concentration after conditioning. Both analytic methods demonstrated that SO{sub 2} is removed to a significantly greater extent by the thermoelectric dryer. These results have important implications for SO{sub 2} monitoring and emissions trading.

  5. Trace Analytical Techniques for Nuclear Forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, J.E.

    1999-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the history of the Savannah River Site, the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has developed high sensitivity analytical capabilities in support of the Site's Environmental Monitoring Program and nuclear material protection process. Many of these techniques are applicable to the developing need for nuclear forensic analysis capabilities. Radiological and critically control procedures are in place at the SRTC, as well as clean room practices, to minimize the potential for a radiological evidentiary sample to contaminate personnel and the facility, as well as to minimize contaminating the sample thus rendering it useless by law enforcement agencies. Some of the trace analytical techniques available at the SRTC include ultra-low-level gamma and alpha spectrometry, high-sensitivity thermal ionization mass spectrometry, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and trace organic analyses. These techniques have been tested during a planned domestic smuggling exercise and in the analysis of an unknown sample.In the event of an interdiction involving the illegal use or movement of radioactive material by U.S. law enforcement agencies (local, state or federal) forensic analyses will be used in developing and building a legal case against the perpetrators. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, a former nuclear production site currently conducting nuclear material stabilization missions, located in Aiken South Carolina, has a long history of performing trace analytical analyses for environmental monitoring. Many of these techniques are also applicable to nuclear forensic analyses. A summary of the trace analytical techniques used at the SRTC, which are applicable to Nuclear Forensics, is presented in this paper.Contamination control, of facilities and personnel involved in the analytical analyses, as well as preventing contamination of the sample, is a unique challenge for nuclear forensic analyses. A discussion of sample handling and contamination control procedures is included in this paper. Some of the applicable analytical techniques available at the SRTC for nuclear forensic analyses include: ultra-low-level gamma and alpha spectroscopy, high-sensitivity thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and trace organic analyses. Results from analyses of special nuclear material (SNM) standards, materials from nuclear smuggling exercises, and materials of unknown origin will be presented.

  6. A preliminary assessment of beryllium dust oxidation during a wet bypass accident in a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad J. Merrill; Richard L. Moore; J. Phillip Sharp

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A beryllium dust oxidation model has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the Fusion Safety Program (FSP) for the MELCOR safety computer code. The purpose of this model is to investigate hydrogen production from beryllium dust layers on hot surfaces inside a fusion reactor vacuum vessel (VV) during in-vessel loss-of-cooling accidents (LOCAs). This beryllium dust oxidation model accounts for the diffusion of steam into a beryllium dust layer, the oxidation of the dust particles inside this layer based on the beryllium-steam oxidation equations developed at the INL, and the effective thermal conductivity of this beryllium dust layer. This paper details this oxidation model and presents the results of the application of this model to a wet bypass accident scenario in the ITER device.

  7. Top Ten Interaction Challenges in Extreme-Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Chen, Chaomei

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The chapter presents ten selected user interfaces and interaction challenges in extreme-scale visual analytics. The study of visual analytics is often referred to as 'the science of analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces' in the literature. The discussion focuses on the issues of applying visual analytics technologies to extreme-scale scientific and non-scientific data ranging from petabyte to exabyte in sizes. The ten challenges are: in situ interactive analysis, user-driven data reduction, scalability and multi-level hierarchy, representation of evidence and uncertainty, heterogeneous data fusion, data summarization and triage for interactive query, analytics of temporally evolving features, the human bottleneck, design and engineering development, and the Renaissance of conventional wisdom. The discussion addresses concerns that arise from different areas of hardware, software, computation, algorithms, and human factors. The chapter also evaluates the likelihood of success in meeting these challenges in the near future.

  8. Analytic equivalence relations and bi-embeddability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ros, Luca Motto

    Analytic equivalence relations and bi-embeddability Luca Motto Ros Kurt G¨odel Research Center Analytic equivalence relations and bi-embeddability #12;Analytic equivalence relations A subset of a Polish Analytic equivalence relations and bi-embeddability #12;Analytic equivalence relations A subset of a Polish

  9. Experimental and analytical study of rotating cavitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamijo, Kenjiro; Shimura, Takashi; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu [National Aerospace Lab., Miyagi (Japan). Kakuda Research Center

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes experimental and analytical results of rotating cavitation. There are four major sections in this paper. The first section presents the main characteristics of rotating cavitation which was found in the inducer test using a water tunnel. The second section describes the rotating cavitation which occurred in the development test of an LE-7 liquid oxygen pump for the H-II rocket. Also described in this section is how the rotating cavitation was suppressed. The rotating cavitation was the cause of both super synchronous shaft vibration and an unstable head coefficient curve. The third section presents how the theory of rotating cavitation was developed. The final section shows the measured cavitation compliance and mass flow gain factor of the LE-7 pump inducer for comparison of the experimental and analytical results of the rotating cavitation of the LE-7 pump inducer. Almost all the information presented in this paper has already been reported by Kamijo et al. (1977, 1980, 1993, 1993) and by Shimura (1993). In the present paper, the authors attempt to combine and give a clear overview of the experimental and analytical results described in the previous papers to systematically show their experience and findings on rotating cavitation.

  10. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  11. Analytical model for Stirling cycle machine design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formosa, Fabien; 10.1016/j.enconman.2010.02.010

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to study further the promising free piston Stirling engine architecture, there is a need of an analytical thermodynamic model which could be used in a dynamical analysis for preliminary design. To aim at more realistic values, the models have to take into account the heat losses and irreversibilities on the engine. An analytical model which encompasses the critical flaws of the regenerator and furthermore the heat exchangers effectivenesses has been developed. This model has been validated using the whole range of the experimental data available from the General Motor GPU-3 Stirling engine prototype. The effects of the technological and operating parameters on Stirling engine performance have been investigated. In addition to the regenerator influence, the effect of the cooler effectiveness is underlined.

  12. Specifying linepipe suitable for safe operation in sour, wet service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, E.M.; Hansen, D.A.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the specifications recommended by the authors for buying linepipe in grades up to X-70 for wet, sour service. The linepipe is tested to verify that it is resistant to hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC). In addition, fracture control requirements are imposed so that if a failure does occur for any reason, the crack is guaranteed to self arrest, thus minimizing the consequences of the failure. Pipe meeting the specifications described in this paper is readily available from numerous European and Japanese mills.

  13. Bianchi Type-I Universe with Wet Dark Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Singh; R. Chaubey

    2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bianchi type-I universe filled with dark energy from a wet dark fluid has been considered. A new equation of state for the dark energy component of the universe has been used. It is modeled on the equation of state $p=\\gamma (\\rho -\\rho_\\star)$ which can describe a liquid, for example water. The exact solutions to the corresponding field equations are obtained in quadrature form. The solution for constant deceleration parameter have been studied in detail for power-law and exponential forms both. The cases $\\gamma =1$ and $\\gamma =0$ have been also analysed.

  14. Bianchi Type-I Universe with Wet Dark Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, T

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bianchi type-I universe filled with dark energy from a wet dark fluid has been considered. A new equation of state for the dark energy component of the universe has been used. It is modeled on the equation of state $p=\\gamma (\\rho -\\rho_\\star)$ which can describe a liquid, for example water. The exact solutions to the corresponding field equations are obtained in quadrature form. The solution for constant deceleration parameter have been studied in detail for power-law and exponential forms both. The cases $\\gamma =1$ and $\\gamma =0$ have been also analysed.

  15. US PRACTICE FOR INTERIM WET STORAGE OF RRSNF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinson, D.

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the United States and stored at Department of Energy storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper summarizes the current practices to provide for continued safe interim wet storage in the U.S. Aluminum fuel stored in poor quality water is subject to aggressive corrosion attack and therefore water chemistry control systems are essential to maintain water quality. Fuel with minor breaches are safely stored directly in the basin. Fuel pieces and heavily damaged fuel is safely stored in isolation canisters.

  16. Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of FossilFoot) Year JanCubic Feet) Gas, Wet

  17. Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease

  18. Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After

  19. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. Progress report for FY 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1996. This annual report is the thirteenth for the ACL. It describes effort on continuing and new projects and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The ACL operates in the ANL system as a full-cost-recovery service center, but has a mission that includes a complementary research and development component: The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory will provide high-quality, cost-effective chemical analysis and related technical support to solve research problems of our clients -- Argonne National Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and others -- and will conduct world-class research and development in analytical chemistry and its applications. Because of the diversity of research and development work at ANL, the ACL handles a wide range of analytical chemistry problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but the ACL usually works with commercial laboratories if our clients require high-volume, production-type analyses. It is common for ANL programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. Thus, much of the support work done by the ACL is very similar to our applied analytical chemistry research.

  20. Experimental evaluation of dry/wet air-cooled heat exchangers. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, S.G.; Gruel, R.L.; Huenefeld, J.C.; Eschbach, E.J.; Johnson, B.M.; Kreid, D.K.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate goal of this project was to contribute to the development of improved cooling facilities for power plants. Specifically, the objective during FY-81 was to experimentally determine the thermal performance and operating characteristics of an air-cooled heat exchanger surface manufactured by the Unifin Company. The performance of the spiral-wound finned tube surface (Unifin) was compared with two inherently different platefin surfaces (one developed by the Trane Co. and the other developed by the HOETERV Institute) which were previously tested as a part of the same continuing program. Under dry operation the heat transfer per unit frontal area per unit inlet temperature difference (ITD) of the Unifin surface was 10% to 20% below that of the other two surfaces at low fan power levels. At high fan power levels, the performances of the Unifin and Trane surfaces were essentially the same, and 25% higher than the HOETERV surface. The design of the Unifin surface caused a significantly larger air-side pressure drop through the heat exchanger both in dry and deluge operation. Generally higher overall heat transfer coefficients were calculated for the Unifin surface under deluged operation. They ranged from 2.0 to 3.5 Btu/hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F as compared to less than 2.0 Btu hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F for the Trane and HOETERV surfaces under similar conditions. The heat transfer enhancement due to the evaporative cooling effect was also measureably higher with the Unifin surface as compared to the Trane surface. This can be primarily attributed to the better wetting characteristics of the Unifin surface. If the thermal performance of the surfaces are compared at equal face velocities, the Unifin surface is as much as 35% better. This method of comparison accounts for the wetting characteristics while neglecting the effect of pressure drop. Alternatively the surfaces when compared at equal pressure drop essentially the same thermal performance.

  1. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, progress report for FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 (October 1992 through September 1993). This annual report is the tenth for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has research programs in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require development or modification of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL is administratively within the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), its principal ANL client, but provides technical support for many of the technical divisions and programs at ANL. The ACL has four technical groups--Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis--which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL.

  2. COLLEGE OF SCIENCE Computational Modeling & Data Analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    COLLEGE OF SCIENCE Computational Modeling & Data Analytics COLLEGE OF SCIENCE Computational Modeling & Data Analytics The Bachelor of Science in Computational Modeling and Data Analytics (CMDA mathematics. It imparts the unique blend of skills from Statistics, Mathematics, and Computer Science needed

  3. 1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen's median trend estimate and Kendall's seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

  4. 1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen`s median trend estimate and Kendall`s seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

  5. Predictive modeling of reactive wetting and metal joining.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, Frank B.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance, reproducibility and reliability of metal joints are complex functions of the detailed history of physical processes involved in their creation. Prediction and control of these processes constitutes an intrinsically challenging multi-physics problem involving heating and melting a metal alloy and reactive wetting. Understanding this process requires coupling strong molecularscale chemistry at the interface with microscopic (diffusion) and macroscopic mass transport (flow) inside the liquid followed by subsequent cooling and solidification of the new metal mixture. The final joint displays compositional heterogeneity and its resulting microstructure largely determines the success or failure of the entire component. At present there exists no computational tool at Sandia that can predict the formation and success of a braze joint, as current capabilities lack the ability to capture surface/interface reactions and their effect on interface properties. This situation precludes us from implementing a proactive strategy to deal with joining problems. Here, we describe what is needed to arrive at a predictive modeling and simulation capability for multicomponent metals with complicated phase diagrams for melting and solidification, incorporating dissolutive and composition-dependent wetting.

  6. An implicit wetting and drying approach for non-hydrostatic flows in high aspect ratio domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candy, Adam S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wetting and drying approach for free surface flows governed by the three-dimensional, non-hydrostatic Navier-Stokes equations in high aspect ratio domains is developed. This has application in the modelling of inundation processes in geophysical domains, where dynamics takes place over a large horizontal extent relative to vertical resolution, such as in the evolution of a tsunami, or an urban fluvial flooding scenario. The approach is novel in that it solves for three dimensional dynamics in these very high aspect ratio domains, to include non-hydrostatic effects and accurately model dispersive processes. These become important in shallow regions with steep gradients, a particularly acute problem where man-made structures exist such as buildings or flood defences in an urban environment. It is implicit in time to allow efficient time integration over a range of mesh element sizes. Specific regularisation methods are introduced to improve conditioning of the full three-dimensional pressure Poisson problem i...

  7. RADON 131 7. ANALYTICAL METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    The purpose of this chapter is to describe the analytical methods that are available for detecting, measuring, and/or monitoring radon and its progeny. The intent is not to provide an exhaustive list of analytical methods. Rather, the intention is to identify well-established methods that are used as the standard methods of analysis. Many of the analytical methods used for environmental samples are the methods approved by federal agencies and organizations such as EPA and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Other methods presented in this chapter are those that are approved by groups such as the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) and the American Public Health Association (APHA). Additionally, analytical methods are included that modify previously used methods to obtain lower detection limits and/or to improve accuracy and precision. 7.1 BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS Table 7-1 lists various methods used to detect radon progeny in biological samples. Since the half-life of radon is short, its measurement in biological samples, such as serum, urine, blood, etc., is not practical. Measurements of the longer lived radon progeny 210 Pb and 210 Po in biological samples may be used as an indication of radon exposure; however, ingestion of these isotopes from food and drinking water or direct exposure from other environmental media are considered the primary sources of exposure for these

  8. Statistically qualified neuro-analytic failure detection method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vilim, Richard B. (Aurora, IL); Garcia, Humberto E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Chen, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL)

    2002-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for monitoring a process involve development and application of a statistically qualified neuro-analytic (SQNA) model to accurately and reliably identify process change. The development of the SQNA model is accomplished in two stages: deterministic model adaption and stochastic model modification of the deterministic model adaptation. Deterministic model adaption involves formulating an analytic model of the process representing known process characteristics, augmenting the analytic model with a neural network that captures unknown process characteristics, and training the resulting neuro-analytic model by adjusting the neural network weights according to a unique scaled equation error minimization technique. Stochastic model modification involves qualifying any remaining uncertainty in the trained neuro-analytic model by formulating a likelihood function, given an error propagation equation, for computing the probability that the neuro-analytic model generates measured process output. Preferably, the developed SQNA model is validated using known sequential probability ratio tests and applied to the process as an on-line monitoring system. Illustrative of the method and apparatus, the method is applied to a peristaltic pump system.

  9. Analytic equivalence of geometric transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Rossi

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper \\emph{analytic equivalence} of geometric transition is defined in such a way that equivalence classes of geometric transitions turn out to be the \\emph{arrows} of the \\cy web. Then it seems natural and useful, both from the mathematical and physical point of view, look for privileged arrows' representatives, called \\emph{canonical models}, laying the foundations of an \\emph{analytic} classification of geometric transitions. At this purpose a numerical invariant, called \\emph{bi--degree}, summarizing the topological, geometric and physical changing properties of a geometric transition, is defined for a large class of geometric transitions.

  10. Analytical mesoscale modeling of aeolian sand transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Lämmel; Anne Meiwald; Klaus Kroy

    2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the mesoscale structure of aeolian sand transport, based on a recently developed two-species continuum model. The calculated sand flux and important average characteristics of the grain trajectories are found to be in remarkable agreement with field and wind-tunnel data. We conclude that the essential mesoscale physics is insensitive to unresolved details on smaller scales and well captured by the coarse-grained analytical model, thus providing a sound basis for precise and numerically efficient mesoscale modeling of aeolian structure formation.

  11. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the eighth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit at the GRE Coal Creek site with all four catalysts in service and sonic horns installed for on-line catalyst cleaning. During the quarter, a catalyst activity measurement trip and mercury SCEM relative accuracy tests were completed, and catalyst pressure drop was closely monitored with the sonic horns in operation. CPS completed the installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter, and the four catalysts to be tested in that unit were ordered. The pilot unit was started up with two of the four catalysts in service late in August, and initial catalyst activity results were measured in late September. The other two catalysts will not become available for testing until sometime in October. This technical progress report details these efforts at both sites.

  12. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period January 1, 2002 through March 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the second full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to pilot unit design and conducting laboratory runs to help select candidate catalysts. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts. A Test Plan for the upcoming pilot-scale evaluations was also prepared and submitted to NETL for review and comment. Since this document was already submitted under separate cover, this information is not repeated here.

  13. Specifying linepipe suitable for safe operation in sour wet service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, E.M. Jr.; Hansen, D.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specifications recommended for buying linepipe for wet, sour service are described. A two-fold approach is used. First the linepipe is tested to verify that it is resistant to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC). Second, fracture mechanics requirements are imposed so that if hydrogen induced cracking does occur due to steel-making or operation upsets, a line rupture is guaranteed to self-arrest, thus minimizing the consequences of the failure. Correlations of HIC susceptibility test results with actual service performance are presented. The HIC test acceptance criteria used by the authors are discussed. The fracture mechanics considerations include drop weight tear testing to establish ductile failures and Charpy impact testing to assure self-arrest of an unstable crack, as well as maximum crack initiation energy. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of the commercial availability of linepipe produced to the specifications discussed below.

  14. From Metaphor to Analytic Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Process Tracing From Metaphor to Analytic Tool Edited by ANDREW BENNETT and JEFFREY T. CHECKEL process tracing." Andrew Bennett is Professor of Government at Georgetown Uni versity. He is also: © VvoeVale/iStock.com series cover design: sue watson "Bennett and Checkel have assembled an im- pressive

  15. SociAL Sensor Analytics: Measuring Phenomenology at Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Courtney D.; Dowling, Chase P.; Rose, Stuart J.; McKenzie, Taylor K.

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to present a system for interrogating immense social media streams through analytical methodologies that characterize topics and events critical to tactical and strategic planning. First, we propose a conceptual framework for interpreting social media as a sensor network. Time-series models and topic clustering algorithms are used to implement this concept into a functioning analytical system. Next, we address two scientific challenges: 1) to understand, quantify, and baseline phenomenology of social media at scale, and 2) to develop analytical methodologies to detect and investigate events of interest. This paper then documents computational methods and reports experimental findings that address these challenges. Ultimately, the ability to process billions of social media posts per week over a period of years enables the identification of patterns and predictors of tactical and strategic concerns at an unprecedented rate through SociAL Sensor Analytics (SALSA).

  16. Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent “experiment” that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University of Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.

  17. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the first full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to project initiation and planning. There is no significant technical progress to report for the current period.

  18. Vol. 82, No. 4, 2005 431 Phosphorus Concentrations and Flow in Maize Wet-Milling Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gluten meal (CGM) and corn gluten feed (CGF) is important to the maize wet-milling industry. High [CGM]). CGF is produced from mixing heavy steep- water with maize fiber (Fig. 1); it has high fiber and CGM is important to the economic viability of the wet-milling industry because it partially offsets

  19. Quantifying wet scavenging processes in aircraft observations of nitric acid and cloud condensation nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    Quantifying wet scavenging processes in aircraft observations of nitric acid and cloud condensation indicator for quantifying wet scavenging. Specifically, nitric acid (HNO3), produced as a by-product of combustion, is highly soluble and removed efficiently from clouds by rain. Regional carbon monoxide (CO

  20. Experimental investigation of burning velocities of ultra-wet methane-air-steam mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , steam, burning velocity, chemiluminescence, OH Introduction In ultra-wet gas turbines, the heatExperimental investigation of burning velocities of ultra-wet methane-air-steam mixtures Eric Abstract Global burning velocities of methane-air-steam mixtures are measured on prismatic laminar Bunsen

  1. Pressure and partial wetting effects on superhydrophobic friction reduction in microchannel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidrovo, Carlos H.

    Pressure and partial wetting effects on superhydrophobic friction reduction in microchannel flow://pof.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 112003 (2012) Pressure and partial wetting effects on superhydrophobic- ing that can lead to a superhydrophobic Cassie-Baxter state. The Cassie-Baxter state is characterized

  2. Analyte detection using an active assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA); Bailey, Charles L. (Cross Junction, VA); Evanskey, Melissa R. (Potomac Falls, VA)

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytes using an active assay may be detected by introducing an analyte solution containing a plurality of analytes to a lacquered membrane. The lacquered membrane may be a membrane having at least one surface treated with a layer of polymers. The lacquered membrane may be semi-permeable to nonanalytes. The layer of polymers may include cross-linked polymers. A plurality of probe molecules may be arrayed and immobilized on the lacquered membrane. An external force may be applied to the analyte solution to move the analytes towards the lacquered membrane. Movement may cause some or all of the analytes to bind to the lacquered membrane. In cases where probe molecules are presented, some or all of the analytes may bind to probe molecules. The direction of the external force may be reversed to remove unbound or weakly bound analytes. Bound analytes may be detected using known detection types.

  3. Analytic bootstrap at large spin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apratim Kaviraj; Kallol Sen; Aninda Sinha

    2015-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We use analytic conformal bootstrap methods to determine the anomalous dimensions and OPE coefficients for large spin operators in general conformal field theories in four dimensions containing a scalar operator of conformal dimension $\\Delta_\\phi$. It is known that such theories will contain an infinite sequence of large spin operators with twists approaching $2\\Delta_\\phi+2n$ for each integer $n$. By considering the case where such operators are separated by a twist gap from other operators at large spin, we analytically determine the $n$, $\\Delta_\\phi$ dependence of the anomalous dimensions. We find that for all $n$, the anomalous dimensions are negative for $\\Delta_\\phi$ satisfying the unitarity bound, thus extending the Nachtmann theorem to non-zero $n$. In the limit when $n$ is large, we find agreement with the AdS/CFT prediction corresponding to the Eikonal limit of a 2-2 scattering with dominant graviton exchange.

  4. Analytic bootstrap at large spin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaviraj, Apratim; Sinha, Aninda

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use analytic conformal bootstrap methods to determine the anomalous dimensions and OPE coefficients for large spin operators in general conformal field theories in four dimensions containing a scalar operator of conformal dimension $\\Delta_\\phi$. It is known that such theories will contain an infinite sequence of large spin operators with twists approaching $2\\Delta_\\phi+2n$ for each integer $n$. By considering the case where such operators are separated by a twist gap from other operators at large spin, we analytically determine the $n$, $\\Delta_\\phi$ dependence of the anomalous dimensions. We find that for all $n$, the anomalous dimensions are negative for $\\Delta_\\phi$ satisfying the unitarity bound, thus extending the Nachtmann theorem to non-zero $n$. In the limit when $n$ is large, we find agreement with the AdS/CFT prediction corresponding to the Eikonal limit of a 2-2 scattering with dominant graviton exchange.

  5. Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britten, Jerald A. (Oakley, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for 1) cleaning, developing or etching, 2) rinsing, and 3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material.

  6. Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britten, J.A.

    1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for (1) cleaning, developing or etching, (2) rinsing, and (3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material. 5 figs.

