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  1. Watts Bar Operating Cycles Simulated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coming in our next issue of Tech Notes: Fuel Performance Predictions with VERA Watts Bar Operating Cycles Simulated to Present Among the most important accomplishments during CASL...

  2. Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) as a potential source for maintaining the nation`s supply of tritium. The Proposed Action discussed in this environmental assessment is a limited scale confirmatory test that would provide DOE with information needed to assess that option. This document contains the environmental assessment results for the Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis for the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee, and the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington.

  3. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,123","9,738",99.0,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"1,123","9,738",99.0 "Data for 2010" "PWR = Pressurized Light Water

  4. Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek This document discusses the Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek. Topics include: * The area's safety * Any use limitations for the area * History and cleanup background for this area * How DOE's cleanup program addressed the problem PDF icon Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek More Documents & Publications EA-1175: Final Environmental Assessment OREM

  5. Results of sediment and water sampling for inorganic, organic, and radionuclide analysis at recreation areas and water intakes -- Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Lakes. Data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-10-01

    Suspected water quality contamination in Watts Bar Reservoir as a result of activities in past decades at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge facility is of public concern. DOE, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the State of Tennessee, and other agencies and officials have received many inquiries from the public in recent years concerning this suspected pollution, especially how this potential contamination may affect the health and safety of those persons who use beaches in the area for swimming or other water-body-contact sports. As a result of these concerns, TVA conducted a study in May and June 1991 to obtain data on potential contaminants of concern in the water and sediment of Watts Bar Reservoir. TVA collected water and sediment samples at a total of 29 sites, including 18 recreation areas and 11 water intake locations, located throughout Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Reservoirs. The samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds which could pose a threat to human health.

  6. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Randy M; Gross, Ian G; Smith, Cyrus M; Hill, David E

    2011-11-01

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

  7. Recommendation and implementation of special seasonal flow releases to enhance sauger spawning in Watts Bar tailwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeager, B.; Shiao, Ming.

    1992-05-01

    In recent years sauger populations in Chickamauga Reservoir, as well as several other areas in the Tennessee River Valley, have suffered drastic declines in numbers. Based on field creel evaluations the fisherman harvest of sauger in Chickamauga Reservoir has declined from an estimated high of 66,000 fish caught in 1979 to 0 fish in 1989. The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency began an aggressive effort in 1990 and 1991 to recover this population, as well as those of Ft. Loudon and Watts Bar Reservoirs, by stocking large numbers of fingerling sauger. This is however, only a short-term, stopgap measure. The decline in the population of Chickamauga Reservoir appears directly related to dramatically lower discharges from Watts Bar Dam during the recent drought. The primary factor affecting year-class strength (numbers of sauger successfully spawned in a year and reaching catchable size in subsequent years) is the amount of spawning habitat available in the month of April (the spawning season for sauger) at one particular site below Watts Bar Dam. This report documents studies aimed at optimizing sauger spawning in Chickamauga Reservoir.

  8. Remedial investigation/feasibility study report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR) Operable Unit (OU). The LWBR is located in Roane, Rhea, and Meigs counties, Tennessee, and consists of Watts Bar Reservoir downstream of the Clinch river. This area has received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). As required by this law, the ORR and all off-site areas that have received contaminants, including LWBR, must be investigated to determine the risk to human health and the environment resulting from these releases, the need for any remedial action to reduce these risks, and the remedial actions that are most feasible for implementation in this OU. Contaminants from the ORR are primarily transported to the LWBR via the Clinch River. There is little data regarding the quantities of most contaminants potentially released from the ORR to the Clinch River, particularly for the early years of ORR operations. Estimates of the quantities released during this period are available for most radionuclides and some inorganic contaminants, indicating that releases 30 to 50 years ago were much higher than today. Since the early 1970s, the release of potential contaminants has been monitored for compliance with environmental law and reported in the annual environmental monitoring reports for the ORR.

  9. Final Project Report on Arsenic Biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir, Volume 2: Quality Assurance/Quality Control Summary Report for Arsenic Biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    Arsenic contamination was studied in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system downstream from the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Arsenic is of particular interest and concern because (1) it occurs commonly in coal-bearing rock and waste products such as fly ash associated with the burning of coal, (2) it is classified as a Class A carcinogen by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, and (3) disposal of fly ash, both on and off the ORR, may have contaminated surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. The present study differs from previous reports on arsenic concentrations in the CR/WBR system in the use of much more sensitive and precise processing and analytical techniques to measure arsenic species (arsenate, arsenite, and organic arsenic) at levels well below the ecological and human health risk screening criteria. The absolute detection limits using these techniques are approximately 20 to 40 pmol/L, or 0.0015 to 0.003 {micro}g/L. Four main sites were sampled quarterly over a 3-year period (1990 through 1992). Sites investigated included Lower Watts Bar Reservoir near the Watts Bar Dam (Tennessee River kilometer 849.6), the Kingston area (Clinch River kilometer 1.6), Poplar Creek (Poplar Creek kilometer 1.6), and the McCoy Branch Embayment (McCoy Branch kilometer 0.3). Additional sites were investigated in the vicinity of these main stations to determine the distribution of contamination and to identify possible alternative or additional sources of arsenic. Detection limits that were a factor of 20 below the minimum risk screening criteria were achieved for 100% of arsenic speciation data. However, 118 samples for inductively coupled plasma metals analysis were not preserved to analytical specifications, and the analytical holding times for 180 ion chromatography samples were not met. More rigorous preservative testing protocols and more tightly defined analytical statements of work will prevent these problems in the future. Introduction, background, materials and methods, results, discussion, and conclusions are presented in Volume 1. The Quality Assurance/Quality Control Summary Report; the listing of water quality and surface water arsenic speciation data by source and site; and the listing of pore water arsenic speciation and particle-to-water distribution coefficients for As, Fe, and Mn by source, site, and season are presented in Volume 2. The Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program is currently completing the second phase of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation, with the intent of performing a baseline risk assessment on collected data. The data collected for this report will contribute to the baseline risk assessment for the Clinch River. Many of the goals of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation were refined using the results of this study.

  10. Annual radiological environmental monitoring report: Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, 1992. Operations Services/Technical Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report describes the preoperational environmental radiological monitoring program conducted by TVA in the vicinity of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN) in 1992. The program includes the collection of samples from the environment and the determination of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the samples. Samples are taken from stations in the general area of the plant and from areas that will not be influenced by plant operations. Material sampled includes air, water, milk, foods, vegetation, soil, fish, sediment, and direct radiation levels. During plant operations, results from stations near the plant will be compared with concentrations from control stations and with preoperational measurements to determine potential impacts to the public. Exposures calculated from environmental samples were contributed by naturally occurring radioactive materials, from materials commonly found in the environment as a result of atmospheric fallout, or from the operation of other nuclear facilities in the area. Since WBN has not operated, there has been no contribution of radioactivity from the plant to the environment.

  11. Recommendation and implementation of special seasonal flow releases to enhance sauger spawning in Watts Bar tailwater. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeager, B.; Shiao, Ming

    1992-05-01

    In recent years sauger populations in Chickamauga Reservoir, as well as several other areas in the Tennessee River Valley, have suffered drastic declines in numbers. Based on field creel evaluations the fisherman harvest of sauger in Chickamauga Reservoir has declined from an estimated high of 66,000 fish caught in 1979 to 0 fish in 1989. The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency began an aggressive effort in 1990 and 1991 to recover this population, as well as those of Ft. Loudon and Watts Bar Reservoirs, by stocking large numbers of fingerling sauger. This is however, only a short-term, stopgap measure. The decline in the population of Chickamauga Reservoir appears directly related to dramatically lower discharges from Watts Bar Dam during the recent drought. The primary factor affecting year-class strength (numbers of sauger successfully spawned in a year and reaching catchable size in subsequent years) is the amount of spawning habitat available in the month of April (the spawning season for sauger) at one particular site below Watts Bar Dam. This report documents studies aimed at optimizing sauger spawning in Chickamauga Reservoir.

  12. Final project report on arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir: Volume 2, Quality assurance/quality control summary report for arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, K.A.; Ford, C.J.; Byrd, J.T.

    1995-04-01

    Arsenic contamination was studied in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system downstream from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Arsenic is of particular interest and concern because (1) it occurs commonly in coal-bearing rock and waste products such as fly ash associated with the burning of coal, (2) it is classified as a Class A carcinogen by the US Environmental Protection Agency, and (3) disposal of fly ash, both on and off the ORR, may have contaminated surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. The present study dffers from previous reports on arsenic concentrations in the CR/WBR system in the use of much more sensitive and precise processing and analytical techniques to measure arsenic species (arsenate, arsenite, and organic arsenic) at levels well below the ecological and human health risk screening criteria. The absolute detection limits using these techniques are approximately 20 to 40 pmol/L or 0.0015 to 0.003 {mu}g/L.

  13. Final project report on arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir: Volume 1, Main text. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, C.J.; Byrd, J.T.; Grebmeier, J.M.; Harris, R.A.; Moore, R.C.; Madix, S.E.; Newman, K.A.; Rash, C.D.

    1995-04-01

    This document reports on the study of arsenic contamination in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system, downstream from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Arsenic is of particular interest and concern because it occurs commonly in coal-bearing rock and waste products, such as fly ash associated with the burning of coal; it is classified as a Class A carcinogen by the Environmental Protection Agency; and disposal of fly ash, both on and off the ORR, may have contaminated surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. Four main sites were sampled quarterly over a 3-year period. Sites investigated included lower Watts Bar Reservoir near Watts Bar Dam [Tennessee River kilometer (TRK) 849.6], the Kingston area [Clinch River kilometer (CRK) 1.6], Poplar Creek, and the McCoy Branch Embayment. Additional sites were investigated in the vicinity of these main stations to determine the distribution of contamination and to identify possible alternative or additional sources of arsenic.

  14. Transport and accumulation of cesium-137 and mercury in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir system. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Lowry, P.D.; Moriones, C.R.; Ford, C.J.; Dearstone, K.C.; Turner, R.R.; Kimmel, B.L.; Brandt, C.C.

    1992-06-01

    Operations and waste disposal activities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant) on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) have introduced a variety of airborne, liquid, and solid wastes into the surrounding environment. Some of these wastes may affect off-site areas by entering local streams, which ultimately drain into the Clinch and Tennessee river system. Previously reported concentrations of radionuclides, metals and organic compounds in water, sediment, and biota of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir suggest the presence of a variety of contaminants of possible concern to the protection of human health and the environment. The work reported here represents part of the initial scoping phase for the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. In this work, the distribution of {sup 137}Cs is used to identify contaminant accumulation patterns and potential problem, or ``hot-spot,`` areas with regard to environmental hazard or human health. Radiocesium was chosen for this scoping effort because (1) its history of release into the Clinch River is reasonably well documented, (2) it is easy and inexpensive to measure by gamma spectrometry, and (3) it is rapidly sorbed to particulate matter and thus serves as a cost-effective tracer for identifying the transport and accumulation patterns of many other particle-reactive contaminants, such as mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and plutonium (Pu), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

  15. Transport and accumulation of cesium-137 and mercury in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Lowry, P.D.; Moriones, C.R.; Ford, C.J.; Dearstone, K.C.; Turner, R.R.; Kimmel, B.L.; Brandt, C.C.

    1992-06-01

    Operations and waste disposal activities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant) on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) have introduced a variety of airborne, liquid, and solid wastes into the surrounding environment. Some of these wastes may affect off-site areas by entering local streams, which ultimately drain into the Clinch and Tennessee river system. Previously reported concentrations of radionuclides, metals and organic compounds in water, sediment, and biota of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir suggest the presence of a variety of contaminants of possible concern to the protection of human health and the environment. The work reported here represents part of the initial scoping phase for the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. In this work, the distribution of {sup 137}Cs is used to identify contaminant accumulation patterns and potential problem, or hot-spot,'' areas with regard to environmental hazard or human health. Radiocesium was chosen for this scoping effort because (1) its history of release into the Clinch River is reasonably well documented, (2) it is easy and inexpensive to measure by gamma spectrometry, and (3) it is rapidly sorbed to particulate matter and thus serves as a cost-effective tracer for identifying the transport and accumulation patterns of many other particle-reactive contaminants, such as mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and plutonium (Pu), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

  16. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tam, P.S.

    1993-10-01

    Supplement No. 12 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for license to operate Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, located in Rhea County, Tennessee, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation of (1) additional information submitted by the applicant since Supplement No. 11 was issued, and (2) matters that the staff had under review when Supplement No. 11 was issued.

  17. Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy proposed action to conduct a lead test assembly program to confirm the viability of using a commercial...

  18. The Watt Stopper Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Watt Stopper Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: The Watt Stopper Inc Place: Santa Clara, Colorado Zip: 95050 Product: Wattstoper produces stand-alone and networked lighting...

  19. PlotWatt | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: PlotWatt AgencyCompany Organization: PlotWatt Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Softwaremodeling tools User Interface:...

  20. NoWatt | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NoWatt Jump to: navigation, search Name: NoWatt Place: Manchester, England, United Kingdom Zip: M20 6UG Product: Manchester, UK-based provider of energy management solutions and...

  1. AlphaWatt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AlphaWatt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: AlphaWatt Ltd Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: EC1V 4PY Sector: Solar Product: Solar project developer, plans to become an...

  2. SpectraWatt | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SpectraWatt Place: Hillsboro, Oregon Product: Spun off from Intel to manufacture PV cells. References: SpectraWatt1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding...

  3. WattQuiz | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.wattquiz.com Country: United States Web Application Link: www.wattquiz.com Cost: Free Northern America Language: English WattQuiz Screenshot References: Genability1 NYC...

  4. Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! May 17, 2012 - 2:21pm Addthis John Chu John Chu Communications Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy For years, I bought light bulbs based on watts, or energy use. Like many light bulb consumers, I looked for a traditional 40, 60, 75, or 100 watt incandescent bulb. Now that stores today carry more and more energy efficient lighting choices, I wanted to replace my old incandescents with new bulbs to save

  5. Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator Test results for low and high temperature thermoelectric ...

  6. Development of a 500 Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a 500 Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator Development of a 500 Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator A low temperature TEG has been built and tested providing ...

  7. Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest National Lab Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest National Lab Case study ...

  8. GlobalWatt Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: GlobalWatt Inc Place: Dover, Delaware Zip: 19801 Product: Shell company, once planned to float on AIM to raise money in order to acquire the business of...

  9. MegaWatt Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy company that delivers scalable solar power generation systems to the utility market. References: MegaWatt Solar1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  10. Watt Does It Cost To Use It?

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Watt Does It Cost to Use It? Grades: 5-8, 9-12 Topic: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Author: Mark Ziesmer Owner: Alliance to Save Energy This educational material is brought to you by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. WATT DOES IT COST TO USE IT? By Mark Ziesmer, Sultana High School Hesperia Unified School District, California Overview: Familiarize students with how electrical usage is counted, electrical pricing, and measure and evaluate

  11. Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution EPS Billboard) | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy EPS Billboard) Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution EPS Billboard) High-resolution EPS of billboard reading, 'Goodbye Watts. Hello Lumens. The new way to shop for light. Energysaver.gov File DoE_Billboard_Goodbye_Watts.EPS More Documents & Publications Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution JPG

  12. Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution JPG Billboard) | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy JPG Billboard) Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution JPG Billboard) High-resolution JPG of billboard reading, 'Goodbye Watts. Hello Lumens. The new way to shop for light. Energysaver.gov Image icon DoE_Billboard_Goodbye_Watts.jpg More Documents & Publications Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution EPS

  13. Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (Low-Resolution Billboard) | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Low-Resolution Billboard) Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (Low-Resolution Billboard) Low-resolution JPG of billboard reading, 'Goodbye Watts. Hello Lumens. The new way to shop for light. Energysaver.gov Image icon DoE_Billboard_Goodbye_Watts_web.jpg More Documents & Publications Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution JPG Billboard) Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution EPS

  14. Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator Test results for low and high temperature thermoelectric generators (TEG) those for a 530-watt BiTe TEG; design and construction of a 100-watt high temperature TEG currently in fabrication. PDF icon deer08_lagrandeur.pdf More Documents & Publications Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Status of

  15. Development of a 500 Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy a 500 Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator Development of a 500 Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator A low temperature TEG has been built and tested providing over 500 watts electric power at a ∆T of 2000C PDF icon deer09_lagrandeur.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program

  16. Analysis of BaBar data for three meson tau decay modes using the Tauola generator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shekhovtsova, Olga

    2014-11-24

    The hadronic current for the τ⁻ → π⁻π⁺π⁻ντ decay calculated in the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory with an additional modification to include the σ meson is described. In addition, implementation into the Monte Carlo generator Tauola and fitting strategy to get the model parameters using the one-dimensional distributions are discussed. The results of the fit to one-dimensional mass invariant spectrum of the BaBar data are presented.

  17. Analysis of BaBar data for three meson tau decay modes using the Tauola generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shekhovtsova, Olga

    2014-11-24

    The hadronic current for the τ⁻ → π⁻π⁺π⁻ντ decay calculated in the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory with an additional modification to include the σ meson is described. In addition, implementation into the Monte Carlo generator Tauola and fitting strategy to get the model parameters using the one-dimensional distributions are discussed. The results of the fit to one-dimensional mass invariant spectrum of the BaBar data are presented.

  18. Specification for strontium-90 500-watt(e) radioisotopic thermoelectric generator. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammel, T.; Himes, J.; Lieberman, A.; McGrew, J.; Owings, D.; Schumann, F.

    1983-04-01

    A conceptual design for a demonstration 500-watt(e) radioisotopic thermoelectric generator has been created for the Department of Energy. The design effort was divided into two tasks, viz., create a design specification for a capsule strength member that utilizes a standard Strontium-90 fluoride-filled WESF inner liner, and create a conceptual design for a 500-watt(e) RTG. Both tasks have been accomplished. The strength-member specification was designed to survive an external pressure of 24,500 psi and meet the requirements of special-form radioisotope heat sources. Therefore the capsule can, if desired, be licensed for domestic and international transport. The design for the RTG features a radioisotopic heat source, an array of nine capsules in a tungsten biological shield, four current-technology series-connected thermoelectric-conversion modules, low-conductivity thermal insulation, and a passive finned-housing radiator for waste-heat dissipation. The preliminary RTG specification formulated previous to contract award has been met or exceeded. The power source will generate the required power for the required service period at 28 volts dc with a conversion efficiency of 8%, provided the existing in-pool capsules at WESF meet the assumed thermal-inventory requirements.

  19. Kill-a-Watt Contest at UCF | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Kill-a-Watt Contest at UCF Kill-a-Watt Contest at UCF April 2, 2010 - 5:16pm Addthis The University of Central Florida has created an innovative way to save energy and money on campus through a new dorm-based competition called "Kill-a-Watt". Students representing campus residence halls compete against each other to achieve energy savings and can receive up to $200 in scholarships. Watch how former DOE intern and current UCF DOE Campus Ambassador, Chris Castro, is spearheading this

  20. APPLICATION OF STIR BAR SORPTIVE EXTRACTION TO ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE AND SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS OF POTENTIAL CONCERN IN SOLIDS AND AQUEOUS SAMPLES FROM THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FRYE JM; KUNKEL JM

    2009-03-05

    Stir bar sorptive extraction was applied to aqueous and solid samples for the extraction and analysis of organic compounds from the Hanford chemicals of potential concern list, as identified in the vapor data quality objectives. The 222-S Laboratory analyzed these compounds from vapor samples on thermal desorption tubes as part of the Hanford Site industrial hygiene vapor sampling effort.

  1. Sulphur Springs Valley EC - SunWatts Rebate Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The SunWatts Program offers home and business owners incentives for purchasing photovoltaic (PV), wind and solar water heating systems. Systems must be grid-connected to be...

  2. Trico Electric Cooperative- SunWatts Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the SunWatts Program, Trico Electric Cooperative offers residential and business customers a rebate for installing solar water heaters. Rebates equal $0.40 per expected first year of...

  3. EA-1210: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

  4. EA-1210: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

  5. VP 100: Retooling Michigan -- Yachts and Watts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retooling Michigan -- Yachts and Watts VP 100: Retooling Michigan -- Yachts and Watts June 18, 2010 - 4:13pm Addthis Energetx Composites was able to purchase equipment such as this mold for utility-scale wind turbine blades thanks to a Recovery Act grant that matched the company’s $3.5 million investment. | Photo Courtesy of Energetx | Energetx Composites was able to purchase equipment such as this mold for utility-scale wind turbine blades thanks to a Recovery Act grant that matched the

  6. White LED Benchmark of 65 Lumens Per Watt Achieved

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel chip design and the balance of multiple interrelated design parameters have enabled Cree, Inc.'s Santa Barbara Technology Center to demonstrate white LEDs with efficacies greater than 65 lumens per watt at 350 mA. The results are particularly significant because they were achieved with a pre-production prototype chip using the same package used in Cree's commercially available XLamp® 7090 high power LED, rather than a laboratory device.

  7. Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest National Lab

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Rock the Watt was a direct applica- tion of the Framework for Organiza- tional Change that included building sustainability champions, integration of a sustainability checklist, and sup- port for employees to come up with their own energy saving actions. Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest National Lab Pacifc Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), one of the seventeen Department of Energy laboratories, implemented the 3-month Rock the Watt campaign in FY2015 to

  8. Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest National Lab

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study describes Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's three-month Rock the Watt campaign to reduce energy use at its main campus in Richland, Washington.

  9. Further testing and development of an 11-watt Stirling converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, B.A.; Montgomery, W.L.

    1995-12-31

    Three previous IECEC papers describe the development of an 11-watt Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) intended for remote power applications. This paper describes more recent testing and development activities. Testing of the engineering model (EM) was performed to determine the effect of heat rejection temperature, thermal input and initial charge pressure on thermal efficiency. Shock testing of the generator included a drop test and 3 hours of testing in a random vibration environment where g{sup 2}/Hz = 0.04. Endurance testing of a complete Stirling converter continues, with over 15,000 maintenance-free operating hours. Endurance testing of critical subsystems and components has achieved 14,000 to 26,000 hours of operation without failure. Minor changes to the RSG prototype design, based on the development of the EM, are described.

  10. Small stirling dynamic isotope power systems for multihundred-watt robotic missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bents, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Free piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) and linear alternator (LA) technology is combined with radioisotope heat sources to produce a compact dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) suitable for multihundred watt space application which appears competitive with advanced radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). The small Stirling DIPS is scalable to multihundred watt power levels or lower. The FPSE/LA is a high efficiency convertor in sizes ranging from tens of kilowatts down to only a few watts. At multihundred watt unit size, the FPSE can be directly integrated with the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) via radiative coupling; the resulting dynamic isotope power system has a size and weight that compares favorably with the advanced modular (Mod) RTG, but requires less than a third the amount of isotope fuel. Thus the FPSE extends the high efficiency advantage of dynamic systems into a power range never previously considered competitive for DIPS. This results in lower fuel cost and reduced radiological hazard per delivered electrical watt.

  11. Bar coded retroreflective target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S. (Fremont, CA)

    2000-01-01

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  12. Third generation development of an 11-watt Stirling converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, W.L.; Ross, B.A.; Penswick, L.B.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes recent design enhancements, performance results, and development of an artificial neural network (ANN) model related to the Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG), an 11-watt converter designed for remote power applications. Design enhancements include minor changes to improve performance, increase reliability, facilitate fabrication and assembly for limited production, and reduce mass. Innovative modifications were effected to increase performance and improve reliability of the vacuum foil insulation (VFI) package and linear alternator. High and low operating temperature acceptance testing of the Engineering Model (EM) demonstrated the robust system characteristics. These tests were conducted for 1 week of operation each, with rejector temperatures of 95 C and 20 C, respectively. Endurance testing continues for a complete Stirling converter, the Development Model (DM), with over 25,000 hours of maintenance-free operation. Endurance testing of flexures has attained over 540 flexure-years and endurance testing of linear motors/alternators has achieved nearly 27,000 hours of operation without failure. An ANN model was developed and tested successfully on the DM. Rejection temperatures were varied between 3 C and 75 C while load voltages ranged between engine stall and displacer overstroke. The trained ANN model, based solely on externally measured parameters, predicted values of piston amplitude, displacer amplitude, and piston-displacer phase angle within {+-}2% of the measured values over the entire operating regime. The ANN model demonstrated its effectiveness in the long-term evaluation of free-piston Stirling machines without adding the complexity, reduced reliability, and increased cost of sophisticated diagnostic instrumentation.

  13. Is the hourly data I get from NREL's PV Watts program adjusted...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Is the hourly data I get from NREL's PV Watts program adjusted for daylight savings time. Home I take the hourly AC output numbers and apply them to a program I built that assigns...

  14. Watt-Sun: A Multi-Scale, Multi-Model, Machine-Learning Solar Forecasting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology | Department of Energy Watt-Sun: A Multi-Scale, Multi-Model, Machine-Learning Solar Forecasting Technology Watt-Sun: A Multi-Scale, Multi-Model, Machine-Learning Solar Forecasting Technology IBM logo.png As part of this project, new solar forecasting technology will be developed that leverages big data processing, deep machine learning, and cloud modeling integrated in a universal platform with an open architecture. Similar to the Watson computer system, this proposed technology

  15. AVTA: GE Energy WattStation AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Energy WattStation AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: GE Energy WattStation AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The

  16. TRUPACT-I Unit 0 test data analysis. [Puncture bar impacts; free fall of package 12 inches onto unyielding surface; 30-foot free fall drop onto unyielding target; 40-inch drops onto 6-inch diagmeter puncture bar; engulfment in jet fuel fire for 35 minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romesberg, L.E.; Hudson, M.L.; Osborne, D.M.

    1985-09-01

    TRUPACT-I was tested to evaluate the response of the design to the normal and hypothetical accident conditions specified in applicable regulations. The governing regulations are contained in DOE Order No. 5480.1, Chapter 3 and 10 CFR, Part 71, Refs. 1 and 2. Tests were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, and at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM. Normal condition tests included three 13-pound (1.25 in. diameter) puncture bar impacts onto the exterior surface and free fall of the package 12 inches onto an essentially unyielding surface. Hypothetical accident conditions included in the test sequence were two 30-foot free fall drops of the package onto an essentially unyielding target, four 40-inch drops onto a 6-inch-diameter puncture bar, and engulfment in a JP-4 jet fuel fire for 35 minutes. Instrumentation data traces will be published in Ref. 3 and are not reproduced herein. This report presents an analysis of the available data and an interpretation of the results. The results of the tests are compared to results from numerical analyses and scale model tests which are incorporated in the TRUPACT-I SARP, Ref. 4. 9 refs., 43 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Triple bar, high efficiency mechanical sealer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pak, Donald J.; Hawkins, Samantha A.; Young, John E.

