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1

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 10, 2003 October 10, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36) Joe DeHerrera- KEWN-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Project-Implemetation of Wildlife Mitigation Plan Project No: 200000900 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.0 Plant Propagation Techniques; 4.0 Water Development and Management; 5.0 Water Distribution Techniques; 6.0 Fire Management Techniques (prompt fire suppression and fuels management, natural fire management), 7.0 Vegetation Management (herbicide, hand pulling, prescribed burns, water level manipulation); 8.0 Species Manangement

2

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2003 1, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33) Ron Morinaka Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Gooderich Bayou Culvert Replacement (Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Program) Project No: 1991-019-03 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 8.2 Control of Predators and Nuisance Animals - Removal or Reduction of Undesirable Wildlife Species. Location: Flathead County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (MFWP) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to fund a fish barrier project with Montana Fish,

3

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2003 7, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35) Joe Deherrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Malheur Wildlife Mitigation Project- Denny Jones Ranch Project No: 200002700 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.0 Plant Propagation Techniques; 4.0 Water Development and Management; 5.0 Water Distribution Techniques; 6.0 Fire Management Techniques (prompt fire suppression and fuels management, natural fire management), 7.0 Vegetation Management (herbicide, hand pulling, prescribed burns, water level manipulation); 8.2 Control of Predators and

4

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-25)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 11, 2002 June 11, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-25) Ron Morinaka, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Purchase of Fisher River Conservation Easement (Fiscal Years 2002-2004) Project No: 2002-044-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: near Libby, Lincoln County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a portion of the cost of a conservation easement on 56,400 acres of land along the Fisher River to preclude development

5

EIS (DOE/EIS-0246-SA-24) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife MitigationProgram EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2002 3, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-24) David Sill Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Herbert Conservation Easement Project No: 1992-068-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: Benton County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on approximately 221 acres of the Herbert parcel in Benton County, Oregon for the protection of wetland, riparian, and riverine habitats. The Herbert parcel is located within the Willamette

6

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-29)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-29) Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-29) Charlie Craig - KEWU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Blue Creek Winter Range - Spokane Reservation (Acquisition of Smith and Parsons Properties) Project No: 1991-062-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.1 Fee Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: On the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Spokane Tribe of Indians Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the purchase of three parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 870 acres.

7

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the Albeni Falls Hydroelectric Project #12;Biological Objective 1 Protect 900 acres of wetland hydroelectric project. · 1988 publication of the Final Report Albeni Falls Wildlife Protection, Mitigation effects on wildlife resulting from hydroelectric development. 2. Select target wildlife species

8

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 16, 2004 January 16, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37) Charlie Craig - KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Blue Creek Winter Range - Spokane Reservation (Acquisition of Sampson, Lantzy, Allotment #0065-C, and Allotment 154 Properties) Project No: 1991-062-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.1 Fee Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: On the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Spokane Tribe of Indians Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the purchase of four parcels of land

9

DOE/EIS-0246-SA-16: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (8/9/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2001 9, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-16) Brad Miller, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Johnson Property Acquisition Project No: 1992-061-06 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition. Location: Benewah Watershed on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase three parcels totaling 411 acres of private property on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation as partial mitigation for

10

(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-23): Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 5/15/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15, 2002 15, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-23) David Sill Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Canby Ferry Conservation Easement Project No: 1992-068-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: Clackamas County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on approximately 16 acres of the Canby Ferry parcel in Clackamas County, Oregon for the protection

11

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)  

SciTech Connect

BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

N /A

2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

12

EIS(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-19) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 12/12/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 12, 2001 December 12, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-19) David Sill, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Bader Property Acquisition Project No: 1992-061-06 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition. Location: St. Joe Watershed on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 650 acres of private property that border the St. Joe River near Goose Heaven Lake on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation

13

(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-28): Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 7/24/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 24, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-28) David Byrnes Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Lower Naches River Land Acquisition, Yakima River Side Channels Project Project No: 1997-051-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources Location: Yakima County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Yakama Nation Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase four parcels of private land that total approximately 125 acres located in south-central Washington along the Naches River in Yakima County. Following acquisition, title to the land will be held by The Yakama Nation. The goal of this project

14

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-32) 5/20/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 20, 2003 May 20, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-32) Joe DeHerrera, KECU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Zumwalt Prairie Preserve Conservation Easement Project No: 2001-043-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): Resource Acquisition Techniques-1.2 Easement Acquisition. Location: Wallowa County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Nature Conservancy Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The

15

EIS(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 3/7/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 7, 2002 March 7, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) Allyn Meuleman, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Camas Prairie Acquisition, Anderson Ranch Dam Phase II Project No: 1995-057-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Camas and Elmore Counties, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 1,370 acres of

16

(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-26): Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (07/3/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2002 3, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-26) David Sill Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Windy Bay Property Acquisition Project No: 1990-044-03 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Kootenai County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 150 acres of land located at the mouth of Lake Creek on Lake Coeur d'Alene on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation in Kootenai County, Idaho. Title to the land will be held by the Coeur d'Alene

17

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-30)(10/28/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0) 0) Allyn Meuleman TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Horkley Property Fee Simple Acquisition Project No: 1995-057-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Jefferson County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of approximately 120 acres of sagebrush steppe and agricultural lands in Jefferson County, Idaho. The property proposed for acquisition lies on the west slope of the Menan Butte Area of Critical

18

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-31)(10/28/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1) 1) Allyn Meuleman TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Allen Property Fee Simple Acquisition Project No: 1995-057-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Jefferson County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of approximately 81 acres of forested wetlands and scrub shrub wetlands along the south bank of the South Fork of the Snake River in Jefferson County, Idaho. The property proposed for acquisition lies within

19

EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), 6: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 30, 1996 EA-1096: Finding of No Significant Impact Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic) July 30, 1996 EA-1096: Final Environmental Assessment Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic)

20

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation : Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect

The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group continued to actively engage in implementing wildlife mitigation actions in 2002. Regular Work Group meetings were held to discuss budget concerns affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, to present potential acquisition projects, and to discuss and evaluate other issues affecting the Work Group and Project. Work Group members protected 1,386.29 acres of wildlife habitat in 2002. To date, the Albeni Falls project has protected approximately 5,914.31 acres of wildlife habitat. About 21% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities have increased as more properties are purchased and continue to center on restoration, operation and maintenance, and monitoring. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development of a monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. This year the Work Group began implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program performing population and plant surveys, data evaluation and storage, and map development as well as developing management plans. Assuming that the current BPA budget restrictions will be lifted in the near future, the Work Group expects to increase mitigation properties this coming year with several potential projects.

Terra-Berns, Mary

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision; 06April1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt a set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) that apply to future BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. Various sourcesincluding Indian tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, or other Federal agenciespropose wildlife mitigation projects to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) for BPA funding. Following independent scientific and public reviews, Council then selects projects to recommend for BPA funding. BPA adopts this set of prescriptions to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects. This decision is based on consideration of potential environmental

22

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI...

24

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

Soults, Scott [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho

2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect

Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

Ashley, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

SciTech Connect

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

SciTech Connect

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation- Project Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation- Project Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation- Project Final Environmental Assessment DOE-EA-1 023 Bonneville POWER ADMINISTRATION April 1995 DISCLAIMER This report w a s prepared a s an account of work sponsored by an agency of t h e United States Government. Neither t h e United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or a s s u m e s any legal liability or responsibility for t h e accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents t h a t its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial, product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise d o e s not necessarily constitute or imply its

32

E-Print Network 3.0 - administration wildlife mitigation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IntroductionI. Introduction The Northwest Power Act of Summary: , mitigate and enhance fish and wildlife, including related spawning grounds and habitat, on the Columbia... to...

33

GRR/Section 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy 2-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies [[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife]] Regulations & Policies Oregon Administrative Rules 635-415-0025 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the procedures required when a project will

34

Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Creek Winter Range: Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project Final Environmental Assessment I F 8 - Spokane Tribe of Indians Bonneville POWER ADMINISTRATION B r n u r r o N aF THIS D O C ~ I H ~ E E 1% utifi_;'iUzi: w DOVEA-0939 November1 994 Bureay of Indian Affairs DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. DISCLAIMER This report was .prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

35

Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Mitigation Projects, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Pend Oreille Wetlands project consists of two adjacent parcels totaling about 600 acres. The parcels make up the northern boundary of the Kalispel Indian Reservation, and is also adjacent to the Pend Oreille River about 25 miles north of Newport and Albeni Falls Dam (Figure 1). Located in the Selkirk Mountains in Pend Oreille County Washington, the project is situated on an active floodplain, increasing its effectiveness as mitigation for Albeni Falls Dam. The combination of the River, wetlands and the north-south alignment of the valley have resulted in an important migratory waterfowl flyway. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Kalispel Natural Resource Department have designated both project sites as priority habitats. Seven habitat types exist on the project properties and include four wetland habitats (open water, emergent, and scrub-shrub and forested), riparian deciduous forest, upland mixed coniferous forest and floodplain meadow. Importance of the project to wildlife is further documented by the occurrence of an active Bald Eagle nest aerie.

Entz, Ray D. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA)

2001-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

36

Wildlife Loss Estimates and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume Three, Hungry Horse Project.  

SciTech Connect

This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Hungry Horse Dam project on the South Fork of the Flathead River and previous mitigation of theses losses. In order to develop and focus mitigation efforts, it was first necessary to estimate wildlife and wildlife hatitat losses attributable to the construction and operation of the project. The purpose of this report was to document the best available information concerning the degree of impacts to target wildlife species. Indirect benefits to wildlife species not listed will be identified during the development of alternative mitigation measures. Wildlife species incurring positive impacts attributable to the project were identified.

Casey, Daniel

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.  

SciTech Connect

This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

Childs, Allen

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

Cousins, Katherine [Idaho Department of Fsh and Game

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

40

EA-0928: Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project, Multnomah County, Oregon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Mitigation Project Management Plan for the "Dilling Addition".  

SciTech Connect

This report is a recommendation from the Kalispel Tribe to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) for management of the Pend Oreille Wetland Wildlife Mitigation project II (Dilling Addition) for the extensive habitat losses caused by Albeni Falls Dam on Kalispel Ceded Lands. Albeni Falls Dam is located on the Pend Oreille River near the Washington-Idaho border, about 25 miles upstream of the Kalispel Indian Reservation. The dam controls the water level on Lake Pend Oreille. The lake was formerly the center of subsistence use by the Kalispel Tribe. Flooding of wetlands, and water fluctuations both on the lake and downstream on the river, has had adverse impacts to wildlife and wildlife habitat. An extensive process was followed to formulate and prioritize wildlife resource goals. The Kalispel Natural Resource Department provided guidance in terms of opportunities onsite. To prioritize specific goals, the Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Wildlife Caucus were consulted. From this process, the top priority goal for the Kalispel Tribe is: Protect and develop riparian forest and shrub, and freshwater wetlands, to mitigate losses resulting from reservoir inundation and river level fluctuations due to Albeni Falls Dam. Indicator species used to determine the initial construction/inundation loses and mitigation project gains include Bald Eagle (breeding and wintering), Black-capped Chickadee, Canada Goose, Mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer, and Yellow Warbler.

Entz, Ray D.

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

43

Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect

The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at 14 of 27 Major Hydroelectric Projects in Idaho, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act and wildlife and their habitats in the Columbia River Basin and to compliance with the Program, the wildlife mitigation status reports coordination with resource agencies and Indian Tribes. developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program development, operation, and maintenance of hydroelectric projects on existing agreements; and past, current, and proposed wildlife factual review and documentation of existing information on wildlife meet the requirements of Measure 1004(b)(l) of the Program. The mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. In mitigate for the losses to those resources resulting from the purpose of these wildlife mitigation status reports is to provide a resources at some of the Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects the river and its tributaries. To accomplish this goal, the Council were written with the cooperation of project operators, and in within Idaho.

Martin, Robert C.; Mehrhoff, L.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Forest inventory: Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit, Craig Mountain, Idaho. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this report is to determine the quantity and quality of existing forest habitat types on the 59,991-acre Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit (WMU). Products from this effort include a description of the ecological condition, a map of habitat types, and an inventory of forest resources on the WMU lands. The purpose of this and other resource inventories (plant and wildlife) is to assess the current resources condition of the WMU and to provide necessary information to generate a long-term management for this area.

Narolski, Steven W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

DoE/..A South Fork Snake RiverPalisades Wildlife Mitigation Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

..A ..A -- South Fork Snake RiverPalisades Wildlife Mitigation Project Final Environmental Assessment ig of No Significant Impact and Findi RECEIVED @ S T 1 JAN 3 1 DOEIEA-0956 September 1995 SOUTH FORK SNAKE RIVER / PALISADES WILDLIFE MITIGATION PROJECT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE EA # 0956 DECLAIMER This report was prepared as an a m u n t of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their ' employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi- , bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer-

49

EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 13, 2001 September 13, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17) Joe HeHerrera - KEWU Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Eagle Lakes Ranch Acquisition and Restoration Project No: 2000-025-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): Resource Acquisition Techniques - 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition Location: Franklin County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Columbia National Wildlife Refuge Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres

50

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2004 14, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38) Joe DeHerrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Proposed Weaver Slough Conservation Easement Project No: 2002-042 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS [page A/2]): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: Flathead River System, Flathead County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Flathead Land Trust Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that

51

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Postearthquake deformation analysis of wildlife site  

SciTech Connect

Postearthquake deformations of the Wildlife site, Imperial Valley, Calif., following the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake, have been interpreted by finite-element deformation analyses. The analyses consider the stress redistribution and reconsolidation caused by the development of liquefaction. The stress redistribution analysis was conducted under fully undrained condition to consider the effects of strain-softening behavior of liquefied materials. The reconsolidation analysis was conducted using Biot's theory to consider the effects of dissipation of excess pore-water pressures. The results reveal that the delayed pore-water pressure response and deformation may be due to the redistribution of stresses and pore-water pressures.

Gu, W.H. (EBA Engineering, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)); Morgenstern, N.R.; Robertson, P.K. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Restoration As Mitigation: Analysis of Stream Mitigation for Coal Mining Impacts in Southern Appalachia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

being implemented in southern Appalachia for coal mining are not meeting the objectives of the CleanRestoration As Mitigation: Analysis of Stream Mitigation for Coal Mining Impacts in Southern of information about 434 stream mitigation projects from 117 permits for surface mining in Appalachia. Data from

Palmer, Margaret A.

54

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume One, Libby Dam Project, Operator, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.  

SciTech Connect

This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Libby Dam project on the Kootenai River and previous mitigation of these losses. The current assessment documents the best available information concerning the impacts to the wildlife populations inhabiting the project area prior to construction of the dam and creation of the reservoir. Many of the impacts reported in this assessment differ from those contained in the earlier document compiled by the Fish and Wildlife Service; however, this document is a thorough compilation of the available data (habitat and wildlife) and, though conservative, attempts to realistically assess the impacts related to the Libby Dam project. Where appropriate the impacts resulting from highway construction and railroad relocation were included in the assessment. This was consistent with the previous assessments.

Yde, Chris A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Willamette Wildlife Mitigation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to 264 miles · 30% decline in small floodplains along tributaries-70% decline of islands in tributaries developments and habitat loss Land matrix: small parcels with high value #12;Willamette Subbasin Plan." Willamette Basin Hydro-Facilities Willamette Valley Cascade Mtns Big Cliff Detroit Foster Green Peter Hills

58

GHG mitigation options database (GMOD) and analysis tool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There is a growing public consensus that the primary cause of climate change is anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and that it will be necessary for the global community to use low-carbon technologies in both the energy and industrial sectors (IEA, 2013). As a result of the recent focus on GHG emissions, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies are implementing policies and programs to quantify and regulate GHG emissions from sources in the United States. These policies and programs have generated a need for a reliable source of information regarding GHG mitigation options. In response to this need, EPA developed a comprehensive GHG mitigation options database (GMOD). The database is a repository of data on available GHG technologies in various stages of development for several industry sectors. It can also be used to assess the performance, costs, and limitations of various mitigation control options. This paper further describes the objectives of GMOD, the data available in GMOD, and functionality of GMOD as an analysis tool. In addition, examples are provided to demonstrate GMOD's usability and capabilities. A comparison of GMOD to other existing GHG mitigation databases is also provided along with the recommended next steps for GMOD.

Gurbakhash Bhander; Nick Hutson; Jacky Rosati; Frank Princiotta; Kristine Pelt; Jim Staudt; Jeffrey Petrusa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

FY2010 2018 Fish and Wildlife Program Project Solicitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Idaho Wildlife Mitigation-Middle Snake #12;2 A. Abstract The Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation project (SIWM) of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) proposes implementation of wildlife mitigation and/or scientific background In both the Mid and Upper Snake Provinces, human development

60

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase 1, Volume Two (B), Clark Fork River Projects, Cabinet Gorge and Noxon Rapids Dams, Operator, Washington Water Power Company.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents best available information concerning the wildlife species impacted and the degree of the impact. A target species list was developed to focus the impact assessment and to direct mitigation efforts. Many non-target species also incurred impacts but are not discussed in this report. All wildlife habitats inundated by the two reservoirs are represented by the target species. It was assumed the numerous non-target species also affected will be benefited by the mitigation measures adopted for the target species. Impacts addressed are limited to those directly attributable to the loss of habitat and displacement of wildlife populations due to the construction and operation of the two hydroelectric projects. Secondary impacts, such as the relocation of railroads and highways, and the increase of the human population, were not considered. In some cases, both positive and negative impacts were assessed; and the overall net effect was reported. The loss/gain estimates reported represent impacts considered to have occurred during one point in time except where otherwise noted. When possible, quantitative estimates were developed based on historical information from the area or on data from similar areas. Qualitative loss estimates of low, moderate, or high with supporting rationale were assessed for each species or species group.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge May 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester. Contacts

62

Wildlife Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildlife Services, part of Texas Cooperative Extension, is an agency created to assist the public in managing the problems sometimes caused by wildlife. Its objectives are to protect wildlife, crops, livestock, property and human health...

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

EIS-0246-SA-18: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

246-SA-18: Supplement Analysis 246-SA-18: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-18: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program BPA proposes to fund the acquisition and preservation of approximately 99 acres of native wet prairie and oak woodland habitat in Lane County, Oregon. Title to the land will be held by The Nature Conservancy, who will convey permanent mitigation rights to BPA in the form of a conservation easement. These newly acquired parcels will become part of the existing 330-acre Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Area. Passive management practices may take place on the land until a wildlife mitigation and management plan is developed and approved for the property. Bonneville Power Administration and The Nature Conservancy, Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS, EIS-0246-SA-18 (October

64

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan : Executive Summary.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Northwest Power Act directs the NPPC to develop a program to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance'' fish and wildlife of the Columbia River and its tributaries. The overarching goals include: A Columbia River ecosystem that sustains an abundant, productive, and diverse community of fish and wildlife; Mitigation across the basin for the adverse effects to fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the hydrosystem; Sufficient populations of fish and wildlife for abundant opportunities for tribal trust and treaty right harvest and for non-tribal harvest; and Recovery of the fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the hydrosystem that are listed under the Endangered Species Act.

Childs, Allen B.; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Low Probability Tail Event Analysis and Mitigation in BPA Control Area: Task 2 Report  

SciTech Connect

Task report detailing low probability tail event analysis and mitigation in BPA control area. Tail event refers to the situation in a power system when unfavorable forecast errors of load and wind are superposed onto fast load and wind ramps, or non-wind generators falling short of scheduled output, causing the imbalance between generation and load to become very significant.

Lu, Shuai; Makarov, Yuri V.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Jin, Shuangshuang

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

66

Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4-04 4-04 Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This Service Report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requestor.

67

EIS-0246-SA-16: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Supplement Analysis 6: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-16: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program BPA proposes to purchase three parcels totaling 411 acres of private property on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation as partial mitigation for fish and wildlife impacts caused by the construction and operation of Albeni Falls Dam. Title to the land will be transferred to the Coeur d'Alene Tribe for wildlife habitat protection and enhancement. The goal of this project is to protect, restore, and maintain approximately 2.3 miles of Benewah Creek, its floodplain, and the associated riparian zone as native fish and wildlife habitat. DOE/EIS-0246, Bonneville Power Administration, Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (August 2001) More Documents & Publications

68

Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service A National Streamflow Network Gap Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2013 13039500, Henrys Fork near Lake, Idaho; photograph by Nathan Jacobson, USGS. USGS streamgage 10336660, Emily B. Osborne, and Ken Eng Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Scientific

Fleskes, Joe

69

EIS-0246-SA-35: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Supplement Analysis 5: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-35: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon, Malheur County This review is to ensure that project activities continue to be consistent with the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and that there continues to be no effects on endangered species or cultural resources. A Supplement Analysis was completed for the original acquistion of the property and initial project activities. This project would allow the Burns-Pauite Tribe to continue manage 6,500 acres of richly diverse property on the Malheur River while developing a Wildlife Mitigation Plan. A subsequent NEPA process will be conducted for the Wildlife Mitigation Plan. DOE/EIS-0246, Bonneville Power Administration and Burns Paiute Tribe,

70

EIS-0246-SA-36: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0246-SA-36: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-36: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-36: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Grant County, Oregon The compliance checklist for this project was originally completed by the Burns Paiute Tribe in 2000, and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD), as well as the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Plan, now being implemented, continues to be consistent with the aboved mentioned EISs and RODs. DOE/EIS-0246, Bonneville Power Administration and Burns Paiute Tribe, Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS, Grant County, Oregon (October 2003)

71

EIS-0246-SA-36: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Supplement Analysis 6: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-36: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Grant County, Oregon The compliance checklist for this project was originally completed by the Burns Paiute Tribe in 2000, and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD), as well as the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Plan, now being implemented, continues to be consistent with the aboved mentioned EISs and RODs. DOE/EIS-0246, Bonneville Power Administration and Burns Paiute Tribe, Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS, Grant County, Oregon (October 2003)

72

Hunting, Habitat, and Indigenous Settlement Patterns: A Geographic Analysis of Bugl Wildlife Use in Western Panama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation analyzes indigenous wildlife use from a geographic perspective, focusing on the relationships between hunting, habitat, and settlement patterns. Fieldwork took place among five neighboring communities in ...

