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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Edison batch system is up and running  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

batch system is up and running Edison batch system is up and running July 25, 2013 (0 Comments) Edison batch system is up and running. Cray benchmark team and NERSC staff have...

2

Running Jobs with the UGE Batch System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jobs Jobs Running Jobs Submitting Jobs How to submit your job to the UGE. Read More » Running with Java Solutions to some of the common problems users have with running on Genepool when the JVM is part of their workflow. Read More » Batch Script Examples Sample batch scripts for Genepool/Phoebe highlighting queue selection, setting the run time and requesting large amounts of memory. Read More » Interactive Jobs How to run your workflow on the interactive nodes. Read More » Job Arrays Job arrays are a way to efficiently submit large numbers of jobs. Read More » Parallel Batch Scripts This page has examples of how to run parallel jobs on Genepool. Read More » Best Practices - and Practices to Avoid Things users should do to run jobs efficiently using UGE. Read More »

3

runManySections.py - Easy Interface to CMSLPC Condor CAF and CERN's Batch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

runManySections.py - Easy Interface to CMSLPC Condor CAF and CERN's LSF runManySections.py - Easy Interface to CMSLPC Condor CAF and CERN's LSF Batch System Introduction Quick Overview Setup Basic Idea Including a Tarball Using runManySections.py to Create Command File Running Compiled Root Macros Debugging Jobs Locally CERN (LSF) versus FNAL (Condor) Differences Introduction runManySections.py is designed to make it easy to run many different sections (or jobs) at once on the CMSLPC CAF or CERN's batch system. It is designed to complement CRAB as runManySections.py is designed to be used with non-cmsRun executables. The general idea is that you pass in a list of commands you would like run and you get the output of these commands back. It is currently configured to run for the Condor system at CMSLPC CAF and CERN's LSF batch system. It is very easy to configure to run on other

4

SLUDGE BATCH SUPPLEMENTAL SRAT RUNS EFFECTS OF YIELD STRESS AND CYCLE TIME INCREASE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has transitioned from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing to Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) processing. Phase III-Tank 40 Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet simulations have been completed to determine the initial processing conditions for the DWPF transition. The impact of higher yield stress (SB-25) and cycle time extension (SB6-26) on the physical and chemical effects of SB6 processing during the SRAT (Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank) cycle were evaluated. No significant impacts on the SRAT chemistry were noted during the higher yield stress run. In particular, no impact on mercury stripping was noted, indicating that settling of elemental mercury was not the primary factor in the low mercury recovery noted in the flowsheet testing. The SRAT product from this run retained the higher yield stress of the starting sludge. The run indicated that ultrasonication is an effective tool to increase the yield stress of simulants to targeted values and the chemistry of downstream processing is not impacted. Significant differences were noted in the cycle time extension test compared to the Phase III flowsheet baseline runs. Large decreases in the ammonia and hydrogen generation rates were noted along with reduced mercury stripping efficiency. The latter effect is similar to that of operating under a high acid stoichiometry. It is conceivable that, under the distinctly different conditions of high formic acid concentration (high acid run) or slow formic acid addition (extended run), that mercury could form amalgams with noble metals, possibly rendering both inert. Thus, the removal of free mercury and noble metals could decrease the rate of catalytic formic acid reactions which would decrease generation of ammonium and hydrogen. The potential underlying reasons for the behavior noted during this run would require additional testing.

Fernandez, A.

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

5

Example Edison Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts The default number of cores per node on Edison is 16, and the default "mppnppn" setting is 16. However, if you run with hyperthreading...

6

Edison Batch Jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batch Jobs Batch Jobs Batch Jobs Overview Batch jobs are jobs that run non-interactively under the control of a "batch script," which is a text file containing a number of job directives and LINUX commands or utilities. Batch scripts are submitted to the "batch system," where they are queued awaiting free resources on Edison. The batch system on Edison is known as "Torque." Bare-Bones Batch Script The simplest Edison batch script will look something like this. #PBS -q regular #PBS -l mppwidth=48 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00 cd $PBS_O_WORKDIR aprun -n 48 ./my_executable This example illustrates the basic parts of a script: Job directive lines begin with #PBS. These "Torque Directives" tell the batch system how many nodes to reserve for your job and how long to

7

Hopper Batch Jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batch Jobs Batch Jobs Batch Jobs Overview Batch jobs are jobs that run non-interactively under the control of a "batch script," which is a text file containing a number of job directives and LINUX commands or utilities. Batch scripts are submitted to the "batch system," where they are queued awaiting free resources on Hopper. The batch system on Hopper is known as "Torque." Bare-Bones Batch Script The simplest Hopper batch script will look something like this. #PBS -q regular #PBS -l mppwidth=48 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00 cd $PBS_O_WORKDIR aprun -n 48 ./my_executable This example illustrates the basic parts of a script: Job directive lines begin with #PBS. These "Torque Directives" tell the batch system how many nodes to reserve for your job and how long to

8

Edison Batch Jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batch Jobs Batch Jobs Batch Jobs Overview Batch jobs are jobs that run non-interactively under the control of a "batch script," which is a text file containing a number of job directives and LINUX commands or utilities. Batch scripts are submitted to the "batch system," where they are queued awaiting free resources on Edison. The batch system on Edison is known as "Torque." Bare-Bones Batch Script The simplest Edison batch script will look something like this. #PBS -q regular #PBS -l mppwidth=32 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00 cd $PBS_O_WORKDIR aprun -n 32 ./my_executable This example illustrates the basic parts of a script: Job directive lines begin with #PBS. These "Torque Directives" tell the batch system how many nodes to reserve for your job and how long to

9

ANALYTICAL PLANS SUPPORTING THE SLUDGE BATCH 8 GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY BEING CONDUCTED BY ENERGYSOLUTIONS AND CUA'S VITREOUS STATE LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

EnergySolutions (ES) and its partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA), are to provide engineering and technical services support to Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) for ongoing operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet as well as for modifications to improve overall plant performance. SRR has requested via a statement of work that ES/VSL conduct a glass variability study (VS) for Sludge Batch 8. SRR issued a technical task request (TTR) asking that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide planning and data reduction support for the ES/VSL effort. This document provides two analytical plans for use by ES/VSL: one plan is to guide the measurement of the chemical composition of the study glasses while the second is to guide the measurement of the durability of the study glasses. The measurements generated by ES/VSL are to be provided to SRNL for data reduction and evaluation. SRNL is to review the results of its evaluation with ES/VSL and SRR. The results will subsequently be incorporated into a joint report with ES/VSL as a deliverable to SRR to support the processing of SB8 at DWPF.

Edwards, T.; Peeler, D.

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

10

Analytical Plans Supporting The Sludge Batch 8 Glass Variability Study Being Conducted By Energysolutions And Cua's Vitreous State Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EnergySolutions (ES) and its partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA), are to provide engineering and technical services support to Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) for ongoing operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet as well as for modifications to improve overall plant performance. SRR has requested via a statement of work that ES/VSL conduct a glass variability study (VS) for Sludge Batch 8. SRR issued a technical task request (TTR) asking that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide planning and data reduction support for the ES/VSL effort. This document provides two analytical plans for use by ES/VSL: one plan is to guide the measurement of the chemical composition of the study glasses while the second is to guide the measurement of the durability of the study glasses. The measurements generated by ES/VSL are to be provided to SRNL for data reduction and evaluation. SRNL is to review the results of its evaluation with ES/VSL and SRR. The results will subsequently be incorporated into a joint report with ES/VSL as a deliverable to SRR to support the processing of SB8 at DWPF.

Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

11

Submitting Batch Jobs on Carver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submitting Batch Jobs Submitting Batch Jobs Submitting Batch Jobs Overview A batch job is the most common way users run production applications on NERSC machines. Carver's batch system is based on the PBS model, implemented with the Moab scheduler and Torque resource manager. Typically, the user submits a batch script to the batch system. This script specifies, at the very least, how many nodes and cores the job will use, how long the job will run, and the name of the application to run. The job will advance in the queue until it has reached the top. At this point, Torque will allocate the requested number of nodes to the batch job. The batch script itself will execute on the "head node" (sometimes known as the "MOM" node). See Queues and Policies for details of batch queues, limits,

12

Submitting Batch Jobs on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submitting Batch Jobs Submitting Batch Jobs Debug Jobs Short jobs requesting less than 30 minutes and requiring 512 nodes (2,048 cores) or fewer can run in the debug queue. From...

13

SJSU Information Support Services Run Batch Contracts for Temporary TAs and GAs info-support@sjsu.edu, 408-924-1530 Page 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-support@sjsu.edu, 408-924-1530 Page 4 The TF Batch Contract page displays. 5. Term: Use the lookup button to search the appropriate term. 6. Due Date: (Optional.) Enter due date. 7. Dean's Name: Enter your Dean's name. 8. Enter Batch Contract page displays. 5. Term: Use the lookup button to search the appropriate term. 6. Due Date

Su, Xiao

14

PDSF Interactive Batch Jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Batch Jobs Interactive Batch Jobs Running Interactive Batch Jobs You cannot login to the PDSF batch nodes directly but you can run an interactive session on a batch node using either qlogin or qsh. This can be useful if you are doing something that is potentially disruptive or if the interactive nodes are overloaded. qlogin will give you an interactive session in the same window as your original session on PDSF, however, you must have your ssh keys in place. Due to system limitations there is a small (but important) difference in the user environment you get when you use qlogin. When you receive a shell prompt with qlogin, your CHOS environment is not set up for you. In order to set up the CHOS environment of your choice you will need to manually chos into the chos environment of your choice:

15

Example Edison Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts The default number of cores per node on Edison is 16, and the default "mppnppn" setting is 16. However, if you run with hyperthreading (HT), Edison compute nodes have 32 cores per node, and the mppnppn value needs to be set to 32. In addition, the "-j 2" option needs to be added to the "aprun" command. In most of the following example batch scripts, the default number of 16 cores per node is used. Basic Scripts Sample Job script This script uses the default 16 cores per node. This job will run on 64 nodes, with 1024 cores. #PBS -q debug #PBS -l mppwidth=1024 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00 #PBS -N my_job #PBS -j oe #PBS -V cd $PBS_O_WORKDIR aprun -n 1024 ./my_executable Sample job script to run with Hyperthreading (HT)

16

Example Edison Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Edison has 24 cores (physical cores) per node, so the default "mppnppn" value is set to 24 for all queues. If you run with hyperthreading (HT), Edison has 48 logical cores per node, and the mppnppn value can be set to 48. However, this is not required. The "-j 2" option of the "aprun" command allows you to use all 48 logical cores on the nodes. In most of the following example batch scripts, we assume that jobs are run without Hyperthreading unless explicitly mentioned, therefore the default mppnppn value, 24, is used. Basic Scripts Sample Job script This script uses the default 24 cores per node. This job will run on 64 nodes, with 1536 cores. #PBS -q debug #PBS -l mppwidth=1536 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00

17

Submitting Batch Jobs on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submitting Batch Jobs Submitting Batch Jobs Submitting Batch Jobs Debug Jobs Short jobs requesting less than 30 minutes and requiring 512 nodes (2,048 cores) or fewer can run in the debug queue. From 5am-6pm Pacific Time, 256 nodes are reserved for debugging and interactive use. See also, running Interactive Jobs. Sample Batch Scripts The following batch script requests 8 cores on 2 nodes with a 10 minute wall clock limit in the debug queue. Torque directive lines tell the batch system how to run a job and begin with #PBS. #PBS -q debug #PBS -l mppwidth=8 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00 #PBS -j eo #PBS -V cd $PBS_O_WORKDIR aprun -n 8 ./a.out Here is another example requesting 8 processors using 4 nodes with only 2 cores per node: #PBS -q debug #PBS -l mppwidth=8 #PBS -l mppnppn=2 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00

18

Parallel Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parallel Batch Scripts Parallel Batch Scripts Parallel Batch Scripts Parallel Environments on Genepool You can run parallel jobs that use MPI or OpenMP on Genepool as long as you make the appropriate changes to your submission script! To investigate the parallel environments that are available on Genepool, you can use Command Description qconf -sp Show the configuration for the specified parallel environment. qconf -spl Show a list of all currently configured parallel environments. Basic Parallel Example If your job requires the default 5GB of memory per slot, you can do the following: #!/bin/bash # # == Set SGE options: # # -- ensure BASH is used # -- run the job in the current working directory (where qsub is called) #$ -cwd # -- run with the environment variables from the User's environment

19

Running Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

jobs jobs Running jobs Quick Instructions for Hopper users Major differences between running jobs on Hopper and Edison are: the number of cores per node are different, and the Intel Hyper-threading option is available on Edison. Read More » Overview A brief overview of how to run jobs on Edison. Read More » Interactive Jobs Interactive jobs may be run on Edison by requesting resources from the batch system. "qsub -I -V -q interactive -lmppwidth=[num_cores]" is the basic command to request interactive resources. Read More » Batch Jobs Batch script options. Read More » Example Batch Scripts Sample batch scripts for MPI, OpenMP, hybrid applications and various workflows. Read More » Job Launch Command: aprun Aprun is the job launcher for Cray XC30. There are many options that are

20

PDSF Batch Job Example  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDSF Batch Job Example PDSF Batch Job Example PDSF Batch Job Example On this page we show an example of how to run a simple batch job, monitor it, check its output, and look at the SGE accounting information about it. We start with a simple script named hello.csh, which just sleeps a bit and then writes some output: pdsf4 72% cat hello.csh #!/bin/csh sleep 600 echo "Hello, World" The simplest way to submit it is to just use qsub without any options: pdsf4 74% qsub hello.csh Your job 1787239 ("hello.csh") has been submitted We can check on its status with qstat. Use the -u option to get only your jobs: pdsf4 75% qstat -u hjort job-ID prior name user state submit/start at queue slots ja-task-ID -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Running Jobs on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

jobs jobs Running jobs Job Launch Overview Parallel applications can not run on the login nodes. They must be launched onto the compute nodes via the aprun command. Read More » Interactive Jobs Interactive jobs may be run on Franklin by requesting resources from the batch system. "qsub -I -V -q interactive -lmppwidth=[num_cores]" is the basic command to request interactive resources. Read More » Submitting Batch Jobs Basic batch scripts, torque keywords. Sample scripts for advanced work flows: running multiple jobs, MPMD jobs, job dependencies. Read More » Queues and Policies Queue configuration and limits, policies and tips for getting your job through the queue faster. Read More » Monitoring Jobs Once a job is submitted it can be monitored, held, deleted and in some

22

Using the PDSF Batch System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System System Using the PDSF Batch System Submitting PDSF Jobs UGE (Univa Grid Engine) is the batch system used at PDSF. Read More » Scratch Space Use on Compute Nodes Use $TMPDIR and not /scratch or /tmp directly. Read More » I/O Resources I/O resources are in important tool at PDSF and this page describes how to use them. Read More » Running Interactive Batch Jobs This page describes when you should consider working in an interactive batch session and how to do it. Read More » Monitoring and Managing Jobs This page is about what you can do with your jobs after you have submitted them. Read More » Getting Info about Completed Jobs UGE accounting information about all jobs is available and this page describes how to access it. Read More » PDSF Batch Job Example

23

Data-driven batch schuduling  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we develop data-driven strategies for batch computing schedulers. Current CPU-centric batch schedulers ignore the data needs within workloads and execute them by linking them transparently and directly to their needed data. When scheduled on remote computational resources, this elegant solution of direct data access can incur an order of magnitude performance penalty for data-intensive workloads. Adding data-awareness to batch schedulers allows a careful coordination of data and CPU allocation thereby reducing the cost of remote execution. We offer here new techniques by which batch schedulers can become data-driven. Such systems can use our analytical predictive models to select one of the four data-driven scheduling policies that we have created. Through simulation, we demonstrate the accuracy of our predictive models and show how they can reduce time to completion for some workloads by as much as 80%.

Bent, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denehy, Tim [GOOGLE; Arpaci - Dusseau, Remzi [UNIV OF WISCONSIN; Livny, Miron [UNIV OF WISCONSIN; Arpaci - Dusseau, Andrea C [NON LANL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Running Interactive Jobs on Carver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Overview There are two types of interactive jobs. The first type runs on a login node. These applications are typically pre- and post-processing jobs, data management programs, or some other type of "tool". Note that it is not possible to run any MPI application on Carver login nodes. The second type of interactive job runs on one or more Carver compute nodes. Because the only way to gain access to the compute nodes is through the batch system, these types of jobs may more accurately be called "interactive batch" jobs. The remainder of this section focuses on these types of jobs. Usage Basic usage: carver% qsub -I The above command creates an interactive shell on a compute node, in the user's home directory. As a batch job, it has default values for batch

25

Example Hopper Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Sample Batch Scripts One of the most noted differences between the Hopper system and other NERSC systems is the number of cores per node...

26

Edison Batch Jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the control of a "batch script," which is a text file containing a number of job directives and LINUX commands or utilities. Batch scripts are submitted to the "batch system,"...

27

Running Jobs Overview for Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Overview Overview and Basic Description Jobs on Edison execute on one or more "compute" nodes dedicated to that job. These nodes are distinct from the shared "login" nodes that host interactive sessions and the shared "MOM" nodes that execute commands from a "batch script" that controls how the job runs. Typically, users write the batch script with a text editor and submit it to the system using the "qsub" command. The batch script contains a number of job control directives and also the "aprun" command that actually runs the program in parallel on the compute nodes. It is possible to run small, short parallel jobs interactively as described in the pages in this section. Pages in this section explain the process in more detail.

28

Batch-oriented software appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents AppPot, a system for creating Linux software appliances. AppPot can be run as a regular batch or grid job and executed in user space, and requires no special virtualization support in the infrastructure. The main design goal of AppPot is to bring the benefits of a virtualization-based IaaS cloud to existing batch-oriented computing infrastructures. In particular, AppPot addresses the application deployment and configuration on large heterogeneous computing infrastructures: users are enabled to prepare their own customized virtual appliance for providing a safe execution environment for their applications. These appliances can then be executed on virtually any computing infrastructure being in a private or public cloud as well as any batch-controlled computing clusters the user may have access to. We give an overview of AppPot and its features, the technology that makes it possible, and report on experiences running it in production use within the Swiss National Grid infrastructure SMSCG.

Murri, Riccardo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

CMS Runs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Runs Runs Web Based Monitoring Run Summary DQM Run Registry Commissioning & Run Coordination Online WorkBook Global Run Data Analysis FNAL ROC Process Summary [May-Dec 2007] Text output of Run Summary Global File List in dCache Directory Index DBS Discovery Aug 2008: ROOT Jul 2008: ROOT Jun 2008: ROOT May 2008: ROOT Mar 2008: ROOT Nov/Dec 2007: Streamer ROOT Sep 2007: Streamer ROOT Aug 2007: Streamer ROOT Jul 2007: Streamer ROOT Jun 2007: Streamer ROOT DQM May 2007: Streamer ROOT DQM PhEDEx Transfer State Cruzet4 Files Transferred Cruzet3 Files Transferred Cruzet2 Files Transferred GlobalCruzet1 Files Transferred GlobalMar08 Files Transferred to FNAL GlobalNov07 Files Transferred to FNAL GlobalSep07 Files Transferred to FNAL GlobalAug07 Files Transferred to FNAL

30

Running Jobs Overview for Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Overview Overview and Basic Description Jobs on Edison execute on one or more "compute" nodes dedicated to that job. These nodes are distinct from the shared "login" nodes that host interactive sessions and the shared "MOM" nodes that execute commands from a "batch script" that controls how the job runs. Typically, users write the batch script with a text editor and submit it to the system using the "qsub" command. The batch script contains a number of job control directives and also the "aprun" command that actually launches the program on to the compute nodes. It is possible to run small, short parallel jobs interactively as described in the pages in this section. Pages in this section explain the process in more detail.

31

Repo Runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a model of financial institutions that borrow shortterm and invest into long-term marketable assets. Because these financial intermediaries perform maturity transformation, they are subject to runs. We endogenize the profits of the intermediary and derive distinct liquidity and solvency conditions that determine whether a run can be prevented. We first characterize these conditions for an isolated intermediary and then generalize them to the case where the intermediary can sell assets to prevent runs. The sale of assets can eliminate runs if the intermediary is solvent but illiquid. However, because of cash-in-the-market pricing, this becomes less likely the more intermediaries are facing problems. In the limit, in case of a general market run, no intermediary can sell assets to forestall a run, and our original solvency and liquidity constraints are again relevant for the stability of financial institutions.

Antoine Martin; David Skeie; Ernst-ludwig Von Thadden

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Running Jobs.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submitting and Running Jobs on Submitting and Running Jobs on the Cray XT5 Richard Gerber NERSC User Services RAGerber@lbl.gov Joint Cray XT5 Workshop UC-Berkeley February 1, 2010 February 1, 2010 Joint Cray XT5 Workshop, UC Berkeley February 1, 2010 Joint Cray XT5 Workshop, UC Berkeley Outline * XT5 Overview * Creating and Submitting a Batch Job * How a Job Is Launched * Monitoring Your Job * Queues and Policies Hopper in blue; Jaguar in Orange; Kraken in Green February 1, 2010 Joint Cray XT5 Workshop, UC Berkeley Cray XT5 Overview Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node etc.... No local disk Login Node Login Node Login Node etc.... home Login Node Login Node $SCRATCH[1|2] /tmp/work/$USER /lustre/scratch/$USER

33

Batch Script Examples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batch Script Examples Batch Script Examples Batch Script Examples My First Script This is a simple example that you can use to make sure that your settings are correct before submitting more complicated jobs. First, copy the contents of hello.sh into a file. genepool% cat hello.sh #!/bin/bash sleep 120 echo "Hello World" Then submit your job with the qsub command genepool% qsub hello.sh Monitor your job with the qstat command: genepool% qstat -u You can also get more detailed information about your job using: genepool% qstat -j The job id can be found using the qstat -u command. Basic Batch Script Here is an example of a basic script that specifies the working directory, the shell and the queue. The #$ must be used to specify the grid engine

34

PDSF Batch Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summaries PDSF Group Batch Summary Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 Partial SGE62 2012 SGE62 SGE62...

35

Batch Queue Configuration and Policies on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Queues and Policies Queues and Policies Queues and Policies Queues and Job Scheduling Jobs must be submitted to a valid Submit Queue. Upon submission the job is routed to the appropriate Torque execution class. Users can not directly access the Torque execution classes. Submit Queue Execution Queue (Do not use in batch script) Nodes Available Processors Max Wallclock Relative Priority (1 being the highest) Run Limit Queued Limit (eligible to run limit) Queue Charge Factor xfer xfer 1 4 6 hrs 3 3 2 1 interactive interactive 1-128 1-512 30 mins 1 1 1 1 debug debug 1-512 1-2,048 30 mins 2 1 1 1 premium premium 1-4,096 1-16,384 24 hrs 4 2 2 2 regular reg_short 1-511 1-2,044 6 hrs 7 12 8 1 reg_small 1-255 1-1,020 48 hrs 7 7 3 1

36

NDA BATCH 2009-7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The testing facility is LLNL plutonium facility segmented gamma scanner. 100% of the radioassay data in the batch data report is reviewed.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Progressing batch hydrolysis process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A progressive batch hydrolysis process for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock, comprising passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feedstock to glucose; cooling said dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, then feeding said dilute acid stream serially through a plurality of prehydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose; and cooling the dilute acid stream containing glucose after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

Wright, John D. (Denver, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Progressing batch hydrolysis process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

Wright, J.D.

1985-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

39

Analytical Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical Division Common (non-systematic) Names for Fatty Acids Analytical Division Analytical Chemistry Divisions Analytical Division Common (non-

40

Running Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

jobs Running jobs For Edison Phase 1 users You can run jobs in the same way as you did on the phase 1 system, but keep in mind that the number of cores per node is 24 instead of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs January 14, 2013 by Helen He (0 Comments) Symptom User job sometimes get an error message similar to the following, usually at the start of a batch job, causing the job to abort: MPICH2 ERROR [Rank 7436] [job id 14638087] [Sat Jan 12 04:56:54 2013] [c11-2c1s3n1] [nid04487] - MPIU_nem_gni_get_hugepages(): Unable to mmap 4194304 bytes for file /var/lib/hugetlbfs/global/pagesize-2097152/hugepagefile.MPICH.0.5841.kvs_14638087, err Cannot allocate memory This is caused by available huge page memory being not sufficient on one or more of the allocated compute nodes. The above error happens more often with jobs using the "-ss" option for the aprun command. It is confirmed

42

User_RunReports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Running Standard Reports Running Standard Reports © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Running Standard Reports Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of running standard reports in SuccessFactors Learning. Task A. Run Standard Report From the Home page, click the Reports easy link. In the Report Name table, locate the report you want to generate. Click the expand icon ( ) to expand the report group. Click the title link. For this example, select the User Curriculum Status Group by Item Details report. Note: Click Help ( ) for additional information on reports. 1 1 2 2 3 3 Run Standard Report 13 Steps Task A SuccessFactors Learning v 6.4 User Job Aid

43

Standard Seawater Comparison of Some Recent Batches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The comparison experiment results of the standard seawater (SSW) were presented for batches P90, P100, P104, P106, P108 P111, and P112. This work shows that the SSW batch-to-batch agreement was recently improved. The adjusted mean differences ...

Yasushi Takatsuki; Michio Aoyama; Toshiya Nakano; Haruo Miyagi; Toshihiro Ishihara; Toshiya Tsutsumida

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Running Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instructions for Hopper users Major differences between running jobs on Hopper and Edison are: the number of cores per node are different, and the Intel Hyper-threading option...

45

Running jobs on Euclid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Running jobs Running jobs Running jobs Overview and Basic Description Euclid is a single node system with 48 processors. It supports both multiprocessing (MPI) and multithreading programming models. Interactive Jobs All Euclid jobs are interactive. To launch an MPI job, type in this at the shell prompt: % mpirun -np numprocs executable_name where numprocs is the total number of MPI processes that will be executed. Interactive Usage Policy Due to the dynamic and unpredictable nature of visualization and data analysis, NERSC will attempt to provide equitable access to Euclid's resources through the enforcement of certain usage guidelines. The most crucial resources are the processor cores (48) and memory (512 GB). Processor Core Usage Policy No single interactive job should use more than 12 processor cores. A single

46

Fermilab DART run control  

SciTech Connect

DART is the high speed, Unix based data acquisition system being developed by Fermilab in collaboration with seven High Energy Physics Experiments. This paper describes DART run control, which has been developed over the past year and is a flexible, distributed, extensible system for the, control and monitoring of the data acquisition systems. We discuss the unique and interesting concepts of the run control and some of our experiences in developing it. We also give a brief update and status of the whole DART system.

Oleynik, G.; Engelfried, J.; Mengel, L. [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

NDA BATCH 2008-05  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

QC sample results (daily background check drums and 100-gram standard) were within acceptance criteria established by WIPPs Quality Assurance objectives for TRU Waste characterization. Replicate run was performed on the following drums LL85234292 and LL85101617. Replicate measurement results are acceptable at the 95% confidence level as established by WIPP criteria.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

48

Adding coal dust to coal batch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The granulometric composition of coke dust from the dry-slaking machine is determined. The influence of additions of 3-7% coke dust on the quality of industrial coking batch and the coke obtained by box coking is estimated. Adding 1% coke dust to coking batch does not markedly change the coke quality. Industrial equipment for the supply of dry-slaking dust to the batch is described.

V.S. Shved; A.V.Berezin [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Dirac Batch Queues and Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Queues and Policies Queues and Policies Queues and Policies Queue Classes Jobs must be submitted to a valid Submit Queue. Upon submission the job is routed to the appropriate Execution Queue. You can not directly submit a job to an Execution Queue. Submit Queue Nodes Available Processors Max Wallclock Relative Priority Run Limit dirac_int 1 1-8 30 mins 1 1 dirac_reg 1-12 1-96 6 hrs 2 2 dirac_small 1 1-8 6 hrs 2 4 dirac_special 1-48 1-384 Contact consult@nersc.gov to arrange Special Queue for higher concurrency jobs For jobs that need more than 32 nodes, please contact consult@nersc.gov with the subject "Special queue request for Dirac". Note that these jobs might take some time to run depending on the load on Dirac. Requesting Special Resources Multi-GPU Nodes

50

Pulping lignocellulose in continuous pressurized batch digesters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A batch process to produce kraft pulp is described, in which a combination of black and white liquor is used for cooking of wood chips. In the process, the steam consumption to produce 357 tons/day pulp at 50% yield was approximately 1600 lb/ton pulp, compared with 4000 lb/ton for a batch digester of conventional type.

Green, F.B.

1980-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

Scheduling a capacitated batch-processing machine to minimize makespan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims at improving the utilization of a single batch-processing machine. The batch-processing machine can process a batch of jobs, as long as the number of jobs and the total size of all the jobs in a batch do not violate the machine's capacity. ... Keywords: Batch processing, Mathematical modeling, Scheduling, Simulated annealing

Purushothaman Damodaran; Krishnaswami Srihari; Sarah S. Lam

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Melting of foaming batches: Nuclear waste glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model is presented for the rate of melting of a batch blanket in an electric glassmelting furnace. The melting process is assumed to be jointly controlled by the heat transfer from the pool of molten glass and the batch-to-glass conversion kinetics. Factors affecting the melting rate in the conversion-controlled regime are discussed. Attention is paid to gas evolution from redox reactions in waste glass batches and component accumulation within the blanket. It is suggested that the high rate of the blanket-free melting in a mechanically agitated furnace is made possible by increasing the rate of melt surface renewal. 27 refs.

Hrma, P.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Batch Upload | Scientific and Technical Information Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Notices » Automated Protocols Notices » Automated Protocols Batch Upload Print page Print page Email page Email page One option for electronically submitting AN 241.1 data is Batch Upload (Site-to-OSTI). This method allows sites to upload metadata in a batch XML file at any time. The uploaded XML file is formatted according to the requirements of OSTI's XML. The Batch Upload process allows sites to export data from existing databases and upload it to OSTI. The process is customized for the submitting site. Full text documents can also be uploaded. Sites choose how often and how many records each file will contain. Sites also choose whether to include in the metadata a URL to the site-hosted full text or an uploaded full text. Unclassified documents with CUI access limitations MUST be input to E-Link via the Web Announcement Notice 241.1.

54

6 Batch Injection and Slipped Beam Tune Measurements in Fermilab's Main Injector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During Nova operations it is planned to run the Fermilab Recycler in a 12 batch slip stacking mode. In preparation for this, measurements of the tune during a six batch injection and then as the beam is slipped by changing the RF frequency, but without a 7th injection, have been carried out in the Main Injector. The coherent tune shifts due to the changing beam intensity were measured and compared well with the theoretically expected tune shift. The tune shifts due to changing RF frequency, required for slip stacking, also compare well with the linear theory, although some nonlinear affects are apparent at large frequency changes. These results give us confidence that the expected tunes shifts during 12 batch slip stacking Recycler operations can be accommodated.

Scott, D J; Kourbanis, I; Seiya, K; Yan, M -J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

6 Batch Injection and Slipped Beam Tune Measurements in Fermilab?s Main Injector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During NOVA operations it is planned to run the Fermilab Recycler in a 12 batch slip stacking mode. In preparation for this, measurements of the tune during a six batch injection and then as the beam is decelerated by changing the RF frequency have been carried out in the Main Injector. The coherent tune shifts due to the changing beam intensity were measured and compared well with the theoretically expected tune shift. The tune shifts due to changing RF frequency, required for slip stacking, also compare well with the linear theory, although some nonlinear affects are apparent at large frequency changes. These results give us confidence that the expected tunes shifts during 12 batch slip stacking Recycler operations can be accommodated.

Scott, D.J.; Capista, D.; Kourbanis, I.; Seiya, K.; Yan, M.-J.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Polarization Issues in Run 2008  

SciTech Connect

The RHIC proton beam polarization has a strong dependence on intensity in Run 2008, whereas the dependence is almost absent in Run 2006. Meanwhile, the RHIC beam transverse emittance also has a dependence on intensity in Run 2008, but little in Run 2006. Using the emittance measurement at the AGS IPM and the BtA multiwires, the source of this difference between 2006 and 2008 runs is traced to the Booster. It is found that at least the degree of the vertical scraping in the Booster is different in 2006 and 2008. The effect of this scraping for the RHIC beam emittance and polarization is studied.

Zhang,S.Y.; Ahrens, L.; Huang, H.; Zeno, K.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. ... see all Nuclear Analytical Chemistry news ... ...

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

58

Running Interactive Jobs on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Serial Code or Commands Franklin is a massively parallel high-performance computing platform and is intended and designed to run large parallel codes. While it is possible to run serial jobs on Franklin, it is discouraged. Any code or command that is not preceeded by the aprun command will execute serially on a service (usually login) node. The login nodes are for executing general UNIX shell commands, building code, and submitting jobs intended to run on the compute nodes. The service nodes are shared by many users, so. please do not run your compute- or memory-intensive jobs on these nodes. NERSC may kill running processes that severely degrade service node performance. If your job will run for more than 5 minutes, or use more than 1 GB of memory it should not

59

PRELIMINARY Run Shutdown BL Commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PRELIMINARY Run Shutdown BL Commissioning Maintenance AP SPEAR Down Injector Startup University Holidays Spear Down SPEAR Startup MA Sep Oct 2011 2012 MA Mar Apr May Jun Jul...

60

Analytical Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analytical Division is comprised of members with a variety of interests, including: chromatography (liquid, gas-liquid, high-performance liquid column, thin-layer, and supercritical-fluid), electrophoresis, spectroscopy (UV, IR, NMR, light-scattering)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Oil shale project run summary: small retort run S-14  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Retort run S-14 was a combustion run in the small retort conducted on Nov. 15-16, 1977. The charge of Anvil Points shale operated under a 50% steam - 50% air mixture. Results indicate that the broad particle size range in the packed bed increases nonuniformities in gas flow and bed retorting characteristics. Oil yield was 87%, hydrogen production amounted to 0.25 wt % of the raw shale. (DLC)

Ackerman, F.J.; Sandholtz, W.A.; Raley, J.H.; Tripp, L.J.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Analytical Microscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Running Interactive Jobs on Dirac  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

requests 8 cores on one node using the interactive queue (and you will run on either Tesla or Fermi nodes): % qsub -I -V -q diracint -l nodes1:ppn8 If you want to request...

64

Analytical Dashboards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Analytical Dashboards facilitates easy access to essential high-level corporate-wide safety performance information through key metrics, charts, graphs, and text bullets to provide both managers and operations personnel with a current perspective on safety performance within the Department.

65

Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts September 4, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) We would like to encourage you to use...