    2013-03-19

    A clamp with a bottom clamp bar that has a planar upper surface is provided. The clamp may also include a top clamp bar connected to the bottom clamp bar, and a pressure distribution bar between the top clamp bar and the bottom clamp bar. The pressure distribution bar may have a planar lower surface in facing relation to the upper surface of the bottom clamp bar. An object is capable of being disposed in a clamping region between the upper surface and the lower surface. The width of the planar lower surface may be less than the width of the upper surface within the clamping region. Also, the pressure distribution bar may be capable of being urged away from the top clamp bar and towards the bottom clamp bar.

  18. BAR FORMATION FROM GALAXY FLYBYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, Meagan; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Sinha, Manodeep E-mail: k.holley@vanderbilt.edu

    2014-08-01

    Recently, both simulations and observations have revealed that flybysfast, one-time interactions between two galaxy halosare surprisingly common, nearing/comparable to galaxy mergers. Since these are rapid, transient events with the closest approach well outside the galaxy disk, it is unclear if flybys can transform the galaxy in a lasting way. We conduct collisionless N-body simulations of three coplanar flyby interactions between pure-disk galaxies to take a first look at the effects flybys have on disk structure, with particular focus on stellar bar formation. We find that some flybys are capable of inciting a bar with bars forming in both galaxies during our 1:1 interaction and in the secondary during our 10:1 interaction. The bars formed have ellipticities ? 0.5, sizes on the order of the host disk's scale length, and persist to the end of our simulations, ?5Gyr after pericenter. The ability of flybys to incite bar formation implies that many processes associated with secular bar evolution may be more closely tied with interactions than previously thought.

  19. Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest National Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2016-01-01

    Case study describes Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) three-month Rock the Watt campaign to reduce energy use at its main campus in Richland, Washington. The campaign objectives were to educate PNNL employees about energy conservation opportunities in their workplace and to motivate them to help PNNL save energy and costs and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  20. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monorchio, Diego; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.

    2011-09-13

    The authors will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be payed in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment where to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  1. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baracchini, Elisabetta; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2011-11-10

    We will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)}{nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be paid in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  2. Investigating Aeroelastic Performance of Multi-Mega Watt Wind Turbine Rotors Using CFD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating Aeroelastic Performance of Multi-MegaWatt Wind Turbine Rotors Using CFD David A. Corson 1 Altair Engineering, Inc., Clifton Park, NY, 12065 D. Todd Griffith 2 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 Tom Ashwill 3 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 Farzin Shakib 4 Altair Engineering, Inc., Mountain View, CA, 94043 Recent trends in wind power technology are focusing on increasing power output through an increase in rotor diameter. As the rotor diameter

  3. Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Baker's Bar M...

  4. Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Robinson Bar...

  5. West African Clean Energy Gateway-Software Analysis Tools | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power 1.0 Energy Efficiency Petroleum Reduction Planning Tool Biomass Energy Efficiency Hydrogen Fuels & Efficiency Transportation PlotWatt Energy Efficiency Policy Analysis...

  6. Lumen Maintenance Testing of the Philips 60-Watt Replacement Lamp L Prize Entry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Hafen, Ryan P.; Hathaway, John E.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes testing conducted to evaluate the Philips' L Prize award winning 60-watt LED replacement product's ability to meet the lifetime/lumen maintenance requirement of the competition, which was: "having 70 percent of the lumen value under subparagraph (A) [producing a luminous flux greater than 900 lumens] exceeding 25,000 hours under typical conditions expected in residential use." A custom test apparatus was designed and constructed for this testing and a statistical approach was developed for use in evaluating the test results. This will be the only publicly available, third-party data set of long-term LED product operation.

  7. Study of CP Symmetry Violation in the Charmonium-K*(892) Channel By a Complete Time Dependent Angular Analysis (BaBar Experiment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T'Jampens, Stephane; /Orsay

    2006-09-18

    This thesis presents the full-angular time-dependent analysis of the vector-vector channel B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0})*{sup 0}. After a review of the CP violation in the B meson system, the phenomenology of the charmonium-K*(892) channels is exposed. The method for the measurement of the transversity amplitudes of the B {yields} J/{psi}K*(892), based on a pseudo-likelihood method, is then exposed. The results from a 81.9 fb{sup -1} of collected data by the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance peak are |A{sub 0}|{sup 2} = 0.565 {+-} 0.011 {+-} 0.004, |A{sub {parallel}}|{sup 2} = 0.206 {+-} 0.016 {+-} 0.007, |A{sub {perpendicular}}|{sup 2} = 0.228 {+-} 0.016 {+-} 0.007, {delta}{sub {parallel}} = -2.766 {+-} 0.105 {+-} 0.040 and {delta}{sub {perpendicular}} = 2.935 {+-} 0.067 {+-} 0.040. Note that ({delta}{sub {parallel}}, {delta}{sub {perpendicular}}) {yields} (-{delta}{sub {parallel}}, {pi} - {delta}{sub {perpendicular}}) is also a solution. The strong phases {delta}{sub {parallel}} and {delta}{sub {perpendicular}} are at {approx}> 3{sigma} from {+-}{pi}, signing the presence of final state interactions and the breakdown of the factorization hypothesis. The forward-backward analysis of the K{pi} mass spectrum revealed the presence of a coherent S-wave interfering with the K*(892). It is the first evidence of this wave in the K{pi} system coming from a B meson. The particularity of the B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0})*{sup 0} channel is to have a time-dependent but also an angular distribution which allows to measure sin 2{beta} but also cos2{beta}. The results from an unbinned maximum likelihood fit are sin 2{beta} = -0.10 {+-} 0.57 {+-} 0.14 and cos 2{beta} = 3.32{sub -0.96}{sup +0.76} {+-} 0.27 with the transversity amplitudes fixed to the values given above. The other solution for the strong phases flips the sign of cos 2{beta}. Theoretical considerations based on the s-quark helicity conservation favor the choice of the strong phases given above, leading to a positive sign for cos 2{beta}. The sign of cos 2{beta} is the one predicted by the Standard Model.

  8. DOE Publishes Final Rule for the Request for Exclusion of 100 Watt R20 Short Incandescent Reflector Lamps from Energy Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy has published a final rule regarding the request for exclusion of 100 Watt R20 short incandescent reflector lamps from energy conservation standards.

  9. Webinar: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projection | Department of Energy Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection Webinar: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection January 26, 2016 12:00PM to 1:00PM EST The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Tuesday, January 26, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. Strategic Analysis will present results of its cost analysis

  10. Cam-controlled boring bar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glatthorn, Raymond H. (St. Petersburg, FL)

    1986-01-01

    A cam-controlled boring bar system (100) includes a first housing (152) which is rotatable about its longitudinal axis (154), and a second housing in the form of a cam-controlled slide (158) which is also rotatable about the axis (154) as well as being translatable therealong. A tool-holder (180) is mounted within the slide (158) for holding a single point cutting tool. Slide (158) has a rectangular configuration and is disposed within a rectangularly configured portion of the first housing (152). Arcuate cam slots (192) are defined within a side plate (172) of the housing (152), while cam followers (194) are mounted upon the cam slide (158) for cooperative engagement with the cam slots (192). In this manner, as the housing (152) and slide (158) rotate, and as the slide (158) also translates, a through-bore (14) having an hourglass configuration will be formed within a workpiece (16) which may be, for example, a nuclear reactor steam generator tube support plate.

  11. A newly developed Kolsky tension bar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin; Korellis, John S.

    2010-03-01

    Investigation of damage and failure of materials under impact loading relies on reliable dynamic tensile experiments. A precise Kolsky tension bar is highly desirable. Based on the template of the Kolsky compression bar that we recently developed and presented at 2009 SEM conference, a new Kolsky tension bar apparatus was completed at Sandia National Laboratories, California. It is secured to the same optical table. Linear bearings with interior Frelon coating were employed to support the whole tension bar system including the bars and gun barrel. The same laser based alignment system was used to efficiently facilitate highly precise alignment of the bar system. However, the gun part was completely re-designed. One end of the gun barrel, as a part of loading device, was directly jointed to the bar system. A solid cylindrical striker is launched inside the gun barrel and then impacts on a flange attached to the other end of the gun barrel to facilitate a sudden tensile loading on the whole system. This design improves the quality of impact to easily produce a perfect stress wave and is convenient to utilize pulse shaping technique. A calibration and dynamic characterization of an aluminum specimen are presented.

  12. Addendum to the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This document is an addendum to the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (DOE 1993). The Department of Energy--Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) is proposing this addendum to the US Envianmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA-IV), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) as a reduced sampling program on the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir and on Poplar Creek. DOE-ORO is proposing to maximize the use of existing data and minimize the collection of new data for water, sediment, and biota during Phase 2 of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation. The existing data along with the additional data collected in Phase 2 would be used to perform a baseline risk assessment and make remedial decisions. DOE-ORO considers that the existing data, the additional data collected in Phase 2, and on-site remedial investigation data would be sufficient to understand the nature and extent of the contamination problem in the Clinch River, perform a baseline risk assessment,and make remedial decisions. This addendum is organized in three sections. The first section provides background information and describes a rationale for modifying the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan. Section 2 presents a summary of the existing data for the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir and an evaluation of the sufficiency of this data for a baseline human health and ecological risk assessment. Section 3 describes the revised Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan for surface water, sediment, and biota in the Clinch River OU and in the Poplar Creek OU.

  13. Chiral coupling constants {ital {bar l}}{sub 1} and {ital {bar l}}{sub 2} from {pi}{pi}phase shifts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ananthanarayan, B.; Buettiker, P.

    1996-07-01

    A Roy equation analysis of the available {pi}{pi} phase shift data is performed with the {ital I}=0 {ital S}-wave scattering length {ital a}{sup 0}{sub 0} in the range predicted by the one-loop standard chiral perturbation theory. A suitable dispersive framework is developed to extract the chiral coupling constants {bar {ital l}}{sub 1}, {bar {ital l}}{sub 2} and yields {bar {ital l}}{sub 1}={minus}1.70{plus_minus}0.15 and {bar {ital l}}{sub 2}{approx_equal}5.0. We remark on the implications of this determination to (combinations of) threshold parameter predictions of the three lowest partial waves. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. American Bar Association Section on Environment | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bar Association Section on Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Bar Association Section on Environment Place: Chicago, Illinois Zip: 60610 Product: The Section of...

  15. ${{\\bar{d}} - {\\bar{u}}}$ Flavor Asymmetry in the Proton in Chiral Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salamu, Y.; Ji, Cheung-Ryong; Melnitchouk, Wally; Wang, P.

    2015-09-01

    The ${\\bar d - \\bar u}$ flavor asymmetry in the proton arising from pion loops is computed using chiral effective field theory. The calculation includes both nucleon and ? intermediate states, and uses both the fully relativistic and heavy baryon frameworks. The x dependence of ${\\bar d - \\bar u}$ extracted from the Fermilab E866 DrellYan data can be well reproduced in terms of a single transverse momentum cutoff parameter regulating the ultraviolet behavior of the loop integrals. In addition to the distribution at x > 0, corrections to the integrated asymmetry from zero momentum contributions are computed, which arise from pion rainbow and bubble diagrams at x = 0. These have not been accounted for in previous analyses, and can make important contributions to the lowest moment of ${\\bar d-\\bar u}$ .

  16. Results of Performance Tests Performed on the John Watts Casing Connection on 7" Pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Watts

    1999-08-01

    Stress Engineering Services (SES) was contracted by Mr. John Watts to test his threaded connection developed for oilfield oil and gas service. This particular test required the application of a variety of loads including axial tension and compression, internal pressure (gas), external pressure (water), bending and both low and elevated temperature. These loads were used to determine the sealing and structural limits of the connection. The connection design tested had tapered threads with 10 threads per inch. A square thread form and a round thread form were tested. The square thread form had a 2{sup o} load flank and 15{sup o} stab flank. The round thread had a 0{sup o} load flank and 20{sup o} stab flank. Most of the testing was performed on the round thread form. Both a coupled connection design and an integral connection design were tested. The coupling was a pin by pin (male) thread, with the pipe having a box (female) thread. Both designs have outside and inside diameters that are flush with the pipe body. Both designs also contain a small external shoulder. The test procedure selected for this evaluation was the newly written ISO 13679 procedure for full scale testing of casing and tubing connections. The ISO procedure requires a variety of tests that includes makeup/breakout testing, internal gas sealability/external water sealability testing with axial tension, axial compression, bending, internal gas thermal cycle tests and limit load (failure) tests. This test was performed with four coupled samples and included most of these loads. Two integral samples were also included for limit load testing ISO makeup/breakout tests are divided into three types--initial makeup, IML1, repeated makeup within the same sample, MBL, and repeated makeup using several samples called round robin, RR. IMU and MBL were performed in this project. The ISO sealing and structural procedure is divided into four primary tests and identified as Series A, B, C and Limit Load (failure). Series A and B test to 95% actual yield of the pipe and Series C uses 90% of actual yield. Samples 1 and 3 were tested to Series A and the loads are shown in Figure 1. For these samples, the axial compression was limited to 75% pipe body yield, which was set by Mr. Watts at the beginning of the test. Samples 2 and 4 were tested to Series B with loads shown in Figure 2. This series included 20 degrees per 100 feet bending but no external pressure. Due to premature leaks, no samples were subjected to Series C which included mechanical and thermal cycles. Samples 5 and 6 were tested to failure. The project started with the selection and purchase of a popular size of oilfield pipe, which was 7-inch OD, 32 pound per foot, P-110 casing. While the connections were being threaded, material tensile tests were performed to get the actual strength of the 7-inch pipe. The first samples contained a square thread form. Excessive galling was experienced during the first series of makeup/breakout tests and Mr. Watts decided to change the thread form and remachine the samples. The second samples had a round thread form and performed very well in the makeup/breakout tests. Basically no galling occurred of any consequence. Samples 1 and 3 were to be tested with external water (ISO Series A) while samples 2 and 4 were to be tested with bending (ISO Series B, no external pressure). Testing of all four samples started with tension and internal gas pressure. During this initial pressure testing, samples 1, 3 and 4 developed leaks and the test was stopped before any external pressure or bending was applied. Sample 2 successfully tested to ISO Load Point 5 which included bending before developing a leak. Figure 3 shows the loads at which the samples leaked and the relative pipe body performance capability. Sample 1 and end A of sample 2 held a high pressure while samples 3, 4 and end B of sample 2 leaked at relatively low pressures. All of these leaks were with nitrogen gas pressure. After reviewing the results, it was believed that several conditions may have contributed to the prema

  17. Evidence for B+ -> K*0bar K*+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-06-19

    We present measurements of the branching fraction and fraction of longitudinal polarization for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K*{sup +} with a sample of 467 {+-} 5 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We obtain the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K*{sup +}) = (1.2 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup ?6} with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. We measure the fraction of longitudinal polarization f{sub L} = 0.75{sub -0.26}{sup +0.16} {+-} 0.03. The first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic.

  18. Star formation properties in barred galaxies. III. Statistical study of bar-driven secular evolution using a sample of nearby barred spirals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Zhi-Min; Wu, Hong; Cao, Chen E-mail: hwu@bao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    Stellar bars are important internal drivers of secular evolution in disk galaxies. Using a sample of nearby spiral galaxies with weak and strong bars, we explore the relationships between the star formation feature and stellar bars in galaxies. We find that galaxies with weak bars tend coincide with low concentrical star formation activity, while those with strong bars show a large scatter in the distribution of star formation activity. We find enhanced star formation activity in bulges toward stronger bars, although not predominantly, consistent with previous studies. Our results suggest that different stages of the secular process and many other factors may contribute to the complexity of the secular evolution. In addition, barred galaxies with intense star formation in bars tend to have active star formation in their bulges and disks, and bulges have higher star formation densities than bars and disks, indicating the evolutionary effects of bars. We then derived a possible criterion to quantify the different stages of the bar-driven physical process, while future work is needed because of the uncertainties.

  19. Webinar February 25: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Thursday, February 25, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST). Strategic Analysis will present results of its cost analysis of onboard compressed hydrogen storage systems.

  20. Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Tuesday, January 26, from 12 to 1 p.m. EST. Strategic Analysis will present results of its cost analysis of onboard compressed hydrogen storage systems.

  1. Strength of hydrostation trash rack bars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsvetkov, A.P.

    1985-07-01

    Trash racks are one of the important parts of the mechanical equipment of hydroelectric stations since their breakage causes shutdown of the turbines until they are repaired. Therefore, the provision of trouble-free operation of racks is of importance. The author states that the most vulnerable part of the rack structure is the bars, which can be damaged both from the static load as a result of clogging and from the stresses occurring during vibration of the bars under the effect of the water passing through them. Used for explaining the processes in the case reported here is the Milovich theory, which does not however touch on all the causes and conditions of increase of oscillation amplitude as it is observed in the laboratory.

  2. Multipole Field Effects for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Delayen, Jean Roger [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity is currently being considered as one of the design options in rf separation for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for the crabbing cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade. Knowledge of multipole field effects is important for accurate beam dynamics study of rf structures. The multipole components can be accurately determined numerically using the electromagnetic surface field data in the rf structure. This paper discusses the detailed analysis of those components for the fundamental deflecting/crabbing mode and higher order modes in the parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity.

  3. DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington, DC - The Office of General Counsel was recently asked whether the Sudan Accountability and Divestment Act of 2007 barred the Department from considering a loan ...

  4. Diamond Bar, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Diamond Bar, California US South Coast Air Quality Management District SCAQMD References US Census Bureau Incorporated place...

  5. L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site This fact sheet provides information about the L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. Location of the L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site Site Description and History The L-Bar disposal site is in Cibola County approximately 47 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and 10 miles north of Laguna Pueblo. The disposal

  6. MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bar Field Bend < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zo...

  7. Bus bar electrical feedthrough for electrorefiner system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Mark; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2013-12-03

    A bus bar electrical feedthrough for an electrorefiner system may include a retaining plate, electrical isolator, and/or contact block. The retaining plate may include a central opening. The electrical isolator may include a top portion, a base portion, and a slot extending through the top and base portions. The top portion of the electrical isolator may be configured to extend through the central opening of the retaining plate. The contact block may include an upper section, a lower section, and a ridge separating the upper and lower sections. The upper section of the contact block may be configured to extend through the slot of the electrical isolator and the central opening of the retaining plate. Accordingly, relatively high electrical currents may be transferred into a glovebox or hot-cell facility at a relatively low cost and higher amperage capacity without sacrificing atmosphere integrity.

  8. Unitarity Triangle Angle Measurements at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latham, Thomas E.; /SLAC

    2005-06-30

    We present recent results of measurements of the Unitarity Triangle angles alpha, beta and gamma made with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory. We present recent results of measurements of the Unitarity Triangle angles alpha, beta and gamma made with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory.

  9. I=1/2 and 3/2 K pi scattering in a qqq-bar q-bar potential model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan Isgur; J. Weinstein

    1991-01-01

    We present the results of a study of I=1/2 and 3/2 K pi scattering based on our earlier analysis of the I=0, 1, and 2 pseudoscalar-pseudoscalar systems. While the latter systems formed KK-bar molecules in both I=0 and 1, here, with the same parameters, we find that neither K pi , K eta , nor K eta ' form bound states. Both I=1/2 and 3/2 phase-shift predictions are found to agree with experimental data. A shift in the mass and width of the ''bare'' qq-bar state K*{sub 0}is induced by the coupled-channel interactions, which also provide a physical source for the low-energy ''background'' phase shift normally introduced in analyses of K pi data.

  10. A New Stochastic Modeling of 3-D Mud Drapes Inside Point Bar Sands in Meandering River Deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Yanshu

    2013-12-15

    The environment of major sediments of eastern China oilfields is a meandering river where mud drapes inside point bar sand occur and are recognized as important factors for underground fluid flow and distribution of the remaining oil. The present detailed architectural analysis, and the related mud drapes' modeling inside a point bar, is practical work to enhance oil recovery. This paper illustrates a new stochastic modeling of mud drapes inside point bars. The method is a hierarchical strategy and composed of three nested steps. Firstly, the model of meandering channel bodies is established using the Fluvsim method. Each channel centerline obtained from the Fluvsim is preserved for the next simulation. Secondly, the curvature ratios of each meandering river at various positions are calculated to determine the occurrence of each point bar. The abandoned channel is used to characterize the geometry of each defined point bar. Finally, mud drapes inside each point bar are predicted through random sampling of various parameters, such as number, horizontal intervals, dip angle, and extended distance of mud drapes. A dataset, collected from a reservoir in the Shengli oilfield of China, was used to illustrate the mud drapes' building procedure proposed in this paper. The results show that the inner architectural elements of the meandering river are depicted fairly well in the model. More importantly, the high prediction precision from the cross validation of five drilled wells shows the practical value and significance of the proposed method.

  11. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, James B.

    1984-01-01

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengageable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls (10, 12) are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit (14) and a rigid member (16, 18, 20, 22, 24). One gage ball (10) is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly (34) which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball (12) is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly (38) which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball (12) is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball (10). As the moving ball (12) executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls (10, 12) caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly (50, 52, 54, 56, 58, 60) actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit (14). Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball (10) locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  12. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, J.B.

    1984-03-13

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengageable servo drives which cannot be clutched out is disclosed. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine. 3 figs.

  13. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, J.B.

    1982-03-15

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengagable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  14. The Road to the Higgs in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Facini, Gabriel; /Northeastern U.

    2011-04-01

    Presented is a series of analyses which are central to the search for a low-mass Higgs boson. A search for ZZ production in the ZZ {yields} {ell}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} channel is introduced then the successful combination of this analysis with with the ZZ {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{ell}'{sup +}{ell}'{sup -} search to produce the first observation of the ZZ process at a hadron collider is then detailed. The final analysis presented is the search for the Higgs in the ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} channel and the interpretation as a ZZ {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} search in order to validate the techniques. Common themes are discussed, such as multivariate techniques and instrumental backgrounds from energy measurement fluctuations and the tools used to combat them. The formalism of the statistical analysis of the final selected sample is introduced generally and demonstrated in the context of the above mentioned searches. The optimization of the selection through the identification of poorly reconstructed leptons is included as well as the utilization of b-quark identifying tools. Some space is given to jet reconstruction/identification and the Level 1 Calorimeter Trigger. The efficient identification and calibration of jets is central to many physics analysis especially in the low mass higgs search. Another key component of the ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} search is the proficient identification of jets and an imbalance of transverse energy in the first level of the triggering system. Therefore, the Level 1 Calorimeter Trigger, designed to achieve this, is a necessary component for a sensitive ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} search.

  15. Numerical Simulations of the Kolsky Compression Bar Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corona, Edmundo

    2015-10-01

    The Kolsky compression bar, or split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB), is an ex- perimental apparatus used to obtain the stress-strain response of material specimens at strain rates in the order of 10 2 to 10 4 1/s. Its operation and associated data re- duction are based on principles of one-dimensional wave propagation in rods. Second order effects such as indentation of the bars by the specimen and wave dispersion in the bars, however, can significantly affect aspects of the measured material response. Finite element models of the experimental apparatus were used here to demonstrate these two effects. A procedure proposed by Safa and Gary (2010) to account for bar indentation was also evaluated and shown to improve the estimation of the strain in the bars significantly. The use of pulse shapers was also shown to alleviate the effects of wave dispersion. Combining the two can lead to more reliable results in Kolsky compression bar testing.

  16. Charm Mixing, CP Violation and Rare D**0 Decays at BaBar (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Charm Mixing, CP Violation and Rare D**0 Decays at BaBar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Charm Mixing, CP Violation and Rare D**0 Decays at BaBar Dsup 0-bar Dsup 0...

  17. W/Z + jets production at the tevatron {bar p}p collider (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: WZ + jets production at the tevatron bar pp collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: WZ + jets production at the tevatron bar pp collider You are...

  18. J Bar L Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name J Bar L Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility J Bar L Guest...

  19. Exotic/charmonium Hadron Spectroscopy at Belle and BaBar (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Exoticcharmonium Hadron Spectroscopy at Belle and BaBar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exoticcharmonium Hadron Spectroscopy at Belle and BaBar You are...

  20. Webinar: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Tuesday, January 26, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. ...

  1. Quarkonium Spectroscopy and New States from BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, L.; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2007-06-08

    We review results on charmonium and bottomonium spectroscopy by the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. More space is reserved to the new results like the observation of hadronic non-B{bar B} {Upsilon}(4S) decays and the investigation on the production and decay properties of the recently discovered charmonium-like states X(3872) and Y (4260). These results are preliminary, unless otherwise specified.

  2. Raising the Bar for Quality PV Modules | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Raising the Bar for Quality PV Modules Raising the Bar for Quality PV Modules October 30, 2014 - 4:58pm Addthis As photovoltaics (PV) markets expand across the United States the manufacture of safe, reliable, and high-quality PV modules is critical to achieve cost competitive solar energy. Since the development and codification of testing standards for PV modules requires a lengthy multiyear process, Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative and National Renewable Energy Laboratory worked

  3. Sustainability at Home: Raising the Bar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at Home: Raising the Bar Sustainability at Home: Raising the Bar August 11, 2015 - 4:50pm Addthis Make sure that you hire accredited and certified workers for your home energy projects. <em>Photo courtesy of NREL 6307614</em> Make sure that you hire accredited and certified workers for your home energy projects. Photo courtesy of NREL 6307614 Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office When I say "sustainability at

  4. Raising the Bar within the Weatherization and Home Performance Industry |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Raising the Bar within the Weatherization and Home Performance Industry Raising the Bar within the Weatherization and Home Performance Industry Addthis Description The Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) was created in 1976 to assist low-income families who lacked resources to invest in energy efficiency. This video not only shines a light of the existing success of the WAP, but it also takes a look at its recent evolution through the Guidelines for Home Energy

  5. Watts111.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  6. New experimental techniques with the split Hopkinson pressure bar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantz, C.E.; Follansbee, P.S.; Wright, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    The split Hopkinson pressure bar or Kolsky bar has provided for many years a technique for performing compression tests at strain rates approaching 10/sup 4/ s/sup -1/. At these strain rates, the small dimensions possible in a compression test specimen give an advantage over a dynamic tensile test by allowing the stress within the specimen to equilibrate within the shortest possible time. The maximum strain rates possible with this technique are limited by stress wave propagation in the elastic pressure bars as well as in the deforming specimen. This subject is reviewed in this paper, and it is emphasized that a slowly rising excitation is preferred to one that rises steeply. Experimental techniques for pulse shaping and a numerical procedure for correcting the raw data for wave dispersion in the pressure bars are presented. For tests at elevated temperature a bar mover apparatus has been developed which effectively brings the cold pressure bars into contact with the specimen, which is heated with a specially designed furnace, shortly before the pressure wave arrives. This procedure has been used successfully in tests at temperatures as high as 1000/sup 0/C.