  7. Improved Wetting of Mixed Ionic/Electronic Conductors Used in Electrochemical Devices with Ternary Reactive Air Braze Filler Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, John S.; Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Thomsen, Ed C.; Weil, K. Scott

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the wetting behavior, reactivity, and long-term electrical conductance of a series of ternary filler metals being considered for brazing lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) based oxygen separation membranes. Mixed ionic/electronic conducting perovskite oxides such as LSCF and various doped barium cerates are currently being considered for use in high-temperature electrochemical devices such as oxygen and hydrogen concentrators and solid oxide fuel cells. However to take full advantage of the unique properties of these materials, reliable joining techniques need to be developed. Furthermore, if the proposed joining technique were to yield a hermetic ceramic-to-metal junction that was also electrically conductive, it would additionally benefit the device by allowing current to be drawn from or carried to the electrochemically active mixed conducting oxide component without requiring an separate current collector. A newly developed brazing technique known as air brazing is one such method of joining. In its present form, air brazing uses a silver-copper oxide based filler metal that can be melted directly in air to form a compliant joint that is electrically conductive. Recently, it has been shown that the addition of titania can enhance the wetting behavior of Ag-CuO filler metals on alumina. Here the effect of this wetting agent on the surface wettability, long-term electrical resistance at 750°C, and reactivity with La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-? (LSCF-6428 or LSCF) substrates is discussed.

  8. Analytical formulas for gravitational lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Amore; Santiago Arceo Diaz

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss a new method which can be used to obtain arbitrarily accurate analytical expressions for the deflection angle of light propagating in a given metric. Our method works by mapping the integral into a rapidly convergent series and provides extremely accurate approximations already to first order. We have derived a general first order formula for a generic spherically symmetric static metric tensor and we have tested it in four different cases.

  9. Direct Use of Wet Ethanol in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine: Experimental and Numerical Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L; Aceves, Salvador M; Dibble, Robert W

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for 4 different water-in-ethanol fuel blends at a variety ofmotivation for using wet ethanol fuel is that significantengine running on wet ethanol. Fuel mixtures studied range

  10. Wetting and strength issues at Al/alpha-alumina interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The wetting behavior and strength at aluminum/alumina interfaces has been an active subject of research. Al/alumina applications include ceramic-metal composites and several applications for electronic industries. In this paper the interface strength and microstructure of Al/alpha-alumina was investigated. We discovered that in a solid-state joining, the strength of the joint increases with increasing joining temperature. In a liquid-state joining, the strength of the joint gradually decreases due to the formation of unbonded areas. The strength, sigma sub b, is expressed by the following equation as a function of unbonded area, A: sigma sub b = 2.22 A + 143 (70 percent {le} A {le} 100 percent). The highest strength reached 400 MPa when the interface was formed at around the melting temperature of aluminum. An aluminum layer close to the interface became a single crystal when it was bonded to a sapphire. The following crystallographic orientation relationship is established: (1{bar 1}1){sub Al}//(001){sub {alpha}}-Al{sub 2} O{sub 3}, (110){sub Al}//<100>{sub {alpha}}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Amorphous alumina islands were formed at the interface. In the amorphous alumina, gamma-alumina nanocrystals grew from the sapphire, with the same orientation relationship to sapphire as above.

  11. Contact angles in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of wetting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. Li; K. H. Luo; Q. J. Kang; Q. Chen

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we aim to investigate the implementation of contact angles in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of wetting at a large density ratio. The pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model [X. Shan and H. Chen, Phys. Rev. E 49, 2941 (1994)] is a popular mesoscopic model for simulating multiphase flows and interfacial dynamics. In this model, the contact angle is usually realized by a fluid-solid interaction. Two widely used fluid-solid interactions: the density-based interaction and the pseudopotential-based interaction, as well as a modified pseudopotential-based interaction formulated in the present paper, are numerically investigated and compared in terms of the achievable contact angles, the maximum and the minimum densities, and the spurious currents. It is found that the pseudopotential-based interaction works well for simulating small static (liquid) contact angles, however, is unable to reproduce static contact angles close to 180 degrees. Meanwhile, it is found that the proposed modified pseudopotential-based interaction performs better in light of the maximum and the minimum densities and is overall more suitable for simulating large contact angles as compared with the other two types of fluid-solid interactions. Furthermore, the spurious currents are found to be enlarged when the fluid-solid interaction force is introduced. Increasing the kinematic viscosity ratio between the vapor and liquid phases is shown to be capable of reducing the spurious currents caused by the fluid-solid interactions.

  12. Gallium nitride microcavities formed by photoenhanced wet oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, L.-H.; Lu, C.-Y.; Wu, W.-H.; Wang, S.-L. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2005-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the formation of gallium nitride (GaN) microcavities by manipulating a photoenhanced oxidation rate difference between the polar and nonpolar crystallographic planes of GaN. When immersed in a buffered acetic (CH{sub 3}COOH) electrolyte of pH{approx}6.2 at room temperature, it is shown that the photo-oxidation can proceed at a rate that is one order of magnitude slower on the nonpolar plane of {l_brace}1100{r_brace}{sub GaN} than on the polar plane of {l_brace}0001{r_brace}{sub GaN} due to the reduced surface field action. Gallium nitride microcavities bounded by optically smooth {l_brace}1100{r_brace} and {l_brace}1103{r_brace} facets can thus be preferentially formed on the c-plane sapphire substrate after dissolving the oxide layer. The optical properties of these GaN hexagonal cavities reveal characteristic peaks of whispering gallery modes in resonance with the GaN band edge emission spectrum. A typical cavity Q factor of 10{sup 3} is observed in these GaN microcavities due to a reduced optical scattering loss in the wet chemical reaction process.

  13. Arguments for an Alternative Account of Analyticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sexton, Clark Alan

    2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents an alternative account of analyticity, as well as arguments for that account. Although an analysis and interpretation of previous accounts of analyticity are presented, the focus is on the analysis ...

  14. RESEARCH ENGINEER IN ADVANCED ANALYTICAL ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    RESEARCH ENGINEER IN ADVANCED ANALYTICAL ELECTRON MICROSCOPY Department of Materials Science. #12;Job Description (for website) Job Title: Research Engineer in Advanced Analytical Electron or an engineering discipline and four years of demonstrated experience in electron microscopy. Requirements

  15. PLEAEERUSH ANALYTICAL DA-~-A SHEET

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' PLEAEERUSH ANALYTICAL DA--A SHEET ' ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhD SAFETY DlVlSlON 1956 Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. 1. H.Sample Nos. 3 --Date Collectedby-CESS-.Route...

  16. The Streaming Potential Generated by Flow of Wet Steam in Capillary Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsden, S.S. Jr.; Tyran, Craig K.

    1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    For a constant pressure differential, the flow of wet steam generated electric potentials which increased with time and did not reach equilibrium values. These potentials were found to increase to values greater than 100 volts. The reason for this kind of potential build-up behavior was the presence of tiny flowing water slugs which were interspersed with electrically nonconductive steam vapor slugs. The measured electric potential for wet steam increased with pressure differential, but the relationship was not linear. The increase in potential with pressure drop was attributed both to an increase in fluid flow rate and changes in the wet steam quality.

  17. RBS' New BAIT Major: Business Analytics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :623:386) ­ Analytics / decision making and planning ­ Building mathematical models of business situations ­ Also builds · 33:623:485 Time Series Modeling for Business · 33:623:400 Business Decision Analytics underRBS' New BAIT Major: Business Analytics and Information Technology "Introducing the New Business

  18. Decision Analytic Modelling in the Economic Evaluation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    Decision Analytic Modelling in the Economic Evaluation of Health Technologies A Consensus Statement when used for the economic evaluation of health technologies; there is limited guidanceforgoodmodelling developed in the context of broader healthcare and economic evaluations, for which ex- plicit guidelines

  19. analytical methods biodiesel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods biodiesel First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Biodiesel analytical development and...

  20. SUSS PM 5 Analytic Probe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton n uSTEM-A SANCHEZSUSS PM 5 Analytic

  1. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes. FY 1991--1992 interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R.; Phelps, M.R.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic gasification system operating in a pressurized water environment has been developed and refined at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for over 12 years. Initial experiments were aimed at developing kinetics information for steam gasification of biomass in the presence of catalysts. The combined use of alkali and metal catalysts was reported for gasification of biomass and its components at low temperatures (350{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C). From the fundamental research evolved the concept of a pressurized, catalytic gasification system for converting wet biomass feedstocks to fuel gas. Extensive batch reactor testing and limited continuous reactor system (CRS) testing were undertaken in the development of this system under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. A wide range of biomass feedstocks were tested, and the importance of the nickel metal catalyst was identified. Specific use of this process for treating food processing wastes was also studied. The concept application was further expanded to encompass cleanup of hazardous wastewater streams, and results were reported for batch reactor tests and continuous reactor tests. Ongoing work at PNL focuses on refining the catalyst and scaling the system to long-term industrial needs. The process is licensed as the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) to Onsite*Ofsite, Inc., of Duarte, California. This report is a follow-on to the 1989--90 interim report [Elliott et al. 1991], which reviewed the results of the studies conducted with a fixed-bed, continuous-feed, tubular reactor. The discussion here provides an overview of experiments on the wide range of potential feedstock materials conducted in a batch reactor; development of new catalyst materials; and tests performed in continuous-flow reactors at three scales. The appendices contain the history and background of the process development, as well as more detailed descriptions and results of the recent studies.

  2. Sky coverage of orbital detectors. Analytical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Casadei

    2005-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Orbital detectors without pointing capability have to keep their field of view axis laying on their orbital plane, to observe the largest sky fraction. A general approach to estimate the exposure of each sky element for such detectors is a valuable tool in the R&D phase of a project, when the detector characteristics are still to be fixed. An analytical method to estimate the sky exposure is developed, which makes only few very reasonable approximations. The formulae obtained with this method are used to compute the histogram of the sky exposure of a hypothetical gamma-ray detector installed on the ISS. The C++ code used in this example is freely available on the http://cern.ch/casadei/software.html web page.

  3. Analytical applications for delayed neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eccleston, G.W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical formulations that describe the time dependence of neutron populations in nuclear materials contain delayed-neutron dependent terms. These terms are important because the delayed neutrons, even though their yields in fission are small, permit control of the fission chain reaction process. Analytical applications that use delayed neutrons range from simple problems that can be solved with the point reactor kinetics equations to complex problems that can only be solved with large codes that couple fluid calculations with the neutron dynamics. Reactor safety codes, such as SIMMER, model transients of the entire reactor core using coupled space-time neutronics and comprehensive thermal-fluid dynamics. Nondestructive delayed-neutron assay instruments are designed and modeled using a three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code. Calculations on high-burnup spent fuels and other materials that contain a mix of uranium and plutonium isotopes require accurate and complete information on the delayed-neutron periods, yields, and energy spectra. A continuing need exists for delayed-neutron parameters for all the fissioning isotopes.

  4. Soil water content dependent wetting front characteristics in sands T.W.J. Bautersa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    affects wetting front instability. A series of experiments were conducted where water was infiltrated in a 0.94 cm thick, 30 cm wide, and 55 cm long polycarbonate chamber filled with clean, 20­30 (US sieve

  5. Restoration of resaca wetlands and associated wet prairie habitats at Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margo, Michael Ray

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cultivation and drainage projects associated with livestock production have substantially disturbed resaca wetlands and wet prairie habitats in southern Texas. As a consequence of the anthropogenic disturbances, the area of these wetlands has been...

  6. 1 Mathematical Model The mass consevation equations are for wetting phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    la wetting phase (brine, digamos). Menos aun para un gas, o sea si el CO2 no estuviera en estado se tiene en cuenta la compresibilidad del CO2, y ademas de la solubilidad en brine, pero eso es

  7. ChemCam follows the 'Yellowknife Road' to Martian wet area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the 'Yellowknife Road' to martian wet area Researchers have tracked a trail of minerals that point to the prior presence of water at the Curiosity rover site on Mars....

  8. BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE E for the production of bioethanol. This pre-treatment method, similar to other hot water pre-treatments, acts

  9. Wetting and phase-change phenomena on micro/nanostructures for enhanced heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro/nanostructures have been extensively studied to amplify the intrinsic wettability of materials to create superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic surfaces. Such extreme wetting properties can influence the heat transfer ...

  10. Feeding Value of Wet Sorghum Distillers Grains for Growing and Finishing Beef Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeding Value of Wet Sorghum Distillers Grains for Growing and Finishing Beef Cattle Ethanol, but sorghum grain is commonly either blended with corn before use or used as the sole grain for ethanol

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - ashing wet Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences and Ecology 4 By-Products Utilization Summary: A3, containing 20% clean coal ash and 5% wet collected Class F ash had compressive strengths... 0 Center for...

  12. The Effect of Deformation on Grain Boundary Wetness in Partially Molten Peridotite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Stephen E.

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial distribution of the melt phase can affect many properties of partially molten rocks, including viscosity and seismic wave velocity. A good way to quantify this distribution is the grain boundary wetness, the fraction of total grain...

  13. Simulation of Oil Displacement from Oil-Wet Cores by Interfacial Tension Reduction and Wettability Alteration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalaei, Mohammad Hosein

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    wettability toward water-wet may increase spontaneous imbibition of water. This change in rock wettability leads to positive capillary pressure and results in higher brine counter-current imbibition and therefore a higher oil production rate. A three...

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

    Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry in the food and kindred products group (SIC 20). Plants typically spend approximately $15 to 25 million per year on energy, one of its largest operating costs, making energy efficiency...

  15. Wetting transition behavior of Xe on Cs and Cs/graphite Stefano Curtarolo,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    Wetting transition behavior of Xe on Cs and Cs/graphite Stefano Curtarolo,1, * Milton W. Cole,2 surface, covered by a monolayer of Cs. With data obtained from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations

  16. Wet-Weather Flow Characterization for the Rock Creek through Monitoring and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    support of the following organizations: ­ DC Water Resources Research Institute ­ U.S. Geological Survey..................................................................16 Modeling of Urban Stormwater Management discharged to receiving waters demand that wet-weather flow control systems be planned and engineered

  17. Wetting hysteresis and droplet roll off behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces by Katherine Marie Smyth.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Katherine Marie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various states of hydrophobic wetting and hysteresis are observed when water droplets are deposited on micro-post surfaces of different post densities. Hysteresis is commonly defined as the difference between the advancing ...

  18. Rapid Deceleration-Driven Wetting Transition during Pendant Drop Deposition on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, HyukMin

    A hitherto unknown mechanism for wetting transition is reported. When a pendant drop settles upon deposition, there is a virtual “collision” where its center of gravity undergoes rapid deceleration. This induces a high ...

  19. Modeling of wet gas compression in twin-screw multiphase pump 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jian

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Twin-screw multiphase pumps experience a severe decrease in efficiency, even the breakdown of pumping function, when operating under wet gas conditions. Additionally, field operations have revealed significant vibration and thermal issues which can...

  20. Toxicologic evaluation of analytes from Tank 241-C-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahlum, D.D.; Young, J.Y.; Weller, R.E.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Hanford Company requested PNL to assemble a toxicology review panel (TRP) to evaluate analytical data compiled by WHC, and provide advice concerning potential health effects associated with exposure to tank-vapor constituents. The team`s objectives would be to (1) review procedures used for sampling vapors from tanks, (2) identify constituents in tank-vapor samples that could be related to symptoms reported by workers, (3) evaluate the toxicological implications of those constituents by comparison to establish toxicological databases, (4) provide advice for additional analytical efforts, and (5) support other activities as requested by WHC. The TRP represents a wide range of expertise, including toxicology, industrial hygiene, and occupational medicine. The TRP prepared a list of target analytes that chemists at the Oregon Graduate Institute/Sandia (OGI), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and PNL used to establish validated methods for quantitative analysis of head-space vapors from Tank 241-C-103. this list was used by the analytical laboratories to develop appropriate analytical methods for samples from Tank 241-C-103. Target compounds on the list included acetone, acetonitrile, ammonia, benzene, 1, 3-butadiene, butanal, n-butanol, hexane, 2-hexanone, methylene chloride, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrous oxide, dodecane, tridecane, propane nitrile, sulfur oxide, tributyl phosphate, and vinylidene chloride. The TRP considered constituent concentrations, current exposure limits, reliability of data relative to toxicity, consistency of the analytical data, and whether the material was carcinogenic or teratogenic. A final consideration in the analyte selection process was to include representative chemicals for each class of compounds found.

  1. Permeability and wet-out characterization of SRIM automotive bumper beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morse, Christopher Todd

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PERMEABILITY AND WET-OUT CHARACTERIZATION OF SRIM AUTOMOTIVE BUMPER BEAMS A Thesis CHRISTOPHER TODD MORSE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering PERMEABILITY AND WET-OUT CHARACTERIZATION OF SRIM AUTOMOTIVE BUMPER BEAMS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER TODD MORSE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

  2. Interrelationships between air velocity and natural wet-bulb thermometer response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Nathan Glenn

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTERRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN AIR VFLOCITY ANO NATURAL WET-BULB THERMOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by NATHAN GLENN JONES Submitted to the Graduate Colleqe of Texas ASM University i n partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE AUGUST 1983 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene INTERRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN AIR VELOCITY AND NATURAL WET-BULB THERMOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by NATHAN GLENN JONES Approved as to style an content by: airman o ommittee er Member ~~' A~ Member...

  3. User's guide for the BNW-III optimization code for modular dry/wet-cooled power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, D.J.; Faletti, D.W.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This user's guide describes BNW-III, a computer code developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Dry Cooling Enhancement Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The BNW-III code models a modular dry/wet cooling system for a nuclear or fossil fuel power plant. The purpose of this guide is to give the code user a brief description of what the BNW-III code is and how to use it. It describes the cooling system being modeled and the various models used. A detailed description of code input and code output is also included. The BNW-III code was developed to analyze a specific cooling system layout. However, there is a large degree of freedom in the type of cooling modules that can be selected and in the performance of those modules. The costs of the modules are input to the code, giving the user a great deal of flexibility.

  4. Progress in year 1994 1. An analytical model for evaporative cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Progress in year 1994 1. An analytical model for evaporative cooling We have developed an analytical model for evaporative cooling [1]. By simulating evaporation as a sequence of discrete steps, we the cloud rethermalizes and ensures efficient evaporative cooling. 2. Elastic collision cross section

  5. 1st International Workshop on High Performance Computing, Networking and Analytics for the Power Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1st International Workshop on High Performance Computing, Networking and Analytics for the Power Transient Stability" #12;1st International Workshop on High Performance Computing, Networking and Analytics (University of Vermont). "Developing a Dynamic Model of Cascading Failure for High Performance Computing using

  6. Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate Mark Williamson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Mark

    Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate complexity. Analytic solutions for the temporal evolution of the land temperature are obtained for an Earth system and atmosphere radiation balance in a developing EMIC project named GENIE (Grid Enabled Integrated Earth system

  7. The Use of Electrochemical Techniques to Characterize Wet Steam Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce W. Bussert; John A. Crowley; Kenneth J. Kimball; Brian J. Lashway

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The composition of a steam phase in equilibrium with a water phase at high temperature is remarkably affected by the varying capabilities of the water phase constituents to partition into the steam. Ionic impurities (sodium, chloride, sulfate, etc.) tend to remain in the water phase, while weakly ionic or gaseous species (oxygen) partition into the steam. Analysis of the water phase can provide misleading results concerning the steam phase composition or environment. This paper describes efforts that were made to use novel electrochemical probes and sampling techniques to directly characterize a wet steam phase environment in equilibrium with high temperature water. Probes were designed to make electrochemical measurements in the thin film of water existing on exposed surfaces in steam over a water phase. Some of these probes were referenced against a conventional high temperature electrode located in the water phase. Others used two different materials (typically tungsten and platinum) to make measurements without a true reference electrode. The novel probes were also deployed in a steam space removed from the water phase. It was necessary to construct a reservoir and an external, air-cooled condenser to automatically keep the reservoir full of condensed steam. Conventional reference and working electrodes were placed in the water phase of the reservoir and the novel probes protruded into the vapor space above it. Finally, water phase probes (both reference and working electrodes) were added to the hot condensed steam in the external condenser. Since the condensing action collapsed the volatiles back into the water phase, these electrodes proved to be extremely sensitive at detecting oxygen, which is one of the species of highest concern in high temperature power systems. Although the novel steam phase probes provided encouraging initial results, the tendency for tungsten to completely corrode away in the steam phase limited their usefulness. However, the conventional water phase electrodes, installed both in the reservoir and in the external condensing coil, provided useful data showing the adverse impact of oxygen and carbon dioxide on the REDOX potential and high temperature pH, respectively.

  8. Analytic calculation of properties of holographic superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Siopsis; Jason Therrien

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate analytically properties of holographic superconductors in the probe limit. We analyze the range $1/2 3/2$. We also obtain the frequency dependence of the conductivity by solving analytically the wave equation of electromagnetic perturbations. We show that the real part of the DC conductivity behaves as $e^{-\\Delta_g /T}$ and estimate the gap $\\Delta_g$ analytically. Our results are in good agreement with numerical results.

  9. Method of identity analyte-binding peptides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kauvar, L.M.

    1990-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for affinity chromatography or adsorption of a designated analyte utilizes a paralog as the affinity partner. The immobilized paralog can be used in purification or analysis of the analyte; the paralog can also be used as a substitute for antibody in an immunoassay. The paralog is identified by screening candidate peptide sequences of 4--20 amino acids for specific affinity to the analyte. 5 figs.

  10. Strategies for Choosing Analytics and Visualization Software...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be interchangeable. Visualization Analytics Visit Matlab Python tools: Numpy, Scipy, iPython, matplotlib Paraview Mathematica Perl IDL Python TCLTK AVSExpress R SQL ImageJFiji...

  11. Guided Text Analysis Using Adaptive Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad A [ORNL] [ORNL; Symons, Christopher T [ORNL] [ORNL; DeNap, Frank A [ORNL] [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper demonstrates the promise of augmenting interactive visualizations with semi-supervised machine learning techniques to improve the discovery of significant associations and insight in the search and analysis of textual information. More specifically, we have developed a system called Gryffin that hosts a unique collection of techniques that facilitate individualized investigative search pertaining to an ever-changing set of analytical questions over an indexed collection of open-source publications related to national infrastructure. The Gryffin client hosts dynamic displays of the search results via focus+context record listings, temporal timelines, term- frequency views, and multiple coordinated views. Furthermore, as the analyst interacts with the display, the interactions are recorded and used to label the search records. These labeled records are then used to drive semi-supervised machine learning algorithms that re-rank the unlabeled search records such that potentially relevant records are moved to the top of the record listing. Gryffin is described in the context of the daily tasks encountered at the Department of Homeland Securitys Fusion Centers, with whom we are collaborating in its development. The resulting system is capable of addressing the analysts information overload that can be directly attributed to the deluge of information that must be addressed in search and investigative analysis of textual information.