66

SLUDGE BATCH 6/TANK 51 SIMULANT CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL SIMULATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Qualification simulant testing was completed to determine appropriate processing conditions and assumptions for the Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) Shielded Cells demonstration of the DWPF flowsheet using the qualification sample from Tank 51 for SB6 after SRNL washing. It was found that an acid addition window of 105-139% of the DWPF acid equation (100-133% of the Koopman minimum acid equation) gave acceptable Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) results for nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation occurred continuously after acid addition in three of the four tests. The three runs at 117%, 133%, and 150% stoichiometry (Koopman) were all still producing around 0.1 lb hydrogen/hr at DWPF scale after 42 hours of boiling in the SRAT. The 150% acid run reached 110% of the DWPF SRAT limit of 0.65 lb H{sub 2}/hr, and the 133% acid run reached 75% of the DWPF SME limit of 0.223 lb H{sub 2}/hr. Conversely, nitrous oxide generation was subdued compared to previous sludge batches, staying below 25 lb/hr in all four tests or about a fourth as much as in comparable SB4 testing. Two other processing issues were noted. First, incomplete mercury suspension impacted mercury stripping from the SRAT slurry. This led to higher SRAT product mercury concentrations than targeted (>0.45 wt% in the total solids). Associated with this issue was a general difficulty in quantifying the mass of mercury in the SRAT vessel as a function of time, especially as acid stoichiometry increased. About ten times more mercury was found after drying the 150% acid SME product to powder than was indicated by the SME product sample results. Significantly more mercury was also found in the 133% acid SME product samples than was found during the SRAT cycle sampling. It appears that mercury is segregating from the bulk slurry in the SRAT vessel, as mercury amalgam deposits for example, and is not being resuspended by the agitators. The second processing issue was significant ammonium ion formation as the acid stoichiometry was increased due to the high noble metal-high mercury feed conditions. Ammonium ion was found partitioned between the SRAT product slurry and the condensate from the lab-scale off-gas chiller downstream of the SRAT condenser. The ammonium ion was produced from nitrate ion by formic acid. Formate losses increased with increasing acid stoichiometry reaching 40% at the highest stoichiometry tested. About a third of the formate loss at higher acid stoichiometries appeared to be due to ammonia formation. The full extent of ammonia formation was not determined in these tests, since uncondensed ammonia vapor was not quantified; but total formation was bounded by the combined loss of nitrite and nitrate. Nitrate losses during ammonia formation led to nitrite-to-nitrate conversion values that were negative in three of the four tests. The negative results were an artifact of the calculation that assumes negligible SRAT nitrate losses. The sample data after acid addition indicated that some of the initial nitrite was converted to nitrate, so the amount of nitrate destroyed included nitrite converted to nitrate plus some of the added nitrate from the sludge and nitric acid. It is recommended that DWPF investigate the impact of SME product ammonium salts on melter performance (hydrogen, redox). It was recommended that the SB6 Shielded Cells qualification run be performed at 115% acid stoichiometry and allow about 35 hours of boiling for mercury stripping at the equivalent of a 5,000 lb/hr boil-up rate.

Koopman, David; Best, David

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Analytical Dashboards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analytical Dashboards Analytical Dashboards Public Final Occurrence Reports: Searchable information on DOE's Final Occurrence Reports since 2009, available to the public and updated daily. Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System (CAIRS) - Injury and Illness Dashboard: The Injury and Illness Dashboard is a tool that allows users to easily explore DOE occupational safety and health injury and illness information. Its features include: Graphical and tabular depictions of injury and illness information Calendar year and fiscal year incidence rates for DOE and DOE contractor total recordable cases (TRC) of injuries and illnesses and cases involving days away from work or on job transfer or restriction (DART) due to injury or illness Incidence rates of injuries and illnesses by DOE program

68

Tevatron Run II Physics Projections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run II Physics Projections (Spring 2006) Run II Physics Projections (Spring 2006) Document for the P5 Committee (version 8, September 30, 2005) Electroweak Precision Measurements and Standard Model Higgs Searches W Mass Measurement: 20 - 30 MeV Projections versus Integrated Luminosity (made by CDF): eps, gif, gif (log) Extrapolated from Run Ib measurement Uncertainties assumed to scale with luminosity: Statiscal uncertainties Systematic uncertainties such as Energy and momentum scale, Hadron Recoil against W Uncertainties assumed not to scale with luminosity: W production and decay: PDFs, d(sigma_W)/d(Pt), higher order QCD/QED effects Assumed to be beween 20 MeV (dashed lines) and 30 MeV (solid lines) Top Mass Measurement: ~1.5 GeV Assumptions Channel: only lepton+jets channle considered. Uncertainties that scale with luminosity - 1 / sqrt(lum)

69

2.1E Sample Run Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEAT 1993EDL RUN 2 UTILITY-RATEs GAS-RATE RESOURCE, NATURAL-ES-E SUMMARY OF UTILITY-RATE: ELI_CTRGCHRONIC GLAZING ININP RUN 3 1993EDL RUN UTILITY-RATE: ELk'C-COST RESOURCE:

Winkelmann, F.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Green Flash Project Runs First Prototype Successfully  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facebook Find us "in the news" Home News & Publications News Center News Green Flash Project Runs First Prototype Successfully Green Flash Project Runs First...

71

Batch Queues and Policies on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Queues and Policies Queues and Policies Queues and Scheduling Policies Users submit jobs to a submit queue and wait in line until nodes become available to run a job. NERSC's queue structures are intended to be fair and to allow jobs of various sizes to run efficiently. Balancing the job size and throughput requirements of a large number of users is always a challenge. We encourage users to send questions, feedback, or concerns about the queue structures, to the consultants. Queue Classes Submit Queue Execution Queue1 Nodes Processors Max Wallclock Relative Priority Run Limit2 Queued Limit3 Queue Charge Factor interactive interactive 1-256 1-6,144 30 mins 2 1 1 1 debug debug 1-512 1-12,288 30 mins 3 1 1 1 regular reg_1hour 1-256 1-6,144 1 hr 5 8 8 1

72

REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES IN DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that the waste producer 'shall report the curie inventory of radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115.' As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type all radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and contribute greater than 0.01 percent of the total curie inventory from the time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial list of radionuclides to be reported is based on the design-basis glass identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report. However, it is required that the list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that meet the 'greater than 0.01% of the curie inventory' criterion. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, and U-238; and Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete list of reportable radionuclides must also include these sets of U and Pu isotopes - and the U and Pu isotopic mass distributions must be identified. The DWPF receives HLW sludge slurry from Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 40. For Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), the waste in Tank 40 contained a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) material transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. This sludge blend is also referred to as Macrobatch 8. Laboratory analyses of a Tank 40 sludge sample were performed to quantify the concentrations of pertinent radionuclides in the SB7a waste. Subsequently, radiological decay and in-growth were calculated over the time period from 2015 to 3115. This provided a basis for characterizing the radionuclide content of SB7a over time and for identifying the 'reportable radionuclides.' Details of the characterization methodology and the analytical results are the focus of this report. This work was performed at the request of the Waste Solidification Engineering Department of Savannah River Remediation, initiated via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. A minor revision in the reporting requirements was requested via a subsequent email communication. The work was conducted in accordance with the protocols identified in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01218 and Analytical Study Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01219. All of the raw data related to this scope have been recorded in laboratory notebook SRNL-NB-2011-00061. The overall goal of this task was to characterize the radionuclide content of the SB7a waste sufficiently to meet the WAPS and DWPF reporting requirements. The specific objectives were: (1) Quantify the current concentrations of all radionuclides impacting (or potentially-impacting) the total curie content between calendar years 2011 and 3115. Also quantify the current concentrations of other radionuclides specifically requested in the TTR or required by the WAPS. (2) Calculate future concentrations of decayed and in-grown radionuclides impacting the total curie content between calendar years 2015 and 3115; (3) Identify as 'reportable' all radionuclides contributing {ge} 0.01% of the total curie content from 2015 to 3115 and having half-lives {ge} 10 years.

Reboul, S.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.; Bannochie, C.

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

Effect Of Batch Charging Equipment On Glass Furnace Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the effects of batch pattern in the melt space caused by charging equipment on the energy efficiency of the furnace focusing on the...

74

Exploration of supercritical water gasification of biomass using batch reactor .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The focus of this study is on gasification of a biomass in supercritical water. Vapor mass yield in a batch reactor after 20 minutes in (more)

Venkitasamy, Chandrasekar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Better Mini-Batch Algorithms via Accelerated Gradient Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Better Mini-Batch Algorithms via Accelerated Gradient Methods Andrew Cotter Toyota Technological Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago nati@ttic.edu Karthik Sridharan Toyota Technological Institute

76

Reducing variance in batch partitioning measurements  

SciTech Connect

The partitioning experiment is commonly performed with little or no attention to reducing measurement variance. Batch test procedures such as those used to measure K{sub d} values (e.g., ASTM D 4646 and EPA402 -R-99-004A) do not explain how to evaluate measurement uncertainty nor how to minimize measurement variance. In fact, ASTM D 4646 prescribes a sorbent:water ratio that prevents variance minimization. Consequently, the variance of a set of partitioning measurements can be extreme and even absurd. Such data sets, which are commonplace, hamper probabilistic modeling efforts. An error-savvy design requires adjustment of the solution:sorbent ratio so that approximately half of the sorbate partitions to the sorbent. Results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that this simple step can markedly improve the precision and statistical characterization of partitioning uncertainty.

Mariner, Paul E.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

77

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run a Program Run a Program Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Workforce Development Run a Program Energy efficiency upgrade programs provide communities with many benefits. In addition to helping homeowners, businesses, and institutions save money

78

Oil shale project: large retort run summary, run L-3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the retort run L-3, a high yield (83 to 84% of FA) was achieved using a broad particle size distribution (-30.5 cm, + 0.001 cm) with 15 to 20% of the shale larger than 15 cm. The nonuniform flow in the retort was closely predicted by the changing shape of the steam front. Steam front measurements after the run indicated that the flow distribution through the bed was little affected by the retorting and combustion processes. The technique of ignition by hot-gas-preheating worked satisfactorily; no oxygen was observed in the exit gas during the entire retort operation. The temperature of the retort front was controlled by the air flux; no runaway temperatures were encountered when making the step grade change from 18 to 36 gal/ton. The hydrogen concentration in the exit gas reached approximately 18% in the rich (36 gal/ton) shale at the bottom of the bed; this is the highest concentration seen in any of the retorting experiments. A factor-of-three change in the CO/CO/sub 2/ ratio was observed as the combustion front moved from the 18 gal/ton to 36 gal/ton shale; also, about a factor-of-two change occurred in the rate of production of CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/ and CO.

Ackerman, F.J.; Sandholtz, W.A.; Raley, J.H.; Carley, J.F.; Tripp, L.J.; Rothman, A.J.; Campbell, J.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Nuclear Analytical Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nuclear Analytical Methods. Research activities in the Nuclear Analytical Methods Group are focused on the science that ...

80

Explicit control a batch-aware distributed file system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the design, implementation, and evaluation of the Batch-Aware Distributed File System (BAD-FS), a system designed to orchestrate large, I/O-intensive batch workloads on remote computing clusters distributed across the wide area. BAD-FS consists ...

John Bent; Douglas Thain; Andrea C. Arpaci-Dusseau; Remzi H. Arpaci-Dusseau; Miron Livny

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Heuristic batching policies for video-on-demand services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A video-on-demand (VOD) service imposes extremely severe resource requirement in terms of bandwidth and storage. Batching policies that use a single channel to serve multiple active clients for the same video program can reduce system resource requirement ... Keywords: Batching policy, Channel allocation, Instantaneous MFQL, Maximum factored queue length, Rate-based, Regular-interval, Statistical MFQL

J.-K Chen; J. -L. C Wu

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Simulated Annealing For The Optimization Of Chemical Batch Production Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Batch distillation processes are widely used in chemical industry. In this work, we consider the optimization of such processes by simulated annealing. Although this method is stochastically in nature, it has two evitable advantages: it can be readily connected to highly sophisticated simulation codes and it converges towards a global optimum. According to the characteristics of batch distillation operation we propose to use a two-step computation approach. A feasible strategy (admissible control) will be searched for in the first step and it will be optimized in the second step. The approach has been applied to three models of batch distillation ranging from a simple test example to a real production system. These results show the potential of the method for developing optimal operation strategies for batch chemical processes. Keywords: batch distillation, simulated annealing, dynamic optimization. 1 Introduction The determination of optimal control strategies for chemical processe...

Michael Hanke; Pu Li

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

STATISTICAL EVALUATION OF SMALL SCALE MIXING DEMONSTRATION SAMPLING AND BATCH TRANSFER PERFORMANCE - 12093  

SciTech Connect

The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. DOE's Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has previously presented the results of mixing performance in two different sizes of small scale DSTs to support scale up estimates of full scale DST mixing performance. Currently, sufficient sampling of DSTs is one of the largest programmatic risks that could prevent timely delivery of high level waste to the WTP. WRPS has performed small scale mixing and sampling demonstrations to study the ability to sufficiently sample the tanks. The statistical evaluation of the demonstration results which lead to the conclusion that the two scales of small DST are behaving similarly and that full scale performance is predictable will be presented. This work is essential to reduce the risk of requiring a new dedicated feed sampling facility and will guide future optimization work to ensure the waste feed delivery mission will be accomplished successfully. This paper will focus on the analytical data collected from mixing, sampling, and batch transfer testing from the small scale mixing demonstration tanks and how those data are being interpreted to begin to understand the relationship between samples taken prior to transfer and samples from the subsequent batches transferred. An overview of the types of data collected and examples of typical raw data will be provided. The paper will then discuss the processing and manipulation of the data which is necessary to begin evaluating sampling and batch transfer performance. This discussion will also include the evaluation of the analytical measurement capability with regard to the simulant material used in the demonstration tests. The paper will conclude with a discussion of the analysis results illustrating the relationship between the pre-transfer samples and the batch transfers, which support the recommendation regarding the need for a dedicated feed sampling facility.

GREER DA; THIEN MG

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

84

EFFECT OF GLASS-BATCH MAKEUP ON THE MELTING PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5 {micro}m in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures <800 C, contributing to the formation of viscous glass forming melt that trapped evolving batch gases. Primary foam did not occur in batches with larger quartz grains, {+-}75 {micro}m in size, because their major portion dissolved at temperatures >800 C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160 C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, Li{sub 2}O, MgO, and Na{sub 2}O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.

KRUGER AA; HRMA P

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

SLUDGE BATCH 6/TANK 40 SIMULANT CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL SIMULATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Phase III simulant flowsheet testing was completed using the latest composition estimates for SB6/Tank 40 feed to DWPF. The goals of the testing were to determine reasonable operating conditions and assumptions for the startup of SB6 processing in the DWPF. Testing covered the region from 102-159% of the current DWPF stoichiometric acid equation. Nitrite ion concentration was reduced to 90 mg/kg in the SRAT product of the lowest acid run. The 159% acid run reached 60% of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) limit of 0.65 lb H2/hr, and then sporadically exceeded the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) limit of 0.223 lb H2/hr. Hydrogen generation rates peaked at 112% of the SME limit, but higher than targeted wt% total solids levels may have been partially responsible for rates seen. A stoichiometric factor of 120% met both objectives. A processing window for SB6 exists from 102% to something close to 159% based on the simulant results. An initial recommendation for SB6 processing is at 115-120% of the current DWPF stoichiometric acid equation. The addition of simulated Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) streams to the SRAT cycle had no apparent impact on the preferred stoichiometric factor. Hydrogen generation occurred continuously after acid addition in three of the four tests. The three runs at 120%, 118.4% with ARP/MCU, and 159% stoichiometry were all still producing around 0.1 lb hydrogen/hr at DWPF scale after 36 hours of boiling in the SRAT. The 120% acid run reached 23% of the SRAT limit and 37% of the SME limit. Conversely, nitrous oxide generation was subdued compared to previous sludge batches, staying below 29 lb/hr in all four tests or about a fourth as much as in comparable SB4 testing. Two processing issues, identified during SB6 Phase II flowsheet testing and qualification simulant testing, were monitored during Phase III. Mercury material balance closure was impacted by acid stoichiometry, and significant mercury was not accounted for in the highest acid run. Coalescence of elemental mercury droplets in the mercury water wash tank (MWWT) appeared to degrade with increasing stoichiometry. Observations were made of mercury scale formation in the SRAT condenser and MWWT. A tacky mercury amalgam with Rh, Pd, and Cu, plus some Ru and Ca formed on the impeller at 159% acid. It contained a significant fraction of the available Pd, Cu, and Rh as well as about 25% of the total mercury charged. Free (elemental) mercury was found in all of the SME products. Ammonia scrubbers were used during the tests to capture off-gas ammonia for material balance purposes. Significant ammonium ion formation was again observed during the SRAT cycle, and ammonia gas entered the off-gas as the pH rose during boiling. Ammonium ion production was lower than in the SB6 Phase II and the qualification simulant testing. Similar ammonium ion formation was seen in the ARP/MCU simulation as in the 120% flowsheet run. A slightly higher pH caused most of the ammonium to vaporize and collect in the ammonia scrubber reflux solution. Two periods of foaminess were noted. Neither required additional antifoam to control the foam growth. A steady foam layer formed during reflux in the 120% acid run. It was about an inch thick, but was 2-3 times more volume of bubbles than is typically seen during reflux. A similar foam layer also was seen during caustic boiling of the simulant during the ARP addition. While frequently seen with the radioactive sludge, foaminess during caustic boiling with simulants has been relatively rare. Two further flowsheet tests were performed and will be documented separately. One test was to evaluate the impact of process conditions that match current DWPF operation (lower rates). The second test was to evaluate the impact of SRAT/SME processing on the rheology of a modified Phase III simulant that had been made five times more viscous using ultrasonication.

Koopman, David

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

86

Running Interactive Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Edison's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the debug queue. edison% qsub -I -V -q debug -l mppwidth=48 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V flag passes your current environment variable settings to the compute environment. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The number of nodes given to your job (remember, the system allocates nodes, not cores), is the value of mppwidth divided by the number of cores per node. On Edison, with 24 cores per node, the number of nodes is mppwidth/24 plus one

87

Running Interactive Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Hopper's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the interactive queue. hopper% qsub -I -V -q interactive -l mppwidth=48 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V flag passes your current environment variable settings to the compute environment. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The number of nodes given to your job (remember, the system allocates nodes, not cores), is the value of mppwidth divided by the umber of cores per node. On Hopper, with 24 cores per node, the number of nodes is mppwidth/24 plus one more if

88

Running Interactive Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Edison's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the debug queue. edison% qsub -I -V -q debug -l mppwidth=32 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V flag passes your current environment variable settings to the compute environment. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The number of nodes given to your job (remember, the system allocates nodes, not cores), is the value of mppwidth divided by the number of cores per node. On Edison, with 16 cores per node, the number of nodes is mppwidth/16 plus one

89

Tabu search heuristic for two-machine flowshop with batch processing machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batch processing machines are frequently encountered in many industrial environments. A batch processing machine is one which can process several jobs simultaneously as a batch. The processing time of a batch is equal to the largest processing time of ... Keywords: Batch processing machines, Flowshop, MILP model, Tabu search

Li-Man Liao; Ching-Jen Huang

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

TANK 40 FINAL SLUDGE BATCH 8 CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

A sample of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) was pulled from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB8 WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition, including noble metals, and fissile constituents, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as SB8. At SRNL, the 3-L Tank 40 SB8 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 553 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent slurry sample preparations. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon? vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass ? 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma ? atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma ? mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB8 supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH-/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH-/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method developed by SRNL AD and previously described.

Bannochie, C.

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

91

Caloric expenditure and substrate utilization in underwater treadmill running versus land-based treadmill running.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this study is to compare the caloric expenditure and oxidative sources of underwater treadmill running and land-based treadmill running at maximal and (more)

Schaal, Courtney

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

FRIT DEVELOPMENT FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated a large number of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) composition projections to support frit optimization for SB6 vitrification at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The evaluations discussed in this report occurred over a period of about 4 months, and included about 40 composition projections, developed by both Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and SRNL. Paper study assessments were used to evaluate the sludge composition projections with arrays of potential frit compositions using the predictive models in the DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). Both nominal sludge compositions and sludge compositions with anticipated compositional variation were considered. The model predictions were used to identify candidate frit compositions for each SB6 projection and to provide some guidance to SRR on washing and blending strategies for SB6 preparation. This report presents a chronological review of this process and summarizes the findings at each stage. Following initial feedback from this work, the number of washes in Tank 51 was reduced to increase the projected sodium concentration in SB6. Analyses of predicted frit performance before and after a potential decant of Tank 40 showed that the post-decant SB6 composition would be difficult to process with any frit composition and that this scenario should be avoided. Based on the most recent SB6 projections (February 2010 SB6 composition projections developed at SRNL using the measured SB6 qualification sample composition and the revised Tank Farm washing plan), Frit 418 appears to be viable for SB6 processing at a target waste loading of 36%. A Nominal Stage PCCS Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) assessment gave projected operating windows of 25-41% waste loading, limited by predictions of nepheline crystallization. The projected operating window is reduced to 25-38% waste loading when anticipated compositional variation is considered, again limited by predictions of nepheline crystallization. Blend points between 62 and 40 inches of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) heel in Tank 40 had no practical impact on the projected performance of Frit 418. This assessment is made from a paper study approach only and assumes that no decant of Tank 40 will occur during SB6 processing. A decant of Tank 40 would reduce the Na2O concentration in Tank 40 to a point where it would be very difficult to target a waste loading of 36% for SB6 with Frit 418. The performance of Frit 418 with SB6 is limited by predictions of nepheline crystallization, which is a durability limiting constraint. Alternatives to Frit 418 are available that can provide equivalent projected operating windows and are limited by process related constraints (i.e., liquidus temperature predictions) rather than durability limiting constraints. A separate memorandum has recently been issued that discusses the use of Frit 418 for SB6 vitrification.1 potential differences in melt rate among these alternative frits will be discussed in a forthcoming technical report.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Zamecnik, J.

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

93

Analytical Division Student Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Awarded to graduate student(s) in the field of lipid analytical chemistry. Analytical Division Student Award Divisions achievement agricultural analytical application award awards biotechnology detergents distinguished division Divisions edible fa

94

Your Unanswered Questions.... Answered - Batch 2 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Your Unanswered Questions.... Answered - Batch 2 Your Unanswered Questions.... Answered - Batch 2 Your Unanswered Questions.... Answered - Batch 2 February 28, 2011 - 2:46pm Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs Last month, Secretary Chu hosted an online town hall to discuss President Obama's clean energy innovation agenda -- and while he was able to answer about 10 questions submitted online during the event, we received more than 200! For the next fews days, we're answering some of the ones Secretary Chu wasn't able to get to that day. Below is our second batch of questions and answers. From John Fahey over Facebook: How can we create a predictable investment environment for the renewable sector? President Obama's proposal to generate 80 percent of electricity from

95

Effect of Batch Initial Velocity on the Glass Furnace Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a direct coloration between the batch distribution techniques and the furnace ... A Review: Solar Thermal Reactors for Materials Production ... Cellulose Acetate Membranes for CO2 Separation from Water-gas-shift Reaction Products.

96

Structural analysis of magnetic fusion energy systems in a combined interactive/batch computer environment  

SciTech Connect

A system of computer programs has been developed to aid in the preparation of input data for and the evaluation of output data from finite element structural analyses of magnetic fusion energy devices. The system utilizes the NASTRAN structural analysis computer program and a special set of interactive pre- and post-processor computer programs, and has been designed for use in an environment wherein a time-share computer system is linked to a batch computer system. In such an environment, the analyst must only enter, review and/or manipulate data through interactive terminals linked to the time-share computer system. The primary pre-processor programs include NASDAT, NASERR and TORMAC. NASDAT and TORMAC are used to generate NASTRAN input data. NASERR performs routine error checks on this data. The NASTRAN program is run on a batch computer system using data generated by NASDAT and TORMAC. The primary post-processing programs include NASCMP and NASPOP. NASCMP is used to compress the data initially stored on magnetic tape by NASTRAN so as to facilitate interactive use of the data. NASPOP reads the data stored by NASCMP and reproduces NASTRAN output for selected grid points, elements and/or data types.

Johnson, N.E.; Singhal, M.K.; Walls, J.C.; Gray, W.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small number of the D-optimally selected 'outer layer' extreme vertices (EV) glasses were not predictable using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, but were acceptable compared to the EA glass when tested. These glasses fell outside of the lower 95% confidence band, which demonstrates conservatism in the model. A few of the glasses fell outside of the upper 95% confidence band; however, these particular glasses have normalized release values that were much lower than the values of EA and should be of no practical concern. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable to the SB7b sludge system with a range of Na{sub 2}O concentrations blended with Frits 418 or 702. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable by the current DWPF PCCS models and/or acceptable with respect to the EA benchmark glass regardless of thermal history or compositional view.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

98

SLUDGE BATCH VARIABILITY STUDY WITH FRIT 418  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) initiated processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) in the summer of 2010. In support of processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 418 to process SB6. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB6 available at the time from the Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) and SRNL (using a model-based approach). To support qualification of SB6, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB6. The durability models were assessed over the expected Frit 418-SB6 composition range. Seventeen glasses were selected for the variability study based on the sludge projections used in the frit recommendation. Five of the glasses are based on the centroid of the compositional region, spanning a waste loading (WL) range of 32 to 40%. The remaining twelve glasses are extreme vertices (EVs) of the sludge region of interest for SB6 combined with Frit 418 and are all at 36% WL. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). After initiating the SB6 variability study, the measured composition of the SB6 Tank 51 qualification glass produced at the SRNL Shielded Cells Facility indicated that thorium was present in the glass at an appreciable concentration (1.03 wt%), which made it a reportable element for SB6. This concentration of ThO{sub 2} resulted in a second phase of experimental studies. Five glasses were formulated that were based on the centroid of the new sludge compositional region combined with Frit 418, spanning a WL range of 32 to 40%. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis and the PCT. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses (with and without thorium) were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) reference glass regardless of thermal history. All of the normalized boron releases were less than 1 g/L. While all of the targeted glass compositions were predictable with respect to the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, a small number of the measured glass compositions were located outside of the lower prediction limit indicating poorer durability than what was actually measured. These unpredictable glasses were in the same lithium metaborate (LM) preparation block during the chemical analyses, which resulted in measured compositions that were not representative of the target compositions. A review of the data did not indicate a clear cause for the problem. Re-digestion and re-measurement of three glasses from this preparation block yielded glass compositions closer to the target values and predicted PCT responses within the PCCS model uncertainty. Therefore, it is believed that the glasses were correctly fabricated and the targeted compositions are closer representations of the true compositions. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable for the SB6/Frit 418 glass system. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable and/or acceptable with respect to the DWPF PCCS models. In addition, the inclusion of ThO{sub 2} was shown to have minimal impact on the acceptability and predictability of the variability study glasses.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

99

Comparing Computer Run Time of Building Simulation Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an approach to comparing computer run time of buildingthe purpose of comparing computer run time. Modelers shouldATIONAL L ABORATORY Comparing Computer Run Time of Building

Hong, Tianzhen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

SNS Run Schedule for FY 2012 | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Facilities SNS SNS Operating Status FY 2012 Run Schedule SNS Run Schedule for FY 2012 (Oct. 2011-Sep. 2012) Printable version Excel version SNS Run Schedule...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Scheduling a hybrid flowshop with batch production at the last stage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we address the problem of scheduling n jobs in an s-stage hybrid flowshop with batch production at the last stage with the objective of minimizing a given criterion with respect to the completion time. The batch production at stage s is ... Keywords: Batch decoupling, Batch production, Hybrid flowshop scheduling, Improved dynamic programming, Lagrangian relaxation

Hua Xuan; Lixin Tang

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Evaluation of neural networks-based controllers in batch polymerisation of methyl methacrylate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of batch reactors in today's process industries cannot be overstated. Thus said, it is important to optimise their operation in order to consistently achieve products of high quality while minimising the production of undesirables. In ... Keywords: Batch polymerisation, Batch reactor control, Batch reactor optimisation

E. E. Ekpo; I. M. Mujtaba

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis  

SciTech Connect

EnergyPlus is a new generation building performance simulation program offering many new modeling capabilities and more accurate performance calculations integrating building components in sub-hourly time steps. However, EnergyPlus runs much slower than the current generation simulation programs. This has become a major barrier to its widespread adoption by the industry. This paper analyzed EnergyPlus run time from comprehensive perspectives to identify key issues and challenges of speeding up EnergyPlus: studying the historical trends of EnergyPlus run time based on the advancement of computers and code improvements to EnergyPlus, comparing EnergyPlus with DOE-2 to understand and quantify the run time differences, identifying key simulation settings and model features that have significant impacts on run time, and performing code profiling to identify which EnergyPlus subroutines consume the most amount of run time. This paper provides recommendations to improve EnergyPlus run time from the modeler?s perspective and adequate computing platforms. Suggestions of software code and architecture changes to improve EnergyPlus run time based on the code profiling results are also discussed.

Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

104

SLUDGE BATCH 7B QUALIFICATION ACTIVITIES WITH SRS TANK FARM SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry - Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) - be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). With the tight schedule constraints for SB7b and the potential need for caustic addition to allow for an acceptable glass processing window, the qualification for SB7b was approached differently than past batches. For SB7b, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 and a Tank 40 sample for qualification. SRNL did not receive the qualification sample from Tank 51 nor did it simulate all of the Tank Farm washing and decanting operations. Instead, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 SB7b sample from samples of Tank 7 and Tank 51, along with a wash solution to adjust the supernatant composition to the final SB7b Tank 51 Tank Farm projections. SRNL then prepared a sample to represent SB7b in Tank 40 by combining portions of the SRNL-prepared Tank 51 SB7b sample and a Tank 40 Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) sample. The blended sample was 71% Tank 40 (SB7a) and 29% Tank 7/Tank 51 on an insoluble solids basis. This sample is referred to as the SB7b Qualification Sample. The blend represented the highest projected Tank 40 heel (as of May 25, 2011), and thus, the highest projected noble metals content for SB7b. Characterization was performed on the Tank 51 SB7b samples and SRNL performed DWPF simulations using the Tank 40 SB7b material. This report documents: (1) The preparation and characterization of the Tank 51 SB7b and Tank 40 SB7b samples. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the SB7b Tank 40 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a nonradioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the SRAT receipt, SRAT product, and SME product. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7b related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7b processing.

Pareizs, J.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.; Reboul, S.

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

105

Running against hunger | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Running against hunger | National Nuclear Security Administration Running against hunger | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Running against hunger Running against hunger Posted By Office of Public Affairs Pantex Security Police Officers Byron Logan and Randy Stokes completed their annual Run Against Hunger last week. The two officers ran and biked

106

Mound Laboratory: Analytical Capability  

SciTech Connect

The Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Laboratory Analytical Capability report is intended to fulfill a customer need for basic information concerning Mound Laboratory's analytical instrumentation and techniques.

Hendrickson, E. L.

1955-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Analytical Microscopy Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... research on autoradiography and nuclear track methods ... and standards that address critical challenges in ... Public Safety and Security in Analytical ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Fuzzy logic control of batch-feeding refuse incineration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The municipal solid waste (MSW) or refuse incineration plant is designated to reduce the volume of the refuse and recover energy from it. The steam generated from a boiler heated by burning refuse is sent to a turbine to generate the electricity. Batch-feeding ... Keywords: Singapore, Ulu Pandan refuse incineration plant, batch-feeding refuse incineration, boiler, boilers, combustion, complete combustion, electricity generation, energy recovery, flow control, fuzzy control, fuzzy logic control, grate rotating rates, incomplete combustion, municipal solid waste plant, rule-base fuzzy logic control algorithms, steam flow rate, steam power stations, uncertain fluctuation, waste disposal, waste-to-energy power plants

Desong Chen

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Running Jobs | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservations Cobalt Job Control How to Queue a Job Running Jobs FAQs Queuing and Running on BG/Q Systems Data Transfer Debugging & Profiling Performance Tools & APIs Software & Libraries IBM References Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Running Jobs Contents Job Submission Submitting a Script Job Sub-block Script Jobs Multiple Consecutive Runs within a Script Job Settings Environment Variables Script Environment Program and Argument Length Limit Job Dependencies Thread Stack Size Verbose Setting for Runjob How do I get each line of the output labeled with the MPI rank that it came from? Mapping of MPI Tasks to Cores

110

Run manager module for CORAL laboratory management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a new module, the Run Manager (RM), for Stanford Nanofabrication Facility's Common Object Representation for Advanced Laboratories (CORAL). CORAL is the lab manager with which MIT's Microsystems ...

Klann, Jeffrey G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

OPTIMIZATION OF RUNNING STRATEGIES BASED ON ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determine his speed in order to run a given distance in the shortest time. ... based on the equation of motion and aerobic energy, to include a balance of ..... associated cost converges to the one associated with ? . The conclusion follows.

112

RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8  

SciTech Connect

During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

113

On the running of the gravitational constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that there is no useful and universal definition of a running gravitational constant, G(E), in the perturbative regime below the Planck scale. By consideration of the loop corrections to several physical processes, we show that the quantum corrections vary greatly, in both magnitude and sign, and do not exhibit the required properties of a running coupling constant. We comment on the potential challenges of these results for the Asymptotic Safety program.

Mohamed M. Anber; John F. Donoghue

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

114

On the running of the gravitational constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that there is no useful and universal definition of a running gravitational constant, G(E), in the perturbative regime below the Planck scale. By consideration of the loop corrections to several physical processes, we show that the quantum corrections vary greatly, in both magnitude and sign, and do not exhibit the required properties of a running coupling constant. We comment on the potential challenges of these results for the Asymptotic Safety program.

Anber, Mohamed M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

An Evaluation of Some Recent Batches of IAPSO Standard Seawater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine changes in the salinity of the International Association for the Physical Sciences of the Ocean standard seawater (SSW) as used in seven cruises between 1991 and 1997. Ten batches of SSW were used during this timeseveral more ...

Sheldon Bacon; Helen M. Snaith; Margaret J. Yelland

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE BATCH 4 VARIABILITY STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing for vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) in early FY2007. To support this process, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 503 for vitrifying this sludge batch, based on the composition projection provided by the Liquid Waste Organization on June 22, 2006. Frit 418 was also recommended for possible use during the transition from SB3 to SB4. A critical step in the SB4 qualification process is to demonstrate the applicability of the durability models, which are used as part of the DWPF's process control strategy, to the glass system of interest via a variability study. A variability study is an experimentally-driven assessment of the predictability and acceptability of the quality of the vitrified waste product that is anticipated from the processing of a sludge batch. At the DWPF, the durability of the vitrified waste product is not directly measured. Instead, the durability is predicted using a set of models that relate the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response of a glass to the chemical composition of that glass. In addition, a glass sample is taken during the processing of that sludge batch, the sample is transmitted to SRNL, and the durability is measured to confirm acceptance. The objective of a variability study is to demonstrate that these models are applicable to the glass composition region anticipated during the processing of the sludge batch - in this case the Frit 503 - SB4 compositional region. The success of this demonstration allows the DWPF to confidently rely on the predictions of the durability/composition models as they are used in the control of the DWPF process.

Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

117

Compare 100 GeV/n Au Run 2010 with Run 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the very successful commissioning of the vertical stochastic cooling in 100 GeV/n Au Run 2010, the IBS (intra-beam scattering) is no longer the dominant factor in terms of the integrated luminosity. A new luminosity model is needed, where the beam intensity lifetime is more important and the burn-off needs to be accounted for. Toward this goal, a brief review of the Run 2010, compared with Run 2007, is presented.

Zhang, S.Y.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Analytical Chemistry Databases and Links  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical chemistry websites, humor, Material Safety Data Sheets,Patent Information, and references. Analytical Chemistry Databases and Links Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDiffer

119

SunRun Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SunRun Inc SunRun Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name SunRun Inc Address 717 Market Street Place San Francisco, California Zip 94103 Sector Solar Product Solar installer Website http://www.sunrunhome.com/ Coordinates 37.7871306°, -122.4041075° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.7871306,"lon":-122.4041075,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

120

Rapid Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batch Characterization Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products Peter A. Hesbach 1 *, Alexander S. P. Abel 2 Ann G. Kim 3 , and Steven C. Lamey 4 1 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 USA; 2 NETL Site Support Contractor, Parsons, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26505 USA; 3 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Post-Doctoral Fellow, 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 USA; 4 retired, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV USA (* author for correspondence, phone: 304-285-4443, fax: 304-285-4487, e-mail: peter.hesbach@netl.doe.gov) KEYWORDS: leaching methods, ash characterization, coal utilization by-products

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Extreme Scale Visual Analytics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme-scale visual analytics (VA) is about applying VA to extreme-scale data. The articles in this special issue examine advances related to extreme-scale VA problems, their analytical and computational challenges, and their real-world applications.

Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Pascucci, Valerio

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

122

SLUDGE BATCH 4 SIMULANT FLOWSHEET STUDIES: PHASE II RESULTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) processing to Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) processing in early fiscal year 2007. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB4 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) process. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. Initial SB4 flowsheet studies were conducted to guide decisions during the sludge batch preparation process. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB4 composition at the time of the study. The composition has changed slightly since these studies were completed due to changes in the sludges blended to prepare SB4 and the estimated SB3 heel mass. The following TTR requirements were addressed in this testing: (1) Hydrogen and nitrous oxide generation rates as a function of acid stoichiometry; (2) Acid quantities and processing times required for mercury removal; (3) Acid quantities and processing times required for nitrite destruction; and (4) Impact of SB4 composition (in particular, oxalate, manganese, nickel, mercury, and aluminum) on DWPF processing (i.e. acid addition strategy, foaming, hydrogen generation, REDOX control, rheology, etc.).

Stone, M; David Best, D

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

123

Dynamic scheduling II: look-ahead strategies for controlling batch operations in industry an overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batching jobs in a manufacturing system is a very common policy in most industries. Main reasons for batching are avoidance of set ups and/or facilitation of material handling. Examples of batch-wise production systems are ovens found in aircraft industry ...

Durk-Jouke van der Zee

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

How to Run DomainParser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run DomainParser Run DomainParser The structure for partition needs to be prepared in the PDB format. In most cases, running DomainParser using defaults should give satisfactory partitions. However, several options offered in DomainParser can provide a partition that a user desires or correct some overcut/undercut partitions. Here, we use a PDB file 1atna.pdb as an example to show how to use the DomainParser program. Run DomainParser using defaults: domainparser 1atna.pdb The output shows the partition for each domain in terms of ranges of residue numbers: 4 domains have been found for 1atna: Domain 1 : 34-96. Domain 2 : 181-272. Domain 3 : 148-180; 273-336. Domain 4 : 0-33; 97-147; 337-372. The program also generates a new file 1atna_dom.pdb, with the "temperature factor" column (column 61-66 of an "ATOM" entry) showing domain numbers. A

125

BEAM SCRUBBING FOR RHIC POLARIZED PROTON RUN.  

SciTech Connect

One of the intensity limiting factor of RHIC polarized proton beam is the electron cloud induced pressure rise. A beam scrubbing study shows that with a reasonable period of time of running high intensity 112-bunch proton beam, the pressure rise can be reduced, allowing higher beam intensity.

ZHANG,S.Y.FISCHER,W.HUANG,H.ROSER,T.

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

126

B PHYSICS AT THE TEVATRON RUN II.  

SciTech Connect

We present the B physics results from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron Run II at Fermilab and their future prospect. This includes various B mass and lifetime measurements, B mixing, the confirmation of the discovery of the X particle, rare decays, CP violation, and spectroscopy.

YIP,K.

2004-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

127

The D0 run II trigger system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron was upgraded for Run II. This upgrade included improvements to the trigger system in order to be able to handle the increased Tevatron luminosity and higher bunch crossing rates compared to Run I. The D0 Run II trigger is a highly exible system to select events to be written to tape from an initial interaction rate of about 2.5 MHz. This is done in a three-tier pipelined, buffered system. The first tier (level 1) processes fast detector pick-off signals in a hardware/firmware based system to reduce the event rate to about 1. 5kHz. The second tier (level 2) uses information from level 1 and forms simple Physics objects to reduce the rate to about 850 Hz. The third tier (level 3) uses full detector readout and event reconstruction on a filter farm to reduce the rate to 20-30 Hz. The D0 trigger menu contains a wide variety of triggers. While the emphasis is on triggering on generic lepton and jet final states, there are also trigger terms for specific final state signatures. In this document we describe the D0 trigger system as it was implemented and is currently operating in Run II.

Schwienhorst, Reinhard; /Michigan State U.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A luminosity model of RHIC gold runs  

SciTech Connect

In this note, we present a luminosity model for RHIC gold runs. The model is applied to the physics fills in 2007 run without cooling, and with the longitudinal cooling applied to one beam only. Having good comparison, the model is used to project a fill with the longitudinal cooling applied to both beams. Further development and possible applications of the model are discussed. To maximize the integrated luminosity, usually the higher beam intensity, smaller longitudinal and transverse emittance, and smaller {beta} are the directions to work on. In past 10 years, the RHIC gold runs have demonstrated a path toward this goal. Most recently, a successful commissioning of the bunched beam stochastic cooling, both longitudinal and transverse, has offered a chance of further RHIC luminosity improvement. With so many factors involved, a luminosity model would be useful to identify and project gains in the machine development. In this article, a preliminary model is proposed. In Section 2, several secondary factors, which are not yet included in the model, are identified based on the RHIC operation condition and experience in current runs. In Section 3, the RHIC beam store parameters used in the model are listed, and validated. In Section 4, the factors included in the model are discussed, and the luminosity model is presented. In Section 5, typical RHIC gold fills without cooling, and with partial cooling are used for comparison with the model. Then a projection of fills with more coolings is shown. In Section 6, further development of the model is discussed.

Zhang, S.Y.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The MADlib analytics library: or MAD skills, the SQL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MADlib is a free, open-source library of in-database analytic methods. It provides an evolving suite of SQL-based algorithms for machine learning, data mining and statistics that run at scale within a database engine, with no need for data import/export ...

Joseph M. Hellerstein; Christoper R; Florian Schoppmann; Daisy Zhe Wang; Eugene Fratkin; Aleksander Gorajek; Kee Siong Ng; Caleb Welton; Xixuan Feng; Kun Li; Arun Kumar

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Modelling and optimisation of batch distillation involving esterification and hydrolysis reaction systems. Modelling and optimisation of conventional and unconventional batch distillation process: Application to esterification of methanol and ethanol using acetic acid and hydrolysis of methyl lactate system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Batch distillation with chemical reaction when takes place in the same unit is referred to as batch reactive distillation process. The combination reduces the capital (more)

Edreder, Elmahboub A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Batch Preheat for glass and related furnace processing operations  

SciTech Connect

The objectives that our development work addressed are: (1) Establish through lab tests a salt eutectic with a melting point of about 250 F and a working range of 250 to 1800 F. (2) Establish the most economical material of construction for the screened salt eutectics identified in the first objective. (3) Establish the material of construction for the salt heater liner. Objectives 2 and 3 were determined through corrosion tests using selected metallurgical samples. Successful completion of the above-stated goals will be incorporated in a heat recovery design that can be used in high temperature processes and furnaces, typical of which is the glass melting process. The process design incorporates the following unit operations: a vertical batch heater (whereby the batch flows down through tubes in a shell and tube exchanger; a molten salt eutectic is circulated on the shell side); a molten salt heater utilizing furnace flue gas in a radiation type heater (molten salt is circulated in the annular space between the inner and outer shells of the vertical heater, and flue gas passes from the furnace exhaust through the inner shell of the heater); a cantilever type molten salt circulating pump; and a jacketed mixer/conveyor to drive off moisture from the batch prior to feeding the batch to the vertical batch heater. Historically, radiation heaters, when applied to glass or fiberglass furnace recuperation, have experienced failures due to uneven heat flux rates, which increases internal stresses and spot overheating conditions. Low heat transfer coefficients result in requirements for large heat transfer surface areas in gas to gas or gas to air exchangers. Fouling is another factor that results in lower unit availability and reduced performance. These factors are accommodated in this process by the incorporation of several design features. The salt heater will be a vertical double wall radiation design, similar to radiation air heaters used in high temperature heat recovery. The unit utilizes an inner shell that the furnace exhaust gas passes through: this provides essentially a self-cleaning surface. Utilization of radiation air heaters in fiberglass furnaces has demonstrated that the inner shell provides a surface from which molten ash can drain down. The molten salt eutectic will be pumped through the annulus between this inner wall and the outer wall of the unit. The annular space tempering via the molten salt will promote more uniform expansion for the unit, and thereby promote more uniform heat flux rates. Heat transfer would be via radiation mainly, with a minor convective contributor.

Energy & Environmental Resources, Inc

2002-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

132

ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7) POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), also referred to as Macrobatch 7 (MB7), in June 2010. SB6 is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), H-Canyon Np transfers and SB6 that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51.1 SB6 was processed using Frit 418. Sludge is received into the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) and is processed through the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Tank (SME). The treated sludge slurry is then transferred to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) and fed to the melter. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP) and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. The DWPF requested various analyses of radioactive glass samples obtained from the melter pour stream during processing of SB6 as well as reduction/oxidation (REDOX) analysis of MFT samples to determine the impact of Argon bubbling. Sample analysis followed the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) and an Analytical Study Plan (ASP). Four Pour Stream (PS) glass samples and two MFT slurry samples were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from the DWPF. Table 1-1 lists the sample information for each pour stream glass sample. SB6 PS3 (S03472) was selected as the official pour stream sample for SB6 and full analysis was requested. This report details the visual observations of the as-received SB6 PS No.3 glass sample as well as results for the chemical composition, Product Consistency Test (PCT), radionuclide content, noble metals, and glass density. REDOX results will be provided for all four pour stream samples and vitrified samples of MFT-558 and MFT-568A. Where appropriate, data from other pour stream samples will be provided.

Johnson, F.

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

133

ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8) POUR STREAM SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The sum of oxides for the official SB7a pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%). (2) The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7a is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7a pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7a Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample. (3) As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the official SB7a pour stream sample. (4) The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7a pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.64 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. (5) The measured density of the SB7a pour stream glass was 2.7 g/cm{sup 3}. (6) The Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios of the SB7a pour stream samples were in the range of 0.04-0.13, while the MFT sample glasses prepared by SRNL were in the range of 0.02-0.04.

Johnson, F.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Investigation of Sludge Batch 3 (Macrobatch 4) Glass Sample Anomalous Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass samples from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) (Macrobatch 4) were received by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) on February 23, 2005. One sample, S02244, was designated for the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and elemental and radionuclide analyses. The second sample, S02247, was designated for archival storage. The samples were pulled from the melter pour stream during the feeding of Melter Feed Tank (MFT) Batch 308 and therefore roughly correspond to feed from Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Batches 306-308. During the course of preparing sample S02244 for PCT and other analyses two observations were made which were characterized as ''unusual'' or anomalous behavior relative to historical observations of glasses prepared for the PCT. These observations ultimately led to a series of scoping tests in order to determine more about the nature of the behavior and possible mechanisms. The first observation was the behavior of the ground glass fraction (-100 +200 mesh) for PCT analysis when contacted with deionized water during the washing phase of the PCT procedure. The behavior was analogous to that of an organic compound in the presence of water: clumping, floating on the water surface, and crawling up the beaker walls. In other words, the glass sample did not ''wet'' normally, displaying a hydrophobic behavior in water. This had never been seen before in 18 years SRNL PCT tests on either radioactive or non-radioactive glasses. Typical glass behavior is largely to settle to the bottom of the water filled beaker, though there may be suspended fines which result in some cloudiness to the wash water. The typical appearance is analogous to wetting sand. The second observation was the presence of faint black rings at the initial and final solution levels in the Teflon vessels used for the mixed acid digestion of S02244 glass conducted for compositional analysis. The digestion is composed of two stages, and at both the intermediate and the final content levels in the digestion vessel the rings were present. The rings had not been seen previously during glass digestions and were not present in the Analytical Reference Glass (ARG) standard samples digested, in separate vessels, along with the DWPF glass. What follows in this report are the results and analyses from various scoping experiments done in order to explain the anomalous behavior observed with DWPF glass S02244, along with a comparison with tests on sample S02247 where the anomalous wetting behavior was not observed.

Bannochie, C. J.; Bibler, N. E.; Peeler, D. K.

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program April 19, 2012 -...

136

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog Blog Archive Run, Dishwasher...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run, Dishwasher, Run Saturday, September 24, 2011 By Alexis Powers The typical college student does about two loads of laundry a week. However, the student decathletes must go...

137

Welcome to Analytical Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

We've been part of the SRS family for over 50 years. Mission To safely operate nuclear and environmental laboratories in providing the highest quality analytical services to all of...

138

About Analytical Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LOOKING FOR THE RIGHT MIX IN ANALYTICAL SERVICES? LOOKING FOR THE RIGHT MIX IN ANALYTICAL SERVICES? Let's break it down. Analytical Laboratories at the SRS offers a wide-range of analytical capabilities; extensive and highly-specialized facilities; in-depth talent; and an unsurpassed record for providing our customers with the highest quality of service. We've served our nation for more than 50 years. Now, we're ready to provide those same services to you. Call us when you are looking for the right proportion of capabilities, facilities, talent and commitment to excellence. Our Facilities Analytical Laboratories at the SRS offers a wide-range of analytical capabilities; extensive and highly-specialized facilities; in-depth talent; and an unsurpassed record for providing our customers with the highest quality of service. We've served our nation for more than 50 years. Now, we're ready to provide those same services to you. Call us when you are looking for the right proportion of capabilities, facilities, talent and commitment to excellence.

139

SRL online Analytical Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site is operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Co. for the Department of Energy to produce special nuclear materials for defense. R&D support for site programs is provided by the Savannah River Laboratory, which I represent. The site is known primarily for its nuclear reactors, but actually three fourths of the efforts at the site are devoted to fuel/target fabrication, fuel/target reprocessing, and waste management. All of these operations rely heavily on chemical processes. The site is therefore a large chemical plant. There are then many potential applications for process analytical chemistry at SRS. The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has an Analytical Development Section of roughly 65 personnel that perform analyses for R&D efforts at the lab, act as backup to the site Analytical Laboratories Department and develop analytical methods and instruments. I manage a subgroup of the Analytical Development Section called the Process Control & Analyzer Development Group. The Prime mission of this group is to develop online/at-line analytical systems for site applications.

Jenkins, C.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

SRL online Analytical Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site is operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Co. for the Department of Energy to produce special nuclear materials for defense. R D support for site programs is provided by the Savannah River Laboratory, which I represent. The site is known primarily for its nuclear reactors, but actually three fourths of the efforts at the site are devoted to fuel/target fabrication, fuel/target reprocessing, and waste management. All of these operations rely heavily on chemical processes. The site is therefore a large chemical plant. There are then many potential applications for process analytical chemistry at SRS. The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has an Analytical Development Section of roughly 65 personnel that perform analyses for R D efforts at the lab, act as backup to the site Analytical Laboratories Department and develop analytical methods and instruments. I manage a subgroup of the Analytical Development Section called the Process Control Analyzer Development Group. The Prime mission of this group is to develop online/at-line analytical systems for site applications.

Jenkins, C.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Physics Case for Extended Tevatron Running  

SciTech Connect

Run II of the Tevatron collider at Fermilab is currently scheduled to end late in 2011. Given the current performance of the collider and of the CDF and D0 detectors, it is estimated that the current data set could be approximately doubled with a run extended into 2014. A few examples are presented of the physics potential of these additional statistics. These are discussed in the context of the expected reach of the LHC 7 TeV data and the existing Tevatron data. In particular, an extraordinary opportunity is described which could probe the existence of a standard model Higgs boson with mass in the currently preferred region between 115 GeV and 150 GeV.

Wood, Darien R.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

PARLO: PArallel Run-Time Layout Optimization for Scientific Data Explorations with Heterogeneous Access Pattern  

SciTech Connect

Download Citation Email Print Request Permissions Save to Project The size and scope of cutting-edge scientific simulations are growing much faster than the I/O and storage capabilities of their run-time environments. The growing gap is exacerbated by exploratory, data-intensive analytics, such as querying simulation data with multivariate, spatio-temporal constraints, which induces heterogeneous access patterns that stress the performance of the underlying storage system. Previous work addresses data layout and indexing techniques to improve query performance for a single access pattern, which is not sufficient for complex analytics jobs. We present PARLO a parallel run-time layout optimization framework, to achieve multi-level data layout optimization for scientific applications at run-time before data is written to storage. The layout schemes optimize for heterogeneous access patterns with user-specified priorities. PARLO is integrated with ADIOS, a high-performance parallel I/O middleware for large-scale HPC applications, to achieve user-transparent, light-weight layout optimization for scientific datasets. It offers simple XML-based configuration for users to achieve flexible layout optimization without the need to modify or recompile application codes. Experiments show that PARLO improves performance by 2 to 26 times for queries with heterogeneous access patterns compared to state-of-the-art scientific database management systems. Compared to traditional post-processing approaches, its underlying run-time layout optimization achieves a 56% savings in processing time and a reduction in storage overhead of up to 50%. PARLO also exhibits a low run-time resource requirement, while also limiting the performance impact on running applications to a reasonable level.

Gong, Zhenhuan [North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Boyuka, David [North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Zou, X [North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Liu, Gary [ORNL; Podhorszki, Norbert [ORNL; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Ma, Xiaosong [North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Samatova, Nagiza F [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Hydrogen Evolution and Sludge Suspension During the Preparation of the First Batch of Sludge at the Savannah River Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first batch of High Level Radioactive Sludge for the Defense Waste Processing Facility is being prepared in two 4.9 million liter waste tanks. The preparation involves removing water soluble salts by washing (water addition, sludge suspension, settling and decantation). Sludge suspension is accomplished using long shafted slurry pumps that are mounted on rotating turntables. During the sludge suspension runs in 1993 and 1994, the slurry pumps` cleaning radius was determined to be less than that expected from previous determinations using synthetic sludge in a full size waste tank mockup. Hydrogen concentrations in the tanks` vapor space were monitored during the sludge suspension activities. As expected, the initial agitation of the sludge increased the hydrogen concentration, however, with the controls in place the hydrogen concentration was maintained below seven percent of the lower flammability limit

Hay, M.S.; Lee, E.D.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Comparison of CAISO-run Plexos output with LLNL-run Plexos output  

SciTech Connect

In this report we compare the output of the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) 33% RPS Plexos model when run on various computing systems. Specifically, we compare the output resulting from running the model on CAISO's computers (Windows) and LLNL's computers (both Windows and Linux). We conclude that the differences between the three results are negligible in the context of the entire system and likely attributed to minor differences in Plexos version numbers as well as the MIP solver used in each case.

Schmidt, A; Meyers, C; Smith, S

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

145

Comparing Computer Run Time of Building Simulation Programs  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an approach to comparing computer run time of building simulation programs. The computing run time of a simulation program depends on several key factors, including the calculation algorithm and modeling capabilities of the program, the run period, the simulation time step, the complexity of the energy models, the run control settings, and the software and hardware configurations of the computer that is used to make the simulation runs. To demonstrate the approach, simulation runs are performed for several representative DOE-2.1E and EnergyPlus energy models. The computer run time of these energy models are then compared and analyzed.

Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip; Selkowitz, Stephen; Wetter, Michael

2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

146

Renewable Analytics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Renewable Analytics Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Analytics Place San Francisco,...

147

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Analysis of coal-derived synthetic crude from HRI CTSL Run CC-15 and HRI Run CMSL-2  

SciTech Connect

Under subcontract from CONSOL Inc. (US DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-89PC89883), IIT Research Institute, National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research applied a suite of petroleum inspection tests to two direct coal liquefactions net product oils produced in two direct coal liquefaction processing runs. Two technical reports, authored by NIPER, are presented here. The following assessment briefly describes the two coal liquefaction runs and highlights the major findings of the project. It generally is concluded that the methods used in these studies can help define the value of liquefaction products and the requirements for further processing. The application of these methods adds substantially to our understanding of the coal liquefaction process and the chemistry of coal-derived materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of this contract.

Sturm, G.P. Jr.; Kim, J.; Shay, J. [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 7a*) be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) is composed of portions of Tanks 4, 7, and 12; the Sludge Batch 6 heel in Tank 51; and a plutonium stream from H Canyon. SRNL received the Tank 51 qualification sample (sample ID HTF-51-10-125) following sludge additions to Tank 51. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernate) and concentration (decanting of supernate) of the SB7a - Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a non-radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7a related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7a processing.

Pareizs, J.; Billings, A.; Click, D.

2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

149

Analytical Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryAnalytical Division2013 Members391 Members as of October 1, 2013Abdurahman, SadegWashington State UniversityPullman, WA, USAAbuzaytoun, ReemDalhousie UniversityHalifax, NS, CanadaAdcock, JacquiDeakin Universityaurn Ponds

150

FLOWSHEET FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM SLUDGE BATCH 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of Tank 12 sludge slurry show a substantially larger fraction of aluminum than originally identified in sludge batch planning. The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to formulate Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with about one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 12 and one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 4. LWO identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days and dissolved nearly 80% of the aluminum in the sludge slurry. In 2008, LWO successfully dissolved 64% of the aluminum at approximately 60 C in 46 days with minimal tank modifications and using only slurry pumps as a heat source. This report establishes the technical basis and flowsheet for performing an aluminum removal process in Tank 51 for SB6 that incorporates the lessons learned from previous aluminum dissolution evolutions. For SB6, aluminum dissolution process temperature will be held at a minimum of 65 C for at least 24 days, but as long as practical or until as much as 80% of the aluminum is dissolved. As planned, an aluminum removal process can reduce the aluminum in SB6 from about 84,500 kg to as little as 17,900 kg with a corresponding reduction of total insoluble solids in the batch from 246,000 kg to 131,000 kg. The extent of the reduction may be limited by the time available to maintain Tank 51 at dissolution temperature. The range of dissolution in four weeks based on the known variability in dissolution kinetics can range from 44 to more than 80%. At 44% of the aluminum dissolved, the mass reduction is approximately 1/2 of the mass noted above, i.e., 33,300 kg of aluminum instead of 66,600 kg. Planning to reach 80% of the aluminum dissolved should allow a maximum of 81 days for dissolution and reduce the allowance if test data shows faster kinetics. 47,800 kg of the dissolved aluminum will be stored in Tank 8 and 21,000 kg will be stored in saltcake via evaporation. Up to 77% of the total aluminum planned for SB6 may be removed via aluminum dissolution. Storage of the aluminum-laden supernate in Tank 8 will require routine evaluation of the free hydroxide concentration in order to maintain aluminum in solution. Periodic evaluation will be established on concurrent frequency with corrosion program samples as previously established for aluminum-laden supernate from SB5 that is stored in Tank 11.

Pike, J; Jeffrey Gillam, J

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

151

An Abstract Model of VHS Case Study 1 (Experimental Batch Plant)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we describe the verification of safety properties for the experimental batch plant of case study 1 using the model checker SMV.

Ur Informatik; Und Praktische Mathematik; Lehrstuhl F; Ben Lukoschus; Ben Lukoschus

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Entropy signature of the running cosmological constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renormalization group (RG) improved cosmologies based upon a RG trajectory of Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG) with realistic parameter values are investigated using a system of cosmological evolution equations which allows for an unrestricted energy exchange between the vacuum and the matter sector. It is demonstrated that the scale dependence of the gravitational parameters, the cosmological constant in particular, leads to an entropy production in the matter system. The picture emerges that the Universe started out from a state of vanishing entropy, and that the radiation entropy observed today is essentially due to the coarse graining (RG flow) in the quantum gravity sector which is related to the expansion of the Universe. Furthermore, the RG improved field equations are shown to possess solutions with an epoch of power law inflation immediately after the initial singularity. The inflation is driven by the cosmological constant and ends automatically once the RG running has reduced the vacuum energy to the...

Bonanno, Alfio

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

LHC Computing: The First Run and Beyond  

SciTech Connect

Even in between the last two generations of high energy physics detectors there has been a tremendous amount of progress in the area of computing. The distributed computing systems used in the LHC are composed of large-scale facilities on 5 continents, executing over a million processing requests a day, and moving peta-bytes of data a month. In this presentation I will discuss the operational experience of the LHC experiments and the challenges faced in the first run. I will discuss how the techniques have evolved and I will cover future projects to improve the distributed computing infrastructure and services. I will close by speaking of some potential new technologies being explored.

Fisk, Ian [Michigan State Univeristy

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

154

ATLAS Trigger Performance and Initial Running  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An efficient trigger will be crucial to charged Higgs boson searches at the LHC. The ATLAS trigger will need to achieve a rejection factor of about 10^7 against random proton-proton collisions, and still be able to efficiently select signal events. Commissioning of the ATLAS trigger is progressing well, and much has already been done using cosmic rays and by replaying simulated physics events through the system. Detailed plans have been developed for commissioning with single LHC beams and the first collisions. The evolution of the ATLAS trigger towards stable running will be discussed in view of the searches for the charged Higgs boson. In particular, the determination of the trigger efficiency will be discussed, both in the case of the inclusive lepton triggers and the combined triggers needed for charged Higgs boson searches.

Winklmeier, F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Running Line-Haul Trucks on Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

I I magine driving a 55,000-pound tractor- trailer that runs on corn! If you find it difficult to imagine, you can ask the truck drivers for Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) what it's like. For the past 4 years, they have been piloting four trucks powered by ethyl alcohol, or "ethanol," derived from corn. Several advantages to operating trucks on ethanol rather than on conventional petro- leum diesel fuel present themselves. Because ethanol can be produced domestically, unlike most of our petroleum supply, the price and supply of ethanol is not subject to the whims of potentially unstable foreign governments. And domestic production translates into domestic jobs. In addition, ethanol has the potential to reduce harmful emissions, such as particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen

156

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Counties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Documents & Publications

157

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Counties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Documents & Publications

158

Cloud Coverage in the Joint OSSE Nature Run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A successful observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) is fundamentally dependent on the simulation of the global observing system used in the experiment. In many applications, a free-running numerical model simulation, called a nature run, is ...

Will McCarty; Ronald M. Errico; Ronald Gelaro

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

TianRun UILK LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name TianRun UILK LLC Place Minnesota Sector Wind energy Product Minnesota-based joint venture formed by TianRun USA, Horizon Wind, and Dakota Wind to develop the UILK wind...

160

PHENIX Beam Use Proposal for RHIC Runs 5-9  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- larized proton collisions. Building on the successes of Runs 1-4, the requested running conditions of an Aerogel Cerenkov Counter (ACC). This detector, con- sisting of 160 elements of hydrophobic aerogel

Homes, Christopher C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Requirements for Predictive Analytics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is important to have a clear understanding of how traditional Business Intelligence (BI) and analytics are different and how they fit together in optimizing organizational decision making. With tradition BI, activities are focused primarily on providing context to enhance a known set of information through aggregation, data cleansing and delivery mechanisms. As these organizations mature their BI ecosystems, they achieve a clearer picture of the key performance indicators signaling the relative health of their operations. Organizations that embark on activities surrounding predictive analytics and data mining go beyond simply presenting the data in a manner that will allow decisions makers to have a complete context around the information. These organizations generate models based on known information and then apply other organizational data against these models to reveal unknown information.

Troy Hiltbrand

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Guided Summarization Results GOOGLE Google Inc Run ID ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Guided Summarization Results GOOGLE Google Inc Run ID: GOOGLE1 Overall Responsiveness 1.000 Overall ...

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

163

Production-run software failure diagnosis via hardware performance counters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sequential and concurrency bugs are widespread in deployed software. They cause severe failures and huge financial loss during production runs. Tools that diagnose production-run failures with low overhead are needed. The state-of-the-art diagnosis techniques ... Keywords: concurrency bugs, failure diagnosis, performance counters, production run

Joy Arulraj; Po-Chun Chang; Guoliang Jin; Shan Lu

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Designs of control charts with supplementary runs rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article studies the designs of the control charts with the supplementary runs rules (zone rules). It also investigates, compares and ranks 15 resultant control charts based on steady-state Average Run Length (ARL) that is evaluated by computer simulation. ... Keywords: Computer simulation, Control charts, Optimization design, Quality control, Runs rules

Sheng Zhang; Zhang Wu

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Long-run marginal costs lower than average costs  

SciTech Connect

The thesis of this article is that the long-run marginal costs of electricity are not always greater than the present average costs, as is often assumed. As long as short-run costs decrease with new plant additions, the long-run marginal cost is less than long-run average cost. When average costs increase with new additions, long-run marginal costs are greater than long-run average costs. The long-run marginal costs of a particular utility may be less than, equal to, or greater than its long-run average costs - even with inflation present. The way to determine which condition holds for a given utility is to estimate costs under various combinations of assumptions: probable load growth, zero load growth, and load growth greater than expected; and changes in load factor with attendant costs. Utilities that can demonstrate long-run marginal costs lower than long-run average costs should be encouraged to build plant and increase load, for the resulting productivity gains and slowing of inflation. Utilities that face long-run marginal costs greater than long-run average costs should discourage growth in sales through any available means.

Hunter, S.R.

1980-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

166

SULFATE SOLUBILITY LIMIT VERIFICATION FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During processing at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), high sulfate concentrations in the feed are a concern to DWPF as it can lead to the formation of a detrimental, sulfate-rich, molten salt phase on the surface of the glass melt pool. To avoid these issues, a sulfate concentration limit was implemented into the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). Related to SB7a frit development efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) assessed the viability of using the current 0.6 wt % SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} limit set for SB6 (in glass) and the possibility of increasing the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} solubility limit in PCCS to account for anticipated sulfur concentrations, targeted waste loadings, and inclusion of secondary streams (e.g., Actinide Removal Process (ARP)) with two recommended frits (Frit 418 and Frit 702) for SB7a processing. For a nominal SB7a blend with a 63 inch SB6 heel remaining in Tank 40 (projection SB7a-63), a 0.60 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass limit was determined for waste loadings of 34 wt% up to 40 wt% with Frit 418 based on crucible melts with batched chemicals. SRNL also examined the inclusion of ARP for the same blending scenario (SB7a-63-ARP) with Frit 418 and at least a 0.6 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} level, and waste loadings of 34 wt% to 40 wt% were also acceptable. When a visible yellow and/or white sulfate salt layer was visible on the surface of any cooled glass, it was assumed to have surpassed the solubility limit of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for that particular composition. All of the glasses fabricated at these concentrations did not exhibit a sulfate rich salt layer on the surface of the glass melt and retained the majority of the batched SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. At higher levels of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} 'spiked' into the projected sludge compositions over the aforementioned interval of waste loadings, with Frit 418, low viscosity sulfur layers were observed on the surface of glass melts which confirm exceeding the solubility limit. The same sludge scenarios were also tested with Frit 702 and all glasses did not exhibit sulfur layers on the surfaces of the glass melts at spiking levels up to 0.80 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. An ultimate SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} limit was not defined with Frit 702, but if projected SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations are expected to increase with the onset of SB7a processing, a higher limit is achievable with Frit 702 than is achievable with Frit 418. Given the anticipated concentration of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for SB7a, a SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} limit of 0.6 wt % SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} is recommended for processing using Frit 418. Once the confirmed SB7a composition is known and should a higher limit be needed, SRNL can re-evaluate the limit based on the actual composition and provide an updated recommendation. It has been observed that higher levels of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass can be retained with compositional changes to the frit, as was demonstrated by the glasses fabricated using Frit 702. SRNL also recommends the continuation of studies to define a more 'global' sulfate concentration limit to account for future sludge batch composition uncertainties.

Billings, A.

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

167

A real-time warehouse operations planning system for small batch replenishment problems in production environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A factory consists of numerous production workstations, multiple production lines and many production floors. Due to the characteristics of just-in-time and make-to-order mode manufacturing, small batches of production materials are required for production ... Keywords: Genetic algorithm (GA), Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology, Small batch replenishment problem

T. C. Poon; K. L. Choy; F. T. S. Chan; G. T. S. Ho; A. Gunasekaran; H. C. W. Lau; H. K. H. Chow

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Single-machine batch delivery scheduling with an assignable common due date and controllable processing times  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider single-machine batch delivery scheduling with an assignable common due date and controllable processing times, which vary as a convex function of the amounts of a continuously divisible common resource allocated to individual jobs. Finished ... Keywords: Batch delivery, Common due date, Resource allocation, Scheduling

Yunqiang Yin, T. C. E. Cheng, Shuenn-Ren Cheng, Chin-Chia Wu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Design, implementation, and operation of a class based batch queue scheduler for VAX/VMS  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab found that the standard VMS batch configuration options were inadequate for the job mix that exists on the Fermilab central computer facility VAX cluster. Accordingly, Fermilab designed and implemented a class based batch queue scheduler. This scheduler makes use of the standard VMS job controller and batch system. Users interact with the scheduler at job submission time by specification of CPU time limits and batch job characteristics. This scheduler allows Fermilab to make efficient use of our large heterogeneous VAX cluster which contains machines ranging from a VAX 780 to a VAX 8800. The scheduler was implemented using the VMS system services $GETQUI and $SNDJBC, without changes to the existing VMS job scheduler. As a result, the scheduler should remain compatible with future VMS versions. This session will discuss the design goals, implementation, and operational experience with Fermilab's class based batch queue scheduler.