  7. THE MASS PROFILE AND SHAPE OF BARS IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G): SEARCH FOR AN AGE INDICATOR FOR BARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Taehyun; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Sheth, Kartik; Muoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Zaritsky, Dennis; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Holwerda, Benne; Ho, Luis C.; Comern, Sbastien; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Knapen, Johan H.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Hinz, Joannah L.; Buta, Ronald J.; Kim, Minjin; Madore, Barry F.; and others

    2015-01-20

    We have measured the radial light profiles and global shapes of bars using two-dimensional 3.6 ?m image decompositions for 144 face-on barred galaxies from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. The bar surface brightness profile is correlated with the stellar mass and bulge-to-total (B/T) ratio of their host galaxies. Bars in massive and bulge-dominated galaxies (B/T> 0.2) show a flat profile, while bars in less massive, disk-dominated galaxies (B/T? 0) show an exponential, disk-like profile with a wider spread in the radial profile than in the bulge-dominated galaxies. The global two-dimensional shapes of bars, however, are rectangular/boxy, independent of the bulge or disk properties. We speculate that because bars are formed out of disks, bars initially have an exponential (disk-like) profile that evolves over time, trapping more disk stars to boxy bar orbits. This leads bars to become stronger and have flatter profiles. The narrow spread of bar radial profiles in more massive disks suggests that these bars formed earlier (z > 1), while the disk-like profiles and a larger spread in the radial profile in less massive systems imply a later and more gradual evolution, consistent with the cosmological evolution of bars inferred from observational studies. Therefore, we expect that the flatness of the bar profile can be used as a dynamical age indicator of the bar to measure the time elapsed since the bar formation. We argue that cosmic gas accretion is required to explain our results on bar profile and the presence of gas within the bar region.

  8. Measurement of the $t\\bar{t}$ production cross section using dilepton events in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector. We consider final states with at least two jets and two leptons (ee, e{mu}, {mu}{mu}), and events with one jet for the the e{mu} final state as well. The measured cross section is {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.36{sub -0.79}{sup +0.90} (stat + syst) pb. This result combined with the cross section measurement in the lepton + jets final state yields {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.56{sub -0.56}{sup +0.63}(stat + syst) pb, which agrees with the standard model expectation. The relative precision of 8% of this measurement is comparable to the latest theoretical calculations.

  9. STAR FORMATION IN NUCLEAR RINGS OF BARRED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-06-01

    Nuclear rings in barred galaxies are sites of active star formation. We use hydrodynamic simulations to study the temporal and spatial behavior of star formation occurring in nuclear rings of barred galaxies where radial gas inflows are triggered solely by a bar potential. The star formation recipes include a density threshold, an efficiency, conversion of gas to star particles, and delayed momentum feedback via supernova explosions. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) in a nuclear ring is roughly equal to the mass inflow rate to the ring, while it has a weak dependence on the total gas mass in the ring. The SFR typically exhibits a strong primary burst followed by weak secondary bursts before declining to very small values. The primary burst is associated with the rapid gas infall to the ring due to the bar growth, while the secondary bursts are caused by re-infall of the ejected gas from the primary burst. While star formation in observed rings persists episodically over a few Gyr, the duration of active star formation in our models lasts for only about half of the bar growth time, suggesting that the bar potential alone is unlikely to be responsible for gas supply to the rings. When the SFR is low, most star formation occurs at the contact points between the ring and the dust lanes, leading to an azimuthal age gradient of young star clusters. When the SFR is large, on the other hand, star formation is randomly distributed over the whole circumference of the ring, resulting in no apparent azimuthal age gradient. Since the ring shrinks in size with time, star clusters also exhibit a radial age gradient, with younger clusters found closer to the ring. The cluster mass function is well described by a power law, with a slope depending on the SFR. Giant gas clouds in the rings have supersonic internal velocity dispersions and are gravitationally bound.

  10. Powering a Home with Just 25 Watts of Solar PV. Super-Efficient Appliances Can Enable Expanded Off-Grid Energy Service Using Small Solar Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol A.; Jacobson, Arne; Park, Won Young; Lee, Ga Rick; Alstone, Peter; Khare, Amit

    2015-04-01

    Highly efficient direct current (DC) appliances have the potential to dramatically increase the affordability of off-grid solar power systems used for rural electrification in developing countries by reducing the size of the systems required. For example, the combined power requirement of a highly efficient color TV, four DC light emitting diode (LED) lamps, a mobile phone charger, and a radio is approximately 18 watts and can be supported by a small solar power system (at 27 watts peak, Wp). Price declines and efficiency advances in LED technology are already enabling rapidly increased use of small off-grid lighting systems in Africa and Asia. Similar progress is also possible for larger household-scale solar home systems that power appliances such as lights, TVs, fans, radios, and mobile phones. When super-efficient appliances are used, the total cost of solar home systems and their associated appliances can be reduced by as much as 50%. The results vary according to the appliances used with the system. These findings have critical relevance for efforts to provide modern energy services to the 1.2 billion people worldwide without access to the electrical grid and one billion more with unreliable access. However, policy and market support are needed to realize rapid adoption of super-efficient appliances.

  11. Charmless B Decays at BaBar and Belle (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Charmless B Decays at BaBar and Belle Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Charmless B Decays at BaBar and Belle Authors: Sitt, Simon ; Ecole Polytechnique Publication Date:...

  12. Flow-Based Detection of Bar Coded Particles (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Flow-Based Detection of Bar Coded Particles Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Flow-Based Detection of Bar Coded Particles You are accessing a document from the...

  13. Pinkbar is an epithelial-specific BAR domain protein that generates planar membrane structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pyklinen, Anette; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Zhao, Hongxia; Saarikangas, Juha; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Jansen, Maurice; Hakanen, Janne; Koskela, Essi V.; Pernen, Johan; Vihinen, Helena; Jokitalo, Eija; Salminen, Marjo; Ikonen, Elina; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2013-05-29

    Bin/amphipysin/Rvs (BAR)-domain proteins sculpt cellular membranes and have key roles in processes such as endocytosis, cell motility and morphogenesis. BAR domains are divided into three subfamilies: BAR- and F-BAR-domain proteins generate positive membrane curvature and stabilize cellular invaginations, whereas I-BAR-domain proteins induce negative curvature and stabilize protrusions. We show that a previously uncharacterized member of the I-BAR subfamily, Pinkbar, is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, where it localizes to Rab13-positive vesicles and to the plasma membrane at intercellular junctions. Notably, the BAR domain of Pinkbar does not induce membrane tubulation but promotes the formation of planar membrane sheets. Structural and mutagenesis analyses reveal that the BAR domain of Pinkbar has a relatively flat lipid-binding interface and that it assembles into sheet-like oligomers in crystals and in solution, which may explain its unique membrane-deforming activity.

  14. Spreader-Bar Radiation Detection System Enhancements: A Modeling and Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ely, James H.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Batdorf, Michael T.; Baciak, James E.; Hensley, Walter K.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, Sean M.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Schweppe, John E.

    2012-11-13

    This report provides the modeling and simulation results of the investigation of enhanced spreader bar radiation detection systems.

  15. Search for New Bottomlike Quark Pair Decays Q Q-Bar to (T W- ) (T-Bar W -) in Same-Charge Dilepton Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; /more authors..

    2012-04-02

    We report the most restrictive direct limits on masses of fourth-generation down-type quarks b{prime}, and quark-like composite fermions (B or T{sub 5/3}), decaying promptly to tW{sup {-+}}. We search for a significant excess of events with two same-charge leptons (e, {mu}), several hadronic jets, and missing transverse energy. An analysis of data from p{bar p} collisions with an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the CDF II detector at Fermilab yields no evidence for such a signal, setting mass limits m{sub b{prime}}, m{sub B} > 338 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub T{sub 5/3}} > 365 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level.

  16. Beam Dynamics Studies of Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Ahmed, G. Krafft, K. Detrick, S. Silva, J. Delayen, M. Spata ,M. Tiefenback, A. Hofler ,K. Beard

    2011-03-01

    We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for parallel-bar transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type RF separators: normal- and super-conducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to conventional TM$_{110}$ type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a one- or two-cell superconducting structure are enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the Lambertson magnet. Both the normal and super-conducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the vertical kick of the beam.

  17. ~~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ALTERNaTE I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ALTERNaTE I --------------------------------------- NAME: 333 Iv. Mkhi qr) Aw. thka o ~~~---~~~--~~~_-----__ C I TV : 8 Morim 'Love 82 10 bhh &Q Ir -+----------- STATE- fL I - ------ l OWNER(S) -__----_ past: Current: I --------------------____ Owner contacted q yes p no; _____--_____-____------~~~l if yes, data contacted -_--------__- TYPE OF OPERATION ---_------------- 0 Research & Development q Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale process 0

  18. Automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jostlein, Hans (Naperville, IL)

    1997-01-01

    An automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine determines the accuracy of a coordinate measuring machine having at least one servo drive. The apparatus comprises a first and second gauge ball connected by a telescoping rigid member. The rigid member includes a switch such that inward radial movement of the second gauge ball relative to the first gauge ball causes activation of the switch. The first gauge ball is secured in a first magnetic socket assembly in order to maintain the first gauge ball at a fixed location with respect to the coordinate measuring machine. A second magnetic socket assembly secures the second gauge ball to the arm or probe holder of the coordinate measuring machine. The second gauge ball is then directed by the coordinate measuring machine to move radially inward from a point just beyond the length of the ball bar until the switch is activated. Upon switch activation, the position of the coordinate measuring machine is determined and compared to known ball bar length such that the accuracy of the coordinate measuring machine can be determined.

  19. Automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jostlein, H.

    1997-07-15

    An automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine determines the accuracy of a coordinate measuring machine having at least one servo drive. The apparatus comprises a first and second gauge ball connected by a telescoping rigid member. The rigid member includes a switch such that inward radial movement of the second gauge ball relative to the first gauge ball causes activation of the switch. The first gauge ball is secured in a first magnetic socket assembly in order to maintain the first gauge ball at a fixed location with respect to the coordinate measuring machine. A second magnetic socket assembly secures the second gauge ball to the arm or probe holder of the coordinate measuring machine. The second gauge ball is then directed by the coordinate measuring machine to move radially inward from a point just beyond the length of the ball bar until the switch is activated. Upon switch activation, the position of the coordinate measuring machine is determined and compared to known ball bar length such that the accuracy of the coordinate measuring machine can be determined. 5 figs.

  20. Report on FY15 Two-Bar Thermal Ratcheting Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yanli; Jetter, Robert I; Baird, Seth T; Pu, Chao; Sham, Sam

    2015-06-22

    Alloy 617 is a reference structural material for very high temperature components of advanced-gas cooled reactors with outlet temperatures in the range of . In order for designers to be able to use Alloy 617 for these high temperature components, Alloy 617 has to be approved for use in Section III (the nuclear section) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. A plan has been developed to submit a draft code for Alloy 617 to ASME Section III by 2015. However, the current rules in Subsection NH* for the evaluation of strain limits and creep-fatigue damage using simplified methods based on elastic analysis have been deemed inappropriate for Alloy 617 at temperatures above . The rationale for this exclusion is that at higher temperatures it is not feasible to decouple plasticity and creep deformation, which is the basis for the current simplified rules. This temperature, , is well below the temperature range of interest for this material in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) applications. The only current alternative is, thus, a full inelastic analysis which requires sophisticated material models which have been formulated but not yet verified. To address this issue, proposed code rules have been developed which are based on the use of elastic-perfectly plastic (EPP) analysis methods and which are expected to be applicable to very high temperatures. These newly proposed rules also address a long-term objective to provide an option for more simple, comprehensive and easily applied rules than the current so called simplified rules These two-bar tests discussed herein are part of an ongoing series of tests with cyclic loading at high temperatures using specimens representing key features of potential component designs. The initial focus of the two-bar ratcheting test program, to verify the procedure for evaluation of strain limits for Alloy 617 at very high temperatures, has been expanded to respond to guidance from ASME Code committees that the proposed EPP methodology should also apply to other Subsection NH materials throughout their allowed temperature range. To support these objectives, two suites of tests have been accomplished during this reporting period. One suite addresses the issue of the response of Alloy 617 at a lower temperature with tests in range of 500 800oC and a few at 350 650°C. The other suite addresses the response of SS316H up to its current maximum allowed temperature of 1500°F (815°C) In the two-bar test methodology, the two bars can be viewed as specimens taken out of a tubular component across the wall thickness representing the inner wall element and the outer wall element respectively. The two bars are alternately heated and cooled under sustained axial loading to generate ratcheting. A sustained hold time is introduced at the hot extreme of the cycle to capture the accelerated ratcheting and strain accumulation due to creep. Since the boundary conditions are a combination of strain control and load control it is necessary to use two coupled servo-controlled testing machines to achieve the key features of the two-bar representation of actual component behavior. Two-bar thermal ratcheting test results with combinations of applied mean stresses, transient temperature difference and heating and cooling rates were recorded. Tests performed at heating and cooling rates of 30°C/min are comparable to a strain rate of 10 ⁻⁵/sec. At high mean stresses in tension the direction of ratcheting was in-phase with the load, e.g. tensile strain ratcheting under high tensile loading; however, at lower loads, strain ratcheting in compression was observed under net tensile mean stresses. The strain accumulation was proportional to the applied thermal load. However, there was a narrow range of applied load in which the high applied thermal loading did not result in significant strain accumulation. Unfortunately, when the proposed EPP strain limit evaluation rules were applied to the loading history for the two-bar configuration, the predicted narrow range of low strain accumulation did not coincide with the experimental data. However, by the use of inelastic analysis in conjunction with an analytic experiment it was possible to show that the EPP strain limit code case rules could be applied to high temperature structures where the stress and temperature is not uniform throughout which is the general case. Interestingly, the suite of tests on Alloy 617 at the lower temperature range of 500°C to 800oC showed good agreement with the proposed EPP strain limit rules with a much wider band of applied load that exhibited minimal ratcheting. The four tests conducted at the lower temperature range of 350°C to 650°C showed no ratcheting. The suite of tests on SS316H at a temperature range of 515°C to 815°C resembled the results from the tests on Alloy 617 at 650°C to 950°C. Both exhibited a narrow band of applied load wher...

  1. Erratum: Search for Anomalous $t\\bar{t}$ Production in the Highly-Boosted All-Hadronic Final State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-03-28

    A search is presented for a massive particle, generically referred to as a Z', decaying into a t t-bar pair. The search focuses on Z' resonances that are sufficiently massive to produce highly Lorentz-boosted top quarks, which yield collimated decay products that are partially or fully merged into single jets. The analysis uses new methods to analyze jet substructure, providing suppression of the non-top multijet backgrounds. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Upper limits in the range of 1 pb are set on the product of the production cross section and branching fraction for a topcolor Z' modeled for several widths, as well as for a Randall--Sundrum Kaluza--Klein gluon. In addition, the results constrain any enhancement in t t-bar production beyond expectations of the standard model for t t-bar invariant masses larger than 1 TeV.

  2. Erratum: Search for Anomalous $$t\\bar{t}$$ Production in the Highly-Boosted All-Hadronic Final State

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-03-28

    A search is presented for a massive particle, generically referred to as a Z', decaying into a t t-bar pair. The search focuses on Z' resonances that are sufficiently massive to produce highly Lorentz-boosted top quarks, which yield collimated decay products that are partially or fully merged into single jets. The analysis uses new methods to analyze jet substructure, providing suppression of the non-top multijet backgrounds. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Upper limits in the range of 1more » pb are set on the product of the production cross section and branching fraction for a topcolor Z' modeled for several widths, as well as for a Randall--Sundrum Kaluza--Klein gluon. In addition, the results constrain any enhancement in t t-bar production beyond expectations of the standard model for t t-bar invariant masses larger than 1 TeV.« less

  3. Calibration of a Hopkinson Bar with a Transfer Standard

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bateman, Vesta I.; Leisher, William B.; Brown, Fred A.; Davie, Neil T.

    1993-01-01

    A program requirement for field test temperatures that are beyond the test accelerometer operational limits of −30° F and +150° F required the calibration of accelerometers at high shock levels and at the temperature extremes of −50° F and +160° F. The purposes of these calibrations were to insure that the accelerometers operated at the field test temperatures and to provide an accelerometer sensitivity at each test temperature. Because there is no National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable calibration capability at shock levels of 5,000–15,000 g for the temperature extremes of −50° F and +160° F, a method for calibrating and certifying the Hopkinson barmore » with a transfer standard was developed. Time domain and frequency domain results are given that characterize the Hopkinson bar. The National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable accuracy for the standard accelerometer in shock is ±5%. The Hopkinson bar has been certified with an uncertainty of 6%.« less

  4. Cryogenic Pressure Vessels for H2 Vehicles Rapidly Refueled by LH2 pump to 700 bar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cryogenic Pressure Vessels for H 2 Vehicles Rapidly Refueled by LH 2 pump to 700 bar Salvador Aceves, Gene Berry, Guillaume Petitpas, Vernon Switzer Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CAMX meeting October 29 th , 2015 LLNL-PRES-678629 * Cryogenic H 2 Onboard Storage * Temperature as a Degree of Freedom in H 2 storage * LLNL Cryocompressed Project History * 350 Bar Test Vehicle Park & Drive Results * Current Project * 700 bar prototype (cryogenic) vessels * Refueling with LH 2 Pump * Test

  5. DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Services LLC Loan Application | Department of Energy DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application December 28, 2009 - 10:57am Addthis Washington, DC - The Office of General Counsel was recently asked whether the Sudan Accountability and Divestment Act of 2007 barred the Department from considering a loan guarantee application

  6. U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addthis PROBLEM: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability PLATFORM: Version(s): Mozilla Firefox 6 - 12 ABSTRACT: To exploit this issue, an attacker...

  7. Flow-Based Detection of Bar Coded Particles (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Flow-Based Detection of Bar Coded Particles We have developed methods for flow control, electric field alignment, and readout of colloidal Nanobarcodescopyright. Our ...

  8. Evidence for Spin Correlation in t(t)over-bar Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; la Cruz, I. Heredia-De; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.

    2012-01-19

    We present a measurement of the ratio of events with correlated t and {bar t} spins to the total number of t{bar t} events. This ratio f is evaluated using a matrix-element-based approach in 729 t{bar t} candidate events with a single lepton {ell} (electron or muon) and at least four jets. The analyzed p{bar p} collisions data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb{sup -1} and were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Combining this result with a recent measurement of f in dileptonic final states, we find f in agreement with the standard model. In addition, the combination provides evidence for the presence of spin correlation in t{bar t} events with a significance of more than 3 standard deviations.

  9. Exclusive Initial-State-Radiation Production of the DDbar,D*Dbar, and D*D*bar Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-06-19

    We perform a study of the exclusive production of D{bar D}, D*{bar D}, and D*{bar D}* in initial-state-radiation events, from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, to search for charmonium and possible new resonances. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384 fb{sup -1} and was recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage rings. The D{bar D}, D*{bar D}, and D*{bar D}* mass spectra show clear evidence of several {psi} resonances. However, there is no evidence for Y(4260) {yields} D*{bar D} or Y(4260) {yields} D*{bar D}*.

  10. Measurements of the CKM Angle Alpha at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stracka, Simone; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2012-04-04

    The authors present improved measurements of the branching fractions and CP-asymmetries fin the B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup 0} decays, which impact the determination of {alpha}. The combined branching fractions of B {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and B {yields} K{sub 1}(1400){pi} decays are measured for the first time and allow a novel determination of {alpha} in the B{sup 0} {yields} {alpha}{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay channel. These measurements are performed using the final dataset collected by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B-factory. The primary goal of the experiments based at the B factories is to test the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) picture of CP violation in the standard model of electroweak interactions. This can be achieved by measuring the angles and sides of the Unitarity Triangle in a redundant way.

  11. Verification of Advective Bar Elements Implemented in the Aria Thermal Response Code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Brantley

    2016-01-01

    A verification effort was undertaken to evaluate the implementation of the new advective bar capability in the Aria thermal response code. Several approaches to the verification process were taken : a mesh refinement study to demonstrate solution convergence in the fluid and the solid, visually examining the mapping of the advective bar element nodes to the surrounding surfaces, and a comparison of solutions produced using the advective bars for simple geometries with solutions from commercial CFD software . The mesh refinement study has shown solution convergence for simple pipe flow in both temperature and velocity . Guidelines were provided to achieve appropriate meshes between the advective bar elements and the surrounding volume. Simulations of pipe flow using advective bars elements in Aria have been compared to simulations using the commercial CFD software ANSYS Fluent (r) and provided comparable solutions in temperature and velocity supporting proper implementation of the new capability. Verification of Advective Bar Elements iv Acknowledgements A special thanks goes to Dean Dobranich for his guidance and expertise through all stages of this effort . His advice and feedback was instrumental to its completion. Thanks also goes to Sam Subia and Tolu Okusanya for helping to plan many of the verification activities performed in this document. Thank you to Sam, Justin Lamb and Victor Brunini for their assistance in resolving issues encountered with running the advective bar element model. Finally, thanks goes to Dean, Sam, and Adam Hetzler for reviewing the document and providing very valuable comments.

  12. Optimizing Parallel Access to the BaBar Database System Using CORBA Servers

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Optimizing Parallel Access to the BaBar Database System Using CORBA Servers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optimizing Parallel Access to the BaBar Database System Using CORBA Servers The BaBar Experiment collected around 20 TB of data during its first 6 months of running. Now, after 18 months, data size exceeds 300 TB, and according to prognosis, it is a small fraction of the size of data coming in the next few months. In order to keep up with

  13. W/Z + jets production at the tevatron {bar p}p collider (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Conference: W/Z + jets production at the tevatron {bar p}p collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: W/Z + jets production at the tevatron {bar p}p collider Both the D0 and CDF experiments at Fermilab Tevatron collider at {radical}s = 1.8TeV have accumulated over 13pb{sup {minus}1} of data during the 1992--1993 collider run. Each experiment collected more than 10,000 W {yields} l + {nu} and 1,000 Z {yields} l + {bar l} candidates for each lepton species (e and

  14. Chiral Anomaly Effects And the BaBar Measurements of the$\\gamma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chiral Anomaly Effects And the BaBar Measurements of the gammagamma*to pi0 Transition Form Factor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chiral Anomaly Effects...

  15. Application of bar codes to the automation of analytical sample data collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jurgensen, H A

    1986-01-01

    The Health Protection Department at the Savannah River Plant collects 500 urine samples per day for tritium analyses. Prior to automation, all sample information was compiled manually. Bar code technology was chosen for automating this program because it provides a more accurate, efficient, and inexpensive method for data entry. The system has three major functions: sample labeling is accomplished at remote bar code label stations composed of an Intermec 8220 (Intermec Corp.) interfaced to an IBM-PC, data collection is done on a central VAX 11/730 (Digital Equipment Corp.). Bar code readers are used to log-in samples to be analyzed on liquid scintillation counters. The VAX 11/730 processes the data and generates reports, data storage is on the VAX 11/730 and backed up on the plant's central computer. A brief description of several other bar code applications at the Savannah River Plant is also presented.

  16. Chiral Anomaly Effects And the BaBar Measurements of the$\\gamma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Chiral Anomaly Effects And the BaBar Measurements of the gammagamma*to pi0 Transition Form Factor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chiral...

  17. Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human Genome

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human Genome Project Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues » submit Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human Genome Project Researchers have collaborated to craft a request that could fundamentally alter how the antibodies used in research are identified. March 1, 2015 Researchers from around the world want to fundamentally

  18. EERE Success Story-Raising the Bar for Quality PV Modules | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Raising the Bar for Quality PV Modules EERE Success Story-Raising the Bar for Quality PV Modules October 30, 2014 - 4:58pm Addthis As photovoltaics (PV) markets expand across the United States the manufacture of safe, reliable, and high-quality PV modules is critical to achieve cost competitive solar energy. Since the development and codification of testing standards for PV modules requires a lengthy multiyear process, Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative and National Renewable

  19. Measurement of the mass difference between $t$ and $\\bar{t}$ quarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    We present a direct measurement of the mass difference between t and {bar t} quarks using t{bar t} candidate events in the lepton+jets channel, collected with the CDF II detector at Fermilab's 1.96 TeV Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. We make an event by event estimate of the mass difference to construct templates for top quark pair signal events and background events. The resulting mass difference distribution of data is compared to templates of signals and background using a maximum likelihood fit. From a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb{sup -1}, we measure a mass difference, {Delta}M{sub top} = M{sub t} - M{sub {bar t}} = -3.3 {+-} 1.4 (stat) {+-} 1.0 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}, approximately two standard deviations away from the CPT hypothesis of zero mass difference. This is the most precise measurement of a mass difference between t and its {bar t} partner to date.

  20. The Use of a Beryllium Hopkinson Bar to Characterize In-Axis and Cross-Axis Accelerometer Response in Shock Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.

    1999-01-01

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments have been studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Laboratory. A beryllium Hopkinson bar capability with diameters of 0.75 in. and 2.0 in has been developed to extend our understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. The in-axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer determined from measurements with a beryllium Hopkinson bar and a certified laser doppler vibrometer as the reference measurement is presented. The cross-axis performance of the accelerometer subjected to static compression on a beryllium cylinder, static strain on a steel beam, dynamic strain on a steel beam (ISA-RP 37.2, Paragraph 6.6), and compressive shocks in a split beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration is also presented. The performance of the accelerometer in a combined in-axis and cross-axis shock environment is shown for one configuration. Finally, a failure analysis conducted in cooperation with ENDEVCO gives a cause for the occasional unexplained failures that have occurred in some applications.

  1. Diffractive Dijet Production in $\\bar{p}p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Albrow, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2012-06-01

    We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider. A data sample from 310 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by triggering on a high transverse energy jet, E{sub T}{sup jet}, in coincidence with a recoil antiproton detected in a Roman pot spectrometer is used to measure the ratio of single-diffractive to inclusive-dijet event rates as a function of x{sup {bar p}} of the interacting parton in the antiproton, the Bjorken-x, x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}}, and a Q{sup 2} {approx} (E{sub T}{sup jet}){sup 2} in the ranges 10{sup -3} < x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} < 10{sup -1} and 10{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 10{sup 4} GeV{sup 2}, respectively. Results are presented for the region of {bar p}-momentum-loss fraction 0.03 < {zeta}{sub {bar p}} < 0.09 and a four-momentum transfer squared t{sub {bar p}} > -4 GeV{sup 2}. The t{sub {bar p}} dependence is measured as a function of Q{sup 2} and x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} and compared with that of inclusive single diffraction dissociation. We find weak x{sub Bj}{sup bar p}} and Q{sup 2} dependencies in the ratio of single diffractive to inclusive event rates, and no significant Q{sup 2} dependence in the diffractive t{sub {bar p}} distributions.