Smith, Derek Anthony

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US Massive Gas Injection Disruption Mitigation System Design  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a candidate design for the ITER Disruption Mitigation System. This candidate is the Massive Gas Injection System that provides machine protection in a plasma disruption event. The FMEA was quantified with generic component failure rate data as well as some data calculated from operating facilities, and the failure events were ranked for their criticality to system operation.

Lee C. Cadwallader

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-27): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 6/28/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 28, 2002 June 28, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-27) Ron Morinaka, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Abbot Creek Fish Barrier Project (Hungry Horse Mitigation / Habitat Improvements) Project No: 1991-19-03 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 8.2 Control of Predators and Nuisance Animals Location: Kalispell, Flathead County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a fishery enhancement project where a fish passage barrier will be installed in Abbot Creek to remove introduced rainbow trout

75

EIS-0246-SA-39: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SA-39: Supplement Analysis SA-39: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-39: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Pend Oreille County, Washington Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for

76

EIS-0246-SA-39: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46-SA-39: Supplement Analysis 46-SA-39: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-39: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Pend Oreille County, Washington Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for

77

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

Rissman, Adena

78

Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.  

SciTech Connect

Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

Allee, Brian J. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

79

EIS-0246-SA-29: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29: Supplement Analysis 29: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-29: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, on the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington BPA proposes to fund the purchase of three parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 870 acres. Title to the land will pass to the Spokane Tribe of Indians. The goal of the property acquisition is to dedicate the land to the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife affected by the construction and operation of portions of the Federal Columbia River Power System. DOE/EIS-0246, Bonneville Power Administration and The Spokane Tribe of Indians, Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS, on the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington

80

EIS-0246-SA-37: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Supplement Analysis 7: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-37: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, On the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund the purchase of four parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 860 acres. Title to the land will pass to the Spokane Tribe of Indians. The goal of the property acquisition is to dedicate the land to the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife affected by the construction and operation of portions of the Federal Columbia River Power System. DOE/EIS-0246, Bonneville Power Administration and The Spokane Tribe of Indians, Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS, On

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Regional GHG Mitigation Response and Leakage Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional GHG Mitigation Response and Leakage Effects: Scenario Analysis of U.S. Forestry of Analysis · Assess net GHG mitigation potential in forestry & ag · Use FASOM-GHG model · Mitigation results) ­ vary GHG targets ­ vary payment approach · Show regional mitigation potential across U

McCarl, Bruce A.

82

Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

SciTech Connect

Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

Cassirer, E. Frances

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase I, Volume Two (A), Clark Fork Projects, Thompson Falls Dam, Operator, Montana Power Company.  

SciTech Connect

The Thompson Falls Dam inundated approximately 347 acres of wildlife habitat that likely included conifer forests, deciduous bottoms, mixed conifer-deciduous forests and grassland/hay meadows. Additionally, at least one island, and several gravel bars were inundated when the river was transformed into a reservoir. The loss of riparian and riverine habitat adversely affected the diverse wildlife community inhabiting the lower Clark Fork River area. Quantitative loss estimates were determined for selected target species based on best available information. The loss estimates were based on inundation of the habitat capable of supporting the target species. Whenever possible, loss estimates bounds were developed by determining ranges of impacts based on density estimates and/or acreage loss estimates. Of the twelve target species or species groups, nine were assessed as having net negative impacts. 86 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

84

Quantitative Analysis of CO2 Mitigation in Thai Low Carbon Power Sector towards 2050  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recently, Low Carbon Society (LCS) principle has emerged as a practicable campaign for both developing and developed countries to deal with the dramatic increment of greenhouse gas concentration in the atmosphere. Various key features of LCS entail reducing energy demand and consumption while avoiding the fossil fuel utilization which is a major contributor to substantial CO2 emissions. In this study, Thailand's power sector is modeled using Asia-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM/Enduse). The objective of this study is to model the Thai power sector such that the viability of clean generating technologies for Thailand is considered and their mitigating effects are analyzed. The results demonstrate that the fossil fuel based technology would be replaced by clean technologies including, coal-fired power plant with CCS technology and renewable energies in the LCS scenario. The LCS scenario can mitigate CO2 emissions by 58,098 ktCO2 in 2050 when compared to BAU scenario.

P. Chunark; K. Promjiraprawat; P. Winyuchakrit; B. Limmeechokchai; T. Masui; T. Hanaoka; Y. Matsuoka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Description and analysis of vehicle and train collisions with wildlife in Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada, 1951-1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measures that have been used in Jasper National Park is alsoCOLLISIONS WITH WILDLIFE IN JASPER NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTANational Park Warden, Jasper National Park, 780-852-6235,

Bertwistle, Jim

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-181- Noxon-Hot Springs/Taft-Hot Springs 39/2 to 44/1)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2003 2, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-34) Joe DeHerrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Asotin Creek Watershed, Washington-Schlee Acquisition Project No: 1996-094-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Asotin County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of approximately 8,500 acres consisting of shrub-steppe rangeland, 1,480 acres of Conservation Reserve Program

87

EIS-0246-SA28: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SA28: Supplement Analysis SA28: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA28: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Yakima County, Washington BPA proposes to purchase four parcels of private land that total approximately 125 acres located in south-central Washington along the Naches River in Yakima County. Following acquisition, title to the land will be held by The Yakama Nation. The goal of this project is to protect and enhance riparian, wetland, and upland habitats for the benefit of fish and wildlife. DOE/EIS-0246, Bonneville Power Administration and The Yakama Nation, Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS, Yakima County, Washington (July 2002) More Documents & Publications EIS-0246-SA-29: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-37: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-70

88

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-148- McNary Wildlife (McNary-Santiam #2))  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-148- McNary Wildlife (McNary-Santiam #2)) Mark Newbill - TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Joint project with US Forest Service for vegetation control for the McNary- Santiam #2 230 kV transmission line that enhances wildlife habitat under powerlines. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region within Marion County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in cooperation with US Forest Service. Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way by hand cutting or machine mowing. The overall goal is to remove small fir trees, brushy

89

Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.  

SciTech Connect

In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Cooperative Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005 Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program Annual Report #12; 2005Annual Report Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program www.coopunits.org #12;2 #12;2 Front cover photos

91

Visual Resource Analysis to Identify and Mitigate Visual Impacts of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visual Impacts of Energy Facilities Visual Impacts of Energy Facilities The potential visual effects of utility-scale energy facilities on the nation's scenic, cultural, and historic resources have become a factor in slowing or halting energy and electric transmission projects. Concerns about the potential visual effects of utility-scale energy facilities on the nation's scenic, cultural, and historic resources have become a factor in slowing or halting energy and electric transmission projects. Because these projects are so important to the nation's energy supply, their potential visual impacts need to be identified and mitigated. The EVS Division has undertaken a number of studies to analyze visual resources. Detailed information about this work is online at http://visualimpact.anl.gov/.

92

ANALYSIS AND MITIGATION OF X-RAY HAZARD GENERATED FROM HIGH INTENSITY LASER-TARGET INTERACTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Interaction of a high intensity laser with matter may generate an ionizing radiation hazard. Very limited studies have been made, however, on the laser-induced radiation protection issue. This work reviews available literature on the physics and characteristics of laser-induced X-ray hazards. Important aspects include the laser-to-electron energy conversion efficiency, electron angular distribution, electron energy spectrum and effective temperature, and bremsstrahlung production of X-rays in the target. The possible X-ray dose rates for several femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser systems used at SLAC, including the short pulse laser system for the Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument (peak power 4 TW and peak intensity 2.4 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) were analysed. A graded approach to mitigate the laser-induced X-ray hazard with a combination of engineered and administrative controls is also proposed.

Qiu, R.; Liu, J.C.; Prinz, A.A.; Rokni, S.H.; Woods, M.; Xia, Z.; /SLAC; ,

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

93

WILDLIFE CONTROL Session Highlights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

field assistance for airport operators. Wolf has been responsible for operational wildlife hazard mentioned in these highlights, please contact: Jim Grothaus, Technology Transfer Engineer Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 #12;1 GENERAL OVERVIEW OF WILDLIFE HAZARDS Wildlife can create hazards for an airport environment

Minnesota, University of

94

EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-18) Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS 10/17/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DATE: October 17, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-18) Charlie Craig - KEWU Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Eugene Wetlands Acquisition Phase II Project No: 1992-059-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): Resource Acquisition Techniques - 1.1 Fee- Title Acquisition, 1.2 Easement Acquisition. Location: Lane County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Nature Conservancy Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition and preservation of approximately 99 acres of native wet prairie and oak woodland habitat in Lane County, Oregon.

95

EIS-0246-SA-19: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0246-SA-19: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-19: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-19: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program BPA proposes to purchase approximately 650 acres of private property that border the St. Joe River near Goose Heaven Lake on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation as partial mitigation for fish and wildlife impacts caused by the construction and operation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project. Title to the land will be transferred to the Coeur d'Alene Tribe for wildlife habitat protection and enhancement. The goal of this project is to protect and restore riparian, wetland, floodplain and river corridor systems to help enhance water quality and in-stream habitat in the St. Joe Watershed. Bonneville Power Administration and The Nature Conservancy, Supplement

96

Using Advanced Technology-Rich Models for Regional And Global Economic Analysis of GHG Mitigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article presents the case for a detailed regional analysis of the economic impacts of GHG control, via a set of inter-connected...

Richard Loulou; Amit Kanudia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Topological Analysis and Mitigation Strategies for Cascading Failures in Power Grid Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, there has been a growing concern about the overload status of the power grid networks, and the increasing possibility of cascading failures. Many researchers have studied these networks to provide design guidelines for more robust power grids. Topological analysis is one of the components of system analysis for its robustness. This paper presents a complex systems analysis of power grid networks. First, the cascading effect has been simulated on three well known networks: the IEEE 300 bus test system, the IEEE 118 bus test system, and the WSCC 179 bus equivalent model. To extend the analysis to a larger set of networks, we develop a network generator and generate multiple graphs with characteristics similar to the IEEE test networks but with different topologies. The generated graphs are then compared to the test networks to show the effect of topology in determining their robustness with respect to cascading failures. The generated graphs turn out to be more robust than the test graphs, showing the...

Pahwa, Sakshi; Schulz, Noel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Statistical Survival Analysis of Fish and Wildlife Tagging Studies; SURPH.1 Manual - Analysis of Release-Recapture Data for Survival Studies, 1994 Technical Manual.  

SciTech Connect

Program SURPH is the culmination of several years of research to develop a comprehensive computer program to analyze survival studies of fish and wildlife populations. Development of this software was motivated by the advent of the PIT-tag (Passive Integrated Transponder) technology that permits the detection of salmonid smolt as they pass through hydroelectric facilities on the Snake and Columbia Rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Repeated detections of individually tagged smolt and analysis of their capture-histories permits estimates of downriver survival probabilities. Eventual installation of detection facilities at adult fish ladders will also permit estimation of ocean survival and upstream survival of returning salmon using the statistical methods incorporated in SURPH.1. However, the utility of SURPH.1 far exceeds solely the analysis of salmonid tagging studies. Release-recapture and radiotelemetry studies from a wide range of terrestrial and aquatic species have been analyzed using SURPH.1 to estimate discrete time survival probabilities and investigate survival relationships. The interactive computing environment of SURPH.1 was specifically developed to allow researchers to investigate the relationship between survival and capture processes and environmental, experimental and individual-based covariates. Program SURPH.1 represents a significant advancement in the ability of ecologists to investigate the interplay between morphologic, genetic, environmental and anthropogenic factors on the survival of wild species. It is hoped that this better understanding of risk factors affecting survival will lead to greater appreciation of the intricacies of nature and to improvements in the management of wild resources. This technical report is an introduction to SURPH.1 and provides a user guide for both the UNIX and MS-Windows{reg_sign} applications of the SURPH software.

Smith, Steven G.; Skalski, John R.; Schelechte, J. Warren [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Center for Quantitative Science

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The biennial Wind Wildlife Research Meeting provides an internationally recognized forum for researchers and wind-wildlife stakeholders to hear contributed papers, view research posters, and listen...

100

Forest Preserve Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forest Preserve Wildlife Forest Preserve Wildlife Nature Bulletin No. 437-A December 11, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FOREST PRESERVE WILDLIFE The Forest Preserve District now comprises about 62,512 acres of native landscape, mostly wooded, acquired and held as the statute prescribes: for the purpose of protecting the flora, fauna and scenic beauties in their natural state and condition as nearly as may be. It is a huge wildlife sanctuary wherein no weapon may be carried and no hunting, trapping or molestation of any mammal or bird is permitted. Aside from fish management, the wildlife has been left alone to work out its own systems of checks and balances. There has been no attempt to remove surplus populations; no control of any predator other than wild cats and dogs. None is needed. Dead or hollow trees have been allowed to stand, or lie where they fall, because they furnish homes for many kinds of wildlife and go back into the soil to maintain the health of the woodland. There has been considerable reforestation of open tracts formerly farmed and, in some areas, planting of shrubs and vines which provide food for wildlife.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Presentation, Training materials Website: unfccc.int/resource/cd_roms/na1/mitigation/index.htm UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments Screenshot References: UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments[1] "This training package (containing PowerPoint presentations and notes, a handbook and reference materials) is designed to facilitate the preparation of the mitigation component of the national communications by non-Annex I teams based on UNFCCC guidelines contained in the annex to decision 17/CP.8." References

102

Wildlife's Winter Diet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildlife's Winter Diet Wildlife's Winter Diet Nature Bulletin No. 659 December 9, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F, Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILDLIFE'S WINTER DIET Anyone who regularly feeds wild birds, and counts up the amount of food that they eat in the course of a winter, often wonders how they could get along without his help. In one day of freezing weather two or three dozen small birds commonly clean up a half pound of food -- suet, sunflower seed, cracked corn or small grain. This does not take into account raids by squirrels and rabbits. Winter in this region is a time of food crisis for all warm-blooded wildlife. Most of our summer song birds, especially the insect eaters, avoid cold by migrating to warm climates until spring. Likewise, most waterfowl and shorebirds go south during the months when our waters are locked in ice.

103

Wildlife Photography Market Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

programs to reach existing groups such as photography clubs. Joining tourism organizations is also likely to be helpful. Private Landowners? Responses The data gathered from the landowners? survey responses illustrates the limited nature of wildlife... wildlife photography, most have not yet reached the levels desired by operators. This is partly due to a lack of development as a tourism enterprise, which includes marketing and well-defined operational limits.It does seem that satisfaction is very...

Phillips, Miles

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

104

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Interior FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office 300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Room 3-122, Box 50088 Honolulu, Hawaii 96850 In Reply Refer To: 20 lO-F...

105

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Website: ies.lbl.gov/taxonomy/term/34 References: GCOMAP Project [1] Logo: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) "The GCOMAP project reported on the global potential for carbon sequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbon emissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenarios from 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typically seen in global

106

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) (Redirected from GCOMAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Website: ies.lbl.gov/taxonomy/term/34 References: GCOMAP Project [1] Logo: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) "The GCOMAP project reported on the global potential for carbon sequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbon emissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenarios from 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typically seen in global

107

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-71) (10/29/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29, 2001 29, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-71) Alan Ruger Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Duncan Creek Channel Rehabilitation Project Project No: 2001-053-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.11 Remove Debris Functioning as Barrier to Passage, 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements, 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities, 2.9 Mechanical Vegetation Control. Location: Skamania County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW)

108

EIS-0246-SA-24: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Supplement Analysis 4: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-24: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on approximately 221 acres of the Herbert parcel in Benton County, Oregon for the protection of wetland, riparian, and riverine habitats. The Herbert parcel is located within the Willamette Basin Mitigation Program's Canby Muddy Creek/Mary's River Focus Area southwest of the City of Corvallis. The Herbert site is a cooperative project principally facilitated by BPA, Trust for Public Land, City of Corvallis, and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Once the conservation easement is finalized, the participants will develop a management plan for the Herbert parcel. Future management actions will likely involve the restoration and enhancement of riparian

109

Ecological & Environmental Acoustic Remote Sensor (EcoEARS) Application for Long-Term Monitoring and Assessment of Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Assessment of Wildlife Gonzalo Sanchez; President, Sanchez Industrial Design, Inc., 3510 Beltline Hwy due to water, wind, geologic activity (the Geophony), acoustic signals can provide information about. Signal analysis techniques to identify wildlife and simultaneous collection of environmental parameters

Maher, Robert C.

110

EIS-0246-SA-34: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

246-SA-34: Supplement Analysis 246-SA-34: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-34: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Flathead County, Montana Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund the acquisition of approximately 8,500 acres consisting of shrub-steppe rangeland, 1,480 acres of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)/cropland, 40,000 lineal feet of stream waterfront, 426 acres of main stem riparian habitat, 400 acres of wetlands, and 23.5 miles of tributary streams in Asotin County, Washington. The Schlee Property proposed for acquisition, which is divided into the Smoothing Iron and George Creek parcels, adjoins the Umatilla National Forest, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Asotin Creek Wildlife Area, and other state lands. Title to the land will be held by

111

EIS-0246-SA-33: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Supplement Analysis 3: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-33: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Flathead County, Montana Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund a fish barrier project with Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks that proposes to block migrating rainbow trout during spawning to prevent the production and recruitment of approximately 2,500 rainbow trout into the Flathead River system annually. This action will reduce the opportunity for hybridization between rainbow and native westslope cutthroat trout; a species currently under consideration for threatened status under the Endangered Species Act. The project will be accomplished by replacing an existing culvert and retrofitting a fish passage barrier to the bayou. DOE/EIS-0246, Bonneville Power Administration and Montana Fish, Wildlife,

112

Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.  

SciTech Connect

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

113

Wildlife conservation as wealth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... illustrates how a renewable resource, publicly owned and managed, can be exploited by the private sector to create a job-sensitive manufacturing and service industry worth more than $70 ... The important lesson is to keep wildlife out of the marketplace, and thus out of private hands, while encouraging its diverse use under close public scrutiny. Like the US automobile ...

Valerius Geist

1994-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project --Use of Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities (03/08/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 8, 2000 March 8, 2000 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECN-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03) David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities PL-6: F3204 Location: Yakima, Yakima County, Washington; and Easton, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed environmental impacts of research and supplementation projects in the Yakima basin in an

115

Quantifying Carbon Mitigation Wedges in U.S. Cities: Near-Term Strategy Analysis and Critical Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper, inspired by the wedges concept, asks the questionwhat is the rate and extent of GHG mitigation that can be achieved by cities in the near-term of about five years, with existing technologies, and with current energy prices, state and national policies, and physical infrastructure? ... Hybrid programs that combine behavioral feedback with subsidies for retrofits can yield greater energy savings per home;(36) however cities must find ways to fund such subsidies. ... Specifically relevant to the buildings sector in Denver is the Colorado Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) that requires electric utilities to incorporate 30% renewable energy into the grid mix by 2020,(48) projected to reduce Denvers electricity GHG emissions factor from 0.8 to 0.72 kg-CO2e/kWh from 2007 to 2012, a 10% reduction. ...

Anu Ramaswami; Meghan Bernard; Abel Chavez; Tim Hillman; Michael Whitaker; Gregg Thomas; Matthew Marshall

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

116

EIS-0312-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0312-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Supplement Analysis for the Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS (DOE...

117

FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995 Section 12 FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT Much of this program has focused on mitigating damage done for additional federal hydroelectric projects and to plan for new development in the basin. The Federal Energy

118

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Mitigation Planning section provides Federal agency personnel with guidance to achieve agency GHG reduction goals in the most cost-effective way. Using a portfolio-based management approach for GHG mitigation planning, agencies will be able to prioritize strategies for GHG mitigation. Agencies can also use this guidance to set appropriate GHG reduction targets for different programs and sites within an agency.

119

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE 9 Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

capture or collect, or attempt to engage in any such conduct) of listed species of fish or wildlife without a special exemption. "Harm" is further defined to include...