Chadwick, K.

1988-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

170

OIL PRICES AND LONG-RUN RISK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I show that relative levels of aggregate consumption and personal oil consumption provide an excellent proxy for oil prices, and that high oil prices predict low future aggregate consumption growth. Motivated by these facts, I add an oil consumption good to the long-run risk model of Bansal and Yaron [2004] to study the asset pricing implications of observed changes in the dynamic interaction of consumption and oil prices. Empirically I observe that, compared to the first half of my 1987- 2010 sample, oil consumption growth in the last 10 years is unresponsive to levels of oil prices, creating an decrease in the mean-reversion of oil prices, and an increase in the persistence of oil price shocks. The model implies that the change in the dynamics of oil consumption generates increased systematic risk from oil price shocks due to their increased persistence. However, persistent oil prices also act as a counterweight for shocks to expected consumption growth, with high expected growth creating high expectations of future oil prices which in turn slow down growth. The combined effect is to reduce overall consumption risk and lower the equity premium. The model also predicts that these changes affect the riskiness of of oil futures contracts, and combine to create a hump shaped

Robert Ready; Robert Clayton Ready; Robert Clayton Ready; Amir Yaron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Analytical Division Newsletter April 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the March newsletter from the Analytical Division. Analytical Division Newsletter April 2013 Membership Information achievement application award Awards distinguished division Divisions fats job Join lipid lipids Member member get a member Me

172

Batch leaching tests: Colloid release and PAH leachability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to assess leaching potential of contaminants from waste, and to provide a test to classify, hazardous waste. It is a batch leaching test where a waste (such as contaminated soil) and an extraction fluid are agitated for a predetermined time. Since TCLP employs an aggressive mixing technique, it is possible that hydrophobic contaminant-laden colloidal fractions may appear as 'dissolved' constituents. In this study, TCLP was employed to determine the leachability of PAH contamination from a coal tar contaminated site. Generated colloids and the apparent aqueous concentrations of naphthalene and phenanthrene were measured at various mixing times in the extraction fluid. A mathematical model was developed that predicted the apparent aqueous contaminant concentration in the filtrate. This model accounted for the presence of colloids in the filtrate, and quantified contaminant desorption from colloids. The fraction of colloid-bound contaminant was predicted to be negligible for naphthalene. However, phenanthrene was predicted to have a significant fraction of the total contaminant in the colloidal phase, while naphthalene was primarily dissolved. The desorption model and PAH desorption data are presented here to determine the extent of colloid-facilitated desorption during leaching tests.

Bergendahl, J. [Worcester Polytechnique Institute, Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Welcome to Analytical Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Services Our Capabilities Analytical Laboratories at the SRS performs analyses on a wide range of materials, including soil, water, gases, foodstuffs, decommissioning debris, waste, urine, fecal matter and process control samples. The laboratories maintain certifications and qualifications through a variety of governing bodies, which allows multiple applications of our services. Each year, we process over 200,000 samples and over half a million determinations, with an error-free rate better than 99.99%. Our Services We offer a full complement of nuclear counting and chemical processing methods, including microwave/hot block digestion of solids; alpha pulse height analyzer (PHA), gamma PHA and liquid scintillation counter, diode array spectrophotometer, ICP emission spectrometer, ICP mass spectrometer, thermal ionization mass spectrometer, chemical titrators, and IR analyzer. In addition, we offer unique environmental and industrial hygiene analytical services, including rapid analysis of radiological contaminants in water, soil, and human matrices; Radiological American Industrial Hygiene Association-accredited beryllium, lead, other metals, hexavalent chromium, and asbestos analyses.

174

Strategies for Choosing Analytics and Visualization Software...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Python tools: Numpy, Scipy, iPython, matplotlib Paraview Mathematica Perl IDL Python TCLTK AVSExpress R SQL ImageJFiji Choosing the Right System Small datasets: batch:...

175

Neutronics and Depletion Methods for Parametric Studies of Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactors with Slab Fuel Geometry and Multi-Batch Fuel Management Schemes  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a 3400 MWth fluoride salt cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) that uses TRISO particle fuel compacted into slabs rather than spherical fuel pebbles or cylindrical fuel compacts. Simplified methods are required for parametric design studies such that analyzing the entire feasible design space for an AHTR is tractable. These simplifications include fuel homogenization techniques to increase the speed of neutron transport calculations in depletion analysis and equilibrium depletion analysis methods to analyze systems with multi-batch fuel management schemes. This paper presents three elements of significant novelty. First, the reactivity-equivalent physical transformation (RPT) methodology usually applied in systems with coated particle fuel in cylindrical and spherical geometries was extended to slab geometries. Secondly, based on this newly developed RPT method for slab geometries, a methodology that uses Monte Carlo depletion approaches was further developed to search for the maximum discharge burnup in a multi-batch system by iteratively estimating the beginning of equilibrium cycle composition and sampling different discharge burnups. This iterative equilibrium depletion search (IEDS) method fully defines an equilibrium fuel cycle (keff, power, flux and composition evolutions across space and time), but is computationally demanding, although feasible on single-processor workstations. Finally, an analytical method, the non-linear reactivity model, was developed by expanding the linear reactivity model to include an arbitrary number of higher order terms to extrapolate single-batch depletion results to estimate the maximum discharge burnup and BOEC keff in systems with multi-batch fuel management schemes. Results from this method were benchmarked against equilibrium depletion analysis results using the IEDS.

Cisneros, Anselmo T. [University of California, Berkeley; Ilas, Dan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Neutronics and Depletion Methods for Parametric Studies of Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactors with Slab Fuel Geometry and Multi-Batch Fuel Management Schemes  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a 3400 MWth fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR) that uses TRISO particle fuel compacted into slabs rather than spherical or cylindrical fuel compacts. Simplified methods are required for parametric design studies such that analyzing the entire feasible design space for an AHTR is tractable. These simplifications include fuel homogenization techniques to increase the speed of neutron transport calculations in depletion analysis and equilibrium depletion analysis methods to analyze systems with multi-batch fuel management schemes. This paper presents three elements of significant novelty. First, the Reactivity-Equivalent Physical Transformation (RPT) methodology usually applied in systems with coated-particle fuel in cylindrical and spherical geometries has been extended to slab geometries. Secondly, based on this newly developed RPT method for slab geometries, a methodology that uses Monte Carlo depletion approaches was further developed to search for the maximum discharge burnup in a multi-batch system by iteratively estimating the beginning of equilibrium cycle (BOEC) composition and sampling different discharge burnups. This Iterative Equilibrium Depletion Search (IEDS) method fully defines an equilibrium fuel cycle (keff, power, flux, and composition evolutions) but is computationally demanding, although feasible on single-processor workstations. Finally, an analytical method, the Non-Linear Reactivity Model, was developed by expanding the linear reactivity model to include an arbitrary number of higher order terms so that single-batch depletion results could be extrapolated to estimate the maximum discharge burnup and BOEC keff in systems with multi-batch fuel management schemes. Results from this method were benchmarked against equilibrium depletion analysis results using the IEDS.

Cisneros, Anselmo T. [University of California, Berkeley; Ilas, Dan [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Analytical Modeling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analytical Modeling Analytical Modeling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Analytical Modeling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Data and Modeling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Modeling Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Modeling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Analytical Modeling: A mathematical modeling technique used for simulating, explaining, and making predictions about the mechanisms involved in complex physical processes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Analytical models are mathematical models that have a closed form solution. Or in other words the solution to the equations used to describe changes in

178

Welcome to Analytical Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Material Dissolution from Destructive Analysis Measurements Nuclear Material Dissolution from Destructive Analysis Measurements Overview The Savannah River Site F/H Laboratories perform nuclear material dissolution of Pu/U oxides and metals plus Np oxide to support site productions/remediation projects. Nuclear material dissolutions are performed in glovebox containment via microwaves, hot blocks and hot plates. Resulting solutions are aliquotted for a variety of elemental and compound analyses. Features Varying sample size (100 mg - 30 g) High temperature digestions up to 200°C computer-controlled temperature and pressure dissolutions Excellent analyte recovery in destructive analysis Commercially-available electronic equipment with trained operators capable of handling high alpha activity levels (facility source term limit of 310 Alpha Curies)

179

ANALYTIC MODELING OF STARSHADES  

SciTech Connect

External occulters, otherwise known as starshades, have been proposed as a solution to one of the highest priority yet technically vexing problems facing astrophysics-the direct imaging and characterization of terrestrial planets around other stars. New apodization functions, developed over the past few years, now enable starshades of just a few tens of meters diameter to occult central stars so efficiently that the orbiting exoplanets can be revealed and other high-contrast imaging challenges addressed. In this paper, an analytic approach to the analysis of these apodization functions is presented. It is used to develop a tolerance analysis suitable for use in designing practical starshades. The results provide a mathematical basis for understanding starshades and a quantitative approach to setting tolerances.

Cash, Webster [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 g/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 C, 27 C, and 32 C there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

PDSF FAQ - Why don't my jobs run?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

don't my don't my jobs run? Why don't my jobs run? If your jobs are just sitting in the "qw" state and not starting you cannot ask SGE directly why they aren't running (that service is turned off for scalability) so you have to do some detective work. Things to consider include: - Is the cluster full? Maybe you just need to be patient, especially if your project doesn't have any shares. In that case your jobs won't run until the cluster isn't full. In any event your jobs can't run until some other jobs finish and sometimes there are a lot of relatively long jobs running. - Check your job's resource requirements. It might be that you are incorrectly specifying some resource or requesting something that is not available. For example you might be specifying "-l eliza18io=1" and

182

SSRL_2003_Run_Sched.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26/02 26/02 Run Shutdown Weekends Maintenance / AP Injector Startup University Holidays PPS Certification Injector / SPEAR Startup SLAC Closed Edited - Robleto, Scott 10 11 12 AP 13 14 12 AP MA/AP 13 14 15 8 9 7 3 L A 11 12 8 9 I S N 30 11 O 12 13 14 18 A I T 31 29 2002 2003 1 2 3 13 4 2002 2003 1 2 3 4 25 26 29 30 28 30 5 6 5 6 8 9 22 16 17 15 16 N 23 24 25 5 17 18 19 Startup 23 24 23 22 21 1 2 3 MA/AP 10 4 5 AP 6 7 8 9 20 22 18 24 24 17 22 23 20 21 14 15 11 16 10 12 9 13 7 8 S T A 1 2 3 15 4 5 5 6 8 6 4 5 R T 8 1 7 6 7 U P 2 3 10 9 10 9 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 31 24 25 26 27 30 18 19 28 29 20 21 22 23 18 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 29 30 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 1 2 3 4 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 19 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 31 25 26 27 28 29 14 15 16 20 17 18 19 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 30 31 21 15 16 13 14 10 27 28 26 22 23 24 25 8 9 10 21 20 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 8 9 10 11 12 22 23 15 16 21 8 9 10 5 6 7 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 15 22 23 16 17 18 19 26 27 28 30 25 24 20 21 23 24 14 1 2 3 4 15 16 29 30 31 29 31 28 20 28 21 22 23 24 25 17 26 27 18 19 20 24

183

FY2003 Run Sched.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/16/02 7/16/02 Run Maint/AP PPS Certification SLAC Closed Shutdown Startup Weekends University Holidays AP AP 15 8 9 10 11 12 14 12 AP MA/AP 7 3 L A 11 12 8 9 I 7 8 9 T S N 30 11 O 12 13 14 18 A I Edited by J. Robleto, B. Scott 31 29 2002 2003 1 2 3 N 13 4 2002 2003 1 2 3 29 30 31 10 5 6 5 6 7 8 9 22 23 MA/AP AP A E 5 17 18 19 10 11 12 9 MA/AP 18 Startup 24 23 22 21 16 17 15 1 2 3 15 10 4 5 AP 5 6 16 13 20 21 20 22 23 24 24 16 17 13 14 5 6 7 8 4 5 1 2 3 6 4 5 1 2 3 8 9 7 6 7 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 31 24 25 26 27 30 18 19 28 29 20 21 22 23 S T A R T U P 18 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 29 30 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 1 2 3 4 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 19 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 22 23 13 14 15 16 20 17 18 19 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 15 16 13 14 10 25 17 18 19 20 22 21 29 22 23 24 25 27 28 26 21 19 20 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 22 23 15 16 21 25 17 18 19 20 24 4 8 9 10 5 6 7 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 15 22 23 16 17 18 19 26 27 28 30 25 24 20 21 23 24 14 1 2 3 4 28 21 22 23 24 25 26 15 16 29 30 31 26 27 28

184

Multi-batch slip stacking in the Main Injector at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

The Main Injector (MI) at Fermilab is planning to use multi-batch slip stacking scheme in order to increase the proton intensity at the NuMI target by about a factor of 1.5.[1] [2] By using multi-batch slip stacking, a total of 11 Booster batches are merged into 6, 5 double ones and one single. We have successfully demonstrated the multibatch slip stacking in MI and accelerated a record intensity of 4.6E13 particle per cycle to 120 GeV. The technical issues and beam loss mechanisms for multibatch slip stacking scheme are discussed.

Seiya, K.; Berenc, T.; Chase, B.; Dey, J.; Joireman, P.; Kourbanis, I.; Reid, J.; /Fermilab

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Optimal production and rationing policies of a make-to-stock production system with batch demand and backordering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider the stock rationing problem of a single-item make-to-stock production/inventory system with multiple demand classes. Demand arrives as a Poisson process with a randomly distributed batch size. It is assumed that the batch demand ... Keywords: Batch demand, Inventory, Markov decision process, Production, Rationing

Jianjun Xu; Shaoxiang Chen; Bing Lin; Rohit Bhatnagar

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Big Run, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Congressional Districts by Places. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigRun,Pennsylvania&oldid227772" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here...

187

First Mira Runs Break New Ground with Turbulence Simulations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Mira Runs Break New Ground with Turbulence Simulations July 16, 2013 Printer-friendly version Shortly after Mira, the ALCF's new 10-petaflops supercomputer, entered...

188

Predicting Baseball Home Run Records Using Exponential Frequency Distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new model, which uses the frequency of individuals' annual home run totals, is employed to predict future home run totals and records in Major League Baseball. Complete home run frequency data from 1903--2005 is analyzed, resulting in annual exponential distributions whose changes can be a used as a measure of progression in the sport and serve as a basis against which record-setting performances can be compared. We show that there is an 80% chance that Barry Bonds' current 73 home run record will be broken in the next 10 years, despite the longevity of previous records held by baseball legends Babe Ruth and Roger Marris.

Kelley, D J; Phillips, J A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

SARA Cadets and Midshipmen Hit the Ground Running | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SARA Cadets and Midshipmen Hit the Ground Running | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

190

Appendix C, Analytical Data | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C, Analytical Data Appendix C, Analytical Data Docket No. EO-05-01: Appendix C, Analytical Data from Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Generating...

191

DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7)  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that 'The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115'. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) with H-Canyon Np transfers completed after the start of processing SB5, and Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 7 (MB7). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2009-0014; Rev. 2 entitled Sludge Batch 6 SRNL Shielded Cells Testing. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask III, Item 2 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 7 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2009-00473, Rev. 15 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), SRNL-RP-2009-00474, Rev. 1. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB6 (MB7), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy's (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes were excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, 30 radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB6 as specified by WAPS 1.2. The WCP and WQR require that all of the radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB6, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100-year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes (Pu-238, -239, -240, -241, and -242) and other U isotopes (U-233, -234, and -238) identified in WAPS 1.6 were already determined to be reportable according to WAPS 1.2 This brings the total number of reportable radionuclides for SB6 to 32. The radionuclide measurements made for SB6 are the most extensive condu

Bannochie, C.; Diprete, D.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7B (MACROBATCH 9)  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2011-0004; Rev. 0 entitled Sludge Batch 7b Qualification Studies. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask II, Item 2 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 6 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00247, Rev. 0 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), SRNL-RP-2011-00248, Rev. 0. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB7b (MB9), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energys (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes were excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, 27 radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b as specified by WAPS 1.2. The WCP and WQR require that all of the radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100-year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes (Pu-238, -239, -240, -241, and -242) and other U isotopes (U-233, -234, and -238) identified in WAPS 1.6 were already determined to be reportable according to WAPS 1.2 This brings the total number of reportable radionuclides for SB7b to 29. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are similar to those performed in the previous SB7a MB8 work. Some method development/refine

Crawford, C. L.; Diprete, D. P.

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

193

DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 5 (MACROBATCH 6)  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that ''The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115''. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Tank 40 (Sludge Batch 4 (SB4)), Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51, and H-Canyon Np transfers completed after the start of processing. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 6 (MB6). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities and determines the radionuclide activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to the radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010; Rev. 2 entitled Sludge Batch 5 SRNL Shielded Cells Testing. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask II, 5 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 7 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), WSRC-RP-2008-00137, Rev. 2 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), WSRC-RP-2008-00138, Rev. 2. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB5 (MB6), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy's (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, twenty-six radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB5 as specified by WAPS 1.2. The 26 reportable radionuclides are: Cl-36, Ni-59, Ni-63, Sr-90, Zr-93, Nb-93m, Tc-99, Sn-126, Cs-137, Sm-151, U-233, U-234, Np-237, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Am-241, Pu-241, Pu-242, Am-242m, Am-243, Cm-244, Cm-245, Cm-246, Cf-251. Chlorine-36 is reported for the first time based on the upper bounding activity determined from the aqua regia digested sludge slurry. The WCP and WQR require that all of radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB5 (MB6), all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for four radionuclides: Se-79, Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time through the year 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to

Bannochie, C.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, D.

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

194

Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts September 4, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) We would like to encourage you to use the generic resources ("gres") setting for various file systems that your batch jobs use. This feature is currently available on Hopper and Carver. The advantage of this setting is that your jobs won't start (thus won't fail) during a scheduled file system maintenance. The syntax for the "gres" setting is: #PBS -l gres=filesystem1[%filesystem2%filesystem3...] (new recommendation) or #PBS -l gres=filesystem1:1[%filesystem2:1%filesystem3:1...] (as announced before) Note that the "%" character means "and". Therefore, if multiple file

195

Analysis of batching strategies for multi-item production with yield uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we investigate the batch sizing problem for a custom-job production facility. More specifically, given a production system that has been assigned several different types of custom jobs, we try to derive ...

Siow, Christopher (Christopher Shun Yi)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Site Selection for Concrete Batch Plant to Support Plutonium Disposition Facilities at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WSRC conducted a site selection study to identify, assess, and rank candidate sites for an onsite concrete batch plant at the Savannah River Site in the vicinity of F-Area.

Wike, L.D.

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

ICTASDiscoveryAnalyticsCenter Sustainable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IDAC ICTASDiscoveryAnalyticsCenter Nanoscale Science Nano-Bio Interface Sustainable Energy on the basis of race, gender, disability, age, veteran status, national origin, religion, sexual orientation

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

198

NERSC Job Logs and Analytics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Allocations Policies Data Analytics & Visualization Science Gateways User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Operations for: Passwords & Off-Hours Status...

199

Run_HistoryStatistics_4_plots.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 35.0 55.0 75.0 95.0 115.0 135.0 155.0 175.0 195.0 215.0 235.0 255.0 275.0 295.0 315.0 Hours Run Number APS Run History Operational Statistics Average Fill Duration Without a...

200

Original papers EFFECT OF GLASS-BATCH MAKEUP ON THE MELTING PROCESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5 m in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures 800C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B 2O 3, CaO, Li 2O, MgO, and Na 2O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.

Pavel Hrma; Michael J. Schweiger; Carissa J. Humrickhouse; J. Adam Moody; Rachel M. Tate; Timothy T. Rainsdon; Nathan E. Tegrotenhuis; Benjamin M. Arrigoni; Jos Marcial; Carmen P. Rodriguez; Benjamin H. Tincher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SULFATE SOLUBILITY LIMIT VERIFICATION FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7B  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to determine a sulfate solubility limit in glass for Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). The SB7b composition projection provided by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) on May 25, 2011 was used as the basis for formulating glass compositions to determine the sulfate limit. Additions of Na{sub 2}O to the projected sludge composition were made by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) due to uncertainty in the final concentration of Na{sub 2}O for SB7b, which is dependent on washing effectiveness and the potential need to add NaOH to ensure an acceptable projected operating window. Additions of 4, 6, and 8 wt % Na{sub 2}O were made to the nominal May 25, 2011 composition projection. An updated SB7b composition projection was received from SRR on August 4, 2011. Due to compositional similarities, no additional experimental work using the August 4, 2011 compositions was considered to be necessary for this study. Both Frit 418 and Frit 702 were included in this study. The targeted sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) concentrations of the study glasses were selected within the range of 0.6 to 0.9 wt % in glass. A total of 52 glass compositions were selected based on the compositional variables of Na{sub 2}O addition, Actinide Removal Process (ARP) stream addition, waste loading, frit composition, and sulfate concentration. The glasses were batched, melted, and characterized following SRNL procedures. Visual observations were recorded for each glass after it cooled and used as in indicator of sulfur retention. Representative samples of each of the glasses fabricated were subjected to chemical analysis to determine whether the targeted compositions were met, as well as to determine the quantity of sulfate that was retained after melting. In general, the measured composition data showed that there were only minor issues in meeting the targeted compositions for the study glasses, and the measured sulfate concentrations for each study glass were within 10% of the targeted values. The results for the SB7b glasses fabricated with Frit 418 showed an apparent trend of increasing sulfate retention with increasing Na{sub 2}O additions to the 5/25/11 sludge projection. This trend appears contradictory to other recent studies of sulfate retention in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) type glasses. Additional apparent contradictions to this trend were found in the data collected in the present study. Overall, the results for the SB7b sulfate study glasses with Frit 418 and the 5/25/11 projection with Na{sub 2}O additions showed that subtle changes in this complex glass composition impacted the degree of sulfate retention. These results do however provide confidence that a 0.6 wt % sulfate limit in glass is warranted for Frit 418 with the SB7b compositions evaluated in this study. The results for the SB7b glasses fabricated with Frit 702 are consistent with those of the previous SB7a study in that Frit 702 allowed for higher sulfate retention as compared to Frit 418 for the same sludge compositions. It is recommended that the DWPF implement a sulfate concentration limit of 0.6 wt % in glass for SB7b processing with Frit 418. If a higher than projected sulfate concentration is measured when SB7b processing begins (i.e., if a sulfate concentration higher than 0.6 wt % becomes necessary to achieve targeted waste loadings), DWPF should consider a transition to Frit 702. The sulfate limit could likely be raised to 0.8 wt % by transitioning to this frit. However, if DWPF considers transitioning from Frit 418 to Frit 702, additional glasses should be fabricated to confirm this higher limit due to the issues with incorrect B{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations for some of the glasses made with Frit 702 in this study. There are several factors other than sulfate retention that must also be carefully considered prior to changing frit compositions.

Fox, K.

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

202

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 14, 2012 August 14, 2012 AIKEN, S.C. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Coun- ties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. "We excavated and disposed of over five million pounds of contaminated soil from three specific sites along the stream, erected miles of fence and placed over 2,000 signs in order to make Lower Three Runs safe and to reduce our site's footprint by another 10 percent," said Chris

203

Microsoft PowerPoint - S08-02_Rios-Armstrong_SRS Experience Preparing Salt Batches.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site (SRS) Experience Savannah River Site (SRS) Experience with Preparing Salt Batches Presentation to: EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange Date: November 17 th , 2010 Author: Maria A. Rios-Armstrong Position: Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) Process Engineering Lead Savannah River Remediation SRR-SPT-2010-00222 Print Close 2 Agenda * SRS Composite Inventory * Salt Processing * SRS Liquid Waste System * Background * Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batches - ISDP Salt Batch 1 - ISDP Salt Batch 2 - ISDP Salt Batch 3 - ISDP Salt Batch 4 * Future Salt Batches * Summary * Questions Print Close 3 SRS Composite Inventory Saltcake Sludge Volume 37.1 Million Gallons (Mgal) Curies 183 MCi (52%) 169 MCi (48%) 352 Million Curies (MCi) 171 MCi (49%) Sludge 34.2 Mgal (92%) 2.9 Mgal (8%) 18.4 Mgal (49%) Inventory values as of 2010-06-30

204

Improved steamflood analytical model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Jeff Jones steamflood model incorporates oil displacement by steam as described by Myhill and Stegemeier, and a three-component capture factor based on empirical correlations. The main drawback of the model however is the unsatisfactory prediction of the oil production peak: usually significantly lower than the actual. Our study focuses on improving this aspect of the Jeff Jones model. In our study, we simulated the production performance of a 5-spot steamflood pattern unit and compared the results against those based on the Jeff Jones model. Three reservoir types were simulated using 3-D Cartesian black oil models: Hamaca (9?°API), San Ardo (12?°API) and that based on the SPE fourth comparative solution project (14?°API). In the first two field cases, a 45x23x8 model was used that represented 1/8 of a 10-acre 5-spot pattern unit, using typical rock and reservoir fluid properties. In the SPE project case, three models were used: 23x12x12 (2.5 ac), 31x16x12 (5 ac) and 45x23x8 (10 ac), that represented 1/8 of a 5-spot pattern unit. To obtain a satisfactory match between simulation and Jeff Jones analytical model results of the start and height of the production peak, the following refinements to the Jeff Jones model were necessary. First, the dimensionless steam zone size AcD was modified to account for decrease in oil viscosity during steamflood and its dependence on the steam injection rate. Second, the dimensionless volume of displaced oil produced VoD was modified from its square-root format to an exponential form. The modified model gave very satisfactory results for production performance up to 20 years of simulated steamflood, compared to the original Jeff Jones model. Engineers will find the modified model an improved and useful tool for prediction of steamflood production performance.

Chandra, Suandy

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Analytical laboratory quality audits  

SciTech Connect

Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

Kelley, William D.

2001-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

206

Spent Fuel Drying System Test Results (Dry-Run in Preparation for Run 8)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a)on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of a test ''dry-run'' conducted prior to the eighth and last of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister6513U. The system used for the dry-run test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 4.0 and discussed Section 5.0.

BM Oliver; GS Klinger; J Abrefah; SC Marschman; PJ MacFarlan; GA Ritter

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

207

Explanatory Business Analytics in OLAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the authors describe a method to integrate explanatory business analytics in OLAP information systems. This method supports the discovery of exceptional values in OLAP data and the explanation of such values by giving their underlying causes. ... Keywords: Business Analytics, Exception Reporting, Explanation, OLAP, Variance Analysis

Emiel Caron, Hennie Daniels

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Computing Models of CDF and D0 in Run II  

SciTech Connect

The next collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron, Run II, is scheduled for autumn of 1999. Both experiments, the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the D0 experiment are being modified to cope with the higher luminosity and shorter bunch spacing of the Tevatron. New detector components, higher event complexity, and an increased data volume require changes from the data acquisition systems up to the analysis systems. In this paper we present a summary of the computing models of the two experiments for Run II.

Lammel, S.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Instrument Front-Ends at Fermilab During Run II  

SciTech Connect

The optimization of an accelerator relies on the ability to monitor the behavior of the beam in an intelligent and timely fashion. The use of processor-driven front-ends allowed for the deployment of smart systems in the field for improved data collection and analysis during Run II. This paper describes the implementation of the two main systems used: National Instruments LabVIEW running on PCs, and WindRiver's VxWorks real-time operating system running in a VME crate processor.

Meyer, Thomas; Slimmer, David; Voy, Duane; /Fermilab

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

210

Run_HistoryStatistics_4_plots.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scheduled Scheduled User Hours User Beam Available hours User beam Availability (%) Total Faults Mean Time to Recovery Faults Per Day of Delivered Beam Delivered Integrated Current (A-hr) Hours of Top- up Scheduled Top-up Injector Availability MTBF Run 97-7 741.9 698.2 94.1% 17 2.6 0.58 52.9 N/A N/A 41.1 Run 98-1 703.1 640.6 91.1% 21 3.0 0.79 48.7 N/A N/A 30.5 Run 98-2 714.5 656.4 91.9% 27 2.2 0.99 50.3 N/A N/A 24.3 Run 98-3 1154.2 1091.1 94.5% 28 2.3 0.62 85.1 N/A N/A 39.0 Run 98-4 1152.2 1076.9 93.5% 31 2.4 0.69 84.2 N/A N/A 34.7 Run 98-5 1093.6 987.4 90.3% 49 2.2 1.19 79.3 N/A N/A 20.2 Run 99-1 976.6 923.6 94.6% 35 1.5 0.91 75.3 N/A N/A 26.4 Run 99-2 831.2 794.9 95.6% 19 1.9 0.57 65.1 N/A N/A 41.8 Run 99-3 832.0 805.6 96.8% 31 0.9 0.92 58.5 N/A N/A 26.0 Run 99-4 1320.0 1256.2 95.2% 42 1.5 0.80 102.5 N/A N/A 29.9 Run 99-5 1024.0 970.8 94.8% 44 1.2 1.09 82.0 N/A N/A 22.1 Run 00-1 1511.0

211

Real-time spatio-temporal analytics using Microsoft StreamInsight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microsoft StreamInsight (StreamInsight, for brevity) is a platform for developing and deploying streaming applications that run continuous queries over high-rate streaming events. StreamInsight adopts a temporal stream model to handle imperfections in ... Keywords: SQL server, StreamInsight, analytics, complex event processing, data streaming, spatio-temporal

Mohamed Ali; Badrish Chandramouli; Balan S. Raman; Ed Katibah

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET hlul ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH ANI SAFETY...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

hlul ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH ANI SAFETY DlVlSlON Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. 1956 I. H. 1093 Sample Nos. 9 -Date Collected- 812 by-LLP Route to I"? Lo,--tionrOGERS...

213

ParaView on the Data Analytics Cluster on Eureka/Gadzooks | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the Data Analytics Cluster on Eureka/Gadzooks on the Data Analytics Cluster on Eureka/Gadzooks Set Up User Environment The recommended way of running ParaView on Eureka is in client/server mode. This consists of running the ParaView client on your local resource, and the ParaView server (pvserver) on the Eureka visualization nodes. The latest version currently installed on Eureka is ParaView 4.0.1. This should first be installed on your local resource. Binary and source packages for Linux, MacOS, and Windows are available from the ParaView Download Page. (Run the 'softenv' command on the Eureka login node to see additional versions of ParaView that are available on Eureka). To put ParaView in your environment on Eureka, add the following line to your ~/.softenvrc file NOTE: This must go before the @default entry. Also note that this macro

214

Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy March 12, 2012 - 11:39am Addthis John Chu John Chu Communications Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Spring. With gentle breezes, blooming flowers, and warm sunshine, the season marks the beginning of fun outdoor activities-picnics, camping, hikes, and the classic American pastime-baseball. In the past five years, major league baseball teams have increasingly made strides in greening up their stadiums. Here are several examples of teams that are hitting a home run for clean energy: Cleveland Indians Progressive Field - As the first American League ballpark to use solar energy back in 2007, the stadium boasts an upper deck solar panel array. The electricity produced from its 42 solar panels is

215

Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility Facility Brent Run Generating Station Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Genesee County, Michigan Coordinates 43.0777289°, -83.6773928° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0777289,"lon":-83.6773928,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

216

Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy March 12, 2012 - 11:39am Addthis John Chu John Chu Communications Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Spring. With gentle breezes, blooming flowers, and warm sunshine, the season marks the beginning of fun outdoor activities-picnics, camping, hikes, and the classic American pastime-baseball. In the past five years, major league baseball teams have increasingly made strides in greening up their stadiums. Here are several examples of teams that are hitting a home run for clean energy: Cleveland Indians Progressive Field - As the first American League ballpark to use solar energy back in 2007, the stadium boasts an upper deck solar panel array. The electricity produced from its 42 solar panels is

217

Running fermi with one-stage compressor: advantages, layout, performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Running FERMI with one-stage compressor: advantages, layout,a lattice with one-stage compressor, it was thought at thetime that the two bunch compressors configuration was still

Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Di Mitri, S.; Penco, G.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Early science runs prepare Sequoia for national security missions |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Early science runs prepare Sequoia for national security missions | Early science runs prepare Sequoia for national security missions | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Early science runs prepare Sequoia for national ... Early science runs prepare Sequoia for national security missions Posted By Office of Public Affairs

219

Holographic fermions with running chemical potential and dipole coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the properties of the holographic fermions in extremal $R$-charged black hole background with a running chemical potential, as well as the dipole coupling between fermions and the gauge field in the bulk. We find that although the running chemical potential effect the location of the Fermi surface, it does not change the type of fermions. We also study the onset of the Fermi gap and the gap effected by running chemical potential and the dipole coupling. The spectral function in the limit $\\omega\\rightarrow0$ and the existence of the Fermi liquid are also investigated. The running chemical potential and the dipole coupling altogether can make a non-Fermi liquid become the Landau-Fermi type.

Li Qing Fang; Xian-Hui Ge; Xiao-Mei Kuang

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

220

Using Dynamic Tracing Sampling to Measure Long Running Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed cache simulation can be useful to both system developers and application writers to understand an application's performance. However, measuring long running programs can be extremely slow. In this paper we present a technique to use dynamic ...

Jeffrey Odom; Jeffrey K. Hollingsworth; Luiz DeRose; Kattamuri Ekanadham; Simone Sbaraglia

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Summary of June 2 Step-up Transformer Experiment Run  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANLHEPWF Note 184 June 3, 1999 Summary of June 2 Step-up Transformer Experiment Run Wei Gai for AWA group Purpose: To verify efficient Wakefield energy coupling from stage I to...

222

Estimation of run times in a freight rail transportation network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to improve the accuracy of individual freight train run time predictions defined as the time between departure from an origin node to arrival at a destination node not including yard time. ...

Bonsra, Kunal (Kunal Baldev)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

TianRun USA Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name TianRun USA Inc. Place Minnesota Sector Wind energy Product Minnesota-based investment arm of Goldwind Science & Technology, Beijing Tianrun invested USD 3m to set up the...

224

First operational experience with the CMS Run Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Run Control System of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN's new Large Hadron Collider (LHC) controls the sub-detector and central data acquisition systems and the high-level trigger farm of the experiment. ...

Bauer, Gerry P.