  2. Search for a narrow t(t)over-bar resonance in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-03-14

    We report a search for a narrow t{bar t} resonance that decays into a lepton+jets final state based on an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We set upper limits on the production cross section of such a resonance multiplied by its branching fraction to t{bar t}. We exclude a leptophobic topcolor Z' at the 95% confidence level for masses below 835 GeV (940 GeV) if its width is 1.2% (3%) of its mass. We also exclude color octet vector bosons (colorons) with masses below 775 GeV.

  3. Proton Form Factors And Related Processes in BaBar by ISR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferroli, R.B.; /Enrico Fermi Ctr., Rome /INFN, Rome

    2007-02-12

    BaBar has measured with unprecedented accuracy e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} from the threshold up to Q{sub p{bar p}}{sup 2} {approx} 20 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 4}, finding out an unexpected cross section, with plateaux and drops. In particular it is well established a sharp drop near threshold, where evidence for structures in multihadronic channels has also been found. Other unexpected and spectacular features of the Nucleon form factors are reminded, the behavior of space-like G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} and the neutron time-like form factors.

  4. T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is a high risk security vulnerability with the ActiveBar ActiveX controls used by IBM Rational System Architect.

  5. Grid Application for the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, A.; Wilson, F.; /Rutherford

    2006-08-14

    This paper discusses the use of e-Science Grid in providing computational resources for modern international High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. We investigate the suitability of the current generation of Grid software to provide the necessary resources to perform large-scale simulation of the experiment and analysis of data in the context of multinational collaboration.

  6. On the Verge of One Petabyte - the Story Behind the BaBar Database System

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: On the Verge of One Petabyte - the Story Behind the BaBar Database System Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On the Verge of One Petabyte - the Story Behind the BaBar Database System × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional

  7. Optimizing Parallel Access to the BaBar Database System Using CORBA Servers

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Optimizing Parallel Access to the BaBar Database System Using CORBA Servers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optimizing Parallel Access to the BaBar Database System Using CORBA Servers × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources

  8. Radiative Bottomonium Spectroscopy at the Y(2, 3S) Resonances at BaBar

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Radiative Bottomonium Spectroscopy at the Y(2, 3S) Resonances at BaBar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Radiative Bottomonium Spectroscopy at the Y(2, 3S) Resonances at BaBar Authors: Lewis, Peter M. ; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC Publication Date: 2013-08-26 OSTI Identifier: 1091526 Report Number(s): SLAC-R-1035 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Thesis/Dissertation Research Org: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC)

  9. Recent Results on Meson Spectroscopy from BELLE And BaBar (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Recent Results on Meson Spectroscopy from BELLE And BaBar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recent Results on Meson Spectroscopy from BELLE And BaBar Authors: Uehara, Sadaharu ; /KEK, Tsukuba Publication Date: 2013-05-31 OSTI Identifier: 1081533 Report Number(s): SLAC-REPRINT-2013-079 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Int.J.Mod.Phys.A26:341-346,2011 Research Org: SLAC National

  10. Latest results on the XYZ states from Belle and BaBar (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Conference: Latest results on the XYZ states from Belle and BaBar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Latest results on the XYZ states from Belle and BaBar Authors: Uehara, Sadaharu ; /KEK, Tsukuba Publication Date: 2013-04-26 OSTI Identifier: 1076839 Report Number(s): SLAC-REPRINT-2013-045 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Journal Name: AIP Conf.Proc.1257:189-196,2010; Conference: Prepared for Hadron 2009: 13th

  11. Rapid quantification of mutant fitness in diverse bacteria by sequencing randomly bar-coded transposons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; Lamson, Jacob S.; He, Jennifer; Hoover, Cindi A.; Blow, Matthew J.; Bristow, James; Butland, Gareth; Arkin, Adam P.; et al

    2015-05-12

    Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with anymore » transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative D-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. A large challenge in microbiology is the functional assessment of the millions of uncharacterized genes identified by genome sequencing. Transposon mutagenesis coupled to next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to assign phenotypes and functions to genes. However, the current strategies for TnSeq are too laborious to be applied to hundreds of experimental conditions across multiple bacteria. Here, we describe an approach, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which greatly simplifies the measurement of gene fitness by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to monitor the abundance of mutants. We performed 387 genome-wide fitness assays across five bacteria and identified phenotypes for over 5,000 genes. RB-TnSeq can be applied to diverse bacteria and is a powerful tool to annotate uncharacterized genes using phenotype data.« less

  12. Exotic/charmonium Hadron Spectroscopy at Belle and BaBar (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Conference: Exotic/charmonium Hadron Spectroscopy at Belle and BaBar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exotic/charmonium Hadron Spectroscopy at Belle and BaBar Authors: Liventsev, Dmitri ; /Moscow, ITEP ; Publication Date: 2013-10-14 OSTI Identifier: 1096828 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15785 arXiv:1105.4760 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Journal Name: arXiv:1105.4760; Conference: Prepared for 46th Rencontres de Moriond

  13. Bottomonium Spectroscopy at BaBar and Belle (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Bottomonium Spectroscopy at BaBar and Belle Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bottomonium Spectroscopy at BaBar and Belle Authors: Simi, Gabriele ; /Maryland U. Publication Date: 2013-06-12 OSTI Identifier: 1083513 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15563 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Journal Name: PoS BEAUTY2009:036,2009; Conference: Prepared for 12th International Conference on B Physics at Hadron Machines (BEAUTY 2009),

  14. Update on Angles and Sides of the CKM Unitarity Triangle from BaBar

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Update on Angles and Sides of the CKM Unitarity Triangle from BaBar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Update on Angles and Sides of the CKM Unitarity Triangle from BaBar We report several recent updates from the BABAR Collaboration on the matrix elements |V{sub cb}|, |V{sub ub}|, and |V{sub td}| of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) quark-mixing matrix, and the angles {beta} and {alpha} of the unitarity triangle. Most results presented

  15. POSTPONED: Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar has been postponed until further notice. The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Tuesday, January 26, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

  16. NREL Sets the Bar for Office Building Energy Use - News Feature | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sets the Bar for Office Building Energy Use December 7, 2009 Photo of a truck delivering materials to an office building under construction. Enlarge image Designers met NREL's aggressive energy use requirement for the Research Support Facility by taking advantage Colorado's sunny climate. Large windows for daylighting and thermally sophisticated wall systems for solar heating are crucial to the net-zero energy design. Credit: Pat Corkery Technology - from sophisticated computer modeling to

  17. Effects of spiral arms on star formation in nuclear rings of barred-spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-09-01

    We use hydrodynamic simulations to study the effect of spiral arms on the star formation rate (SFR) in nuclear rings of barred-spiral galaxies. We find that spiral arms can be an efficient means of gas transport from the outskirts to the central parts, provided that the arms are rotating slower than the bar. While the ring star formation in models with no arms or corotating arms is active only during around the bar growth phase, arm-driven gas accretion both significantly enhances and prolongs the ring star formation in models with slow-rotating arms. The arm-enhanced SFR is larger by a factor of ?3-20 than in the no-arm model, with larger values corresponding to stronger and slower arms. Arm-induced mass inflows also make dust lanes stronger. Nuclear rings in slow-arm models are ?45% larger than in the no-arm counterparts. Star clusters that form in a nuclear ring exhibit an age gradient in the azimuthal direction only when the SFR is small, whereas no notable age gradient is found in the radial direction for models with arm-induced star formation.

  18. Optimization of Design and Manufacturing Process of Metal Foam Filled Anti-Intrusion Bars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa, Andrea; Mussi, Valerio; Strano, Matteo

    2011-05-04

    The role of an anti-intrusion bar for automotive use is to absorb the kinetic energy of the colliding bodies that is partially converted into internal work of the bodies involved in the crash. The aim of this paper is to investigate the performances of a new kind of anti-intrusion bars for automotive use, filled with metallic foams. The reason for using a cellular material as a filler deals with its capacity to absorb energy during plastic deformation, while being lightweight. The study is the evolution of a previous paper presented by the authors at Esaform 2010 and will present new results and findings. It is conducted by evaluating some key technical issues of the manufacturing problem and by conducting experimental and numerical analyses. The evaluation of materials and shapes of the closed sections to be filled is made in the perspective of a car manufacturer (production costs, weight reduction, space availability in a car door, etc.). Experimentally, foams are produced starting from an industrial aluminium precursor with a TiH{sub 2} blowing agent. Bars are tested in three point bending, in order to evaluate their performances in terms of force-displacement response and other specific performance parameters. In order to understand the role of interface between the inner surface of the tube and the external surface of the foam, different kinds of interface are tested.

  19. Study of the Ds+ to K+K-e+ nu Decay Channel with the BaBar Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ThesisDissertation: Study of the Ds+ to K+K-e+ nu Decay Channel with the BaBar Experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of the Ds+ to K+K-e+ nu Decay Channel...

  20. U-165: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Spoof Address Bar URLs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two vulnerabilities were reported in Apple iOS. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. A remote user can spoof the address bar URL.

  1. The effects of interim flow operations from Glen Canyon Dam on Colorado River sand bars in the Grand Canyon, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplinski, M.A.; Hazel, J.E.; Beus, S.S. . Geology Dept.); Stevens, L.E. . NPS Cooperative Parks Studies Unit); Mayes, H.B. )

    1993-04-01

    Discharges from Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) affect the geomorphology and stability of downstream alluvial sediment deposits. To protect downstream resources, the US DOI mandated interim flow criteria (IFC) on 1 August, 1991. The IFC consist of reduced daily fluctuations (226--566 m[sup 3]/s) and reduced ramping rates (42.5--57 m[sup 3]/s/hr), the primary objective of which is to maintain sediment storage in the river system by minimizing sediment transport. This study was initiated to determine the effectiveness of the IFC in achieving this objective. The authors examined whether reduced daily fluctuations lead to subaerial sand bar erosion and increased subaqueous sediment storage. They collected and analyzed topographic and bathymetric survey data from sand bars throughout the Colorado River corridor in Sept/Oct, 1991 and in Oct/Nov, 1992 to compare changes in sand bar morphology. They examined changing topography due to GCD operation in what they termed the hydrologically active zone (HAZ), that portion of the sand bar exposed to daily dam operations (142--900 m[sup 3]/s stage elevations). Volumes within the HAZ and profiles across this zone were generated from these sediment deposits. Their preliminary results show that, in general, erosion of sediment at higher bar elevations was coincident with deposition along lower parts of the bar platform. The observed response to IFC elevation in order to maintain sediment deposits for Colorado River corridor bio-diversity (e.g., fisheries habitats). 88% of sand bars that showed significant volume gain were preceded by significant volume loss, implying that antecedent conditions are an important factor in sand bar response to GCD operations. Sediment transport capacity was reduced as evidenced by increased sediment storage in recirculation zones and sediment infilling of eddy return channels. The authors conclude that IFC are achieving their primary objective of maintaining sediment storage within the river corridor.

  2. Search for Scalar Top Quark Production in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-03-01

    We report on a search for the supersymmetric partner of the top quark (scalar top) decaying into a charm quark and a neutralino in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data sample, collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.6 fb{sup -1}. Candidate events are selected by requiring two or more jets and a large imbalance in the transverse momentum. To enhance the analysis sensitivity, at least one of the jets is required to be identified as originating from a charm quark using an algorithm specifically designed for this analysis. The selected events are in good agreement with standard model predictions. In the case of large mass splitting between the scalar top quark and the neutralino we exclude a scalar top quark mass below 180 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level.

  3. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, V.I.; Bell, R.G. III; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125-fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical system. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two part study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. This paper reports the first part of the shock mitigating materials study. A study to compare three thicknesses (0.125, 0.250, and 0.500 in.) of seventeen, unconfined materials for their shock mitigating characteristics has been completed with a split Hopkinson bar configuration. The nominal input as measured by strain gages on the incident Hopkinson bar is 50 fps {at} 100 {micro}s for these tests. It is hypothesized that a shock mitigating material has four purposes: to lengthen the shock pulse, to attenuate the shock pulse, to mitigate high frequency content in the shock pulse, and to absorb energy. Both time domain and frequency domain analyses of the split Hopkinson bar data have been performed to compare the materials` achievement of these purposes.

  4. Search for Universal Extra Dimensions in p(p)over-bar Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goryachev V. N.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Mansour J.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-03-30

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

  5. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. VIII. BARRED DISK GALAXIES IN THE CORE OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinova, Irina; Jogee, Shardha; Weinzirl, Tim; Erwin, Peter; Trentham, Neil; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hammer, Derek; Den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Kleijn, Gijs V.; Graham, Alister W.; Carter, David; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Balcells, Marc; Guzman, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Mobasher, Bahram; Peng, Eric W. E-mail: sj@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2012-02-20

    We use high-resolution ({approx}0.''1) F814W Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images from the Hubble Space Telescope ACS Treasury survey of the Coma cluster at z {approx} 0.02 to study bars in massive disk galaxies (S0s), as well as low-mass dwarf galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster, the densest environment in the nearby universe. Our study helps to constrain the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments and provides a comparison point for studies in lower density environments and at higher redshifts. Our results are: (1) we characterize the fraction and properties of bars in a sample of 32 bright (M{sub V} {approx}< -18, M{sub *} > 10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun }) S0 galaxies, which dominate the population of massive disk galaxies in the Coma core. We find that the measurement of a bar fraction among S0 galaxies must be handled with special care due to the difficulty in separating unbarred S0s from ellipticals, and the potential dilution of the bar signature by light from a relatively large, bright bulge. The results depend sensitively on the method used: the bar fraction for bright S0s in the Coma core is 50% {+-} 11%, 65% {+-} 11%, and 60% {+-} 11% based on three methods of bar detection, namely, strict ellipse fit criteria, relaxed ellipse fit criteria, and visual classification. (2) We compare the S0 bar fraction across different environments (the Coma core, A901/902, and Virgo) adopting the critical step of using matched samples and matched methods in order to ensure robust comparisons. We find that the bar fraction among bright S0 galaxies does not show a statistically significant variation (within the error bars of {+-}11%) across environments which span two orders of magnitude in galaxy number density (n {approx} 300-10,000 galaxies Mpc{sup -3}) and include rich and poor clusters, such as the core of Coma, the A901/902 cluster, and Virgo. We speculate that the bar fraction among S0s is not significantly enhanced in rich clusters compared to low-density environments for two reasons. First, S0s in rich clusters are less prone to bar instabilities as they are dynamically heated by harassment and are gas poor as a result of ram pressure stripping and accelerated star formation. Second, high-speed encounters in rich clusters may be less effective than slow, strong encounters in inducing bars. (3) We also take advantage of the high resolution of the ACS ({approx}50 pc) to analyze a sample of 333 faint (M{sub V} > -18) dwarf galaxies in the Coma core. Using visual inspection of unsharp-masked images, we find only 13 galaxies with bar and/or spiral structure. An additional eight galaxies show evidence for an inclined disk. The paucity of disk structures in Coma dwarfs suggests that either disks are not common in these galaxies or that any disks present are too hot to develop instabilities.

  6. Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Analysis Home/Tag:Analysis - Electricity use by water service sector and county. Shown are electricity use by (a) large-scale conveyance, (b) groundwater irrigation pumping, (c) surface water irrigation pumping, (d) drinking water, and (e) wastewater. Aggregate electricity use across these sectors (f) is also mapped. Permalink Gallery Sandians Recognized in Environmental Science & Technology's Best Paper Competition Analysis, Capabilities,

  7. Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis Home/Analysis - Structures of the zwitterionic coatings synthesized for this study. Permalink Gallery Investigations on Anti-biofouling Zwitterionic Coatings for MHK Is Now in Press Analysis, Capabilities, Energy, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Water Power Investigations on Anti-biofouling Zwitterionic Coatings for MHK Is Now in Press Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Advanced Materials program has a new publication on the antifouling efficacy

  8. Shanghai Solar Watt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    China Zip: 200040 Sector: Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product: Providing photovoltaic systems, solar air heating systems, solar water pumping systems, wind energy...

  9. AstroWatt | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Product: Texas-based venture backed company developing a proprietary solar cell technology. Coordinates: 30.267605, -97.742984 Show Map Loading map......

  10. TerraWatt Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Schenectady, New York Zip: 12305-1036 Product: American manufacturer of micro-inverters, subsidiary of Advanced Energy Conversion. Coordinates: 42.81226, -73.941026...

  11. Watt Does It Cost To Use It?

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students learn how electrical usage is counted and priced. They measure and evaluate energy use and cost of representative household and school electrical items.

  12. Copper damage modeling with the tensile hopkinson bar and gas gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonks, D. L.; Thissell, W. R.; Trujillo, C. P.; Schwartz, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile damage nucleation in recovered copper tensile Hopkinson bar specimens has been modeled using the 2D EPIC code. The model has also been successfully applied to spallation gas gun data to greatly expand the pressure range. The split tensile Hopkinson pressure bar permits the creation of damage at fairly high strain rates (10{sup 4}/s) with large plastic strains (100%). Careful momentum trapping allows incipient damage states to be arrested and recovered for metallurgical examination. The use of notched samples allows the pressure - flow stress, or triaxiality, to be varied from 1/3 to about 1.2 to study the interplay of pressure and deviatoric stress. In this paper, we will concentrate on modeling the nucleation of ductile damage in pure copper (Hitachi). With the same material, we also study spallation in a gas gun experiment to obtain the nucleation stress under high pressure and small plastic strain. The goal of the modeling is to obtain a unified nucleation model suitable for both.

  13. Nuclear Deployment Scorecards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Initiatives » Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Nuclear Deployment Scorecards Nuclear Deployment Scorecards October 27, 2015 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - October 2015 News on Watts Bar 2 license, Calvert Cliffs and Callaway withdrawals. July 22, 2015 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2015 News updates on Fermi 3, Watts Bar 2, and Calvert Cliffs 3 April 24, 2015 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - April 2015 Updates on V.C. Summer construction schedule, Watts Bar 2,

  14. Study of the Ds+ to K+K-e+ nu Decay Channel with the BaBar Experiment

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: Study of the Ds+ to K+K-e+ nu Decay Channel with the BaBar Experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of the Ds+ to K+K-e+ nu Decay Channel with the BaBar Experiment Charm semileptonic decays allow a validation of lattice QCD calculations through the measurement of the hadronic form factors, which characterize the effect of strong interaction in these reactions. The accuracy of such calculations is crucial for the

  15. Investigation of novel decay B _____ ____(2S)____K at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schalch, Jacob; /Oberlin Coll. /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    We investigate the undocumented B meson decay, B{sup +} {yields} {Psi}(2S){omega}K{sup +}. The data were collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collier operating at the {gamma}(4S) resonance, a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV/c{sup 2}. The {gamma}(4S) resonance primarily decays to pairs of B-mesons. The BaBar collaboration at the PEP-II ring was located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and was designed to study the collisions of positrons and electrons. The e{sup -}e{sup +} pairs collide at asymmetric energies, resulting in a center of mass which is traveling at relativistic speeds. The resulting time dilation allows the decaying particles to travel large distances through the detector before undergoing their rapid decays, a process that occurs in the in the center of mass frame over extremely small distances. As they travel through silicon vertex trackers, a drift chamber, a Cerenkov radiation detector and finally an electromagnetic calorimeter, we measure the charge, energy, momentum, and particle identification in order to reconstruct the decays that have occurred. While all well understood mesons currently fall into the qq model, the quark model has no a priori exclusion of higher configuration states such as qqqq which has led experimentalists and theorists alike to seek evidence supporting the existence of such states. Currently, there are hundreds of known decay modes of the B mesons cataloged by the Particle Data Group, but collectively they only account for approximately 60% of the B branching fraction and it is possible that many more exist.

  16. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkins bar configuration. Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1997-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil and rock penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reached the electronics contained in the various mechanical systems. Here, a study to compare two thickness values, 0.125 and 0.250 in. of five materials, GE RTV 630, HS II Silicone, Polysulfide Rubber, Sylgard 184, and Teflon for their shock mitigating characteristics with a split Hopkinson bar configuration has been completed. The five materials have been tested in both unconfined and confined conditions at ambient temperature and with two applied loads of 750 {mu}{epsilon} peak (25 fps peak) with a 100 {micro}s duration, measured at 10% amplitude, and 1500 {mu}{epsilon} peak (50 fps peak) with a 100 {micro}s duration, measured at 10% amplitude. The five materials have been tested at ambient, cold ({minus}65 F), and hot (+165 F) for the unconfined condition with the 750 {mu}{epsilon} peak (25 fps peak) applied load. Time domain and frequency domain analyses of the split Hopkinson bar data have been performed to compare how these materials lengthen the shock pulse, attenuate the shock pulse, reflect high frequency content in the shock pulse, and transmit energy.

  17. Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard- July 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Includes an update on the South Texas Project and construction updates on V.C. Summer, Vogtle, and Watts Bar 2.

  18. Rod internal pressure quantification and distribution analysis using Frapcon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratton, Ryan N; Jessee, Matthew Anderson; Wieselquist, William A

    2015-09-30

    This report documents work performed supporting the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Fuel Cycle Technologies Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) under work breakdown structure element 1.02.08.10, ST Analysis. In particular, this report fulfills the M4 milestone M4FT- 15OR0810036, Quantify effects of power uncertainty on fuel assembly characteristics, within work package FT-15OR081003 ST Analysis-ORNL. This research was also supported by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (http://www.casl.gov), an Energy Innovation Hub (http://www.energy.gov/hubs) for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors under U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. The discharge rod internal pressure (RIP) and cladding hoop stress (CHS) distributions are quantified for Watts Bar Nuclear Unit 1 (WBN1) fuel rods by modeling core cycle design data, operation data (including modeling significant trips and downpowers), and as-built fuel enrichments and densities of each fuel rod in FRAPCON-3.5. A methodology is developed which tracks inter-cycle assembly movements and assembly batch fabrication information to build individual FRAPCON inputs for each evaluated WBN1 fuel rod. An alternate model for the amount of helium released from the zirconium diboride (ZrB2) integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) layer is derived and applied to FRAPCON output data to quantify the RIP and CHS for these types of fuel rods. SCALE/Polaris is used to quantify fuel rodspecific spectral quantities and the amount of gaseous fission products produced in the fuel for use in FRAPCON inputs. Fuel rods with ZrB2 IFBA layers (i.e., IFBA rods) are determined to have RIP predictions that are elevated when compared to fuel rod without IFBA layers (i.e., standard rods) despite the fact that IFBA rods often have reduced fill pressures and annular fuel pellets. The primary contributor to elevated RIP predictions at burnups less than and greater than 30 GWd/MTU is determined to be the total fuel rod void volume and the amount of released fission gas in the fuel rod, respectively. Cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) are prepared from the distribution of RIP and CHS predictions for all standard and IFBA rods. The provided CDFs allow for the determination of the portion of WBN1 fuel rods that exceed a specified RIP or CHS limit. Results are separated into IFBA and standard rods so that the two groups may be analyzed individually. FRAPCON results are provided in sufficient detail to enable the recalculation of the RIP while considering any desired plenum gas temperature, total void volume, or total amount of gas present in the void volume. A method to predict the CHS from a determined or assumed RIP is also proposed, which is based on the approximately linear relationship between the CHS and the RIP. Finally, improvements to the computational methodology of FRAPCON are proposed.

  19. Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Sonic-Frequency Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements of Small, Isotropic Geologic Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver - the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB) test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples and a natural rock sample.

  20. Measurement of the branching ratio of B¯→D(*)τ−ν¯τ relative to (B)over bar to B¯→D(*)ℓ−ν¯ℓ decays with hadronic tagging at Belle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huschle, Matthias J.; Kuhr, Thomas; Heck, M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, Bipul; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, Kirill; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Frey, A.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, Alexey; Gillard, R.; Glattaur, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Grygier, J.; Hamer, P.; Hara, K.; Hara, Takanori; Hasenbusch, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Heider, M.; Heller, A.; Horiguchi, T.; Hou, W. S.; Hsu, C. L.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Keck, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Nakako; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lee, I. S.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Lukin, P.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, Hideki; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, Subhashree; Moll, A.; Moon, H K.; Mussa, R.; Nakamura, KR; Nakano, E.; Nakao, Mikihiko; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, Shohei; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Oswald, Christian; Pakhlova, Galina; Pal, Bilas K.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pesantez, L.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, Alan J.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, Martin E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Simon, F.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sokolov, A.; Solovyeva, Elena; Stanic, S.; Staric, M.; Steder, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, Umberto; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Trusov, V.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, Gary; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, Eun Il; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, Jared AK; Yashchenko, S.; Ye, H.; Yook, Youngmin; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-10-26

    Belle II paper 450 We report a measurement of the branching fraction ratios R(D)(()*)) of (B) over bar

  1. Measurement of the double differential diject mass cross section in pp(bar) collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen; /Oklahoma U.

    2009-07-01

    This thesis presents the analysis of the double differential dijet mass cross section, measured at the D0 detector in Batavia, IL, using p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The dijet mass was calculated using the two highest p{sub T} jets in the event, with approximately 0.7 fb{sup -1} of data collected between 2004 and 2005. The analysis was presented in bins of dijet mass (M{sub JJ}) and rapidity (y), and extends the measurement farther in M{sub JJ} and y than any previous measurement. Corrections due to detector effects were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation and applied to data. The errors on the measurement consist of statistical and systematic errors, of which the Jet Energy Scale was the largest. The final result was compared to next-to-leading order theory and good agreement was found. These results may be used in the determination of the proton parton distribution functions and to set limits on new physics.