  12. Guided Text Search Using Adaptive Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad A [ORNL; Symons, Christopher T [ORNL; Senter, James K [ORNL; DeNap, Frank A [ORNL

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research demonstrates the promise of augmenting interactive visualizations with semi- supervised machine learning techniques to improve the discovery of significant associations and insights in the search and analysis of textual information. More specifically, we have developed a system called Gryffin that hosts a unique collection of techniques that facilitate individualized investigative search pertaining to an ever-changing set of analytical questions over an indexed collection of open-source documents related to critical national infrastructure. The Gryffin client hosts dynamic displays of the search results via focus+context record listings, temporal timelines, term-frequency views, and multiple coordinate views. Furthermore, as the analyst interacts with the display, the interactions are recorded and used to label the search records. These labeled records are then used to drive semi-supervised machine learning algorithms that re-rank the unlabeled search records such that potentially relevant records are moved to the top of the record listing. Gryffin is described in the context of the daily tasks encountered at the US Department of Homeland Security s Fusion Center, with whom we are collaborating in its development. The resulting system is capable of addressing the analysts information overload that can be directly attributed to the deluge of information that must be addressed in the search and investigative analysis of textual information.

  13. Analytical Study on Adhesively Bonded Joints Using Peeling Test and Symmetric Composite Models Based on Bernoulli-Euler and Timoshenko Beam Theories for Elastic and Viscoelastic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Ying-Yu

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Adhesively bonded joints have been investigated for several decades. In most analytical studies, the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory is employed to describe the behaviour of adherends. In the current work, three analytical models are developed...

  14. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  15. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  16. Development of a wet vapor homogeneous liquid metal MHD power system. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branover, H.; Unger, Y.; El-Boher, A.; Schweitzer, H.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A feasibility study for the approval of liquid metal seeds recovery from a liquid metal vapor-inert gas mixture was conducted and presented in this report. The research activity included background studies on processes relating to mixing stream condenser performance, parametric studies and its experimental validation. The condensation process under study includes mass transfer phenomena combined with heat transfer and phase change. Numerical methods were used in order to solve the dynamic equations and to carry out the parametric study as well as the experimental data reduction. The MSC performance is highly effected by droplet diameter, thus the possibility of atomizing liquid metals were experimentally investigated. The results are generalized and finally used for a set of recommendations by which the recovery of seeds is expected to be feasible.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ALGAL BIOSENSOR FOR TOXICITY ASSESSMENT OF URBAN WET WEATHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    .ferro@entpe.fr Abstract Stormwater runoff from urban areas generates various pollutants (suspended solids, heavy metals of receiving water bodies (urban streams, ground water). In order to preserve aquatic ecosystems the contamination of these effluents by various compounds: heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs

  18. Aberrant Response Patterns as a Multidimensional Phenomenon: Using Factor-Analytic Model Comparison to Detect Cheating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark III, John Michael

    2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation proposes a new factor-analytic technique for detecting cheating on exams. Person-fit statistics have been developed to assess the extent to which examinees' response patterns are consistent with expectation, ...

  19. Production Systems and Processing Effect on Phytochemicals in Citrus Fruits and Their Analytical and Isolation Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uckoo, Ram 1980-

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    of these phytochemicals this dissertation describes the development of rapid analytical and isolation methods, and the effect of production systems and processing techniques on the levels of phytochemicals in citrus fruits. In the first study, a simultaneous high...

  20. Silicate electrochemical measurements in seawater: Chemical and analytical aspects towards a reagentless sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    Silicate electrochemical measurements in seawater: Chemical and analytical aspects towards Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex, France Keywords: Molybdenum Silicate Reagentless developed a semi-autonomous method to detect silicate in aqueous samples. Molybdenum oxidation was used

  1. A comparative analysis of numerical simulation and analytical modeling of horizontal well cyclic steam injection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravago Bastardo, Delmira Cristina

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research is to compare the performance of cyclic steam injection using horizontal wells based on the analytical model developed by Gunadi against that based on numerical simulation. For comparison, ...

  2. Analytical Chemistry Division's sample transaction system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanton, J.S.; Tilson, P.A.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analytical Chemistry Division uses the DECsystem-10 computer for a wide range of tasks: sample management, timekeeping, quality assurance, and data calculation. This document describes the features and operating characteristics of many of the computer programs used by the Division. The descriptions are divided into chapters which cover all of the information about one aspect of the Analytical Chemistry Division's computer processing.

  3. Visual Analytics at the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    customers. The success of PNNL's information visualization software, such as IN-SPIRETM and StarlightTM, and publications in top visualization journals and conference proceedings are the results of PNNL researchers with a focus on analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces. PNNL's visual analytics team

  4. Method and apparatus for detecting an analyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allendorf, Mark D. (Pleasanton, CA); Hesketh, Peter J. (Atlanta, GA)

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the use of coordination polymers (CP) as coatings on microcantilevers for the detection of chemical analytes. CP exhibit changes in unit cell parameters upon adsorption of analytes, which will induce a stress in a static microcantilever upon which a CP layer is deposited. We also describe fabrication methods for depositing CP layers on surfaces.

  5. Microfabricated field calibration assembly for analytical instruments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Alex L. (Albuquerque, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Moorman, Matthew W. (Albuquerque, NM); Rodacy, Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Simonson, Robert J. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated field calibration assembly for use in calibrating analytical instruments and sensor systems. The assembly comprises a circuit board comprising one or more resistively heatable microbridge elements, an interface device that enables addressable heating of the microbridge elements, and, in some embodiments, a means for positioning the circuit board within an inlet structure of an analytical instrument or sensor system.

  6. The Evolving Leadership Path of Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kluse, Michael; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Gracio, Deborah K.

    2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a requested book chapter for an internationally authored book on visual analytics and related fields, coordianted by a UK university and to be published by Springer in 2012. This chapter is an overview of the leadship strategies that PNNL's Jim Thomas and other stakeholders used to establish visual analytics as a field, and how those strategies may evolve in the future.

  7. Bearing Analytics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    University 31 likes SiNode Systems is a battery materials venture developing silicon-graphene anodes for the next generation of lithium-ion batteries. SiNode anodes offer higher...

  8. ANALYTIC EQUIVALENCE OF NORMAL CROSSING FUNCTIONS ON A REAL ANALYTIC MANIFOLD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ANALYTIC EQUIVALENCE OF NORMAL CROSSING FUNCTIONS ON A REAL ANALYTIC MANIFOLD Goulwen Fichou crossing singularities after a modification. We focus on the analytic equivalence of such functions with only normal crossing singularities. We prove that for such functions C right equivalence implies

  9. Analytical energy spectrum for hybrid mechanical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honghua Zhong; Qiongtao Xie; Xiwen Guan; Murray T. Batchelor; Kelin Gao; Chaohong Lee

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the energy spectrum for hybrid mechanical systems described by non-parity-symmetric quantum Rabi models. A set of analytical solutions in terms of the confluent Heun functions and their analytical energy spectrum are obtained. The analytical energy spectrum includes regular and exceptional parts, which are both confirmed by direct numerical simulation. The regular part is determined by the zeros of the Wronskian for a pair of analytical solutions. The exceptional part is relevant to the isolated exact solutions and its energy eigenvalues are obtained by analyzing the truncation conditions for the confluent Heun functions. By analyzing the energy eigenvalues for exceptional points, we obtain the analytical conditions for the energy-level-crossings, which correspond to two-fold energy degeneracy.

  10. Pre-photolithographic GaAs surface treatment for improved photoresist adhesion during wet chemical etching and improved wet etch profiles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, Marino John; Clevenger, Jascinda; Austin, Franklin H., IV (, LMATA, Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Patrizi, Gary A.; Romero, Katherine (LMATA, Albuquerque, NM); Timon, Robert P.; Vigil, Pablita S. (LMATA, Albuquerque, NM); Grine, Alejandro J.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of several experiments aimed at remedying photoresist adhesion failure during spray wet chemical etching of InGaP/GaAs NPN HBTs are reported. Several factors were identified that could influence adhesion and a Design of Experiment (DOE) approach was used to study the effects and interactions of selected factors. The most significant adhesion improvement identified is the incorporation of a native oxide etch immediately prior to the photoresist coat. In addition to improving adhesion, this pre-coat treatment also alters the wet etch profile of (100) GaAs so that the reaction limited etch is more isotropic compared to wafers without surface treatment; the profiles have a positive taper in both the [011] and [011] directions, but the taper angles are not identical. The altered profiles have allowed us to predictably yield fully probe-able HBTs with 5 x 5 {micro}m emitters using 5200 {angstrom} evaporated metal without planarization.

  11. A theory for heat exchangers with liquid-desiccant-wetted surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otterbein, R.T. [Otterbein Engineering, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following theory extends the wet surface model of Maclaine-cross and Banks (1981) to include heat exchangers that heat or cool moist air with liquid-desiccant-wetted surfaces. The theory uses a wall boundary condition that forces the moist air to be at an arbitrary relative humidity that is less than totally saturated. The theory defines a new temperature scale (brine-bulb temperature) for which the wet-bulb temperature is a special case. Brine-bulb heat capacitance and heat transfer coefficient are defined. By using an analogy to the dry surface heat exchanger theory, the performance of these heat exchangers can then be estimated from the performance of geometrically identical heat exchangers with a dry surface. Charts to utilize the theory at various elevations are shown.

  12. A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (Barrier M) - Partners * Sub-Contractor: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) * Co-supporter: ORMAT Overview 3 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov...

  13. analytical tool development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Websites Summary: is the main body of the final report submitted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Many of the appendices (not Newsletter 27:22-23. 12;FHX Project...

  14. Analytical Tool Development for Aftertreatment Sub-Systems Integration |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1Albuquerque, NMPerformanceof Energy PistonAnalysis

  15. Hydrogen Fuel Quality - Focus: Analytical Methods Development & Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e& FuelInvitedinEnergyFuel Cells

  16. Analytic orbit propagation for transiting circumbinary planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgakarakos, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The herein presented analytical framework fully describes the motion of coplanar systems consisting of a stellar binary and a planet orbiting both stars on orbital as well as secular timescales. Perturbations of the Runge-Lenz vector are used to derive short period evolution of the system, while octupole secular theory is applied to describe its long term behaviour. A post Newtonian correction on the stellar orbit is included. The planetary orbit is initially circular and the theory developed here assumes that the planetary eccentricity remains relatively small (e_2<0.2). Our model is tested against results from numerical integrations of the full equations of motion and is then applied to investigate the dynamical history of some of the circumbinary planetary systems discovered by NASA's Kepler satellite. Our results suggest that the formation history of the systems Kepler-34 and Kepler-413 has most likely been different from the one of Kepler-16, Kepler-35, Kepler-38 and Kepler-64, since the observed plan...

  17. ARPEFS as an analytic technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schach von Wittenau, A.E.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two modifications to the ARPEFS technique are introduced. These are studied using p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) as a model system. The first modification is the obtaining of ARPEFS {chi}(k) curves at temperatures as low as our equipment will permit. While adding to the difficulty of the experiment, this modification is shown to almost double the signal-to-noise ratio of normal emission p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) {chi}(k) curves. This is shown by visual comparison of the raw data and by the improved precision of the extracted structural parameters. The second change is the replacement of manual fitting of the Fourier filtered {chi}(k) curves by the use of the simplex algorithm for parameter determination. Again using p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) data, this is shown to result in better agreement between experimental {chi}(k) curves and curves calculated based on model structures. The improved ARPEFS is then applied to p(2 {times} 2)S/Ni(111) and ({radical}3 {times} {radical}3) R30{degree}S/Ni(111). For p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) we find a S-Cu bond length of 2.26 {Angstrom}, with the S adatom 1.31 {Angstrom} above the fourfold hollow site. The second Cu layer appears to be corrugated. Analysis of the p(2 {times} 2)S/Ni(111) data indicates that the S adatom adatom adsorbs onto the FCC threefold hollow site 1.53 {Angstrom} above the Ni surface. The S-Ni bond length is determined to be 2.13 {Angstrom}, indicating an outwards shift of the first layer Ni atoms. We are unable to assign a unique structure to ({radical}3 {times} {radical}3)R30{degree}S/Ni(111). An analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of ARPEFS as an experimental and analytic technique is presented, along with a summary of problems still to be addressed.

  18. System and method for monitoring wet bulb temperature in a flue gas stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, R.L.; Bland, V.V.

    1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes in a system for monitoring wet bulb temperature in a flue gas stream means for extracting a sample of the gas from the flue, means for heating the sample to maintain the sample at substantially the same temperature as the gas in the flue, a sensor for measuring the wet bulb temperature of the sample, a reservoir of liquid, a liquid absorbent wick surrounding the sensor and extending into the liquid in the reservoir, and means for maintaining the liquid in the reservoir at a substantially constant level.

  19. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPriceNonassociated Natural Gas, WetGas, Wet After Lease

  20. Mobile encapsulation and volume reduction system for wet low-level wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buelt, J.L.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of the program entitled ''A Preconceptual Study for a Transportable Vitrification Process''. The objective of the study is to determine the feasibility of a Mobile Encapsulation and Volume Reduction System (MEVS). The report contains design criteria, a preconceptual design of the system, a comparison of disposal costs with other solidification technologies, and an assessment of utility interests in the transportable volume reduction service MEVS can provide. The MEVS design employs the use of a joule-heated glass melter to convert the wet low-level wastes into glass. The process is self-sufficient, requiring no direct facility services or reactor personnel. It is capable of servicing one waste type from a minimum of three reactors. The design was used to prepare capital and operating cost estimates. The capital cost for the MEVS is $4,680,000, which includes all labor necessary for design, engineering, inspection, and licensing. The operating cost of the system for servicing a minimum of three reactors is $1,530,000/y for resins or $2,280,000/y for concentrated liquids. The cost estimates compared favorably to the more common solidification process of cementation. Total MEVS operating costs which include processing, transportation and burial, are $191 to $218/ft/sup 3/ waste, whereas quoted costs for cementation and disposal from reactor operators range from $155 to $350/ft/sup 3/. The report concludes with the requirements for additional development, which can be accomplished for less than one sixth of the capital costs. The report also presents the results of an assessment conducted with utility representatives to obtain their expressions of interest in a service of this type.

  1. Analytical Methods for Measuring Mercury in Water, Sediment and Biota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasorsa, Brenda K.; Gill, Gary A.; Horvat, Milena

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury (Hg) exists in a large number of physical and chemical forms with a wide range of properties. Conversion between these different forms provides the basis for mercury's complex distribution pattern in local and global cycles and for its biological enrichment and effects. Since the 1960’s, the growing awareness of environmental mercury pollution has stimulated the development of more accurate, precise and efficient methods of determining mercury and its compounds in a wide variety of matrices. During recent years new analytical techniques have become available that have contributed significantly to the understanding of mercury chemistry in natural systems. In particular, these include ultra sensitive and specific analytical equipment and contamination-free methodologies. These improvements allow for the determination of total mercury as well as major species of mercury to be made in water, sediments and soils, and biota. Analytical methods are selected depending on the nature of the sample, the concentration levels of mercury, and what species or fraction is to be quantified. The terms “speciation” and “fractionation” in analytical chemistry were addressed by the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) which published guidelines (Templeton et al., 2000) or recommendations for the definition of speciation analysis. "Speciation analysis is the analytical activity of identifying and/or measuring the quantities of one or more individual chemical species in a sample. The chemical species are specific forms of an element defined as to isotopic composition, electronic or oxidation state, and/or complex or molecular structure. The speciation of an element is the distribution of an element amongst defined chemical species in a system. In case that it is not possible to determine the concentration of the different individual chemical species that sum up the total concentration of an element in a given matrix, meaning it is impossible to determine the speciation, it is a useful practice to do fractionation instead. Fractionation is the process of classification of an analyte or a group of analytes from a certain sample according to physical (e.g. size, solubility) or chemical (e.g. bonding, reactivity) properties."

  2. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Rhudy

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98% elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, but declined to 79% oxidation after nearly 13 months in service. The other two catalysts, an SCR-type catalyst (titanium/vanadium) and an experimental fly-ash-based catalyst, were significantly less active. The palladium-based and SCR-type catalysts were effectively regenerated at the end of the long-term test by flowing heated air through the catalyst overnight. The carbon-based catalyst was not observed to regenerate, and no regeneration tests were conducted on the fourth, fly-ash-based catalyst. Preliminary process economics were developed for the palladium and carbon-based catalysts for a scrubbed, North Dakota lignite application. As described above, the pilot-scale results showed the catalysts could not sustain 90% or greater oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas for a period of two years. Consequently, the economics were based on performance criteria in a later DOE NETL solicitation, which required candidate mercury control technologies to achieve at least a 55% increase in mercury capture for plants that fire lignite. These economics show that if the catalysts must be replaced every two years, the catalytic oxidation process can be 30 to 40% less costly than conventional (not chemically treated) activated carbon injection if the plant currently sells their fly ash and would lose those sales with carbon injection. If the plant does not sell their fly ash, activated carbon injection was estimated to be slightly less costly. There was little difference in the estimated cost for palladium versus the carbon-based catalysts. If the palladium-based catalyst can be regenerated to double its life to four years, catalytic oxidation process economics are greatly improved. With regeneration, the catalytic oxidation process shows over a 50% reduction in mercury control cost compared to conventional activated carbon injection for a case where the plant sells its fly ash. At Spruce Plant, mercury oxidation catalyst testing began in September 2003 and continued through the end of April 2005, interrupted only by a

  3. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D C; Neuenschwander, G G; Baker, E G; Sealock, Jr, L J; Butner, R S

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bench-scale reactor tests are in progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}), is designed for treating a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. This report describes a test program which used a continuous-feed tubular reactor. This test program is an intermediate stage in the process development. The reactor is a laboratory-scale version of the commercial concept as currently envisioned by the process developers. An energy benefit and economic analysis was also completed on the process. Four conceptual commercial installations of the TEES process were evaluated for three food processing applications and one organic chemical manufacturing application. Net energy production (medium-Btu gas) was achieved in all four cases. The organic chemical application was found to be economically attractive in the present situation. Based on sensitivity studies included in the analysis, the three food processing cases will likely become attractive in the near future as waste disposal regulations tighten and disposal costs increase. 21 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. Coupled electromechanical effects in wurtzite quantum dots with wetting layers in gate controlled electric fields: The multiband case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    Coupled electromechanical effects in wurtzite quantum dots with wetting layers in gate controlled quantifies the electromechanical effects on the band structure of wurtzite quantum dots. c Systematic study on the band structure calculations of wurtzite AlN/GaN quantum dots with wetting layers (WLs). Based

  5. Conversion of Full-Scale Wet Scrubbers to Biotrickling Filters for H2S Control at Publicly Owned Treatment Works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conversion of Full-Scale Wet Scrubbers to Biotrickling Filters for H2S Control at Publicly Owned. This paper discusses the conversion of chemical scrubbers to biological trickling filters. Initially in determining the general suitability of converting wet scrubbers to biotrickling filters were identified

  6. Critical angle of wet sandpiles T. G. Mason, A. J. Levine,* D. Ertas, and T. C. Halsey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Alex J.

    with a surface roughness theory. Electron and fluorescence microscopy of the dry and wet surfaces of the grains . In this, the problem of wet sand brings to mind the problem of friction in sandpiles, a problem to which Mohr-Coulomb analysis 1 applied to cohesive sandpiles reveals that the stability criterion govern- ing

  7. Process Analytical Technology in biopharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosby, Samuel T. (Samuel Thomas)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process Analytical Technology (PAT) became a well-defined concept within the pharmaceutical industry as a result of a major initiative by the FDA called "Pharmaceutical cGMPs for the 21st Century: A Risk-Based Approach." ...

  8. Sensor for detecting and differentiating chemical analytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yi, Dechang (Metuchen, NJ); Senesac, Lawrence R. (Knoxville, TN); Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor for detecting and differentiating chemical analytes includes a microscale body having a first end and a second end and a surface between the ends for adsorbing a chemical analyte. The surface includes at least one conductive heating track for heating the chemical analyte and also a conductive response track, which is electrically isolated from the heating track, for producing a thermal response signal from the chemical analyte. The heating track is electrically connected with a voltage source and the response track is electrically connected with a signal recorder. The microscale body is restrained at the first end and the second end and is substantially isolated from its surroundings therebetween, thus having a bridge configuration.

  9. Implicit costs of data and analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapicka, Bryan A. (Bryan Anderson)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Firms have been able to utilize data and analytics to achieve a variety of economic benefits. To realize this value, firms have to invest in the necessary information technology, process updates, and employee training. ...

  10. Diffusive transport of light in a two-dimensional disordered packing of disks: Analytical approach to transport-mean-free path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeinab Sadjadi; MirFaez Miri; M. Reza Shaebani; Sareh Nakhaee

    2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study photon diffusion in a two-dimensional random packing of monodisperse disks as a simple model of granular media and wet foams. We assume that the intensity reflectance of disks is a constant. We present an analytic expression for the transport-mean-free path in terms of the velocity of light in the disks and host medium, radius and packing fraction of the disks, and the intensity reflectance. For the glass beads immersed in the air or water, we estimate transport-mean-free paths about half the experimental ones. For the air bubbles immersed in the water, transport-mean-free paths is an inverse function of liquid volume fraction of the model wet foam. This throws new light on the empirical law of Vera et. al, and promotes more realistic models.

  11. OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    subsystems was performed parametrically to uncover key physics/technology uncertainties and to iden- tify be necessary that may preclude propagation of the laser driver and require assisted pinch transport issue for wetted-wall concepts. KEYWORDS: inertial fusion, fusion technology, IFE chambers *E

  12. Modeling of wet gas compression in twin-screw multiphase pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jian

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fig. 1.4 Subsea multiphase pumping system in Ceiba Field, West Africa............................................................... 8 Fig. 1.5 Twin-screw pump cutaway ............................................................... 12 Fig... Page Table 1.1 Summary of subsea multiphase pumping projects............................ 9 Table 1.2 Summary of subsea wet gas compression projects ........................... 10 Table 2.1 Summary of current models for twin-screw pump...

  13. DELETERIOUS EXPANSION OF CEMENT PASTE SUBJECTED TO WET-DRY CYCLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ·I CEMENT PASTE SUBJECTED TO WET-DRY CYCLES John A. Wells*, Emmanuel K with five cements produced in different regions of Canada. Test specimens with nominal diameters of 25 mm program show that cement paste specimens exhibit significant differences in the magnitude of expansion

  14. Portable XRF and wet materials: application to dredged contaminated sediments1 from waterways2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Portable XRF and wet materials: application to dredged contaminated sediments1 from waterways2 7 ABSTRACT: The sustainable management of dredged waterway sediments requires on-site determination8 commonly used for similar applications with contaminated soil, but the high water content of dredged10

  15. An efficient scheme on wet/dry transitions for Shallow Water Equations with friction Christophe Berthona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coudière, Yves

    An efficient scheme on wet/dry transitions for Shallow Water Equations with friction Christophe discrepancy between both source terms comes from their relevance in dry regions. Indeed, the friction term the friction source terms in the shallow-water model. Such additional source terms are known to be very stiff

  16. Effect of Roughness as Determined by Atomic Force Microscopy on the Wetting Properties of PTFE Thin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drelich, Jaroslaw W.

    Engineering College of Mines and Earth Sciences University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 and G. YAMAUCHI decreases the spreading of a non-wetting liquid on low energy solids (1­4). Similar work with high energy ratio (r a/A (da/dA) 1), a is the apparent contact angle, a is the actual area of surface

  17. 1 Mathematical Model The mass consevation equations are for wetting phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    que para el CO2 no se puede no se puede asumir que es incompresible como para la wetting phase (brine compresibilidad del CO2, y ademas de la solubilidad en brine, pero eso es harina de otro costal... Otra cosa: vos

  18. Stable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindeman, Ilya N.

    isotope redistribution by thermal diffusion leading to enrichment of light isotopes at the hot endStable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate 2012 Editor: T.M. Harrison Keywords: thermal diffusion hydrogen isotope separation oxygen isotopes

  19. Heat Transfer Performance of a Dry and Wet / Dry Advanced Cooling Tower Condenser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fricke, H. D.; Webster, D. J.; McIlroy, K.; Bartz, J. A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an EPRI-funded experimental evaluation of advanced air-cooled ammonia condensers for a phase. Change dry/wet cooling system for power plants. Two condenser surfaces with different air-side augmentation were tested in an ammonia...