120

Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity Harvesting Prepared for considerations for biodiversity and wildlife habitat values during their development of a discussion paper paper. #12;2 A. INTRODUCTION When evaluating the biodiversity and wildlife habitat implications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN MITIGATION ACTION PLAN KEMPER COUNTY IGCC PROJECT KEMPER COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2010 2 INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Kemper County IGCC Project (Project) (DOE/EIS-0409) in May 2010 and a Record of Decision (ROD) in August 2010 (75 FR 51248). The ROD identified commitments to mitigate potential adverse impacts associated with the project. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes the monitoring and mitigation actions the recipient must implement during the design, construction, and demonstration of the Project. DOE prepared this MAP in accordance with 10 CFR § 1021.331. PURPOSE Section 1021.331 of the DOE regulations implementing NEPA (10 CFR Part 1021) provides

122

EA-1592: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1592: Mitigation Action Plan Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant Based on the analysis in the Environmental Assessment prepared for the proposal by the GSA and NNSA, neither the construction nor operation of the selected alternative wouldhave significant environmental impact. This MAP contains mitigation and monitoring commitments for the project, including commitments set in permits for the new facility. Mitigation Action Plan for the Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant More Documents & Publications EA-1592: Finding of No Significant Impact

123

Bonneville Power Administration Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Final EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 SAMPLE IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS, RESEARCH MONITORING AND EVALUATION, AND POLICY AND PLANNING Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS Volume 3: Sample Implementation Actions, Research Monitoring and Evaluation, and Policy and Planning Volume 3/ 1 VOLUME 3 SAMPLE IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS, RESEARCH MONITORING AND EVALUATION, AND POLICY AND PLANNING One of the major challenges within the Region has been understanding the interrelationships among the numerous proposed fish and wildlife mitigation and recovery actions. One reason for this difficulty is that these actions are derived from many different regional proposals, each of which has been designed to meet a specific goal. In addition, the lack of an effective tool to illustrate these interrelationships has hampered understanding.

124

Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish Substitution/Blocked Area Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish Substitution/Blocked Area Mitigation *Preliminary draft, please refer to full recommendations for complete review 10/29/2013 10:08:05 AM 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Section Section II.C. 1. Substitution for Anadromous Fish Losses Section II. D. 8

125

COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2006 #12;Front cover photos: Top. #12;2006 ANNUAL REPORT iANNUAL REPORT 2006 COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM Above Harbor, Alaska, to study the navigational needs of small boats and commercial fishing vessels. Laboratory

126

India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife Agency/Company /Organization Government of India Sector Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.envfor.nic.in/legis Country India UN Region South-Eastern Asia References India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife[1] Overview "Category Name Water Pollution Air Pollution Environment Protection Coastal Regulation Zone Delegation of Powers Eco-marks Scheme Eco-sensitive Zone Environmental Clearance - General Environmental Labs Environmental Standards Hazardous Substances Management Loss Of Ecology Noise Pollution Ozone Layer Depletion Water Pollution 2-T Oil Public Liability Insurance

127

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation; Kokanee Stocking and Monitoring in Flathead Lake, 1995 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork-of the Flathead River reduced the reproductive success of kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) spawning in the Flathead River. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) authored a mitigation plan to offset those losses. The mitigation goal, stated in the Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributed to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam, is to: {open_quotes}Replace lost annual production of 100,000 kokanee adults, initially through hatchery production and pen rearing in Flathead Lake, partially replacing lost forage for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Flathead Lake.{close_quotes}

Fredenberg, Wade; Carty, Daniel (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Kalispell, MT); Cavigli, Jon (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Kalispell, MT)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Wildlife in Chicago  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

650 October 7, 1961 650 October 7, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILDLIFE IN CHICAGO Few people realize that there is enough native wildlife worth mentioning in roaring, jam-packed Chicago, nor that very much of it is left in its fringe of adjoining suburbs. Surprisingly, this is not the case. Just as rural people become accustomed to urban life, some wild birds and mammals have adjusted to city life and are holding their own. A few kinds seem to be more numerous in parts of metropolitan Chicago than they were in those same areas a hundred years ago. The white-tailed deer, long extinct in this part of Illinois, is on the increase in the Chicago region. In recent winters two of them, perhaps chased by dogs, were rescued from the ice on the lake front -- one at Jackson Park and the other in the Calumet region.

129

Record of Decision for the Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0312) (10/31/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FISH AND WILDLIFE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FISH AND WILDLIFE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT ADMINISTRATOR'S RECORD OF DECISION Summary The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt the Preferred Alternative (PA 2002) Policy Direction in its Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Environmental Impact Statement (FWIP EIS, DOE/EIS-0312, April 2003) as a comprehensive and consistent policy to guide the implementation and funding of the agency's fish and wildlife mitigation and recovery efforts. PA 2002 focuses on enhancing fish and wildlife habitat, modifying hydro operations and structures, and reforming hatcheries to both increase populations of listed fish stocks and provide long-term harvest opportunities. PA 2002 reflects regional fish and wildlife policy guidance and

130

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-83)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19, 2002 19, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-83) John Baugher Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Bear Creek Irrigation Siphon Project Project No: 1993-066-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.8 Bank Protection; 1.9 Structural Bank Protection using Bio Engineering Techniques; 1.10 Structural Bank Protection using Engineering Structures; 1.14 Reduce Scour and Deposition at Hydraulic Structures; 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement-Fishways; 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements; 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements; 2.1 Maintain Healthy Riparian Plant Communities; 2.4 Provide Filter Strips to

131

National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.iea.org/papers/2009/Mitigation_potentials.pdf References: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models[1] Summary "This paper focuses on mitigation potential to provide a comparative assessment across key economies. GHG mitigation potential is defined here to be the level of GHG emission reductions that could be realised, relative

132

Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Maine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and Department of Wildlife Ecology, University Fisheries and Wildlife United States Geological Survey United States Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife of this report in any way is withheld pending specific authorization from the Leader, Maine Cooperative Fish

Thomas, Andrew

133

EIS-0472: Mitigation Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Uranium Leasing Program Mitigation Action Plan for the Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

134

Wildlife Trade: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

real life situations. The real life situations. The teacher asks students to spend a few minutes thinking about and jotting down responses in their journals to the question, "When you have gone somewhere on vacation, what kinds of things have you brought back?" She then asks the students to turn to a partner and discuss their responses. Each pair summarizes and shares their comments with the entire group. Several answers were given: pictures, postcards, souvenirs, etc. The project on wildlife trade is expected to be a multiweek inquiry. The goal is to investigate the problem, as defined by the students, using a variety of tools. Students are assigned to base groups or teams, which are frequently reorganized based on interest, but all students return to their base group to share information and help each other fill in the information

135

Wildlife in Chicago  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

386-A September 12, 1970 386-A September 12, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILDLIFE IN CHICAGO In August of 1803, when a detachment of soldiers came here from Detroit to build Fort Dearborn, they found only four crude cabins, situated on the north bank of the Chicago River. Three were occupied by French fur traders -- LeMaie, Ouilmette and Pettle -- and one was vacant. In 1833, when Chicago was incorporated as a village, there were only 200 people here. Wolves were still a problem, especially in winter. On October 6, 1834, a black bear -- the last wild one seen in Chicago was killed near the intersection of LaSalle and Adams Streets. Game was so plentiful that the region was a hunter's paradise .

136

Wildlife Trade: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

real-life situations. The real-life situations. The teacher asks students to spend a few minutes thinking about and jotting down responses in their journals to the question, "When you have gone somewhere on vacation, what kinds of things have you brought back?" She then asks the students to turn to a partner and discuss their responses. Each pair summarizes and shares their comments with the entire group. Several answers were given: pictures, postcards, souvenirs, etc. The project on wildlife trade is expected to be a multiweek inquiry. The goal is to investigate the problem, as defined by the students, using a variety of tools. Students are assigned to base groups or teams, which are frequently reorganized based on interest, but all students return to their base group to share information and help each other fill in the information

137

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE 9 Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

on the October 22, 2008, status document online. If unavailable, contact the Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office in Las Vegas at (702) 5 15-5230 and reference File No....

138

International Partnership on Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: International Partnership on Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) Name International Partnership on Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) Agency/Company /Organization German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservancy and Nuclear Safety (BMU), German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Sector Climate Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Technology characterizations

139

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, 2004-2006 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Management Area (LMWA) in May 2005. The 2005 HEP assessment resulted in a total of 647.44 HUs, or 0.76 HUs/acre. This is an increase of 420.34 HUs (0.49 HUs/acre) over 2001 HEP survey results. The most significant increase in HUs occurred on the Wallender and Simonis parcels which increased by 214.30 HUs and 177.49 HUs respectively. Transects were established at or near 2001 HEP analysis transect locations whenever possible. ODFW staff biologists assisted the RHT re-establish transect locations and/or suggested areas for new surveys. Since 2001, significant changes in cover type acreage and/or structural conditions have occurred due to conversion of agriculture cover types to emergent wetland and grassland cover types. Agricultural lands were seeded to reestablish grasslands and wetlands were restored through active management and manipulation of extant water sources including natural stream hydrology/flood regimes and available irrigation. Grasslands increased on the Wallender parcel by 21% (65 acres), 23% (71 acres) at the Simonis site, and 39% (62 acres) at Conley Lake. The emergent wetland cover type also changed significantly increasing 60% (184 acres) at Wallender and 59% (184 acres) on the Simonis tract. Today, agriculture lands (crop and grazed pasture) have been nearly eliminated from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation project lands located on the LMWA.

Ashley, Paul; Wagoner, Sara

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-67) (10/4/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2001 4, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-67) Jay Marcotte Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Install Fish Screens to Protect ESA Listed Steelhead and Bull Trout in the Walla Walla Basin. Project No: 2001-039-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement - Fishways. Location: Various Walla Walla River Basin Irrigation Diversions, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Walla Walla County Conservation District. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to provide cost share for a program that

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-163: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (8/04/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-163) John Baugher TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWL-4 Proposed Action: John Day Watershed Restoration Program Project No: 1998-018-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 4.2 Water Measuring Devices 4.10 Water Conveyance Pipeline, 4.25 Consolidate/Replace Irrigation Diversion Dams, 6.5 Water Supply: Pipeline, 6.10 Access: Fencing; 8.13 Stand Thinning; 8.15 Manage Stands to Enhance Snowpack Location: Sites within the John Day River Watershed, in Wheeler County and Grant County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm

142

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-63) (9/17/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2001 7, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-63) Joe DeHerrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Pelican Creek Crossing Improvement Project No: 1992-026-01 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.13 Culvert Removal/Replacement to Improve Fish Passage. Location: Pelican Creek, Union County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (GRMWP), and the Union County Public Works Department (UCPWD) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA provides funds to the Grande Ronde Model Watershed

143

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-70) (10/23/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23, 2001 23, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECN-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-70) David Byrnes - KEWL-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Yakima Basin Side Channels Project, Scatter Creek/Plum Creek Land Acquisition Phase I. Project No: 1997-051-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources. Location: Yakima River Basin, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Yakama Nation Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase 4 privately owned parcels totaling

144

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-68)(10/12/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12, 2001 12, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-68) Joe DeHerrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Mill Creek and Little Creek Crossing Improvement Project No: 1992-026-01 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.13 Culvert Removal/Replacement to Improve Fish Passage. Location: Mill Creek and Little Creek, Union County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (GRMWP), and the Union County Public Works Department (UCPWD) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA provides funds to the Grande Ronde Model Watershed

145

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-72)(12/3/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 3, 2001 December 3, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-72) David Byrnes - KEWL-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Yakima Basin Side Channels Project, Scatter Creek/Plum Creek Land Acquisition Phase II. Project No: 1997-051-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources. Location: Yakima River Basin, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Yakama Nation Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase 2 privately owned parcels

146

Supplement Analysis for the Watrshed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-75) (2/20/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20, 2002 20, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-75) Peter Lofy - KEWL-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Gourlay Creek Fish Ladder Project Project No: 2001-038-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement - Fishways. Location: Columbia County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the City of Scappoose Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the construction of a fish passage facility at the Gourlay Creek Dam/water reservoir in Columbia County, Oregon. The City of

147

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia Photo of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation...

148

California Department of Fish & Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: California Department of Fish & Wildlife Name: California Department of Fish & Wildlife Address: 1416 9th St, 12th Floor Place:...

149

Monitoring and Mitigation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Mitigation of Sustained Localized Pitting Corrosion FINAL REPORT DOE FEW 49297 YuPo J. Lin, Edward J. St.Martin, and James R. Frank Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 January 2003 Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 Monitoring and Mitigation of Sustained Localized Pitting Corrosion Submitted to: Nancy C. Comstock U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Petroleum Technology Office By: YuPo J. Lin, Edward J. St.Martin, and James R. Frank Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 January 2003 The submitted manuscript has been created by the University of Chicago as Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne") under Contract No. W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on

150

Wildlife -- Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New What's New Wildlife Some of the links on this page lead to documents in Portable Document Format (PDF) and can only be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. You can download a free copy from the Adobe site. WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT HUNTING ON THE OAK RIDGE RESERVATION OTHER WILDLIFE INFORMATION WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT Top of Page ORR Wildlife Management Update (Presentation - February 5, 2010) Goose Control. (Video - December 2009) Giffen, Neil R., James W. Evans, and Patricia D. Parr. 2007. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. ORNL/TM-2006/155. August. Giffen, Neil R. 2007. Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL/TM-2006/154. March. Wildlife Management Plan for the ORR (Presentation - November 2006) Wildlife Management Activities on the ORR (Presentation - September 2006)

151

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Argentina South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

153

Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Colombia South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

154

Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Brazil South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

155

Greenhouse gas mitigation in agriculture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dung and dedicated energy crops). The economic mitigation potential of biomass...soils and potential mitigation practices in eastern...international bio-energy trade chains. Biomass...regional potential of renewable energy sources. PhD thesis...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The Costs of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Costs of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change: A Meta of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change: A Meta-Analysis of Estimates in the Literature and overlapping choices of assumptions. The purpose of the study is to use regression and related analyses

Watson, Andrew

158

Microsoft Word - Final Mitigated Action Plan - CNMI.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

| P | P a g e MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Golden Service Center Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DOE/EA-1923 2 | P a g e ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS AMC Adaptive Management Committee CFR Code of Federal Regulations DOE U.S. Department of Energy EA environmental assessment ESA Endangered Species Act FONSI finding of no significant impacts MAP mitigation action plan NEPA National Environmental Policy Act USFWS U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 3 | P a g e 1.0 Introduction The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a Final Environmental Assessment (EA) and a

159

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2006-2007.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 07 contract period October 1, 2006-September 30, 2007. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was significant positive changes in the vegetative community in several wetland basins throughout the wildlife area. This major goal is being achieved in part by new equipment and operation capability funded under the BPA contract, state capital and migratory bird stamp funds, and the past or ongoing investment of other partners including Ducks Unlimited, The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Clark Public Utilities and others. We continue to be challenged by requirements under the archaeological and historic preservation act necessary to protect many sensitive sites known to occur within the wildlife area. The problems encountered to date have been largely administrative in nature and those experienced this year were unforeseen and probably unavoidable. Early in the contract period, WDFW and BPA had agreed to have a BPA staff archaeologist perform the survey and reporting work. Unexpectedly, just prior to the expected start date for the surveys, the employee resigned leaving BPA's staff short handed and necessitated contracting the work with an archaeological consultant. This delay caused us to forego work on several projects that are now deferred until the next contract period. The most notable projects impacted by this unfortunate circumstance are those involving the construction or repair of fences.

Calkins, Brian

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Using Livestock to Manage Wildlife Habitat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Livestock grazing can be an effective tool in managing wildlife habitat. This publication explains how grazing affects various wildlife species such as white-tailed deer, bobwhite quail and turkeys, and how to select the type of livestock needed...

Lyons, Robert K.; Wright, Byron D.

2003-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EIS-0246-SA-23: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Supplement Analysis 3: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-23: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on approximately 16 acres of the Canby Ferry parcel in Clackamas County, Oregon for the protection of wetland, riparian, and riverine habitats. This project is part of a multi-agency effort to protect Willamette River frontage and to connect existing Oregon State Park lands with recreational trails. Once the conservation easement is finalized, a management plan will be developed for the Canby Ferry parcel and adjacent parcels, including the Fish Eddy parcel and the Molalla State Park parcel. Future management actions on these lands will likely involve wildlife habitat and riparian area enhancement, restoration, and preservation activities.

162

EIS-0246-SA-27: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Supplement Analysis 7: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-27: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Kalispell, Flathead County, Montana BPA proposes to fund a fishery enhancement project where a fish passage barrier will be installed in Abbot Creek to remove introduced rainbow trout and prevent hybridization with westslope cutthroat trout. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) will operate a fish trap downstream of the barrier for 6-10 consecutive years to manually remove the rainbow trout and hybrid spawners from the population. Removal of rainbow trout and hybrids from the stream will eradicate the existing hybrid population spawning in Abbot Creek and ultimately reduce the threat of hybridization in the Flathead River system. Pending completion of a successful disease screening and

163

EIS-0246-SA-25: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Supplement Analysis 5: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-25: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program BPA proposes to fund a portion of the cost of a conservation easement on 56,400 acres of land along the Fisher River to preclude development and protect riparian habitat. The land is owned by the Plum Creek Timber Company, and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) will own and monitor the perpetual easement. The goal of the project is to protect approximately 142,000 acres owned by Plum Creek Timber Company: 56,400 in the Fisher River valley and 86,000 in the Thompson River valley. The total cost for the easement over 142,000 acres is estimated at around $30 million. BPA will contribute $500,000 toward the smaller parcel in the Fisher River valley, for each of fiscal years 2002, 2003, and 2004, for a total of $1.5

164

EIS-0246-SA-38: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Supplement Analysis 8: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-38: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Flathead River System, Flathead County, Montana BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that current fisheries and natural resource values remain protected, and that no development or human encroachment would occur on these parcels, in perpetuity. No planned construction or improvements are currently proposed and the project does not involve fee title land acquisition. Protection will sustain quality aquatic habitats, water quality, and fish and wildlife habitat. Wetlands protected by this easement are priority wetlands in the basin, according to the Flathead Lakers Critical Lands Study.

165

EIS-0246-SA-27: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46-SA-27: Supplement Analysis 46-SA-27: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-27: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Kalispell, Flathead County, Montana BPA proposes to fund a fishery enhancement project where a fish passage barrier will be installed in Abbot Creek to remove introduced rainbow trout and prevent hybridization with westslope cutthroat trout. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) will operate a fish trap downstream of the barrier for 6-10 consecutive years to manually remove the rainbow trout and hybrid spawners from the population. Removal of rainbow trout and hybrids from the stream will eradicate the existing hybrid population spawning in Abbot Creek and ultimately reduce the threat of hybridization in the Flathead River system. Pending completion of a successful disease screening and

166

EXAMPLES OF CONTEMPORARY TOPICS Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the potential for ecosystem service markets in Tennessee and how might they affect forest management? 20. What analysis as a tool for bioenergy/biorefinery evaluation 2) What is the best bioenergy crop for the US-scale bioenergy crop development on wildlife and fisheries habitat 7) Top technologies for biomass conversion 8

Gray, Matthew

167

Mitigation Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

212 212 Mitigation Action Plan for the Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory Departme~t of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Los Alamos Area Office Los Alamos, New Mexico MITIGATION ACTION PLAN for the LEASE OF LAND FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A RESEARCH PARK AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY Background on the Lease of Land at Los Alamos National Laboratory: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has approved an Environmental Assessment (EA) on the Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)(DOE/EA-1212), Los Alamos, New Mexico. The DOE released a Predecisional Draft of this EA for State and Tribal review and made the draft document available to the public on July 24, 1997 for

168

DOE/EIS-0265-SA-168: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - Protect and Restore Lolo Creek Watershed - Jim Brown Creek Streambank Stabilization (08/10/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-168) Sabrina Keen Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Protect and Restore Lolo Creek Watershed - Jim Brown Creek Streambank Stabilization Project No: 1996-077-02 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.8 Bank Protection through Vegetation Management, 1.9 Structural Bank Protection using Bioengineering Methods Location: Clearwater County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Nez Perce Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: The Bonneville Power Administration, Nez Perce Tribe, and Potlatch Corporation are proposing to stabilize streambanks along Jim Brown Creek near

169

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Management Areas exist in the State of Maryland as wildlife sanctuaries, and vehicles, tree removal, and construction are severely

170

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

171

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2007.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

172

Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project wind power project site, we conducted an analysis of the suitability of habitat within the project

Firestone, Jeremy

173

Notices Background The National Wildlife Refuge System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

89 Federal Register 89 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 223 / Friday, November 20, 2009 / Notices Background The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 668dd-668ee) (Administration Act), as amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, requires us to develop a CCP for each national wildlife refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and our policies. In addition to outlining broad management direction on conserving wildlife and their habitats, CCPs identify wildlife-

174

Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Burundia

175

Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

176

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.  