  2. Method and an apparatus to control the lateral motion of a long metal bar being formed by a mechanical process such as rolling or drawing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Tzyy-Shuh (Ann Arbor, MI); Huang, Hsun-Hau (Ann Arbor, MI); Lin, Chang-Hung (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2007-10-02

    An adjustable guide, includes two or more mechanisms each having a rotatable retaining element containing a retaining groove with a variable radius in its perimeter surface. The grooves form a guidance path to control the lateral, i.e. non-axial, motion of a long bar moving along a longitudinal axis during a production process.The diameter of the guidance path varies according to the variable radii of the grooves. The guidance path increases in size at a predetermined rate, from a point of origin to an end point on the retaining groove. Rotating the retaining elements causes the diameter of the retaining grooves to change so that the size of the guidance path can be changed to match the diameter of the bar being rolled, size of the guidance path can be changed to fit the diameter of a new bar rolled without having to exchange the guide for a different sized guide, reduce fiction between the bar and the guide, a media, such as compressed air, can be injected between the retaining elements via orifices.Each retaining element is attached to a mounting apparatus. The mounting apparatus can be fixed or flexible. The flexible mounting apparatus includes one or more springs and one or more shock absorbers. A force neutral position of the flexible mounting apparatus is designed to be located on the predetermined ideal bar path line. The flexible mounting apparatus dissipates kinetic energy from the bar thereby reducing the bar's lateral motion relative to the ideal bar path line.The damping ratio of the mounting apparatus can be adjustable to alter the product's vibration mode to enable better control of the bar's lateral motion.

  3. $W$ boson polarization measurement in the $t\\bar{t}$ dilepton channel using the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-05-01

    We present a measurement of W boson polarization in top-quark decays in t{bar t} events with decays to dilepton final states using 5.1 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity in p{bar p} collisions collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron. A simultaneous measurement of the fractions of longitudinal (f{sub 0}) and right-handed (f{sub +}) W bosons yields the results f{sub 0} = 0.71{sub -0.17}{sup +0.18}(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.07 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst). Combining this measurement with our previous result based on single lepton final states, we obtain f{sub 0} = 0.84 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.16 {+-} 0.05(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst). The results are consistent with standard model expectation.

  4. The use of a beryllium Hopkinson bar to characterize in-axis and cross-axis accelerometer response in shock environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.

    1997-05-01

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A beryllium Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend the understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations and with and without mechanical isolation, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. In this paper, recent measurements with beryllium single and split-Hopkinson bar configurations are described. The in axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer in mechanical isolation for frequencies of dc-30 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 6,000 g as determined from measurements with a beryllium Hopkinson bar with a certified laser doppler vibrometer as the reference measurement are presented. Results of characterizations of the accelerometers subjected to cross axis shocks in a split beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration are also presented.

  5. Inclusive and differential measurements of the t t-bar charge asymmetry in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-10-01

    The t t-bar charge asymmetry is measured in events containing a charged lepton (electron or muon) and at least four jets, one of which is identified as originating from b-quark hadronization. The analyzed dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. An inclusive and three differential measurements of the t t-bar charge asymmetry as a function of rapidity, transverse momentum, and invariant mass of the t t-bar system are presented. The measured inclusive t t-bar charge asymmetry is A(C) = 0.004 +/- 0.010 (stat.) +/- 0.011 (syst.). This result and the three differential measurements are consistent with zero asymmetry as well as with the predictions of the standard model.

  6. Combination of searches for anomalous top quark couplings with 5.4 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J. A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Lashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffe, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-07-09

    We present measurements of the tWb coupling form factors using information from electroweak single top quark production and from the helicity of W bosons from top quark decays in t{bar t} events. We set upper limits on anomalous tWb coupling form factors using data collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}.

  7. Search for a heavy particle decaying to a top quark and a light quark in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2012-03-01

    We present a search for a new heavy particle M produced in association with a top quark, p{bar p} {yields} t(M {yields} {bar t}q) or p{bar p} {yields} {bar t}({bar M} {yields} t{bar q}), where q stands for up quarks and down quarks. Such a particle may explain the recent anomalous measurements of top-quark forward-backward asymmetry. If the light-flavor quark (q) is reconstructed as a jet (j), this gives a {bar t}+j or t+j resonance in t{bar t}+jet events, a previously unexplored experimental signature. In a sample of events with exactly one lepton, missing transverse momentum and at least five jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector, we find the data to be consistent with the standard model. We set cross-section upper limits on the production (p{bar p} {yields} Mt or {bar M} {bar t}) at 95% confidence level from 0.61 pb to 0.02 pb for M masses ranging from 200 GeV/c{sup 2} to 800 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.

  8. Studies of the Strange Hadronic Tau Decay Tau- to K0(S) Pi- Nu-Tau Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, Andrew J.; /Manchester U. /SLAC

    2006-01-27

    A study of the decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} (K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) using the BABAR detector is presented. Using 124.4 fb{sup -1} of data we measure {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.830 {+-} 0.005(stat) {+-} 0.042(syst))%, which is the world's most precise measurement to date of this branching ratio, and is consistent with the current world average. This preliminary result, unlike most of the {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) measurements already published, is systematics dominated and so the biggest future improvement to this number should come from reducing the systematic uncertainties in the analysis. A study of the K{pi} mass spectrum, from which the strange (K{pi}) spectral function can be measured, reveals excess contributions above the K*(892) tail at higher K{pi} mass. While in the past this has been thought to be due to K*(892) - K*(1410) interference, we find that the K*(1410), whose branching ratio to K{pi} is approximately 7%, seems insufficient to explain the excess mass observed in the data. Instead, we perform a fit using a K*(892) - K*(1680) interference model and find better agreement. The discrepancy that remains could be due to an s-wave contribution to the interference that is not parameterized in the model used, and/or detector smearing that is not accounted for in our fit. We also attempt to find an s-wave contribution to the K{pi} mass spectrum by searching for an sp-interference effect. While we find a hint that such an effect exists, we have neither the confidence in the statistics nor systematics in the higher K{pi} mass region to announce an observation. We conclude that it would be a worthwhile study to pursue.

  9. Study of Rare B Meson Decays Related to the CKM Angle Beta at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulmer, Keith; /Amherst Coll.

    2007-06-06

    This study reports measurements of the branching fractions of B meson decays to {eta}{prime}K{sup +}, {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, {omega}{pi}{sup +}, {omega}K{sup +}, and {omega}K{sup 0}. Charge asymmetries are measured for the charged modes and the time-dependent CP-violation parameters S and C are measured for the neutral modes. The results are based on a data sample of 347 fb{sup -1} containing 383 million B{bar B} pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- storage ring located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Statistically significant signals are observed for all channels with the following results: B(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup +}) = (70.0{+-}1.5{+-}2.8)x10{sup -6}, B(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}) = (66.6{+-}2.6{+-}2.8)x10{sup -6}, B(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup +}) = (6.7{+-}0.5{+-}0.4)x10{sup -6}, B(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}K{sup +}) = (6.3{+-}0.5{+-}0.3)x10-6, and B(B{sup 0} {yields} ?K0) = (5.6{+-}0.8{+-}0.3)x10-6, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We measure A{sub ch}({eta}{prime}K{sup +}) = +0.010{+-}0.022{+-}0.006, A{sub ch}({omega}{pi}{sup +}) = -0.02{+-}0.08{+-}0.01, A{sub ch}({omega}K{sup +}) = -0.01{+-}0.07{+-}0.01, S{sub {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = 0.56{+-}0.12{+-}0.02, C{sub {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = -0.24 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.03, S{sub {omega}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = 0.62+0.25 -0.29 {+-} 0.02, and C{sub {omega}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = -0.39+0.25 -0.24 {+-} 0.03. The result in S{sub {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} contributes to the published measurement from BABAR, which differs from zero by 5.5 standard deviations and is the first observation of mixing-induced CP-violation in a charmless B decay.

  10. NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Systems Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Analysis Graphic showing a map and chart. Hydrogen infrastructure simulation models focus on the spatial and temporal deployment of vehicles and fueling infrastructure to provide insights into investment decisions and policy support options. Image of a generic bar graph. H2FAST: Hydrogen Financial Analysis Scenario Tool Delivers in-depth financial analysis for hydrogen fueling stations. NREL's hydrogen systems analysis activities provide direction, insight, and support for the

  11. Search for a light charged Higgs boson decaying to $ \\mathrm{ c \\bar{s} } $ in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-12-29

    Our search for a light charged Higgs boson, originating from the decay of a top quark and subsequently decaying into a charm quark and a strange antiquark, is presented. The data used in the analysis correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 recorded in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The search is performed in the process tt- WbH?b-, where the W boson decays to a lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Furthermore, the decays lead to a final state comprising an isolated lepton, at least four jets and large missing transverse energy. No significant deviation is observed in the data with respect to the standard model predictions, and model-independent upper limits are set on the branching fraction B(t? H+b), ranging from 1.2 to 6.5% for a charged Higgs boson with mass between 90 and 160 GeV, under the assumption that B(H+ ?cs-) = 100%.

  12. Search for a light charged Higgs boson decaying to $$ \\mathrm{ c \\bar{s} } $$ in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s} =$$ 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-12-29

    Our search for a light charged Higgs boson, originating from the decay of a top quark and subsequently decaying into a charm quark and a strange antiquark, is presented. The data used in the analysis correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 recorded in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The search is performed in the process tt- W±bH∓b-, where the W boson decays to a lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Furthermore, the decays lead to a final state comprising an isolated lepton, at least four jets and largemore » missing transverse energy. No significant deviation is observed in the data with respect to the standard model predictions, and model-independent upper limits are set on the branching fraction B(t→ H+b), ranging from 1.2 to 6.5% for a charged Higgs boson with mass between 90 and 160 GeV, under the assumption that B(H+ →cs-) = 100%.« less

  13. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Produced in Association with a $Z$ Boson in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-03-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson, using up to 7.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions collected with the CDF II detector. We utilize several novel techniques, including multivariate lepton selection, multivariate trigger parametrization, and a multi-stage signal discriminant consisting of specialized functions trained to distinguish individual backgrounds. By increasing acceptance and enhancing signal discrimination, these techniques have significantly improved the sensitivity of the analysis above what was expected from a larger dataset alone. We observe no significant evidence for a signal, and we set limits on the ZH production cross section. For a Higgs boson with mass 115 GeV/c{sup 2}, we expect (observe) a limit of 3.9 (4.8) times the standard model predicted value, at the 95% credibility level.

  14. Current work in energy analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the work performed at Berkeley Lab most recently. One of the Labs accomplishments is the publication of Scenarios of US Carbon Reductions, an analysis of the potential of energy technologies to reduce carbon emissions in the US. This analysis is described and played a key role in shaping the US position on climate change in the Kyoto Protocol negotiations. The Labs participation in the fundamental characterization of the climate change issue by the IPCC is described. Described also is a study of leaking electricity, which is stimulating an international campaign for a one-watt ceiling for standby electricity losses from appliances. This ceiling has the potential to save two-thirds of the 5% of US residential electricity currently expended on standby losses. The 54 vignettes contained in the report summarize results of research activities ranging in scale from calculating the efficacy of individual lamp ballasts to estimating the cost-effectiveness of the national Energy Star{reg_sign} labeling program, and ranging in location from a scoping study of energy-efficiency market transformation in California to development of an energy-efficiency project in the auto parts industry in Shandong Province, China.

  15. Method and apparatus to control the lateral motion of a long metal bar being formed by a mechanical process such as rolling or drawing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Tzyy-Shuh (Ann Arbor, MI); Huang, Hsun-Hau (Ann Arbor, MI); Lin, Chang-Hung (Ypsilanti, MI)

    2011-01-04

    An apparatus to control lateral motion of a bar moving along a guidance path includes a pair of rotatable hubs each having at least first and second rollers at locations around the perimeter of the hub. The first roller has a first retaining groove of a first radius and the second roller has a second groove of a second radius smaller than the first radius. Each hub further includes at least one guiding element located between the rollers with a guide channel extending in the outer surface. A mounting system allows the hubs to be rotated between first and second positions. In the first position the first rollers oppose each other forming a guideway having a first, enlarged diameter for capturing a free end of an approaching bar. In the second position the second rollers form a second, smaller diameter to match the actual size of the bar.

  16. CP violating anomalous top-quark coupling in p$\\bar{p}$ collision at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sehwook; /Iowa State U.

    2011-04-01

    We conduct the first study of the T-odd correlations in tt events produced in p{bar p} collision at the Fermilab Tevatron collider that can be used to search for CP violation. We select events which have lepton+jets final states to identify t{bar t} events and measure counting asymmetries of several physics observables. Based on the result, we search the top quark anomalous couplings at the production vertex at the Tevatron. In addition, Geant4 development, photon identification, the discrimination of a single photon and a photon doublet from {pi}{sup 0} decay are discussed in this thesis.

  17. Branching Fraction Measurements of the Color-Suppressed Decays B0bar to D(*)0 pi0, D(*)0 eta, D(*)0 omega, and D(*)0 eta_prime and Measurement of the Polarization in the Decay B0bar to D*0 omega

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; ,

    2012-02-14

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}', and D*{sup 0}{eta}'. We measure the branching fractions (x10{sup -4}): {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.13, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 3.05 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.28, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.53 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.11, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.23, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{omega}) = 2.57 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.14, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{omega}) = 4.55 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.39, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.48 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.07, and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.49 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.15. We also present the first measurement of the longitudinal polarization fraction of the decay channel D*{sup 0}{omega}, f{sub L} = (66.5 {+-} 4.7 {+-} 1.5)%. In the above, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The measurements are the most precise determinations of these quantities from a single experiment. They are compared to theoretical predictions obtained by factorization, Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). We find that the presence of final state interactions is favored and the measurements are in better agreement with SCET than with pQCD.

  18. Observation of Exclusive Gamma Gamma Production in $p \\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-12-01

    We have observed exclusive {gamma} production in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using data from 1.11 {+-} 0.07 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity taken by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab. We selected events with two electromagnetic showers, each with transverse energy E{sub T} > 2.5 GeV and pseudorapidity |{eta}| < 1.0, with no other particles detected in -7.4 < {eta} < +7.4. The two showers have similar E{sub T} and azimuthal angle separation {Delta}{phi} {approx} {pi}; 34 events have two charged particle tracks, consistent with the QED process p{bar p} {yields} p + e{sup +}e{sup -} + {bar p} by two-photon exchange, while 43 events have no charged tracks. The number of these events that are exclusive {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is consistent with zero and is < 15 at 95% C.L. The cross section for p{bar p} {yields} p + {gamma}{gamma} + {bar p} with |{eta}({gamma})| < 1.0 and E{sub T} ({gamma}) > 2.5 GeV is 2.48{sub -0.35}{sup +0.40}(stat){sub -0.51}{sup +0.40}(syst)pb.

  19. Hypothetical accident conditions thermal analysis of the 5320 package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensel, S.J.; Gromada, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    An axisymmetric model of the 5320 package was created to perform hypothetical accident conditions (HAC) thermal calculations. The analyses assume the 5320 package contains 359 grams of plutonium-238 (203 Watts) in the form of an oxide powder at a minimum density of 2.4 g/cc or at a maximum density of 11.2 g/cc. The solution from a non-solar 100 F ambient steady-state analysis was used as the initial conditions for the fire transient. A 30 minute 1,475 F fire transient followed by cooling via natural convection and thermal radiation to a 100 F non-solar environment was analyzed to determine peak component temperatures and vessel pressures. The 5320 package was considered to be horizontally suspended within the fire during the entire transient.

  20. Nonrelativistic QCD analysis of bottomonium production at the Fermilab

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tevatron (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Nonrelativistic QCD analysis of bottomonium production at the Fermilab Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nonrelativistic QCD analysis of bottomonium production at the Fermilab Tevatron Recent data from the CDF Collaboration on the production of spin-triplet bottomonium states at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider are analyzed within the NRQCD factorization formalism. The color-singlet matrix elements are determined from

  1. First Search for Multijet Resonances in $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$$ TeV $$ p\\bar{p}$$ Collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-07-22

    We present the first model independent search for three-jet hadronic resonances within multijet events inmore » $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$$ TeV $$ p\\bar{p}$$ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. Pair production of supersymmetric gluinos and squarks with hadronic R-parity violating decays is employed as an example of a new physics benchmark for this signature. Selection criteria based on the kinetmatic properties of an ensemble of jet combinations within each event help to extract signal from copious QCD background. Our background estimates include all-hadronic t{anti t} decays that have a signature similar to the signal. No significant excess outside the top quark mass window is observed in data with an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb{sup -1}. We place 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section {sigma}(p{anti p} {yields} X X') x BR ((tilde gg) {yields} 3 jet + 3 jet) where X, X' = {tilde g}, {tilde q}, or {tilde {anti q}}, with {tilde q}, {tilde {anti q}} {yields} {tilde g} + jet, as a function of gluino mass, in the range of 77 GeV/c{sup 2} to 240 GeV/c{sup 2}.« less

  2. Measurements of WW and WZ Production in W plus jets Final States in p(p)over-bar Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De la Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin et al.

    2012-05-02

    We study WW and WZ production with {ell}{nu}qq ({ell} = e,{mu}) final states using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Assuming the ratio between the production cross sections {sigma}(WW) and {sigma}(WZ) as predicted by the standard model, we measure the total WV (V = W,Z) cross section to be {sigma}(WV) = 19.6{sub -3.0}{sup +3.2} pb and reject the background-only hypothesis at a level of 7.9 standard deviations. We also use b-jet discrimination to separate the WZ component from the dominant WW component. Simultaneously fitting WW and WZ contributions, we measure {sigma}(WW) = 15.9{sub -3.2}{sup +3.7} pb and {sigma}(WZ) = 3.3{sub -3.3}{sup +4.1} pb, which is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  3. First Search for Multijet Resonances in $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV $ p\\bar{p}$ Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-07-22

    We present the first model independent search for three-jet hadronic resonances within multijet events in $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV $ p\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. Pair production of supersymmetric gluinos and squarks with hadronic R-parity violating decays is employed as an example of a new physics benchmark for this signature. Selection criteria based on the kinetmatic properties of an ensemble of jet combinations within each event help to extract signal from copious QCD background. Our background estimates include all-hadronic t{anti t} decays that have a signature similar to the signal. No significant excess outside the top quark mass window is observed in data with an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb{sup -1}. We place 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section {sigma}(p{anti p} {yields} X X') x BR ((tilde gg) {yields} 3 jet + 3 jet) where X, X' = {tilde g}, {tilde q}, or {tilde {anti q}}, with {tilde q}, {tilde {anti q}} {yields} {tilde g} + jet, as a function of gluino mass, in the range of 77 GeV/c{sup 2} to 240 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  4. Microsoft Word - fact sheet alternatives and key findings 090214.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Alternatives and Key Findings of the Draft SEIS ALTERNATIVES The Draft SEIS evaluates a range of reactor site and tritium production capacity alternatives. Seven alternatives are analyzed in the Draft SEIS:  Alternative 1 Watts Bar site only (2,500 TPBARs maximum). This is the preferred alternative.  Alternative 2 Sequoyah site only (2,500 TPBARs maximum).  Alternative 3 Both Watts Bar and Sequoyah sites (2,500 TPBARs maximum).  Alternative 4 Watts Bar site only (5,000 TPBARs

  5. Development and Demonstration of a High Efficiency, Rapid Heating, Low NOx Alternative to Conventional Heating of Round Steel Shapes, Steel Substrate (Strip) and Coil Box Transfer Bars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurek, Harry; Wagner, John

    2010-01-25

    Direct Flame Impingement involves the use of an array of very high-velocity flame jets impinging on a work piece to rapidly heat the work piece. The predominant mode of heat transfer is convection. Because of the locally high rate of heat transfer at the surface of the work piece, the refractory walls and exhaust gases of a DFI furnace are significantly cooler than in conventional radiant heating furnaces, resulting in high thermal efficiency and low NOx emissions. A DFI furnace is composed of a successive arrangement of heating modules through or by which the work piece is conveyed, and can be configured for square, round, flat, and curved metal shapes (e.g., billets, tubes, flat bars, and coiled bars) in single- or multi-stranded applications.

  6. Measurement of the top-quark mass in all-jets $$t\\bar{t}$$ events in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2013-07-17

    The mass of the top quark is measured using a sample ofmore » $$t\\bar{t}$$ candidate events with at least six jets in the final state. The sample is selected from data collected with the CMS detector in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 7 TeV in 2011 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.54 inverse femtobarns. The mass is reconstructed for each event employing a kinematic fit of the jets to a $$t\\bar{t}$$ hypothesis. The top-quark mass is measured to be 173.49 $$\\pm$$ 0.69 (stat.) $$\\pm$$ 1.21 (syst.) GeV. A combination with previously published measurements in other decay modes by CMS yields a mass of 173.54 $$\\pm$$ 0.33 (stat.) $$\\pm$$ 0.96 (syst.) GeV.« less

  7. Search for Higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric standard model in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jaminn D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; Lopes de Sa R.; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; et al.

    2012-04-20

    We report results from searches for neutral Higgs bosons produced in p{bar p} collisions recorded by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We study the production of inclusive neutral Higgs boson in the {tau}{tau} final state and in association with a b quark in the b{tau}{tau} and bbb final states. These results are combined to improve the sensitivity to the production of neutral Higgs bosons in the context of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). The data are found to be consistent with expectation from background processes. Upper limits on MSSM Higgs boson production are set for Higgs boson masses ranging from 90 to 300 GeV. We exclude tan {beta} > 20-30 for Higgs boson masses below 180 GeV. These are the most stringent constraints on MSSM Higgs boson production in p{bar p} collisions.

  8. WATT Production of Solar Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Chorzow, Poland Product: Established in 1998, the company produces sun collectors for domestic, small scale, use. Coordinates: 50.26386, 18.936605 Show Map...

  9. Rocky Mountain Power- WattSmart Residential Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rocky Mountain Power offers the Home Energy Savings Program for their residential Wyoming customers to improve the energy efficiency of their homes. Full details are available on the program website. 

  10. Sulphur Springs Valley EC- SunWatts Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sulphur Springs Valley Electric Cooperative (SSVEC) has a loan program that allows its members to finance a portion of a photovoltaic (PV) or small wind system. Loans are available in an amount of ...

  11. Search for High-Mass \\boldmath$e^+e^-$ Resonances in \\boldmath$p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at \\boldmath$\\sqrt{s}=$1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, Michael G.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, Alberto; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

    2008-10-01

    A search for high-mass resonances in the e{sup +}e{sup -} final state is presented based on {radical}s =1.96 TeV p{bar p} collision data from the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron from an integrated luminosity of 2.5 fb{sup -1}. The largest excess over the standard model prediction is at an e{sup +}e{sup -} invariant mass of 240 GeV/c{sup 2}. The probability of observing such an excess arising from fluctuations in the standard model anywhere in the mass range of 150-1,000 GeV/c{sup 2} is 0.6% (equivalent to 2.5 {sigma}). We set Bayesian upper limits on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} X) {center_dot} {Beta}(X {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) at the 95% credibility level, where X is a spin 1 or spin 2 particle, and we exclude the standard model coupling Z{prime} and the Randall-Sundrum graviton for {kappa}/{bar M}{sub Pl} = 0.1 with masses below 963 and 848 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.

  12. Measurements of the $$t\\bar{t}$$ charge asymmetry using the dilepton decay channel in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-04-30

    The t t-bar charge asymmetry in proton-proton collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 7 TeV is measured using the dilepton decay channel (ee, e mu, or mu mu). The data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The t t-bar and lepton charge asymmetries, defined as the differences in absolute values of the rapidities between the reconstructed top quarks and antiquarks and of the pseudorapidities between the positive and negative leptons, respectively, are measured to be Ac = -0.010 +/- 0.017 (stat.) +/- 0.008 (syst.) and Aclep = 0.009 +/- 0.010 (stat.) +/- 0.006 (syst). The lepton charge asymmetry is also measured as a function of the invariant mass, rapidity, and transverse momentum of the t t-bar system. All measurements are consistent with the expectations of the standard model.« less

  13. A simultaneous measurement of the $b$-tagging efficiency scale factor and the $t\\bar{t}$ Production Cross Section at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussain, Nazim; /McGill U.

    2011-07-01

    The ability to compare results between Monte Carlo and data is imperative in modern experimental high-energy physics analyses. The b-tagging efficiency Scale Factor (SF) allows for an accurate comparison of b quark identification in data samples and Monte Carlo. This thesis presents a simultaneous measurement of the SF for the SecVtx algorithm and the t{bar t} production cross section using 5.6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. The t{bar t} cross section was measured to be 7.26 {+-} 0.47 pb, consistent with prior CDF analyses. The tight SF value was measured to be 0.925 {+-} 0.032 and the loose SF value was measured at 0.967 {+-} 0.033. These are the most precise SF SecVtx measurements to be performed at CDF to date.

  14. Dalitz-plot Analysis of B0 -> anti-D0 pi pi-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; ,

    2010-08-25

    The authors report preliminary results from a study of the decay B{sup 0} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using a data sample of 470.9 {+-} 2.8 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Using the Dalitz-plot analysis technique, they find contributions from the intermediate resonances D*{sub 2}(2460){sup -}, D*{sub 0}(2400){sup -}, {rho}(770){sup 0} and f{sub 2}(1270) as well as a {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} S-wave term, a {bar D}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} nonresonant S-wave term and a virtual D*(2010) amplitude. They measure the branching fractions of the contributing decays.

  15. Search for the Z_1(4050)^+ and Z_2(4250)^+ States in bar B^0 to chi_{c1} K^- pi^+ and B^+ to chi_{c1} K^0_S pi^+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-04-10

    We search for the Z{sub 1}(4050){sup +} and Z{sub 2}(4250){sup +} states, reported by the Belle Collaboration, decaying to {chi}{sub c1}{pi}{sup +} in the decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {chi}{sub c1}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and B{sup +} {yields} {chi}{sub c1}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} where {chi}{sub c1} {yields} J/{psi}{gamma}. The data were collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at center-of-mass energy 10.58 GeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 429 fb{sup -1}. In this analysis, we model the background-subtracted, efficiency-corrected {chi}{sub c1}{pi}{sup +} mass distribution using the K{pi} mass distribution and the corresponding normalized K{pi} Legendre polynomial moments, and then test the need for the inclusion of resonant structures in the description of the {chi}{sub c1}{pi}{sup +} mass distribution. No evidence is found for the Z{sub 1}(4050){sup +} and Z{sub 2}(4250){sup +} resonances, and 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions are reported for the corresponding B-meson decay modes.

  16. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for TVA Watts Bar plant * First-of-a-kind three-dimensional (3D) assessment of fuel pellet-to- cladding interaction * VERA 1.0 established with infrastructure and basic industry...

  17. CASL - PWR Reactor Vessel Multi-Physics CFD Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3Oak Ridge National Lab *Correspondence to: yan3j@westinghouse.com A complete 3D SolidWorks CAD model of Watts Bar Unit 1 was constructed based on drawings. A single fuel...

  18. Jennifer Kasten

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jennifer Kasten is a retired nuclear/environmental engineer, most recently employed from 2000 to 2005 at the Tennessee Valley Authority Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant. Previously, she worked in the...