  20. Eos, Vol. 91, No. 29, 20 July 2010 Water and wet sediments under ice sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    Eos, Vol. 91, No. 29, 20 July 2010 Water and wet sediments under ice sheets can play an important role in regulating the rate of ice stream flow in Antarctica, particularly over short time scales. Indeed, the discharge of subglacial lakes has been linked to an increase in ice velocity of Byrd Glacier

  1. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: A sensor] The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified as the potential habitability of its regolith. INDEX TERMS: 6225 Planetology: Solar System Objects: Mars; 6297

  2. Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer Boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    . SPE SPE 23442 Production and Pressure Decline Curves for Wet Gas Sands With Closed Outer, Richardson, TX 7S0834S36 U.5A. Telex, 730989 SPEDAL. ABSTRACT A family of pressure and production decline as gas reservoirs which produce substan- tial amounts of water together with ~as. Production of water

  3. Rheology of weakly wetted granular materials - a comparison of experimental and numerical data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruediger Schwarze; Anton Gladkyy; Fabian Uhlig; Stefan Luding

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Shear cell simulations and experiments of weakly wetted particles (a few volume percent liquid binders) are compared, with the goal to understand their flow rheology. Application examples are cores for metal casting by core shooting made of sand and liquid binding materials. The experiments are carried out with a Couette-like rotating viscometer. The weakly wetted granular materials are made of quartz sand and small amounts of Newtonian liquids. For comparison, experiments on dry sand are also performed with a modified configuration of the viscometer. The numerical model involves spherical, monodisperse particles with contact forces and a simple liquid bridge model for individual capillary bridges between two particles. Different liquid content and properties lead to different flow rheology when measuring the shear stress-strain relations. In the experiments of the weakly wetted granular material, the apparent shear viscosity $\\eta_g$ scales inversely proportional to the inertial number $I$, for all shear rates. On the contrary, in the dry case, an intermediate scaling regime inversely quadratic in $I$ is observed for moderate shear rates. In the simulations, both scaling regimes are found for dry and wet granular material as well.

  4. THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01 LANDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01, Morgantown, WV, 26507 Introduction. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) is an instrument of acquiring information relevant to HEDS, the WCL will assess the chemical composition and properties

  5. Assessment of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Waste and Low-Grade Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettinger, J.; Koppel, P.; Margulies, A.

    an assessment of wet oxidation technologies, followed by bench-scale and pilot unit testing and by eventual demonstration of the pilot unit at an industrial host site. This paper discusses the assessment conducted under the first phase of this effort, which...

  6. Analysis of uncertainties in CRAC2 calculations: wet deposition and plume rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, R.C.; Kocher, D.C.; Hicks, B.B.; Hosker, R.P. Jr.; Ku, J.Y.; Rao, K.S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the sensitivity of results from the CRAC2 computer code, which predicts health impacts from a reactor-accident scenario, to uncertainties in selected meteorological models and parameters. The sources of uncertainty examined include the models for plume rise and wet deposition and the meteorological bin-sampling procedure. An alternative plume-rise model usually had little effect on predicted health impacts. In an alternative wet-deposition model, the scavenging rate depends only on storm type, rather than on rainfall rate and atmospheric stability class as in the CRAC2 model. Use of the alternative wet-deposition model in meteorological bin-sampling runs decreased predicted mean early injuries by as much as a factor of 2 to 3 and, for large release heights and sensible heat rates, decreased mean early fatalities by nearly an order of magnitude. The bin-sampling procedure in CRAC2 was expanded by dividing each rain bin into four bins that depend on rainfall rate. Use of the modified bin structure in conjunction with the CRAC2 wet-deposition model changed all predicted health impacts by less than a factor of 2. 9 references.

  7. A model for reactive porous transport during re-wetting of hardened concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockie, John

    A model for reactive porous transport during re-wetting of hardened concrete Michael Chapwanya residing in the porous concrete matrix. The main hypothesis in this model is that the reaction product hydration; Porous media; Reaction-diffusion equations; Vari- able porosity. 1. Introduction Concrete

  8. Surface phase behavior in binary polymer mixtures. III. Temperature dependence of surface enrichment and of wetting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Jacob

    enrichment and of wetting A. Budkowski,a) F. Scheffold, and J. Klein Department of Materials and Interfaces model systems, surface enrichment from polymer blends has clear technological implications-same mixtures--surface enrichment characteristics of the air- surface preferred phases. In these binary pairs

  9. Analytical Layer Planning for Nanometer VLSI Designs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chi-Yu

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    i ANALYTICAL LAYER PLANNING FOR NANOMETER VLSI DESIGNS A Thesis by CHI-YU CHANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 2012 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering ii ANALYTICAL LAYER PLANNING FOR NANOMETER VLSI DESIGNS A Thesis by CHI-YU CHANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  10. Building up the elliptic flow: analytical insights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshitaka Hatta; Bo-Wen Xiao

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a fully analytical description of the early-stage formation of elliptic flow in relativistic viscous hydrodynamics. We first construct an elliptic deformation of Gubser flow which is a boost invariant solution of the Navier-Stokes equation with a nontrivial transverse profile. We then analytically calculate the momentum anisotropy of the flow as a function of time and discuss the connection with the empirical formula by Bhalerao {\\it et al.} regarding the viscosity dependence of elliptic flow.

  11. Preconcentration and separation of analytes in microchannels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hatch, Anson (Tracy, CA); Singh, Anup K. (Danville, CA); Herr, Amy E. (Fremont, CA); Throckmorton, Daniel J. (Tracy, CA)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein are methods and devices for preconcentrating and separating analytes such as proteins and polynucleotides in microchannels. As disclosed, at least one size-exclusion polymeric element is adjacent to processing area or an assay area in a microchannel which may be porous polymeric element. The size-exclusion polymeric element may be used to manipulate, e.g. concentrate, analytes in a sample prior to assaying in the assay area.

  12. Analytic Coleman-de Luccia Geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xi; /Stanford U., ITP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC; Harlow, Daniel; /Stanford U., ITP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the necessary and sufficient conditions for a Euclidean scale factor to be a solution of the Coleman-de Luccia equations for some analytic potential V ({psi}), with a Lorentzian continuation describing the growth of a bubble of lower-energy vacuum surrounded by higher-energy vacuum. We then give a set of explicit examples that satisfy the conditions and thus are closed-form analytic examples of Coleman-de Luccia geometries.

  13. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) Analytical Research, Development, and Implementation. The division maintains a program to conceptualize, investigate, develop, assess, improve, and implement advanced technology for chemical and physicochemical measurements. Emphasis is on problems and needs identified with ORNL and Department of Energy (DOE) programs; however, attention is also given to advancing the analytical sciences themselves. (2) Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization. The division carries out a wide variety of chemical work that typically involves analytical research and/or development plus the utilization of analytical capabilities to expedite programmatic interests. (3) Technical Support. The division performs chemical and physicochemical analyses of virtually all types. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each of which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1988. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8.

  14. Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faletti, D.W.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

  15. COOKSON, EDWARD JAMES. Development of the Metal Foam Electrical Resistance Heater. (Under the Direction of Dr. Albert Shih.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Albert J.

    to convert the electrical energy into thermal energy. An analytic heat transfer model is first developed

  16. Sampling, preservation, and analytical methods research plan - liquid redox sulfur recovery technologies: Stretford process. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trofe, T.W.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GRI has developed a sampling, preservation, and analytical (SPandA) methods research plan for developing and validating analytical methodologies for liquid redox sulfur recovery processes (e.g., Stretford process). The document describes the technical approach which will be used to direct research activities to develop SPandA methodologies to analyze gaseous, aqueous, and solid process streams from the Stretford sulfur recovery process. The primary emphasis is on developing and validating methodologies for analyzing vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V), anthraquinone disulphonic acids (ADA), polysulfide-sulfur, sulfide-sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfate, thiocyanate, total soluble sulfur, alkalinity, pH, total dissolved solids, total suspended solids, and dissolved oxygen in aqueous process streams. The document includes descriptions of the process streams and chemical species, selection of candidate analytical methods, and technical approach for methods development and validation.

  17. Analytic prognostic for petrochemical pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaoude, Abdo Abou; El-Tawil, Khaled; Noura, Hassan; Ouladsine, Mustapha

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pipelines tubes are part of vital mechanical systems largely used in petrochemical industries. They serve to transport natural gases or liquids. They are cylindrical tubes and are submitted to the risks of corrosion due to high PH concentrations of the transported liquids in addition to fatigue cracks due to the alternation of pressure-depression of gas along the time, initiating therefore in the tubes body micro-cracks that can propagate abruptly to lead to failure. The development of the prognostic process for such systems increases largely their performance and their availability, as well decreases the global cost of their missions. Therefore, this paper deals with a new prognostic approach to improve the performance of these pipelines. Only the first mode of crack, that is, the opening mode, is considered.

  18. Analytic prognostic for petrochemical pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdo Abou Jaoude; Seifedine Kadry; Khaled El-Tawil; Hassan Noura; Mustapha Ouladsine

    2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Pipelines tubes are part of vital mechanical systems largely used in petrochemical industries. They serve to transport natural gases or liquids. They are cylindrical tubes and are submitted to the risks of corrosion due to high PH concentrations of the transported liquids in addition to fatigue cracks due to the alternation of pressure-depression of gas along the time, initiating therefore in the tubes body micro-cracks that can propagate abruptly to lead to failure. The development of the prognostic process for such systems increases largely their performance and their availability, as well decreases the global cost of their missions. Therefore, this paper deals with a new prognostic approach to improve the performance of these pipelines. Only the first mode of crack, that is, the opening mode, is considered.

  19. PNGV Battery Testing Procedures and Analytical Methodologies for Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motloch, Chester George; Belt, Jeffrey R; Christophersen, Jon Petter; Wright, Randy Ben; Hunt, Gary Lynn; Haskind, H. J.; Tartamella, T.; Sutula, R.

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel testing procedures and analytical methodologies to assess the performance of hybrid electric vehicle batteries have been developed. Tests include both characterization and cycle life and/or calendar life, and have been designed for both Power Assist and Dual Mode applications. Analytical procedures include a battery scaling methodology, the calculation of pulse resistance, pulse power, available energy, and differential capacity, and the modeling of calendar and cycle life data. Representative performance data and examples of the application of the analytical methodologies including resistance growth, power fade, and cycle and calendar life modeling for hybrid electric vehicle batteries are presented.

  20. Analytical Chemistry Division. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The functions of the Analytical Chemistry Division fall into three general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development and utilization; (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections each of which may carry out any type of work falling into the thre categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections which are: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectrometry; analytical technical support; bio/organic analysis section; and nuclear and radiochemical analysis. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Chapter 7 covers supplementary activities. Chapter 8 is on presentation of research results (publications, articles reviewed or referred for periodicals). Approximately 56 articles, 31 proceedings publications and 33 reports have been published, and 119 oral presentations given during this reporting period.

  1. Analytical tools in accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko, V.N.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a sub-set of my lectures presented in the Accelerator Physics course (USPAS, Santa Rosa, California, January 14-25, 2008). It is based on my notes I wrote during period from 1976 to 1979 in Novosibirsk. Only few copies (in Russian) were distributed to my colleagues in Novosibirsk Institute of Nuclear Physics. The goal of these notes is a complete description starting from the arbitrary reference orbit, explicit expressions for 4-potential and accelerator Hamiltonian and finishing with parameterization with action and angle variables. To a large degree follow logic developed in Theory of Cyclic Particle Accelerators by A.A.Kolmensky and A.N.Lebedev [Kolomensky], but going beyond the book in a number of directions. One of unusual feature is these notes use of matrix function and Sylvester formula for calculating matrices of arbitrary elements. Teaching the USPAS course motivated me to translate significant part of my notes into the English. I also included some introductory materials following Classical Theory of Fields by L.D. Landau and E.M. Liftsitz [Landau]. A large number of short notes covering various techniques are placed in the Appendices.

  2. Detection of Low Volatility Organic Analytes on Soils Using Infrared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Low Volatility Organic Analytes on Soils Using Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy. Detection of Low Volatility Organic Analytes on Soils Using Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy....

  3. analytical system involving: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analytics. Desired: Successful completion of graduate courses in general linear models or statistical quality control Shepp, Larry 3 Analytic reconstruction of some...

  4. An Analytical Approach for Tail-Pipe Emissions Estimation with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Analytical Approach for Tail-Pipe Emissions Estimation with Coupled Engine and Aftertreatment System An Analytical Approach for Tail-Pipe Emissions Estimation with Coupled...

  5. Model and Analytic Processes for Export License Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Sandra E.; Whitney, Paul D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Wood, Thomas W.; Daly, Don S.; Brothers, Alan J.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Cook, Diane; Holder, Larry

    2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper represents the Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22) Simulations, Algorithms and Modeling (SAM) Program's first effort to identify and frame analytical methods and tools to aid export control professionals in effectively predicting proliferation intent; a complex, multi-step and multi-agency process. The report focuses on analytical modeling methodologies that alone, or combined, may improve the proliferation export control license approval process. It is a follow-up to an earlier paper describing information sources and environments related to international nuclear technology transfer. This report describes the decision criteria used to evaluate modeling techniques and tools to determine which approaches will be investigated during the final 2 years of the project. The report also details the motivation for why new modeling techniques and tools are needed. The analytical modeling methodologies will enable analysts to evaluate the information environment for relevance to detecting proliferation intent, with specific focus on assessing risks associated with transferring dual-use technologies. Dual-use technologies can be used in both weapons and commercial enterprises. A decision-framework was developed to evaluate which of the different analytical modeling methodologies would be most appropriate conditional on the uniqueness of the approach, data availability, laboratory capabilities, relevance to NA-22 and Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (NA-24) research needs and the impact if successful. Modeling methodologies were divided into whether they could help micro-level assessments (e.g., help improve individual license assessments) or macro-level assessment. Macro-level assessment focuses on suppliers, technology, consumers, economies, and proliferation context. Macro-level assessment technologies scored higher in the area of uniqueness because less work has been done at the macro level. An approach to developing testable hypotheses for the macro-level assessment methodologies is provided. The outcome of this works suggests that we should develop a Bayes Net for micro-level analysis and continue to focus on Bayes Net, System Dynamics and Economic Input/Output models for assessing macro-level problems. Simultaneously, we need to develop metrics for assessing intent in export control, including the risks and consequences associated with all aspects of export control.

  6. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

  7. Submitted to the Journal of the American Water Resources Association Potential Human Health Effects Associated with Pathogens in Urban Wet Weather Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    Effects Associated with Pathogens in Urban Wet Weather Flows Robert Pitt1 , Melinda Lalor2 , and John stormwater conveyance systems, or wet weather sewage overflows, may adversely impact many of the desired uses. Urban runoff or wet weather flows include not only precipitation and washoff from lawns and landscaped

  8. FISCAL FORESIGHT: ANALYTICS AND ECONOMETRICS ERIC M. LEEPER, TODD B. WALKER, AND SHU-CHUN SUSAN YANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    FISCAL FORESIGHT: ANALYTICS AND ECONOMETRICS ERIC M. LEEPER, TODD B. WALKER, AND SHU-CHUN SUSAN policy process. This paper develops an analytical framework to study the econometric implications from statistical innovations in conventional ways. Econometric analyses that fail to align agents

  9. Supernova neutrino oscillations: A simple analytical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; D. Montanino; A. Palazzo

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses of observable supernova neutrino oscillation effects require the calculation of the electron (anti)neutrino survival probability P_ee along a given supernova matter density profile. We propose a simple analytical prescription for P_ee, based on a double-exponential form for the crossing probability and on the concept of maximum violation of adiabaticity. In the case of two-flavor transitions, the prescription is shown to reproduce accurately, in the whole neutrino oscillation parameter space, the results of exact numerical calculations for generic (realistic or power-law) profiles. The analytical approach is then generalized to cover three-flavor transitions with (direct or inverse) mass spectrum hierarchy, and to incorporate Earth matter effects. Compact analytical expressions, explicitly showing the symmetry properties of P_ee, are provided for practical calculations.

  10. Analytical Study of Stress State in HTS Solenoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barzi, E.; Terzini, E.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A main challenge for high field solenoids made of in High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) is the large stress developed in the conductor. This is especially constraining for BSCCO, a brittle and strain sensitive ceramic material. To find parametric correlations useful in magnet design, analytical models can be used. A simple model is herein proposed to obtain the radial, azimuthal and axial stresses in a solenoid as a function of size, i.e. self-field, and of the engineering current density for a number of different constraint hypotheses. The analytical model was verified against finite element modeling (FEM) using the same hypotheses of infinite rigidity of the constraints and room temperature properties. FEM was used to separately evaluate the effect of thermal contractions at 4.2 K for BSCCO and YBCO coils. Even though the analytical model allows for a finite stiffness of the constraints, it was run using infinite stiffness. For this reason, FEM was again used to determine how much stresses change when considering an outer stainless steel skin with finite rigidity for both BSCCO and YBCO coils. For a better understanding of the actual loads that high field solenoids made of HTS will be subject to, we have started some analytical studies of stress state in solenoids for a number of constraint hypotheses. This will hopefully show what can be achieved with the present conductor in terms of self-field. The magnetic field (B) exerts a force F = B x J per unit volume. In superconducting magnets, where the field and current density (J) are both high, this force can be very large, and it is therefore important to calculate the stresses in the coil.

  11. Waste minimization in analytical chemistry through innovative sample preparation techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, L. L.

    1998-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Because toxic solvents and other hazardous materials are commonly used in analytical methods, characterization procedures result in significant and costly amount of waste. We are developing alternative analytical methods in the radiological and organic areas to reduce the volume or form of the hazardous waste produced during sample analysis. For the radiological area, we have examined high-pressure, closed-vessel microwave digestion as a way to minimize waste from sample preparation operations. Heated solutions of strong mineral acids can be avoided for sample digestion by using the microwave approach. Because reactivity increases with pressure, we examined the use of less hazardous solvents to leach selected contaminants from soil for subsequent analysis. We demonstrated the feasibility of this approach by extracting plutonium from a NET reference material using citric and tartaric acids with microwave digestion. Analytical results were comparable to traditional digestion methods, while hazardous waste was reduced by a factor often. We also evaluated the suitability of other natural acids, determined the extraction performance on a wider variety of soil types, and examined the extraction efficiency of other contaminants. For the organic area, we examined ways to minimize the wastes associated with the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in environmental samples. Conventional methods for analyzing semivolatile organic compounds are labor intensive and require copious amounts of hazardous solvents. For soil and sediment samples, we have a method to analyze PCBs that is based on microscale extraction using benign solvents (e.g., water or hexane). The extraction is performed at elevated temperatures in stainless steel cells containing the sample and solvent. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to quantitate the analytes in the isolated extract. More recently, we developed a method utilizing solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for natural water samples. In this SPME technique, a fused-silica fiber coated with a polymeric film is exposed to the sample, extraction is allowed to take place, and then the analytes are thermally desorbed for GC analysis. Unlike liquid-liquid extraction or solid-phase extraction, SPME consumes all of the extracted sample in the analysis, significantly reducing the required sample volume.

  12. Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be useful in defining a roadmap for what future capability needs to look like.

  13. Wetting of Sodium on ??-Al2O3/YSZ Composites for Low Temperature Planar Sodium-Metal Halide Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, David M.; Coffey, Greg W.; Mast, Eric S.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Mansurov, Jirgal; Lu, Xiaochuan; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetting of Na on B”-Al2O3/YSZ composites was investigated using the sessile drop technique. The effects of moisture and surface preparation were studied at low temperatures. Electrical conductivity of Na/B”-Al2O3-YSZ/Na cells was also investigated at low temperatures and correlated to the wetting behavior. The use of planar B”-Al2O3 substrates at low temperature with low cost polymeric seals is realized due to improved wetting at low temperature and conductivity values consistent with the literature.

  14. Audit of wet gas processing at Chevron's McKittrick Plant, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the audit was to determine if: (1) volumes of wet gas delivered to the McKittrick plant were properly calculated and reported; (2) processing fees paid to Chevron conformed to contract provisions; (3) wet gas processing at Chevron's facility was economical; and (4) controls over natural gas liquid sales were adequate. Our review showed that there were weaknesses in internal controls, practices and procedures regarding the Department's management of the wet gas which is processed by Chevron under contract to the Reserve. The findings, recommendations and management comments are synopsized in the Executive Summary.

  15. Analytical modeling of balloon launch dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strganac, Thomas W

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subject; Aerospace Engineer1ng ANALYTICAL MODELING OF BALLOON LAUNCH DYNAMICS A Thesis by THOMAS WILLIAM STRGANAC Approved as to sty1e and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) (Head of Dep rtment) December 1980 ABSTRACT Analyt1... aerodynam1cs. Actual fl1ght data has been used to qualify the model via comparisons of the launch trans1ent configurations. DEDICATION To my father. . THOMAS JOHN STRGANAC 1922-1980 . . . who provided me the examp1e to fo1Iow in life. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS...

  16. Excerpted from: R. Pitt, M. Lilburn. S.R. Durrans, S. Burian, S. Nix, J. Vorhees, and J. Martinson (I had a lot of help from my friends). Guidance Manual for Integrated Wet Weather Flow (WWF) Collection and Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    . Martinson (I had a lot of help from my friends). Guidance Manual for Integrated Wet Weather Flow (WWF.....................................................................................................................................7 Wet Weather Flow Management: Lessons Learned from the Past

  17. Wet to dry crossover and a flow vortex-lattice in active nematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Thampi, Sumesh P; Yeomans, Julia M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to vibrated granular matter, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements. The energy input leads to exotic behaviour such as collective motion, pattern formation, topological defects and active turbulence, but theories that link the different manifestations of activity across systems and length scales are lacking. Here we unify two different classes of active matter by using friction as a control parameter to interpolate between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened. At the wet-dry crossover, we find a novel lattice of flow vortices interleaved with an ordered network of topological defects which arises from the competition between friction and viscous dissipation. Our results contribute to understanding the physics of matter operating out-of-equilibrium, with its potential in the design of active micro- and nano-machines.

  18. Wet to dry crossover and a flow vortex-lattice in active nematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin Doostmohammadi; Michael Adamer; Sumesh P. Thampi; Julia M. Yeomans

    2015-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to vibrated granular matter, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements. The energy input leads to exotic behaviour such as collective motion, pattern formation, topological defects and active turbulence, but theories that link the different manifestations of activity across systems and length scales are lacking. Here we unify two different classes of active matter by using friction as a control parameter to interpolate between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened. At the wet-dry crossover, we find a novel lattice of flow vortices interleaved with an ordered network of topological defects which arises from the competition between friction and viscous dissipation. Our results contribute to understanding the physics of matter operating out-of-equilibrium, with its potential in the design of active micro- and nano-machines.