SciTech Connect

Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

Allard, Donna

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Resource assessment, Background analysis Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/micca/en/ References: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries[1] "The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems, emissions can be reduced and sinks created in biomass and soils while

178

Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from CIFF-Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)) (Redirected from CIFF-Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, South Africa South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, Southern Africa References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1]

179

EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

128: Mitigation Action Plan 128: Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan Los Banos-Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project This MAP addresses the construction, operation, and maintenance of the new 84-mile long 500-kV transmission line. Necessary work conducted by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) at their substations will occur within the previously disturbed area inside the substation boundaries. Western or Trans Elect, Inc. will also not have a role in upgrading the various existing PG&E 230-kV system components. DOE/EIS-0128, Western Area Power Administration, Mitigation Action Plan for the Los Banos-Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project (January 2003) More Documents & Publications EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Mechanical Systems

180

Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Agency/Company /Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Website http://www.iadb.org/en/news/ne Program Start 2011 Country Dominican Republic Caribbean References IDB, FONTAGRO, Government of New Zealand sign agreement on climate change mitigation and agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean[1]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Role of technologies in energy-related CO2 mitigation in China within a climate-protection world: A scenarios analysis using REMIND  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In a world with the need of climate protection through emission reduction, Chinas domestic mitigation will be put on the national agenda. The large-scale deployment of innovative technologies induced by climate policies is a key determinant for reducing emissions in an effective and efficient manner. A distinguishing feature of the Chinese energy sector (especially electricity generation), is that investment costs are significantly lower than in other world regions. Represented in the methodological framework of the augmented REMIND model, three promising mitigation technologies (also known as technology clusters) in the electricity sector: CCS with advanced coal-generation technologies, nuclear, and renewables are the focus of this study. The scenarios are designed to analyze the roles of these technologies and their associated economic impacts under a climate policy (i.e., a carbon tax). Our results indicate that: (1) Technology policies improving the techno-economic features of low-carbon technologies are insufficient to restrain Chinas increasing emissions. (2) Carbon-pricing policies can effectively reduce emissions by making low-carbon options more competitive than conventional fossil fuel alternatives. In the global carbon tax regime framed in this paper, Chinas mitigation potential is larger than that of any of other region and the peak of emissions occurs earlier (by 2020) and is 50% lower than in the BASE scenario. (3) CCS is important, but the window of opportunity for its deployment is limited to the near- to mid-term future. It is important to lower the cost of the carbon tax by supplying CCS technology; however, the gains from CCS for the myopic fossil fuel sectors are limited, compared to the case without CCS. Therefore, strong social support for CCS development should be implemented, if it is to be an effective mitigation option. (4) The cost of nuclear is a major determinant of the future development pattern in Chinas power sector. Renewables are the long-term solution (with large-scale deployment only after 2030, solar PV in particular) for deep emissions mitigation. The creative policies reflected by alternative investment, technology innovation, and climate protection strategies should be explored and implemented to make use of their long-term potential.

Shuwei Zhang; Nico Bauer; Gunnar Luderer; Elmar Kriegler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Surface mine reclamation for wildlife  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a reclamation plan for use on surface coal mines in southern Appalachia. The plan has been implemented cooperatively by TVA and the FWS on a mine site in Campbell County, Tennessee. Included are suggestions for establishing groundcover and trees on the mine site, and for retaining surface water on mine sites. All techniques discussed are to benefit wildlife and to assist the operator in achieving bond release. Also included is a section on the costs of reclaiming the Campbell County study site to benefit forestry and wildlife. The costs of this project are compared to the costs of reclaiming a more traditional forestry (monoculture) option. The comparison showed the techniques at the study site to be less costly than those that would be associated with a forestry option. 11 references, 14 figures, 2 tables.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2004-2005.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 05 contract period October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was completion of the water system that will provide water to wetland basins within the Vancouver Lake Unit and three independent basins on adjoining Clark County owned lands. The water system paid for by Clark Public Utilities was designed and built under the direction of Ducks Unlimited. Having a reliable water supply for these areas has allowed us for the first time to begin making significant progress toward our wetland vegetation management goals on this unit. A reduction in the density of reed canary grass has already been noted and increased levels of native plant occurrence have been observed. Our most notable setback was an increase in the infestation of purple loosestrife within a portion of the Shillapoo Lakebed including parts of the North and South Units. A great deal of effort and time was spent on addressing the problem including hand cutting and spraying individual plants.

Calkins, Brian

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Wildlife Photography for Fun and Profit: Constructing and Installing Wildlife Photography Blinds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. *Extension Ecotourism Program Specialist, The Texas A&M University System WILDLIFE Photography Miles Phillips* for Fun and Profit: Constructing and Installing Wildlife Photography Blinds B-6187 3/06 Types of Blinds Surface blinds Most photographers...

Phillips, Miles

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

185

Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

Stovall, Stacey H.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hungry Horse Mitigation Plan; Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam, 1990-2003 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

In this document we present fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives, and recommendations to protect, mitigate, and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan addresses six separate program measures in the 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. We designed the plan to be closely coordinated in terms of dam operations, funding, and activities with the Kerr Mitigation Plan presently before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. This document represents a mitigation plan for consideration by the Northwest Power Planning Council process; it is not an implementation plan. Flathead Lake is one of the cleanest lakes of its size in the world. The exceptional water quality and unique native fisheries make the Flathead Lake/River system extremely valuable to the economy and quality of life in the basin. The recreational fishery in Flathead Lake has an estimated value of nearly eight million dollars annually. This mitigation process represents our best opportunity to reduce the impacts of hydropower in this valuable aquatic system and increase angling opportunity. We based loss estimates and mitigation alternatives on an extensive data base, agency reports, nationally and internationally peer-reviewed scientific articles, and an innovative biological model for Hungry Horse Reservoir and the Flathead River. We conducted an extensive, 14-month scoping and consultation process with agency representatives, representatives of citizen groups, and the general public. This consultation process helped identify issues, areas of agreement, areas of conflict, and advantages and disadvantages of mitigation alternatives. The results of the scoping and consultation process helped shape our mitigation plan. Our recommended plan is based firmly on principles of adaptive management and recognition of biological uncertainty. After we receive direction from the NPPC, we will add more detailed hypotheses and other features necessary for a long-term implementation plan.

Fraley, John J.; Marotz, Brian L. (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Helena, MT); DosSantos, Joseph M. (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Pretesting of New Pesticides on Wildlife Urged  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pretesting of New Pesticides on Wildlife Urged ... In the wind is the threat of stiffer government control over pesticides' testing and marketing. ...

1962-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

OAR 635-100 - Wildlife Diversity Plans | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Wildlife Diversity Plans used to guide the State of Oregon's Department of Fish and Wildlife when managing non-game wildlife. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect...

189

USGS National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USGS National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines The following guidelines broadly outline the framework used by the National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC to the submitting agency, its wildlife populations, or domestic animal and human health. Type of Specimens

190

Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention/Mitigation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells Implantation, Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of...

191

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation RyanEnergy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation Ryanand/or site-attributable carbon emissions at commercial and

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Montana Building with Wildlife Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Provides guidance on conservation oriented development. Authors State of Montana Fish and Wildlife & Parks Organizations State of Montana Fish and Wildlife & Parks Published...

193

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

194

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Parks and Wildlife Department Name: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Address: 4200 Smith School Rd Place: Austin, TX Zip: 78744 Phone Number: (512) 389-4800 Website: http:...

195

Ultrasonic mitigation investigation  

SciTech Connect

The suggestion was made that the introduction of ultrasound into Tank 101-SY might serve to release the hydrogen bubbles trapped in the slurry. This would cause a continuous release of bubbles and thereby prevent the turnover phenomenon. Two major considerations were (1) the method for delivering the energy into the slurry and (2) the effective volume of action. In this study, we attached the former by designing and testing a liquid-filled waveguide and radiator, and the latter by making ultrasonic property measurements on synthetic waste. Our conclusion is that ultrasonic mitigation may not be feasible, primarily because of the very high attenuation (1000 to 50000 dB/m) factor to 10 to 30 kHz. Such a high attenuation would restrict the action volume to such a low value as to make the method impractical. Further investigations are recommended to identify the cause of this effect and determine if this same effect will be seen in real 101-SY waste.

Hildebrand, B.P.; Shepard, C.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (2006(2006--006006--00)00)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP 101HEP 101 Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed byHabitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP

197

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.  

SciTech Connect

The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Smith P, Powlson DS, Smith JU, Falloon P, and Coleman K. 2000. Meeting Europe's climate change commitments: Quantitative estimates of the potential for carbon mitigation by agriculture. Global Climate Change 6:525-539. Abstract Under the Kyoto Protocol, the European Union is committed to a reduction in CO2 emissions to 92% of baseline (1990) levels during the first commitment period (2008-2012). The Kyoto Protocol allows carbon emissions to be offset by demonstrable removal of carbon from the atmosphere. Thus, land-use / land-management change and forestry activities that are shown to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels can be included in the Kyoto targets. These activities include afforestation, reforestation and deforestation (article

199

Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Chile South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru

200

EA-1736: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1736: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, Los Alamos, New Mexico Based on the analysis of potential environmental impacts presented in the environmental assessment, neither the construction or operation of the expanded Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility considered in the two action alternatives for that facility, nor the environmental restoration action measures considered in the two action alternatives for reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon would have significant environmental impacts. Mitigation Action Plan for the Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Name Turkey - Analyzing Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Issues Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Partner Turkish Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources, Turkish Electricity Transmission-Generation Company Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Background analysis Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/39 Country Turkey Western Asia References http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/39156.pdf Abstract CEEESA trained a team of experts from Turkey's Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources (MENR) and the Turkish Electricity Transmission-Generation Company (TEAS) to use various ENPEP modules. CEEESA trained a team of experts from Turkey's Ministry of Energy and

202

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: Dose metric  

SciTech Connect

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to all organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazards to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by examining which dose metric to use for threshold determination and interspecific extrapolation, Since wild animals are exposed to environmental contaminants primarily through ingestion, should threshold values be expressed as amount of chemical in the diet (e.g., ppm) or as a body weight-adjusted dose (mg/kg/day)? Which of these two approaches is most relevant for ecological risk assessment decision making? Which is best for interspecific extrapolations? Converting from one metric to the other can compound uncertainty if the actual consumption rates of a species is unknown. How should this be dealt with? Is it of sufficient magnitude to be of concern?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: Measurement endpoints  

SciTech Connect

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to ail organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazard to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by examining which are the appropriate measurement endpoints. Should only mortality, growth, or reproductive endpoints be used? Since toxicity threshold values may be used to make management decisions, should values related to each measurement endpoint be presented to allow the risk assessor to choose the measurement endpoint most relevant to the assessment questions being asked, or is a standard approach that uses the lowest value that causes a toxicologic response in any system of the animal a more appropriate, conservative estimate?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

Miller, Karl V.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Wildlife Management Areas (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida) Florida) Wildlife Management Areas (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and

207

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Mitigation Planning Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning October 7, 2013 - 10:08am Addthis The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Mitigation Planning section provides Federal agency personnel with guidance to achieve agency GHG reduction goals in the most cost-effective way. Using a portfolio-based management approach for GHG mitigation planning, agencies will be able to prioritize strategies for GHG mitigation. Agencies can also use this guidance to set appropriate GHG reduction targets for different programs and sites within an agency. Learn more about the benefits of portfolio-based planning for GHG mitigation. Also see information about greenhouse gas mitigation planning data and tools. Step-by-Step The GHG mitigation planning process follows six key steps. Click on a step

208

World Wildlife Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Fund Wildlife Fund Jump to: navigation, search Logo: World Wildlife Fund Name World Wildlife Fund Address 1250 Twenty-Fourth Street, N.W. Place Washington, DC Zip 20090-7180 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Website http://www.worldwildlife.org Coordinates 38.92°, -76.99° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.92,"lon":-76.99,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

209

Colorado Division of Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name Colorado Parks and Wildlife Address 1313 Sherman Street, Suite 618 Place Denver, Colorado Zip 80203 Phone number (303) 866-3437 Website http://wildlife.state.co.us/Pa Coordinates 39.7370973°, -104.9851154° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7370973,"lon":-104.9851154,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

210

Nevada Department of Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Nevada Department of Wildlife Name Nevada Department of Wildlife Address 1100 Valley Rd. Place Reno, Nevada Zip 89512 Website http://www.ndow.org/ Coordinates 39.5394967°, -119.807584° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5394967,"lon":-119.807584,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

211

Fish and Wildlife | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting 2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today...

212

Effects of environmental change on wildlife health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Effects of environmental change on wildlife health Karina Acevedo-Whitehouse 1 * Amanda...Living organisms will strive to maintain health by recognizing and resolving abnormal...additional pressure on immunocompetence and health maintenance, which may seriously impact...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Rwanda

214

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:27am Addthis At this point in the analysis for using renewable energy in buildings, after estimating costs to implement strategies, there should be a list of sites and promising renewable energy technologies. The next step in the analysis is to prioritize those sites and technologies to achieve cost-effective reductions in greenhouse (GHG) emissions. In prioritizing the locations for cost-effective renewable energy project development, start with the sites that have the: Best resources Best financial incentives Highest energy rates. These factors are the most important for determining the economic viability

215

Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Growth Engines Jump to: navigation, search Name Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Growth Engines Agency/Company /Organization Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Guide/manual Website http://www.oecd.org/officialdo Country South Korea UN Region Eastern Asia References Korea's Green Growth Strategy[1] Overview "Korea's greenhouse gas emissions almost doubled between 1990 and 2005, the highest growth rate in the OECD area. Korea recently set a target of reducing emissions by 30% by 2020 relative to a "business as usual"

216

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2007-2008.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 08 contract period October 1, 2007-September 30, 2008. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. Significant progress was realized in almost all major work types. Of particular note was progress made in tree plantings and pasture rehabilitation efforts. This year's tree planting effort included five sites detailed below and in terms of the number of plants was certainly the largest effort on the wildlife area to date in one season. The planting itself took a significant amount of time, which was anticipated. However, installation of mats and tubes took much longer than expected which impacted planned fence projects in particular. Survival of the plantings appears to be good. Improvement to the quality of waterfowl pasture habitats is evident on a number of sites due to replanting and weed control efforts. Continuing long-term weed control efforts will be key in improving this particular type of habitat. A prolonged cold, wet spring and a number of equipment breakdowns presented stumbling blocks that impacted schedules and ultimately progress on planned activities. The unusual spring weather delayed fieldwork on pasture planting projects as well as weed control and slowed the process of maintaining trees and shrubs. This time lag also caused the continued deferral of some of our fencing projects. The large brush hog mower had the driveline break twice and the smaller tractor had an engine failure that caused it to be down for over a month. We have modified our budget plan for next year to include a temporary employee that will work primarily on tree maintenance and fencing projects to make sure that we make progress in these areas and we will be investigating whether a heavier duty driveline can be obtained for the mower.

Calkins, Brian

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project This Mitigation Action Plan identifies measures that are intended to avoid, reduce, or...

218

EA-1912: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1912: Mitigation Action Plan Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, neartown of Desert Aire, Benton County, Washington This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP)...

219

EIS-0026: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0026: Mitigation Action Plan Waste Isolation Pilot Plant This MAP focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the RODs to the 1980 Final Environmental...

220

EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Mitigation Action Plan was prepared to address...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

EA-1891: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan EA-1891: Mitigation Action Plan Alvey-Fairview Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Oregon This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No...

222

Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Peru South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

223

EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project, Bonneville County, Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic...

224

Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

Fitzner, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

WIPPAnnualMitigationActionReport2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-3322 2-3322 2012 ANNUAL MITIGATION REPORT FOR THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT JULY 10, 2012 DOE/CBFO-12-3322 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................. 3 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................... 4 THE 2012 ANNUAL MITIGATION REPORT ......................................................................... 5 REFERENCES ............................................................................................................................ 14 DOE/CBFO-12-3322 3 ACRONYMS AMR Annual Mitigation Report ASER Annual Site Environmental Report

226

Can Uncertainty Justify Overlapping Policy Instruments to Mitigate Emissions?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, for instance a renewable energy subsidy. Our analysis has both a practical and a theoretical purpose. It aims, Mitigation policy, Energy policy, EU-ETS, Re- newable energy, Corner solutions, Nil CO2 price, European Union (in some Member States), by energy-efficiency obligations2 (in some Member States), and by renewable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

227

Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1985.  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation approaches to document a record of credit for mitigation were developed in 1984-1985 for most of the habitat projects. Restoration of upriver anadromous fish runs through increased passage survival at main stem Columbia and Snake River dams is essential to the establishment of an off-site mitigation record, as well as to the success of the entire Fish and Wildlife program. The mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production (i.e., yield) at full-seeding as the basic measure of benefit from a habitat project. The IDFG evaluation approach consists of three basic, integrated levels: general monitoring, standing crop evaluations, and intensive studies. Annual general monitoring of anadromous fish densities in a small number of sections for each project will be used to follow population trends and define full-seeding levels. For most projects, smolt production will be estimated indirectly from standing crop estimates by factoring appropriate survival rates from parr to smolt stages. Intensive studies in a few key production streams will be initiated to determine these appropriate survival rates and provide other basic biological information that is needed for evaluation of the Fish and Wildlife program. A common physical habitat and fish population data base is being developed for every BPA habitat project in Idaho to be integrated at each level of evaluation. Compatibility of data is also needed between Idaho and other agencies and tribes in the Columbia River basin. No final determination of mitigation credit for any Idaho habitat enhancement project has been attainable to date.

Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Wildlife and Wind Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Wildlife and Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Sage grouse sitting in grassland. Photo from LuRay Parker, NREL 17429 Birds and bats are occasionally killed in collisions with wind turbines. Like any form of development, wind projects can also negatively impact wildlife by altering habitat. However, although the wind industry receives a lot of attention for avian impacts, research shows that nuclear and fossil-fueled plants have a greater impact. The Avian and Wildlife Costs of Fossil Fuels and Nuclear Power report quantifies those impacts. The study estimates that wind farms are responsible for roughly 0.27 avian fatalities

229

Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants  

SciTech Connect

This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Protection policy for Hawaii's native wildlife during geothermal energy development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hawaii possesses abundant geothermal resources and rare native wildlife. Geothermal energy development has not posed a threat to...

Lee Hannah

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Wildlife Refuges (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Refuges (Iowa) Refuges (Iowa) Wildlife Refuges (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources This document contains a list of wildlife refuges and sanctuaries in the state

232

Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota) Minnesota) Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas

233

Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development RELATIONSHIP OF THE POWER PLAN TO THE FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM: SUFFICIENT RESOURCES TO MEET ELECTRICITY DEMANDS AND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR FISH and to accommodate system operations to benefit fish and wildlife. The central purpose of this chapter of the power

234

Wildlife Management Notes Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildlife Management Notes Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources No.12 and weak points develop, and the wall becomes much more susceptible to disturbances such as wind or tremors Ditchkoff, Former Associate Wildlife Specialist and Assistant Professor of Wildlife Ecology Auburn

Ditchkoff, Steve

235

Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

08(96) 08(96) Distribution Category UC-950 Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting October 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. For More Information Individuals or members of organizations wishing to report reductions in emissions of greenhouse gases under the auspices of the Voluntary Reporting Program can contact the Energy Information Administration (EIA) at: Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Energy Information Administration U.S. Department

236

EIS-0312-SA-03: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-SA-03: Supplement Analysis EIS-0312-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan The attached Supplement Analysis for Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's)...

237

Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013

238

Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.iisd.org/climate/de Program Start 2012

239

Energy-Efficient Computing for Wildlife Tracking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy-Efficient Computing for Wildlife Tracking: Design Tradeoffs and Early Experiences with ZebraNet Philo Juang Hidekazu Oki Yong Wang Margaret Martonosi Li-Shiuan Peh Dan Rubenstein Dept. of Electrical Princeton University ZebraNet Project VET TES EN NOV TAM TVM Current Tracking Technology Most common: VHF

Singh, Jaswinder Pal

240

Integrated Program Review Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Program Review (IPR) Fish and Wildlife Program Costs May 20, 2010 Presented to Northwest-2013 data is based on the proposed IPR spending levels as of May 13, 2010. Total $ 155 4 20 34 4 445 116 778 Program Proposed Expense Budget F&W Program Expense Budget IPR FY 2012 FY 2013 Base * 239,634,000 243

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Wildlife Exclusion Fencing Temporary Hourly Technicians  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technical support, conduct applied research, and offer career development and learning opportunities and mammals that present a threat to aircraft operations. In order to prevent wildlife from burrowing under sponsorship for this position. Candidates must be physical able to conduct repetitive actions; eye, hand

242

Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Agency/Company /Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.iadb.org/en/news/ne Program Start 2011 Country Argentina UN Region South America References IDB, FONTAGRO, Government of New Zealand sign agreement on climate change mitigation and agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean[1]

243

Colombia-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Colombia-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Colombia-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name Colombia-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Agency/Company /Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Website http://www.iadb.org/en/news/ne Program Start 2011 Country Colombia South America References IDB, FONTAGRO, Government of New Zealand sign agreement on climate change mitigation and agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean[1]

244

Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Agency/Company /Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Website http://www.iadb.org/en/news/ne Program Start 2011 Country Uruguay South America References IDB, FONTAGRO, Government of New Zealand sign agreement on climate change mitigation and agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean[1]

245

Ecofys-How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Ecofys-How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com/w/images/4/49/Ecofy How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work Screenshot References: How to get Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to work[1] "This short paper identifies three types of issues as potential obstacles for NAMAs in this early stage of development. First, it highlights the importance of dealing with local ownership, which is quite time intensive.