225

Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program April 19, 2012 - 11:41am Addthis Annie Whatley Annie Whatley Deputy Director, Office of Minority Economic Impact Editor's Note: This article is cross-posted from the Office of Fossil Energy. Four projects that will strengthen and promote U.S. energy security, scientific discovery and economic competitiveness while producing a diverse next generation of scientists and engineers have been selected as part of the Energy Department's long-running minority educational research program. The awards - presented under the Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions program - are $200,000 each

226

DOE Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program DOE Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program April 19, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Four projects that will strengthen and promote U.S. energy security, scientific discovery and economic competitiveness while producing a diverse next generation of scientists and engineers have been selected as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) long running minority educational research program. The DOE awards - presented under the Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions (HBCU/OMIs) program - are $200,000 each for projects that will address high-performance materials for long-term fossil energy applications, such as advanced ultrasupercritical

227

Silicon detector upgrades for the Tevatron Run 2  

SciTech Connect

The current silicon devices being used by the D0 and CDF collaborations for the Tevatron Run 2a, which is expected to end in 2005 after accumulating about 2 fb{sup -1} of data, will need to be replaced due to radiation damage for the following data collection period designated as Run 2b. We will discuss these silicon replacement plans, the more uniform design of the detectors between D0 and CDF, and the current status of their fabrication.

M. Kruse

2002-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

228

Pomeron fan diagrams with an infrared cutoff and running coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By direct numerical calculations the influence of a physically relevant infrared cutoff and running coupling on the gluon density and structure function of a large nucleus is studied in the perturbative QCD approach. It is found that the infrared cutoff changes the solutions very little. Running of the coupling produces a bigger change, considerably lowering both the saturation momentum and values of the structure functions.

M. A. Braun

2003-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

229

Bearing Analytics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bearing Analytics Bearing Analytics National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition 2013 355 likes Bearing Analytics Purdue University Avoidable bearing failures cost the US industrial economy $50B in damage and downtime every year. Current bearing health monitoring systems do not adequately detect failure until it is too late. Bearing Analytics offers a patent-pending micro-sensor technology that monitors temperature and vibration directly on the bearing cage helping predict performance degradation and impending failure while improving operating, performance, and energy efficiencies. Our technology does all of that with a better accuracy, faster response time, and increased reliability over any other competing solution today. We intend to target the wind turbine industry as our initial target point

230

Bearing Analytics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bearing Analytics Bearing Analytics National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition 2013 355 likes Bearing Analytics Purdue University Avoidable bearing failures cost the US industrial economy $50B in damage and downtime every year. Current bearing health monitoring systems do not adequately detect failure until it is too late. Bearing Analytics offers a patent-pending micro-sensor technology that monitors temperature and vibration directly on the bearing cage helping predict performance degradation and impending failure while improving operating, performance, and energy efficiencies. Our technology does all of that with a better accuracy, faster response time, and increased reliability over any other competing solution today. We intend to target the wind turbine industry as our initial target point

231

Bearing Analytics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bearing Analytics Bearing Analytics National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition 2013 355 likes Bearing Analytics Purdue University Avoidable bearing failures cost the US industrial economy $50B in damage and downtime every year. Current bearing health monitoring systems do not adequately detect failure until it is too late. Bearing Analytics offers a patent-pending micro-sensor technology that monitors temperature and vibration directly on the bearing cage helping predict performance degradation and impending failure while improving operating, performance, and energy efficiencies. Our technology does all of that with a better accuracy, faster response time, and increased reliability over any other competing solution today. We intend to target the wind turbine industry as our initial target point

232

Computing $\\pi(x)$ Analytically  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a rigorous implementation of the Lagarias and Odlyzko Analytic Method to evaluate the prime counting function and its use to compute unconditionally the number of primes less than $10^{24}$.

Platt, David J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Video Analytics for Business Intelligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Closed Circuit TeleVision (CCTV) cameras have been increasingly deployed pervasively in public spaces including retail centres and shopping malls. Intelligent video analytics aims to automatically analyze content of massive amount of public space video ...

Caifeng Shan; Fatih Porikli; Tao Xiang; Shaogang Gong

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Optimal design and operation of multivessel batch distillation with fixed product demand. Modelling, simulation and optimisation of design and operation parameters in multivessel batch distillation under fixed product demand scenario and strict product specifications using simple dynamic model in gPROMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increased interest in unconventional batch distillation column configurations offers new opportunities for increasing the flexibility and energy efficiency of batch distillation. One configuration of particular (more)

Mahmud, Mohamed Taher Mustafa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Visual Analytics for Roof Savings Calculator Ensembles  

SciTech Connect

The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for DOE as an industry-consensus, web-based tool for easily running complex building energy simulations. These simulations allow both homeowners and experts to determine building-specific cost and energy savings for modern roof and attic technologies. Using a database of over 3 million RSC simulations for different combinations of parameters, we have built a visual analytics tool to assist in the exploration and identification of features in the data. Since the database contains multiple variables, both categorical and continuous, we employ a coordinated multi-view approach that allows coordinated feature exploration through multiple visualizations at once. The main component of our system, a parallel coordinates view, has been adapted to handle large-scale, mixed data types as are found in RSC simulations. Other visualizations include map coordinated plots, high dynamic range (HDR) line plot rendering, and an intuitive user interface. We demonstrate these techniques with several use cases that have helped identify software and parametric simulation issues.

Jones, Chad [University of California, Davis; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; Ma, Kwan-Liu [University of California, Davis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Sequoia retains top ranking on Graph 500 for third year running  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12113_sequoia 12113_sequoia 11/21/2013 High Resolution Image Lawrence Livermore's Sequoia supercomputer again retained its No. 1 ranking on the Graph 500 list. Sequoia retains top ranking on Graph 500 for third year running Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov High Resolution Image From left: LLNL's Adam Bertsch, Dona Crawford and Scott Futral with the certificate for No. 1 on the Graph 500 in the SC13 DOE booth. LLNL's 20 petaflops Sequoia supercomputer again retained its No. 1 ranking on the Graph 500 list, a measure of a system's ability to conduct analytic calculations -- finding the proverbial needle in the haystack. An IBM Blue Gene Q system, Sequoia was able to traverse 15,363 giga edges per second on a scale of 40 graph (a graph with 2^40 vertices). The new

237

Analytical Division Seed Oil Translation Table  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

seed oil translation table nomencalture Analytical Division Seed Oil Translation Table Analytical Chemistry Analytical Chemistry aocs articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemistry Chromatography (liquid detergents esters fats fo

238

SLUDGE BATCH 5 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL  

SciTech Connect

Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Five (SB5) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Part of this SB5 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40 to complete the formation of SB5. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB4. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry taken on March 21, 2008. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by five washes, six decants, an addition of Pu/Be from Canyon Tank 16.4, and an addition of NaNO2. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Ta Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task 2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task 5) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB5 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. Data presented in this report represents the measured or estimated radionuclide concentrations obtained from several standard and special analytical methods performed by Analytical Development (AD) personnel within SRNL. The method for I-129 measurement in sludge is described in detail. Most of these methods were performed on solutions resulting from the dissolutions of the slurry samples. Concentrations are given for twenty-nine radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated. Results also indicate that 98% of the Tc-99 and 92% of the I-129 that could have been in this sludge batch have been removed by chemical processing steps in the SRS Canyons or Tank Farm.

Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

239

Experimental Results of NWCF Run H4 Calcine Dissolution Studies Performed in FY-98 and -99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolution experiments were performed on actual samples of NWCF Run H-4 radioactive calcine in fiscal years 1998 and 1999. Run H-4 is an aluminum/sodium blend calcine. Typical dissolution data indicates that between 90-95 wt% of H-4 calcine can be dissolved using 1gram of calcine per 10 mLs of 5-8M nitric acid at boiling temperature. Two liquid raffinate solutions composed of a WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend and a WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend were converted into calcine at the NWCF. Calcine made from each blend was collected and transferred to RAL for dissolution studies. The WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend calcine was dissolved with resultant solutions used as feed material for separation treatment experimentation. The WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend calcine dissolution testing was performed to determine compositional analyses of the dissolved solution and generate UDS for solid/liquid separation experiments. Analytical fusion techniques were then used to determine compositions of the solid calcine and UDS from dissolution. The results from each of these analyses were used to calculate elemental material balances around the dissolution process, validating the experimental data. This report contains all experimental data from dissolution experiments performed using both calcine blends.

Garn, Troy Gerry; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Sierra, Tracy Laureena

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Running Dry at the Power Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Running Dry at the Power Plant Running Dry at the Power Plant Running Dry at the Power Plant Securing sufficient supplies of fresh water for societal, industrial, and agricultural uses while protecting the natural environment is becoming increasingly difficult in many parts of the United States. Climate variability and change may exacerbate the situation through hotter weather and disrupted precipitation patterns that promote regional droughts. Achieving long- term water sustainability will require balancing competing needs effectively, managing water resources more holistically, and developing innovative approaches to water use and conserva- tion. Utility companies-which use substantial amounts of water for plant cooling and other needs-are doing their part by pursuing water-conserving

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities May 28, 2013 - 12:05pm Addthis Working with Republic Services, the city of Boise and Valley Regional Transit, Treasure Valley Clean Cities built four compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations that allowed all three organizations to transition to CNG vehicles. | Photo courtesy of Valley Regional Transit. Working with Republic Services, the city of Boise and Valley Regional Transit, Treasure Valley Clean Cities built four compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations that allowed all three organizations to transition to CNG vehicles. | Photo courtesy of Valley Regional Transit. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What are the key facts?

242

Mill Run Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Power Project Wind Power Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Mill Run Wind Power Project Facility Mill Run Wind Power Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Atlantic Renewable Energy Energy Purchaser Exelon Location Mill Run PA Coordinates 39.921026°, -79.388666° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.921026,"lon":-79.388666,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

243

Analytical Dashboards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reporting » Analytical Dashboards Reporting » Analytical Dashboards Analytical Dashboards Public Final Occurrence Reports: Searchable information on DOE's Final Occurrence Reports since 2009, available to the public and updated daily. Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System (CAIRS) - Injury and Illness Dashboard: The Injury and Illness Dashboard is a tool that allows users to easily explore DOE occupational safety and health injury and illness information. Its features include: Graphical and tabular depictions of injury and illness information Calendar year and fiscal year incidence rates for DOE and DOE contractor total recordable cases (TRC) of injuries and illnesses and cases involving days away from work or on job transfer or restriction (DART) due to injury or illness Incidence rates of injuries and illnesses by DOE program

244

Ecologic Analytics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecologic Analytics Ecologic Analytics Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecologic Analytics Place Bloomington, Minnesota Zip 55425 Product Minnesota-based meter data management company. Coordinates 42.883574°, -90.926122° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.883574,"lon":-90.926122,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

245

Performance data from the ZEPLIN-III second science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ZEPLIN-III is a two-phase xenon direct dark matter experiment located at the Boulby Mine (UK). After its first science run in 2008 it was upgraded with: an array of low background photomultipliers, a new anti-coincidence detector system with plastic scintillator and an improved calibration system. After 319 days of data taking the second science run ended in May 2011. In this paper we describe the instrument performance with emphasis on the position and energy reconstruction algorithm and summarise the final science results.

Majewski, P; Akimov, D Yu; Araujo, H M; Barnes, E J; Belov, V A; Burenkov, A A; Chepel, V; Currie, A; DeViveiros, L; Edwards, B; Ghag, C; Hollingsworth, A; Horn, M; Kalmus, G E; Kobyakin, A S; Kovalenko, A G; Lebedenko, V N; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Luscher, R; Murphy, A St J; Neves, F; Paling, S M; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R; Quenby, J J; Reichhart, L; Scovell, P R; Silva, C; Smith, N J T; Stekhanov, V N; Sumner, T J; Thorne, C; Walker, R J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Run-time optimization of adaptive irregular applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compared to traditional compile-time optimization, run-time optimization could o?er signi?cant performance improvements when parallelizing and optimizing adaptive irregular applications, because it performs program analysis and adaptive optimizations during program execution. Run-time techniques can succeed where static techniques fail because they exploit the characteristics of input data, programs' dynamic behaviors, and the underneath execution environment. When optimizing adaptive irregular applications for parallel execution, a common observation is that the effectiveness of the optimizing transformations depends on programs' input data and their dynamic phases. This dissertation presents a set of run-time optimization techniques that match the characteristics of programs' dynamic memory access patterns and the appropriate optimization (parallelization) transformations. First, we present a general adaptive algorithm selection framework to automatically and adaptively select at run-time the best performing, functionally equivalent algorithm for each of its execution instances. The selection process is based on off-line automatically generated prediction models and characteristics (collected and analyzed dynamically) of the algorithm's input data, In this dissertation, we specialize this framework for automatic selection of reduction algorithms. In this research, we have identi?ed a small set of machine independent high-level characterization parameters and then we deployed an off-line, systematic experiment process to generate prediction models. These models, in turn, match the parameters to the best optimization transformations for a given machine. The technique has been evaluated thoroughly in terms of applications, platforms, and programs' dynamic behaviors. Speci?cally, for the reduction algorithm selection, the selected performance is within 2% of optimal performance and on average is 60% better than "Replicated Buffer," the default parallel reduction algorithm speci?ed by OpenMP standard. To reduce the overhead of speculative run-time parallelization, we have developed an adaptive run-time parallelization technique that dynamically chooses effcient shadow structures to record a program's dynamic memory access patterns for parallelization. This technique complements the original speculative run-time parallelization technique, the LRPD test, in parallelizing loops with sparse memory accesses. The techniques presented in this dissertation have been implemented in an optimizing research compiler and can be viewed as effective building blocks for comprehensive run-time optimization systems, e.g., feedback-directed optimization systems and dynamic compilation systems.

Yu, Hao

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Appendix C Analytical Chemistry Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Analytical Chemistry Data This page intentionally left blank Contents Section Analytical Data for Deleted Contaminants of Concern ............................................................. C1.O Mol~tezuma Creek Hardness Dat Surface Water Copper Data Summa ................ CI-9 Surface Water Radium-228 Dat Surface Water Radon-222 Data Summary ....................... ....................................... . . . . . . . . . . . C l - I 2 Alluvial Ground Water Aln~noniuu~ as Nitrogen Data Summary ....................... . . . ................................ Cl-15 Alluvial Ground Water Cobalt Data Summary ........... Alluvial Ground Water Copper Data Sumrl Alluvial Ground Water Lead Data Su~nmary ................................. C1-19 Alluvial Ground Water Lead-210 Data Sutl~rnary

248

Use of Batch and Column Methodologies to Assess Utility Waste Leaching and Subsurface Chemical Attenuation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Often, a combination of batch and column methods is used in the laboratory to test wastes for leaching and attenuation potentials. This literature review addresses the strengths and limitations of using these two methods to predict leachate generation and subsequent attenuation at coal combustion waste management sites.

1991-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

Effects of Fe2+ on the Anaerobic Digestion of Chicken Manure: A Batch Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trace elements are considered to be essential for anaerobic process. Laboratory-scale batch studies were undertaken to evaluate the effect of Fe2+on the biogas production from chicken manure at mesophilic condition (37 1C). The biogas production ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, chicken manure, dynamics, iron, stimulation and inhibition

Zhang Wanqin; Guo Jianbin; Wu Shubiao; Dong Renjie; Zhou Jie; Lang Qianqian; Li Xin; Lv Tao; Pang Changle; Chen Li; Wang Baozhi

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Bid Prices When Demand Is a Mix of Individual and Batch Bookings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industries such as aviation, hospitality, and package tours often face both individual and batch bookings, requiring one unit and multiple units of capacity, respectively. Using bid prices is a common practice in accepting or rejecting an incoming booking ... Keywords: air cargo, bid prices, nonlinear programming formulation, revenue management

Andreea Popescu, Earl Barnes, Ellis Johnson, Pinar Keskinocak

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Batch fabrication of cantilever array aperture probes for scanning near-field optical microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a novel batch fabrication process for cantilever array aperture probes used in scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). The array probes, consisting of 16 parallel cantilevers with each tip having an identical aperture, are proposed ... Keywords: Cantilever probes, Nanofabrication, Scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM)

Y. Zhang; K. E. Docherty; J. M. R. Weaver

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Restructuring Batch View Maintenance Efficiently Bin Liu, Elke A. Rundensteiner and David Finkel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with existing batch algorithms. Categories and Subject Descriptors: H.2.4 [Database Management]: Systems maintenance strategies within the TxnWrap system [3]. The experiments are conducted on four Pentium III 500MHz Systems (TODS), 2004, to appear. [4] A. Gupta and I. Mumick. Maintenance of Materialized Views: Problems

253

Neural network based controller for Cr6+-Fe2+ batch reduction process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated pilot plant has been designed and commissioned to carry out online/real-time data acquisition and control for the Cr^6^+-Fe^2^+ reduction process. Simulated data from the Cr^6^+-Fe^2^+ model derived are validated with online data and laboratory ... Keywords: Batch system, Neural Networks, ORP, Redox process

Chew Chun Ming; M. A. Hussain; M. K. Aroua

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Sorption of Eu(III) on Attapulgite Studied by Batch, XPS and EXAFS Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption of Eu(III) on Attapulgite Studied by Batch, XPS and EXAFS Techniques Q.H. FAN,, , X.L. TAN, , J.X. LI , X.K. WANG* , W.S. WU* , G. Montavon&* Key Laboratory of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, the sorption of Eu(III) at the solid-water interface is important for the performance assessment of nuclear

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

255

Machine-Generated Algorithms, Proofs and Software for the Batch Verification of Digital Signature Schemes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expand upon an extended abstract on AutoBatch appearing in ACM CCS 2012 in a number of ways. We add a new Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) under contract FA (DARPA) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) under contract FA8750-11-2-0211, the Office of Naval

256

Enhanced genetic algorithm-based fuzzy multiobjective strategy to multiproduct batch plant design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of the optimal design of batch plants with imprecise demands in product amounts. The design of such plants necessary involves how equipment may be utilized, which means that plant scheduling and production must constitute ... Keywords: Fuzzy numbers, Genetic algorithms, Imprecise demand, Multiobjective optimization, Net present value, Plant design, Production scheduling

A. A. Aguilar-Lasserre; L. Pibouleau; C. Azzaro-Pantel; S. Domenech

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Analytic properties of transition amplitudes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are vectors in Lorent z s pace . 10. Dirac y-mat r ' ces. It i s sually supposed that i ts precise f orm has no effe ct on the analytic pro~ rties of the integr , so t ha t i t suff i ces to t ake V = 1, al though under certain condit ions t his...

Landshoff, Peter Vincent

1962-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

258

PARABOLIC EXHAUSTIONS AND ANALYTIC COVERINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PARABOLIC EXHAUSTIONS AND ANALYTIC COVERINGS Finnur L´arusson January 31, 1993 Abstract. Let be a parabolic exhaustion on a Stein manifold X such that is strictly plurisubharmonic at its zeros. The metric to be parabolic because its logarithm is plurisubharmonic and satisfies the so-called Monge-Amp`ere equation

Lárusson, Finnur

259

Race Fusion 5K Benefit Run/Walk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Race Fusion 5K Benefit Run/Walk ·This event will be held in recognition of Alex who is living already love him so much!" ­Alex Keefover Fus-ion: The process or result of joining two or more things

Mohaghegh, Shahab

260

Floodplain modeling for Paddy's Run at the DOE Fernald Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The restoration work for an intermittent stream, Paddy's Run, in the boundaries of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Site, Ohio, managed by Fluor Fernald, involved floodplain expansion and the installation of grade control structures. Floodplain ... Keywords: Fernald, HEC-RAS, RiverCAD, floodplain, surface water

Marek H. Zaluski; Mark A. Ewanic; Steve D. Dunstan

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Performance monitoring strategies for effective running of commercial refrigeration systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refrigeration systems often represent the largest electricity consumers in the supermarkets. Therefore there is a clear need for running these systems effectively. Performance monitoring uses different techniques to determine the actual system state. ... Keywords: COP, FDD, energy monitoring, performance measure, refrigeration

Martin Hrn?r; Petr Stluka

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The long-run evolution of energy prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I examine the long-run behavior of oil, coal, and natural gas prices, using up to 127 years of data, and address the following questions: What does over a century of data tell us about the stochastic dynamics of price ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

DOE-1: sample run book. [Four different bldgs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Samples of DOE-1 energy analysis runs are presented for four different buildings: a simple structure; a 31-story office building; a modified 31-story office building with a solar-heating system; and a small medical-office building. The intention is to progress from minimal to complex uses of the program. The simple structure introduces the new user to DOE-1. The large office building demonstrates runs on a variety of systems and plant options. The modified office building is a more complex treatment that illustrates the use of DOE-1 to determine energy code compliance. The medical building demonstrates a number of available options, such as simulation of shading surfaces and use of heat recovery. The following is given for each run: a simplified drawing of the building, detailed specifications, DOE-1 input, and selected output reports. The building specifications were compiled to allow the reader to relate the input to the actual physical characteristics of the architecture, distribution system, and central plant for each building. The input shown is that echoed by the program, complete with line numbers supplied by the Building Design Language processor. All of the runs were made on the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory CDC 7600 computer using Version 1.4 of the DOE-1 (formerly Cal-ERDA) program.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses Test Campaign TC11 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). Test run TC11 began on April 7, 2003, with startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until April 18, 2003, when a gasifier upset forced the termination of the test run. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,650 and 1,800 F at pressures from 160 to 200 psig during air-blown operations and around 135 psig during enriched-air operations. Due to a restriction in the oxygen-fed lower mixing zone (LMZ), the majority of the test run featured air-blown operations.

Southern Company Services

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Quantifying disturbance rejection of SLIP-like running systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The speed and maneuverability at which legged animals can travel across rough and cluttered landscapes has provided inspiration for the development of legged robots with similar capabilities. Researchers have developed a number of robots that can run ... Keywords: Legged robot, biologically-inspired robot, disturbance rejection, stability

Bruce Miller; John Schmitt; Jonathan E Clark

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Run-time validation of knowledge-based systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As knowledge bases become more complex it is increasingly unlikely that they will have been validated against all possible data and therefore an increasing risk of making errors. Run-time validation is checking whether the output of a knowledge base ... Keywords: anomalies, outliers, prudence, ripple-down rules, validation

Angela Finlayson, Paul Compton

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Sea-Breeze Front Analytical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical solutions to the nonlinear equations of motion are used to describe the sea breeze front.

Yizhak Feliks

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Analyses by the Defense Waste Processing Facility Laboratory of Thorium Glasses from the Sludge Batch 6 Variability Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with Frit 418. At times during the processing of this glass system, thorium is expected to be at concentrations in the final wasteform that make it a reportable element for the first time since startup of radioactive operations at the DWPF. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) supported the qualification of the processing of this glass system at the DWPF. A recommendation from the SRNL studies was the need for the DWPF Laboratory to establish a method to measure thorium by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES). This recommendation led to the set of thorium-bearing glasses from the SB6 Variability Study (VS) being submitted to the DWPF Laboratory for chemical composition measurement. The measurements were conducted by the DWPF Laboratory using the sodium peroxide fusion preparation method routinely employed for analysis of samples from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). These measurements are presented and reviewed in this report. The review indicates that the measurements provided by the DWPF Laboratory are comparable to those provided by Analytical Development's laboratory at SRNL for these same glasses. As a result, the authors of this report recommend that the DWPF Laboratory begin using its routine peroxide fusion dissolution method for the measurement of thorium in SME samples of SB6. The purpose of this technical report is to present the measurements generated by the DWPF Laboratory for the SB6 VS glasses and to compare the measurements to the targeted compositions for these VS glasses as well as to SRNL's measurements (both sets, targeted and measured, of compositional values were reported by SRNL in [2]). The goal of these comparisons is to provide information that will lead to the qualification of peroxide fusion dissolution as a method for the measurement by the DWPF Laboratory of thorium in SME glass samples.

Edwards, T.; Click, D.; Feller, M.

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

269

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) is predominantly a combination of H-modified (HM) sludge from Tank 11 that underwent aluminum dissolution in late 2007 to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and aluminum being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Purex sludge transferred from Tank 7. Following aluminum dissolution, the addition of Tank 7 sludge and excess Pu to Tank 51, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB5 qualification. SB5 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of a Pu/Be stream from H Canyon), DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass chemical durability evaluation. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernatant) and concentration (decanting of supernatant) of the Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF CPC simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. This includes a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid is added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and remove mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit is added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters for the CPC processing were based on work with a non radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and Product Consistency Test (PCT) evaluation of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This work is controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) , and analyses are guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF.

Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Amanda Billings, A; Ned Bibler, N

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

270

Analytical evaluation of the electrostatic potential for diatomic molecules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technique of expanding Lowdin alpha-functions in a Taylor series has been further developed and applied to the problem of the electrostatic potential due to H{sub 2} with given 1s, 2s, 2p Slater-type orbitals. In contrast to other methods, the approach is completely analytic, and capable of arbitrary precision. The ultimate accuracy of our method is dependent upon the number of partial waves used; here by use of only 13 harmonics excellent results are achieved. The methods are readily generalized to larger molecules. The electron-molecule static interaction potentials is of central importance to calculations of cross sections for electron-molecule collisions. In this paper, using the diatomic hydrogen molecule of Fraga and Ransil, the authors introduce a fully analytic method and make a few comparisons with computer runs using the codes of Morrison and Schmid et al. They, as well as others, need numerical integrals for the potential. The authors analytical methods avoid cancellation errors and singularities by expanding the exponentials in the Lowdin alpha-functions, which are used to represent displaced orbitals in a spherical harmonic series.

Jones, H.W.; Etemadi, B.; Weatherford, C.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The big bang and inflation united by an analytic solution  

SciTech Connect

Exact analytic solutions for a class of scalar-tensor gravity theories with a hyperbolic scalar potential are presented. Using an exact solution we have successfully constructed a model of inflation that produces the spectral index, the running of the spectral index, and the amplitude of scalar perturbations within the constraints given by the WMAP 7 years data. The model simultaneously describes the big bang and inflation connected by a specific time delay between them so that these two events are regarded as dependent on each other. In solving the Friedmann equations, we have utilized an essential Weyl symmetry of our theory in 3+1 dimensions which is a predicted remaining symmetry of 2T-physics field theory in 4+2 dimensions. This led to a new method of obtaining analytic solutions in the 1T field theory which could in principle be used to solve more complicated theories with more scalar fields. Some additional distinguishing properties of the solution includes the fact that there are early periods of time when the slow-roll approximation is not valid. Furthermore, the inflaton does not decrease monotonically with time; rather, it oscillates around the potential minimum while settling down, unlike the slow-roll approximation. While the model we used for illustration purposes is realistic in most respects, it lacks a mechanism for stopping inflation. The technique of obtaining analytic solutions opens a new window for studying inflation, and other applications, more precisely than using approximations.

Bars, Itzhak [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-2535 (United States); Chen, Shih-Hung [Department of Physics and School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1404 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Energy Analytics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Analytics Energy Analytics Place Brewster, New York Product New York-based energy management and curtailment company. Coordinates 48.099675°, -119.78091° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.099675,"lon":-119.78091,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

273

SSRL Experimental Run Schedule | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experimental Run Schedule Experimental Run Schedule SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will be closed for the winter holidays, December 21, 2013 through January 5, 2014. SSRL generally operates November through August, using the shutdown period for upgrades and maintenance projects. SSRL operates at 500mA and employs a frequent fill schedule to maintain the SPEAR3 current approximately constant. Automatic injections will be conducted every 5 minutes. Automatic injections will only occur at the designated 5 minute intervals (i.e., on the hour and every 5 minutes thereafter). If the injector is not functional at the designated fill time, then the fill will be skipped. The current will be replenished at the next scheduled fill time after the injector is repaired and normal injection intervals will resume. The operator will give

274

Dry Run, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Run, Ohio: Energy Resources Run, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.1042277°, -84.330494° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1042277,"lon":-84.330494,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

275

Running Springs, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Running Springs, California: Energy Resources Running Springs, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.2077859°, -117.1092049° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.2077859,"lon":-117.1092049,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

276

SUMMARY OF HRE-2 RUN 13 (INITIAL POWER OPERATION)  

SciTech Connect

The first power operation of the HRE-2, referred to as Run 13, occurred in February 1958. In five days of power operation, the maximum sustained power was 1.5 Mw and the total power generated was 4B Mw-hr. During the first part of the power operation, the fuel solution contained very little internal recombination catalyst. This part of the run was characterized by high concentrations of radiolytic gas and significant loss of reactivity at very low powers. After an addition of copper and acid, reactivity losses were observed only nt higher powers. Power operation was terminated after samples showed high nickel concentrations in the fuel solution, indicating a very high stainless steel corrosion rate. Subsequent subcritical operation ended because of power wiring insulation failures. (auth)

Engel, J.R.; Haubenreich, P.N.; Hernandez-Fragoso, J.; Richardson, D.M.

1958-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

277

THE ANALYSIS OF DEPOLARIZATION FACTORS IN THE LAST RHIC RUN.  

SciTech Connect

Polarized proton beams were accelerated successfully at RHIC up to 100 Gev with the use of Siberian Snakes. Although the snakes were designed to preserve polarization, the successful acceleration and storage of polarized beams was dependent also on beam characteristics, like closed orbit, betatron tunes and even betatron coupling. The high-order spin resonances were observed and evaluated. The paper summarizes depolarizing effects observed during the run.

PTITSYN,V.LUCCIO,A.U.RANJBAR,V.H.

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

278

Snowmass Benchmark Points and Three-Loop Running  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the full three-loop beta-functions for the MSSM generalised to include additional matter multiplets in 5, 10 representations of SU(5). We analyse in detail the effect of three-loop running on the sparticle spectrum for the MSSM Snowmass Benchmark Points. We also consider the effect on these spectra of additional matter multiplets (the semi-perturbative unification scenario).

I. Jack; D. R. T. Jones; A. F. Kord

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

Succinct suffix arrays based on run-length encoding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A succinet full-text self-index is a data structure built on a text T = t1t2...tn, which takes little space (ideally close to that of the compressed text), permits efficient search for the ... Keywords: burrows-wheeler transform, compressed full-text self-indexes, empirical k-th order entropy, indexed string matching, run-length compression, suffix arrays, text retrieval

Veli Mkinen; Gonzalo Navarro

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Federal Reserve Bank of New York Staff Reports Repo Runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary findings and is being distributed to economists and other interested readers solely to stimulate discussion and elicit comments. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and are not necessarily reflective of views at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York or the Federal Reserve System. Any errors or omissions are the responsibility of the authors. Repo Runs

Antoine Martin; David Skeie; Antoine Martin; David Skeie; Ernst-ludwig Von Thadden

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Search for gravitational wave bursts in LIGO's third science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts in data from the three LIGO interferometric detectors during their third science run. The search targets subsecond bursts in the frequency range 100-1100 Hz for which no waveform model is assumed, and has a sensitivity in terms of the root-sum-square (rss) strain amplitude of hrss ~ 10^{-20} / sqrt(Hz). No gravitational wave signals were detected in the 8 days of analyzed data.

LIGO Scientific Collaboration

2005-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

282

GoldRush: resource efficient in situ scientific data analytics using fine-grained interference aware execution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Severe I/O bottlenecks on High End Computing platforms call for running data analytics in situ. Demonstrating that there exist considerable resources in compute nodes un-used by typical high end scientific simulations, we leverage this fact by creating ...

Fang Zheng, Hongfeng Yu, Can Hantas, Matthew Wolf, Greg Eisenhauer, Karsten Schwan, Hasan Abbasi, Scott Klasky

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Spent fuel drying system test results (second dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks have been detected in the basins and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the second dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. With the concurrence of project management, the test protocol for this run, and subsequent drying test runs, was modified. These modifications were made to allow for improved data correlation with drying procedures proposed under the IPS. Details of these modifications are discussed in Section 3.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Design and first tests of the CDF Run 2 farms  

SciTech Connect

The high energy physics experiment CDF, located in the anti-proton-proton collider at Fermilab, will write data in Run 2 at a rate of 20 MByte/s, twenty times the rate of Run 1. The offline production system must be able to handle this rate. Components of that system include a large PC farm, I/O systems to read/write data to and from mass storage, and a system to split the reconstructed data into physics streams which are required for analysis. All of the components must work together seamlessly to ensure the necessary throughput. A description will be given of the overall hardware and software design for the system. A small prototype farm has been used for about one year to study performance, to test software designs and for the first Mock Data Challenge. Results from the tests and experience from the first Mock Data Challenge will be discussed. The hardware for the first production farm is in place and will be used for the second Mock Data Challenge. Finally, the possible scaling of the system to handle larger rates foreseen later in Run 2 will be described.

Jaroslav Antos et al.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

SRS SLUDGE BATCH QUALIFICATION AND PROCESSING; HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE AND LESSONS LEARNED  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a historical overview and lessons learned associated with the SRS sludge batch (SB) qualification and processing programs. The report covers the framework of the requirements for waste form acceptance, the DWPF Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), waste feed acceptance, examples of how the program complies with the specifications, an overview of the Startup Program, and a summary of continuous improvements and lessons learned. The report includes a bibliography of previous reports and briefings on the topic.

Cercy, M.; Peeler, D.; Stone, M.

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

Removal of aqueous rinsable flux residues in a batch spray dishwater  

SciTech Connect

An alkaline detergent solution used in an industrial dishwasher was evaluated to remove aqueous rinsable flux residues on printed wiring boards (PWBs) after hot air solder leveling and hot oil solder dip and leveling. The dishwasher, a batch cleaning process, was compared to an existing conveyorized aqueous cleaning process. The aqueous soluble flux residues from both soldering processes were removed with a solution of a mild alkaline detergent dissolved in hot deionized (DI) water.

Slanina, J.T.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Analysis Of DWPF Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8) Pour Stream Samples  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed.

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

288

Spent fuel drying system test results (first dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site. Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. The empty test apparatus was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The data from this dry-run test can serve as a baseline for the first two fuel element tests, 1990 (Run 1) and 3128W (Run 2). The purpose of this dry-run was to establish the background levels of hydrogen in the system, and the hydrogen generation and release characteristics attributable to the test system without a fuel element present. This test also serves to establish the background levels of water in the system and the water release characteristics. The system used for the drying test series was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, which is located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in section 3.0, and the experimental results provided in Section 4.0. These results are further discussed in Section 5.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Streamlined determination of processive run length and mechanochemical coupling of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RecBCD helicase determined from single turnover chemical quenched-flow kinetic studies. J. Mol. Biol, for both basic research and technological applications. Here, we present a streamlined analytical method of kinetic time courses of NTP hydrolysis that have not been addressed in previous analyses, and also

Derényi, Imre

290

AOCS Analytical Guidelines Am 1a-09  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near Infrared Spectroscopy Instrument Management and Prediction Model Development. Am 1a-09. AOCS Analytical Guidelines Am 1a-09 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads AOCS ...