  19. Dynamic Imaging of Au-nanoparticles via Scanning Electron Microscopy in a Graphene Wet Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wayne Yang; Yuning Zhang; Michael Hilke; Walter Reisner

    2015-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution nanoscale imaging in liquid environments is crucial for studying molecular interactions in biological and chemical systems. In particular, electron microscopy is the gold-standard tool for nanoscale imaging, but its high-vacuum requirements make application to in-liquid samples extremely challenging. Here we present a new graphene based wet cell device where high resolution SEM (scanning electron microscope) and Energy Dispersive X-rays (EDX) analysis can be performed directly inside a liquid environment. Graphene is an ideal membrane material as its high transparancy, conductivity and mechanical strength can support the high vacuum and grounding requirements of a SEM while enabling maximal resolution and signal. In particular, we obtain high resolution (graphene wet cell and EDX analysis of nanoparticle composition in the liquid enviornment. Our obtained resolution surpasses current conventional silicon nitride devices imaged in both SEM and TEM under much higher electron doses.

  20. Environmental aspects of alternative wet technologies for producing energy/fuel from peat. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.T.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peat in situ contains up to 90% moisture, with about 50% of this moisture trapped as a colloidal gel. This colloidal moisture cannot be removed by conventional dewatering methods (filter presses, etc.) and must be removed by thermal drying, solvent extraction, or solar drying before the peat can be utilized as a fuel feedstock for direct combustion or gasification. To circumvent the drying problem, alternative technologies such as wet oxidation, wet carbonization, and biogasification are possible for producing energy or enhanced fuel from peat. This report describes these three alternative technologies, calculates material balances for given raw peat feed rates of 1000 tph, and evaluates the environmental consequences of all process effluent discharges. Wastewater discharges represent the most significant effluent due to the relatively large quantities of water removed during processing. Treated process water returned to the harvested bog may force in situ, acidic bog water into recieving streams, disrupting local aquatic ecosystems.

  1. Study of the effect of seasonal desiccation and wetting on the strength of highway subgrade soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswas, Bhupati Ranjan

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for possible deteriora- tion of soil strength due to cyolic drying and wetting. Likewise the test procedure (28) used by the Kansas State Highway Commission provides for saturation ranging from a few minutes to two weeks, depending on the density... (il, ). East Pakistan can be divided into three broad geological divisions: (a) the deltaic coastal areas; (b) the broad alluvial valleys of the Ganges and Brahmaputra Rivers through the central, western and northern portion of the country; and (c...

  2. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ Lease Condensate ProvedGas, Wet After Lease Separation

  3. On atomic structure of Ge huts growing on the Ge/Si(001) wetting layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arapkina, Larisa V.; Yuryev, Vladimir A. [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)] [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural models of growing Ge hut clusters—pyramids and wedges—are proposed on the basis of data of recent STM investigations of nucleation and growth of Ge huts on the Si(001) surface in the process of molecular beam epitaxy. It is shown that extension of a hut base along <110> directions goes non-uniformly during the cluster growth regardless of its shape. Growing pyramids, starting from the second monolayer, pass through cyclic formation of slightly asymmetrical and symmetrical clusters, with symmetrical ones appearing after addition of every fourth monolayer. We suppose that pyramids of symmetrical configurations composed by 2, 6, 10, etc., monolayers over the wetting layer are more stable than asymmetrical ones. This might explain less stability of pyramids in comparison with wedges in dense arrays forming at low temperatures of Ge deposition. Possible nucleation processes of pyramids and wedges on wetting layer patches from identical embryos composed by 8 dimers through formation of 1 monolayer high 16-dimer nuclei different only in their symmetry is discussed. Schematics of these processes are presented. It is concluded from precise STM measurements that top layers of wetting layer patches are relaxed when huts nucleate on them.

  4. NERSC Analytics Program Status and Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    spanning all aspects of analytics, high performance computing, and many science domains. · SGI Altix ­ 32, application, and deployment of a diverse array of technologies spanning the domains of high performance computing, data management, data analysis and visualization, and workflow management. #12;DOE CGF April 29

  5. Software Analytics: Achievements and Challenges Dongmei Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Tao

    , USA Email: xie@csc.ncsu.edu Abstract--A huge wealth of various data exist in the practice of software insightful and actionable information; such information is used for completing various tasks around software and challenges of research and practice on principles, techniques, and applications of soft- ware analytics

  6. Analytical Study of Thermonuclear Reaction Probability Integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Chaudhry; H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    2000-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic study of the reaction probability integrals corresponding to the various forms of the slowly varying cross-section factor $S(E)$ is attempted. Exact expressions for reaction probability integrals are expressed in terms of the extended gamma functions.

  7. The Analytical Labortory sample tracking and reporting system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colvin, W.J.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulatory and project requirements stipulate that samples submitted for chemical/physical analysis be owed throughout the analytical process. The Analytical Laboratory (AL) began tracking sample request information electronically using a simple dBASE{trademark} database in 1992. In mid 1993, AL chemists formed a committee to determine the software requirements for a formal sample tracking system. The requirements were outlined for a multi-user FoxPro{trademark} application which tracked sample logins, login templates, worksheets, and sample results and also provided standardized reporting capabilities. The Analytical Laboratory Sample Tracking and Reporting System became available to AL chemists and management in February, 1994. Chemists now had quick, easy access to organized and readable sample data. Up to date, on-line access to sample status information also benefitted AL management. The ability to closely monitor samples decreased sample process time. AL customers also benefitted by receiving standardized Final reports for their samples. Eventually, system performance began to deteriorate as the database grew and network traffic increased. To improve performance, ANL-W Information Services recommended upgrading the system. Upgrading to a fully relational, client/server Oracle{trademark} database accessed from a front-end application developed using Visual Basio{trademark}, one of the many Graphical User Interface (GUI) design tools available today, would improve performance times by greater than 50%. The move to Oracle would improve throughput times of transactions and employ a more efficient use of resources. Visual Basic front-and application development began in May, 1995. In October 1995, the first prototype of the Visual Basic application was made available for testing. AL users were pleased with the added ease-of-use the GUI interface provided. The production version is scheduled for release mid May, 1996.

  8. ,"Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPriceNonassociated Natural Gas, WetGas, Wet After

  9. An analytical inversion method for determining regional and global emissions of greenhouse gases: Sensitivity studies and application to halocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stohl, A.

    A new analytical inversion method has been developed to determine the regional and global emissions of long-lived atmospheric trace gases. It exploits in situ measurement data from three global networks and builds on ...

  10. WETTABILITY ALTERATION OF POROUS MEDIA TO GAS-WETTING FOR IMPROVING PRODUCTIVITY AND INJECTIVITY IN GAS-LIQUID FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wettability alteration to intermediate gas-wetting in porous media by treatment with FC-759, a fluoropolymer polymer, has been studied experimentally. Berea sandstone was used as the main rock sample in our work and its wettability before and after chemical treatment was studied at various temperatures from 25 to 93 C. We also studied recovery performance for both gas/oil and oil/water systems for Berea sandstone before and after wettability alteration by chemical treatment. Our experimental study shows that chemical treatment with FC-759 can result in: (1) wettability alteration from strong liquid-wetting to stable intermediate gas-wetting at room temperature and at elevated temperatures; (2) neutral wetting for gas, oil, and water phases in two-phase flow; (3) significant increase in oil mobility for gas/oil system; and (4) improved recovery behavior for both gas/oil and oil/water systems. This work reveals a potential for field application for improved gas-well deliverability and well injectivity by altering the rock wettability around wellbore in gas condensate reservoirs from strong liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting.

  11. Enhancing the analytical performance of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cremers, D.A.; Chinni, R.C.; Pichahchy, A.E.; Thornquist, H.K.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work is to enhance the analytical capabilities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS is a method of elemental analysis in which powerful laser pulses are focused on a sample to form a microplasma. LIBS is perhaps the most versatile elemental analysis method, applicable to a variety of different real-world analysis problems. Therefore, it is important to enhance the capabilities of the method as much as possible. Accomplishments include: (1) demonstration of signal enhancements of 5--30 times from soils and metals using a double pulse method; (2) development of a model of the observed enhancement obtained using double pulses; (3) demonstration that the analytical performance achievable using low laser-pulse energies (10 and 25 mJ) can match that achievable using an energy of 100 mJ; and (4) demonstration that time-gated detection is not necessary with LIBS.

  12. Predicting Student Success using Analytics in Course Learning Management Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL] [ORNL; Thakur, Gautam [ORNL] [ORNL; McNair, Wade [ORNL] [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Educational data analytics is an emerging discipline, concerned with developing methods for exploring the unique types of data that come from the educational context. For example, predicting college student performance is crucial for both the student and educational institutions. It can support timely intervention to prevent students from failing a course, increasing efficacy of advising functions, and improving course completion rate. In this paper, we present the efforts carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) toward conducting predictive analytics to academic data collected from 2009 through 2013 and available in one of the most commonly used learning management systems, called Moodle. First, we have identified the data features useful for predicting student outcomes such as students scores in homework assignments, quizzes, exams, in addition to their activities in discussion forums and their total GPA at the same term they enrolled in the course. Then, Logistic Regression and Neural Network predictive models are used to identify students as early as possible that are in danger of failing the course they are currently enrolled in. These models compute the likelihood of any given student failing (or passing) the current course. Numerical results are presented to evaluate and compare the performance of the developed models and their predictive accuracy.

  13. The use of wet limestone systems for combined removal of SO sub 2 and NO sub x from flue gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, G.C. (Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Shen, D.X.; Littlejohn, D.; Chang, S.G. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach by utilizing yellow phosphorus in conventional wet limestone systems for high efficiency control of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions from power plants has been developed. The addition of yellow phosphorus in the system induces the production of O{sub 3} which subsequently oxidizes NO to NO{sub 2}. The resulting NO{sub 2} dissolves readily and can be reduced to form ammonium ions by dissolved SO{sub 2} under appropriate conditions. Yellow phosphorus is oxidized to yield P{sub 2}O{sub 5} which picks up water to form H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} mists and can be collected as a valuable product. Proof of concept experiments have been performed using a 20 acfm bench-scale system. The results show that better than 90% of SO{sub 2} and NO in simulated flue gas can be removed. Stoichiometric ratios (P/NO) ranging between 0.6 and 1.5 were obtained. This ratio depends on operating conditions as well as the process configuration. A conceptual process flow diagram has been proposed. A preliminary cost evaluation of this approach appears to indicate great economic potential. 22 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  14. An Analytical Solution on Convective and Diffusive Transport of Analyte in Laminar Flow of Microfluidic Slit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, X.

    Microfluidic devices could find applications in many areas, such as BioMEMs, miniature fuel cells and microfluidic cooling of electronic circuitry. One of the important considerations of microfluidic device in analytical ...

  15. Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

  16. Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kertesz, Vilmos [Knoxville, TN; Van Berkel, Gary [Clinton, TN

    2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

  17. Analytical evaluation of onion flavor and pungency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzgerald, James Wallace

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major Subject: Food Science and Technology ANALYTICAL EVALUATION OF ONION FLAVOR AND PUNGENCY A Thesis by James Wallace Fitzgerald Approved as to st le and content by: Chairman of Committee He d of Departmen Member Member December 1980..., and love. It is to these special people that this manuscr1pt 1s dedicated. TABLE OF CONTENTS Abstract . Acknowledgements Table of Contents List of Tables . List of Figures Introduction . Objectives Literature Review History . Food Value Flavor...

  18. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved management and reporting. The other four tasks involved field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. These four tasks included: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal was completed in 2006; only the TMT-15 additive was tested in these efforts. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1 were completed in 2007, and both the TMT-15 and Nalco 8034 additives were tested.

  19. WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to improve understanding of the wettability alteration of mixed-wet rocks that results from contact with the components of synthetic oil-based drilling and completion fluids formulated to meet the needs of arctic drilling; (2) to investigate cleaning methods to reverse the wettability alteration of mixed-wet cores caused by contact with these SBM components; and (3) to develop new approaches to restoration of wetting that will permit the use of cores drilled with SBM formulations for valid studies of reservoir properties.

  20. Heat-transfer characteristics of a dry and wet/dry advanced condenser for cooling towers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, H.D.; McIlroy, K.; Webster, D.J.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An EPRI-funded, experimental evaluation of two types of advanced, air-cooled ammonia condensers for a phase-change dry/wet cooling system for electric power plants is described. Condensers of similar design, but much bigger, are being tested in a 15 MWe demonstration plant at the Pacific Gas and Electric Kern Power Station in Bakersfield, California. These condensers, featuring different air-side augmentation, were tested in Union Carbide's ammonia phase-change pilot plant (0.3 MWe). The first unit consisted of the Curtiss-Wright integral shaved-fin extruded aluminum tubing designed for dry operation. Heat transfer and air-side pressure loss characteristics were measured under varying air face velocities (600 to 1000 FPM) and initial temperature differences, ITD (20 to 60/sup 0/F). Overall heat transfer coefficients (based on air-side surface), U, ranged between 7.0 to 8.6 Btu/hr ft/sup 2/ F. The second configuration constituted the Hoterv aluminum plate-fin/tube assembly of which two different sizes (5 ft/sup 2/ and 58 ft/sup 2/ frontal area) were performance tested; in both dry and wet modes at 200 to 800 FPM air face velocities, ITD's of 10 to 60/sup 0/F and at water deluge rates up to 3.0 gpm/ft. of core width. In the dry mode, U's ranged from 7.0 to 12.0 Btu/hr ft/sup 2/ F. Increasing water deluge greatly enhanced the heat rejection capacity over dry operation - as high as 4 times, depending on operating conditions. This deluge augmentation was greater for lower air relative humidities and lower ITD's. A brief description of the recently completed ammonia phase-change dry/wet-dry cooling demonstration plant at the Kern Power Station concludes this document.

  1. Preliminary Evaluation of Cesium Distribution for Wet Sieving Process Planned for Soil Decontamination in Japan - 13104

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enokida, Y.; Tanada, Y.; Hirabayashi, D. [Graduate School of Engineering, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan); Sawada, K. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)] [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purpose of decontaminating radioactive cesium from a huge amount of soil, which has been estimated to be 1.2x10{sup 8} m{sup 3} by excavating to a 5-cm depth from the surface of Fukushima Prefecture where a severe nuclear accident occurred at TEPCO's power generating site and has emitted a significant amount of radioactive materials, mainly radioactive cesium, a wet sieving process was selected as one of effective methods available in Japan. Some private companies have demonstrated this process for soil treatment in the Fukushima area by testing at their plants. The results were very promising, and a full-fledged application is expected to follow. In the present study, we spiked several aqueous samples containing soil collected from an industrial wet sieving plant located near our university for the recycling of construction wastes with non-radioactive cesium hydroxide. The present study provides scientific data concerning the effectiveness in volume reduction of the contaminated soil by a wet sieving process as well as the cesium distribution between the liquid phase and clay minerals for each sub-process of the full-scale one, but a simulating plant equipped with a process of coagulating sedimentation and operational safety fundamentals for the plant. Especially for the latter aspect, the study showed that clay minerals of submicron size strongly bind a high content of cesium, which was only slightly removed by coagulation with natural sedimentation (1 G) nor centrifugal sedimentation (3,700 G) and some of the cesium may be transferred to the effluent or recycled water. By applying ultracentrifugation (257,000 G), most of submicron clay minerals containing cesium was removed, and the cesium amount which might be transferred to the effluent or recycled water, could be reduced to less than 2.3 % of the original design by the addition of a cesium barrier consisting of ultracentrifugation or a hollow fiber membrane. (authors)

  2. Enhanced-wetting, boron-based liquid-metal ion source and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozack, M.J.; Swanson, L.W.; Bell, A.E.; Clark, W.M. Jr.; Utlaut, M.W.; Storms, E.K.

    1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A binary, boron-based alloy as a source for field-emission-type, ion-beam generating devices, wherein boron predominates in the alloy, preferably with a presence of about 60 atomic percent is disclosed. The other constituent in the alloy is selected from the group of elements consisting of nickel, palladium and platinum. Predominance of boron in these alloys, during operation, promotes combining of boron with trace impurities of carbon in the alloys to form B{sub 4}C and thus to promote wetting of an associated carbon support substrate. 1 fig.

  3. Experimental results and operational characteristics of heat exchangers in dry/wet operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, S.G.; Kreid, D.K.; Johnson, B.M.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This second part of a two-part paper summarizes the experimental evaluation of three air-cooled finned heat exchangers, both with and without the finned surface, wetted by flowing water. In addition, the performance of one of the heat exchangers is compared with predictions from the model which was presented in Part 1. The experimental results are in close agreement with the predictions based on the model. Once the effective film coefficient of the deluge film was determined, deluge performance was predicted using dry heat transfer correlations.

  4. The effects of digital elevation model resolution on the calculation and predictions of topographic wetness indices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drover, Damion, Ryan

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the largest exports in the Southeast U.S. is forest products. Interest in biofuels using forest biomass has increased recently, leading to more research into better forest management BMPs. The USDA Forest Service, along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Georgia and Oregon State University are researching the impacts of intensive forest management for biofuels on water quality and quantity at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Surface runoff of saturated areas, transporting excess nutrients and contaminants, is a potential water quality issue under investigation. Detailed maps of variable source areas and soil characteristics would therefore be helpful prior to treatment. The availability of remotely sensed and computed digital elevation models (DEMs) and spatial analysis tools make it easy to calculate terrain attributes. These terrain attributes can be used in models to predict saturated areas or other attributes in the landscape. With laser altimetry, an area can be flown to produce very high resolution data, and the resulting data can be resampled into any resolution of DEM desired. Additionally, there exist many maps that are in various resolutions of DEM, such as those acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey. Problems arise when using maps derived from different resolution DEMs. For example, saturated areas can be under or overestimated depending on the resolution used. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of DEM resolution on the calculation of topographic wetness indices used to predict variable source areas of saturation, and to find the best resolutions to produce prediction maps of soil attributes like nitrogen, carbon, bulk density and soil texture for low-relief, humid-temperate forested hillslopes. Topographic wetness indices were calculated based on the derived terrain attributes, slope and specific catchment area, from five different DEM resolutions. The DEMs were resampled from LiDAR, which is a laser altimetry remote sensing method, obtained from the USDA Forest Service at Savannah River Site. The specific DEM resolutions were chosen because they are common grid cell sizes (10m, 30m, and 50m) used in mapping for management applications and in research. The finer resolutions (2m and 5m) were chosen for the purpose of determining how finer resolutions performed compared with coarser resolutions at predicting wetness and related soil attributes. The wetness indices were compared across DEMs and with each other in terms of quantile and distribution differences, then in terms of how well they each correlated with measured soil attributes. Spatial and non-spatial analyses were performed, and predictions using regression and geostatistics were examined for efficacy relative to each DEM resolution. Trends in the raw data and analysis results were also revealed.

  5. Enhanced-wetting, boron-based liquid-metal ion source and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozack, Michael J. (Opelika, AL); Swanson, Lynwood W. (Portland, OR); Bell, Anthony E. (McMinnville, OR); Clark Jr., William M. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Utlaut, Mark W. (Saugus, CA); Storms, Edmund K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A binary, boron-based alloy as a source for field-emission-type, ion-beam generating devices, wherein boron predominates in the alloy, preferably with a presence of about 60 atomic percent. The other constituent in the alloy is selected from the group of elements consisting of nickel, palladium and platinum. Predominance of boron in these alloys, during operation, promotes combining of boron with trace impurities of carbon in the alloys to form B.sub.4 C and thus to promote wetting of an associated carbon support substrate.

  6. Transient nature of salt movement with wetting front in an unsaturated soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soman, Vishwas Vinayak

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from unit area of soil (me/sq. m), () is moisture content of the soil layer at time of extraction for salt (cc/cc), Co is initial average salt concentration in the soil solution at moisture content 8 (me/liter) and C1 is average concentration...TRANSIENT NATURE OF SALT MOVEMENT WITH WETTING FRONT IN AN UNSATURATED SOIL A Thesis bY VISHWAS VINAYAK SOMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M UniversitY in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  7. Interface Tensions and Perfect Wetting in the Two-Dimensional Seven-State Potts Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Grossmann; Sourendu Gupta

    1993-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a numerical determination of the order-disorder interface tension, \\sod, for the two-dimensional seven-state Potts model. We find $\\sod=0.0114\\pm0.0012$, in good agreement with expectations based on the conjecture of perfect wetting. We take into account systematic effects on the technique of our choice: the histogram method. Our measurements are performed on rectangular lattices, so that the histograms contain identifiable plateaus. The lattice sizes are chosen to be large compared to the physical correlation length. Capillary wave corrections are applied to our measurements on finite systems.

  8. FY04 Inspection Results for Wet Uruguay Fuel in L-Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VORMELKER, PHILIP

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2004 visual inspection of four Uruguay nuclear fuel assemblies stored in L-Basin was completed. This was the third inspection of this wet stored fuel since its arrival in the summer of 1998. Visual inspection photographs of the fuel from the previous and the recent inspections were compared and no evidence of significant corrosion was found on the individual fuel plate photographs. Fuel plates that showed areas of pitting in the cladding during the original receipt inspection were also identified during the 2004 inspection. However, a few pits were found on the non-fuel aluminum clamping plates that were not visible during the original and 2001 inspections.

  9. WET-NZ Multi-Mode Wave Energy Converter Advancement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopf, Steven

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the project was to verify the ocean wavelength functionality of the WET-NZ through targeted hydrodynamic testing at wave tank scale and controlled open sea deployment of a 1/2 scale (1:2) experimental device. This objective was accomplished through a series of tasks designed to achieve four specific goals: ?Wave Tank Testing to Characterize Hydrodynamic Characteristics; ? Open-Sea Testing of a New 1:2 Scale Experimental Model; ? Synthesis and Analysis to Demonstrate and Confirm TRL5/6 Status; ? Market Impact & Competitor Analysis, Business Plan and Commercialization Strategy.

  10. Regimes of Wetting Transitions on Superhydrophobic Textures Conditioned by Energy of Receding Contact Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander L. Dubov; Ahmed Mourran; Martin Möller; Olga I. Vinogradova

    2015-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss an evaporation-induced wetting transition on superhydrophobic stripes, and show that depending on the elastic energy of the deformed contact line, which determines the value of an instantaneous effective contact angle, two different scenarios occur. For relatively dilute stripes the receding angle is above 90$^\\circ$, and the sudden impalement transition happens due to an increase of a curvature of an evaporating drop. For dense stripes the slow impregnation transition commences when the effective angle reaches 90$^\\circ$ and represents the impregnation of the grooves from the triple contact line towards the drop center.

  11. ,"Ohio Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, ExpectedLNGCoalbed Methane ProvedNetGas, Wet After Lease

  12. ,"Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold toDryDryDry NaturalCrudeGas, Wet After

  13. ,"U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+LiquidsAnnual",2014Annual",2014Gas, Wet

  14. U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar Apr18,736 269,010ChangesWet (Billion

  15. U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar Apr18,736 269,010ChangesWet (BillionField

  16. U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar Apr18,736 269,010ChangesWet

  17. U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar Apr18,736 269,010ChangesWetAcquisitions

  18. Indian Centre for Wind Energy Technology C WET | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms AHefeiHydroenergy CompanyJump to: navigation,WET

  19. ,"Alaska Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheetGas, Wet

  20. ,"Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNaturalDryCoalbedNetGas, Wet After

  1. ,"Florida Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPrice (Dollars per+ Lease CondensateWellhead PriceGas, Wet

  2. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPrice (DollarsVolumeCoalbed MethaneNetGas, Wet After Lease

  3. ,"Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future ProductionNetPriceGas, Wet After Lease

  4. An Interactive Visual Analytics Framework for Multi-Field Data...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Visual Analytics Framework for Multi-Field Data in a Geo-Spatial Context. An Interactive Visual Analytics Framework for Multi-Field Data in a Geo-Spatial Context....