  19. Environmental Stewardship Fact Sheets | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    East Tennessee Technology Park Zones 1 and 2 Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch RiverPoplar Creek Melton Valley Watershed ORAU South Campus Facility...

  20. CASL - VERA-CS Coupled Multi-physics Capability demonstrated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VERA-CS Coupled Multi-physics Capability demonstrated in a Full Core Simulation In December, CASL reported on the latest results from its Watts Bar reactor progression problem...

  1. Current Work in Energy Analysis (Energy Analysis Program -1996 Annual Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Energy Analysis Program

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the work that Environmental Energy Technologies Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been doing most recently. One of our proudest accomplishments is the publication of Scenarios of U.S. Carbon Reductions, an analysis of the potential of energy technologies to reduce carbon emissions in the U.S. This analysis played a key role in shaping the U.S. position on climate change in the Kyoto Protocol negotiations. Our participation in the fundamental characterization of the climate change issue by the IPCC is described. We are also especially proud of our study of ''leaking electricity,'' which is stimulating an international campaign for a one-watt ceiling for standby electricity losses from appliances. This ceiling has the potential to save two-thirds of the 5% of U.S. residential electricity currently expended on standby losses. The 54 vignettes contained in the following pages summarize results of research. activities ranging in scale from calculating the efficacy of individual lamp ballasts to estimating the cost-effectiveness of the national ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} labeling program, and ranging in location from a scoping study of energy-efficiency market transformation in California to development of an energy-efficiency project in the auto parts industry in Shandong Province, China. These are the intellectual endeavors of a talented team of researchers dedicated to public service.

  2. From QCD-based hard-scattering to nonextensive statistical mechanical descriptions of transverse momentum spectra in high-energy $pp$ and $p\\bar p$ collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wilk, Grzegorz; Cirto, Leonardo J. L.; Tsallis, Constantino

    2015-01-01

    Transverse spectra of both jets and hadrons obtained in high-energy $pp$ and $p\\bar p $ collisions at central rapidity exhibit power-law behavior of $1/p_T^n$ at high $p_T$. The power index $n$ is 4-5 for jet production and is slightly greater for hadron production. Furthermore, the hadron spectra spanning over 14 orders of magnitude down to the lowest $p_T$ region in $pp$ collisions at LHC can be adequately described by a single nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution that is widely used in other branches of science. This suggests indirectly the dominance of the hard-scattering process over essentially the whole $p_T$ region at central rapidity in $pp$ collisions at LHC. We show here direct evidences of such a dominance of the hard-scattering process by investigating the power index of UA1 jet spectra over an extended $p_T$ region and the two-particle correlation data of the STAR and PHENIX Collaborations in high-energy $pp$ and $p \\bar p$ collisions at central rapidity. We then study how the showering of the hard-scattering product partons alters the power index of the hadron spectra and leads to a hadron distribution that can be cast into a single-particle non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution. Because of such a connection, the non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution can be considered as a lowest-order approximation of the hard-scattering of partons followed by the subsequent process of parton showering that turns the jets into hadrons, in high energy $pp$ and $p\\bar p$ collisions.

  3. Nuclear Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reactor Technologies Nuclear Reactor Technologies TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Small

  4. Factors affecting the failure of copper connectors brazed to copper bus bar segments on a 615-MVA hydroelectric generator at Grand Coulee Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atteridge, D.G.; Klein, R.F.; Layne, R.; Anderson, W.E.; Correy, T.B.

    1988-01-01

    On March 21, 1986, the United States Bureau of Reclamation experienced a ground fault in the main parallel ring assembly of Unit G19 - a 615-MVA hydroelectric generator - at Grand Coulee Dam, Washington. Inspection of the unit revealed that the ground fault had been induced by fracture of one or more of the copper connectors used to join adjacent segments of one of the bus bars in the north half of the assembly. Various experimental techniques were used to detect and determine the presence of cracks, crack morphology, corrosion products, and material microstructure and/or embrittlement. The results of these inspections and recommendations are given. 7 refs., 27 figs.

  5. Search for anomalous Wtb couplings in single top quark production in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beni S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-02-14

    We present new direct constraints on a general Wtb interaction using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The standard model provides a purely left-handed vector coupling at the Wtb vertex, while the most general, lowest dimension Lagrangian allows right-handed vector and left- or right-handed tensor couplings as well. We obtain precise limits on these anomalous couplings by comparing the data to the expectations from different assumptions on the Wtb coupling.

  6. Precise study of the $Z/\\gamma^*$ boson transverse momentum distribution in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions using a novel technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-10-01

    Using 7.3 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, we measure the distribution of the variable {phi}*{sub {eta}}, which probes the same physical effects as the Z/{gamma}* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. A QCD prediction is found to describe the general features of the {phi}*{sub {eta}} distribution, but is unable to describe its detailed shape or dependence on boson rapidity. A prediction that includes a broadening of transverse momentum for small values of the parton momentum fraction is strongly disfavored.

  7. Search for Production of Heavy Particles Decaying to Top Quarks and Invisible Particles in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    We present a search for a new particle T{prime} decaying to a top-quark via T{prime} {yields} t + X, where X is an invisible particle. In a data sample with 4.8 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab in p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, we search for pair production of T0 in the lepton+jets channel, p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} + XX {yields} {ell}{nu}bqq{prime}b + XX. We interpret our results primarily in terms of a model where T{prime} are exotic fourth generation quarks and X are dark matter particles. The data are consistent with standard model expectations, and we set 95% confidence level limits on the generic production of T{prime}{bar T}{prime} {yields} t{bar t} + XX. We apply these limits to the dark matter model and exclude the fourth generation exotic quarks T{prime} at 95% confidence level up to m{sub T{prime}} = 360 GeV/c{sup 2} for m{sub x} {<=} 100 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  8. Top physics: measurement of the tt-bar production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev using lepton + jets events with secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-04-07

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section using events with one charged lepton and jets from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96TeV. In these events, heavy flavor quarks from top quark decay are identified with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. From 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab, a total of 48 candidate events are selected, where 13.5 {+-} 1.8 events are expected from background contributions. We measure a t{bar t} production cross section of 5.6{sub -1.1}{sup _1.2}(stat.){sub -0.6}{sup +0.9}(syst.)pb.

  9. Measurement of the $WZ$ Cross Section and Triple Gauge Couplings in $p \\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-02-01

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the WZ production cross section as well as limits on anomalous WWZ couplings at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV in proton-antiproton collisions. The WZ candidates are reconstructed from decays containing three charged leptons and missing energy from a neutrino, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector (7.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity), 64 candidate events are observed with the expected background contributing 8 {+-} 1 events. The measured total cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WZ) = 3.93{sub -0.53}{sup +0.60}(stat){sub -0.46}{sup +0.59}(syst) pb is in good agreement with the standard model prediction of 3.50 {+-} 0.21. The same sample is used to set limits on anomalous WWZ couplings.

  10. Search for High Mass Resonances Decaying to Muon Pairs in $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-01-01

    We present a search for a new narrow, spin-1, high mass resonance decaying to {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} + X, using a matrix element based likelihood and a simultaneous measurement of the resonance mass and production rate. In data with 4.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1960 GeV, the most likely signal cross section is consistent with zero at 16% confidence level. We therefore do not observe evidence for a high mass resonance, and place limits on models predicting spin-1 resonances, including M > 1071 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level for a Z{prime} boson with the same couplings to fermions as the Z boson.

  11. Measurement of the $t\\bar{t}$ Production Cross Section with an in situ Calibration of $b$-jet Identification Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-07-01

    A measurement of the top-quark pair-production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.12 fb{sup -1} collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab is presented. Decays of top-quark pairs into the final states e{nu} + jets and {mu}{nu} + jets are selected, and the cross section and the b-jet identification efficiency are determined using a new measurement technique which requires that the measured cross sections with exactly one and multiple identified b-quarks from the top-quark decays agree. Assuming a top-quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, a cross section of 8.5 {+-} 0.6(stat.) {+-} 0.7(syst.) pb is measured.

  12. Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in t t-bar production in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2014-08-01

    The normalised differential top quark-antiquark production cross section is measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV at the LHC with the CMS detector. The measurement is performed in both the dilepton and lepton + jets decay channels using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns. Using a procedure to associate jets to decay products of the top quarks, the differential cross section of the t t-bar production is determined as a function of the additional jet multiplicity in the lepton + jets channel. Furthermore, the fraction of events with no additional jets is measured in the dilepton channel, as a function of the threshold on the jet transverse momentum. The measurements are compared with predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics and no significant deviations are observed.

  13. Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in t t-bar production in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2014-08-20

    The normalised differential top quark-antiquark production cross section is measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV at the LHC with the CMS detector. The measurement is performed in both the dilepton and lepton + jets decay channels using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns. Using a procedure to associate jets to decay products of the top quarks, the differential cross section of the t t-bar production is determined as a function of the additional jet multiplicity in the lepton + jets channel. Furthermore, the fractionmore » of events with no additional jets is measured in the dilepton channel, as a function of the threshold on the jet transverse momentum. The measurements are compared with predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics and no significant deviations are observed.« less

  14. Search for the Flavor Changing Neutral Current Decay t $\\to Zq$ in $p \\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, : T.

    2008-05-01

    We report a search for the flavor changing neutral current (FCNC) decay of the top quark t {yields} Zq (q = u, c) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector. This decay is strongly suppressed in the standard model (SM) and a signal at the Tevatron would be an indication of physics beyond the SM. Using Z+ {ge} 4 jet final state candidate events, both with and without an identified bottom quark jet, we discriminate signal from background by exploring kinematic constraints present in FCNC events and obtain an upper limit of {Beta}(t {yields} Zq) < 3.7% at 95% C.L.

  15. Measurement of the $t \\bar{t}$ production cross section in the dilepton channel in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-12-29

    The top-antitop quark (t t-bar) production cross section is measured in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 inverse femtobarns. The measurement is performed by analysing events with a pair of electrons or muons, or one electron and one muon, and at least two jets, one of which is identified as originating from hadronisation of a bottom quark. The measured cross section is 239 +/- 2 (stat.) +/- 11 (syst.) +/- 6 (lum.) pb, for an assumed top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV,morein agreement with the prediction of the standard model.less

  16. Search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau(+)tau(-) pairs in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Achary, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjea, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopia, S.; Haley, J.; Hang, L.; Harder, K.; Harein, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoangau, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Lashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I. I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-02-01

    We present a search for the production of neutral Higgs bosons decaying into {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pairs in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}, were collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We set upper limits at the 95% C.L. on the product of production cross section and branching ratio for a scalar resonance decaying into {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pairs, and we interpret these limits as limits on the production of Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and as constraints in the MSSM parameter space.

  17. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Gillberg D.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J-F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Hegeman J. G.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Makovec N.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-03-20

    We present a measurement of the inclusive jet cross section using the Run II cone algorithm and data collected by the D0 experiment in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.70 fb{sup -1}. The jet energy calibration and the method used to extract the inclusive jet cross section are described. We discuss the main uncertainties, which are dominated by the jet energy scale uncertainty. The results cover jet transverse momenta from 50 GeV to 600 GeV with jet rapidities in the range -2.4 to 2.4 and are compared to predictions using recent proton parton distribution functions. Studies of correlations between systematic uncertainties in transverse momentum and rapidity are presented.

  18. Search for Doubly Charged Higgs Boson Pair Production in p(p)over-bar Collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orbaker, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; et. al.

    2012-01-10

    We present a search for pair production of doubly-charged Higgs bosons in the processes q{bar q} {yields} H{sup 2+}H{sup 2-} decaying through H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {tau}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}, {mu}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}, {mu}{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}}. The search is performed in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using an integrated luminosity of up to 7.0 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The results are used to set 95% C.L. limits on the pair production cross section of doubly-charged Higgs bosons and on their mass for different H{sup {+-}{+-}} branching fractions. Models predicting different H{sup {+-}{+-}} decays are investigated. Assuming B(H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {tau}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}) = 1 yields an observed (expected) lower limit on the mass of a left-handed H{sub L}{sup {+-}{+-}} boson of 128 (116) GeV and assuming {Beta}(H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}) = 1 the corresponding limits are 144 (149) GeV. In a model with {Beta}(H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {tau}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}) = {Beta}(H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}) = {Beta}(H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}}) = 1/3, we obtain M(H{sub L}{sup {+-}{+-}}) > 130 (138) GeV.

  19. Measurements of Time-Dependent CP-Asymmetry Parameters in B Meson Decays to \\eta^{\\prime} K^0 and of Branching Fractions of SU(3) Related Modes with BaBar Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biassoni, Pietro; /Milan U.

    2009-01-22

    In this thesis work we have measured the following upper limits at 90% of confidence level, for B meson decays (in units of 10{sup -6}), using a statistics of 465.0 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{eta}) < 1.4 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{eta}{prime}) < 2.1 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{phi}) < 0.52 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{omega}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{phi}) < 1.2 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}) < 1.7 We have no observation of any decay mode, statistical significance for our measurements is in the range 1.3-3.5 standard deviation. We have a 3.5{sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{omega} and a 3.1 {sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}. The absence of observation of the B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0} open an issue related to the large difference compared to the charged mode B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +} branching fraction, which is measured to be 3.7 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.1 [118]. Our results represent substantial improvements of the previous ones [109, 110, 111] and are consistent with theoretical predictions. All these results were presented at Flavor Physics and CP Violation (FPCP) 2008 Conference, that took place in Taipei, Taiwan. They will be soon included into a paper to be submitted to Physical Review D. For time-dependent analysis, we have reconstructed 1820 {+-} 48 flavor-tagged B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0} events, using the final BABAR statistic of 467.4 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs. We use these events to measure the time-dependent asymmetry parameters S and C. We find S = 0.59 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, and C = -0.06 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.02. A non-zero value of C would represent a directly CP non-conserving component in B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, while S would be equal to sin2{beta} measured in B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} [108], a mixing-decay interference effect, provided the decay is dominated by amplitudes of a single weak phase. The new measured value of S can be considered in agreement with the expectations of the 'Standard Model', inside the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Inconsistency of our result for S with CP conservation (S = 0) has a significance of 7.1 standard deviations (statistical and systematics included). Our result for the direct-CP violation parameter C is 0.9 standard deviations from zero (statistical and systematics included). Our results are in agreement with the previous ones [18]. Despite the statistics is only 20% larger than the one used in previous measurement, we improved of 20% the error on S and of 14% the error on C. This error is the smaller ever achieved, by both BABAR and Belle, in Time-Dependent CP Violation Parameters measurement is a b {yields} s transition.

  20. NREL: Energy Analysis - Manufacturing Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Analysis Home Capabilities & Expertise Key Activities Analysis of Project Finance ... Supply Constraints Analysis Workforce Development Analysis Resource Assessment Models & ...

  1. An Integrated Front-End Readout And Feature Extraction System for the BaBar Drift Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinlong; /Colorado U.

    2006-08-10

    The BABAR experiment has been operating at SLAC's PEP-II asymmetric B-Factory since 1999. The accelerator has achieved more than three times its original design luminosity of 3 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with plans for an additional factor of three in the next two years. To meet the experiment's performance requirements in the face of significantly higher trigger and background rates, the drift chamber's front-end readout system has been redesigned around the Xilinx Spartan 3 FPGA. The new system implements analysis and feature-extraction of digitized waveforms in the front-end, reducing the data bandwidth required by a factor of four.

  2. Model-Independent Results for the Decay B \\to L Nu(L) Gamma at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindemann, D.M.; /McGill U.

    2012-04-09

    We present a search for the radiative leptonic decays B{sub +} {yields} e{sup +} {nu}{sub e}{gamma} and B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}{gamma} using data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We fully reconstruct the hadronic decay of one of the B mesons in {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{sup +}B{sup -} and then search for evidence of the signal decay within the rest of the event. This method provides clean kinematic information on the signal's missing energy and high momentum photon and lepton, and allows for a model-independent analysis of this decay. Using a data sample of 465 million B-meson pairs, we obtain sensitivity to branching fractions of the same order as predicted by the Standard Model. We report a model-independent branching fraction upper limit of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{gamma}) < 15.6 x 10{sup -6} ({ell} = e or {mu}) at the 90% confidence level.

  3. Searches for the Theta_s(1540)+ Strange-Pentaquark Candidate in e+e- Annihilation, Hadroproduction and Electroproduction with the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Jonathan P.; /SLAC

    2009-07-29

    Since early in 2003, several experiments have presented evidence for the existence of a positive strangeness baryon state of mass around 1540 MeV/c{sup 2} and width <8 MeV, the {Theta}(1540), which decays to K{sup +}n and K{sup 0}p. Such a state has minimum quark content udud{bar s} and consequently has been interpreted as the S = +1 member of the anti-decuplet of pentaquark states proposed by Diakonov et al. Subsequently, the NA49 experiment presented evidence for the S = -2 member of the anti-decuplet, the {Xi}{sub 5}(1860){sup --}, but this has yet to be observed in any other experiment. Results from the search for the production of the {Theta}(1540) memember of the anti-decuplet of pentaquark states using data from e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions obtained with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II Collider are presented. No signal is observed, and cross section limits for the {Theta}(1540) are given; these prove to be well below the cross section values for ordinary baryons of similar mass. In addition, a search has been carried out for the electroproduction of the {Theta}(1540) in the material of the BABAR detector. Event selection procedures are discussed in detail, the results of this search are presented, and are discussed in the light of several other experiments.

  4. Search for $WH$ associated production in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\,{\\rm TeV}$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Aoki, Masato; Askew, Andrew Warren

    2012-03-01

    This report describes a search for associated production of W and Higgs bosons based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L {approx} 5.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. Events containing a W {yields} {ell}{nu} candidate (with {ell} corresponding to e or {mu}) are selected in association with two or three reconstructed jets. One or two of the jets are required to be consistent with having evolved from a b quark. A multivariate discriminant technique is used to improve the separation of signal and backgrounds. Expected and observed upper limits are obtained for the product of the WH production cross section and branching ratios and reported in terms of ratios relative to the prediction of the standard model as a function of the mass of the Higgs boson (M{sub H}). The observed and expected 95% C.L. upper limits obtained for an assumed M{sub H} = 115 GeV are, respectively, factors of 4.5 and 4.8 larger than the value predicted by the standard model.

  5. Search for the Production of Scalar Bottom Quarks in $p \\bar {p} $ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} $ = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.

    2010-05-01

    We report on a search for direct scalar bottom quark (sbottom) pair production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, in events with large missing transverse energy and two jets of hadrons in the final state, where at least one of the jets is required to be identified as originating from a b quark. The study uses a CDF Run II data sample corresponding to 2.65 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The data are in agreement with the standard model. In an R-parity conserving minimal supersymmetric scenario, and assuming that the sbottom decays exclusively into a bottom quark and a neutralino, 95% confidence-level upper limits on the sbottom pair production cross section of 0.1 pb are obtained. For neutralino masses below 70 GeV/c{sup 2}, sbottom masses up to 230 GeV/c{sup 2} are excluded at 95% confidence level.

  6. Search for a Very Light CP-Odd Higgs Boson in Top Quark Decays from pp-bar; Collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-07-11

    We present the results of a search for a very light CP-odd Higgs boson a10 originating from top quark decays t?Hb ? W(*)a10b, and subsequently decaying into ?+?-. Using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector in pp-bar collisions at 1.96 TeV, we perform a search for events containing a lepton, three or more jets, and an additional isolated track with transverse momentum in the range 3 to 20 GeV/c. Observed events are consistent with background sources, and 95% C.L. limits are set on the branching ratio of t?Hb for various masses of H and a10.

  7. Limits on Anomalous Trilinear Gauge Couplings in $Z\\gamma$ Events from $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    Using Z{gamma} candidate events collected by the CDF detector at the Tevatron Collider, we search for potential anomalous (non-standard-model) couplings between the Z boson and the photon. At the hard scatter energies typical of the Tevatron, standard model Z{gamma} couplings are too weak to be detected by current experiments; hence any evidence of couplings indicates new physics. Measurements are performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb{sup -1} in the Z {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}} decay channel and 5.1 fb{sup -1} in the Z {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -} (l = {mu}, e) decay channels. The combination of these measurements provides the most stringent limits to date on Z{gamma} trilinear gauge couplings. Using an energy scale of {Lambda} = 1.5 TeV to allow for a direct comparison with previous measurements, we find limits on the CP-conserving parameters that describe Z{gamma} couplings to be |h{sub 3}{sup {gamma},Z}| < 0.017 and |h{sub 4}{sup {gamma},Z}| < 0.0006. These results are consistent with standard model predictions.

  8. Search for a dark matter candidate produced in association with a single top quark in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Anza, F.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2012-02-01

    We report a new search for dark matter in a data sample of an integrated luminosity of 7.7 fb{sup -1} of Tevatron p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected by the CDF II detector. We search for production of a dark matter candidate, D, in association with a single top quark. We consider the hadronic decay mode of the top quark exclusively, yielding a final state of three jets with missing transverse energy. The data are consistent with the standard model; we thus set 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section of the process p{bar p} {yields} t + D as a function of the mass of the dark-matter candidate. The limits are approximately 0.5 pb for a dark-matter particle with mass in the range of 0 - 150 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  9. Z(gamma) production and limits on anomalous ZZ(gamma) and Z(gamma gamma) couplings in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kobach, A. C.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; et al.

    2012-03-01

    We present a measurement of p{bar p} {yields} Z{sub {gamma}} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{sub {gamma}} ({ell} = e, {mu}) production with a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.2 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The results of the electron and muon channels are combined, and we measure the total production cross section and the differential cross section d{sigma}/dp{sub T}{sup {gamma}}, where p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} is the momentum of the photon in the plane transverse to the beam line. The results obtained are consistent with the standard model predictions from next-to-leading order use ttransverse momentum spectrum of the photon to place limits on anomalous ZZ{gamma} and Z{gamma}{gamma} couplings.

  10. Model-independent measurement of t-channel single top quark production in p(p)over-bar collisions at,root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Ancu, L. S.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, R.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cochran, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Eller, P.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Focke, C.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; et al.

    2011-11-17

    We present a model-independent measurement of t-channel electroweak production of single top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and selecting events containing an isolated electron or muon, missing transverse energy and one or two jets originating from the fragmentation of b quarks, we measure a cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tqb + X) = 2.90 {+-} 0.59 (stat + syst) pb for a top quark mass of 172.5 GeV. The probability of the background to fluctuate and produce a signal as large as the one observed is 1.6 x 10{sup -8}, corresponding to a significance of 5.5 standard deviations.

  11. Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWA...

  12. Property:GeneratingCapacity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWA...

  13. Property:GrossProdCapacity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWA...

  14. Property:InstalledCapacity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWA...

  15. Design and Structural Analysis of Mars Rover RTG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred; Hamrick, T.; Sankarankandath, V.; Shirbacheh, M.

    1989-09-29

    The paper describes the design and the structural and mass analysis of a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) for powering the MARS Rover vehicle, which is a critical element of the unmanned Mars Rover and Sample Return mission (MRSR). The RTG design study was conducted by Fairchild Space Company for the U.S. Department of Energy, in support of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's MRSR project.; The paper briefly describes a reference mission scenario, an illustrative Rover design and activity pattern on Mars, and its power system requirements and environmental constraints, including the RTG cooling requirements during transit to Mars. It identifies the key RTG design problem, i.e. venting the helium generated by the fuel's alpha decay without intrusion of the Martian atmosphere into the RTG, and proposes a design approach for solving that problem.; Using that approach, it describes a very conservative baseline RTG design. The design is based on the proven and safety-qualified General Purpose Heat Source module, and employs standard thermoelectric unicouples whose reliability and performance stability has been extensively demonstrated on previous space missions. The heat source of the 250-watt RTG consists of a stack of 18 separate modules that is supported at its ends but not along its length. The paper describes and analyzes the structure that holds the stack together during Earth launch and Mars operations but allows it to come apart in case of an inadvertent reentry.; A companion paper presented at this conference describes the RTG's thermal and electrical analysis, and compares its performance with that of several lighter but less conservative design options.; There is a duplicate copy in the ESD files. This document is not relevent to OSTI Library. Do not send.

  16. Data summary for the near-shore sediment characterization task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, D.A.; Hargrove, W.W.; Campbell, K.R.; Wood, M.A.; Rash, C.D.

    1994-10-01

    This report presents the results of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). The goals of the task were to (1) determine the extent to which near-shore surface sediments are contaminated by releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and (2) provide data for the Watts Bar Reservoir Interagency Permitting Group (WBRIPG) to evaluate the human health risks from exposure to sediments during and following dredging operations. The data collected for this task are also to be used in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RLTS) for the CR-ERP operable units (Lower Watts Bar and Clinch River) to characterize the human health risk associated with exposure to near-shore sediments throughout the Watts Bar Reservoir.

  17. CO2-H2O Mixtures in the Geological Sequestration of CO2. II. Partitioning in Chloride Brines at 12-100 °C and 1-600 bar.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CO 2 -H 2 O Mixtures in the Geological Sequestration of CO 2 . II. Partitioning in Chloride Brines at 12-100°C and up to 600 bar. Nicolas Spycher and Karsten Pruess Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1116, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California, USA September 2004 ABSTRACT Correlations presented by Spycher et al. (2003) to compute the mutual solubilities of CO 2 and H 2 O are extended to include the effect of chloride salts in the aqueous phase. This is accomplished by including, in

  18. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ Production Cross Section and Search for Anomalous $WW\\gamma$ and $WWZ$ Couplings in $p \\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-12-01

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the W boson pair production cross section and most sensitive test of anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The WW candidates are reconstructed from decays containing two charged leptons and two neutrinos, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector from 3.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, a total of 654 candidate events are observed with an expected background contribution of 320 {+-} 47 events. The measured total cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} + X) = 12.1 {+-} 0.9 (stat){sub -1.4}{sup +1.6} (syst) pb, which is in good agreement with the standard model prediction. The same data sample is used to place constraints on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings.

  19. Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in Association with a $W$ Boson Using a Matrix Element Technique at CDF in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb{sup -1}. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits are set on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WH) x {Beta}(H {yields} b{bar b}). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between m{sub H} = 100 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub H} = 150 GeV/c{sup 2}. The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.