246

Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Agency/Company /Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Website http://www.iadb.org/en/news/ne Program Start 2011 Country Chile South America References IDB, FONTAGRO, Government of New Zealand sign agreement on climate change mitigation and agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean[1]

247

Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. Full report. WorkingIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change www.webcda.it LaIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Il Rapporto

Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This section looks at financial requirements for successfully implementing Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions such as the National and State ... path. The financial requirement of scaling of renewable energy

Dhanapal Govindarajulu

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These data and tools from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other organizations can help Federal agencies with greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation planning for:

250

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*II. HEAT WAVE DEFINITIONS .. A . HCHANGE AND HEAT WAVES .. CLIMATE III. IV. HEAT

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System Testing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology (Innovative System Testing)-Deployment and Testing of the Alden Hydropower Fish-Friendly Turbine Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System...

252

Chapter 4 Environmental Consequences and Mitigation Measures  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

programs that directly and indirectly contribute to avoiding, minimizing and mitigating air pollution emissions and associated impacts and risks. These programs are in place and...

253

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*II. HEAT WAVE DEFINITIONS .. A . HW aves B. Heat-related

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

National Mitigation Planning in Agriculture: Review and Guidelines | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture: Review and Guidelines Agriculture: Review and Guidelines Jump to: navigation, search Name National Mitigation Planning in Agriculture: Review and Guidelines Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, UNIQUE Agroforestry Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, -Roadmap, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 References CGIAR - CCAFS[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "CGIAR - CCAFS" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=National_Mitigation_Planning_in_Agriculture:_Review_and_Guidelines&oldid=581360"

255

CARBON MITIGATION HS 2013 Prof. Nicolas Gruber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARBON MITIGATION HS 2013 Prof. Nicolas Gruber Mondays 10-12, CHN E42 (nicolas & Introduction (Gruber) Introduction to the carbon mitigation problem 9/23 2 Ocean Sequestration (Gruber) Putting2 sequestration (Mazzotti) Putting the CO2 underground... 10/14 5 Carbon sinks on land (Gruber) How

Fischlin, Andreas

256

CARBON MITIGATION HS 2014 Prof. Nicolas Gruber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARBON MITIGATION HS 2014 Prof. Nicolas Gruber Mondays 10-12, CHN E42 (nicolas & Introduction (Gruber) Introduction to the carbon mitigation problem 9/22 2 Geological CO2 sequestration (Mazzotti) Putting the CO2 underground... 9/29 3 No class ­ group formation 10/06 4 Carbon sinks on land

Fischlin, Andreas

257

HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(1):136138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landscape of Wildlife Management," discusses the transition in the U.S. from a primarily agrarian societyHuman­Wildlife Conflicts 2(1):136­138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews Urban Wildlife Management by Clark wildlife management in the urban landscape. Professors teaching urban wildlife classes have drawn on peer

258

Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Service Service Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Fish and Wildlife Service Name Fish and Wildlife Service Place Washington, DC Year founded 1940 Phone number (303) 275-2370 Website http://www.fws.gov/ Coordinates 38.8951118°, -77.0363658° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8951118,"lon":-77.0363658,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

259

Property:EnvironmentalMitigation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EnvironmentalMitigation EnvironmentalMitigation Jump to: navigation, search Property Name EnvironmentalMitigation Property Type Text Description Description of measures that could be used to mitigate environmental impact. Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: E Exploration Drilling Pages using the property "EnvironmentalMitigation" Showing 24 pages using this property. 2 2-M Probe Survey + The use of off road vehicles should avoid overland travel during periods when soils are moist or wet. Backfilling of excavated probe holes. A Active Seismic Techniques + The environmental impacts of a seismic survey vary drastically and are survey-specific. Factors to consider are: terrain, land access, land usage, survey extent, seismic crew size, source (dynamite, vibroseis, etc.), accomodation for the crew, remoteness of survey location, among others.

260

NE Oregon Wildlife Project "Precious Lands"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NE Oregon Wildlife Project "Precious Lands" Managed by The Nez Perce Tribe Angela C. Sondenaa, Ph Oct 1996 Helm 10,306 $2,660,674.00 Sept 1998 Graham Tree farm 158 $402,453.00 Aug 1999 Beach Ranch 1 of shrub sub-canopy Project Goals: 40-70% tree canopy cover 35-65% shrub canopy cover > 3.5 snags 6-10" dbh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana Adopt-a-Patient Form The Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana cares for over 1,600 wildlife cases every year. Our ability to care for these animals is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana Adopt-a-Patient Form The Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana cares: Dr. Javier Nevarez, Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana, LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONTRIBUTION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! #12;Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana

Harms, Kyle E.

262

Bonneville Power Administration Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Final EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: 2: Appendices DOE/EIS-0312 April 2003 Appendix A Fish and Wildlife Funding Principles for Bonneville Power Administration Rates and Contracts Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS Appendix A: Fish and Wildlife Funding Principles Appendix A/ 1 Appendix A FISH AND WILDLIFE FUNDING PRINCIPLES FOR BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION RATES AND CONTRACTS September 16, 1998 Preamble The purpose of these principles is to conclude the fish and wildlife funding process in which Bonneville has been engaged with various interests in the Region, and provide a set of guidelines for structuring Bonneville's subscription and power rate processes. The principles are intended to "keep the options open" for future fish and wildlife decisions that are anticipated to be made in late 1999 on reconfiguration of the hydrosystem and in

263

Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind and Wildlife Interactions | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Wildlife Interactions and Wildlife Interactions Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind and Wildlife Interactions November 23, 2011 - 2:08pm Addthis This webinar is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America 2011 webinar series. This webinar will provide an overview of wind turbine and wildlife issues, including a summary of research plans by the American Wind and Wildlife Institute. Other topics will include an update of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wind regulations and bat/wind turbine interactions. The webinar is free; no registration is required. More Addthis Related Articles Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends DOE Announces Webinar on Tying Energy Efficiency to Compensation and Performance Reviews, and More

264

Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

265

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Abstract This website provides...

266

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Abstract This website explains the...

267

United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

268

Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

The NREL Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) contains citations to more than 1,000 journal articles, government publications, conference proceedings, and other reports.

Sinclair, K.; Sandberg, T.; Cohn, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the Nationwide Inventory Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate...

270

Mitigating Wind-Radar Interference | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

mitigating radar interference caused by the physical and electromagnetic effects of wind turbines. These new mitigation technologies are expected to open up new areas to wind...

271

Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy Technologies Program Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime...

272

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in urban transport...

273

Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events April...

274

EIS-0389: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0389: Mitigation Action Plan Trinity Public Utilities District Direct Interconnection Project Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to...

275

Transmission/Resource Library/Enviromental Resources and Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enviromental Resources and Mitigation < Transmission | Resource Library(Redirected from TransmissionResource LibraryMitigation) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search...

276

EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy 2007 Annual Mitigation Report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (July 2007) More Documents & Publications EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2010...

277

EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2008 Annual Mitigation Report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, DOECBFO-08-3322 (July 2008) More Documents & Publications EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026:...

278

EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through June 2013. EIS-0026-AMR-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report...

279

EA-1595: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan EA-1595: Mitigation Action Plan Davis-Mead 230-kV Transmission Line Reconductor Project Western Area Power Administration proposes to reconductor...

280

EIS-0422: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan EIS-0422: Mitigation Action Plan Central Ferry-Lower Monumental 500-kilovolt Transmission Line Project Mitigation measures and estimated time of implementation within...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSouthAfrica-FacilitatingImplementationandReadinessforMitigation(FIRM)&oldid70000...

282

WILDLIFE LOCATIONS AND GIS Kent Fricke and Kate Hasapes, GIS 551  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WILDLIFE LOCATIONS AND GIS Kent Fricke and Kate Hasapes, GIS 551 #12;Wildlife Research In wildlife by Satellites and Stored in Collar #12;Locations and GIS Plot Location Points onto Habitat Map of Study Area

Hung, I-Kuai

283

EIS-0312-SA-02: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Supplement Analysis EIS-0312-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Columbia Basin Riparian Conservation Easement Program. The action area for the...

284

Identify Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Identify Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 1:34pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE The tables below illustrate some of the more common strategies that can enable employees to travel less and travel more efficiently for business. The "Purpose of Travel" analysis in the previous step can be used with the guidance below to help determine what type of trips may be most appropriately substituted with each business travel alternative. Table 1. Strategies that Enable Employees to Travel Less Business Travel Strategy Best Potential Application Best Practices Web meetings/webinars, including option for video Purpose of travel: training, conferences.

285

Assessing the state of knowledge of utility-scale wind energy development and operation on non-volant terrestrial and marine wildlife  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A great deal has been published in the scientific literature regarding the effects of wind energy development and operation on volant (flying) wildlife including birds and bats, although knowledge of how to mitigate negative impacts is still imperfect. We reviewed the peer-reviewed scientific literature for information on the known and potential effects of utility-scale wind energy development and operation (USWEDO) on terrestrial and marine non-volant wildlife and found that very little has been published on the topic. Following a similar review for solar energy we identified known and potential effects due to construction and eventual decommissioning of wind energy facilities. Many of the effects are similar and include direct mortality, environmental impacts of destruction and modification of habitat including impacts of roads, and offsite impacts related to construction material acquisition, processing and transportation. Known and potential effects due to operation and maintenance of facilities include habitat fragmentation and barriers to gene flow, as well as effects due to noise, vibration and shadow flicker, electromagnetic field generation, macro- and micro-climate change, predator attraction, and increased fire risk. The scarcity of before-after-control-impact studies hinders the ability to rigorously quantify the effects of USWEDO on non-volant wildlife. We conclude that more empirical data are currently needed to fully assess the impact of USWEDO on non-volant wildlife.

Jeffrey E. Lovich; Joshua R. Ennen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

E-Print Network 3.0 - atoll national wildlife Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Changed Pupping and Hauling Summary: . Atoll Research Bulletin 103. 3 pp. US.Fish and Wildlife Service. 1986. Hawaiian IslandsNational Wildlife... Islands National...

287

Trains, Grains, and Grizzly Bears: Reducing Wildlife Mortality on Railway Tracks in Banff National Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the causes and solutions to train-wildlife collisions. Whilepopulations, relatively few trains strike wildlife on thegrizzlies were struck by CPR trains, and none of the five

Pissot, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana Annual Adopt-a-Bird Form Print Name: ____________________________________________________________ Date: ___________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana Annual Adopt-a-Bird Form Print Name, Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana, LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 #12;

Harms, Kyle E.

289

Environmental Sciences, Fisheries, Forestry & Wildlife Biology Organizations Hiring Students in Environmental Sciences, Fisheries, Forestry & Wildlife Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildfire Defense System Wolf Tree, Inc. Yellow Jackets Further Education Colorado State University Cornell of Maplewood Clemson University Youth Learning Institute Colorado Mosquito Control Colorado Natural Heritage Program Colorado Parks and Wildlife Colorado State Forest Service Colorado State University Columbian Park

290

Greenhouse Effect Mitigation Through Photocatalytic Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate change is one of the most critical issues facing the world. One of the pillars of the fight against this phenomenon is the mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, CO2 in particular. Although many ac...

Jesusa Rincn; Rafael Camarillo; Fabiola Martnez; Carlos Jimnez; Susana Tostn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Energy Demand and GHG Mitigation Options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

N. African countries, although not committed to reduce their GHG emissions, can take advantage of their high ... CSP potential in order to contribute to the GHG mitigation effort by providing clean energy (potent...

Leonidas Paroussos; Pantelis Capros

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Heading into the Amendment Process: Hydrosystem Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reforms: Implementation of l ll d t d h t h iti ti lllegally mandated hatchery mitigation, as well uncertainties. Standardized metrics, protocols, reporting and HLIs are being adopted. A number of reforms

293

EA-1562-SA-1: Mitigation Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Construction and Operation of a Physical Sciences Facility at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (Mitigation Action Plan for Phase II Build Out, North Federal Campus, PNNL Site)

294

South Africa-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » South Africa-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country South Africa Southern Africa References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile

295

The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise  

SciTech Connect

In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the worlds energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies

Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Cost-Effectiveness Strategies for the Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cost-Effectiveness Strategies for the Fish and Wildlife Program: Progress and Potential The Northwest Power Act contains language promoting the cost-effectiveness of the Council's Fish and Wildlife responsibilities with respect to cost-effectiveness. Perhaps the two most common questions the IEAB fields

297

Reviewing the human dimensions of wildlife management and recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reviewing the human dimensions of wildlife management and recreation Mariella Marzano Norman Dandy and the Recreational Use of Forests" (Marzano & Dandy 2011) · Overview of disturbance relating to recreational off path/trail)? 2. How do recreational users perceive their own and others' impacts on wildlife

298

Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife.

Not Available

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery And Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan Volume II ­ Subbasin Plan Chapter.F. Kalama Subbasin II.G. Lewis Subbasin II.H. Lower Columbia Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind and wildlife species of interest to recovery and subbasin planning. Appdx. C Program Directory Descriptions

300

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery And Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan Volume II ­ Subbasin Plan Chapter II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin II.K. Little White Salmon Subbasin II.L. Columbia Gorge, status, and limiting factors of other fish and wildlife species of interest to recovery and subbasin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery And Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan APPENDIX D - ECONOMICS Lower Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin II.K. Little White Salmon Subbasin II.L. Columbia Descriptions, status, and limiting factors of other fish and wildlife species of interest to recovery

302

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery And Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan APPENDIX E ­ ASSESSMENT METHODS Subbasin II.H. Lower Columbia Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin II.K. Little White. Appdx. B Other Species Descriptions, status, and limiting factors of other fish and wildlife species

303

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery And Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan Volume II ­ Subbasin Plan Chapter Subbasin II.G. Lewis Subbasin II.H. Lower Columbia Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin and wildlife species of interest to recovery and subbasin planning. Appdx. C Program Directory Descriptions

304

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery And Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan APPENDIX C ­ PROGRAM DIRECTORY Subbasin II.H. Lower Columbia Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin II.K. Little White. Appdx. B Other Species Descriptions, status, and limiting factors of other fish and wildlife species

305

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery And Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan APPENDIX B - OTHER SPECIES Lower Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin II.K. Little White Salmon Subbasin II.L. Columbia Descriptions, status, and limiting factors of other fish and wildlife species of interest to recovery

306

ACOUSTIC POLLUTION HOW HUMAN ACTIVITIES DISRUPT WILDLIFE COMMUNICATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4/17/2011 1 ACOUSTIC POLLUTION HOW HUMAN ACTIVITIES DISRUPT WILDLIFE COMMUNICATION Emily Hockman M.S. Candidate Department of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries 12:20 pm Wednesday, April 13th Room 160 Plant increased anti-predator vocalizations near wind turbines (Rabin et al 2006, Slabbekoorn and Ripmeester 2008

Gray, Matthew

307

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery And Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan APPENDIX A ­ FOCAL FISH Lower Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin II.K. Little White Salmon Subbasin II.L. Columbia Descriptions, status, and limiting factors of other fish and wildlife species of interest to recovery

308

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery And Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan Volume II ­ Subbasin Plan Chapter Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin II.K. Little White Salmon Subbasin II.L. Columbia Descriptions, status, and limiting factors of other fish and wildlife species of interest to recovery

309

[U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service letterhead] Mark Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Wildlife Service (Service) appreciates the opportunity to comment on the Artificial Production Review Phase report are either operated (Spring Creek National Fish Hatchery (NFH) and Leavenworth NFH Complex Shake Regional Director #12;1 U. S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE COMMENTS ON ARTIFICIAL PRODUCTION REVIEW

310

Utah Division of Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resources Resources Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Name Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Address 1594 W North Temple, Suite 2110, Box 146301 Place Salt Lake City, Utah Zip 84114-6301 Phone number 801-538-4745 Website http://wildlife.utah.gov/dwr/a References Webpage[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utah Division of Wildlife Resources is an organization based in Salt Lake City, Utah. References ↑ "Webpage" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utah_Division_of_Wildlife_Resources&oldid=536488" Categories: Government Agencies Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

311

South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios Agency/Company /Organization: South Africa Department of Environment Affairs and Tourism Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Background analysis, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Case studies/examples Website: www.erc.uct.ac.za/Research/publications/07Scenario_team-LTMS_Scenarios Country: South Africa Southern Africa Coordinates: -30.559482°, 22.937506° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-30.559482,"lon":22.937506,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

312

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: NOAEL versus LOAEL  

SciTech Connect

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to all organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazards to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by debating which toxicity value should be used for setting threshold criteria. Should the lowest observable effect level (LOAEL) be used or is it more appropriate to use the no observable effect level (NOAEL)? What are the short-comings of using either of these point estimates? Should a ``benchmark`` approach, similar to that proposed for human health risk assessments, be used instead, where an EC{sub 5} or EC{sub 10} and associated confidence limits are determined and then divided by a safety factor? How should knowledge of the slope of the dose-response curve be incorporated into determination of toxicity threshold values?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Animal-Vehicle Collision Reduction Evaluation of Measures to Minimize Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions and Maintain Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overview of Animal Detection and Animal Warning Systems in North American and Europe, Marcel P. Huijser.................................385 The Wildlife Protection System: Early Successes and Challenges Using Infrared Technology to DetectAnimal-Vehicle Collision Reduction Evaluation of Measures to Minimize Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions

McGowen, Patrick

314

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We report on our progress from April 2000 through March 2001 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report D), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report E), and Oregon State University (OSU; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of our work from April 2000 through March 2001 are listed.

Kern, J. Chris; Ward, David L.; Farr, Ruth A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1986 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the status of resident fish projects currently funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). The report provides a brief synopsis, review and discussion of 13 resident fish projects funded during September 1985 to May 1986. The resident fish section of the Program addresses measures which are intended to protect resident fish, mitigate fishery losses caused by hydroelectric projects, and compensate for past losses through enhancement measures. These measures include, but are not limited to: flow requirements, drawdown requirements, temperature control, and streambed protection.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation; Creston National Fish Hatchery, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Mitigation Objective 1: Produce Native Westslope Cutthroat Trout at Creston NFH--Task: Acquire eggs and rear up to 100,000 Westslope Cutthroat trout annually for offsite mitigation stocking. Accomplishments: A total of 141,000 westslope cutthroat eggs (M012 strain) was acquired from the State of Montana Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in May 2002 for this objective. We also received an additional 22,000 westslope cutthroat eggs, MO12 strain naturalized, from feral fish at Rogers Lake, Flathead County, Montana. The fish were reared using approved fish culture techniques as defined in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fish Hatchery Management guidelines. Survival from the swim up fry stage to stocking was 95.6%. We achieved a 0.80 feed conversion this year on a new diet, Skretting ''Nutra Plus''. Post release survival and angler success is monitored annually by Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT). Stocking numbers and locations vary yearly based on results of biological monitoring and adaptive management. Mitigation Objective 2: Produce Rainbow Trout at Creston NFH--Task: Acquire and rear up to 100,000 Rainbow trout annually for offsite mitigation in closed basin waters. Accomplishments: A total of 54,000 rainbow trout eggs (Arlee strain) was acquired from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery in December 2002 for this objective. The fish were reared using approved fish culture techniques as defined in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fish Hatchery Management guidelines. Survival from the swim up fry stage to stocking was 99.9%. We achieved a 0.79 feed conversion this year on a new diet, Skretting ''Nutra Plus''. Arlee rainbow trout are being used for this objective because the stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs and habitat conditions and returns to the creel are unsuitable for native cutthroat. Post release survival and angler success is monitored annually by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT). Stocking numbers and locations vary yearly based on results of biological monitoring and adaptive management.

US Fish and Wildlife Service Staff, (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Creston National Fish Hatchery, Kalispell, MT)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

HumanWildlife Interactions 7(2):250259, Fall 2013 Winter habitat use by juvenile greater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 1105 S. W. Williston Road, Gainesville, FL 32601, USA The historic range

319

FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995 1 Section 162 3 Findings on the Recommendations for Amendments to the4 Resident Fish and Wildlife Portions of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program5 and Response to Comments6 September 13, 19957 8 9 In late 1994 the Council requested that fish and wildlife

320

Paving materials for heat island mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paving materials for heat island mitigation Paving materials for heat island mitigation Title Paving materials for heat island mitigation Publication Type Report Year of Publication 1997 Authors Pomerantz, Melvin, Hashem Akbari, Allan Chen, Haider Taha, and Arthur H. Rosenfeld Keywords Cool Pavements, Heat Island Abstract This report summarizes paving materials suitable for urban streets, driveways, parking lots and walkways. The authors evaluate materials for their abilities to reflect sunlight, which will reduce their temperatures. This in turn reduces the excess air temperature of cities (the heat island effect). The report presents the compositions of the materials, their suitability for particular applications, and their approximate costs (in 1996). Both new and resurfacing are described. They conclude that, although light-colored materials may be more expensive than conventional black materials, a thin layer of light-colored pavement may produce energy savings and smog reductions whose long-term worth is greater than the extra cost.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy Speaker(s): Steven R. Schiller Date: December 8, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Diamond Steve will discuss policy options for deploying energy efficiency resources in electricity (non-transportation) end-use markets to meet needed GHG emission reduction levels. This discussion will include listing some barriers inherent to climate policy design, as well as energy markets, that inhibit efficiency investment as an emissions reduction strategy. However, the focus of the talk is on recommendations for effective mechanisms that incorporate end-use electricity energy efficiency into climate change mitigation efforts. In a recent ACEEE paper, Steve and his co-authors,

322

EA-1508: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

508: Mitigation Action Plan 508: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1508: Mitigation Action Plan Beaver Creek-Hoyt-Erie Transmission Line Upgrade Project Morgan and Weld Counties, Colorado This is the mitigation action plan (MAP) for use during construction of the Beaver Creek-Hoyt-Erie transmission line upgrades, including right-of ways (ROWS), hydrology, vegetation, construction debris and dewatering, landscape engineering, borrow pits and recommended procedures for Raptors and powerline construction. Mitigation Action Plan to Implement Mitigation Requirements for Beaver Creek-Hoyt-Erie Transmission Line Upgrade Project Morgan and Weld Counties, Colorado November 2005 More Documents & Publications EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan

323

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; Annual Progress Report, April 2007 - March 2008.  