  5. analytical tool supporting: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an Analytical Tool for Track Component Response (I-TRACK) Thiago B. do Carmo, J, NV 7 October 2013 12;Slide 2Simplified Analytical Tool and Parametric Analysis Outline ...

  6. A method for interpreting continental and analytic epistemology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCoy, Sarah Ruth

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of this thesis is to investigate the feasibility and profitability of communication between analytic and continental philosophy in epistemology. Wittgenstein's concept of language games will be used to frame the issue', continental and analytic philosophers play...

  7. Analytical modeling of contaminant transport and horizontal well hydraulics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Eungyu

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is composed of three parts of major contributions. In Chapter II, we discuss analytical study of contaminant transport from a finite source in a finite-thickness aquifer. This chapter provides analytical solutions of contaminant...

  8. Recent results on analytical plasma turbulence theory: Realizability, intermittency, submarginal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recent results on analytical plasma turbulence theory: Realizability, intermittency, submarginal Phys. Control. Fusion 1. Introduction Two fundamental challenges in the systematic analytical theory as f . = # # f # for n = 1, where . = denotes definition and #. . .# denotes an ensemble average) #12

  9. Accelerator waste - A new challenge for radio-analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumann, Dorothea; Neuhausen, Joer; Wohlmuther, Michaelg [Paul Scherrer Institute 5232, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) at Villigen (Switzerland) operates the most powerful accelerator facility in Europe. Due to the increasing quantities of accelerator waste with almost unknown radionuclide inventory, the development of new radio-analytical methods is an urgent task. Besides the characterization by {gamma}-measurements and dose rate determinations, also the investigation of long-lived radionuclides, being probably essential for a final disposal, is required from Swiss authorities. Chemical separation is necessary for the determination of the majority of these isotopes. As a representative example for such studies, the analytics of a beam dump assembly is introduced. Samples were taken from the target E beam dump station from the 590 MeV proton accelerator facility. The content of several radionuclides with half-lives between 2 and 10{sup 7} years was determined by {gamma}-spectrometry and, after chemical separation, by Liquid Scintillation Counting (LSC) as well as Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The results are compared with theoretical predictions. Long-term object of these studies is the elaboration of nuclide vectors, which allow the estimation of nuclide inventories by simple calculations. (authors)

  10. An integrated security framework for GOSS power grid analytics platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, Tara D.; Ciraci, Selim; Sharma, Poorva; Allwardt, Craig H.; Rice, Mark J.; Akyol, Bora A.

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In power grid operations, security is an essential component for any middleware platform. Security protects data against unwanted access as well as cyber attacks. GridOpticsTM Software System (GOSS) is an open source power grid analytics platform that facilitates ease of access between applications and data sources and promotes development of advanced analytical applications. GOSS contains an API that abstracts many of the difficulties in connecting to various heterogeneous data sources. A number of applications and data sources have already been implemented to demonstrate functionality and ease of use. A security framework has been implemented which leverages widely accepted, robust JavaTM security tools in a way such that they can be interchanged as needed. This framework supports the complex fine-grained, access control rules identified for the diverse data sources already in GOSS. Performance and reliability are also important considerations in any power grid architecture. An evaluation is done to determine the overhead cost caused by security within GOSS and ensure minimal impact to performance.

  11. Rapid Migration of Radionuclides Leaked from High-Level Water Tanks; A Study of Salinity Gradients, Wetted Path Geometry and Water Vapor Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson l. Ward; Glendon W. Gee; John S. Selker; Clay Cooper

    2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The basis of this study was the hypothesis that the physical and chemical properties of hypersaline tank waste could lead to wetting from instability and fingered flow following a tank leak. Thus, the goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the impacts of the properties of hypersaline fluids on transport through the unsaturated zone beneath Hanford's Tank Farms. There were three specific objectives (i) to develop an improved conceptualization of hypersaline fluid transport in laboratory (ii) to identify the degree to which field conditions mimic the flow processes observed in the laboratory and (iii) to provide a validation data set to establish the degree to which the conceptual models, embodied in a numerical simulator, could explain the observed field behavior. As hypothesized, high ionic strength solutions entering homogeneous pre-wetted porous media formed unstable wetting fronts atypical of low ionic strength infiltration. In the field, this mechanism could for ce flow in vertical flow paths, 5-15 cm in width, bypassing much of the media and leading to waste penetration to greater depths than would be predicted by current conceptual models. Preferential flow may lead to highly accelerated transport through large homogeneous units, and must be included in any conservative analysis of tank waste losses through coarse-textured units. However, numerical description of fingered flow using current techniques has been unreliable, thereby precluding tank-scale 3-D simulation of these processes. A new approach based on nonzero, hysteretic contract angles and fluid-dependent liquid entry has been developed for the continuum scale modeling of fingered flow. This approach has been coupled with and adaptive-grid finite-difference solver to permit the prediction of finger formation and persistence form sub centimeter scales to the filed scale using both scalar and vector processors. Although laboratory experiments demonstrated that elevated surface tens ion of imbibing solutions can enhance vertical fingered flow, this phenomenon was not observed in the field. Field tests showed that the fingered flow behavior was overwhelmed by the variability in texture resulting from differences in the depositional environment. Field plumes were characterized by lateral spreading with an average width to depth aspect ratio of 4. For both vertical fingers and lateral flow, the high ionic strength contributed to the vapor phase dilution of the waste, which increased waste volume and pushed the wetting from well beyond what would have occurred if the volume of material had remained unchanged from that initially released into the system. It was also observed that following significant vapor-phase dilution of this waste simulants that streams of colloids were ejected from the sediment surfaces. It was shown that due to the high-sodium content of the tank wastes the colloids were deflocculated below a critical salt concentration in Hanford sediments. Th e released colloids, which at the site would be expected to carry the bulk of the sorbed heavy metals and radioisotopes, were mobile though coarse Hanford sediments, but clogged finer layers. The developments resulting from this study are already being applied at Hanford in the nonisothermal prediction of the hypersaline, high pH waste migration in tank farms and in the development of inverse methods for history matching under DOE's Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project at Hanford.

  12. Rapid Migration of Radionuclides Leaked from High-Level Water Tanks: A Study of Salinity Gradients, Wetted Path Geometry and Water Vapor Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson L. Ward; Glendon W. Gee; John S. Selker; Caly Cooper

    2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The basis of this study was the hypothesis that the physical and chemical properties of hypersaline tank waste could lead to wetting from instability and fingered flow following a tank leak. Thus, the goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the impacts of the properties of hypersaline fluids on transport through the unsaturated zone beneath Hanford's Tank Farms. There were three specific objectives (i) to develop an improved conceptualization of hypersaline fluid transport in laboratory (ii) to identify the degree to which field conditions mimic the flow processes observed in the laboratory and (iii) to provide a validation data set to establish the degree to which the conceptual models, embodied in a numerical simulator, could explain the observed field behavior. As hypothesized, high ionic strength solutions entering homogeneous pre-wetted porous media formed unstable wetting fronts a typical of low ionic strength infiltration. In the field, this mechanism could force flow in vertical flow paths, 5-15 cm in width, bypassing much of the media and leading to waste penetration to greater depths than would be predicted by current conceptual models. Preferential flow may lead to highly accelerated transport through large homogeneous units, and must be included in any conservative analysis of tank waste losses through coarse-textured units. However, numerical description of fingered flow using current techniques has been unreliable, thereby precluding tank-scale 3-D simulation of these processes. A new approach based on nonzero, hysteretic contact angles and fluid-dependent liquid entry has been developed for the continuum scale modeling of fingered flow. This approach has been coupled with and adaptive-grid finite-difference solver to permit the prediction of finger formation and persistence form sub centimeter scales to the filed scale using both scalar and vector processors. Although laboratory experiments demonstrated that elevated surface tension of imbibing solutions can enhance vertical fingered flow, this phenomenon was not observed in the field. Field tests of showed that the fingered flow behavior was overwhelmed by the variability in texture resulting from differences in the depositional environment. Field plumes were characterized by lateral spreading with an average width to depth aspect ratio of 4. For both vertical fingers and lateral flow, the high ionic strength contributed to the vapor phase dilution of the waste, which increased waste volume and pushed the wetting from well beyond what would have occurred if the volume of material had remained unchanged from that initially released into the system. It was also observed that following significant vapor-phase dilution of the waste simulants that streams of colloids were ejected from the sediment surfaces. It was shown that due to the high-sodium content of the tank wastes the colloids were deflocculated below a critical salt concentration in Hanford sediment s. The released colloids, which at the site would be expected to carry the bulk of the sorbed heavy metals and radioisotopes, were mobile though coarse Hanford sediments, but clogged finer layers. The developments resulting from this study are already being applied at Hanford in the nonisothermal prediction of the hypersaline, high pH waste migration in tank farms and in the development of inverse methods for history matching under DOE's Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project at Hanford.

  13. An analytically solvable, axially non-homogeneous reactor model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    and Glasstone,1970) and analytically in 1-D noise problems (Kosa ly et al., 1977). The general conclusion

  14. Wet-dry cooling demonstration: A transfer of technology: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allemann, R.T.; Johnson, B.M.; Werry, E.V.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet-dry cooling using the ammonia phase-change system, designated the Advanced Concepts Test, was tested on a large-scale at Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Kern Station at Bakersfield, California. The facility is capable of condensing 60,000 lb/h of steam from a small house turbine. Two different modes of combining dry and evaporative cooling were tested. One uses deluge cooling in which water is allowed to flow over the fins of the dry (air-cooled) heat exchanger on hot days; the other uses a separate evaporative condenser in parallel to the dry heat exchanger. A third mode of enhancing the dry-cooling system, termed capacitive cooling, was tested. In this system, the ammonia-cooled steam condenser is supplemented by a parallel conventional water-cooled condenser with water supplied from a closed system. This water is cooled during off-peak hours each night by an ammonia heat pump that rejects heat through the cooling tower. If operated over the period of a year, each of the wet-dry systems would use only 25% of the water normally required to reject this heat load in an evaporative cooling tower. The third would consume no water, the evaporative cooling being replaced by the delayed cooling of the closed system water supply.

  15. Pulsed plasma treatment of polluted gas using wet-/low-temperature corona reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimizu, Kazuo; Kinoshita, Katsuhiro; Yanagihara, Kenya; Rajanikanth, B.S.; Katsura, Shinji; Mizuno, Akira [Toyohashi Univ. of Technology, Aichi (Japan). Dept. of Ecological Engineering] [Toyohashi Univ. of Technology, Aichi (Japan). Dept. of Ecological Engineering

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of pulsed plasma for gas cleaning is gaining prominence in recent years, mainly from the energy consideration point of view. Normally, the gas treatment is carried out at or above room temperature by the conventional dry-type corona reactor. However, this treatment is still inadequate for the removal of certain stable gases present in the exhaust/flue gas mixture. The authors report here some interesting results of treatment of such stable gases like N{sub 2}O with pulsed plasma at subambient temperature. Also reported in this paper are improvements in DeNO/DeNO{sub x} efficiency using unconventional wet-type reactors, designed and fabricated by us, and operating at different subambient temperatures. DeNO/DeNO{sub x} by the pulsed-plasma process is mainly due to oxidation, but reduction takes place at the same time. When the wet-type reactor was used, the NO{sub 2} product was absorbed by water film and higher DeNO{sub x} efficiency could be achieved. Apart from laboratory tests on simulated gas mixtures, field tests were also carried out on the exhaust gas of an 8-kW diesel engine. A comparative analysis of the various tests are presented, together with a note on the energy consideration.

  16. A comparison between semi-spheroid- and dome-shaped quantum dots coupled to wetting layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahzadeh, Mohammadreza; Sabaeian, Mohammad, E-mail: Sabaeian@scu.ac.ir [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, 61357-43135 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the epitaxial growth method, self-assembled semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the wetting layer (WL). However for sake of simplicity, researchers sometimes assume semi-spheroid-shaped QDs to be dome-shaped (hemisphere). In this work, a detailed and comprehensive study on the difference between electronic and transition properties of dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots is presented. We will explain why the P-to-S intersubband transition behaves the way it does. The calculated results for intersubband P-to-S transition properties of quantum dots show two different trends for dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots. The results are interpreted using the probability of finding electron inside the dome/spheroid region, with emphasis on the effects of wetting layer. It is shown that dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots feature different electronic and transition properties, arising from the difference in lateral dimensions between dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped QDs. Moreover, an analogy is presented between the bound S-states in the quantum dots and a simple 3D quantum mechanical particle in a box, and effective sizes are calculated. The results of this work will benefit researchers to present more realistic models of coupled QD/WL systems and explain their properties more precisely.

  17. Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, X.; Morrow, N.R.; Ma, S.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) and related ensembles showed that wettability and its effect on oil recovery depend on numerous complex interactions. In the present work, the wettability of COBR ensembles prepared using Prudhoe Bay crude oil, a synthetic formation brine, and Berea Sandstone was varied by systematic change in initial water saturation and length of aging time at reservoir temperature (88 C). All displacement tests were run at ambient temperature. Various degrees of water wetness were achieved and quantified by a modified Amott wettability index to water, the relative pseudo work of imbibition, and a newly defined apparent advancing dynamic contact angle. Pairs of spontaneous imbibition (oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition of water) and waterflood (oil recovery vs. pore volumes of water injected) curves were measured for each of the induced wetting states. Several trends were observed. Imbibition rate, and hence water wetness, decreased with increase in aging time and with decrease in initial water saturation. Breakthrough recoveries and final oil recovery by waterflooding increased with decrease in water wetness. Correlations between water wetness and oil recovery by waterflooding and spontaneous imbibition are presented.

  18. Screening for Real Options “In” an Engineering System: A Step Towards Flexible System Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartolomei, Jason E.

    2006-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research is to develop an analytical framework for screening for real options “in” an

  19. EQUIVALENCE RELATIONS FOR TWO VARIABLE REAL ANALYTIC FUNCTION GERMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EQUIVALENCE RELATIONS FOR TWO VARIABLE REAL ANALYTIC FUNCTION GERMS SATOSHI KOIKE & ADAM PARUSI´NSKI Abstract. For two variable real analytic function germs we compare the blow- analytic equivalence in the sense of Kuo to the other natural equivalence relations. Our main theorem states that C1 equivalent

  20. Analytic models of plausible gravitational lens potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward A. Baltz; Phil Marshall; Masamune Oguri

    2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational lenses on galaxy scales are plausibly modelled as having ellipsoidal symmetry and a universal dark matter density profile, with a Sersic profile to describe the distribution of baryonic matter. Predicting all lensing effects requires knowledge of the total lens potential: in this work we give analytic forms for that of the above hybrid model. Emphasising that complex lens potentials can be constructed from simpler components in linear combination, we provide a recipe for attaining elliptical symmetry in either projected mass or lens potential. We also provide analytic formulae for the lens potentials of Sersic profiles for integer and half-integer index. We then present formulae describing the gravitational lensing effects due to smoothly-truncated universal density profiles in cold dark matter model. For our isolated haloes the density profile falls off as radius to the minus fifth or seventh power beyond the tidal radius, functional forms that allow all orders of lens potential derivatives to be calculated analytically, while ensuring a non-divergent total mass. We show how the observables predicted by this profile differ from that of the original infinite-mass NFW profile. Expressions for the gravitational flexion are highlighted. We show how decreasing the tidal radius allows stripped haloes to be modelled, providing a framework for a fuller investigation of dark matter substructure in galaxies and clusters. Finally we remark on the need for finite mass halo profiles when doing cosmological ray-tracing simulations, and the need for readily-calculable higher order derivatives of the lens potential when studying catastrophes in strong lenses.

  1. Analytic models of plausible gravitational lens potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Edward A.; Marshall, Phil; Oguri, Masamune, E-mail: eabaltz@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: pjm@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: oguri@slac.stanford.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, PO Box 20450, MS29, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)] [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, PO Box 20450, MS29, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational lenses on galaxy scales are plausibly modelled as having ellipsoidal symmetry and a universal dark matter density profile, with a Sersic profile to describe the distribution of baryonic matter. Predicting all lensing effects requires knowledge of the total lens potential: in this work we give analytic forms for that of the above hybrid model. Emphasising that complex lens potentials can be constructed from simpler components in linear combination, we provide a recipe for attaining elliptical symmetry in either projected mass or lens potential. We also provide analytic formulae for the lens potentials of Sersic profiles for integer and half-integer index. We then present formulae describing the gravitational lensing effects due to smoothly-truncated universal density profiles in cold dark matter model. For our isolated haloes the density profile falls off as radius to the minus fifth or seventh power beyond the tidal radius, functional forms that allow all orders of lens potential derivatives to be calculated analytically, while ensuring a non-divergent total mass. We show how the observables predicted by this profile differ from that of the original infinite-mass NFW profile. Expressions for the gravitational flexion are highlighted. We show how decreasing the tidal radius allows stripped haloes to be modelled, providing a framework for a fuller investigation of dark matter substructure in galaxies and clusters. Finally we remark on the need for finite mass halo profiles when doing cosmological ray-tracing simulations, and the need for readily-calculable higher order derivatives of the lens potential when studying catastrophes in strong lenses.

  2. Analytic Models of Plausible Gravitational Lens Potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Edward A.; Marshall, Phil; Oguri, Masamune

    2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational lenses on galaxy scales are plausibly modeled as having ellipsoidal symmetry and a universal dark matter density profile, with a Sersic profile to describe the distribution of baryonic matter. Predicting all lensing effects requires knowledge of the total lens potential: in this work we give analytic forms for that of the above hybrid model. Emphasizing that complex lens potentials can be constructed from simpler components in linear combination, we provide a recipe for attaining elliptical symmetry in either projected mass or lens potential.We also provide analytic formulae for the lens potentials of Sersic profiles for integer and half-integer index. We then present formulae describing the gravitational lensing effects due to smoothly-truncated universal density profiles in cold dark matter model. For our isolated haloes the density profile falls off as radius to the minus fifth or seventh power beyond the tidal radius, functional forms that allow all orders of lens potential derivatives to be calculated analytically, while ensuring a non-divergent total mass. We show how the observables predicted by this profile differ from that of the original infinite-mass NFW profile. Expressions for the gravitational flexion are highlighted. We show how decreasing the tidal radius allows stripped haloes to be modeled, providing a framework for a fuller investigation of dark matter substructure in galaxies and clusters. Finally we remark on the need for finite mass halo profiles when doing cosmological ray-tracing simulations, and the need for readily-calculable higher order derivatives of the lens potential when studying catastrophes in strong lenses.

  3. UNEP Ris Centre Energy, Climate and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNEP Risř Centre ­ Energy, Climate and Sustainable Development International and Danish research & Poverty · Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy · Energy Sector Reform · CDM & Carbon markets · Development · Development and Energy in Africa ­ analytical activities: ­ Examining energy-development linkages in existing

  4. Automated DecisionAnalytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvitz, Eric

    Automated Decision­Analytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines To be presented Abstract We have developed an expert system for diagno­ sis of e#ciency problems for large gas turbines the ultimate goal of applying the system in the day­to­day maintenance of gas­ turbine power plants. A Overview

  5. Automated Decision-Analytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvitz, Eric

    Automated Decision-Analytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines To be presented Abstract We have developed an expert system for diagno- sis of efficiency problems for large gas turbines the ultimate goal of applying the system in the day-to-day maintenance of gas- turbine power plants. A Overview

  6. Thirty-seventh ORNL/DOE conference on analytical chemistry in energy technology: Abstracts of papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstracts only are given for papers presented during the following topical sessions: Opportunities for collaboration: Industry, academic, national laboratories; Developments in sensor technology; Analysis in containment facilities; Improving the quality of environmental data; Process analysis; Field analysis; Radiological separations; Interactive analytical seminars; Measurements and chemical industry initiatives; and Isotopic measurements and mass spectroscopy.

  7. A Three-Level Problem-Centric Strategy for Selecting NMR Precusors & Analytes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 2 Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering University;ABSTRACT We have developed a sequential set of computational screens that may prove useful for evaluating determining whether the analytes provide unique flux values or multiple flux solutions. Finally, the economics

  8. Twenty-ninth ORNL/DOE conference on analytical chemistry in energy technology. Abstracts of papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This booklet contains separate abstracts of 55 individual papers presented at this conference. Different sections in the book are titled as follows: laser techniques; resonance ionization spectroscopy; laser applications; new developments in mass spectrometry; analytical chemistry of hazardous waste; and automation and data management. (PLG)

  9. Photovoltaic Degradation Rates -- An Analytical Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As photovoltaic penetration of the power grid increases, accurate predictions of return on investment require accurate prediction of decreased power output over time. Degradation rates must be known in order to predict power delivery. This article reviews degradation rates of flat-plate terrestrial modules and systems reported in published literature from field testing throughout the last 40 years. Nearly 2000 degradation rates, measured on individual modules or entire systems, have been assembled from the literature, showing a median value of 0.5%/year. The review consists of three parts: a brief historical outline, an analytical summary of degradation rates, and a detailed bibliography partitioned by technology.

  10. Analytical solutions to matrix diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kekäläinen, Pekka, E-mail: pekka.kekalainen@helsinki.fi [Laboratory of Radiochemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an analytical method to solve in a few cases of practical interest the equations which have traditionally been proposed for the matrix diffusion problem. In matrix diffusion, elements dissolved in ground water can penetrate the porous rock surronuding the advective flow paths. In the context of radioactive waste repositories this phenomenon provides a mechanism by which the area of rock surface in contact with advecting elements is greatly enhanced, and can thus be an important delay mechanism. The cases solved are relevant for laboratory as well for in situ experiments. Solutions are given as integral representations well suited for easy numerical solution.

  11. New User and Data Analytics Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project Taps HPCNew User and Data Analytics Training

  12. Analytical Services Program | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA NewslettersPartnership of the Americas | DepartmentAnalysisAnalytical

  13. Google Analytics | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <GlacialGolden SpreadGomti BiotechUK JumpAnalytics

  14. Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during a planned unit outage. On October 2, 2009, Unit 3 was taken out of service for a fall outage and the catalyst upstream of Absorber C was removed. This ended the demonstration after approximately 17 months of the planned 24 months of operation. This report discusses reasons for the pressure drop increase and potential measures to mitigate such problems in any future application of this technology. Mercury oxidation and capture measurements were made on Unit 3 four times during the 17-month demonstration. Measurements were performed across the catalyst and Absorber C and 'baseline' measurements were performed across Absorber A or B, which did not have a catalyst upstream. Results are presented in the report from all four sets of measurements during the demonstration period. These results include elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, mercury capture across Absorber C downstream of the catalyst, baseline mercury capture across Absorber A or B, and mercury re-emissions across both absorbers in service. Also presented in the report are estimates of the average mercury control performance of the oxidation catalyst technology over the 17-month demonstration period and the resulting mercury control costs.