291

Analytical Division Newsletter September 201/span>3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the September newsletter from the Analytical Division. Analytical Division Newsletter September 201/span>3 Membership Information achievement application award Awards distinguished division Divisions fats job Join lipid lipids Member member get a

292

Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils According to 20 NMAC 9.1.704 704. REQUIRED), or other applicable statutes. Page 1 of 1Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils 4

293

Definition: Analytical Modeling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analytical Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Analytical Modeling 1. A simple version: A model is a simplified representation of some aspect of the real world. 2....

294

Google Analytics | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Google Analytics Home Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(287) Contributor 8 November, 2012 - 13:58 OpenEI dashboard Google Analytics mediawiki OpenEI statistics wiki OpenEI web...

295

Influence of the batch's coke-ore ratio and distribution on the porosity of the melting zone  

SciTech Connect

The variation in gas permeability in the melting zone is considered as a function of the height and configuration of the coke packing and the ore component of the batch.

V.P. Tarasov; L.V. Bykov; P.V. Tarasov [Priazovsk State Technical University, Mariupol (Ukraine)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Data, information and analytics as services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While organizations are trying to become more agile to better respond to market changes in the midst of rapidly globalizing competition by adopting service orientation-commoditization of business processes, architectures, software, infrastructures and ... Keywords: Agile analytics, Analytics-as-a-service, Business analytics, Cloud computing, Data-as-a-service, Information-as-a-service, Service-orientation

Dursun Delen, Haluk Demirkan

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Using google analytics to explore ETDs use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This poster presents preliminary Google Analytics usage data for a collection of electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs). Correlation of page views with page type, user location, and source (referring link) shows that, during the study period, most ... Keywords: ETDs, evaluation, google analytics, usage, web analytics, web metrics

Midge Coates

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Evaluation of ISDP Batch 2 Qualification Compliance to 512-S, DWPF, Tank Farm, and Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the acceptability of the second macrobatch (Salt Batch 2) of Tank 49H waste to H Tank Farm, DWPF, and Saltstone for operation of the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). Tank 49 feed meets the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) requirements specified by References 11, 12, and 13. Salt Batch 2 material is qualified and ready to be processed through ARP/MCU to the final disposal facilities.

Shafer, A.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

299

The State of Supersymmetry after Run I of the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In these lectures I survey the state of supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model in light of data from the first run of the LHC. After assessing pre-LHC expectations based on principles of naturalness and parsimony, I review the landscape of direct and indirect search limits at the LHC, including the implications of the observed Higgs mass and couplings. Finally, I survey several broad classes of supersymmetric models that are consistent with current data and enumerate the most promising search strategies and model-building directions for the future.

Nathaniel Craig

2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

300

First LQCD Physics Runs with MILC and P4RHMC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An initial series of physics LQCD runs were submitted to the BG/L science bank with the milc and p4rhmc. Both runs were for lattice dimensions of 32{sup 2} x 8. The p4 calculation was performed with v2.0 QMP{_}MPI.X (semioptomized p4 code using qmp over mpi) and milc v7.2, also using RHMC, but not specifically optimized for BlueGene. Calculations were performed along lines of constant physics, with the light quark masses 2-3 times their physics values and the strange quark mass set by m{sub ud} = 0.1m{sub s}. Job submissions was performed using the standard milc and p4 scripts provided on the ubgl cluster. Initial thermalized lattices for each code were also provided in this way. The only modifications for running on BG/L were to the directory names and the mT parameter which determines job durations (24 hrs on BG/L vs. 4 hrs on ubgl). The milc scripts were set to resubmit themselves 10 times, and the p4 scripts were submitted serially using the ''psub -d'' job dependency option. The runp4rhmc.tcsh could not be used to resubmit due to the 30m time limit imposed on interactive jobs. Most jobs were submitted to the smallest, 512 node partitions, but both codes could also run on the 1024 node partitions with a gain of only 30-50%. The majority of jobs ran without error. Stalled jobs were often indicative of a communication gap within a partition that LC was able to fix quickly. On some occasion a zero-length lattice file was deleted to allow jobs to restart successfully. Approximately 1000 trajectories were calculated for each beta value, see Table . The analysis was performed with the standard analysis scripts for each code, make{_}summary.pl for milc and analysis.tcsh for p4rhmc. All lattices, log files, and job submission scripts have been archived to permanent storage for subsequent analysis.

Soltz, R; Gupta, R

2007-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Long-Run Evolution of Energy Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: I examine the long-run behavior of oil, coal, and natural gas prices, using up to 127 years of data, and address the following questions: What does over a century of data tell us about the stochastic dynamics of price evolution, and how it should be modeled? Can models of reversion to stochastically fluctuating trend lines help us forecast prices over horizons of 20 years or more? And what do the answers to these questions tell us about investment decisions that are dependent on prices and their stochastic evolution?

Robert S. Pindyck

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Hybrid Run-time Power Management Technique for Realtime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a new run-time power management technique for real-time embedded systems which consist of a voltage scalable processor and power controllable peripheral devices. We have observed that there exist significant trade-offs in terms of energy consumption between the Dynamic Power Management (DPM) scheme and the Dynamic Voltage Scaling (DVS) scheme over a wide range of system operating conditions. The proposed technique fully exploits workload-variation slack time by partitioning the task into several timeslots and shut down the unneeded peripheral device on timeslot-by-timeslot basis.

Minyoung Kim; Embedded System With

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Full core reactor analysis: Running Denovo on Jaguar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fully-consistent, full-core, 3D, deterministic neutron transport simulations using the orthogonal mesh code Denovo were run on the massively parallel computing architecture Jaguar XT5. Using energy and spatial parallelization schemes, Denovo was able to efficiently scale to more than 160 k processors. Cell-homogenized cross sections were used with step-characteristics, linear-discontinuous finite element, and trilinear-discontinuous finite element spatial methods. It was determined that using the finite element methods gave considerably more accurate eigenvalue solutions for large-aspect ratio meshes than using step-characteristics. (authors)

Jarrell, J. J.; Godfrey, A. T.; Evans, T. M.; Davidson, G. G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

CMS Data Processing Workflows during an Extended Cosmic Ray Run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CMS Collaboration conducted a month-long data taking exercise, the Cosmic Run At Four Tesla, during October-November 2008, with the goal of commissioning the experiment for extended operation. With all installed detector systems participating, CMS recorded 270 million cosmic ray events with the solenoid at a magnetic field strength of 3.8 T. This paper describes the data flow from the detector through the various online and offline computing systems, as well as the workflows used for recording the data, for aligning and calibrating the detector, and for analysis of the data.

Not Available

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Selective batch crushing in the coal-preparation shop at OAO NTMK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 2004, after reconstruction at OAO Nizhnetagil'skii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (NTMK), blast furnace 6 went into operation for the production of vanadium from hot metal. At the startup of furnace 6, besides optimising its composition; it was decided to restore selective crushing of the coal batch using pneumatic and mechanical separation in the third unit of the coal preparation shop. Additional increase in the mechanical strength of coke by 1.5-2.0% was predicted with a 0.5-1.0% decrease in wear.

N.A. Berkutov; Yu.V. Stepanov; P.V. Shtark; L.A. Makhortova; N.K. Popova; D.A. Koshkarov; N.V. Tsarev [OAO Nizhnetagil'skii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (NTMK)(Russian Federation)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

DOE-2 sample run book: Version 2.1E  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-2 Sample Run Book shows inputs and outputs for a variety of building and system types. The samples start with a simple structure and continue to a high-rise office building, a medical building, three small office buildings, a bar/lounge, a single-family residence, a small office building with daylighting, a single family residence with an attached sunspace, a ``parameterized`` building using input macros, and a metric input/output example. All of the samples use Chicago TRY weather. The main purpose of the Sample Run Book is instructional. It shows the relationship of LOADS-SYSTEMS-PLANT-ECONOMICS inputs, displays various input styles, and illustrates many of the basic and advanced features of the program. Many of the sample runs are preceded by a sketch of the building showing its general appearance and the zoning used in the input. In some cases we also show a 3-D rendering of the building as produced by the program DrawBDL. Descriptive material has been added as comments in the input itself. We find that a number of users have loaded these samples onto their editing systems and use them as ``templates`` for creating new inputs. Another way of using them would be to store various portions as files that can be read into the input using the {number_sign}{number_sign} include command, which is part of the Input Macro feature introduced in version DOE-2.lD. Note that the energy rate structures here are the same as in the DOE-2.lD samples, but have been rewritten using the new DOE-2.lE commands and keywords for ECONOMICS. The samples contained in this report are the same as those found on the DOE-2 release files. However, the output numbers that appear here may differ slightly from those obtained from the release files. The output on the release files can be used as a check set to compare results on your computer.

Winkelmann, F.C.; Birdsall, B.E.; Buhl, W.F.; Ellington, K.L.; Erdem, A.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Hirsch, J.J.; Gates, S. [Hirsch (James J.) and Associates, Camarillo, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

[HOW TO RUN THE CSD FROM A WINDOWS2000] January 28, 2009 How to run the CSD from a MS Windows 2000 (will not work with VISTA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[HOW TO RUN THE CSD FROM A WINDOWS2000] January 28, 2009 How to run the CSD from a MS Windows 2000 for a terminal window to appear. The wait may be 30 to 70 seconds on some machines. 6. Use the terminal window, and shut down the X server. 12. Remove CD from drive. #12;[HOW TO RUN THE CSD FROM A WINDOWS2000] January

Meagher, Mary

308

OCIO Technology Summit: Data Analytics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OCIO Technology Summit: Data Analytics OCIO Technology Summit: Data Analytics May 13, 2013 - 1:51pm Addthis OCIO Technology Summit: Data Analytics The Energy Department's Office of...

309

NATIONAL ,LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO HEALTH AND SAFETY DIVISION - ANALYTICAL...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OF OHIO HEALTH AND SAFETY DIVISION - ANALYTICAL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET NO. DISTRIBUTION OF COPIES 1 Analytical Laboratory (RECORD COPP) 2 Industrial Hygiene 8 Radiotion...

310

NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO HEALTH AND SAFETY DIVISION - ANALYTICAL...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

HEALTH AND SAFETY DIVISION - ANALYTICAL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET NLO NO. DISTRIBUTION OF COPIES 1 Analytical Loboratory (RECORD COPY) 2 Industrial Hygiene & Radiation Dept. 3...

311

The LHCb Muon detector commissioning and first running scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHCb muon detector, part of the first LHCb trigger level (L0), has been built to provide a fast and efficient identification of the muons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The expected performances are: 95% L0 trigger efficiency within a 25 ns time window and muon identification in L0 with a Pr resolution of 20%. The detector has been built using Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers and Gas Electron Multiplier technology. The chambers are arranged in five stations, interspersed with iron filter placed along the beam pipe. The results obtained in the commissioning of all the installed chambers and the measured performances are presented. The strategies foreseen for the detector calibration, the results of the space and time alignment efforts and few first running scenarios are discussed.

Furcas, S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Pennsylvania School Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on AddThis.com... Feb. 16, 2013 Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas F ind out how schools in Pennsylvania transport students in compressed

313

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Santa Fe Metro Fleet Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on AddThis.com... June 8, 2010 Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas " CNG buses are reliable, have cleaner-burning engines, offer increased oil life, and have lower fuel costs than diesel.

314

NOAA Awarded 2.6 Million Processor Hours at NERSC to Run Climate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOAA Awarded 2.6 Million Processor Hours at NERSC to Run Climate Change Models NOAA Awarded 2.6 Million Processor Hours at NERSC to Run Climate Change Models September 11, 2008...

315

Using the Bran Luminosity Detectors for Beam Emittance Monitoring During LHC Physics Runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MONITORING DURING LHC PHYSICS RUNS* A. Ratti", H.S. Matis,IP5 during each of the Physics Runs. This provides a toolthe luminous regions from the physics experiments. Operator

Ratti, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Metadata Provided to OSTI via Batch Upload (Site-to-OSTI) | Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Batch Upload (Site-to-OSTI) Batch Upload (Site-to-OSTI) Print page Print page Email page Email page STI Metadata Elements Required (R), Required, but allows for default value (RWD), or Optional (O). Element Description Requirements Author(s) Include all author names; the primary author should be listed first. Allows for "Not Available" as an option for few cases where necessary. R E-mail Address(es) Provide in same order as author names. Will not be available to the end-user. This data is used by OSTI to automate author notification. O Country of Publication Include if country of publication is not United States; defaults to United States RWD Description/ Abstract Defined as the abstract for STI Products. Provide if available (it can be excerpted from the technical report). Text should be publicly releasable information (not personal, financial, or sensitive). Text should be spell-checked, limited in length to 5000 characters, and follow input standards for special characters.

317

Selenite Reduction by a Denitrifying Culture: Batch- and Packed-Bed- Reactor Studies  

SciTech Connect

Selenite reduction by a bacterial consortium enriched from an oil refinery waste sludge was studied under denitrifying conditions using acetate as the electron donor. Fed-batch studies with nitrate as the primary electron acceptor showed that accumulation of nitrite led to a decrease in the extent of selenite reduction. Also, when nitrite was added as the primary electron acceptor, rapid selenite reduction was observed only after nitrite was significantly depleted from the medium. These results indicate that selenite reduction was inhibited at high nitrite concentrations. In addition to batch experiments, continuous flow selenite reduction experiments were performed in packed-bed columns using immobilized enrichment cultures. These experiments were carried out in three phases: In phase-I, a continuous nitrate feed with different inlet selenite concentration was applied; in phase-II, nitrate was fed in a pulsed fashion; and in phase-III, nitrate was fed in a continuous mode but at much lower concentrations than the other two phases. During the phase-I experiments, little selenite was removed from the influent. However, when the column was operated in the pulse feed strategy (phase II), or in the continuous mode with low nitrate levels (phase-III), significant quantities of selenium was removed from solution and retained in the immobilization matrix in the column. Thus, immobilized denitrifying cultures can be effective in removing selenium from waste streams, but nitrate-limited operating conditions might be required.

William A. Apel; Sridhar Viamajala; Yared Bereded-Samuel; James N. Petersen

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Determination Of Reportable Radionuclides For DWPF Sludge Batch 7B (Macrobatch 9)  

SciTech Connect

The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. Twenty-seven radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b. Each of these radionuclides has a half-life greater than ten years and contributes more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis at some point from production through the 1100 year period between 2015 and 3115. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100- year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are the most extensive conducted to date. Some method development/refinement occurred during the conduct of these measurements, leading to lower detection limits and more accurate measurement of some isotopes than was previously possible.

Crawford, C. L.; Diprete, D. P.

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

319

RECOMMENDED FRIT COMPOSITION FOR INITIAL SLUDGE BATCH 5 PROCESSING AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Frit Development Team recommends that the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) utilize Frit 418 for initial processing of high level waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The extended SB5 preparation time and need for DWPF feed have necessitated the use of a frit that is already included on the DWPF procurement specification. Frit 418 has been used previously in vitrification of Sludge Batches 3 and 4. Paper study assessments predict that Frit 418 will form an acceptable glass when combined with SB5 over a range of waste loadings (WLs), typically 30-41% based on nominal projected SB5 compositions. Frit 418 has a relatively high degree of robustness with regard to variation in the projected SB5 composition, particularly when the Na{sub 2}O concentration is varied. The acceptability (chemical durability) and model applicability of the Frit 418-SB5 system will be verified experimentally through a variability study, to be documented separately. Frit 418 has not been designed to provide an optimal melt rate with SB5, but is recommended for initial processing of SB5 until experimental testing to optimize a frit composition for melt rate can be completed. Melt rate performance can not be predicted at this time and must be determined experimentally. Note that melt rate testing may either identify an improved frit for SB5 processing (one which produces an acceptable glass at a faster rate than Frit 418) or confirm that Frit 418 is the best option.

Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

320

FRIT OPTIMIZATION FOR SLUDGE BATCH PROCESSING AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Frit Development Team recommends that the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) utilize Frit 418 for initial processing of high level waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The extended SB5 preparation time and need for DWPF feed have necessitated the use of a frit that is already included on the DWPF procurement specification. Frit 418 has been used previously in vitrification of Sludge Batches 3 and 4. Paper study assessments predict that Frit 418 will form an acceptable glass when combined with SB5 over a range of waste loadings (WLs), typically 30-41% based on nominal projected SB5 compositions. Frit 418 has a relatively high degree of robustness with regard to variation in the projected SB5 composition, particularly when the Na{sub 2}O concentration is varied. The acceptability (chemical durability) and model applicability of the Frit 418-SB5 system will be verified experimentally through a variability study, to be documented separately. Frit 418 has not been designed to provide an optimal melt rate with SB5, but is recommended for initial processing of SB5 until experimental testing to optimize a frit composition for melt rate can be completed. Melt rate performance can not be predicted at this time and must be determined experimentally. Note that melt rate testing may either identify an improved frit for SB5 processing (one which produces an acceptable glass at a faster rate than Frit 418) or confirm that Frit 418 is the best option.

Fox, K.

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Widget:AnalyticsSummary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AnalyticsSummary AnalyticsSummary Jump to: navigation, search Google Analytics widget that returns an HTML summary of site-wide analytics. Use any arbitrary number of days; for instance, 30-31 days will say "a month", 7 days will say "a week", 1 day will say "a day", 365 days will say "a year", and all other day rates will say "n days". How to call it: {{#Widget:AnalyticsSummary|days=30}} Example Output Loading... Statistics summary for the last 1 7 30 365 days Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Widget:AnalyticsSummary&oldid=535712" Category: Widgets What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

322

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Nanomechanical Sensor Detects and Identifies Chemical Analytes  

ORNL 2010-G00612/jcn UT-B ID 200802066 Nanomechanical Sensor Detects and Identifies Chemical Analytes Technology Summary ORNL researchers developed a ...

325

AOCS Analytical Guidelines S 3-64  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods for the Testing of Epoxidized Oils AOCS Analytical Guidelines S 3-64 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads AOCS DEFINITION Not applicable SCOPE

326

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Balance Calibration and Use in an Analytical Environment ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the sources of weighing errors in analytical environments, methodologies for ... to use of balances in an analytical environment where compliance ...

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

328

Microsoft PowerPoint - S08-06_Peters_Result of Salt Batch Qualifications.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Batch Qualification Testing Salt Batch Qualification Testing Tom Peters, Samuel Fink; E&CPT Research Programs, Savannah River National Laboratory Mark Geeting, Steven Brown, David Martin, Brent Gifford; Tank Farm Engineering, Savannah River Remediation November 17, 2010 SRNL-MS-2010-00250 Print Close 2 This presentation..... Results of Salt Batch Qualification Testing * Describes the Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP), the newest operating facilities at the Savannah River Site for treating stored radioactive waste. * Reviews the past campaigns of salt disposition (Macrobatch 1 and 2). * Reviews current operations (Macrobatch 3) * Outlines the next qualification (Macrobatch 4) * Discusses the limiters in operations. Print Close 3 Introduction In 2001, the Department of Energy (DOE) identified Caustic-Side Solvent

329

Verification Of The Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Process Digestion Methods For The Sludge Batch 8 Qualification Sample  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium Peroxide/Sodium Hydroxide Fusion Dissolution (PF) and Cold Chem (CC) method digestions and Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption analysis of Hg digestions from the DWPF Hg digestion method of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples. The SB8 SRAT Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constitutes the SB8 Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), to form the SB8 Blend composition.

Click, D. R.; Edwards, T. B.; Wiedenman, B. J.; Brown, L. W.

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

330

The Evolving Leadership Path of Visual Analytics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a requested book chapter for an internationally authored book on visual analytics and related fields, coordianted by a UK university and to be published by Springer in 2012. This chapter is an overview of the leadship strategies that PNNL's Jim Thomas and other stakeholders used to establish visual analytics as a field, and how those strategies may evolve in the future.

Kluse, Michael; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Gracio, Deborah K.

2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

331

Technosocial predictive analytics for illicit nuclear trafficking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Illicit nuclear trafficking networks are a national security threat. These networks can directly lead to nuclear proliferation, as state or nonstate actors attempt to identify and acquire nuclear weapons-related expertise, technologies, components, and ... Keywords: analytical gaming, decision making, illicit trafficking, knowledge management, modeling, nuclear proliferation, predictive analytics

Antonio Sanfilippo; Scott Butner; Andrew Cowell; Angela Dalton; Jereme Haack; Sean Kreyling; Rick Riensche; Amanda White; Paul Whitney

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Scale and complexity in visual analytics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fundamental problem that we face is that a variety of large-scale problems in security, public safety, energy, ecology, health care and basic science all require that we process and understand increasingly vast amounts and variety of data. There ... Keywords: analytics, scalability, visual analytics, visualization

George Robertson; David Ebert; Stephen Eick; Daniel Keim; Ken Joy

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Budget allocation and the analytic hierarchy process  

SciTech Connect

This report demonstrates that the priorities calculated by the Analytic Hierarchy Process can be used as measures of benefit for budget allocation. A procedure is described that optimally allocates a budget among competing DOE waste minimization projects. The projects are compared using an analytic hierarchy already developed by Sandia National Laboratories. 2 refs., 3 tabs.

Hulme, B.L. (Hulme Mathematics (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

eoretical Terms without Analytic Truths Michael Strevens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

eoretical Terms without Analytic Truths Michael Strevens To appear in Philosophical Studies A When new theoretical terms are introduced into scienti c discourse, pre- vailing accounts imply, analytic a new account of the intro- duction of theoretical terms that avoids both de nition and reference- xing

Strevens, Michael

335

Visual Analytics at the Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

customers. The success of PNNL's information visualization software, such as IN-SPIRETM and StarlightTM, and publications in top visualization journals and conference proceedings are the results of PNNL researchers with a focus on analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces. PNNL's visual analytics team

336

Nanochannel and its application in analytical chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nanochannels method for the separation and detection of analytes plays an important role in the analytical chemistry and is exhibiting the great potential advantages and promising future. In this review we bring together and discuss a number of nanochannels ... Keywords: applications, nanochannels, preparation, separation

Zenglian Yue; Guoqing Zhao; Bin Peng; Shasheng Huang

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Strong Analytic Controllability for Hydrogen Control Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The realization and representation of so(4,2) associated with the hydrogen atom Hamiltonian are derived. By choosing operators from the realization of so(4,2) as interacting Hamiltonians, a hydrogen atom control system is constructed, and it is proved that this control system is strongly analytically controllable based on a time-dependent strong analytic controllability theorem.

Chunhua Lan; Tzyh-Jong Tarn; Quo-Shin Chi; John W. Clark

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

338

Business Intelligence and Analytics: Research Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Business intelligence and analytics (BIA) is about the development of technologies, systems, practices, and applications to analyze critical business data so as to gain new insights about business and markets. The new insights can be used for improving ... Keywords: Business intelligence, business analytics

Ee-Peng Lim; Hsinchun Chen; Guoqing Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd Hua Run | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hua Run Hua Run Jump to: navigation, search Name China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd (Hua Run) Place Shantou, Guangdong Province, China Zip 515041 Sector Wind energy Product A company engages in developing wind power project. References China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd (Hua Run)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd (Hua Run) is a company located in Shantou, Guangdong Province, China . References ↑ "China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd (Hua Run)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=China_Resources_Wind_Power_Development_Co_Ltd_Hua_Run&oldid=343528

340

[Global warming and the running average sunspot number  

SciTech Connect

It has been reported in your pages that the Bush administration`s views and actions regarding how or whether to react to possible global warming due to greenhouse gases have been influenced by the so-called Marshall report. This unrefereed report, released by the George C. Marshall Institute, had as its principal conclusion the finding that the 0.5{degree} C global warming of the last century was mostly due to solar variability and, thus, the greenhouse warming of the 21st century can be expected to be a relatively small l{degree} C or so. The authors support this finding by comparing the 33-year running average sunspot number with the trend in annual average global temperature and noting the parallel between the two, especially during the 1940s--1960s when the temperature trend was downward. Subsequent letters to Science debated the merits of this and other conclusions contained in the report. I now present additional technical evidence which shows that, quite aside from the question of whether the data presented in the report support its conclusions, the actual figure on which the above conclusion is based is in error.

Fernau, M.E.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Commissioning Run of the CRESST-II Dark Matter Search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CRESST cryogenic direct dark matter search at Gran Sasso, searching for WIMPs via nuclear recoil, has been upgraded to CRESST-II by several changes and improvements.We present the results of a commissioning run carried out in 2007. The basic element of CRESST-II is a detector module consisting of a large (~ 300 g) CaWO_4 crystal and a very sensitive smaller (~ 2 g) light detector to detect the scintillation light from the CaWO_4.Information from light-quenching factor studies allows the definition of a region of the energy-light yield plane which corresponds to tungsten recoils. A neutron test is reported which supports the principle of using the light yield to identify the recoiling nucleus. Data obtained with two detector modules for a total exposure of 48 kg-days are presented. Judging by the rate of events in the "all nuclear recoils" acceptance region the apparatus shows a factor ~ten improvement with respect to previous results, which we attribute principally to the presence of the neutron shield. In the "tungsten recoils" acceptance region three events are found, corresponding to a rate of 0.063 per kg-day. Standard assumptions on the dark matter flux, coherent or spin independent interactions,then yield a limit for WIMP-nucleon scattering of 4.8 \\times 10^{-7}pb, at M{WIMP} ~50 GeV.

G. Angloher; M. Bauer; I. Bavykina; A. Bento; A. Brown; C. Bucci; C. Ciemniak; C. Coppi; G. Deuter; F. von Feilitzsch; D. Hauff; S. Henry; P. Huff; J. Imber; S. Ingleby; C. Isaila; J. Jochum; M. Kiefer; M. Kimmerle; H. Kraus; J. -C. Lanfranchi; R. F. Lang; B. Majorovits; M. Malek; R. McGowan; V. B. Mikhailik; E. Pantic; F. Petricca; S. Pfister; W. Potzel; F. Proebst; W. Rau; S. Roth; K. Rottler; C. Sailer; K. Schaeffner; J. Schmaler; S. Scholl; W. Seidel; L. Stodolsky; A. J. B. Tolhurst; I. Usherov; W. Westphal

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

342

WIPP Remote Handled Waste Facility: Performance Dry Run Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Remote Handled (RH) TRU Waste Handling Facility at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was recently upgraded and modified in preparation for handling and disposal of RH Transuranic (TRU) waste. This modification will allow processing of RH-TRU waste arriving at the WIPP site in two different types of shielded road casks, the RH-TRU 72B and the CNS 10-160B. Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), the WIPP Management and Operation Contractor (MOC), conducted a performance dry run (PDR), beginning August 19, 2002 and successfully completed it on August 24, 2002. The PDR demonstrated that the RHTRU waste handling system works as designed and demonstrated the handling process for each cask, including underground disposal. The purpose of the PDR was to develop and implement a plan that would define in general terms how the WIPP RH-TRU waste handling process would be conducted and evaluated. The PDR demonstrated WIPP operations and support activities required to dispose of RH-TRU waste in the WIPP underground.

Burrington, T. P.; Britain, R. M.; Cassingham, S. T.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

343

LHCb: The LHCb Muon detector commissioning and first running scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHCb Muon detector, being part of the first trigger level (L0), has been optimized in order to provide a fast and efficient identification of the muons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The expected performances are: 95% L0 trigger efficiency within a 25ns time window and muon identification in L0 with a pT resolution of ~20%. The detector has been built, to met those stringent requirements, using Multi Wire Proportional Chambers and Gas Electron Multiplier (in the innermost region, closest to the IP) technology. The chambers (1368 MWPC + 12 GEM) are arranged in 5 detector stations, interspersed with iron filters placed along the beam pipe. While the installation of chambers in stations 2 to 5 has already been completed, the work on the first and most challenging station is still ongoing and expected to end by July 09. The results obtained in the commissioning of all the installed chambers as well as the performances measured by means of data acquired during cosmics runs since September 08 are reviewe...

Furcas, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

SAMGrid experiences with the Condor technology in Run II computing  

SciTech Connect

SAMGrid is a globally distributed system for data handling and job management, developed at Fermilab for the D0 and CDF experiments in Run II. The Condor system is being developed at the University of Wisconsin for management of distributed resources, computational and otherwise. We briefly review the SAMGrid architecture and its interaction with Condor, which was presented earlier. We then present our experiences using the system in production, which have two distinct aspects. At the global level, we deployed Condor-G, the Grid-extended Condor, for the resource brokering and global scheduling of our jobs. At the heart of the system is Condor's Matchmaking Service. As a more recent work at the computing element level, we have been benefiting from the large computing cluster at the University of Wisconsin campus. The architecture of the computing facility and the philosophy of Condor's resource management have prompted us to improve the application infrastructure for D0 and CDF, in aspects such as parting with the shared file system or reliance on resources being dedicated. As a result, we have increased productivity and made our applications more portable and Grid-ready. Our fruitful collaboration with the Condor team has been made possible by the Particle Physics Data Grid.

Baranovski, A.; Loebel-Carpenter, L.; Garzoglio, G.; Herber, R.; Illingworth, R.; Kennedy, R.; Kreymer, A.; Kumar, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A.; Merritt, W.; Terekhov, I.; Trumbo, J.; Veseli, S.; White, S.; /Fermilab; St. Denis, R.; /Glasgow U.; Jain, S.; Nishandar, A.; /Texas U., Arlington

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Numerical model for the vacuum pyrolysis of scrap tires in batch reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quantitative model for scrap tire pyrolysis in a batch scale reactor developed comprises the following basic phenomena: conduction inside tire particles; conduction, convection, and radiation between the feedstock particles or between the fluids and the particles; tire pyrolysis reaction; exothermicity and endothermicity caused by tire decomposition and volatilization; and the variation of the composition and the thermal properties of tire particles. This model was used to predict the transient temperature and density distributions in the bed of particles, the volatile product evolution rate, the mass change, the energy consumption during the pyrolysis process, and the pressure history in a tire pyrolysis reactor with a load of 1 kg. The model predictions agree well with independent experimental data.

Yang, J.; Tanguy, P.A.; Roy, C. [Univ. Laval, Quebec, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Chimique

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

STAR-Scheduler: A Batch Job Scheduler for Distributed I/O Intensive Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the implementation of a batch job scheduler designed for single-point management of distributed tasks on a multi-node compute farm. The scheduler uses the notion of a meta-job to launch large computing tasks simultaneously on many nodes from a single user command. Job scheduling on specific computing nodes is predicated on the availability of user specified data files co-located with the CPUs where the analysis is meant to take place. Large I/O intensive data analyses may thus be efficiently conducted on multiple CPUs without the limitations implied by finite LAN or WAN bandwidths. Although this Scheduler was developed specifically for the STAR Collaboration at Brookhaven National Laboratory, its design is sufficiently general, it can be adapted to virtually any other data analysis tasks carried out by large scientific collaborations.

V. Mandapaka; C. Pruneau; J. Lauret; S. Zeadally

2004-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

347

STAR-Scheduler: A Batch Job Scheduler for Distributed I/O Intensive Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the implementation of a batch job scheduler designed for single-point management of distributed tasks on a multi-node compute farm. The scheduler uses the notion of a meta-job to launch large computing tasks simultaneously on many nodes from a single user command. Job scheduling on specific computing nodes is predicated on the availability of user specified data files co-located with the CPUs where the analysis is meant to take place. Large I/O intensive data analyses may thus be efficiently conducted on multiple CPUs without the limitations implied by finite LAN or WAN bandwidths. Although this Scheduler was developed specifically for the STAR Collaboration at Brookhaven National Laboratory, its design is sufficiently general, it can be adapted to virtually any other data analysis tasks carried out by large scientific collaborations.

Mandapaka, V; Lauret, J; Zeadally, S

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

SLUDGE BATCH 4 FOLLOW-UP QUALIFICATION STUDIES TO EVALUATE HYDROGEN GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Follow-up testing was conducted to better understand the excessive hydrogen generation seen in the initial Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) qualification Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank/Slurry Mix Evaporator (SRAT/SME) simulation in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. This effort included both radioactive and simulant work. The initial SB4 qualification test produced 0.59 lbs/hr hydrogen in the SRAT, which was just below the DWPF SRAT limit of 0.65 lbs/hr, and the test produced over 0.5 lbs/hr hydrogen in the SME cycle on two separate occasions, which were over the DWPF SME limit of 0.223 lbs/hr.

Pareizs, J; David Koopman, D; Dan Lambert, D; Cj Bannochie, C

2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

349

Effect of lactose concentration on batch production of ethanol from cheese whey using Candida pseudotropicalis  

SciTech Connect

The effect of lactose concentration on growth of Candida pseudotropicalis and ethanol production from cheese whey under batch conditions was investigated. Four initial lactose concentrations ranging from 50 to 200 g/L (5 to 20% wt/vol) were used. High concentration of lactose had an inhibitory effect on the specific growth rate, lactose utilization rate, and ethanol production rate. The maximum cell concentration was influenced by the initial substrate concentration as well as ethanol concentration. Inhibition of ethanol production was more pronounced at higher initial lactose concentrations. The maximum ethanol yield (96.6% of the theoretical yield) was achieved with the 100 g/L initial substrate concentration. The results indicated that pH control during alcohol fermentation of cheese whey is not necessary. 41 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Ghaly, A.E.; El-Taweel, A.A. [Technical Univ. of Nova Scotia, Halifax (Canada)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Kinetics and dynamic modelling of batch anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in a stirred reactor  

SciTech Connect

A series of batch, slurry anaerobic digestion experiments were performed where the soluble and insoluble fractions, and unwashed MSW were separately digested in a 200 l stirred stainless steel vessel at a pH of 7.2 and a temperature of 38 deg. C. It was found that 7% of the total MSW COD was readily soluble, of which 80% was converted to biogas; 50% of the insoluble fraction was solubilised, of this only 80% was converted to biogas. The rate of digesting the insoluble fraction was about four times slower than the rate of digesting the soluble fraction; 48% of the total COD was converted to biogas and 40% of the total nitrogen was converted to ammonia. Soluble and insoluble fractions were broken down simultaneously. The minimum time to convert 95% of the degradable fraction to biogas was 20 days. The lag phase for the degradation of insoluble fraction of MSW can be overcome by acclimatising the culture with the soluble fraction. The rate of digestion and the methane yield was not affected by particle size (within the range of 2-50 mm). A dynamic model was developed to describe batch digestion of MSW. The parameters of the model were estimated using data from the separate digestion of soluble and insoluble fractions and validated against data from the digestion of unwashed MSW. Trends in the specific aceticlastic and formate-utilising methanogenic activity were used to estimate initial methanogenic biomass concentration and bacterial death rate coefficient. The kinetics of hydrolysis of insoluble fraction could be adequately described by a Contois equation and the kinetics of acidogenesis, and aceticlastic and hydrogen utilising methanogenesis by Monod equations.