SciTech Connect

We report on our progress from April 2007 through March 2008 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report C), and Montana State University (MSU; Report D). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

Mallette, Christine [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

324

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.  

SciTech Connect

The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish, Wildlife & Parks Fish, Wildlife & Parks Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Name Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Address 1420 East 6th Ave, PO Box 200701 Place Helena, Montana Zip 59620-0701 Phone number 406-444-2535 Website http://fwp.mt.gov/doingBusines Coordinates 46.586864°, -112.01525° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.586864,"lon":-112.01525,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

326

United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Act of 1973Legal Abstract This page links to...

327

Tribal Wildlife Grant (FWS)- Grant Writing Strategy Webinar  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Prosper Sustainably is hosting a free webinar on July 23, 2014 at 1pm PST that reviews the FWS Tribal Wildlife Grant funding opportunity. During the webinar Josh Simmons, Prosper Sustainablys...

328

Colorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rules and Regulations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations Abstract This web page lists...

329

Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook - Appendix: Literature Review Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildlife Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook Appendix: Literature Review Database Volume II of II United States Office of Research EPA/600/R-93/187 Environmental Protection and Development December 1993 Agency (8603) Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook Appendix: Literature Review Database Volume II of II EPA/600/R-93/187 December 1993 WILDLIFE EXPOSURE FACTORS HANDBOOK APPENDIX: LITERATURE REVIEW DATABASE Volume II of II Office of Health and Environmental Assessment Office of Research and Development U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. 20460 Additional major funding for this Handbook was provided by the Office of Emergency and Remedial Response, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response and by the Office of Science and Technology, Office of Water U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

330

GHG Mitigation Potential, Costs and Benefits in Global Forests: A Dynamic Partial Equilibrium Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating Global Forestry GHG Mitigation Potential andN ATIONAL L ABORATORY GHG Mitigation Potential, Costs andopportunity employer. LBNL-58291 GHG Mitigation Potential,

Sathaye, Jayant; Makundi, Willy; Dale, Larry; Chan, Peter; Andrasko, Kenneth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Fi h d Wildlif PFish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Burbot) Kootenai River Operation Mitigation & Evaluation Building on Success · All Tribal projects objectives, and to guide and refine future project design and implementation Monitoring Corrective Evaluation Meets objectives Does not meet objectives Corrective action #12;4/11/2013 5 Integrated Ecosystem Based

332

A national assessment of wildlife information transfer to the public  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

teaching hospital that was the focus of a television program called Wildlife Emergency on the Animal Planet channel. Wildlife rehabilitators come from a variety of backgrounds. A recent study of 27 rehabilitators (Dubois and Fraser 2003b) found that 4..., museums, zoos and veterinary hospitals may be involved in rehabilitation activities. There was substantial contact between the public and rehabilitators (Horton 1987, Marion 1989). An NWRA survey indicated that member educational programs reached 70...

Lindsey, Kieran Jane

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Synergisms between climate change mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but increasingly so in developing countries and economies in transition. Certain measures that integrate climateORIGINAL ARTICLE Synergisms between climate change mitigation and adaptation: an insurance an aggregator of the impacts of climate change and a market actor able to play a material role in decreasing

334

IDAHO HABITAT EVALUATION FOR OFFSITE MITIGATION RECORD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-1 #12;This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), U.S. Department of Energy Mitigation Record, Annual Report FY 1984, Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract No. 1984BP13381, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act. The Clearw

335

Cryogenic Filters for RFI Mitigation in Radioastronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RFI mitigation in Radioastronomy can be achieved adopting cryogenic filters in appropriate typologies. A study has been conducted in L, C and X band with the evaluation of the filter architecture in copper, with theoretical estimation, computer simulations, prototypes realization, laboratory measurements. Such work has been preliminary to the realization of HTS samples with the purpose of a similar complete characterization approach.

G. Tuccari; A. Caddemi; S. Barbarino; G. Nicotra; F. Consoli; F. Schilliro; F. Catalfamo

2005-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

336

Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions reductions from GHG emissions reductions policies; AND WE should incentivize agriculture.S. Agriculture in Climate Change Mitigation: Agriculture is both a source of GHG, and a sink (GHG reservoir) As a source of GHG, agriculture contributes approximately 7% of US GHG emissions* ­ mostly from small, diffuse

337

Highly concentrated foam formulation for blast mitigation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A highly concentrated foam formulation for blast suppression and dispersion mitigation for use in responding to a terrorism incident involving a radiological dispersion device. The foam formulation is more concentrated and more stable than the current blast suppression foam (AFC-380), which reduces the logistics burden on the user.

Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Gao, Huizhen (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

338

EIS-0265-SA-163: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program, which includes projects to improve watershed conditions, resulting in improved fish and wildlife habitat. DOEEIS-0265-SA-163: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed...

339

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/67148/en/ RelatedTo: Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Screenshot References: AFOLU Mitigation Database[1] Global Survey of Agricultural Mitigation Projects Paper[2] "The AFOLU MP database endeavors to gather information on all mitigation activities currently ongoing within the agricultural and forestry sectors

340

Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop November 12, 2014 11:00AM EST to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Full Document and...

342

EIS-0473: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan EIS-0473: Mitigation Action Plan W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Fort Bend County, Texas This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP)...

343

Mitigating Performance Degradation of High-Energy Lithium-Ion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigating Performance Degradation of High-Energy Lithium-Ion Cells Mitigating Performance Degradation of High-Energy Lithium-Ion Cells 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

344

Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells November 19, 2013 5:00PM EST Online http:www1.eere.energy.gov...

345

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Congestion Mitigation Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program on AddThis.com...

346

EIS-0380: Annual Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Los Alamos National Laboratory Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Fiscal Year 2013 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report

347

2007 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2007 and includes 11 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and 3 bat habitat mitigation projects.

K. A. Gano; C. T. Lindsey

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

348

2008 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2008 and includes 22 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and two bat habitat mitigation projects.

C. T. Lindsey; K. A. Gano

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Recommendation 195: Mitigation of Contamination in Bear Creek Burial Grounds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ORSSAB requests DOE provide possible remedial actions to mitigate releases of contamination from Bear Creek Burial Grounds.

350

GRR/Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit GRR/Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Regulations & Policies WAC 232-12-064 Triggers None specified In Washington, it is unlawful to take wildlife from the wild without permission from the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The WDFW issues Live Wildlife Taking Permits under WAC 232-12-064. 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

351

Mitigation options for accidental releases of hazardous gases  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to review and compare technologies available for mitigation of unconfined releases of toxic and flammable gases. These technologies include: secondary confinement, deinventory, vapor barriers, foam spraying, and water sprays/monitors. Guidelines for the design and/or operation of effective post-release mitigation systems and case studies involving actual industrial mitigation systems are also presented.

Fthenakis, V.M.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, End of FY '97 Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, End of FY '97 Report: II. Out-of-Beam Corrosion Rates and Water Analysis from the '97 A6 Irradiation R. Scott Lillard, Donald L. Pile, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion & Environmental Effects Lab MST-6, Metallurgy Group Los Alamos National

353

Threat Mitigation: The Gravity Tractor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gravity Tractor (GT) is a fully controlled asteroid deflection concept using the mutual gravity between a robotic spacecraft and an asteroid to slowly accelerate the asteroid in the direction of the "hovering" spacecraft. Based on early warning, provided by ground tracking and orbit prediction, it would be deployed a decade or more prior to a potential impact. Ion engines would be utilized for both the rendezvous with the asteroid and the towing phase. Since the GT does not dock with or otherwise physically contact the asteroid during the deflection process there is no requirement for knowledge of the asteroid's shape, composition, rotation state or other "conventional" characteristics. The GT would first reduce the uncertainty in the orbit of the asteroid via Earth tracking of its radio transponder while station keeping with the asteroid. If, after analysis of the more precise asteroid orbit a deflection is indeed indicated, the GT would "hover" above the surface of the asteroid in the direction of the required acceleration vector for a duration adequate to achieve the desired velocity change. The orbit of the asteroid is continuously monitored throughout the deflection process and the end state is known in real time. The performance envelope for the GT includes most NEOs which experience close gravitational encounters prior to impact and those below 150-200 meters in diameter on a direct Earth impact trajectory.

Russell Schweickart; Clark Chapman; Dan Durda; Piet Hut

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

CO2 Mitigation Potential of Mineral Carbonation with Industrial Alkalinity Sources in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2 Mitigation Potential of Mineral Carbonation with Industrial Alkalinity Sources in the United States ... We show that in the U.S., industrial alkaline byproducts have the potential to mitigate approximately 7.6 Mt CO2/yr, of which 7.0 Mt CO2/yr are CO2 captured through mineral carbonation and 0.6 Mt CO2/yr are CO2 emissions avoided through reuse as synthetic aggregate (replacing sand and gravel). ... This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC36-08-GO28308 with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis. ...

Abby Kirchofer; Austin Becker; Adam Brandt; Jennifer Wilcox

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

355

Technology learning for renewable energy: Implications for South Africa's long-term mitigation scenarios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technology learning can make a significant difference to renewable energy as a mitigation option in South Africa's electricity sector. This article considers scenarios implemented in a Markal energy model used for mitigation analysis. It outlines the empirical evidence that unit costs of renewable energy technologies decline, considers the theoretical background and how this can be implemented in modeling. Two scenarios are modelled, assuming 27% and 50% of renewable electricity by 2050, respectively. The results show a dramatic shift in the mitigation costs. In the less ambitious scenario, instead of imposing a cost of Rand 52/t CO2-eq (at 10% discount rate), reduced costs due to technology learning turn renewables into negative cost option. Our results show that technology learning flips the costs, saving R143. At higher penetration rate, the incremental costs added beyond the base case decline from R92 per ton to R3. Including assumptions about technology learning turns renewable from a higher-cost mitigation option to one close to zero. We conclude that a future world in which global investment in renewables drives down unit costs makes it a much more cost-effective and sustainable mitigation option in South Africa.

Harald Winkler; Alison Hughes; Mary Haw

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Threat Mitigation: The Asteroid Tugboat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Asteroid Tugboat (AT) is a fully controlled asteroid deflection concept using a robotic spacecraft powered by a high efficiency, electric propulsion system (ion or plasma) which docks with and attaches to the asteroid, conducts preliminary operations, and then thrusts continuously parallel to the asteroid velocity vector until the desired velocity change is achieved. Based on early warning, provided by ground tracking and orbit prediction, it would be deployed a decade or more prior to a potential impact. On completion of the initial rendezvous with the near-Earth object (NEO) the AT would first reduce the uncertainty in the orbit of the asteroid via Earth tracking of its radio transponder while it is station keeping with the asteroid. If on analysis of tracking data a deflection is required the AT would execute a reconnaissance phase collecting and processing information about the physical characteristics of the asteroid to support subsequent operations. The AT would then dock at the appropriate pole (i.e. on the spin axis), attach to the asteroid surface, and initiate a NEO reorientation maneuver. Following completion of the NEO reorientation the AT would initiate the deflection phase by thrusting continuously parallel to the asteroid velocity vector until the resultant target orbit is achieved. The orbit of the asteroid is continuously monitored throughout the deflection process and the end state is known in real time. If one assumes a nuclear-electric propulsion (NEP) system similar to that formerly under development in the recently canceled Prometheus Program, the AT would be capable of deflecting threatening NEOs up to 800 meters in diameter or more.

Russell Schweickart; Clark Chapman; Dan Durda; Piet Hut

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Rank Sites by Building Type and Location for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rank Sites by Building Type and Location for Greenhouse Gas Rank Sites by Building Type and Location for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Rank Sites by Building Type and Location for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 10:57am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 2 After establishing building locations for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation analysis, the next step is to rank sites using the additional factors of eGRID region and climate region. In the Table 1 example below, because Site C and Site D represent the same proportion of Program B's office space (22% each), evaluating eGRID region and climate region will help to prioritize which sites may have a greater potential for GHG reductions. Table 1. Example: Program B Office Location Evaluation Site Name Percent of total Program SF by building type (%) eGRID Climate Region eGRID-Climate Weight1 Location Rank

358

News From the D.C. Office: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerial view of Washington D.C. Aerial view of Washington D.C. News From the D.C. Office Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Workshops LBNL brought technical training to four continents this summer with a series of regional greenhouse gas mitigation workshops. As part of LBNL's continued work on the U.S. Country Studies Program (USCSP), staff members of the Energy Analysis Program from Washington, D.C. and Berkeley worked together to put on workshops in Warsaw, Poland; Cancun, Mexico; Arusha, Tanzania; and Seoul, Korea. LBNL began working with USCSP more than a year and a half ago, when it was awarded the contract to provide mitigation assistance to some 35 countries. The Program grew out of the U.S.'s commitment to help developing and transitional countries address climate-change issues- specifically to

359

FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS < PAGE 1 2013 Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIXTH AVENUE, SUITE

360

Applications of Data-driven Modeling to Infectious Diseases in Africa: Anthrax in Wildlife and HIV in Humans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimation of wildlife mortality due to wind farms (Flint etwind turbine-caused bird mortality. Journal of WildlifeWind Turbine-Caused Avian Fatality Estimates. Journal of Wildlife

Bellan, Steven Edward

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Global Warming Mitigation Investments Optimized under Uncertainty  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming Mitigation Investments Optimized under Uncertainty Global Warming Mitigation Investments Optimized under Uncertainty Speaker(s): Hermann Held Date: July 9, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone The Copenhagen Accord (2009) recognizes that 'the increase in global temperature should be below 2 degrees Celsius' (compared to pre-industrial levels, '2° target'). In recent years, energy economics have derived welfare-optimal investment streams into low-emission energy mixes and associated costs. According to our analyses, auxiliary targets that are in line with the 2° target could be achieved at relatively low costs if energy investments were triggered rather swiftly. While such analyses assume 'perfect foresight' of a benevolent 'social planner', an accompanying suite of experiments explicitly

362

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices, Case studies/examples Website: unfccc.int/home/items/5265.php Country: Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brazil, Cameroon, Central African Republic, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, Costa Rica, Ivory Coast, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Gabon, Georgia (country), Ghana, India, Indonesia, Israel, Jordan, Madagascar, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Papua New Guinea, Peru, South Korea, Moldova, San Marino, Sierra Leone, Singapore, South Africa, Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tunisia

363

Decarbonization and Sequestration for Mitigating Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DECARBONIZATION AND SEQUESTRATION FOR DECARBONIZATION AND SEQUESTRATION FOR MITIGATING GLOBAL WARMING M. Steinberg (msteinbe@bnl.gov); 631-344-3036 Brookhaven National Laboratory 12 South Upton Street Upton, NY 11973-5000, USA ABSTRACT Mitigating the global warming greenhouse effect while maintaining a fossil fuel economy, requires improving efficiency of utilization of fossil fuels, use of high hydrogen content fossil fuels, decarbonization of fossil fuels, and sequestering of carbon and CO 2 applied to all the sectors of the economy, electric power generation, transportation, and industrial, and domestic power and heat generation. Decarbonization means removal of carbon as C or CO 2 either before or after fossil fuel combustion and sequestration means disposal of the recovered C or CO 2 including its utilization. Removal and recovery of CO

364

Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Ethiopia UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1]

365

UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1] "The Government of Denmark will provide US$6 million to the new programme

366

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Agency/Company /Organization: Future Perfect Sector: Climate Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Training materials Website: www.gpstrategiesltd.com/divisions/future-perfect/ Country: South Korea Eastern Asia Language: English References: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling[1] Logo: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling Jointly sponsored by Greenhouse Gas Inventory & Research (GIR) Center of

367

Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name UNEP-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Costa Rica, Ethiopia, Ghana, Indonesia, Mexico, Morocco, Senegal, South Africa, Vietnam UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1]

368

Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Agency/Company /Organization: Global Environment Facility, United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: tech-action.org/Guidebooks/TNAhandbook_Transport.pdf Cost: Free Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Screenshot References: Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector[1] "The options outlined in this guidebook are designed to assist you in the process of developing transport services and facilities in your countries

369

Costa Rica-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Costa Rica-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Costa Rica-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Costa Rica-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Costa Rica-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Costa Rica UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1]

370

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ecofys.com/com/publications/brochures_newsletters/documents/Report National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Screenshot References: National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development[1] "Ecofys elaborated in several projects, concrete examples of NAMAs to understand the issues arising from this concept. This report summarizes the

371

South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country South Africa UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1]

372

300 Area Building Retention Evaluation Mitigation Plan  

SciTech Connect

Evaluate the long-term retention of several facilities associated with the PNNL Capability Replacement Laboratory and other Hanfor mission needs. WCH prepared a mitigation plan for three scenarios with different release dates for specific buildings. The evaluations present a proposed plan for providing utility services to retained facilities in support of a long-term (+20 year) lifespan in addition to temporary services to buildings with specified delayed release dates.

D. J. McBride

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

373

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MITIGATION MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT, NOTICE OF WETLAND INVOLVEMENT, AND FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A LIGNOCELLULOSIC U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 1.0 Introd uction 1 1.1 Purpose of the Mitigation Action Plan 1 1.2 Structure of the Mitigation Action Plan 2 2.0 Ambient Ai r Quality 3 2.1 Potential Impacts 3 2.2 Mitigation Measures 3 2.3 Metrics for Determining Success or Failure of the Mitigation Measures 4 2.4 Monitoring Techniques for Mitigation Measures 4 3.0 Truck Traffic 4 3.1 Potential Impacts 4 3.2 Mitigation Measures 4 3.3 Metrics for Determining Success or Failure of the Mitigation Measures 5 3.4 Monitoring Techniques for Mitigation Measures 5 4.0 Genetically Modified Yeasts 6 4.1 Potential Impacts 6 4.2 Mitigation Measures 6 4.3 Metrics for Determining

374

EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kemper County, Mississippi The Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combine Cycle Project (Project) (DOE/EIS-0409) in May 2010 and a Record of Decision (ROD) in August 2010 (75 FR 51248). The ROD identified commitments to mitigate potential adverse impacts associated with the project. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes the monitoring and mitigation actions the recipient must implement during the design, construction, and demonstration of the Project. Mitigation Action Plan Kemper County Iintegrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kemper County, Mississippi, DOE/EIS-0409 (September 2010)

375

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact The Council on Environmental Quality is issuing this guidance for Federal departments and agencies on establishing, implementing, and monitoring mitigation commitments identified and analyzed in Environmental Assessments, Environmental Impact Statements, and adopted in the final decision documents. This guidance also clarifies the appropriate use of mitigated "Findings of No Significant Impact" under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The guidance explains the requirements of NEPA and the CEQ Regulations, describes CEQ policies, and recommends

376

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools October 7, 2013 - 10:27am Addthis These data and tools from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other organizations can help Federal agencies with greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation planning for: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. Buildings Table 1 features data and tools to help with GHG mitigation planning for buildings. Table 1. GHG Mitigation Planning Data and Tools for Buildings Data or Tool Source Description Planning Use Buildings GHG Mitigation Worksheet Estimator Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Estimates savings and costs from GHG reduction strategies Evaluate GHG Reduction Strategies Estimate Costs to Implement GHG Reduction Strategies

377

Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document outlines a plan for management of nuisance wildlife at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Nuisance wildlife management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; and law enforcement. This plan covers the following subjects: (1) roles and responsibilities of individuals, groups, and agencies; (2) the general protocol for reducing nuisance wildlife problems; and (3) species-specific methodologies for resolving nuisance wildlife management issues for mammals, birds, snakes, and insects. Achievement of the objectives of this plan will be a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA); U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)-Wildlife Services (WS); and ORNL through agreements between TWRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC; and UT-Battelle, LLC; and USDA, APHIS-WS.

Giffen, Neil R [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and...