  20. Where few have gone before | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Where few have gone before Where few have gone before Posted: April 16, 2015 - 4:25pm From left, Leslie Houston, Angie Fritts and Megan Houchin inside the under-construction cooling tower for TVA's Watts Bar Nuclear Unit 2. Five Y-12 women recently had the rare opportunity to tour a nuclear reactor site - including the inside of a containment structure and iconic cooling water tower. The tour of the Tennessee Valley Authority's Watts Bar site was part of an all-day event organized by TVA and

  1. SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    812 Supplement Analysis 1 October 2013 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS for the FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for NECO (FORMERLY HAXTUN) WIND ENERGY PROJECT LOGAN AND PHILLIPS COUNTIES, COLORADO U. S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office and U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Customer Service Region OCTOBER 2013 DOE/EA-1812/SA-1 DOE/EA-1812 Supplement Analysis 2 October 2013 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS for the FINAL

  2. Search for a Very Light CP-Odd Higgs Boson in Top Quark Decays from pp-bar; Collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-07-11

    We present the results of a search for a very light CP-odd Higgs boson a10 originating from top quark decays t→H±b → W±(*)a10b, and subsequently decaying into τ+τ-. Using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector in pp-bar collisions at 1.96 TeV, we perform a search for events containing a lepton, three or more jets, and an additional isolated track with transverse momentum in the range 3 to 20 GeV/c. Observed events are consistent with background sources, and 95% C.L. limits are set on the branching ratio of t→H±b formore » various masses of H± and a10.« less

  3. Search for a low mass Standard Model Higgs boson in the $\\tau-\\tau$ decay channel in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2012-01-01

    We report on a search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying into pairs of {tau} leptons in p{bar p} collisions produced by the Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The analyzed data sample was recorded by the CDFII detector and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 6.0 fb{sup -1}. The search is performed in the final state with one {tau} decaying leptonically and the second one identified through its semi-hadronic decay. Since no significant excess is observed, a 95% credibility level upper limit on the production cross section times branching ratio to the {tau}{tau} final state is set for hypothetical Higgs boson masses between 100 and 150 GeV/c{sup 2}. For a Higgs boson of 120 GeV/c{sup 2} the observed (expected) limit is 14.6 (15.3) the predicted value.

  4. First Measurement of the Angular Coefficients of Drell-Yan $e^{+}e^{-}$ pairs in the Z Mass Region from $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    We report on the first measurement of the angular distributions of final state electrons in p{bar p} {yields} {gamma}*/Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} + X events produced in the Z boson mass region at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data sample collected by the CDF II detector for this result corresponds to 2.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The angular distributions are studied as a function of the transverse momentum of the electron-positron pair and show good agreement with the Lam-Tung relation, consistent with a spin-1 description of the gluon, and demonstrate that at high values of the transverse momentum, Z bosons are produced via quark anti-quark annihilation and quark-gluon Compton processes.

  5. Measurement of the CP-violating phase phi sJ/psi phi using the flavor-tagged decay Bs(0) -> J/psi phi in 8 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, {phi}{sub s}{sup J/{psi}{phi}} and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s}, from the flavor-tagged decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb{sup -1} accumulated with the D0 detector using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s} = 0.163{sub -0.064}{sup +0.065} ps{sup -1} and {phi}{sub s}{sup J}/{psi}{phi} = -0.55{sub -0.36}{sup +0.38}. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  6. Watt-Sun: A Multi-Scale, Multi-Model, Machine-Learning Solar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    learning, and cloud modeling integrated in a universal platform with an open architecture. ... INNOVATIONS IBM sky cameras.jpg The goal of the project is the development and ...

  7. The Kill-a-Watt Competition at University of Central Florida

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Margaret Lo

    2010-09-01

    At the University of Central Florida, students have taken it upon themselves to create a culture of energy efficiency. Each year, different dorm buildings compete to see who can save the most. In 2009, the school saw a total savings of $27,000. As of March 2010, they've saved over $24,000 this year alone.

  8. Is the hourly data from the NREL PV Watts program adjusted for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it is stated, "No adjustments are made for leap years or daylight savings time." Hope this helps. Pgray on 1 July, 2014 - 07:04 Points: 0 Thank you. I appreciate the help....

  9. The Kill-a-Watt Competition at University of Central Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the University of Central Florida, students have taken it upon themselves to create a culture of energy efficiency. Each year, different dorm buildings compete to see who can save the most. In...

  10. The LSST Camera 500 watt -130 degC Mixed Refrigerant Cooling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowden, Gordon B.; Langton, Brian J.; Little, William A.; Powers, Jacob R; Schindler, Rafe H.; Spektor, Sam; /MMR-Technologies, Mountain View, CA

    2014-05-28

    The LSST Camera has a higher cryogenic heat load than previous CCD telescope cameras due to its large size (634 mm diameter focal plane, 3.2 Giga pixels) and its close coupled front-end electronics operating at low temperature inside the cryostat. Various refrigeration technologies are considered for this telescope/camera environment. MMR-Technology’s Mixed Refrigerant technology was chosen. A collaboration with that company was started in 2009. The system, based on a cluster of Joule-Thomson refrigerators running a special blend of mixed refrigerants is described. Both the advantages and problems of applying this technology to telescope camera refrigeration are discussed. Test results from a prototype refrigerator running in a realistic telescope configuration are reported. Current and future stages of the development program are described. (auth)

  11. AVTA: GE Energy WattStation AC Level 2 Charging System Testing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research...

  12. The Kill-a-Watt Competition at University of Central Florida

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Castro, Chris; Lo, Margaret; Norvell, David; Coelho, Keith; Hitt, John

    2013-05-29

    At the University of Central Florida, students have taken it upon themselves to create a culture of energy efficiency. Each year, different dorm buildings compete to see who can save the most. In 2009, the school saw a total savings of $27,000. As of March 2010, they've saved over $24,000 this year alone. Hear more stories about energy efficiency and renewable energy at Energy Empowers: http://www.eereblogs.energy.gov/energyempowers/page/Home-Page.aspx

  13. Watch the Watts: Tips for Buying a New Television | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Jeannie Saur Senior Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Buying a new television in a complex and feature-rich market can be a daunting experience. Sure there are lots of great choices with stunning picture quality and amazing features. And with so much competition, TV prices have fallen dramatically from even a year ago. But when my 1990-era television finally died, I was overwhelmed with choices for a flat screen TV. There are plasmas, liquid crystal displays (LCDs), and

  14. First observation of CP violation in B0 ? D(*)CP h0 decays by a combined time-dependent analysis of BaBar And Belle Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdesselam, A.

    2015-09-16

    We report a measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of B0 ? D(*)CPh0 decays, where the light neutral hadron h0 is a ?0, ?, or ? meson, and the neutral D meson is reconstructed in the CP eigenstates K+K, K0S?0, or K0S?. The measurement is performed combining the final data samples collected at the ?(4S) resonance by the BABAR and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy B factories PEP-II at SLAC and KEKB at KEK, respectively. The data samples contain (4713)106 BB pairs recorded by the BABAR detector and (77211)106 BB pairs recorded by the Belle detector. We measure the CP asymmetry parameters ?fS=+0.660.10(stat)0.06(syst) and C=0.020.07(stat)0.03(syst). These results correspond to the first observation of CP violation in B0 ? D(*)CPh0 decays. As a result, the hypothesis of no mixing-induced CP violation is excluded in these decays at the level of 5.4 standard deviations.

  15. Uncertainty Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion ...

  16. NREL: Energy Analysis - Market Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Market Analysis The laboratory's market analysis helps increase the use of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) technologies in the marketplace by providing strategic information to stakeholders interested in rapidly changing electricity markets. Our high-quality and objective crosscutting assessments and analysis support informed decision making. Primary focuses include: Energy Technology/Program Cost, Performance, and Market Data The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - Final CLWR SEIS PUBLIC SCOPING PRESENTATION...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Because tritium decays at a rate of 5.5 percent per i b l i h d i di ll year, it must be ... rods (TPBARs) at Watts Bar 1 NNSA d h i f i i h h * NNSA expected that permeation ...

  18. Finite element analysis of multilayer coextrusion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Schunk, Peter Randall; Baer, Thomas A.; Mrozek, Randy A.; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Collins, Robert; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2011-09-01

    Multilayer coextrusion has become a popular commercial process for producing complex polymeric products from soda bottles to reflective coatings. A numerical model of a multilayer coextrusion process is developed based on a finite element discretization and two different free-surface methods, an arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) moving mesh implementation and an Eulerian level set method, to understand the moving boundary problem associated with the polymer-polymer interface. The goal of this work is to have a numerical capability suitable for optimizing and troubleshooting the coextrusion process, circumventing flow instabilities such as ribbing and barring, and reducing variability in layer thickness. Though these instabilities can be both viscous and elastic in nature, for this work a generalized Newtonian description of the fluid is used. Models of varying degrees of complexity are investigated including stability analysis and direct three-dimensional finite element free surface approaches. The results of this work show how critical modeling can be to reduce build test cycles, improve material choices, and guide mold design.

  19. Program Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and abate nearly 20,000 mmt of CO2 through 2050. EE portfolio analysis wNEMS+MARKAL (Frances Wood, OnLocation, and Chip Friley, BNL) Heavily leverages ANL's Autonomie Tool...

  20. Supplement Analysis

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Supplement Analysis to the LCLS-ll Environmental Assessment, July. 2014 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Office of *ENERGY 1 Science SLAG Site Office SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS-8A Menlo Park, CA 94025 DATE: September 15, 2015 MEMORANDUM FOR: Paul Golan, Site Manager, SLAC Site Office THROUGH: James Elmore, ISC-OR NEPA Compliance Officer, Oak Ridge Office FROM: Mitzi Heard, NEPA Coornator, SLAC Site Office SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis to SLAC LCLS-I1 Environmental Assessment.

  1. NREL: Energy Analysis - Sustainability Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainability Analysis The laboratory's Sustainability Analysis looks at the environmental, life-cycle, climate, and other impacts of renewable energy technologies. Our energy choices have global implications that affect greenhouse gas emissions, water resource distribution, mineral consumption, and equipment manufacturing and transportation. The school of thought is that renewable energy technologies are more sustainable than many current sources of energy. However, we need to verify that this

  2. Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR), The NSLS 200 MeV Linear Electron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumberg, L.N.; Ackerman, A.I.; Dickinson, T.; Heese, R.N.; Larson, R.A.; Neuls, C.W.; Pjerov, S.; Sheehan, J.F.

    1993-06-15

    The radiological, fire and electrical hazards posed by a 200 MeV electron Linear Accelerator, which the NSLS Department will install and commission within a newly assembled structure, are addressed in this Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Although it is clear that this accelerator is intended to be the injector for a future experimental facility, we address only the Linac in the present PSAR since neither the final design nor the operating characteristics of the experimental facility are known at the present time. The fire detection and control system to be installed in the building is judged to be completely adequate in terms of the marginal hazard presented - no combustible materials other than the usual cabling associated with such a facility have been identified. Likewise, electrical hazards associated with power supplies for the beam transport magnets and accelerator components such as the accelerator klystrons and electron gun are classified as marginal in terms of potential personnel injury, cost of equipment lost, program downtime and public impact perceptions as defined in the BNL Environmental Safety and Health Manual and the probability of occurrence is deemed to be remote. No unusual features have been identified for the power supplies or electrical distribution system, and normal and customary electrical safety standards as practiced throughout the NSLS complex and the Laboratory are specified in this report. The radiation safety hazards are similarly judged to be marginal in terms of probability of occurrence and potential injury consequences since, for the low intensity operation proposed - a factor of 25 less than the maximum Linac capability specified by the vendor - the average beam power is only 0.4 watts. The shielding specifications given in this report will give adequate protection to both the general public and nonradiation workers in areas adjacent to the building as well as radiation workers within the controlled access building.

  3. Analysis Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    2012-03-16

    The Analysis Repository is a compilation of analyses and analytical models relevant to assessing hydrogen fuel and fuel cell issues. Projects in the repository relate to: hydrogen production, delivery, storage, fuel cells, and hydrogen vehicle technology; hydrogen production feedstock cost and availability; electricity production, central and distributed; energy resource estimation and forecasting.

  4. Energy Market Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Market Analysis synthesizes all analysis efforts in the analysis spectrum. Scenario analyses, in the context of market analysis, are used to answer several questions:

  5. Financial Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This tool takes into account the net cost savings, implementation costs, and operations and maintenance costs of an energy conservation measure, as well as typical project lifetime and the relating discount and escalation rates. The result is a cash flow analysis over the project lifetime with calculations for simple payback, discounted payback, net present value, and savings to investment ratio. The tool also displays the results graphically.

  6. Uncertainty Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  7. Polyculture Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Polyculture Analysis 24 March 2015 Deborah Newby, Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Algal Feedstocks DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Hub -- Sandia National Laboratories Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office Goal Statement (Hub) Challenge: * To contribute to meeting the Renewable Fuel Standard, DOE

  8. systems analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems analysis - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  9. Microalgae Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microalgae Analysis March 24, 2015 Algal Feedstocks Review Mark Wigmosta Pacific Northwest National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal: Enable Economically Feasible and Sustainable Algal Biofuels to Achieve Advanced Biofuel Targets Key challenge: "A national assessment of land requirements for algae cultivation that takes into account climatic conditions; fresh water, inland and coastal saline water, and

  10. Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Arizona teacher's expertise draws from technologies and strategies in residential efficiency and renewable energy developed through the Energy Department’s Building America program. His class' first home generates more power than it uses.

  11. Bar Gadda LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Place: Palo Alto, California Zip: 94306 Sector: Geothermal energy, Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Has developed a new technology to produce hydrogen from water or geothermal...

  12. Resource Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resource Analysis Technological Feasibility & Cost Analysis Environmental Analysis Delivery Analysis Infrastructure Development & Financial Analysis Energy Market Analysis DOE H2A ...

  13. Economic Analysis of Policy Effects Analysis Platform

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Analysis of Policy Effects Analysis Platform March 24, 2015 Jason Hansen, PhD ... * Annual Milestone (93015): Identify economic benefits of co- products on biorefinery ...

  14. Stability analysis of self-similar behaviors in perfect fluid gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitsuda, Eiji; Tomimatsu, Akira

    2006-06-15

    Stability of self-similar solutions for gravitational collapse is an important problem to be investigated from the perspectives of their nature as an attractor, critical phenomena, and instability of a naked singularity. In this paper we study spherically symmetric non-self-similar perturbations of matter and metrics in spherically symmetric self-similar backgrounds. The collapsing matter is assumed to be a perfect fluid with the equation of state P={alpha}{rho}. We construct a single wave equation governing the perturbations, which makes their time evolution in arbitrary self-similar backgrounds analytically tractable. Further we propose an analytical application of this master wave equation to the stability problem by means of the normal mode analysis for the perturbations having the time dependence given by exp(i{omega}log vertical t vertical bar), and present some sufficient conditions for the absence of nonoscillatory unstable normal modes with purely imaginary {omega}.

  15. Analysis of the quantum numbers J**PC of the X(3872)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-12-01

    The authors present an analysis of angular distributions and correlations of the X(3872) in the exclusive decay mode X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} with J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. They use 780 pb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They derive constraints on spin, parity, and charge conjugation parity of the X(3872) by comparing measured angular distributions of the decay products with predictions for different J{sup PC} hypotheses. The assignments J{sup PC} = 1{sup ++} and 2{sup -+} are the only ones consistent with the data.

  16. Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" held on February 25, 2016.

  17. An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoen, Ben; Cappers, Peter; Wiser, Ryan; Thayer, Mark

    2011-04-19

    An increasing number of homes in the U.S. have sold with photovoltaic (PV) energy systems installed at the time of sale, yet relatively little research exists that estimates the marginal impacts of those PV systems on home sale prices. A clearer understanding of these possible impacts might influence the decisions of homeowners considering the installation of a PV system, homebuyers considering the purchase of a home with PV already installed, and new home builders considering including PV as an optional or standard product on their homes. This research analyzes a large dataset of California homes that sold from 2000 through mid-2009 with PV installed. It finds strong evidence that homes with PV systems sold for a premium over comparable homes without PV systems during this time frame. Estimates for this premium expressed in dollars per watt of installed PV range, on average, from roughly $4 to $5.5/watt across a large number of hedonic and repeat sales model specifications and robustness tests. When expressed as a ratio of the sales price premium of PV to estimated annual energy cost savings associated with PV, an average ratio of 14:1 to 19:1 can be calculated; these results are consistent with those of the more-extensive existing literature on the impact of energy efficiency on sales prices. When the data are split among new and existing homes, however, PV system premiums are markedly affected. New homes with PV show premiums of $2.3-2.6/watt, while existing homes with PV show premiums of more than $6/watt. Reasons for this discrepancy are suggested, yet further research is warranted. A number of other areas where future research would be useful are also highlighted.

  18. Role of Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on the role of analysis to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  19. Planning, Budget, and Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Planning, Budget, and Analysis to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004.

  20. Analysis Methodologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems Analysis » Analysis Methodologies Analysis Methodologies A spectrum of analysis methodologies are used in combination to provide a sound understanding of hydrogen and fuel cell systems and developing markets, as follows: Resource Analysis Technological Feasibility and Cost Analysis Environmental Analysis Delivery Analysis Infrastructure Development and Financial Analysis Energy Market Analysis In general, each methodology builds on previous efforts to quantify the benefits, drawbacks,

  1. Experimental and Numerical Analysis on the Distortion of Parts Made of 20MnCr5 by Hot Metal Forming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rentsch, Ruediger; Brinksmeier, Ekkard [Stiftung Institut fuer Werkstofftechnik, Badgasteiner Strasse 3, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2011-05-04

    For high performance applications, shafts and gears made of 20MnCr5 (AISI 5120) are manufactured in large numbers every year. Inhomogeneities in the material properties, process perturbations and asymmetries in shape and operation setups provide a potential for the distortion of parts, often released by heat treatment. In this contribution experimental results on the distortion of shafts and the dishing of disk-like gear wheel blanks are presented. The numerical analysis of the hot-rolling process allowed to trace a peculiar segregation distribution at the cross-section of the bars back to the casting process, and to identify an asymmetric strain distribution which may be the main cause for shaft distortion. For the dishing of the disks a correlation to the resulting distribution of the material flow was found and, a process perturbation parameter identified which is assumed to be responsible for the observed material flow variation.

  2. Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCAT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Casuccio; Michael Potter; Fred Schwerer; Dr. Richard J. Fruehan; Dr. Scott Story

    2005-12-30

    The objective of this study was to develop the Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCATTM) to permit steelmakers to evaluate the quality of the steel through the analysis of individual inclusions. By characterizing individual inclusions, determinations can be made as to the cleanliness of the steel. Understanding the complicating effects of inclusions in the steelmaking process and on the resulting properties of steel allows the steel producer to increase throughput, better control the process, reduce remelts, and improve the quality of the product. The ASCAT (Figure 1) is a steel-smart inclusion analysis tool developed around a customized next-generation computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (NG-CCSEM) hardware platform that permits acquisition of inclusion size and composition data at a rate never before possible in SEM-based instruments. With built-in customized ''intelligent'' software, the inclusion data is automatically sorted into clusters representing different inclusion types to define the characteristics of a particular heat (Figure 2). The ASCAT represents an innovative new tool for the collection of statistically meaningful data on inclusions, and provides a means of understanding the complicated effects of inclusions in the steel making process and on the resulting properties of steel. Research conducted by RJLG with AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) and SMA (Steel Manufactures of America) members indicates that the ASCAT has application in high-grade bar, sheet, plate, tin products, pipes, SBQ, tire cord, welding rod, and specialty steels and alloys where control of inclusions, whether natural or engineered, are crucial to their specification for a given end-use. Example applications include castability of calcium treated steel; interstitial free (IF) degasser grade slag conditioning practice; tundish clogging and erosion minimization; degasser circulation and optimization; quality assessment/steel cleanliness; slab, billet or bloom disposition; and alloy development. Additional benefits of ASCAT include the identification of inclusions that tend to clog nozzles or interact with refractory materials. Several papers outlining the benefits of the ASCAT have been presented and published in the literature. The paper entitled ''Inclusion Analysis to Predict Casting Behavior'' was awarded the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) Medal in 2004 for special merit and importance to the steel industry. The ASCAT represents a quantum leap in inclusion analysis and will allow steel producers to evaluate the quality of steel and implement appropriate process improvements. In terms of performance, the ASCAT (1) allows for accurate classification of inclusions by chemistry and morphological parameters, (2) can characterize hundreds of inclusions within minutes, (3) is easy to use (does not require experts), (4) is robust, and (5) has excellent image quality for conventional SEM investigations (e.g., the ASCAT can be utilized as a dual use instrument). In summary, the ASCAT will significantly advance the tools of the industry and addresses an urgent and broadly recognized need of the steel industry. Commercialization of the ASCAT will focus on (1) a sales strategy that leverages our Industry Partners; (2) use of ''technical selling'' through papers and seminars; (3) leveraging RJ Lee Group's consulting services, and packaging of the product with a extensive consulting and training program; (4) partnering with established SEM distributors; (5) establishing relationships with professional organizations associated with the steel industry; and (6) an individualized plant by plant direct sales program.

  3. CX-005092: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Non-radiological Carbon Analysis Using Oceanography International Analytical 1030 Watt InstrumentCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/15/2010Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  4. Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis. No...

  5. NREL: Energy Analysis - Solar Technology Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Technology Analysis NREL conducts analysis to support research and development done by the Solar Energy Technologies Program in three major technology areas: concentrating solar power; solar electricity, also known as photovoltaics or PV; and solar heating and lighting. For example, in the area of photovoltaics, EERE's systems modeling and analysis activity rigorously assesses the performance, reliability, installed costs, and levelized energy costs (LECs) of a wide variety of flat-plate

  6. NREL: Energy Analysis - Wind Technology Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind and Hydropower Technology Analysis Wind and hydropower analysis supports advanced technologies that convert more of the nation's wind into electricity. Grid Operational Impact Analysis The wind program will address the variable, normally uncontrollable nature of wind power plant output, and the additional needs that its operation imposes on the overall grid. At present, the generation and transmission operational impacts that occur due to wind variability are not well quantified. This

  7. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  8. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  9. Slide 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transport within the TMIST-3 In-Reactor Experiment WG LUSCHER 1 , DJ SENOR 1 , AND KK CLAYTON 2 1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 2 Idaho National Laboratory Tritium Focus Group Meeting, Princeton, NJ 5-7 May 2015 1 PNNL-SA-109944 Overview: Tritium Technology Program Motivation for TMIST-3 Modeling Needs ATR Environment TMIST-3 Description Tritium Transport Initial Transport Model Initial Transport Test Summary & Future Work 2 Tritium Technology Program Watts Bar Nuclear Plant Spring

  10. PNNL STC Workshop Getter/Liner Tube Properties and Manufacturing Processes

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Methods for Post Irradiation Examination of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods Clark Carlson Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Tritium Technology Program US Government Requires a Tritium Stockpile US Department of Energy Ended Tritium Production at SRS in 1988 Several options for Tritium Production were evaluated Dedicated Reactors Accelerator Production Commercial Light Water Reactors Tritium Technology Program initiated in 1997 to produce tritium at TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Reactor

  11. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Technology Archive Energy Department Announces Five Year Renewal of Funding for First Energy Innovation Hub Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors to Receive up to $121.5 Million Over Five Years. Posted: January 29, 2015 VERA-CS Coupled Multi-physics Capability demonstrated in a Full Core Simulation In December, CASL reported on the latest results from its Watts Bar reactor progression problem modeling. Posted: August 14, 2014 Westinghouse Completes its AP1000®

  12. Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page 1 .........CIPS Simulation Capability Implemented in VERA 1 .........Watts Bar Operating Cycles Simulated to Present 1 .........VERA Training Workshop Held 2 .........Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) Multi-Physics Approach & Applications using VERA 5 .........ITM/DNS Simulations for Closure Development 7 .........EPRI Test Stand Concluded 8 .........Verification and Validation Supporting VERA 12 .........Illustration of VERA Capability to Model a Typical SMR 14 .........VERA

  13. Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - October 2015 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy October 2015 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - October 2015 News Updates The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued an operating license for Tennessee Valley Authority's Watts Bar 2 reactor. This marks the end of unit 2 construction; TVA plans to begin commercial operation of the 1,150 MW reactor in early 2016. The Calvert Cliffs and Callaway COLAs have been withdrawn following the suspension of the Areva US-EPR Design Certification application.The Bell Bend COL application

  14. Lower East Fork Poplar Creek | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    East Fork Poplar Creek Lower East Fork Poplar Creek This document discusses the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek. Topics include: * The area's safety * Any use limitations for the area * History and cleanup background for this area * How DOE's cleanup program addressed the problem PDF icon Lower East Fork Poplar Creek fact sheet More Documents & Publications Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek Recommendation 229: Recommendation on the Preferred

  15. EIS-0288-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0288-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor The Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (DOE/EIS-0288-S1) supplements DOE's 1999 Final EIS (DOE/EIS-0288), which addressed the production of tritium in Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) reactors at Watts Bar Unit 1 in Rhea County, TN,

  16. EIS-0288-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0288-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor The Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (DOE/EIS-0288-S1) supplements DOE's 1999 Final EIS (DOE/EIS-0288), which addressed the production of tritium in Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) reactors at Watts Bar Unit 1 in Rhea County, TN,

  17. Systems Analysis Workshop Purpose

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on SAW purpose to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  18. Office of Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Analysis provides analysis of Department of Energy (DOE)-wide performance in protecting the public, the workers and the environment while performing the missions of DOE.