  15. Big Data Visual Analytics for Exploratory Earth System Simulation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad A [ORNL; Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Smith, Brian E [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid increases in high performance computing are feeding the development of larger and more complex data sets in climate research, which sets the stage for so-called big data analysis challenges. However, conventional climate analysis techniques are inadequate in dealing with the complexities of today s data. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate a visual analytics system, called the Exploratory Data analysis ENvironment (EDEN), with specific application to the analysis of complex earth system simulation data sets. EDEN represents the type of interactive visual analysis tools that are necessary to transform data into insight, thereby improving critical comprehension of earth system processes. In addition to providing an overview of EDEN, we describe real-world studies using both point ensembles and global Community Land Model Version 4 (CLM4) simulations.

  16. Analytical Theory of Neutrino Oscillations in Matter with CP violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Mikkel B; Kisslinger, Leonard S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop an exact analytical formulation of neutrino oscillations in matter within the framework of the Standard Neutrino Model assuming 3 Dirac Neutrinos. Our Hamiltonian formulation, which includes CP violation, leads to expressions for the partial oscillation probabilities that are linear combinations of spherical Bessel functions in the eigenvalue differences. The coefficients of these Bessel functions are polynomials in the neutrino CKM matrix elements, the neutrino mass differences squared, the strength of the neutrino interaction with matter, and the neutrino mass eigenvalues in matter. We give exact closed-form expressions for all partial oscillation probabilities in terms of these basic quantities. Adopting the Standard Neutrino Model, we then examine how the exact expressions for the partial oscillation probabilities might simplify by expanding in one of the small parameters {\\alpha} and sin{\\theta}13 of this model. We show explicitly that for small {\\alpha} and sin{\\theta}13 there are branch poin...

  17. Trends & Controversies: Sociocultural Predictive Analytics and Terrorism Deterrence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; McGrath, Liam R.

    2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of predictive analytics to model terrorist rhetoric is highly instrumental in developing a strategy to deter terrorism. Traditional (e.g. Cold-War) deterrence methods are ineffective with terrorist groups such as al Qaida. Terrorists typically regard the prospect of death or loss of property as acceptable consequences of their struggle. Deterrence by threat of punishment is therefore fruitless. On the other hand, isolating terrorists from the community that may sympathize with their cause can have a decisive deterring outcome. Without the moral backing of a supportive audience, terrorism cannot be successfully framed as a justifiable political strategy and recruiting is curtailed. Ultimately, terrorism deterrence is more effectively enforced by exerting influence to neutralize the communicative reach of terrorists.

  18. SNL software manual for the ACS Data Analytics Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stearley, Jon R.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Rodrigues, Arun F.; Williams, Aaron S.; Hooper, Russell Warren; Robinson, David Gerald; Stickland, Michael G.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the ACS Data Analytics Project (also known as 'YumYum'), a supercomputer is modeled as a graph of components and dependencies, jobs and faults are simulated, and component fault rates are estimated using the graph structure and job pass/fail outcomes. This report documents the successful completion of all SNL deliverables and tasks, describes the software written by SNL for the project, and presents the data it generates. Readers should understand what the software tools are, how they fit together, and how to use them to reproduce the presented data and additional experiments as desired. The SNL YumYum tools provide the novel simulation and inference capabilities desired by ACS. SNL also developed and implemented a new algorithm, which provides faster estimates, at finer component granularity, on arbitrary directed acyclic graphs.

  19. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR DISCRIMINATING STARDUST IN AEROGEL CAPTURE MEDIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean Brennan; Hope A. Ishii; John P. Bradley; Katharina Luening; Piero Pianetta

    Methods using X-ray fluorescence have been developed to identify cometary material captured in aerogel during the NASA Stardust mission to Comet 81P/Wild 2. These analytical methods are necessitated by the levels of trace contaminants present in the aerogel. The cometary material disaggregates during deceleration in the aerogel, so fluorescence mapping of the entire track (which can be several millimeters long) is necessary. Distinguishing those pixels which have cometary material and aerogel from those which have only cometary material can be very challenging. We have chosen a “dual threshold ” method, with some pixels clearly having only aerogel (plus contaminants) and other pixels clearly having cometary and aerogel material. Between these two threshold levels is a set of pixels which cannot be easily ascribed to one or the other. By leaving these pixels out of the analysis, the estimate of cometary material is improved.

  20. Analyticity and the Holographic S-Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, A.Liam; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Kaplan, Jared; /SLAC

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a simple relation between the Mellin amplitude for AdS/CFT correlation functions and the bulk S-Matrix in the flat spacetime limit, proving a conjecture of Penedones. As a consequence of the Operator Product Expansion, the Mellin amplitude for any unitary CFT must be a meromorphic function with simple poles on the real axis. This provides a powerful and suggestive handle on the locality vis-a-vis analyticity properties of the S-Matrix. We begin to explore analyticity by showing how the familiar poles and branch cuts of scattering amplitudes arise from the holographic description. For this purpose we compute examples of Mellin amplitudes corresponding to 1-loop and 2-loop Witten diagrams in AdS. We also examine the flat spacetime limit of conformal blocks, implicitly relating the S-Matrix program to the Bootstrap program for CFTs. We use this connection to show how the existence of small black holes in AdS leads to a universal prediction for the conformal block decomposition of the dual CFT.

  1. Secondary waste minimization in analytical methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Smith, L.L.; Crain, J.S.; Boparai, A.S.; Kiely, J.T.; Yaeger, J.S.; Schilling, J.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Analytical Chemistry Lab.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization phase of site remediation is an important and costly part of the process. Because toxic solvents and other hazardous materials are used in common analytical methods, characterization is also a source of new waste, including mixed waste. Alternative analytical methods can reduce the volume or form of hazardous waste produced either in the sample preparation step or in the measurement step. The authors are examining alternative methods in the areas of inorganic, radiological, and organic analysis. For determining inorganic constituents, alternative methods were studied for sample introduction into inductively coupled plasma spectrometers. Figures of merit for the alternative methods, as well as their associated waste volumes, were compared with the conventional approaches. In the radiological area, the authors are comparing conventional methods for gross {alpha}/{beta} measurements of soil samples to an alternative method that uses high-pressure microwave dissolution. For determination of organic constituents, microwave-assisted extraction was studied for RCRA regulated semivolatile organics in a variety of solid matrices, including spiked samples in blank soil; polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in soils, sludges, and sediments; and semivolatile organics in soil. Extraction efficiencies were determined under varying conditions of time, temperature, microwave power, moisture content, and extraction solvent. Solvent usage was cut from the 300 mL used in conventional extraction methods to about 30 mL. Extraction results varied from one matrix to another. In most cases, the microwave-assisted extraction technique was as efficient as the more common Soxhlet or sonication extraction techniques.

  2. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory system. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, S.M.; Keith, V.F.; Spertzel, R.O.; De Avila, J.C.; O`Donnell, M.; Vann, R.L.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This developmental effort clearly shows that a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory System is a worthwhile and achievable goal. The RTAL is designed to fully analyze (radioanalytes, and organic and inorganic chemical analytes) 20 samples per day at the highest levels of quality assurance and quality control. It dramatically reduces the turnaround time for environmental sample analysis from 45 days (at a central commercial laboratory) to 1 day. At the same time each RTAL system will save the DOE over $12 million per year in sample analysis costs compared to the costs at a central commercial laboratory. If RTAL systems were used at the eight largest DOE facilities (at Hanford, Savannah River, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Idaho, Rocky Flats, Los Alamos, and the Nevada Test Site), the annual savings would be $96,589,000. The DOE`s internal study of sample analysis needs projects 130,000 environmental samples requiring analysis in FY 1994, clearly supporting the need for the RTAL system. The cost and time savings achievable with the RTAL system will accelerate and improve the efficiency of cleanup and remediation operations throughout the DOE complex.

  3. Analytical bunch compression studies for FLUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreck, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current article deals with analytical bunch compression studies for FLUTE whose results are compared to simulations. FLUTE is a linac-based electron accelerator with a design energy of approximately 40 MeV currently being constructed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. One of the goals of FLUTE is to generate electron bunches with their length lying in the femtosecond regime. In the first phase this will be accomplished using a magnetic bunch compressor. This compressor forms the subject of the studies presented. The paper is divided into three parts. The first part deals with pure geometric investigations of the bunch compressor where space charge effects and the back reaction of bunches with coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) are neglected. The second part is dedicated to the treatment of space charge effects and the third part gives some analytical results on the emission of CSR. The upshot is that the results of the first and the third part agree quite well with what is obtained from simulatio...

  4. Visual Analytics for Power Grid Contingency Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Pak C.; Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu; Mackey, Patrick S.; Jin, Shuangshuang

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Contingency analysis is the process of employing different measures to model scenarios, analyze them, and then derive the best response to remove the threats. This application paper focuses on a class of contingency analysis problems found in the power grid management system. A power grid is a geographically distributed interconnected transmission network that transmits and delivers electricity from generators to end users. The power grid contingency analysis problem is increasingly important because of both the growing size of the underlying raw data that need to be analyzed and the urgency to deliver working solutions in an aggressive timeframe. Failure to do so may bring significant financial, economic, and security impacts to all parties involved and the society at large. The paper presents a scalable visual analytics pipeline that transforms about 100 million contingency scenarios to a manageable size and form for grid operators to examine different scenarios and come up with preventive or mitigation strategies to address the problems in a predictive and timely manner. Great attention is given to the computational scalability, information scalability, visual scalability, and display scalability issues surrounding the data analytics pipeline. Most of the large-scale computation requirements of our work are conducted on a Cray XMT multi-threaded parallel computer. The paper demonstrates a number of examples using western North American power grid models and data.

  5. The Human is the Loop: New Directions for Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endert, Alexander; Hossain, Shahriar H.; Ramakrishnan, Naren; North, Chris; Fiaux, Patrick; Andrews, Christopher

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Visual analytics is the science of marrying interactive visualizations and analytic algorithms to support exploratory knowledge discovery in large datasets. We argue for a shift from a ‘human in the loop’ philosophy for visual analytics to a ‘human is the loop’ viewpoint, where the focus is on recognizing analysts’ work processes, and seamlessly fitting analytics into that existing interactive process. We survey a range of projects that provide visual analytic support contextually in the sensemaking loop, and outline a research agenda along with future challenges.

  6. A Visual Analytics Approach to Structured Data Analysis to Enhance Nonproliferation and Arms Control Verification Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillen, David S.

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis activities for Nonproliferation and Arms Control verification require the use of many types of data. Tabular structured data, such as Excel spreadsheets and relational databases, have traditionally been used for data mining activities, where specific queries are issued against data to look for matching results. The application of visual analytics tools to structured data enables further exploration of datasets to promote discovery of previously unknown results. This paper discusses the application of a specific visual analytics tool to datasets related to the field of Arms Control and Nonproliferation to promote the use of visual analytics more broadly in this domain. Visual analytics focuses on analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces (Wong and Thomas 2004). It promotes exploratory analysis of data, and complements data mining technologies where known patterns can be mined for. Also with a human in the loop, they can bring in domain knowledge and subject matter expertise. Visual analytics has not widely been applied to this domain. In this paper, we will focus on one type of data: structured data, and show the results of applying a specific visual analytics tool to answer questions in the Arms Control and Nonproliferation domain. We chose to use the T.Rex tool, a visual analytics tool developed at PNNL, which uses a variety of visual exploration patterns to discover relationships in structured datasets, including a facet view, graph view, matrix view, and timeline view. The facet view enables discovery of relationships between categorical information, such as countries and locations. The graph tool visualizes node-link relationship patterns, such as the flow of materials being shipped between parties. The matrix visualization shows highly correlated categories of information. The timeline view shows temporal patterns in data. In this paper, we will use T.Rex with two different datasets to demonstrate how interactive exploration of the data can aid an analyst with arms control and nonproliferation verification activities. Using a dataset from PIERS (PIERS 2014), we will show how container shipment imports and exports can aid an analyst in understanding the shipping patterns between two countries. We will also use T.Rex to examine a collection of research publications from the IAEA International Nuclear Information System (IAEA 2014) to discover collaborations of concern. We hope this paper will encourage the use of visual analytics structured data analytics in the field of nonproliferation and arms control verification. Our paper outlines some of the challenges that exist before broad adoption of these kinds of tools can occur and offers next steps to overcome these challenges.

  7. Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy on Operating Surface Acoustic Wave Chemical Sensors During Exposure to Gas-Phase Analytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hierlemann, A.; Hill, M.; Ricco, A.J.; Staton, A.W.; Thomas, R.C.

    1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed instrumentation to enable the combination of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor measurements with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopic measurements to understand the response of the SAW sensors with respect to the interfacial chemistry of surface-confined sensing films interacting with gas-phase analytes. Specifically, the instrumentation and software was developed to perform in-situ Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectroscopy (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their chemically modified surfaces with analytes. By probing the surface with IR spectroscopy during gas exposure, it is possible to understand in unprecedented detail the interaction processes between the sorptive SAW coatings and the gaseous analyte molecules. In this report, we provide details of this measurement system, and also demonstrate the utility of these combined measurements by characterizing the SAW and FTIR-ERS responses of organic thin-film sensor coatings interacting with gas-phase analytes.

  8. 2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexter, W

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation Measure 17 iii). The dry sampling (included as an Appendix D) followed the wet season surveys in the summer of 2010.

  9. Controlling RPV embrittlement through wet annealing in support of life attainment and life extension decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasikov, E. A. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., 1, Kurchatov Sq., Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. Low temperature 'wet' annealing at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible. As a rule there is no recovery effect up to annealing and irradiation temperature difference of 70 deg. C. It is known, however, that along with radiation embrittlement neutron irradiation may mitigate the radiation damage in metals. Therefore we have tried to test the possibility to use the effect of radiation-induced ductilization in 'wet' annealing technology by means of nuclear heat utilization as heat and neutron irradiation sources at once. In support of the above-mentioned conception the 3-year duration reactor experiment on 15Cr3NiMoV type steel with preliminary irradiation at operating Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) at 270 deg. C and following extra irradiation (87 h at 330 deg. C) at IR-8 test reactor was fulfilled. In fact, embrittlement was partly suppressed up to value equivalent to 1,5 fold neutron fluence decrease. The degree of recovery in case of radiation enhanced annealing is equal to 27% whereas furnace annealing results in zero effect under existing conditions. Mechanism of the radiation-induced damage mitigation is proposed. It is hoped that 'wet' annealing technology will help provide a better management of the RPV degradation as a factor affecting the lifetime of nuclear power plants which, together with associated management methods, will help facilitate safe and economic long-term operation of PWRs. (authors)

  10. Investigations of segregation phenomena in highly strained Mn-doped Ge wetting layers and Ge quantum dots embedded in silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prestat, E., E-mail: eric.prestat@gmail.com; Porret, C.; Favre-Nicolin, V.; Tainoff, D.; Boukhari, M.; Bayle-Guillemaud, P.; Jamet, M.; Barski, A., E-mail: andre.barski@cea.com [INAC, SP2M, CEA and Université Joseph Fourier, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we investigate manganese diffusion and the formation of Mn precipitates in highly strained, few monolayer thick, Mn-doped Ge wetting layers and nanometric size Ge quantum dot heterostructures embedded in silicon. We show that in this Ge(Mn)/Si system manganese always precipitates and that the size and the position of Mn clusters (precipitates) depend on the growth temperature. At high growth temperature, manganese strongly diffuses from germanium to silicon, whereas decreasing the growth temperature reduces the manganese diffusion. In the germanium quantum dots layers, Mn precipitates are detected, not only in partially relaxed quantum dots but also in fully strained germanium wetting layers between the dots.

  11. Corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulation---Mechanisms and evaluation of electrochemical methods for assessing corrosion behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stansbury, E.E. [Stansbury (E.E.), Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation has been made of the corrosiveness of selected wet residential building thermal insulation materials in contact with low carbon steel. Investigations were conducted both in wet insulations and in filtered leachates from insulations derived from thirteen cellulosic, three mineral fiber and four foam products. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements are reported from which the overall corrosion response was assessed and then the techniques of Tafel and polarization resistance analysis applied to estimate corrosion rates. Corrosion rates were also estimated electrochemically using a direct reading instrument which performs the rate calculation based on the polarization resistance principle. Direct determinations of corrosion rate were based on weight loss measurements.

  12. ,"U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+LiquidsAnnual",2014Annual",2014Gas, WetGas, Wet

  13. ,"Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPriceNonassociated Natural Gas, WetGas, WetCrude Oil

  14. ,"Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPriceNonassociated Natural Gas, WetGas, WetCrude

  15. ANALYTICAL SCIENCES 2001, VOL. 17 SUPPLEMENT i1031 2001 The Japan Society for Analytical Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Sensors for Copper, Lead and Selenium Samuel P. KOUNAVES 1 , Oksana Yu. NADZHAFOVA 2 , Vladislav TARASOV 1 and Sandie H. TAN 1 1 Department of Chemistry, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA (E-mail: samuel were analytical grade. Stock metal solutions were prepared from 99.999% Cu (NO3)2 (Johnson Matthey

  16. Analytical, Visual, and Interactive Concepts for Geo-Visual Analytics Heidrun Schumanna,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tominski, Christian

    Supporting the visual analysis of structured multivariate geo-spatial data is a challenging task involving [15], Chapter 4). In this work, we consider visual analytics support for the analysis of multivariate and analysis of geo-spatial data. In particular, we address the visualization of hierarchical structures

  17. Summative Mass Analysis of Algal Biomass - Integration of Analytical Procedures: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurens, L. M. L.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This procedure guides the integration of laboratory analytical procedures to measure algal biomass constituents in an unambiguous manner and ultimately achieve mass balance closure for algal biomass samples. Many of these methods build on years of research in algal biomass analysis.

  18. An Analytical Study of Thermophoretic Particulate Deposition in Turbulent Pipe Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abarham, Mehdi [University of Michigan; Hoard, John W. [University of Michigan; Assanis, Dennis [University of Michigan; Styles, Dan [Ford Motor Company; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of a cold surface in non-isothermal pipe flows conveying submicron particles causes thermophoretic particulate deposition. In this study, an analytical method is developed to estimate thermophoretic particulate deposition efficiency and its effect on overall heat transfer coefficient of pipe flows in transition and turbulent flow regimes. The proposed analytical solution has been validated against experiments conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Exhaust gas carrying submicron soot particles was passed through pipes with a constant wall temperature and various designed boundary conditions to correlate transition and turbulent flow regimes. Prediction of the reduction in heat transfer coefficient and particulate mass deposited has been compared with experiments. The results of the analytical method are in a reasonably good agreement with experiments.

  19. Analytical and numerical Gubser solutions of the second-order hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long-Gang Pang; Yoshitaka Hatta; Xin-Nian Wang; Bo-Wen Xiao

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Evolution of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) near equilibrium can be described by the second-order relativistic viscous hydrodynamic equations. Consistent and analytically verifiable numerical solutions are critical for phenomenological studies of the collective behavior of QGP in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. A novel analytical solution based on the conformal Gubser flow which is a boost-invariant solution with transverse fluid velocity is presented. It is used to verify with high precision the numerical solution with a newly developed $(3+1)$-dimensional second-order viscous hydro code (CLVisc). The perfect agreement between the analytical and numerical solutions demonstrates the reliability of the numerical simulations with the second-order viscous corrections. This lays the foundation for future phenomenological studies that allow one to gain access to the second-order transport coefficients.

  20. The analytic model of a laser-accelerated plasma target and its stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khudik, V., E-mail: vkhudik@physics.utexas.edu; Yi, S. A.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G. [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, One University Station C1500, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, One University Station C1500, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-consistent kinetic theory of a laser-accelerated plasma target with distributed electron/ion densities is developed. The simplified model assumes that after an initial transition period the bulk of cold ions are uniformly accelerated by the self-consistent electric field generated by hot electrons trapped in combined ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials. Several distinct target regions (non-neutral ion tail, non-neutral electron sheath, and neutral plasma bulk) are identified and analytically described. It is shown analytically that such laser-accelerated finite-thickness target is susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. Particle-in-cell simulations of the seeded perturbations of the plasma target reveal that, for ultra-relativistic laser intensities, the growth rate of the RT instability is depressed from the analytic estimates.

  1. Separation and Quantification of Chemically Diverse Analytes in Neutron Irradiated Fissile Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas, Matthew; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Farmer, Orville T.; Thomas, Linda MP; Maiti, Tapas C.; Finn, Erin C.; Garofoli, Stephanie J.; Gassman, Paul L.; Huff, Morgan M.; Schulte, Shannon M.; Smith, Steven C.; Thomas, Kathie K.; Bachelor, Paula P.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative measurement of fission and activation products resulting from neutron irradiation of fissile materials is of interest for applications in environmental monitoring, nuclear waste management, and national security. To overcome mass and spectral interferences, and the relative small quantities of some target analytes, an extensive series of chemical separations is necessary. Based on established separations processes involving co-precipitation, solvent extraction, and ion-exchange and extraction chromatography, we have been evaluating and optimizing a proposed sequence of separation steps to allow for the timely quantification of analytes of interest. For simplicity, much of the chemical separation development work has been performed using stable elements as surrogates for the radioactive material. We have recently evaluated the optimized procedures using an irradiated sample to examine the adequacy of separations for measurement of desired analytes by gamma spectrometry. Here we present the results of this evaluation and describe the radiochemical separations utilized.

  2. Void Prediction During Liquid Composite Molding Processes: Wetting and Capillary Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed Amine Ben; Bizet, Laurent; Bréard, Joël

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this work is to contribute in improving fibrous preforms impregnation for Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) processes. The void prediction in LCM sparks off interest within the Composite Material elaboration because it represents a significant issue to keep the expected mechanical properties of the final product. The liquid properties, the preform geometry and the flow conditions impact the void or bubble entrapped inside and outside the yarns. Nevertheless, due to the complex geometry of the reinforcement, experimental characterization of bubble formation remains delicate. Thus, our study deals with two simple model networks representing connected pores so called "Pore Doublet Model". A first is considering two capillaries converging on a node (T-junction) and a second is representing two capillaries interconnected with a supplying principle. In this paper, we emphasize on microfluidic and millifluidic approaches where wetting and capillary forces are significant during bubble formation mechanism.

  3. Double heterostructure lasers with facets formed by a hybrid wet and reactive-ion-etching technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salzman, J.; Venkatesan, T.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.

    1985-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Double heterostructure lasers were fabricated in which one of the laser facets was produced by a hybrid wet and reactive-ion-etching technique. This technique is suitable for GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructure lasers and utilizes the selectivity of the plasma in preferentially etching GaAs over GaAlAs. Lasers fabricated by this technique are compatible with optoelectronic integration and have threshold currents and quantum efficiency comparable to lasers with both mirrors formed by cleaving. The technique enables the use of relatively higher pressures of noncorrosive gases in the etch plasma resulting in smoother mirror surfaces and further eliminates the nonreproducibility inherent in the etching of GaAlAs layers.

  4. Linear relationship between water wetting behavior and microscopic interactions of super-hydrophilic surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jian; Guo, Pan [Division of Interfacial Water and Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China) [Division of Interfacial Water and Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Chunlei; Shi, Guosheng, E-mail: shiguosheng@sinap.ac.cn; Fang, Haiping [Division of Interfacial Water and Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [Division of Interfacial Water and Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show a fine linear relationship between surface energies and microscopic Lennard-Jones parameters of super-hydrophilic surfaces. The linear slope of the super-hydrophilic surfaces is consistent with the linear slope of the super-hydrophobic, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic surfaces where stable water droplets can stand, indicating that there is a universal linear behavior of the surface energies with the water-surface van der Waals interaction that extends from the super-hydrophobic to super-hydrophilic surfaces. Moreover, we find that the linear relationship exists for various substrate types, and the linear slopes of these different types of substrates are dependent on the surface atom density, i.e., higher surface atom densities correspond to larger linear slopes. These results enrich our understanding of water behavior on solid surfaces, especially the water wetting behaviors on uncharged super-hydrophilic metal surfaces.