Nopharatana, Annop [Division of Environmental of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. 4072 (Australia); Pilot Plant Development and Training Institute, King Mongkut's University of Technology, Thonburi, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Pullammanappallil, Pratap C. [Division of Environmental of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. 4072 (Australia); Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Clarke, William P. [Division of Environmental of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: billc@cheque.uq.edu.au

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Report for Batch Leach Analyses on Sediments at 100-HR-3 Operable Unit, Boreholes C7620, C7621, C7622, C7623, C7626, C7627, C7628, C7629, C7630, and C7866. Revision 1.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a revision to a previously released report. This revision contains additional analytical results for the sample with HEIS number B2H4X7. Between November 4, 2010 and October 26, 2011 sediment samples were received from 100-HR-3 Operable Unit for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL. Samples were received with a chain of custody (COC) and were analyzed according to the sample identification numbers supplied by the client. All Samples were refrigerated upon receipt until prepared for analysis. All samples were received with custody seals intact unless noted in the Case Narrative. Holding time is defined as the time from sample preparation to the time of analyses. The prescribed holding times were met for all analytes unless noted in the Case Narrative. All reported analytical results meet the requirements of the CAW or client specified SOW unless noted in the case narrative. Due to the requirements of the statement of work and sampling events in the field, the 28 day and the 48 hr requirements cannot be met. The statement of work requires samples to be selected at the completion of the borehole. It is not always possible to complete a borehole and have the samples shipped to the laboratory within the hold time requirements. Duplicate RPD for Uranium 238 (38.9%) was above the acceptance limit (35) in 1E05003-DUP1 for ICPMS-Tc-U-WE The sample result is less than 10 times the detection limits. Duplicate recoveries are not applicable to this analyte. Duplicate RPD for Silver 107 (68.2%) was above the acceptance limit (35) in 2C06004-DUP1 for ICPMS-RCRA-AE The sample result is less than 10 times the detection limits. Duplicate recoveries are not applicable to this analyte. Matrix Spike Recovery for Chromium, Hexavalent (48.8%) was outside acceptance limits (75-125) in 1E23001-MS1 for Hexavalent Chromium/Soil. Potential Matrix interference. Sample results associated with this batch are below the EQL. There should be no impact to the data as reported. Matrix Spike Recovery for Chromium, Hexavalent (50.2%) was outside acceptance limits (75-125) in 2B22010-MS1 for Hexavalent Chromium/Soil. Potential Matrix interference. Sample results associated with this batch are below the EQL. There should be no impact to the data as reported.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

Implementation of an analytical verification technique on three building energy-analysis codes: SUNCAT 2. 4, DOE 2. 1, and DEROB III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analytical verification technique for building energy analysis codes has been developed. For this technique, building models are developed that can be both solved analytically and modeled using the analysis codes. The output of the codes is then compared with the analytical solutions. In this way, the accuracy of selected mechanisms in the codes can be verified. The procedure consists of several tests and was run on SUNCAT 2.4, DOE 2.1, and DEROB III. The results are presented and analyzed.

Wortman, D.; O'Doherty, B.; Judkoff, R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

LCLS-scheduling-run_V_Ver9c.xlsx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tue Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Day Com Com Com Com Com L421 Coffee Night L477 Robinson Gruebel (L304, run 4) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Thur Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Day L498 Yachandra L487 Sokoloswski-Tinten IH Bozek L447 Harmand Night IH Lemke L396 Scherz L396 Scherz L409 Boeglin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Day L399/433 Fromme/Neutze L467 Madsen Night Com Com Com L467 Mad L399/433 Fromme Com Com 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri

354

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC07  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses Test Campaign TC07 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC07. Prior to TC07, the Transport Reactor was modified to allow operations as an oxygen-blown gasifier. Test Run TC07 was started on December 11, 2001, and the sand circulation tests (TC07A) were completed on December 14, 2001. The coal-feed tests (TC07B-D) were started on January 17, 2002 and completed on April 5, 2002. Due to operational difficulties with the reactor, the unit was taken offline several times. The reactor temperature was varied between 1,700 and 1,780 F at pressures from 200 to 240 psig. In TC07, 679 hours of solid circulation and 442 hours of coal feed, 398 hours with PRB coal and 44 hours with coal from the Calumet mine, and 33 hours of coke breeze feed were attained. Reactor operations were problematic due to instrumentation problems in the LMZ resulting in much higher than desired operating temperatures in the reactor. Both reactor and PCD operations were stable and the modifications to the lower part of the gasifier performed well while testing the gasifier with PRB coal feed.

Southern Company Services

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

355

Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data is disclosed. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer. 3 figs.

Berlin, G.J.

1997-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

356

Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer.

Berlin, Gary J. (Beech Island, SC)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer.

Berlin, G.J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Licenses Available in Analytical Instrumentation | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analytical Instrumentation Analytical Instrumentation SHARE Analytical Instrumentation 199700361 Neutron Detection Using an Embedded Sol-Gel Neutron Absorber 199700370 Bioluminescent Bioreporter Integrated Circuits 199900683 Microscale Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer 200101009 Automated Sampling for Microarray Readout Using Electrospray Mass Spectrometry 200201069 Planar Flow-By Electrode Capacitive Electrospray Ion Source 200201145 Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Radiation Detection 200301290 Pulse Thermal Processing of Functional Materials Using a Directed Plasma Arc 200401367 Composite Solid-State Scintillators for Neutron Detection 200501505 Resistive-Glass Drift Tube for Use as a Controlled Kinetic Energy Ion Source 200601675 Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles for Rapid,

359

VERIFICATION OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY'S (DWPF) PROCESS DIGESTION METHOD FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION SAMPLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO{sub 3} acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem Method, see DWPF Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestions of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples. The SB7a SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constituates the SB7a Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), to form the Sb7a Blend composition.

Click, D.; Edwards, T.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

Exact Evaluation of Batch-Ordering Inventory Policies in Two-Echelon Supply Chains with Periodic Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies a two-echelon supply chain with stochastic and discrete consumer demand, batch order quantities, periodic inventory review, and deterministic transportation times. Reorder point policies manage inventories at every location. Average ... Keywords: Inventory/production: multi-echelon, Periodic review heuristic., Stochastic demand

Grard P. Cachon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Performance implications from sizing a VM on multi-core systems: A Data analytic application s view  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we present a quantitative performance analysis of data analytics applications running on multi-core virtual machines. Such environments form the core of cloud computing. In addition, data analytics applications, such as Cassandra and Hadoop, are becoming increasingly popular on cloud computing platforms. This convergence necessitates a better understanding of the performance and cost implications of such hybrid systems. For example, the very rst step in hosting applications in virtualized environments, requires the user to con gure the number of virtual processors and the size of memory. To understand performance implications of this step, we benchmarked three Yahoo Cloud Serving Benchmark (YCSB) workloads in a virtualized multi-core environment. Our measurements indicate that the performance of Cassandra for YCSB workloads does not heavily depend on the processing capacity of a system, while the size of the data set is critical to performance relative to allocated memory. We also identi ed a strong relationship between the running time of workloads and various hardware events (last level cache loads, misses, and CPU migrations). From this analysis, we provide several suggestions to improve the performance of data analytics applications running on cloud computing environments.

Lim, Seung-Hwan [ORNL; Horey, James L [ORNL; Begoli, Edmon [ORNL; Yao, Yanjun [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Cao, Qing [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

SSRL_2004_Run_Sched_3_22_04.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2/04 2/04 Run Shutdown Maintenance / AP Injector Startup SLAC Closed Injector / SPEAR Startup University Holidays 17 MA/AP 18 MA 5 1 1 1 AP 3 4 7 4 9 5 6 8 10 20 10 11 12 11 AP 9 1 4 1 2 8 12 20 24 21 22 21 26 5 5 2 3 6 7 16 MA O 9 12 I 15 10 S 8 9 13 11 11 12 13 6 2 MA MA/AP AP 3 2 4 2 1 1 AP 3 T 17 17 18 16 16 4 3 13 14 12 8 14 15 U 20 10 21 13 MA 15 12 11 9 MA 4 5 5 3 MA 6 1 9 MA 16 13 3 4 1 13 M 5 12 11 M S C 8 11 M M 14 14 15 A E B M 31 M 29 28 MA 18 19 17 4 10 11 7 18 22 17 19 21 20 23 26 25 A 25 24 30 20 24 25 P 29 28 U 31 29 30 MA/AP 29 2003 2004 5 17 4 9 10 11 8 12 13 14 H D 15 16 14 O 13 N 7 User Conf. W 7 7 3 3 9 10 6 4 2 2 6 27 T 2003 2004 1 2 3 24 S 26 R 22 23 T AP 30 29 29 30 31 AP A M E 20 T 30 22 23 24 30 24 MA 25 N N 19 25 17 MA B 20 17 19 18 O W/ I S 27 C 7 8 6 14 15 16 7 10 9 8 10 6 6 7 5 17 15 MA 9 12 11 14 24 26 23 21 26 23 22 I N 2 3 5 2 3 4 8 1 S T 7 6 A L L 7 7 8 9 10 T 6 A I 11 12 I I 10 O 9 11 12 13 10 14 15 16 17 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 30 28 29 O N 22 23 28 20 13 14 15 16 18 19 25 26 O 22 18 27 24 27 22 23 24 30 29 28 21 12 13 22 31 25 23 21 29 30 13 14 27 19 26 24 25 15 16 27 28 29 28 27 26 29 N 28 I 31

363

Software and Analytical Tools | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Resources » Software and Analytical Tools Information Resources » Software and Analytical Tools Software and Analytical Tools October 8, 2013 - 2:12pm Addthis Software and analytical tools are available to help Federal agencies implement energy- and water-efficiency projects. Building Energy Software Tools Directory: This U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technology Office website lists more than 400 software tools for evaluating energy efficiency in facilities. Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) Programs: The following National Institute of Standards and Technology programs help compute and analyze capital investments in buildings: BLCC5 Program: Analyze capital investments in buildings. Energy Escalation Rate Calculator: Compute an average annual escalation rate. Distributed Generation Energy Technology Capital Costs: This National

364

Analytical Solutions for Cloud-Drop Concentration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note compares and evaluates the analytical solutions of Squires and Twomey for cloud droplet concentration. Either solution is likely to be fairly accurate (30%) when the slope parameter (?) of the cloud condensation nuclei distribution is ...

David B. Johnson

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Visualization and Analytics Software at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analytics Analytics Visualization and Analytics AVS/Express AVS/Express includes functionality for data visualization and analysis, image processing and data display. It uses a graphical application development environment. Read More » VisIt - 3D Scientific Visualization VisIt is a point-and-click 3D scientific visualization application that supports most common visualization techniques (e.g., isocontouring and volume rendering) on structured and unstructured grids. Due to its distributed and parallel architecture, VisIt is able to handle very large datasets interactively. In addition, VisIt is extensible, allowing users to add data loaders or additional analysis tools to VisIt. The NERSC Analytics Group has developed extensions to VisIt to support NERSC user applications,

366

Lee Cyclogenesis. Part I: Analytic Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of synoptic scale cyclones imbedded in a baroclinically unstable zonal flow over a long straight mountain range is investigated. Two different analytical models of the phenomenon are used.

J. L. Hayes; R. T. Williams; M. A. Rennick

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

AOCS Analytical Guidelines Ja 12-89  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Lecithin Co-Products AOCS Analytical Guidelines Ja 12-89 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads AOCS DEFINITION These guidelines identify standard methods that are recommended for th

368

Analytical LandAtmosphere Radiometer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conversion of radiometric land surface temperature (?r) to an equivalent isothermal (aerodynamic) surface temperature (?i) is important in balancing the land surface energy budget with satellite-based ?r measurements. An analytical land...

Ayman Suleiman; Richard Crago

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Analytic Representations of Standard Atmosphere Temperature Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytic functions which approximate six commonly used standard temperature profiles (the AFGL set, and the 1976 U.S. Standard) are described. These provide a uniform way of rounding off the sharp corners of the original models, and have been ...

Stephen B. Fels

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Analytic Power LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analytic Power LLC Analytic Power LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Analytic Power LLC Place Woburn, Massachusetts Zip 01801 Sector Hydrogen Product Fuel cell developer Website http://www.analytic-power.com/ Coordinates 42.4884618°, -71.1329685° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4884618,"lon":-71.1329685,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

371

Two Stage Liquefaction With Illinois 6 Coal: Volume 1: Run 247  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 247 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run operated in a Two-Stage Liquefaction (TSL) mode using Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary run objective was to obtain performance data for the TSL system and the individual process units with particular emphasis on hydrotreating catalyst performance. Secondary objectives were to demonstrate operability for the system and the respective ...

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Impact of the Source of Alkali on Sludge Batch 3 Melt Rate (U)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) melt rate tests in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) have indicated that improvements in melt rate can be achieved through an increase in the total alkali of the melter feed. Higher alkali can be attained by the use of an ''underwashed'' sludge, a high alkali frit, or a combination of the two. Although the general trend between melt rate and total alkali (in particular Na{sub 2}O content) has been demonstrated, the question of ''does the source of alkali (SOA) matter?'' still exists. Therefore the purpose of this set of tests was to determine if the source of alkali (frit versus sludge) can impact melt rate. The general test concept was to transition from a Na{sub 2}O-rich frit to a Na{sub 2}O-deficient frit while compensating the Na{sub 2}O content in the sludge to maintain the same overall Na{sub 2}O content in the melter feed. Specifically, the strategy was to vary the amount of alkali in frits and in the sludge batch 3 (SB3) sludge simulant (midpoint or baseline feed was SB3/Frit 418 at 35% waste loading) so that the resultant feeds had the same final glass composition when vitrified. A set of SOA feeds using frits ranging from 0 to 16 weight % Na{sub 2}O (in 4% increments) was first tested in the Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) to determine if indeed there was an impact. The dry-fed MRF tests indicated that if the alkali is too depleted from either the sludge (16% Na{sub 2}O feed) or the frit (the 0% Na{sub 2}O feed), then melt rate was negatively impacted when compared to the baseline SB3/Frit 418 feed currently being processed at DWPF. The MRF melt rates for the 4 and 12% SOA feeds were similar to the baseline SB3/Frit 418 (8% SOA) feed. Due to this finding, a smaller subset of SOA feeds that could be processed in the DWPF (4 and 12% SOA feeds) was then tested in the Slurry-fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF). The results from a previous SMRF test with SB3/Frit 418 (Smith et al. 2004) were used as the SMRF melt rate of the baseline feed. The SOA SMRF test results agreed with those of the MRF tests for these two feeds as the melt rates were similar to the baseline SB3/Frit 418 feed. In other words, the source of alkali was close enough to the baseline feed as to not negatively impact melt rate. Based on these results, there appears to be an acceptable range of the source of alkali that results in the highest melt rate for a particular sludge batch. If, however, the alkali is too depleted from either the sludge or the frit, then melt rate will be lower. Although SB3 simulant sludge and Frit 418 were used for these tests, it was not the intent of these tests to determine an optimum source of alkali range for SB3. Rather, the findings of these tests should be used to help in the decision process for future sludge batch washing and/or blending strategies. The results, however, do confirm that the current processing of SB3 is being performed in the proper source of alkali range. Because all of this testing was performed on small-scale equipment with slurried, non-radioactive simulant, the exact impact of the source of alkali with SB3 in the DWPF melter could not be fully evaluated.

Smith, M

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY WITH FRIT 418 AND FRIT 702  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) in May 2011. To support qualification of SB7a, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to execute a variability study (VS) to assess the applicability of the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) durability models for the Frit 418-SB7a compositional region of interest. The objective of this study was to demonstrate applicability of the current durability models to the SB7a compositional region of interest and acceptability of the SB7a glasses with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass in terms of durability as defined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To support programmatic objectives, twenty-eight SB7a glasses were selected based on the nominal sludge projections used to support the frit recommendation. Twenty-three of the SB7a VS glasses were based on the use of Frit 418, while 5 glasses were based on the use of Frit 702. Frit 702 was also identified as a viable candidate for SB7a, especially if SO{sub 4} concentrations are found to be higher than anticipated. Frit 702 has shown a higher SO{sub 4} retention capability as compared to Frit 418. With respect to acceptability, the PCT results of the SB7a-VS glasses are acceptable relative to the EA glass regardless of thermal history (quenched or canister centerline cooled) or compositional view (target or measured). More specifically, all of the SB7a glasses have normalized boron release values (NL [B]) less than 0.9 g/L as compared to the benchmark NL [B] value for EA of 16.695 g/L. With respect to the applicability of the current durability models to the SB7a VS compositional region of interest, all of the study glasses (based on target compositions) lie within the 95% confidence intervals of the model predictions. When model applicability is based on the measured compositions, all of the SB7a VS glasses are predictable with the exception of SB7aVS-02 and SB7aVS-06. Although the NL [B] values of these two glasses range from 0.66 to 0.73 g/L (considered very acceptable), the PCT responses are not considered predictable by the current durability models. The current durability models are conservative for these glasses since they are more durable than predicted by the models. These two glasses are extreme vertices (EV) based compositions coupled with Frit 418 at 36% WL and target the maximum Na{sub 2}O content (15.01 wt% Na{sub 2}O) of the SB7a VS glasses. Higher alkali glasses for which the model overpredicts the PCT response have been observed previously in the Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) Phase 1 VS and the Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) VS.

Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

374

Effect of organic loading rate on bio-hydrogen production from sweet sorghum syrup by anaerobic mixed cultures in anaerobic sequencing batch reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This present study reported the effect of 4 organic loading rates (OLR) varied from 25-40 g hexose/L-d on bio-hydrogen production from sweet sorghum syrup by anaerobic mixed cultures in anaerobic sequencing batch reactor. The optimum OLR was found to ... Keywords: anaerobic mixed cultures, anaerobic sequencing batch reactor, organic loading rate, sweet sorghum syrup

Piyawadee Saraphirom; Alissara Reungsang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Bruhat-Tits buildings and analytic geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the theory of Bruhat-Tits buildings. Besides, we explain how Bruhat-Tits buildings can be realized inside Berkovich spaces. In this way, Berkovich analytic geometry canbe used to compactify buildings. We discuss in detail the example of the special linear group. Moreover, we give an intrinsic description of Bruhat-Tits buildings in the framework of non-Archimedean analytic geometry.

Remy, Bertrand; Werner, Annette

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

FGD Chemistry and Analytical Methods Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this handbook is to provide a comprehensive guide to sampling, analytical, and physical test methods essential to the operation, maintenance, and understanding of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system chemistry. EPRI sponsored the preparation of the first version of this multi-volume report in the mid-1980s in response to the needs of electric utility personnel responsible for establishing and operating FGD analytical laboratories. Prompted by the results of research into various nonstanda...

2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

377

Building Adoption of Visual Analytics Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adoption of technology is always difficult. Issues such as having the infrastructure necessary to support the technology, training for users, integrating the technology into current processes and tools, and having the time, managerial support, and necessary funds need to be addressed. In addition to these issues, the adoption of visual analytics tools presents specific challenges that need to be addressed. This paper discusses technology adoption challenges and approaches for visual analytics technologies.

Chinchor, Nancy; Cook, Kristin A.; Scholtz, Jean

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

378

Submission for question 1 with items numbered: 1 Run-E 1 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... agreed to work with the United Nations to curb production and encourage ... 35 Run-E 2 XIE19990605.0194 Besides supplying crude oil to Cuba, the ...

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

379

Running on biofuels and beyond Utilizing a wide variety of energy resources is essen-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptable engines Running on biofuels and beyond Utilizing a wide variety of energy resources; natural gas; hydrogen; synthetic fuels; biofuels including biogas, biodiesels, and alcohols--even syngas

Endres. William J.

380

SEE HOW WE RUN...At WIPP, We Really Mean Business  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will ensure accuracy and reliability of information, as well as reduced cycle time for information retrieval. W Why is it important to run WIPP like a business? Continually...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Elasticity of Demand for Relative Petroleum Inventory in the Short Run  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Elasticity of Demand for Relative Petroleum Inventory in the Short Run MICHAEL YE,? JOHN ZYREN,?? AND JOANNE SHORE?? Abstract To better understand petroleum ...

382

DEVELOPMENT OF A MACRO-BATCH QUALIFICATION STRATEGY FOR THE HANFORD TANK WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has evaluated the existing waste feed qualification strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) based on experience from the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) waste qualification program. The current waste qualification programs for each of the sites are discussed in the report to provide a baseline for comparison. Recommendations on strategies are then provided that could be implemented at Hanford based on the successful Macrobatch qualification strategy utilized at SRS to reduce the risk of processing upsets or the production of a staged waste campaign that does not meet the processing requirements of the WTP. Considerations included the baseline WTP process, as well as options involving Direct High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) processing, and the potential use of a Tank Waste Characterization and Staging Facility (TWCSF). The main objectives of the Hanford waste feed qualification program are to demonstrate compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), determine waste processability, and demonstrate unit operations at a laboratory scale. Risks to acceptability and successful implementation of this program, as compared to the DWPF Macro-Batch qualification strategy, include: ? Limitations of mixing/blending capability of the Hanford Tank Farm; ? The complexity of unit operations (i.e., multiple chemical and mechanical separations processes) involved in the WTP pretreatment qualification process; ? The need to account for effects of blending of LAW and HLW streams, as well as a recycle stream, within the PT unit operations; and ? The reliance on only a single set of unit operations demonstrations with the radioactive qualification sample. This later limitation is further complicated because of the 180-day completion requirement for all of the necessary waste feed qualification steps. The primary recommendations/changes include the following: ? Collection and characterization of samples for relevant process analytes from the tanks to be blended during the staging process; ? Initiation of qualification activities earlier in the staging process to optimize the campaign composition through evaluation from both a processing and glass composition perspective; ? Definition of the parameters that are important for processing in the WTP facilities (unit operations) across the anticipated range of wastes and as they relate to qualification-scale equipment; ? Performance of limited testing with simulants ahead of the waste feed qualification sample demonstration as needed to determine the available processing window for that campaign; and ? Demonstration of sufficient mixing in the staging tank to show that the waste qualification sample chemical and physical properties are representative of the transfers to be made to WTP. Potential flowcharts for derivatives of the Hanford waste feed qualification process are also provided in this report. While these recommendations are an extension of the existing WTP waste qualification program, they are more in line with the processes currently performed for SRS. The implementation of these processes at SRS has been shown to offer flexibility for processing, having identified potential processing issues ahead of the qualification or facility processing, and having provided opportunity to optimize waste loading and throughput in the DWPF.

Herman, C.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

Developing Guidelines for Assessing Visual Analytics Environments  

SciTech Connect

Visual analytic systems can be evaluated from a user perspective with quantitative metrics (i.e., time to complete the analysis or the accuracy of the solution found). However, qualitative measures are also useful in a user assessment. These include such measures as the utility of the interactive visualizations in the analysis process and the user's assessment of the efficiency of the analytic process. Quantitative measures can be found if data sets with embedded ground truth are used for analysis. Qualitative measures are more elusive. In this paper we report on an experiment with professional analysts who ranked five of submissions to the VAST 2009 Challenge and provided the rationale for their rankings. Their comments were used in conjunction with a meta-analysis of the 2009 VAST Challenge reviews to produce a set of guidelines for visual analytic systems. As visual analytic software is expected to eventually help in all aspects of analysis, we expect to see future systems provide more help with generating the final report. Hence, researchers also need to have an understanding of what makes a good analytic product. Therefore we asked the analysts to rank the situational assessments of four grand challenge entries and to provide comments on those assessments. We used these comments to produce guidelines for researchers to use in evaluating their analytic reports.

Scholtz, Jean

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

384

AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 ?1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). Well say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one capsule significantly exceeding this value. A maximum R/B of around 2?10-7 was reached at the end of the irradiation in Capsule 5. Several shakedown issues were encountered and resolved during the first three cycles. These include the repair of minor gas line leaks; repair of faulty gas line valves; the need to position moisture monitors in regions of low radiation fields for proper functioning; the enforcement of proper on-line data storage and backup, the need to monitor thermocouple performance, correcting for detector spectral gain shift, and a change in the mass flow rate range of the neon flow controllers.

Blaise P. Collin

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

TRUEX processing of plutonium analytical solutions at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The TRUEX (TRansUranic EXtraction) solvent extraction process was developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the Department of Energy. A TRUEX demonstration completed at ANL involved the processing of analytical and experimental waste generated there and at the New Brunswick Laboratory. A 20-stage centrifugal contactor was used to recover plutonium, americium, and uranium from the waste. Approximately 84 g of plutonium, 18 g of uranium, and 0.2 g of americium were recovered from about 118 liters of solution during four process runs. Alpha decontamination factors as high as 65,000 were attained, which was especially important because it allowed the disposal of the process raffinate as a low-level waste. The recovered plutonium and uranium were converted to oxide; the recovered americium solution was concentrated by evaporation to approximately 100 ml. The flowsheet and operational procedures were modified to overcome process difficulties. These difficulties included the presence of complexants in the feed, solvent degradation, plutonium precipitation, and inadequate decontamination factors during startup. This paper will discuss details of the experimental effort.

Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Hutter, J.C.; Leonard, R.A.; Wygmans, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Guidance for characterizing explosives contaminated soils: Sampling and selecting on-site analytical methods  

SciTech Connect

A large number of defense-related sites are contaminated with elevated levels of secondary explosives. Levels of contamination range from barely detectable to levels above 10% that need special handling due to the detonation potential. Characterization of explosives-contaminated sites is particularly difficult due to the very heterogeneous distribution of contamination in the environment and within samples. To improve site characterization, several options exist including collecting more samples, providing on-site analytical data to help direct the investigation, compositing samples, improving homogenization of samples, and extracting larger samples. On-site analytical methods are essential to more economical and improved characterization. On-site methods might suffer in terms of precision and accuracy, but this is more than offset by the increased number of samples that can be run. While verification using a standard analytical procedure should be part of any quality assurance program, reducing the number of samples analyzed by the more expensive methods can result in significantly reduced costs. Often 70 to 90% of the soil samples analyzed during an explosives site investigation do not contain detectable levels of contamination. Two basic types of on-site analytical methods are in wide use for explosives in soil, calorimetric and immunoassay. Calorimetric methods generally detect broad classes of compounds such as nitroaromatics or nitramines, while immunoassay methods are more compound specific. Since TNT or RDX is usually present in explosive-contaminated soils, the use of procedures designed to detect only these or similar compounds can be very effective.

Crockett, A.B. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Craig, H.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Portland, OR (United States). Oregon Operations Office; Jenkins, T.F. [Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab., Hanover, NH (United States); Sisk, W.E. [Army Environmental Center, Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Validation examples of the Analytic Hierarchy Process and Analytic Network Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One way to validate a scientific theory is to show that the results predicted by the theory give correct answers; that is, that they match known results. In the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) this usually means finding examples with measures in an ... Keywords: Compatibility index for the AHP, Validating the Analytic Hierarchy Process, Validating the Analytic Network Process, Validation examples for the AHP, Validation examples for the ANP

Rozann Whitaker

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

Dick Wingerson

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Batch Microreactor Studies of Lignin Depolymerization by Bases. 1. Alcohol Solvents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass feedstocks contain roughly 10-30% lignin, a substance that can not be converted to fermentable sugars. Hence, most schemes for producing biofuels (ethanol) assume that the lignin coproduct will be utilized as boiler fuel to provide heat and power to the process. However, the chemical structure of lignin suggests that it will make an excellent high value fuel additive, if it can be broken down into smaller molecular units. From fiscal year 1997 through fiscal year 2001, Sandia National Laboratories was a participant in a cooperative effort with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the University of Utah to develop and scale a base catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) process for lignin conversion. SNL's primary role in the effort was to utilize rapidly heated batch microreactors to perform kinetic studies, examine the reaction chemistry, and to develop alternate catalyst systems for the BCD process. This report summarizes the work performed at Sandia during FY97 and FY98 with alcohol based systems. More recent work with aqueous based systems will be summarized in a second report.

MILLER, JAMES E.; EVANS, LINDSEY; LITTLEWOLF, ALICIA; TRUDELL, DANIEL E.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Utilisation of single added fatty acids by consortia of digester sludge in batch culture  

SciTech Connect

Inocula derived from an anaerobic digester were used to study (i) their potential for methane production and (ii) the utilisation rates of different short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) by the microbial community in defined media with mono-carbon sources (formic-, acetetic-, propionic-, butyric acid) in batch culture. It could be demonstrated that the microbial reactor population could be transferred successfully to the lab, and its ability to build up methane was present even with deteriorating biogas plant performance. Therefore, this reduction in performance of the biogas plant was not due to a decrease in abundance, but due to an inactivity of the microbial community. Generally, the physico-chemical properties of the biogas plant seemed to favour hydrogenotrophic methanogens, as seen by the high metabolisation rates of formate compared with all other carbon sources. In contrast, acetoclastic methanogenesis could be shown to play a minor role in the methane production of the investigated biogas plant, although the origin of up to 66% of methane is generally suggested to be generated through acetoclastic pathway.

Wagner, Andreas Otto, E-mail: Andreas.Wagner@uibk.ac.a [University of Innsbruck, Institute of Microbiology, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Gstrauntaler, Gudrun [Abfallbeseitigungsverband Westtirol, Breite Mure, A-6426 Roppen (Austria); Illmer, Paul [University of Innsbruck, Institute of Microbiology, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Organic and nitrogen removal from landfill leachate in aerobic granular sludge sequencing batch reactors  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aerobic granular sludge SBR was used to treat real landfill leachate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COD removal was analyzed kinetically using a modified model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristics of nitrogen removal at different ammonium inputs were explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DO variations were consistent with the GSBR performances at low ammonium inputs. - Abstract: Granule sequencing batch reactors (GSBR) were established for landfill leachate treatment, and the COD removal was analyzed kinetically using a modified model. Results showed that COD removal rate decreased as influent ammonium concentration increasing. Characteristics of nitrogen removal at different influent ammonium levels were also studied. When the ammonium concentration in the landfill leachate was 366 mg L{sup -1}, the dominant nitrogen removal process in the GSBR was simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND). Under the ammonium concentration of 788 mg L{sup -1}, nitrite accumulation occurred and the accumulated nitrite was reduced to nitrogen gas by the shortcut denitrification process. When the influent ammonium increased to a higher level of 1105 mg L{sup -1}, accumulation of nitrite and nitrate lasted in the whole cycle, and the removal efficiencies of total nitrogen and ammonium decreased to only 35.0% and 39.3%, respectively. Results also showed that DO was a useful process controlling parameter for the organics and nitrogen removal at low ammonium input.

Wei Yanjie [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection in Water Transport Engineering Ministry of Communications, Tianjin Research Institute of Water Transport Engineering, Tianjin 300456 (China); Ji Min, E-mail: jmtju@yahoo.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li Ruying [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Qin Feifei [Tianjin Tanggu Sino French Water Supply Co. Ltd., Tianjin 300450 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous  

SciTech Connect

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

Dick Wingerson

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

The online system of the PHENIX experiment in the RHIC run 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PHENIX [1] is one of two large experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). At the time of this conference, the Run 5 of RHIC is in progress and has been very successful so far. Compared to the previous run, ...

Martin L. Purschke

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

When the Internet Runs Out of Addresses, It'll be IPv6 to the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Internet Runs Out of Addresses, It'll be IPv6 to the Rescue When the Internet Runs Out of Addresses, It'll be IPv6 to the Rescue June 8, 2011 - 5:25pm Addthis Wendy Wolfson...

395

PoS(ACAT)027 Online Monitoring for the CDF Run II Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- gency situation handling were defined, e.g. remote shifter replacement with a local (Fnal) one in casePoS(ACAT)027 Online Monitoring for the CDF Run II Experiment and the Remote Operation Facilities T the CDF Run II online event monitoring system and operation, with enphasis on the remote monitoring shift

396

FORODT: Fortran debug routine for the PDP-11 (RT-11). [For run-time debugging  

SciTech Connect

FORODT provides run-time debug features to PDP-11 Fortran programs running with the RT-11 operating system. Digital Equipment Corporation's ODT program has been extended to include Fortran breakpoints, decimal integer and floating point data input, and output options. 3 figures.

Tanner, D.N.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Asymmetric trajectory generation and impedance control for running of biped robots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An online asymmetric trajectory generation method for biped robots is proposed to maintain dynamical postural stability and increase energy autonomy, based on the running stability criterion defined in phases. In a support phase, an asymmetric trajectories ... Keywords: Angular momentum, Asymmetric trajectory, Biped robot, Impedance control, Running stability

Ohung Kwon; Jong Hyeon Park

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Initial steps towards run-time support for norm-governed systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a knowledge representation framework with an associated run-time support infrastructure that is able to compute, for the benefit of the members of a norm-governed multi-agent system, the physically possible and permitted actions at each time, ... Keywords: GOLEM, event calculus, run-time service, social interaction

Visara Urovi; Stefano Bromuri; Kostas Stathis; Alexander Artikis

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Off-momentum dynamic aperture for lattices in the RHIC heavy ion runs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To reduce transverse emittance growth rates from intrabeam scattering in the RHIC heavy ion runs, a lattice with an increased phase advance in the arc FODO cells was adopted in 2008-2011. During these runs, a large beam loss due to limited off-momentum dynamic aperture was observed during longitudinal RF re-bucketing and with transverse cooling. Based on the beam loss observations in the previous ion runs and the calculated off-momentum apertures, we decided to adopt the lattice used before 2008 for the 2012 U-U and Cu-Au runs. The observed beam decay and the measured momentum aperture in the 2012 U-U run are presented.

Luo Y.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Gu, X.; Fischer, W.; Marusic, A.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Zhang, S.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

400

Integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless SEF fluorescent lamp includes a wire mesh amalgam support constructed to jointly optimize positions of a starting amalgam and a running amalgam in the lamp, thereby optimizing mercury vapor pressure in the lamp during both starting and steady-state operation in order to rapidly achieve and maintain high light output. The wire mesh amalgam support is constructed to support the starting amalgam toward one end thereof and the running amalgam toward the other end thereof, and the wire mesh is rolled for friction-fitting within the exhaust tube of the lamp. The positions of the starting and running amalgams on the wire mesh are jointly optimized such that high light output is achieved quickly and maintained, while avoiding any significant reduction in light output between starting and running operation.