379

Bonneville Power Administration Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Final EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: 1: Environmental Analyses DOE/EIS-0312 April 2003 Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0312) Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Title of Proposed Action: Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan States and Provinces Involved: Arizona, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming, and British Columbia Abstract: Despite the efforts of BPA and other regional entities in the Pacific Northwest, some populations of fish and wildlife continue to decline. Reasons for the lack of success include the following: different groups have different values and priorities; there is no clear and agreed-upon scientific answer; and there are conflicting

380

EIS-0312: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan 2: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS-0312: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan SUMMARY In this final environmental impact statement (FEIS), with the benefit of public comment and participation, BPA has developed and proposes a Preferred Alternative (PA 2002) that substantially combines elements of the Weak Stock and Sustainable Use alternatives and that falls within the established range of potential Policy Direction alternatives. This FEIS evaluates the environmental consequences of BPA's implementation and funding of sample actions that could emerge from any of the Policy Directions. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 26, 2012 EIS-0312: Notice of Availability of the Bonneville Power Administration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Comprehensive Monitoring of Wildlife Mortality on British Columbia Highways Using the WARS System (1978 to 2005)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wildlife signs, fencing, under/overpasses, reflectors elevation, cliffs, slopes, plains, undulating terrain rain, snow, sleet, fog, haze, smoke, wind,

Sielecki, Leonard E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Insights from EMF Associated Agricultural and Forestry Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Studies  

SciTech Connect

Integrated assessment modeling (IAM) as employed by the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) generally involves a multi-sector appraisal of greenhouse gas emission (GHGE) mitigation alternatives and climate change effects typically at the global level. Such a multi-sector evaluation encompasses potential climate change effects and mitigative actions within the agricultural and forestry (AF) sectors. In comparison with many of the other sectors covered by IAM, the AF sectors may require somewhat different treatment due to their critical dependence upon spatially and temporally varying resource and climatic conditions. In particular, in large countries like the United States, forest production conditions vary dramatically across the landscape. For example, some areas in the southern US present conditions favorable to production of fast growing, heat tolerant pine species, while more northern regions often favor slower-growing hardwood and softwood species. Moreover, some lands are currently not suitable for forest production (e.g., the arid western plains). Similarly, in agriculture, the US has areas where citrus and cotton can be grown and other areas where barley and wheat are more suitable. This diversity across the landscape causes differential GHGE mitigation potential in the face of climatic changes and/or responses to policy or price incentives. It is difficult for a reasonably sized global IAM system to reflect the full range of sub-national geographic AF production possibilities alluded to above. AF response in the face of climate change altered temperature precipitation regimes or mitigation incentives will likely involve region-specific shifts in land use and agricultural/forest production. This chapter addresses AF sectoral responses in climate change mitigation analysis. Specifically, we draw upon US-based studies of AF GHGE mitigation possibilities that incorporate sub-national detail drawing largely on a body of studies done by the authors in association with EMF activities. We discuss characteristics of AF sectoral responses that could be incorporated in future IAM efforts in climate change policy.

McCarl, Bruce A.; Murray, Brian; Kim, Man-Keun; Lee, Heng-Chi; Sands, Ronald D.; Schneider, Uwe

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided Deforestation of Tropical Rainforests on Privately-owned Lands in High Conservation Value Areas Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided Deforestation of Tropical Rainforests on Privately-owned Lands in High Conservation Value Areas Agency/Company /Organization Government of Costa Rica, Peace with Nature Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Co-benefits assessment, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.paxnatura.org/pax_n Country Costa Rica UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Costa Rica[1] Overview References ↑ "Costa Rica" Retrieved from

384

Strategies for mitigating risk to buildings from abnormal load events  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Building structures customarily are designed to withstand loads from their occupants and the natural environment. The normal design process provides a measure of structural integrity that is also available to withstand events that traditionally have been outside the design envelope, including accidents, misuse, and sabotage. Changes in design and construction practices over the past several decades have lessened inherent robustness in certain modern structural systems, making them vulnerable to such events. Social and political factors also have led to an increase in hazardous events that may pose a risk to buildings. Finally, public awareness of building safety has increased as a result of well-publicised natural and man-made disasters. Building practices to mitigate the risk of abnormal loads and ensuing unacceptable damage or collapse can be improved using concepts of structural reliability and risk analysis. This paper summarises the basis for such practices, from the perspective of a structural engineer.

Bruce R. Ellingwood

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

DESIGN OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PROJECTS (FW 370) Fall Semester, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESIGN OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PROJECTS (FW 370) Fall Semester, 2010 INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Will Clements in fish, wildlife and conservation biology. The course format will include lectures, group discussion Assignments and Homework......................................... 15% #12;FW 370- DESIGN OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

386

TOURISM PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY OF WILDLIFE VIEWING IN THE SQUAMISH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOURISM PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY OF WILDLIFE VIEWING IN THE SQUAMISH VALLEY by Kim Cherie: Tourism Product Development: A Case Study of Wildlife Viewing In the Squamish Valley PROJECT: 284 #12;iii ABSTRACT Wildlife viewing is an increasingly important form of tourism in British Columbia

387

INTRODUCTION SECTION 1 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 1-13 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION SECTION 1 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 1-13 September 13, 1995 to 6 percent by 2015 to rebuild weak fish and wildlife populations, the Council's program calls for participation and funding funding and staffing fish and wildlife rebuilding measures, or run the almost certain risk

388

NEWS RELEASE Contact: Jane Hendron Fish and Wildlife Service -760/431-9440 ext. 205  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEWS RELEASE Contact: Jane Hendron ­ Fish and Wildlife Service - 760/431-9440 ext. 205 Jan Bedrosian ­ Bureau of Land Management ­ 916/978-4614 Timothy J. DiCintio ­ National Fish and Wildlife. The REAT is comprised of representatives of the Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management

389

Win-Win for Wind and Wildlife: A Vision to Facilitate Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Win-Win for Wind and Wildlife: A Vision to Facilitate Sustainable Development Joseph M. Kiesecker1: Kiesecker JM, Evans JS, Fargione J, Doherty K, Foresman KR, et al. (2011) Win-Win for Wind and Wildlife of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States of America, 8 United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Bismarck

Foresman, Kerry R.

390

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

391

Effects of mitigating fouling on the energy efficiency of crude-oil distillation  

SciTech Connect

An analysis was performed to determine the effects of fouling of the preheat train on the energy efficiency of a typical crude-distillation unit with a capacity of 100,000 bbl/day. A spreadsheet analysis was developed to calculate the thermal duty for each of the heat exchanger groups that heat the crude oil from ambient conditions to the distillation temperature. A fouling-rate model developed in a previous study was applied to calculate the fouling resistance as a function of time. Improvements in the energy efficiency were analyzed for different mitigation scenarios. The analysis shows economic incentives for new and improved techniques for mitigating fouling of the preheat train.

Panchal, C.B.; Huangfu, E.P.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

EIS-0026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report 026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Guidance for the development of a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is contained in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, and 10 CFR 1021, National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures. These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record of Decision (ROD) for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Order further requires that an annual report be prepared to demonstrate the progress made in implementing the commitments and effectiveness of any mitigation activity until the activity has been

393

EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28: Mitigation Action Plan 28: Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 Revision 2: This MAP addresses the construction, operation, and maintenance of the new 84-mile long 500-kV transmission line. Necessary work conducted by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) at their substations will occur within the previously disturbed area inside the substation boundaries. Western or Trans Electric, Inc. will also not have a role in upgrading the various existing PG&E 230-kV system components. DOE-0128-MAP-02, Western Area Power Administration, Mitigation Action Plan for Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 (December 2003) More Documents & Publications EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan

394

EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report Los Alamos National Laboratory Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Fiscal Year 2012 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report In Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Project Office focused on tracking and managing mitigation action commitments and reporting. Highlights for FY 2012 include the following: completion and distribution of the FY 2011 SWEIS Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (DOE 2012), which included a section for the Las Conchas Fire, completion and distribution of the calendar year (CY) 2010 SWEIS Yearbook in April 2012 (LANL 2012a), construction and operation of SERF-E, construction of an institutional

395

EA-1923: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1923: Mitigation Action Plan Green Energy School Wind Turbine Project on Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands This Mitgation Action Plan specifies the methods for implementing mitigation measures that address the potential environmental impacts identified in DOE/EA-1923 and by the USFWS Biological Opinion issued to DOE on February 1, 2012, in accordance with the Endangered Species Act (ESA) (16 U.S.C.1531 et seq.). The development of these measures and an implementation plan, are a necessary condition for the DOE FONSI, as described by 40 CFR 1021.331(b) Mitigation action plans. EA-1923-MAP-2013 More Documents & Publications EA-1923: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1923: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact

396

EA-1591: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91: Mitigation Action Plan 91: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1591: Mitigation Action Plan Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project. The project involves reconstruction of the existing Palisades-Goshen 115-kV transmission line, which extends from Palisades Dam in eastern Idaho approximately 52 miles west to the Goshen Substation south of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Mitigation Action Plan for the Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project More Documents & Publications EA-1591: Final Environmental Assessment, Finding of No Significant Impact, and Mitigation Action Plan EA-1591: Finding of No Significant Impact

397

EIS-0026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 Annual Mitigation Report 09 Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Guidance for the development of a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is contained in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, and 10 CFR 1021, National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures. These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record of Decision (ROD) for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Order further requires that an annual report be prepared to demonstrate the progress made in implementing the commitments and effectiveness of any mitigation activity until the activity has been completed. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) MAP was prepared to

398

EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes mitigation and monitoring commitments for constructing and operating the Modified CMRR-NF. The commitments made in this MAP are designed to mitigate potentially adverse environmental consequences associated with the CMRR-NF Project as the CMRR-NF is constructed and operated, and as direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts from these actions occur over time. EIS-0350-S1-MAP-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0350-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0350-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

399

Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 1, 2010 December 1, 2010 EA-1782: Mitigation Action Plan University of Delaware Lewes Campus Onsite Wind Energy Project September 1, 2010 EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kemper County, Mississippi August 24, 2010 EA-1736: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, Los Alamos, New Mexico July 10, 2010 EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant June 4, 2010 EA-1704: Mitigation Action Plan Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi January 1, 2010 EA-1755: Mitigation Action Plan

400

EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Annual Mitigation Report 10 Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Guidance for the development of a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is contained in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, and 10 CFR 1021, National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures. These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record of Decision (ROD) for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Order further requires that an annual report be prepared to demonstrate the progress made in implementing the commitments and effectiveness of any mitigation activity until the activity has been completed. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) MAP was prepared to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EA-1901: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Mitigation Action Plan 1: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1901: Mitigation Action Plan Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is referenced in the Finding of No Significant Impact for the Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project (Department of Energy Environmental Assessment-1901). This MAP includes all of the mitigation measures recommended in the Final Environmental Assessment to mitigate adverse environmental impacts. It includes some measures that are essential to render the impacts of the Proposed Action not significant and other measures that will decrease impacts that did not reach a level to be considered significant. EA-1901-MAP-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications

402

EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Mitigation Action Plan : Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 Revision 2: This MAP addresses the construction, operation, and maintenance of the new 84-mile long 500-kV transmission line. Necessary work conducted by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) at their substations will occur within the previously disturbed area inside the substation boundaries. Western or Trans Electric, Inc. will also not have a role in upgrading the various existing PG&E 230-kV system components. DOE-0128-MAP-02, Western Area Power Administration, Mitigation Action Plan for Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 (December 2003) More Documents & Publications EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan

403

W-519 Sagebrush Mitigation Project FY-2004 Final Review and Status  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes activities conducted as mitigation for loss of sagebrush-steppe habitats due to Project W-519, the construction of the infrastructure for the Tank Waste Remediation System Vitrification Plant. The focus of this report is to provide a review and final status of mitigation actions performed through FY2004. Data collected since FY1999 have been included where appropriate. The Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project W-519 prescribed three general actions to be performed as mitigation for the disturbance of approximately 40 ha (100 acres) of mature sagebrush-steppe habitat. These actions included: (1) transplanting approximately 130,000 sagebrush seedlings on the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE); (2) rectification of the new transmission line corridor via seeding with native grasses and sagebrush; and (3) research on native plant species with a goal of increasing species diversity in future mitigation or restoration actions. Nearly 130,000 Wyoming big sagebrush seedlings where planted on ALE during FY2000 and FY2001. About 39,000 of those seedlings were burned during the 24-Command Fire of June 2000. The surviving and subsequent replanting has resulted in about 91,000 seedlings that were planted across four general areas on ALE. A 50% survival rate at any monitoring period was defined as the performance standard in the MAP for this project. Data collected in 2004 indicate that of the over 5000 monitored plants, 51.1% are still alive, and of those the majority are thriving and blooming. These results support the potential for natural recruitment and the ultimate goal of wildlife habitat replacement. Thus, the basic performance standard for sagebrush survival within the habitat compensation planting has been met. Monitoring activities conducted in 2004 indicate considerable variation in seedling survival depending on the type of plant material, site conditions, and to a lesser extent, treatments performed at the time of planting. The principle findings include: (1) a clear indication that in most settings, bare-root seedling survival is considerably higher than tubling survival; (2) we can expect low plant survival at sites with a high cover of large native bunchgrasses--especially bluebunch wheatgrass; (3) mycorrhizal root treatments appeared to increase growth and survival at the Coppice Dune and 98-Burn Undisturbed sites, but appeared to have little effect at the 98-Burn Disturbed, 111-Road Sitanion, or Cold Creek sites; (4) use of a hydrogel dip at planting increases survival of bare-root plants compared to dipping roots in plain water; (5) reducing leaf area via clipping after planting did not increase survival of bare-root plants; (6) seedlings planted on a south-aspect hillside at the Lower Cold Creek planting area had higher survival than seedlings planted on the hilltop or northern-aspects although these survival rates were lower than the survival rate down on the flats at this same location. Rectification of the transmission line corridor occurred in early March 2001, with the broadcast seeding of Sandberg's bluegrass and sagebrush. Success criteria for this site-of-disturbance rectification required a grass establishment after four years with greater than 25% total canopy cover with 60% of the plant cover from planted species (DOE 1998). This planting met the total canopy criterion but failed the criterion of 60% relative coverage of planted species. Although the performance standard was not met, the planting is not necessarily a failure; the communities on the tower pads appear to be developing toward the desired end state. We feel that there are no reasonable mitigative actions that can be taken at this time that would significantly alter or speed up the plant community development on these sites. In fact, most options, such as overseeding, may cause damage to the currently establishing communities on those sites.

Durham, Robin E.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Global climate change and the mitigation challenge  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Frank Princiotta [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Understanding Participation in Wildlife Conservation Programs on Private Lands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

behavioral responses environmental issues and policy changes including ecotourism (Hearne and Salinas 2002), environmental risk (Casey et al. 2008; Travisi and Nijkamp 2008), wetland mitigation (Bauer et al. 2004), forest management (Boxall and Macnab 2000...

Sorice, Michael G.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

406

Libby Dam Wildlife Habitat Enhancement, 1992 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a project that was initiated in September, 1984 to mitigate for the loss of big game winter and spring range by the Libby Dam hydroelectric facility.

Holifield, Jennifer; Komac, Ron (Kootenai National Forest, Fisher River Ranger District, Libby MT)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Name Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Dataset, Technical report Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan References MICCA Website[1] The overall objective of the MAGHG project is to support developing countries assess and report their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

408

Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

areas that USAID could explore to enable the implementation of projects that produce climate change benefits." References "Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in...

409

Experts assemble at PPPL to discuss mitigation of tokamak disruptions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experts assemble at PPPL to discuss mitigation of tokamak disruptions By John Greenwald July 15, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Amitava Bhattacharjee, left,...

410

PPPL successfully tests system for mitigating instabilities called...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary tabs View(active tab) High Resolution News PPPL successfully tests system for mitigating instabilities called "ELMs" By John Greenwald September 29, 2014 Tweet Widget...

411

PPPL successfully tests system for mitigating instabilities called...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary tabs View(active tab) High Resolution Press Releases PPPL successfully tests system for mitigating instabilities called "ELMs" By John Greenwald September 29, 2014 Tweet...

412

EA-1950: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EA-1950: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington Bonneville Power...

413

EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan Colorado Highlands Wind Project, Logan County, Colorado Colorado Highlands Wind LLC applied to Western Area Power Administration to interconnect a...

414

Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual issues and lessons learned in studies in developing countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

415

Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors of Developing Countries...

416

Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for...

417

Oregon Willamette River Basin Mitigation Agreement | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Willamette River Basin Mitigation Agreement Author State of Oregon Recipient Bonneville Power Administration Published Publisher Not Provided, 10222010 DOI Not Provided Check for...

418

National Planning for GHG Mitigation in Agriculture: A Guidance...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National Planning for GHG Mitigation in Agriculture: A Guidance Document AgencyCompany Organization: Food and...

419

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

When estimating the cost of implementing the greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies, Federal agencies should consider the life-cycle costs and savings of the efforts.

420

Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables and Energy Storage 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Characterizing Uncertainty for Regional Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Decisions  

SciTech Connect

This white paper describes the results of new research to develop an uncertainty characterization process to help address the challenges of regional climate change mitigation and adaptation decisions.

Unwin, Stephen D.; Moss, Richard H.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement July 10, 2014 EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant June 9, 2014 EIS-0380:...

423

Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operation of a Proposed Lignocellulosic Biorefinery, Emmetsburg, Iowa July 10, 2008 EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant May 8, 2008 EA-1440-S1:...

424

Webinar: Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells, originally presented on November 19, 2013.

425

EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact Green Energy School Wind Turbine Project on Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana...

426

EIS-0332: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kilovolt transmission line between Bonneville Power Administration's existing McNary and John Day substations. Mitigation Action Plan for the McNary-John Day Transmission Line...

427

EA-1679: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan EA-1679: Mitigation Action Plan Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington This MAP is for...

428

Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on climate change mitigation and agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean1 Abstract The Government of New Zealand, the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the...

429

2006 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. One of the objectives of restoration is the revegetation of remediated waste sites to stabilize the soil and restore the land to native vegetation. The report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2006 and includes 11 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and 2 bat habitat mitigation projects.

A. L. Johnson; K. A. Gano

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

430

EIS-0460: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

those required mitigation actions and the monitoring and reporting requirements the Alliance must implement during the design, construction, and operation of the FutureGen 2.0...

431

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Name Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Address 3406 Cherry Ave. NE Place Salem, Oregon Zip 97303 Phone number 800-720-ODFW Website http://www.dfw.state.or.us/ Coordinates 44.974582°, -123.020498° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.974582,"lon":-123.020498,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

432

Volunteer Service Position Description Title: Speaking for Wildlife Presenter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hampshire Cooperative Extension is an equal opportunity educator and employer University of New Hampshire, UVolunteer Service Position Description Title: Speaking for Wildlife Presenter Term: One Year Duties; (2) Actively publicize the availability of SFW presentations in your community; (3) For field walks

New Hampshire, University of

433

Michael Murray, Ph.D. National Wildlife Federation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Michael Murray, Ph.D. National Wildlife Federation Great Lakes Natural Resource Center Ann Arbor context #12;2 Source: Cassedy and Grossman, Introduction to Energy, 1998 #12;3 Coal Ranks · Anthracite ­ highest rank, high energy content · Bituminous ­ second highest rank, high energy content; typically

O'Donnell, Tom

434

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service- Shepherdstown, West Virginia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation Training Center (NCTC). The 500-acre site includes 16 buildings that accommodate education and training facilities for the USFWS. The center was designed to use passive solar and low-energy technologies that are readily available, easily maintained and cost effective.

435

Is Forestry Right Do you care about forests, wildlife,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Is Forestry Right For You? · Do you care about forests, wildlife, water, wilderness, treaty rights, public involvement in forest policy, or international trade issues? Contact Information · Silviculture · Consulting Company · Urban Forestry · Tourism · GIS · Computer Modeling · Professional Biologist

Northern British Columbia, University of

436

SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing caused by direct solar insolation and benefit from the cooling effects of wind caused by evaporative, as well as benefits from the cooling effects of wind. Eastern Red Bat Lasiurus borealis Roost trees

New Hampshire, University of

437

Stratigraphic Units at Ft. Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stratigraphic Units at Ft. Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge Mrs. Flynn's Earth Science Class this formation are wind-blown volcanic ash. The climate may have been more arid than during the time Hills (continued) These were deposited by the wind. The climate was similar to the present day climate

Frank, Tracy D.

438

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery And Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan Volume II ­ Subbasin Plan Chapter J ­ Wind Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board December 15, 2004 #12;Preface This is one in a series Subbasin II.H. Lower Columbia Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin II.K. Little White

439

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory: A Strategy for the 21st Century #12;Estuarine emergent wetlands account for only five percent of the wetland area in the lower 48 States. Those like this estuarine wetland in South Carolina provide essential rearing habitat for important

Gray, Matthew

440

Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Fish and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on AddThis.com...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the Nationwide Inventory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the Nationwide Inventory These procedures are designed to assist federal officials in complying with the President's directive (attached) to protect rivers in the Nationwide Inventory through the normal environmental analysis process. NEOA, E.O. 1 15 14, CEQ's NEPA Regulations, and agency implementing procedures should be used to meet the President's directive. Although the steps outlined below pertain to wild and scenic river protection, they also fit clearly within agencies' existing environmental analysis processes. Agencies are already required: to identify and analyze the environmental effects of their actions; to consult with agencies with jurisdiction by law or special expertise (in this case, the National Park Service (NPS)); to

442

Blast mitigation capabilities of aqueous foam.  

SciTech Connect

A series of tests involving detonation of high explosive blanketed by aqueous foam (conducted from 1982 to 1984) are described in primarily terms of recorded peak pressure, positive phase specific impulse, and time of arrival. The investigation showed that optimal blast mitigation occurs for foams with an expansion ratio of about 60:1. Simple analyses representing the foam as a shocked single phase mixture are presented and shown inadequate. The experimental data demonstrate that foam slows down and broadens the propagated pressure disturbance relative to a shock in air. Shaped charges and flyer plates were evaluated for operation in foam and appreciable degradation was observed for the flyer plates due to drag created by the foam.