  5. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  6. Analytical Improvements in PV Degradation Rate Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined accurately. For non-spectrally corrected data several complete seasonal cycles (typically 3-5 years) are required to obtain reasonably accurate degradation rates. In a rapidly evolving industry such a time span is often unacceptable and the need exists to determine degradation rates accurately in a shorter period of time. Occurrence of outliers and data shifts are two examples of analytical problems leading to greater uncertainty and therefore to longer observation times. In this paper we compare three methodologies of data analysis for robustness in the presence of outliers, data shifts and shorter measurement time periods.

  7. Reusing Property Resulting from Analytical Laboratory Closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO 81503 (United States); DePinho, D.; Wetherstein, P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Grand Junction, CO 81503 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE-LM) site in Grand Junction, Colorado, faced the problem of reusing an extensive assortment of laboratory equipment and supplies when its on-site analytical chemistry laboratory closed. This challenge, undertaken as part of the Grand Junction site's pollution prevention program, prioritized reuse of as much of the laboratory equipment and supplies as possible during a 9-month period in fiscal year 2004. Reuse remedies were found for approximately $3 million worth of instrumentation, equipment, chemicals, precious metals, and other laboratory items through other Grand Junction site projects, Federal Government databases, and extensive contact with other DOE facilities, universities, and colleges. In 2005, the DOE-LM Grand Junction site received two prestigious DOE pollution prevention awards for reuse of the laboratory's equipment and supplies. (authors)

  8. Impacts of WRF Physics and Measurement Uncertainty on California Wintertime Model Wet Bias

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, H S; Caldwell, P M; Bader, D C

    2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) model version 3.0.1 is used to explore California wintertime model wet bias. In this study, two wintertime storms are selected from each of four major types of large-scale conditions; Pineapple Express, El Nino, La Nina, and synoptic cyclones. We test the impacts of several model configurations on precipitation bias through comparison with three sets of gridded surface observations; one from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, and two variations from the University of Washington (without and with long-term trend adjustment; UW1 and UW2, respectively). To simplify validation, California is divided into 4 regions (Coast, Central Valley, Mountains, and Southern California). Simulations are driven by North American Regional Reanalysis data to minimize large-scale forcing error. Control simulations are conducted with 12-km grid spacing (low resolution) but additional experiments are performed at 2-km (high) resolution to evaluate the robustness of microphysics and cumulus parameterizations to resolution changes. We find that the choice of validation dataset has a significant impact on the model wet bias, and the forecast skill of model precipitation depends strongly on geographic location and storm type. Simulations with right physics options agree better with UW1 observations. In 12-km resolution simulations, the Lin microphysics and the Kain-Fritsch cumulus scheme have better forecast skill in the coastal region while Goddard, Thompson, and Morrison microphysics, and the Grell-Devenyi cumulus scheme perform better in the rest of California. The effect of planetary boundary layer, soil-layer, and radiation physics on model precipitation is weaker than that of microphysics and cumulus processes for short- to medium-range low-resolution simulations. Comparison of 2-km and 12-km resolution runs suggests a need for improvement of cumulus schemes, and supports the use of microphysics schemes in coarser-grid applications.

  9. Field analytical techniques for mercury in soils technology evaluation. Topical report, November 1994--March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solc, J.; Harju, J.A.; Grisanti, A.A.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the evaluation of the four field analytical techniques for mercury detection in soils, namely (1) an anodic stripping voltametry technique (ASV) developed and tested by General Electric Corporation; (2) a static headspace analysis (SHSA) technique developed and tested by Dr. Ralph Turner of Oak Ridge National Laboratory; (3) the BiMelyze{reg_sign} Mercury Immunoassay (Bio) developed and tested by BioNebraska, Inc.; and (4) a transportable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument/technique developed and tested by Spectrace, Inc.

  10. Nuclear Materials Characterization in the Materials and Fuels Complex Analytical Hot Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Rodriquez

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As energy prices skyrocket and interest in alternative, clean energy sources builds, interest in nuclear energy has increased. This increased interest in nuclear energy has been termed the “Nuclear Renaissance”. The performance of nuclear fuels, fuels and reactor materials and waste products are becoming a more important issue as the potential for designing new nuclear reactors is more immediate. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Analytical Laboratory Hot Cells (ALHC) are rising to the challenge of characterizing new reactor materials, byproducts and performance. The ALHC is a facility located near Idaho Falls, Idaho at the INL Site. It was built in 1958 as part of the former Argonne National Laboratory West Complex to support the operation of the second Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II). It is part of a larger analytical laboratory structure that includes wet chemistry, instrumentation and radiochemistry laboratories. The purpose of the ALHC is to perform analytical chemistry work on highly radioactive materials. The primary work in the ALHC has traditionally been dissolution of nuclear materials so that less radioactive subsamples (aliquots) could be transferred to other sections of the laboratory for analysis. Over the last 50 years though, the capabilities within the ALHC have also become independent of other laboratory sections in a number of ways. While dissolution, digestion and subdividing samples are still a vitally important role, the ALHC has stand alone capabilities in the area of immersion density, gamma scanning and combustion gas analysis. Recent use of the ALHC for immersion density shows that extremely fine and delicate operations can be performed with the master-slave manipulators by qualified operators. Twenty milligram samples were tested for immersion density to determine the expansion of uranium dioxide after irradiation in a nuclear reactor. The data collected confirmed modeling analysis with very tight precision. The gamma scanning equipment in the ALHC has taken on a new role also as a micro-gamma scanning system and has been put into service; allowing the linear and radial counting of a spent fuel segment to determine reaction characteristics within a small section of nuclear fuel. The nitrogen, oxygen and carbon analysis allows the identification of these impurities in spent nuclear fuel and also most oxides, nitrides, carbides, C-14 and tritium.

  11. Applying MODFLOW to wet grassland in-field habitats: a case study from the Pevensey Levels, UK Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 4355 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 43­55 (2003) © EGU Applying MODFLOW to wet grassland in and Hydrology, Wallingford, OX10 8BB, UK Email for corresponding author: rbb@ceh.ac.uk Abstract Historical drainage improvements have created complex hydrological regimes in many low-lying, wet coastal grassland

  12. NOAA Climate Data Prepares Oahu Construction Industry for Wet Season Each year NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, a part of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Climate Data Prepares Oahu Construction Industry for Wet Season Each year NOAA. This year, for example, climate data have been immensely valuable to the construction industry on Oahu October that the winter season would be much wetter than usual, his firm went into mitigation mode. PVT

  13. Wet Shape Memory Alloy Actuators for Active Vasculated Robotic Flesh Stephen A. Mascaro and H. Harry Asada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascaro, Stephen A.

    Wet Shape Memory Alloy Actuators for Active Vasculated Robotic Flesh Stephen A. Mascaro and H is presented where Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) wires are embedded within artificial "blood vessels." Fluid flowing amounts of heat that need to be quickly removed. B. Shape Memory Alloys Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) refer

  14. Mechanisms for Acoustic Absorption in Dry and Weakly Wet Granular Media Th. Brunet, X. Jia,* and P. Mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris 7 - Denis Diderot, Université

    of a linear viscoelastic loss and a nonlinear frictional one is observed in dry media. The Mindlin model the Coulomb frictional sliding be- tween cracks and grain boundary contacts and the linear mechanism dominatedMechanisms for Acoustic Absorption in Dry and Weakly Wet Granular Media Th. Brunet, X. Jia,* and P

  15. Electrical Switching of Wetting States on Superhydrophobic Surfaces: A Route Towards Reversible Cassie-to-Wenzel Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    Electrical Switching of Wetting States on Superhydrophobic Surfaces: A Route Towards Reversible of the composite interface between superhydrophobic surfaces and drops in the superhydrophobic Cassie state under: 47.55.DŔ, 47.55.nb, 68.08.Bc Superhydrophobic surfaces display remarkable proper- ties including

  16. Analytic Torsion of Z_2-graded Elliptic Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varghese Mathai; Siye Wu

    2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We define analytic torsion of Z_2-graded elliptic complexes as an element in the graded determinant line of the cohomology of the complex, generalizing most of the variants of Ray-Singer analytic torsion in the literature. It applies to a myriad of new examples, including flat superconnection complexes, twisted analytic and twisted holomorphic torsions, etc. The definition uses pseudo-differential operators and residue traces. We also study properties of analytic torsion for Z_2-graded elliptic complexes, including the behavior under variation of the metric. For compact odd dimensional manifolds, the analytic torsion is independent of the metric, whereas for even dimensional manifolds, a relative version of the analytic torsion is independent of the metric. Finally, the relation to topological field theories is studied.

  17. Analytic Torsion of Z_2-graded Elliptic Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathai, Varghese

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We define analytic torsion of Z_2-graded elliptic complexes as an element in the graded determinant line of the cohomology of the complex, generalizing most of the variants of Ray-Singer analytic torsion in the literature. It applies to a myriad of new examples, including flat superconnection complexes, twisted analytic and twisted holomorphic torsions, etc. The definition uses pseudo-differential operators and residue traces. We also study properties of analytic torsion for Z_2-graded elliptic complexes, including the behavior under variation of the metric. For compact odd dimensional manifolds, the analytic torsion is independent of the metric, whereas for even dimensional manifolds, a relative version of the analytic torsion is independent of the metric. Finally, the relation to topological field theories is studied.

  18. Determination of Ash in Biomass: Laboratory Analytical Procedure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ash in Biomass Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 7172005 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, R. Ruiz, C. Scarlata, J. Sluiter, and D. Templeton Technical Report NREL...

  19. analytic geometries: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phase Mask rejects all on-axis light for an unaberrated Lloyd, James P. 18 FINER FRACTAL GEOMETRY FOR ANALYTIC FAMILIES Mathematics Websites Summary: of meromorphic functions...

  20. analytical radiation model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    337 Coupled thermodynamic-dynamic semi-analytical model of Free Piston Stirling engines CERN Preprints Summary: The study of free piston Stirling engine (FPSE) requires both...

  1. analytical model assessing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    272 Coupled thermodynamic-dynamic semi-analytical model of Free Piston Stirling engines CERN Preprints Summary: The study of free piston Stirling engine (FPSE) requires both...

  2. analytical model probing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    299 Coupled thermodynamic-dynamic semi-analytical model of Free Piston Stirling engines CERN Preprints Summary: The study of free piston Stirling engine (FPSE) requires both...

  3. accurate analytical model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bruce 107 Coupled thermodynamic-dynamic semi-analytical model of Free Piston Stirling engines CERN Preprints Summary: The study of free piston Stirling engine (FPSE) requires both...

  4. analytical method based: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kholghi, Mahnoosh 2011-01-01 276 Comparative analysis of remaining oil saturation in waterflood patterns based on analytical modeling and simulation Texas A&M University -...

  5. analytical chemistry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Analytical Chemistry, 1990, 62. Copyright 0 1990 by the American Chemical Society Ion Source Mark van Straaten,* Akos Vertes,' and Renaat Gijbels Department of Chemistry,...

  6. analytical chemistry division: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Analytical Chemistry, 1990, 62. Copyright 0 1990 by the American Chemical Society Ion Source Mark van Straaten,* Akos Vertes,' and Renaat Gijbels Department of Chemistry,...

  7. analytical chemistry biochemical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Analytical Chemistry, 1990, 62. Copyright 0 1990 by the American Chemical Society Ion Source Mark van Straaten,* Akos Vertes,' and Renaat Gijbels Department of Chemistry,...

  8. analytical chemistry dac: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Analytical Chemistry, 1990, 62. Copyright 0 1990 by the American Chemical Society Ion Source Mark van Straaten,* Akos Vertes,' and Renaat Gijbels Department of Chemistry,...

  9. analytical magnetohydrostatic equilibria: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solver to calculate solutions not accessible by previous analytical techniques with temperature or entropy prescribed as free functions of the magnetic flux function,...

  10. analytical instrumentation handbook: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Three instrumental approaches to process analytical chemistry are introduced.First, a field portable, multiwavelength,...

  11. analytical mass spectrometry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analytical methods for solving a variety of molecular structure problems. Among high. Extension of mass spectrometry to the analysis of high molecular weight materials,...

  12. analytical performance evaluation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meta- analysis of the empirical evidence on the impact of CSP on firm financial performance. However, since this last meta-analytic review, dozens of studies examining the...

  13. A Practical Analytic Model for Daylight Category: research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Peter

    A Practical Analytic Model for Daylight Category: research Abstract Sunlight and skylight that approximates full spectrum daylight for various atmospheric con­ ditions. These conditions are parameterized

  14. A Practical Analytic Model for Daylight Category: research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Peter

    A Practical Analytic Model for Daylight Category: research Abstract Sunlight and skylight that approximates full spectrum daylight for various atmospheric con- ditions. These conditions are parameterized

  15. analytical ion microscope: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Field-theoretical method is proposed, that yields analytical expression for lateral pressure distribution across hydrophobic core of a bilayer lipid membrane. Lipid molecule,...

  16. analytical chemistry general: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for students who have a prepared background in chemistry Ravikumar, B. 4 General syllabus for third-cycle studies in Technical Analytical Chemistry This syllabus has been...

  17. PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF WINCHESTER ENGINEERING AND ANALYTICAL CENTER

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WINCHESTER ENGINEERING AND ANALYTICAL CENTER Winchester, Massachusetts Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee...

  18. An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and Innovation in Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technology in the United States Jump to: navigation,...

  19. analytical aerodynamic model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model allows analytically express the radial istributions of pressure and wind speed components. The vertical evolution of these distributions and hurricane structure in...

  20. analyte ion transformations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Build Data Sets for Data Mining, Data & Knowledge Engineering (DKE), 2014, Elsevier. DBMS 12 Ordonez, Carlos 4 Discrete analytical Ridgelet Transform Philippe CARR , Eric...

  1. approximate analytical solution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extent. The homogeneous Barrash, Warren 477 Analytical solutions to a hillslope-storage kinematic wave equation for subsurface flow Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  2. approximate analytical solutions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extent. The homogeneous Barrash, Warren 477 Analytical solutions to a hillslope-storage kinematic wave equation for subsurface flow Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  3. aerated flows analytical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extent. The homogeneous Barrash, Warren 37 Analytical solutions to a hillslope-storage kinematic wave equation for subsurface flow Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  4. analytical waste solutions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extent. The homogeneous Barrash, Warren 227 Analytical solutions to a hillslope-storage kinematic wave equation for subsurface flow Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  5. approximate analytic solutions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extent. The homogeneous Barrash, Warren 477 Analytical solutions to a hillslope-storage kinematic wave equation for subsurface flow Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  6. analytical approximate solution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extent. The homogeneous Barrash, Warren 477 Analytical solutions to a hillslope-storage kinematic wave equation for subsurface flow Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  7. analytical anisotropic algorithm: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    THE EFFECTIVENESS OF ANISOTROPIC ANALYTICAL ALGORITHM IN FLATTENED AND FLATTENING-FILTER-FREE BEAMS FOR HIGH ENERGY LUNG DOSE DELIVERY USING THE RADIOLOGICAL PHYSICS CENTER LUNG...

  8. anisotropic analytical algorithm: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    THE EFFECTIVENESS OF ANISOTROPIC ANALYTICAL ALGORITHM IN FLATTENED AND FLATTENING-FILTER-FREE BEAMS FOR HIGH ENERGY LUNG DOSE DELIVERY USING THE RADIOLOGICAL PHYSICS CENTER LUNG...

  9. analytical hot cells: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Antenna 10-year Battery Kemner, Ken 4 Linear Power Spectra in Cold+Hot Dark Matter Models: Analytical Approximations and Applications Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: This...

  10. Biodiesel Utilization: Update on Recent Analytical Techniques (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alleman, T. L.; Fouts, L.; Luecke, J.; Thornton, M.; McAlpin, C.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand and increase the use of biodiesel, analytical methods need to be shared and compared to ensure that accurate data are gathered on this complex fuel.

  11. Analytical innovations bring millions in royalties | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Advances enhance performance of mass spectrometers Yehia Ibrahim, a scientist at PNNL, is part of a team developing the new Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry...

  12. CoNNECT: Data Analytics for Energy Efficient Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Maness, Christopher S [ORNL; Kodysh, Jeffrey B [ORNL; Noranzyk, Amanda M [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficiency is the lowest cost option being promoted for achieving a sustainable energy policy. Thus, there have been some innovations to reduce residential and commercial energy usage. There have also been calls to the utility companies to give customers access to timely, useful, and actionable information about their energy use, in order to unleash additional innovations in homes and businesses. Hence, some web-based tools have been developed for the public to access and compare energy usage data. In order to advance on these efforts, we propose a data analytics framework called Citizen Engagement for Energy Efficient Communities (CoNNECT). On the one hand, CoNNECT will help households to understand (i) the patterns in their energy consumption over time and how those patterns correlate with weather data, (ii) how their monthly consumption compares to other households living in houses of similar size and age within the same geographic areas, and (iii) what other customers are doing to reduce their energy consumption. We hope that the availability of such data and analysis to the public will facilitate energy efficiency efforts in residential buildings. These capabilities formed the public portal of the CoNNECT framework. On the other hand, CoNNECT will help the utility companies to better understand their customers by making available to the utilities additional datasets that they naturally do not have access to, which could help them develop focused services for their customers. These additional capabilities are parts of the utility portal of the CoNNECT framework. In this paper, we describe the CoNNECT framework, the sources of the data used in its development, the functionalities of both the public and utility portals, and the application of empirical mode decomposition for decomposing usage signals into mode functions with the hope that such mode functions could help in clustering customers into unique groups and in developing guidelines for energy conservation.

  13. Appendices to report on DOE analytical laboratory capacity available to meet EM environmental sampling and analysis needs for FY 93-99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Analytical Laboratory Capacity Study was conducted to give EM-263 current information about existing and future analytical capacities and capabilities of site laboratories within the DOE Complex. Each DOE site may have one or more analytical laboratories in operation. These facilities were established to support site missions such as production, research and development, and personnel and environmental monitoring. With changing site missions and the DOE directives for environmental monitoring and cleanup, these laboratories are either devoting or planning to devote resources to support EM activities. The DOE site laboratories represent a considerable amount of capital investment and analytical capability, capacity, and expertise that can be applied to support the EM mission. They not only provide cost-effective high-volume analytical laboratory services, but are also highly recognized analytical research and development centers. Several sites have already transferred their analytical capability from traditional production support to environmental monitoring and waste management support. A model was developed to determine the analytical capacity of all laboratories in the DOE Complex. The model was applied at nearly all the major laboratories and the results collected from these studies are summarized in this report.

  14. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Production of Substituted Natural Gas from the Wet Organic Renewable natural gas has been identified by the California Energy Commission as an important alternativeEnergy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT Production of Substituted Natural

  15. Analytic torsion, vortices and positive Ricci curvature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berman, Robert J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We characterize the global maximizers of a certain non-local functional defined on the space of all positively curved metrics on an ample line bundle L over a Kahler manifold X. This functional is an adjoint version, introduced by Berndtsson, of Donaldson's L-functional and generalizes the Ding-Tian functional whose critical points are Kahler-Einstein metrics of positive Ricci curvature. Applications to (1) analytic torsions on Fano manifolds (2) Chern-Simons-Higgs vortices on tori and (3) Kahler geometry are given. In particular, proofs of conjectures of (1) Gillet-Soul\\'e and Fang (concerning the regularized determinant of Dolbeault Laplacians on the two-sphere) (2) Tarantello and (3) Aubin (concerning Moser-Trudinger type inequalities) in these three settings are obtained. New proofs of some results in Kahler geometry are also obtained, including a lower bound on Mabuchi's K-energy and the uniqueness result for Kahler-Einstein metrics on Fano manifolds of Bando-Mabuchi. This paper is a substantially extend...

  16. Data Intensive Architecture for Scalable Cyber Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Bryan K.; Johnson, John R.; Critchlow, Terence J.

    2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyber analysts are tasked with the identification and mitigation of network exploits and threats. These compromises are difficult to identify due to the characteristics of cyber communication, the volume of traffic, and the duration of possible attack. In this paper, we describe a prototype implementation designed to provide cyber analysts an environment where they can interactively explore a month’s worth of cyber security data. This prototype utilized On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) techniques to present a data cube to the analysts. The cube provides a summary of the data, allowing trends to be easily identified as well as the ability to easily pull up the original records comprising an event of interest. The cube was built using SQL Server Analysis Services (SSAS), with the interface to the cube provided by Tableau. This software infrastructure was supported by a novel hardware architecture comprising a Netezza TwinFin® for the underlying data warehouse and a cube server with a FusionIO drive hosting the data cube. We evaluated this environment on a month’s worth of artificial, but realistic, data using multiple queries provided by our cyber analysts. As our results indicate, OLAP technology has progressed to the point where it is in a unique position to provide novel insights to cyber analysts, as long as it is supported by an appropriate data intensive architecture.

  17. Visual Analytics for Roof Savings Calculator Ensembles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Chad [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Kwan-Liu [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for DOE as an industry-consensus, web-based tool for easily running complex building energy simulations. These simulations allow both homeowners and experts to determine building-specific cost and energy savings for modern roof and attic technologies. Using a database of over 3 million RSC simulations for different combinations of parameters, we have built a visual analytics tool to assist in the exploration and identification of features in the data. Since the database contains multiple variables, both categorical and continuous, we employ a coordinated multi-view approach that allows coordinated feature exploration through multiple visualizations at once. The main component of our system, a parallel coordinates view, has been adapted to handle large-scale, mixed data types as are found in RSC simulations. Other visualizations include map coordinated plots, high dynamic range (HDR) line plot rendering, and an intuitive user interface. We demonstrate these techniques with several use cases that have helped identify software and parametric simulation issues.

  18. Analytic approximate radiation effects due to Bremsstrahlung

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi I.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this note is to provide analytic approximate expressions that can provide quick estimates of the various effects of the Bremsstrahlung radiation produced relatively low energy electrons, such as the dumping of the beam into the beam stop at the ERL or field emission in superconducting cavities. The purpose of this work is not to replace a dependable calculation or, better yet, a measurement under real conditions, but to provide a quick but approximate estimate for guidance purposes only. These effects include dose to personnel, ozone generation in the air volume exposed to the radiation, hydrogen generation in the beam dump water cooling system and radiation damage to near-by magnets. These expressions can be used for other purposes, but one should note that the electron beam energy range is limited. In these calculations the good range is from about 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV. To help in the application of this note, calculations are presented as a worked out example for the beam dump of the R&D Energy Recovery Linac.

  19. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.P.Evans; K.E. Redinger; M.J. Holmes

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).

  20. Multifaced stone and ceramic moulds from Bronze Age Anatolia : building an analytical protocol of mould properties and behavior during the process of metal casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biçer, Katherine K. (Katherine Kershen)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three phase analytical protocol is developed to systematize the study of multifaceted serpentinite bronze-casting moulds from Bronze Age Anatolia (ca. 3500-1700 B.C.). These moulds represent a class of metal processing ...