Borowiec, Joseph Christopher (Schenectady, NY); Cocoma, John Paul (Clifton Park, NY); Roberts, Victor David (Burnt Hills, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DZero Experiment Run 1 (1992-1996) Event Display Gallery from the Fermilab Tevatron  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This web page provides access to images captured during D0 experiments Run I. In addition, the user can see live event displays from the current Run II for both the CDF and the DZero experiments at http://www.fnal.gov/pub/now/live_events/index.html. Another interesting offering from the D0 groups at Fermilab is the large collection of "Plain English Summaries" of their published reports and papers. These Summaries are excellent for layman's understanding of the high energy physics research done at Fermilab and can serve as introductions to the published papers themselves. The Summaries are at http://www-d0.fnal.gov/public/pubs/d0_physics_summaries.html for Run I and http://www-d0.fnal.gov/Run2Physics/WWW/results/summary.htm for Run II.

402

Report on Inspection of Analytical Laboratories Oversight at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analytical Laboratories Oversight at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, INS-9502 Report on Inspection of Analytical Laboratories Oversight at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve,...

403

An Assessment of Analytical Capabilities, Services and Tools...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Assessment of Analytical Capabilities, Services and Tools for Demand Response Title An Assessment of Analytical Capabilities, Services and Tools for Demand Response Publication...

404

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MSLA-ICP-AES) subsystems of the Analytical Hot Cell Laboratory System (AHL), which provide the analytical equipment systems for the...

405

Analysis and Selection of Analytical Tools to Assess National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Selection of Analytical Tools to Assess National-Interest Transmission Bottlenecks Final Report Analysis and Selection of Analytical Tools to Assess National-Interest...

406

EA-0970: Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

70: Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory Project No. 94-AA-01 Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas EA-0970: Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory Project...

407

Evans Analytical Group EAG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analytical Group EAG Analytical Group EAG Jump to: navigation, search Name Evans Analytical Group (EAG) Place Sunnyvale, California Zip 94086 Sector Solar Product California-based firm involved in materials characterization. The company provides testing and performance measurements for solar PV energy systems. Coordinates 32.780338°, -96.547405° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.780338,"lon":-96.547405,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

408

Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 3128W (run 2)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An N-Reactor outer fuel element that had been stored underwater in the Hanford 100 Area K-East Basin was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments. These studies are part of a series of tests being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on the drying behavior of N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel elements removed from both the K-West and K-East Basins. The drying test series was designed to test fuel elements that ranged from intact to severely damaged. The fuel element discussed in this report was removed from an open K-East canister (3128W) during the first fuel selection campaign conducted in 1995, and has remained in wet storage in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building) since that time. Although it was judged to be breached during in-basin (i.e., K-Basin) examinations, visual inspection of this fuel element in the hot cell indicated that it was likely intact. Some scratches on the coating covering the cladding were identified before the furnace test. The drying test was conducted in the Whole Element Furnace Testing System located in G-Cell within the PTL. This test system is composed of three basic systems: the in-cell furnace equipment, the system gas loop, and the analytical instrument package. Element 3128W was subjected to the drying processes based on those proposed under the Integrated Process Strategy, which included a hot drying step. Results of the Pressure Rise and Gas Evolution Tests suggest that most of the free water in the system was released during the extended CVD cycle (68 hr versus 8 hr for the first run). An additional {approximately}0.34 g of water was released during the subsequent HVD phase, characterized by multiple water release peaks, with a principle peak at {approximately}180 C. This additional water is attributed to decomposition of a uranium hydrate (UO{sub 4}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O/UO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) coating that was observed to be covering the surface of the fuel element to a thickness of {approximately}1.6 mg/cm{sup 2}. A limited quantity of hydrogen ({approximately}9 mg) was also released during HVD, mainly at temperatures above 300 C, likely from hydride decomposition.

Abrefah, J.; Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Marshman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Flament, T.A. [Numatec Hanford Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be useful in defining a roadmap for what future capability needs to look like.

Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

410

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY AND MEASUREMENT SCIENCE (What Has DOE Done For Analytical Chemistry?) CONF-8904181--1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, . - - ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY AND MEASUREMENT SCIENCE (What Has DOE Done For Analytical Chemistry?) CONF-8904181--1 DE89 009559 W. D. Shults Analytical Chemistry Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory* Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6129 ABSTRACT Over the past forty years, analytical scientists within the DOE complex have had a tremendous impact on the field of analytical chemistry. This paper suggests six "high impact" research/development areas that either originated within or wcce brought to maturity within the DOE laboratories. "High impact" means they lead to new subdisciplines or to new ways of doing business. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their

411

UTILIZING STATISTICS TO DETERMINE HOW MUCH SAMPLING AND ANALYSISIS WARRANTED TO SUPPORT SAVANNAH RIVER SITEHIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE BATCH PREPARATION  

SciTech Connect

Accelerated cleanup initiatives at the SRS include expediting radioactive sludge processing. Sludge is the highest risk component of waste since it contains the highest concentrations of long-lived radionuclides. The sludge is staged into ''batches'' that are then the feed material to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) which vitrifies the waste into a safe form for permanent disposal. The preparation of each batch includes sampling and analysis of the slurried material. The results of the characterization are used as the bases for batch blending and processing decisions. Uncertainty is inherent in the information used for planning. There is uncertainty in the quantity of sludge contained in a tank, the waste composition, and the waste physical properties. The goal of this analysis is to develop the basis for the number of physical samples that should be taken from the slurried waste tank and the number of replicates of laboratory measurements that should be performed in order to achieve a specified uncertainty level. Recommendations for sampling and analysis strategies are made based on the results of the analysis.

Hamm, B

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

412

Dairy Analytics and Nutrient Analysis (DANA) Prototype System User Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a user manual for the Dairy Analytics and Nutrient Analysis (DANA) model. DANA provides an analysis of dairy anaerobic digestion technology and allows users to calculate biogas production, co-product valuation, capital costs, expenses, revenue and financial metrics, for user customizable scenarios, dairy and digester types. The model provides results for three anaerobic digester types; Covered Lagoons, Modified Plug Flow, and Complete Mix, and three main energy production technologies; electricity generation, renewable natural gas generation, and compressed natural gas generation. Additional options include different dairy types, bedding types, backend treatment type as well as numerous production, and economic parameters. DANAs goal is to extend the National Market Value of Anaerobic Digester Products analysis (informa economics, 2012; Innovation Center, 2011) to include a greater and more flexible set of regional digester scenarios and to provide a modular framework for creation of a tool to support farmer and investor needs. Users can set up scenarios from combinations of existing parameters or add new parameters, run the model and view a variety of reports, charts and tables that are automatically produced and delivered over the web interface. DANA is based in the INLs analysis architecture entitled Generalized Environment for Modeling Systems (GEMS) , which offers extensive collaboration, analysis, and integration opportunities and greatly speeds the ability construct highly scalable web delivered user-oriented decision tools. DANAs approach uses server-based data processing and web-based user interfaces, rather a client-based spreadsheet approach. This offers a number of benefits over the client-based approach. Server processing and storage can scale up to handle a very large number of scenarios, so that analysis of county, even field level, across the whole U.S., can be performed. Server based databases allow dairy and digester parameters be held and managed in a single managed data repository, while allows users to customize standard values and perform individual analysis. Server-based calculations can be easily extended, versions and upgrades managed, and any changes are immediately available to all users. This user manual describes how to use and/or modify input database tables, run DANA, view and modify reports.

Sam Alessi; Dennis Keiser

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Di-J/psi Studies, Level 3 Tracking and the D0 Run IIb Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The D0 detector underwent an upgrade to its silicon vertex detector and triggering systems during the transition from Run IIa to Run IIb to maximize its ability to fully exploit Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. This thesis describes improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms used by the high level trigger in both Run IIa and Run IIb, as well as a search for resonant di-J/{psi} states using both Run IIa and Run IIb data. Improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms during Run IIa included the optimization of the existing tracking software to reduce overall processing time and the certification and testing of a new software release. Upgrades made to the high level trigger for Run IIb included the development of a new tracking algorithm and the inclusion of the new Layer 0 silicon detector into the existing software. The integration of Layer 0 into the high level trigger has led to an improvement in the overall impact parameter resolution for tracks of {approx}50%. The development of a new parameterization method for finding the error associated to the impact parameter of tracks returned by the high level tracking algorithm, in association with the inclusion of Layer 0, has led to improvements in vertex resolution of {approx}4.5 {micro}m. A previous search in the di-J/{psi} channel revealed a unpredicted resonance at {approx}13.7 GeV/c{sup 2}. A confirmation analysis is presented using 2.8 fb{sup -1} of data and two different approaches to cuts. No significant excess is seen in the di-J/{psi} mass spectrum.

Vint, Philip John; /Imperial Coll., London

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Analytical theory of intensity fluctuations in SASE  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in SASE experiments stimulate interest in quantitative comparison of measurements with theory. Extending the previous analysis of the SASE intensity in guided modes, the authors provide an analytical description of the intensity fluctuations by calculating intensity correlation functions in the frequency domain. Comparison of the results with experiment yields new insight into the SASE process.

Yu, L.H.; Krinsky, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Refinery analytical techniques optimize unit performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refinery process engineers need to consider benefits of laboratory analytical techniques when evaluating unit performance. Refinery heavy-oil laboratory analytical techniques use both old and new technologies. Knowing how to use available laboratory analytical techniques within their limitations are critical to obtain correct refinery optimization decisions. Better refinery stream distillation and contaminant data ultimately improves the accuracy of various refinery decision-making tools. These laboratory analytical techniques are covered: high-temperature simulated distillation (HTSD); true boiling point (TBP) distillation--ASTM D2892; vacuum distillation--ASTM D5236; continuous-flash vaporizers; wiped-film evaporators; inductively coupled plasma atomic-emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES); Conradson--ASTM D189/Microcarbon residue--ASTM D4530; and asphaltene IP-143, ASTM D3279, ASTM D4124. Analysis of atmospheric crude, vacuum crude and delayed coker units highlight these laboratory techniques to identify potential yield and product quality benefits. Physical distillation or wiped-film evaporation in conjunction with HTSD, ICP-AES, microcarbon residue and asphaltened data will better characterize a feedstock as well as determine the source of contaminants. Economics are refinery specific, therefore, these examples focus on applying laboratory techniques as opposed to discussing specifics of unit improvement. These are discussed qualitatively.

Golden, S.W. [Process Consulting Services Inc., Grapevine, TX (United States); Craft, S. [Chempro, Inc., LaPorte, TX (United States); Villalanti, D.C. [Triton Analytics Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Analytical modeling of SRAM dynamic stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, for the first time, a theory for evaluating dynamic noise margins of SRAM cells is developed analytically. The results allow predicting the transient error susceptibility of an SRAM cell using a closed-form expression. The key innovation ...

Bin Zhang; Ari Arapostathis; Sani Nassif; Michael Orshansky

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Some analytical models of radiating collapsing spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present some analytical solutions to the Einstein equations, describing radiating collapsing spheres in the diffusion approximation. Solutions allow for modeling physical reasonable situations. The temperature is calculated for each solution, using a hyperbolic transport equation, which permits to exhibit the influence of relaxational effects on the dynamics of the system.

Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A [Escuela de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela); Ospino, J. [Area de Fisica Teorica. Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca Salamanca (Spain)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Enhancing Law Enforcement Using Data & Visual Analytics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Authority of New York and New Jersey (PA NY/NJ), Pacific Northwest National Labs (PNNL), Intuidex will integrate visual analytics methods developed at PNNL to mine valuable links between entities in order Authority of New York and New Jersey (PA NY/NJ) · Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) · Intuidex

419

Biodiesel Analytical Methods: August 2002--January 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for diesel engines that is receiving great attention worldwide. The material contained in this book is intended to provide the reader with information about biodiesel engines and fuels, analytical methods used to measure fuel properties, and specifications for biodiesel quality control.

Van Gerpen, J.; Shanks, B.; Pruszko, R.; Clements, D.; Knothe, G.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Analytic theory of ICRF minority heating  

SciTech Connect

We present a one-dimensional analytic theory of the ICRF gyroresonant absorption and mode-conversion, for the problem of minority fundamental resonance. Using the wave phase-space method, and the theory of linear mode conversion therein, we obtain explicit expressions for the coefficients of transmission (T), reflection (R), conversion (C), absorption (A). 7 refs., 2 figs.

Ye, H.; Kaufman, A.N.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Large scale data analytics on clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We summarize important overall issues affecting use of clouds to support Data Science. We describe the mapping of different applications to HPCC and Cloud systems and the architecture that support data analytics that is interoperable between these architectures. Keywords: clouds, data science, exascale, hpcc, iterative mapreduce, mapreduce, mpi, programming paradigms

Geoffrey C. Fox

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Exploring the analytical processes of intelligence analysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an observational case study in which we investigate and analyze the analytical processes of intelligence analysts. Participating analysts in the study carry out two scenarios where they organize and triage information, conduct intelligence ... Keywords: artifact analysis, collaboration, homeland security, intelligence analysis, national security, participant observation, participatory design, work practices, work-oriented design

George Chin, Jr.; Olga A. Kuchar; Katherine E. Wolf

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Analytical Theory of Graphene Nanoribbon Transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphene has emerged as one of the most promising materials to address scaling challenges in the post silicon era. A simple model for graphene nanoribbon field-effect transistors (GNRFETs) is developed for treating the effects of edge bond relaxation, ... Keywords: Graphene nanoribbons, analytical model, edge bond relaxation, third nearest neighbor interaction, edge scattering

Pei Zhao; Mihir Choudhury; Kartik Mohanram; Jing Guo

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

NERSC Analytics Program Status and Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spanning all aspects of analytics, high performance computing, and many science domains. · SGI Altix ­ 32, application, and deployment of a diverse array of technologies spanning the domains of high performance computing, data management, data analysis and visualization, and workflow management. #12;DOE CGF April 29

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

425

OVERVIEW OF BEAM STUDIES AT RHIC DURING THE YEAR 2000 RUN.  

SciTech Connect

During the Year 2000 run, RHIC has been commissioned and brought into operation reaching 10% of the design luminosity. A program for beam studies and machine development has been setup before the run with the goal of improving machine performance. The plan was implemented during the run in a series of beam studies, focusing initially on interaction region correction, intrabeam scattering, 3-dimensional beam reconstruction and luminosity optimization. An overview of the results is given with pointers to individual contributions where data are presented in more detail. The program for dedicated machine development at RHIC during the Year 2001 is reviewed and discussed.

PILAT,F.; BAI,M.; DREES,A.; FISCHER,W.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

426

Comments on momentum aperture of 100 GeV/n Au runs in RHIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In RHIC 2010 100 GeV/n Au run, the momentum aperture has been an issue in the re-bucketing and the beam intensity lifetime in store. Both Blue and Yellow beams with comparable storage RF voltage and peak current have suffered more beam loss than in Run 2007. In this note, some comments are made for the momentum aperture of the lattices used from the Au runs in 2007, 2008 and 2010. From the wigglings and the beam decays of each lattice, information regarding the machine momentum aperture is presented. Several directions in further improvement are discussed.

Zhang, S.Y.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Recent beauty results from CDF and the Run-II upgrades  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the most recent results from the Collider Detector Facility (CDF) from 110 pb{sup -1} of data taken at the Fermilab Tevatron from 1992 to 1995. Improved measurements of B meson spectroscopy, lifetimes, and searches for new particle states are presented. Evidence for the effectiveness of same side tagging techniques in the context of mixing measurements is shown with applicability for CP violation studies in Run-II explained. The planned upgrades of importance to {ital b} physics for Run-II are briefly detailed with an emphasis on the expected physics reach in Run-II by CDF.

Huffman, B.T. [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States); CDF Collaboration

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Two Stage Liquefaction With Illinois 6 Coal: Volume 2: Run 248  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 248 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run began on 8 February 1985 and continued through 5 May 1985. A total of 170 tons of Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal was fed in 1,904 hours of operation. The primary run objectives included the demonstration of unit and system operability for bituminous coal with the low-contact time (LCT) reactor in place at the thermal liquefaction unit (TLU) in both the Double Integrated T...

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Two Stage Liquefaction With Illinois 6 Coal: Volume 3: Run 250  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 250 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run operated in a Two-Stage Liquefaction (TSL) mode using Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary run objective was demonstration of unit and system operability for bituminous coal in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) mode of operation. In CC-ITSL the products from the thermal (first stage) reactor are sent directly ...

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

100-B/C Target Analyte List Development for Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the process used to identify source area target analytes in support of the 100-B/C remedial investigation/feasibility study addendum to DOE/RL-2008-46. This report also establishes the analyte exclusion criteria applicable for 100-B/C use and the analytical methods needed to analyze the target analytes.

R.W. Ovink

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

431

Design and Optimization of Condenser and Centrifuge Units for Enhancement of a Batch Vacuum Frying System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A batch vacuum frying system, which processes fruits and vegetables, includes a frying pan, a surface-condenser, and a vacuum pump. With health and safety issues in mind, this research focused on developing a modified surface-condenser to prevent cavitation of the vacuum pump. The final oil-content was reduced by centrifugal de- oiling of the product under vacuum, which make the product healthier than what is currently available. The de-oiling mechanism consists of a centrifuge with a motor attached to the basket shaft, rotating up to 750 rpm (63 g units). The condenser consists of a (counter- flow) spiral-coil heat exchanger (SHE) connected to a refrigeration system that uses R404a refrigerant. De-oiling for 40 s at 300 and 750 RPM removed up to 67% and 72% of the chips surface oil, respectively. At 750 RPM for 10 s, 40 s, and 60 s the oil-content was reduced by 38%, 44%, and 51%, respectively. The convective heat transfer coefficient (h) of the frying oil was determined at 120C and 140C using the lumped capacitance method. The h-values were 21713 W/m2K (120C) and 25837 W/m2K (140C) using a copper-ball thermocouple. The h- values increased to 3.6 times during the boiling period. COMSOLTM Multiphysics was used to model the heat transfer in the vacuum fryer pan. Based on the simulation results, a 1.5 cm thick insulation material was installed in the fryer to reduce the energy losses. The refrigeration system operates at Tevap = -26C and Tcond = 50C with 26C sub-cooling. Sensitivity analysis showed that the system Coefficient of Performance (COP) was about 3.87 at these conditions and compressor power requirement (CPR) was 74 W (85% efficiency) when frying 30 g of potatoes slices. The best results were obtained at Tevap = -10C and Tcond = 40C with 26C sub-cooling and superheat of 5C. The predicted COP was 4 and the CPR 70 W. The ice-formation on coils reduced the condensation rate. Reducing the refrigerant temperature to -10C (from -26C) reduced the condensation rate by 30%. These results show a more effective vacuum frying system for high-quality fruits and vegetables than the system previously used.

Pandey, Akhilesh

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Elucidating the solid, liquid and gaseous products from batch pyrolysis of cotton-gin trash.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cotton-gin trash (CGT) was pyrolyzed at different temperatures and reaction times using an externally-heated batch reactor. The average yields of output products (solid/char, liquid/bio-oil, and gaseous) were determined. The heating value (HV) of CGT was measured to be around 15-16 MJ kg- 1 (6500-7000 Btu lb-1). In the first set of tests, CGT was pyrolyzed at 600, 700, and 800C and at 30, 45, and 60 min reaction period. The maximum char yield of 40% by weight (wt.%) was determined at 600C and 30 min settings, however, the HV of char was low and almost similar to the HV of CGT. A maximum gas yield of 40 wt.% was measured at 800C and 60 min and the highest liquid yield of 30 wt.% was determined at 800C and 30 min. In the modified pyrolysis test, the effects of temperature (500, 600, 700, and 800C) on the product yield and other properties were investigated. The experiment was performed using the same reactor purged with nitrogen at a rate of 1000 cm3 min-1. Gas yield increased as temperature was increased while the effect was opposite on char yield. The maximum char yield of 38 wt.% was determined at 500C and 30 min. The char had the largest fraction in the energy output (70-83%) followed by gas (10-20%) and bio-oil (7- 9%). Maximum gas yield of 35 wt.% was determined at 800C. The average yield of CO, H2 and total hydrocarbons (THC) generally increased with increased temperature but CO2 production decreased. Methane, ethane, and propane dominated the THC. The bio-oil yield at 600C was the highest at about 30 wt.% among the temperature settings. The HV of bio-oil was low (2-5 MJ kg-1) due to minimal non-HC compounds and high moisture content (MC). A simple energy balance of the process was performed. The process was considered energy intensive due to the high amount of energy input (6100 kJ) while generating a maximum energy output of only 10%. After disregarding the energy used for preparation and pyrolysis, the energy losses ranged from 30-46% while the energy of the output represent between 55-70% of the input energy from CGT.

Aquino, Froilan Ludana

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote 0: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass March 4, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: Potential Security Impact: Remote execution of arbitrary code, Denial of Service (DoS), authentication bypass. PLATFORM: HP-UX B.11.11, B.11.23, B.11.31 running OpenSSL before vA.00.09.08q. ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP-UX OpenSSL. This vulnerability could be exploited remotely to execute arbitrary code or create a Denial of Service (DoS) or an authentication bypass. reference LINKS: Net-Security Advisory: HPSBUX02638

434

T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

70: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote 70: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass March 4, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: Potential Security Impact: Remote execution of arbitrary code, Denial of Service (DoS), authentication bypass. PLATFORM: HP-UX B.11.11, B.11.23, B.11.31 running OpenSSL before vA.00.09.08q. ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP-UX OpenSSL. This vulnerability could be exploited remotely to execute arbitrary code or create a Denial of Service (DoS) or an authentication bypass. reference LINKS: Net-Security Advisory: HPSBUX02638

435

Would You Consider Driving a Vehicle that Can Run on Biodiesel? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Would You Consider Driving a Vehicle that Can Run on Biodiesel? Would You Consider Driving a Vehicle that Can Run on Biodiesel? Would You Consider Driving a Vehicle that Can Run on Biodiesel? September 16, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Shannon told you about biodiesel, a renewable fuel that can power a vehicle using less fuel and producing fewer greenhouse gas emissions. DOE has an Alternative Fuel Station Locator that can help drivers find the nearest fueling station to fill up their vehicles. Would you consider driving a vehicle that can run on biodiesel? Why or why not? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at

436

Submission for question 1 with items numbered: 1 Run-B 1 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 9 Run-B 2 XIE19971228.0012 The United States has pressured Kazakhstan to shelve a plan for pipeline through Iran in favor of a US backed ...

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

437

diff -ruN oommf12a4pre-20100719/app/mmdisp/scripts ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

diff -ruN oommf12a4pre-20100719/app/mmdisp/scripts/mmdisp.tcl oommf12a4pre-20100719bis/app/mmdisp/scripts/mmdisp.tcl --- oommf12a4pre ...

2011-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

438

The impact of "Never Run Out" policy assured supply chain with dual reorder point expediting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing a big supply chain for one of the largest quick service restaurant companies, especially when the company has a policy called "Never Run Out," is very challenging. A traditional way of managing inventory requires ...

Lee, Gil Su

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Short-run interfuel substitution in West European power generation : a restriced cost function approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes short-run interfuel substitution between fossil fuels in West European power generation. The problem is studied within a restricted translog cost model, which is estimated by pooling time-series data ...

Sderholm, Patrik

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Drilling history and stratigraphic correlation of Rose Run sandstone of northeastern Ohio  

SciTech Connect

To date, 40 known tests have penetrated the Knox unconformity in Ashtabula, Lake, Trumbull, Geauga, and Portage Counties, Ohio. Prior to 1980, there were only 22 tests. Of these, only 10 penetrated and logged rocks older than the Rose Run sandstone. In the period 1980-1986, two Rose Run discoveries were drilled, one in New Lyme Township of Ashtabula County and one in Burton Township of Geauga County. Both discovery wells have been offset. Attempts have been made to correlate these two areas with older tests in northeastern Ohio and with the Rose Run sandstones of Coshocton County. In northeastern Ohio, preliminary studies indicate a Rose Run sandstone and/or dolomite interval approximately 100 ft thick. The upper 50 ft is predominantly sandstone and the lower 50 ft changes locally from sandstone to dolomite. The upper sandy member can be correlated to the A, B, and C sandstone units of Coshocton County.

Moyer, C.C.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analytical batch run" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

IR Radiation from Trees to a Ski Run: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately calculating the surface radiation budget of a groomed ski run is crucial when determining snow surface temperature and other snow-related variables, knowledge of which is important for ski racing. Downwelling longwave radiation can ...

Rosie Howard; Roland Stull

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Analyzing the Long-run Impact of the Regional Greenhouse Gas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analyzing the Long-run Impact of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative on Maryland Power Sectors Costs and CO2 Emissions Speaker(s): Yihsu Chen Date: June 14, 2007 - 12:00pm...

443

Selection of tau leptons with the CDF Run 2 trigger system  

SciTech Connect

We have implemented triggers for hadronically decaying tau leptons within a framework of the CDF Run 2 trigger system. We describe the triggers, along with their physics motivations, and report on their initial performance.

A. Anastassov; S. Baroiant; M. Chertok

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Evaluation of a Fast-Running Urban Dispersion Modeling System Using Joint Urban 2003 Field Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An urban dispersion modeling system was evaluated using the Joint Urban 2003 field data. The system consists of a fast-running urban airflow model (RUSTIC, for Realistic Urban Spread and Transport of Intrusive Contaminants) that is coupled with a ...

Eric A. Hendricks; Steve R. Diehl; Donald A. Burrows; Robert Keith

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

An alternative scaling solution for high-energy QCD saturation with running coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new type of approximate scaling compatible with the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation with running coupling is found, which is different from the previously known running coupling geometric scaling. The corresponding asymptotic traveling wave solution is derived. Although featuring different scaling behaviors, the two solutions are complementary approximations of the same universal solution, and they become equivalent in the high energy limit. The new type of scaling is observed in the small-x DIS data.

Beuf, Guillaume

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

An alternative scaling solution for high-energy QCD saturation with running coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new type of approximate scaling compatible with the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation with running coupling is found, which is different from the previously known running coupling geometric scaling. The corresponding asymptotic traveling wave solution is derived. Although featuring different scaling behaviors, the two solutions are complementary approximations of the same universal solution, and they become equivalent in the high energy limit. The new type of scaling is observed in the small-x DIS data.

Guillaume Beuf

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

447

How Long For the Long-Run Equilibrium in a Cointegration System?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In economics the period of "long-run" often signifies the length of time within which transient fluctuations disappear, and a system eventually comes back to an equilibrium state (or path), if any. Among some interesting cases of long run analysis, the concept of cointegration is a relatively new concept of the long run equilibrium. This paper discusses how to determine the length of the long-run period for a cointegration relation. In an application to a consumption-income relation we found that the length of the long-run period for the relation is about ten quarters. Keywords: Long run equilibrium, cointegration. 1 Department of Economics, State University of New York - Albany, Albany, NY 12222. (518) 442-4926, jykim@cnsunix.albany.edu 1 1 Introduction The concept of cointegration defined by Engle and Granger (1987) has become useful for analyzing linear dynamic systems in economics. The existence of a cointegration relation among a set of variables implies that there exists a...

How Long; Long-run Equilibrium; Jae-young Kim; Jae-young Kim

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Residential response to price changes in natural gas service: A short-run analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential consumer demand for natural gas services is determined by numerous components including natural gas and competing fuel prices, weather patterns, appliance ownership characteristics, income, and energy conservation measure implementation. This study utilizes household-level data on a set of the determinants of residential natural gas demand, combined with corresponding consumption observations, to analyze the price response over the [open quotes]short-run[close quotes] period, in which primary natural gas-consuming appliances are fixed. Two model specifications are employed in this study to model the natural gas demand function and derive short-run price elasticity estimates. These are the Error Components (EC) and Fixed Effects (FE) models. These specifications result in elastic short-run responses estimates ranging between [minus]2.164 and [minus]7.015. These values contrast with the inelastic short-run estimated responses presented in previous empirical work, and the likelihood of actually observing such large short-run responses is expected to be small. The large estimates developed in the current study are evidently due to the use of household-specific data that incorporates disaggregated factors that influence monthly fluctuations in demand. This level of detail is subsumed within the aggregated data employed in prior studies. The price elasticity estimates developed in this study are directly applicable to short-run fuel demand analyses. The estimates are also applicable to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy conservation programs.

Wilson, P.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

PLEAEERUSH ANALYTICAL DA-~-A SHEET  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' PLEAEERUSH ANALYTICAL DA-~-A SHEET ' ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhD SAFETY DlVlSlON 1956 Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. 1. H.#~~Sample Nos. 3 --Date Collected~~by-CESS-.Route to CBS LocationTITANIUM Type of Sample airnalyzed for F Alpham Remarks NIAGARA pALI+S* N.Y. U Beta Bldg. 103 - furnace room - -NO, Ra Oil PH Be Th Sample No. Hour Sample Description I I I--- R ) T 1 Q I I I 7392 1100 GA Induction furnace area duri-nn ----l----- mDeriod;.02; 151 .3 while furnace was charged with UOT_- and carbon, and under heat. 7393 / GA Continuation of 7392 I I 7394 GA Continuation of 7393 -I- ----J -___-_-- - ___(_-- I- -~----~ -- ~- __ __ ___ -----.A ri --- - ----_' ---p. ----- __- -. -~-- -~ - 1 - .- -__ -___ -_--__ -___-- I -__-- -- --' II--T---

450

Technosocial Predictive Analytics for Illicit Nuclear Trafficking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Illicit nuclear trafficking networks are a national security threat. These networks can directly lead to nuclear proliferation, as state or non-state actors attempt to identify and acquire nuclear weapons-related expertise, technologies, components, and materials. The ability to characterize and anticipate the key nodes, transit routes, and exchange mechanisms associated with these networks is essential to influence, disrupt, interdict or destroy the function of the networks and their processes. The complexities inherent to the characterization and anticipation of illicit nuclear trafficking networks requires that a variety of modeling and knowledge technologies be jointly harnessed to construct an effective analytical and decision making workflow in which specific case studies can be built in reasonable time and with realistic effort. In this paper, we explore a solution to this challenge that integrates evidentiary and dynamic modeling with knowledge management and analytical gaming, and demonstrate its application to a geopolitical region at risk.

Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Butner, R. Scott; Cowell, Andrew J.; Dalton, Angela C.; Haack, Jereme N.; Kreyling, Sean J.; Riensche, Roderick M.; White, Amanda M.; Whitney, Paul D.

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry  

SciTech Connect

An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

Kertesz, Vilmos (Knoxville, TN); Van Berkel, Gary (Clinton, TN)

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

452

Analytical model for Stirling cycle machine design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to study further the promising free piston Stirling engine architecture, there is a need of an analytical thermodynamic model which could be used in a dynamical analysis for preliminary design. To aim at more realistic values, the models have to take into account the heat losses and irreversibilities on the engine. An analytical model which encompasses the critical flaws of the regenerator and furthermore the heat exchangers effectivenesses has been developed. This model has been validated using the whole range of the experimental data available from the General Motor GPU-3 Stirling engine prototype. The effects of the technological and operating parameters on Stirling engine performance have been investigated. In addition to the regenerator influence, the effect of the cooler effectiveness is underlined.

Formosa, Fabien; 10.1016/j.enconman.2010.02.010

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

454

Visual Analytics and Storytelling through Video  

SciTech Connect

This paper supplements a video clip submitted to the Video Track of IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization 2005. The original video submission applies a two-way storytelling approach to demonstrate the visual analytics capabilities of a new visualization technique. The paper presents our video production philosophy, describes the plot of the video, explains the rationale behind the plot, and finally, shares our production experiences with our readers.

Wong, Pak C.; Perrine, Kenneth A.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Foote, Harlan P.; Thomas, Jim

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

Analytic solutions of an unclassified artifact /  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the technical detail for analytic solutions for the inner and outer profiles of the unclassified CMM Test Artifact (LANL Part Number 157Y-700373, 5/03/2001) in terms of radius and polar angle. Furthermore, analytic solutions are derived for the legacy Sheffield measurement hardware, also in terms of radius and polar angle, using part coordinates, i.e., relative to the analytic profile solutions obtained. The purpose of this work is to determine the exact solution for the cosine correction term inherent to measurement with the Sheffield hardware. The cosine correction is required in order to interpret the actual measurements taken by the hardware in terms of an actual part definition, or knot-point spline definition, that typically accompanies a component drawing. Specifically, there are two portions of the problem: first an analytic solution must be obtained for any point on the part, e.g., given the radii and the straight lines that define the part, it is required to find an exact solution for the inner and outer profile for any arbitrary polar angle. Next, the problem of the inspection of this part must be solved, i.e., given an arbitrary sphere (representing the inspection hardware) that comes in contact with the part (inner and outer profiles) at any arbitrary polar angle, it is required to determine the exact location of that intersection. This is trivial for the case of concentric circles. In the present case, however, the spherical portion of the profiles is offset from the defined center of the part, making the analysis nontrivial. Here, a simultaneous solution of the part profiles and the sphere was obtained.

Trent, Bruce C.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Analytical steam injection model for layered systems  

SciTech Connect

Screening, evaluation and optimization of the steam flooding process in homogeneous reservoirs can be performed by using simple analytical predictive models. In the absence of any analytical model for layered reservoirs, at present, only numerical simulators can be used. And these are expensive. In this study, an analytical model has been developed considering two isolated layers of differing permeabilities. The principle of equal flow potential is applied across the two layers. Gajdica`s (1990) single layer linear steam drive model is extended for the layered system. The formulation accounts for variation of heat loss area in the higher permeability layer, and the development of a hot liquid zone in the lower permeability layer. These calculations also account for effects of viscosity, density, fractional flow curves and pressure drops in the hot liquid zone. Steam injection rate variations in the layers are represented by time weighted average rates. For steam zone calculations, Yortsos and Gavalas`s (1981) upper bound method is used with a correction factor. The results of the model are compared with a numerical simulator. Comparable oil and water flow rates, and breakthrough times were achieved for 100 cp oil. Results with 10 cp and 1000 cp oils indicate the need to improve the formulation to properly handle differing oil viscosities.

Abdual-Razzaq; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Sensitivity to Gravitational Waves from Compact Binary Coalescences Achieved during LIGO's Fifth and Virgo's First Science Run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We summarize the sensitivity achieved by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors for compact binary coalescence (CBC) searches during LIGO's fifth science run and Virgo's first science run. We present noise spectral density curves for each of the four detectors that operated during these science runs which are representative of the typical performance achieved by the detectors for CBC searches. These spectra are intended for release to the public as a summary of detector performance for CBC searches during these science runs.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; M Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; F. Antonucci; S. Aoudia; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; M. Aronsson; K. G. Arun; Y. Aso; S. Aston; P. Astone; D. E. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; S. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. G. Beker; M. Benacquista; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; S. Bigotta; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Birindelli; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; C. Boccara; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bork; M. Born; S. Bose; L. Bosi; M. Boyle; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; R. Budzy?ski; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; E. Campagna; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; T. Cha