Hartman, William Franklin; Larsen, Marvin Elwood; Boughton, Bruce A.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Microsoft Word - Mitigation Action Plan.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

782 782 MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE LEWES CAMPUS ONSITE WIND ENERGY PROJECT DECEMBER 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 1.0 INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) to aid its decision whether to provide funding for the University of Delaware's construction and operation of a 2-megawatt wind turbine adjacent to the University's College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment Campus in Lewes, Delaware. The EA (DOE/EA-1782) for the University's Wind Energy Project was completed in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and implementing regulations issued by the Council on Environmental Quality and

444

Economics of nuclear power and climate change mitigation policies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...climate change mitigation literature. We apply an energy economy...announced a thorough review of their plans. A public...stabilization. The existing literature on the economics...provided by hydropower, bioenergy with CCS, wind, and geothermal...climate change mitigation literature. We apply an energy...

Nico Bauer; Robert J. Brecha; Gunnar Luderer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

BWR ATWS mitigation by Fine Motion Control Rod  

SciTech Connect

Two main methods of ATWS mitigation in a SBWR are: fine Motion control Rods (FMCRD) and Boron injection via the Standby Liquid control System (SLCS). This study has demonstrated that the use of FMCRD along with feedwater runback mitigated the conditions due to reactivity insertion and possible ATWS in a BWR which is similar to SBWR.

Rohatgi, U.S.; Cheng, H.S.; Khan, H.; Mallen, A.; Diamond, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Tillman Creek Mitigation Site As-Build Report.  

SciTech Connect

This as-built report describes site conditions at the Tillman Creek mitigation site in South Cle Elum, Washington. This mitigation site was constructed in 2006-2007 to compensate for wetland impacts from the Yakama Nation hatchery. This as-built report provides information on the construction sequence, as-built survey, and establishment of baseline monitoring stations.

Gresham, Doug [Otak, Inc.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

447

RESEARCH REPORT 1740-1 WETLANDS MITIGATION FORHIGHWAY IMPACTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH REPORT 1740-1 WETLANDS MITIGATION FORHIGHWAY IMPACTS: A NATIONWIDESURVEY OF STATE; 8QFODVVLILHG 1RRISDJHV 3ULFH )RUP'27)#12; 5HSURGXFWLRQRIFRPSOHWHGSDJHDXWKRUL]HG #12;WETLANDS Title: Development of a Mechanism to Compare On-Site vs. Off-Site Wetlands Mitigation Conducted

Texas at Austin, University of

448

List of Texas Fuel Mitigation Vendors This list of fuel mitigation vendors that offer services in Texas is divided into two groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

List of Texas Fuel Mitigation Vendors This list of fuel mitigation vendors that offer services as a service to communities and landowners seeking assistance with fuel mitigation practices on their land Service Area Mu, Be, CP, Sc, Mo, FB Page 1 of 4Last updated on 10/16/2013 #12;List of Fuel Mitigation

Behmer, Spencer T.

449

Morocco-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morocco-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Morocco-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Morocco-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Morocco-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Morocco UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1] "The Government of Denmark will provide US$6 million to the new programme

450

Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Portfolio-Based Planning Process for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 10:10am Addthis The portfolio-based planning process for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation offers an approach to: Evaluating the GHG reduction potential at the site, program, and agency level Identifying strategies for reducing those emissions Prioritizing activities to achieve both GHG reduction and cost objectives. Portfolio-based management for GHG mitigation helps agencies move from "peanut-butter-spreading" obligations for meeting GHG reduction targets evenly across all agency operating units to strategic planning of GHG reduction activities based on each operating unit's potential and cost to reduce emissions. The result of this prioritization will lay the foundation

451

Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: U.S. Agency for International Development Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, Finance Resource Type: Publications Website: pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PNADO826.pdf Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Screenshot References: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries[1] Summary "In order to determine how USAID assistance may help overcome barriers to financing these types of projects, this report addresses the following

452

EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Mitigation Action Plan 6: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project Carbon, Albany and Laramie Counties, Wyoming and Weld County, Colorado Western proposes to upgrade the existing 146 miles of CH-MM 115kB transmission line which crosses Carbon, Albany and Larmie Counties in Wyoming and 35 miles of the AU-CH transmission line which corsses portions of Laramie Counties, Wyoming and Weld County, Colorado. The upgrade would remove the existing 115-kV H-frame structures and replace them with new 230-Kv H-frame structures and single pole steel structures. Western also proposes to widen the existing right-of-way (ROW), where necessary to allow adequate electrical clearances. Mitigation Action Plan to Implement Mitigation Requirements for

453

EA-1755: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1755: Mitigation Action Plan Reconstruction of the South Access Road (CR 802) in Support of the Department of Energy, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Eddy County, New Mexico EA prepared for the proposed reconstruction of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) South Access Road (County Road 802) located in Eddy County, New Mexico. Through the environmental review process, the Bureau of Land Management Carlsbad Field Office (BLM CFO) determined that there would be potential environmental impacts from the proposed project that would require mitigation to assure that the impacts would not become significant. Therefore, the Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) prepared this Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) to establish conditions for issuing its

454

Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Publications Website: www.unep.fr/shared/publications/pdf/DTIx1047xPA-ClimateChange.pdf Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector Screenshot References: Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector[1] Summary "This document forms part of the " UNEP Manuals on Sustainable Tourism" and the UNWTO sustainable tourism policy guidebooks publication series, aiming to provide guidance to tourism stakeholders to integrate

455

EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record of Decision (ROD) for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Order further requires that an annual report be prepared to demonstrate the progress made in implementing the commitments and effectiveness of any mitigation activity until the activity has been completed. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) MAP was prepared to address commitments made in the RODs for the WIPP Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS), and the WIPP Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement. This 2011 Annual Mitigation Report (2011 AMR) addresses those WIPP Project-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994

456

Vietnam-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Vietnam-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Vietnam-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Vietnam-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Vietnam UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1] "The Government of Denmark will provide US$6 million to the new programme

457

Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1 Xcel document describes Version 1 of the the Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator tool. This tool assists federal agencies in estimating the greenhouse gas mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings, for example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office buildings, users can define their own efficiency measures, costs, and savings estimates for inclusion in the portfolio assessment. More information on user-defined measures can be

458

EA-1636: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1636: Mitigation Action Plan Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project. The project involves replacing wood pole structures on about 26 miles of the Albany-Burnt Woods single-circuit, 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line and about 21 miles of the Santiam-Toledo single circuit, 230-kVtransmission line in Linn, Benton and Lincoln counties, Oregon. Mitigation Action Plan for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project More Documents & Publications EA-1636: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1636: Finding of No Significant Impact

459

Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Ghana-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Ghana UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1] "The Government of Denmark will provide US$6 million to the new programme

460

Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.unido.org/fileadmin/user_media/Publications/Pub_free/UNEnergy2009P Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Screenshot References: Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change[1]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Supporting International Mitigation and MRV activities | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Mitigation and MRV activities International Mitigation and MRV activities Jump to: navigation, search Name Supporting International Mitigation and MRV activities Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.mitigationpartnersh Program End 2014 References International Partnership on Mitigation and MRV[1] Program Overview In the framework of the Petersberg Climate Dialogue in May 2010 in Bonn/Germany, South Africa, South Korea and Germany launched the International Partnership on Mitigation and MRV. The overall aim of the

462

Mexico-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Mexico-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mexico-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Name Mexico-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Global Environment Facility (GEF), Government of Denmark Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/climatecha Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)[1] "The Government of Denmark will provide US$6 million to the new programme

463

EA-1440-S1: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1440-S1: Mitigation Action Plan National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex, Golden, Colorado ThIs Mitigation Action Plan implements the mitigation measures associated with the potential environmental impact of a DOE proposal that consists of three site development projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) South Table Mountain (STM) site at Golden, Colorado: Construction of the Research Support Facilities (RSF), a new office building or multi-building office complex; Installation of Phase 1 of planned Site Infrastructure Improvements (Phase 1 of Full Site Development); Upgrades to the Thermochemical User Facility (TCUF), TCUF High Bay area, and addition of the Thermochemical Biorefinery Pilot Plant

464

Observation techniques that minimize impacts on wildlife and maximize visitor satisfaction in night-time tours  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nocturnal observation of wildlife is a popular tourist attraction. However, there is very little research about its impact on wildlife and thus the optimal trade-off in minimizing impacts and maximizing visitor satisfaction. We first used a questionnaire-based survey to determine the characteristics of a satisfying nocturnal wildlife tour for visitors to a popular Australian rangeland tourist site. This revealed a particular interest by visitors in high-tech wildlife observation equipment such as night vision devices and bat detectors. Further satisfaction was gained from the types of wildlife viewed and the conduct of the tour. Respondents underestimated aversive effects on wildlife imposed by night-time tours. With this context, we analyzed observation methods typically employed in night-time wildlife tours. We compared the results achieved with different illumination (white vs. red vs. infrared light), watch modes (sitting at artificial watering points vs. hiking in creek beds), observation times (starting at dusk vs. 2h past dusk) and wind speed. Abundance and species richness of the non-bat fauna and bat activity were greatest at artificial watering points directly after dusk during calm nights. A night vision device enhanced by infrared light facilitated closer observations, the viewing of undisturbed wildlife behavior and revealed more species than under white or red light. We consolidated our findings from the visitor survey and the wildlife observation research to recommend a tour design that minimizes impacts and optimizes observation outcomes when conducting night-time tours of wildlife.

Isabelle D. Wolf; David B. Croft

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Integrating Agricultural and Forestry GHG Mitigation Response into General Economy Frameworks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrating Agricultural and Forestry GHG Mitigation Response into General Economy Frameworks. #12;2 Integrating Agricultural and Forestry GHG Mitigation Response into General Economy Frameworks and Forestry Response to GHG Mitigation into General Economy Frameworks: Developing a Family of Response

McCarl, Bruce A.

466

ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MITIGATION OF MICROBIOLOGICALLY INFLUENCED CORROSION (MIC)  

SciTech Connect

The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. The technical approach for this quarter included the fractionation of extracts prepared from several varieties of pepper plants, and using several solvents, by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A preliminary determination of antimicrobial activities of the new extracts and fractions using a growth inhibition assay, and evaluation of the extracts ability to inhibit biofilm formation was also performed. The analysis of multiple extracts of pepper plants and fractions of extracts of pepper plants obtained by HPLC illustrated that these extracts and fractions are extremely complex mixtures of chemicals. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to identify the chemical constituents of these extracts and fractions to the greatest degree possible. Analysis of the chemical composition of various extracts of pepper plants has illustrated the complexity of the chemical mixtures present, and while additional work will be performed to further characterize the extracts to identify bioactive compounds the focus of efforts should now shift to an evaluation of the ability of extracts to inhibit corrosion in mixed culture biofilms, and in pure cultures of bacterial types which are known or believed to be important in corrosion.

John J. Kilbane II; William Bogan

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

NREL: Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Browse By Reset All Geography Africa (11) Apply Africa filter Asia (12) Apply Asia filter Australia and Oceania (10) Apply Australia and Oceania filter Europe (219) Apply Europe filter Global (7) Apply Global filter North America (217) Apply North America filter Technology Land-Based Wind (280) Apply Land-Based Wind filter Marine Energy (58) Apply Marine Energy filter Offshore Wind (161) Apply Offshore Wind filter Power Lines (66) Apply Power Lines filter Towers (23) Apply Towers filter Animal Birds (334) Apply Birds filter Fish (71) Apply Fish filter Invertebrates (44) Apply Invertebrates filter Mammals (185) Apply Mammals filter Reptiles (10) Apply Reptiles filter Publication Year 2013 (92) Apply 2013 filter

468

Sources and Mitigation of CO and UHC Emissions in Low-temperature...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Mitigation of CO and UHC Emissions in Low-temperature Diesel Combustion Regimes: Insights Obtained via Homogeneous Reactor Modeling Sources and Mitigation of CO and UHC...

469

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment mitigation options Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the selected mitigation options, methodologies for estimating on-road mobile... (GHG) mitigation ... Source: Texas A&M University, Texas Transportation Institute...

470

E-Print Network 3.0 - addressing mitigation options Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On... (GHG) mitigation options for on-road mobile sources from the perspective of DOTs, MPOs and...

471

E-Print Network 3.0 - activation effects mitigated Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On... (GHG) mitigation options for on-road mobile sources from the perspective of DOTs, MPOs and...

472

E-Print Network 3.0 - assess carbon mitigation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, The potential for U.S. forest soils to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect. CRC Press, New York... fields: assessment, measurement and mitigation. Plant...

473

GRR/Section 3-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land 03-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the process of leasing Texas Parks & Wildlife Department (TPWD) land in Texas. The Texas General Land Office manages

474

Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Jump to: navigation, search Name Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

475

Kenya-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Kenya-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

476

Aspen and Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aspen and Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program Aspen and Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program Aspen and Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) The City of Aspen and Pitkin County have adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), with some amendments, as their official energy code effective March 9, 2010. The [http://www.aspenpitkin.com/Portals/0/docs/county/countycode/Building%20C...

477

Philippines-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Philippines-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Jump to: navigation, search Name Philippines-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

478

Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), International Council for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Ministry of Agriculture Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -TNA

479

Movements of white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus Texanus (Mearns), on the Welder Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MOVEMENTS OF WHITE-TAILED DEER, ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS TEXANUS (MEARNS), ON THE WELDER WILDLIFE REFUGE A Thesis By EDWIN DARYL MICHAEL Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1963 Major Subject: Wildlife Management MOVEMENTS OF WHITE-TAILED DEER, ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS TEXANUS (MaARNS), Ol THE WELDER WILDLIFE REFUGE A Thesis EDWIN DARYL MICHAEL Appr e as to tyle a...

Michael, Edwin Daryl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

480

The Tiger and the Sun: Solar Power Plants and Wildlife Sanctuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss separate and integrated approaches to building scalable solar power plants and wildlife sanctuaries. Both solar power plants and wildlife sanctuaries need a lot of land. We quantify some of the requirements using various estimates of the rate of solar power production as well as the rate of adding wildlife to a sanctuary over the time range 2010-2050. We use population dynamics equations to study the evolution of solar energy and tiger populations up to and beyond 2050.

McGuigan, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis wildlife mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Operating Experience Level 1 - Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OE-1: 2013-01 April 2013 OE-1: 2013-01 April 2013 Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events PURPOSE: The purpose of this Operating Experience (OE) document is to (1) provide results from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration , initiatives related to beyond design basis events (BDBEs) , and (2) provide direction for enhancing capabilities for mitigating BDBEs at DOE sites . BACKGROUND: After the March 2011 Fukushima Daiich i nuclear plant accident in Japan , DOE embarked upon several initiatives to investigate the safety posture of its nuclear facilities relative to BDBEs. These initiatives included issuing Safety Bulletin 2011-01 , Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis, conducting pilots to refine possible

482

CO2 Mitigation Economics for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering & Economic Consultants Engineering & Economic Consultants Website: www.sfapacific.com 444 Castro Street, Suite 720 Mountain View, California 94041 Telephone: (650) 969-8876 Fax: (650) 969-1317 Email: Simbeck@sfapacific.com CO 2 MITIGATION ECONOMICS FOR EXISTING COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS Presented at the U.S. Dept. of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 Washington, DC by Dale R. Simbeck Vice President Technology SFA Pacific, Inc. Mountain View, CA ABSTRACT Electric power generation represents one of the largest sources of CO 2 emissions in North America. A major issue in the analysis of CO 2 mitigation options is the fact that over 45% of total electric power generation in North America is from coal. These existing coal-based power

483

Residual stress profiles for mitigating fretting fatigue in gas turbine engine disks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The driving force for fretting fatigue in engine disks is the contact stresses generated by fretting of the blade and the disk surfaces in the attachment region. This paper examines the use of different residual compressive stress profiles to counteract the undesirable effects of contact stresses and to mitigate fretting fatigue. A global finite-element analysis of the disk blade assembly is first performed. The contact pressure and shear traction at the attachment region are extracted from the FEM results and used to compute the contact stress distribution. The contact stresses are then combined with the residual stresses and the bulk stresses. The overall stress distribution is then utilized in a probabilistic crack growth model to predict the risk of disk failure for a military engine under simulated loading conditions. The results are used to identify the minimum residual stress profile for mitigating fretting fatigue in engine disks.

Kwai S. Chan; Michael P. Enright; Jonathan P. Moody; Patrick J. Golden; Ramesh Chandra; Alan C. Pentz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Carbon Geography: The Political Economy of Congressional Support for Legislation Intended to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Production  

SciTech Connect

Over the last five years, the U.S Congress has voted on several pieces of legislation intended to sharply reduce the nations greenhouse gas emissions. Given that climate change is a world public bad, standard economic logic would predict that the United States would ?free ride? and wait for other nations to reduce their emissions. Within the Congress, there are clear patterns to who votes in favor of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. This paper presents a political economy analysis of the determinants of ?pro-green? votes on such legislation. Conservatives consistently vote against such legislation. Controlling for a Representatives ideology, representatives from richer districts and districts with a lower per-capita carbon dioxide footprint are more likely to vote in favor of climate change mitigation legislation. Representatives from districts where industrial emissions represent a larger share of greenhouse gas emissions are more likely to vote no.

Cragg, Michael; Zhou, Yuyu; Gurney, Kevin R.; Kahn, Matthew

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Renewable Energy Programs Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan NCCOS-CMA-Biogeography Branch National Oceanographic...

486

Division of Fish and Wildlife Programs, 1984-1985 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

The report describes the organization and functions of the Division of Fish and Wildlife, and lists the projects conducted during FY 1985. (ACR)

Kiilsgaard, Chris

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation was given on March 29, 2013, by Kristen Johnson to the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies and addresses BETO's work and sustainability efforts.

488

E-Print Network 3.0 - abu wildlife sanctuary Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FORESTRY SECTOR IN GHANA Ben N. Donkor Summary: wildlife sanctuaries and one strict nature reserve (Figure 1.7). Management plans based on biological... and sociological surveys...

489

A study of wind waves in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway near the Arkansas National Wildlife Refuge.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge has been experiencing extensive erosion along the bank of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. A project was initiated to study the (more)

Hershberger, Darla Anne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

UNDERSTANDING METHANE EMISSIONS SOURCES AND VIABLE MITIGATION MEASURES IN THE NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS: RUSSIAN AND U.S. EXPERIENCE  

SciTech Connect

This article will compare the natural gas transmission systems in the U.S. and Russia and review experience with methane mitigation technologies in the two countries. Russia and the United States (U.S.) are the world's largest consumers and producers of natural gas, and consequently, have some of the largest natural gas infrastructure. This paper compares the natural gas transmission systems in Russia and the U.S., their methane emissions and experiences in implementing methane mitigation technologies. Given the scale of the two systems, many international oil and natural gas companies have expressed interest in better understanding the methane emission volumes and trends as well as the methane mitigation options. This paper compares the two transmission systems and documents experiences in Russia and the U.S. in implementing technologies and programs for methane mitigation. The systems are inherently different. For instance, while the U.S. natural gas transmission system is represented by many companies, which operate pipelines with various characteristics, in Russia predominately one company, Gazprom, operates the gas transmission system. However, companies in both countries found that reducing methane emissions can be feasible and profitable. Examples of technologies in use include replacing wet seals with dry seals, implementing Directed Inspection and Maintenance (DI&M) programs, performing pipeline pump-down, applying composite wrap for non-leaking pipeline defects and installing low-bleed pneumatics. The research methodology for this paper involved a review of information on methane emissions trends and mitigation measures, analytical and statistical data collection; accumulation and analysis of operational data on compressor seals and other emission sources; and analysis of technologies used in both countries to mitigate methane emissions in the transmission sector. Operators of natural gas transmission systems have many options to reduce natural gas losses. Depending on the value of gas, simple, low-cost measures, such as adjusting leaking equipment components, or larger-scale measures, such as installing dry seals on compressors, can be applied.

Ishkov, A.; Akopova, Gretta; Evans, Meredydd; Yulkin, Grigory; Roshchanka, Volha; Waltzer, Suzie; Romanov, K.; Picard, David; Stepanenko, O.; Neretin, D.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program Volume 60 (2013) LAKEWATCH Continues to be a Large Part of Florida Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) Long-Term Fish Monitoring Program in their water bodies. Focusing more on fish and wildlife (biological integrity of fish and wildlife that had set mission statements and they all incorporate

Jawitz, James W.

492

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 10:29am Addthis Energy use in buildings represents the single largest source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the Federal sector. Buildings can contribute to Scope 1 emissions from direct stationary combustion sources; Scope 2 from indirect electricity, heat, or steam purchases; and Scope 3 emissions from transmission and distribution losses. Also see Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation. Step 1: Assess Agency Size Changes Step 2: Evaluate Emissions Profile Step 3: Evaluate Reduction Strategies Step 4: Estimate Implementation Costs Step 5: Prioritize Strategies Helpful Data and Tools See GHG planning data and tools for buildings.

493

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Publication Type Conference Proceedings Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6308E Year of Publication 2013 Authors DeForest, Nicholas, Gonçalo Mendes, Michael Stadler, Wei Feng, Judy Lai, and Chris Marnay Conference Name ECEEE 2013 Summer Study 3-8 June 2013, Belambra Les Criques, France Date Published 06/2013 Conference Location Belambra Les Criques, France Keywords electricity, energy storage, Energy System Planning & Grid Integration, peakdemand mitigation, thermal Abstract In much of the developed world, air-conditioning in buildings is the dominant driver of summer peak electricit