  19. Systems Analysis Workshop Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda from DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  20. NETL: SOFC Systems Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Analysis NETL possesses strong systems analysis and policy support capabilities. Systems analysis support of the SOFC Program consists of conducting various energy analyses that provide input to decisions on issues such as national plans and programs, resource use, environmental and energy security policies, technology options for R&D programs and pathways to the commercialization and deployment of SOFC power systems. Here is a partial listing of SOFC systems analysis:

  1. Modeling & Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A view upwind of SWIS' aerosol-generating system. Permalink Gallery Sandia Wake-Imaging System Successfully Deployed at Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Analysis, Capabilities, Energy, Facilities, Modeling, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, SWIFT, Systems Analysis, Technical Highlights, Wind Energy, Wind News Sandia Wake-Imaging System Successfully Deployed at Scaled Wind Farm

  2. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary Notes from 15 November 2007 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis and Model Support

  3. NREL: Energy Analysis - Technology Systems Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Systems Analysis NREL's Technology Systems Analysis examines RD&D areas in terms of potential costs, benefits, risks, uncertainties, and timeframes. The following pages provide information on specific technology areas: Biomass Building Electric Infrastructure Systems Energy Sciences Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Solar Vehicles and Fuels Research Wind Key staff analyst Summary bios of staff expertise and interests Team Lead: Margaret Mann Administrative Support: Catherine

  4. NREL: Energy Analysis - Biomass Technology Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass Technology Analysis Conducting full life-cycle assessments for biomass products, including electricity, biodiesel, and ethanol, is important for determining environmental benefits. NREL analysts use a life-cycle inventory modeling package and supporting databases to conduct life-cycle assessments. These tools can be applied on a global, regional, local, or project basis. Integrated system analyses, technoeconomic analyses, life-cycle assessments (LCAs), and other analysis tools are

  5. NREL: Energy Analysis - Building Technologies Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building Technologies Analysis The Building Technologies analysis supports research and development on technologies and practices for energy efficiency, working closely with the building industry and manufacturers; promotes energy and money-saving opportunities to builders and consumers; and works with state and local regulatory groups to improve building codes and appliance standards. Building Energy Software Tools Directory Described here are 283 energy-related software tools for buildings,

  6. Economic Analysis of Policy Effects Analysis Platform

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Analysis of Policy Effects Analysis Platform March 24, 2015 Jason Hansen, PhD Idaho National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review 4.1.2.20 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office * The goal of this project is to 1) identify risk factors in the biofuel supply system, 2) translate risk factors to implications, and 3) identify strategies and polices to

  7. Sustainability & Strategic Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kristen Johnson Technology Manager Bioenergy Technologies Office Peer Review March 23, 2015 Sustainability & Strategic Analysis 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office * The Team * Goals & Objectives * Challenges * Approach & Partnerships * Budget * Key Accomplishments * Future Directions * Upcoming Activities Introduction: Analysis & Sustainability (A&S) 3 | Bioenergy Technologies Office Introductions: Analysis & Sustainability Staff Alison Goss Eng Alicia Lindauer Zia Haq

  8. New analysis indicates no thermal inversion in the atmosphere of HD 209458b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond-Lowe, Hannah; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Bean, Jacob L.; Line, Michael R.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-11-20

    An important focus of exoplanet research is the determination of the atmospheric temperature structure of strongly irradiated gas giant planets, or hot Jupiters. HD 209458b is the prototypical exoplanet for atmospheric thermal inversions, but this assertion does not take into account recently obtained data or newer data reduction techniques. We reexamine this claim by investigating all publicly available Spitzer Space Telescope secondary-eclipse photometric data of HD 209458b and performing a self-consistent analysis. We employ data reduction techniques that minimize stellar centroid variations, apply sophisticated models to known Spitzer systematics, and account for time-correlated noise in the data. We derive new secondary-eclipse depths of 0.119% 0.007%, 0.123% 0.006%, 0.134% 0.035%, and 0.215% 0.008% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 ?m bandpasses, respectively. We feed these results into a Bayesian atmospheric retrieval analysis and determine that it is unnecessary to invoke a thermal inversion to explain our secondary-eclipse depths. The data are well fitted by a temperature model that decreases monotonically between pressure levels of 1 and 0.01 bars. We conclude that there is no evidence for a thermal inversion in the atmosphere of HD 209458b.

  9. The Tariff Analysis Project: A Database and Analysis Platform...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tariff Analysis Project: A Database and Analysis Platform for Electricity Tariffs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Tariff Analysis Project: A Database...

  10. Dalitz Plot Analysis of B+- --> pi+-pi+-pi-+ Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collaboration, The BABAR; Aubert, B.

    2009-02-23

    The authors present a Dalitz-plot analysis of charmless B{sup {+-}} decays to the final state {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} using a sample of (465 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR experiment at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. They measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}) = (15.2 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(770){pi}{sup {+-}}) = (8.1 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 1.2{sub -1.1}{sup +0.4}) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup {+-}}) = (1.57 {+-} 0.42 {+-} 0.16{sub -0.19}{sup +0.53}) x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} nonresonant) = (5.3 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 0.6{sub -0.5}{sup +1.1}) x 10{sup -6}, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and model-dependent, respectively. Measurements of branching fractions for the modes B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(1450){pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(1370){pi}{sup {+-}} are also presented. They observe no significant direct CP asymmetries for the above modes, and there is no evidence for the decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(980){pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup {+-}} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}{pi}{sup {+-}}, or B{sup {+-}} {yields} {chi}{sub c2}{pi}{sup {+-}}.

  11. Delivery Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems Analysis » Analysis Methodologies » Delivery Analysis Delivery Analysis Delivery Analysis identifies the most economic options for delivering hydrogen, and provides a foundation for additional research on alternative storage and transportation options. Additionally, delivery analysis provides crucial information to technology feasibility analysis, in determining the optimal production capacities and locations. Delivery analyses will be conducted to determine the most promising

  12. Infrastructure Development and Financial Analysis | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resource Analysis Technological Feasibility & Cost Analysis Environmental Analysis Delivery Analysis Infrastructure Development & Financial Analysis Energy Market Analysis DOE H2A ...

  13. ENHANCED UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS FOR SRS COMPOSITE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, F.; Phifer, M.

    2011-06-30

    The Composite Analysis (CA) performed for the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 2009 (SRS CA 2009) included a simplified uncertainty analysis. The uncertainty analysis in the CA (Smith et al. 2009b) was limited to considering at most five sources in a separate uncertainty calculation performed for each POA. To perform the uncertainty calculations in a reasonable amount of time, the analysis was limited to using 400 realizations, 2,000 years of simulated transport time, and the time steps used for the uncertainty analysis were increased from what was used in the CA base case analysis. As part of the CA maintenance plan, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) committed to improving the CA uncertainty/sensitivity analysis. The previous uncertainty analysis was constrained by the standard GoldSim licensing which limits the user to running at most four Monte Carlo uncertainty calculations (also called realizations) simultaneously. Some of the limitations on the number of realizations that could be practically run and the simulation time steps were removed by building a cluster of three HP Proliant windows servers with a total of 36 64-bit processors and by licensing the GoldSim DP-Plus distributed processing software. This allowed running as many as 35 realizations simultaneously (one processor is reserved as a master process that controls running the realizations). These enhancements to SRNL computing capabilities made uncertainty analysis: using 1000 realizations, using the time steps employed in the base case CA calculations, with more sources, and simulating radionuclide transport for 10,000 years feasible. In addition, an importance screening analysis was performed to identify the class of stochastic variables that have the most significant impact on model uncertainty. This analysis ran the uncertainty model separately testing the response to variations in the following five sets of model parameters: (a) K{sub d} values (72 parameters for the 36 CA elements in sand and clay), (b) Dose Parameters (34 parameters), (c) Material Properties (20 parameters), (d) Surface Water Flows (6 parameters), and (e) Vadose and Aquifer Flow (4 parameters). Results provided an assessment of which group of parameters is most significant in the dose uncertainty. It was found that K{sub d} and the vadose/aquifer flow parameters, both of which impact transport timing, had the greatest impact on dose uncertainty. Dose parameters had an intermediate level of impact while material properties and surface water flows had little impact on dose uncertainty. Results of the importance analysis are discussed further in Section 7 of this report. The objectives of this work were to address comments received during the CA review on the uncertainty analysis and to demonstrate an improved methodology for CA uncertainty calculations as part of CA maintenance. This report partially addresses the LFRG Review Team issue of producing an enhanced CA sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. This is described in Table 1-1 which provides specific responses to pertinent CA maintenance items extracted from Section 11 of the SRS CA (2009). As noted above, the original uncertainty analysis looked at each POA separately and only included the effects from at most five sources giving the highest peak doses at each POA. Only 17 of the 152 CA sources were used in the original uncertainty analysis and the simulation time was reduced from 10,000 to 2,000 years. A major constraint on the original uncertainty analysis was the limitation of only being able to use at most four distributed processes. This work expanded the analysis to 10,000 years using 39 of the CA sources, included cumulative dose effects at downstream POAs, with more realizations (1,000) and finer time steps. This was accomplished by using the GoldSim DP-Plus module and the 36 processors available on a new windows cluster. The last part of the work looked at the contribution to overall uncertainty from the main categories of uncertainty variables: K{sub d}s, dose parameters, flow parameters, and material propertie

  14. NREL: Energy Analysis - Jenny Heeter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Market analysis Policy analysis Utility regulation and analysis Primary research interests Voluntary green power market Renewable energy certificate markets and pricing Solar ...

  15. Technical Review Report for the Model 9977 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging Addendum 1 Justification for DNDO Contents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, M H

    2008-12-17

    The Model 9977 Package is currently certified for Content Envelope C.1, {sup 238}Pu Heat Sources, either in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG), or in Food-Pack Can configurations, under Certificate of Compliance (CoC) Certificate Number 9977 and Package Identification Number USA/9977/B(M)F-96 (DOE). Addendum 1, Justification for DNDO Contents,--the Submittal--supplements Revision 2 of the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging for the Model 9977 Package. The Submittal adds five new contents to the Model 9977 Package, Content Envelopes, AC.1 through AC.5. The Content Envelopes are neptunium metal, the beryllium-reflected plutonium ball (BeRP Ball), plutonium/uranium metal, plutonium/uranium metal with enhanced wt% {sup 240}Pu (to 50 wt%), and uranium metal. The last three Content Envelopes are stabilized to DOE-STD-3013. These Content Envelopes will be shipped to the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), where they will reside, and, hence, to off-site locations in support of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The new certificate will apply to a limited number of Model 9977 Packages. At the same time, the Submittal requests an extension of the periodic maintenance requirements from one (1) year to up to five (5) years using Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) temperature-monitoring systems to measure the ambient storage temperature in order to ensure that the temperature of the Viton{reg_sign} O-rings for the 6-inch Containment Vessel (6CV) remain less than 200 F. The RFIDs have been developed by Argonne National Laboratory. An on-going surveillance program at the K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) facility at the Savannah River Site, and an on-going examination of Viton{reg_sign} O-rings from mock Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide the technical justification for the extension of the periodic maintenance interval. Where extended periodic maintenance is desired, the decay heat rate for the Model 9977 Package is limited to 15 watts.

  16. Chemical Sector Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACChemical Sector Analysis content top Chemical Supply Chain Analysis Posted by Admin on Mar 1, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments Chemical Supply Chain Analysis NISAC has developed a range of capabilities for analyzing the consequences of disruptions to the chemical manufacturing industry. Each capability provides a different but complementary perspective on the questions of interest-questions like Given an event, will the entire chemical sector be impacted or just parts? Which chemicals, plants,

  17. Decision Analysis for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYSIS TOOLS TO ASSESS: Uncertainties associated with exploration for EGS; Uncertainties associated with development of EGS; Uncertainties associated with operation of EGS.

  18. Asset Protection Analysis Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-08-21

    The Guide provides examples of the application of as set protection analysis to several common problems. Canceled by DOE N 251.80.

  19. Sandia Energy - Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Is the Subject of a New Book Analysis, Climate, Global Climate & Energy, Monitoring, News, News & Events, Sensing, Sensing & Monitoring, Water Security Climate...

  20. Performance Analysis with Vampir

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (frank.winkler@tu-dresden.de) Performance Analysis with Vampir Disclaimer Performance tools will not automatically make you code run faster. They help you understand, what your...

  1. Independent Statistics & Analysis

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    October 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Quarterly Coal Distribution Report April - June 2014 This report was...

  2. Modeling and Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE modeling and analysis activities focus on reducing uncertainties and improving transparency in photovoltaics (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) performance modeling. The overall goal of...

  3. Automated Hazard Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-06-26

    The Automated Hazard Analysis (AHA) application is a software tool used to conduct job hazard screening and analysis of tasks to be performed in Savannah River Site facilities. The AHA application provides a systematic approach to the assessment of safety and environmental hazards associated with specific tasks, and the identification of controls regulations, and other requirements needed to perform those tasks safely. AHA is to be integrated into existing Savannah River site work control andmore » job hazard analysis processes. Utilization of AHA will improve the consistency and completeness of hazard screening and analysis, and increase the effectiveness of the work planning process.« less

  4. Fast Analysis and Simulation Team | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACFast Analysis and Simulation Team

  5. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  6. NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Analysis Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decision Insight and Market Impacts Newsletter Unsubscribe Please enter your email address to unsubscribe from the Decision Insight and Market Impacts Newsletter. Complete E-mail Address: Unsubscribe If you have any questions about this online subscription service, please contact us. Printable Version Energy Analysis Home Capabilities & Expertise Key Activities Models & Tools Data & Resources Publications Partnerships Staff Working with Us Related Links News Did you find what you

  7. NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Sciences Technology Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Sciences Technology Analysis To help meet the nation's needs for clean energy, inexpensive alternative fuels, and a healthy environment, researchers in NREL's Energy Sciences are improving our understanding of the science behind renewable energy and energy-efficient technologies. These technologies include photovoltaics (solar cells), fuels and energy systems made from biomass (plants and waste products) and hydrogen, and advanced energy storage and transmission systems. In this work, our

  8. NREL: Energy Analysis - Geothermal Technology Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geothermal Technology Analysis The Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program focuses in three areas: energy systems research and testing (working to enhance conversion of geothermal energy into heat and electricity) led by NREL; drilling technologies research (for both hardware and diagnostic tools) led by Sandia National Laboratories; and geoscience and supporting technologies research (exploration and resource management) led by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental

  9. Hazard Analysis Database Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GAULT, G.W.

    1999-10-13

    The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved TWRS Authorization Basis (AB). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the TWRS FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The TWRS Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The database supports the preparation of Chapters 3,4, and 5 of the TWRS FSAR and the USQ process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Evaluation Database--Data from the results of the hazard evaluations; and (2) Hazard Topography Database--Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

  10. Graphical Contingency Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-03-02

    GCA is a visual analytic tool for power grid contingency analysis to provide more decision support for power grid operations. GCA allows power grid operators to quickly gain situational awareness of power grid by converting large amounts of operational data to graphic domain with a color contoured map; identify system trend and foresee and discern emergencies by performing trending analysis; identify the relationships between system configurations and affected assets by conducting clustering analysis; and identifymore » the best action by interactively evaluate candidate actions.« less

  11. Demand Response Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-03-01

    Demand Response Analysis Tool is a software developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is initially funded by Southern California Edison. Our goal in developing this tool is to provide an online, useable, with standardized methods, an analysis tool to evaluate demand and demand response performance of commercial and industrial facilities. The tool provides load variability and weather sensitivity analysis capabilities as well as development of various types of baselines. It can be used by researchers, real estate management firms, utilities, or any individuals who are interested in analyzing their demand and demand response capabilities.

  12. Demand Response Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-03-01

    Demand Response Analysis Tool is a software developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is initially funded by Southern California Edison. Our goal in developing this tool is to provide an online, useable, with standardized methods, an analysis tool to evaluate demand and demand response performance of commercial and industrial facilities. The tool provides load variability and weather sensitivity analysis capabilities as well as development of various types of baselines. It can be usedmore » by researchers, real estate management firms, utilities, or any individuals who are interested in analyzing their demand and demand response capabilities.« less

  13. A Method for Selecting Software for Dynamic Event Analysis II: the Taylor Anvil and Dynamic Brazilian Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. D. Richins; J. M. Lacy; T. K. Larson; S. R. Novascone

    2008-05-01

    New nuclear power reactor designs will require resistance to a variety of possible malevolent attacks as well as traditional dynamic accident scenarios. The design/analysis team may be faced with a broad range of phenomena including air and ground blasts, high-velocity penetrators or shaped charges, and vehicle or aircraft impacts. With a host of software tools available to address these high-energy events, the analysis team must evaluate and select the software most appropriate for their particular set of problems. The accuracy of the selected software should then be validated with respect to the phenomena governing the interaction of the threat and structure. Several software codes are available for the study of blast, impact, and other shock phenomena. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a study is underway to investigate the comparative characteristics of a group of shock and high-strain rate physics codes including ABAQUS, LS-DYNA, CTH, ALEGRA, and ALE-3D. In part I of this report, a series of five benchmark problems to exercise some important capabilities of the subject software was identified. The benchmark problems selected are a Taylor cylinder test, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test, a free air blast, the dynamic splitting tension (Brazilian) test, and projectile penetration of a concrete slab. Part II-- this paper-- reports the results of two of the benchmark problems: the Taylor cylinder and the dynamic Brazilian test. The Taylor cylinder test is a method to determine the dynamic yield properties of materials. The test specimen is a right circular cylinder which is impacted against a theoretically rigid target. The cylinder deforms upon impact, with the final shape depending upon the dynamic yield stress, in turn a function of strain and strain rate. The splitting tension test, or Brazilian test, is a method to measure the tensile strength of concrete using a cylindrical specimen. The specimen is loaded diametrically in compression, producing a fracture at the center of the specimen that propagates toward the loading points until the cylinder is split. To generate a dynamic load, different methods such as a drop-weight or a split Hopkinson pressure bar are employed. The Taylor anvil and dynamic Brazilian test analyses are presented, including discussion of the analysis approach for each of the five subject software packages; comparison of results both among the codes and to physical test results; and conclusions as to the applicability of the subject codes to these two problems. Studies of the remaining three benchmark problems and overall conclusions will be presented in future reports.

  14. Hydrogen Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis Hydrogen Analysis Presentation on Hydrogen Analysis to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program. PDF icon 6_h2a_mann.pdf More Documents & Publications H2A Delivery Models and Results H2A Delivery Components Model and Analysis Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Plus Meeting: DTT, STT, HPTT, Other Analysts, Invited Guests

  15. Energy Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL 24348 Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL 24348 Energy analysis informs EERE decision-making by delivering analytical products in four main areas: Data Resources, Market Intelligence, Energy Systems Analysis, and Portfolio Impacts Analysis. The Energy Analysis website is designed to help energy experts and policymakers access energy analysis resources related to renewable energy and energy efficiency. It

  16. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  17. Building America Analysis Spreadsheets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Building America Analysis Spreadsheets are companions to the House Simulation Protocols, and can assist with many of the calculations and look-up tables found in the report. The spreadsheets...

  18. Energy Sector Market Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

  19. Systems Analysis Sub site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EERE

    2012-03-16

    Systems analysis provides direction, focus, and support for the development and introduction of hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies, and provides a basis for recommendations on a balanced portfolio of activities.

  20. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  1. Supervisory Program Analysis Officer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will be responsible for the program analysis and evaluation of all activities which fall within the purview of the Office. The incumbent directs a moderate...

  2. NREL: Energy Analysis - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis The front cover of the Reimagining What's Possible brochure. PDF 3.6 MB Making Sustainable Energy Choices: Insights on the EnergyWater Land Nexus The front cover of...

  3. Performance Measurement Analysis System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1989-06-01

    The PMAS4.0 (Performance Measurement Analysis System) is a user-oriented system designed to track the cost and schedule performance of Department of Energy (DOE) major projects (MPs) and major system acquisitions (MSAs) reporting under DOE Order 5700.4A, Project Management System. PMAS4.0 provides for the analysis of performance measurement data produced from management control systems complying with the Federal Government''s Cost and Schedule Control Systems Criteria.

  4. NREL Sustainability Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Date: March 25, 2015 Technology Area: Sustainability PIs: Daniel Inman and Garvin Heath Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. NREL Sustainability Analysis WBS 4.2.1.30 2 Goal - Air Emissions from Bioenergy Systems NREL's sustainability analysis program aims to better understand air emissions from the biofuel supply chain, applicable air regulations and implications for cost,

  5. Interactive Comparative Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparative Analysis Interactive Comparative Analysis We can learn the correlations between sensors and modalities that differentiate activities (or operating modes) by using transfer learning. Our new approach to data fusion and signature discovery has a number of advantages and applications: * Finding correlations that differentiate datasets requires less data than finding correlations that explain datasets. * The differences between datasets are smaller in number, and often easier to

  6. Hurricane Irene Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SheetsHurricane Irene Analysis content top Hurricane Irene Analysis Hurricane Irene was the only 2011 hurricane to make a U.S. landfall. As Irene neared landfall, NISAC modeled the hurricane's potential impacts on critical infrastructure in several key sectors located in the projected storm track. This provided situational awareness and advanced warning of potential infrastructure impacts for DHS and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) leadership and personnel on the ground, both federal

  7. Modeling & Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Modeling & Analysis Home/Tag:Modeling & Analysis - Electricity use by water service sector and county. Shown are electricity use by (a) large-scale conveyance, (b) groundwater irrigation pumping, (c) surface water irrigation pumping, (d) drinking water, and (e) wastewater. Aggregate electricity use across these sectors (f) is also mapped. Permalink Gallery Sandians Recognized in Environmental Science & Technology's Best Paper

  8. Strategic Analysis and Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Strategic Analysis and Modeling Mary J. Biddy, Ling Tao, Eric Tan, Yimin Zhang National Renewable Energy Laboratory March 24, 2015 Analysis and Sustainability Peer Review 2015 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review 2 Goal Statement * Develop tools and perform analyses to address key questions in support of

  9. DOE Retro Analysis Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Retro Analysis Plan August 2, 2011 Page 1 August 2, 2011 Daniel Cohen, Esq. Office of General Counsel U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Re: Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis Dear Mr. Cohen: These comments are submitted by the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) in response to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) notice appearing in the July 11, 2011 Federal Register requesting comments on the Preliminary Plan for

  10. Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis Analysis The Bioenergy Technologies Office uses a wide range of analytical tools, data, and methodologies to support decision making, guide research, and demonstrate progress toward goals. The wide variety of available biomass feedstocks, conversion technologies, and integration strategies offer a broad range of feasible biofuels scenarios, so the Office focuses its analytical activities on the biofuels research and development (R&D) pathways that offer the best potential for

  11. Sandia Energy - PV Modeling & Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PV Modeling & Analysis Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics PV Modeling & Analysis PV Modeling & AnalysisTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-11T20:03...

  12. Production, Storage, and FC Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Production, Storage, and FC Analysis to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  13. Systems Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About the Geothermal Technologies Office » Systems Analysis Systems Analysis What is the Systems Analysis program? The Systems Analysis program in the Geothermal Technologies Office focuses primarily on: Environmental issues Policy, regulatory, and financing Economic Analysis and validation Data and Tools that support geothermal exploration and development As a key part of the Systems Analysis portfolio, a two-year, comprehensive Vision Study for geothermal energy development is underway to

  14. Advanced engineering analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, W.R.

    1992-11-01

    The Advanced Engineering Analysis project is being used to improve the breadth of engineering analysis types, the particular phenomena which may be simulated, and also increase the accuracy and usability of the results of both new and current types of simulations and analyses. This is an interim report covering several topics under this project. Information on two new implementations of failure criteria for metal forming, the implementation of coupled fluid flow/heat transfer analysis capabilities, the integration of experimental shock and vibration test data with analyses, a correction to a contact solution problem with a 3-D parabolic brick finite element, and the development and implementation of a file translator to link IDEAS to DYNA3D is provided in this report.

  15. Contamination analysis unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, Hugh R. (Livermore, CA); Meltzer, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

  16. Contamination analysis unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

    1996-05-28

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

  17. NREL: Energy Analysis - Daniel Getman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Daniel Getman Photo of Daniel Getman. Daniel Getman is a member of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Geospatial Data Science Team...

  18. NREL: Energy Analysis - David Keyser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of expertise Economic impact studies Time series analysis Analysis of labor and demographic data Primary research interests Static and dynamic economic impact models Labor...

  19. Germanium-76 Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-04-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, and the first one gram sample was received from the supplier for analysis on April 24, 2011. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility, a DOE user facility at PNNL, was used to make the required isotopic and chemical purity measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The results of this first analysis are reported here.

  20. Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Street and Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool was developed by a partnership of the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium, the Clinton Climate Initiative (CCI)/C40, and the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), for the financial analysis of retrofitting street and parking facility lighting with more efficient alternatives. Property owners, city and other government agencies, utilities, and energy efficiency organizations can use this tool to compute annualized energy and energy-cost savings, maintenance savings, greenhouse gas reductions, net present value, and simple payback associated with potential lighting upgrades.

  1. Radiative Flux Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck [NOAA

    2008-05-14

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  2. Country Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01

    An ongoing compilation of country energy profiles. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) maintains Country Analysis Briefs (CABs) for specific countries that are important to world energy markets, including members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), major non-OPEC oil producers, major energy transit countries, major energy consumers, and other areas of current interest to energy analysts and policy makers.

  3. Electronic Mail Analysis Capability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-08

    Establishes the pilot program to test the Department of Energy (DOE) Electronic Mail Analysis Capability (EMAC), which will be used to monitor and analyze outgoing and incoming electronic mail (e-mail) from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and DOE laboratories that are engaged in nuclear weapons design or work involving special nuclear material. No cancellation.

  4. Shot loading trainer analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T.K.

    1995-02-15

    This document presents the results from the analysis of the shot loading trainer (SLT). This device will be used to test the procedure for installing shot into the annulus of the Project W-320 shipping container. To ensure that the shot is installed uniformly around the container, vibrators will be used to settle the shot. The SLT was analyzed to ensure that it would not jeopardize worker safety during operation. The results from the static analysis of the SLT under deadweight and vibrator operating loads show that the stresses in the SLT are below code allowables. The results from the modal analysis show that the natural frequencies of the SLT are far below the operating frequencies of the vibrators, provided the SLT is mounted on pneumatic tires. The SLT was also analyzed for wind, seismic, deadweight, and moving/transporting loads. Analysis of the SLT is in accordance with SDC-4.1 for safety class 3 structures (DOE-RL 1993) and the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of Steel Construction (AISC 1989).

  5. Handsfree Surface Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-11-01

    The HANDSFREE SURFACE ANALYSIS software code enables unattended analysis of surfaces by desorption electrospray (DESI) and liquid-junction surface sampling probe (SSP) mass spectrometry. The software allows automated lane scanning, imaging (e.g. lane rastering), spot and array sampling, and array scanning methods by controlling the movement of the sample attached to a computer-controlled stage. The software is able to collect, visualize and analyze mass spectrometry data real-time for surface analysis purposes by interacting with mass spectrometrymore » instrumentation software. The software also enables data post processing for imaging and other analytical purposes. The software also contains image analysis approaches to control the sampling capillary-to-surface distance when used with DESI, and for automated formation and real-time reoptimization of the sampling probe-to-surface liquid microjunction when used with SSP. Control of these distances is essential to automated, hands-free operation of a DESI or SSP mass spectrometry system.« less

  6. Regional Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01

    Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

  7. Design of Superconducting Parallel Bar Deflecting and Crabbing rf Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jean Delayen, Haipeng Wang

    2009-05-01

    A new concept for a deflecting and crabbing rf structure based on half-wave resonant lines was introduced recently*. It offers significant advantages to existing designs and, because of it compactness, allows low frequency operation. This concept has been further refined and optimized for superconducting implementation. Results of this optimization and application to a 400 MHz crabbing cavity and a 499 MHz deflecting cavity are presented.

  8. Sustainability at Home: Raising the Bar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    home improvement steps to save as much energy-and money-as you can. But did you know that sustainability at home starts before you move in? It starts with your home's structure....

  9. Reconstructing $t\\bar{t}$ events with one lost jet

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Demina, Regina; Harel, Amnon; Orbaker, Douglas

    2015-04-02

    We present a technique for reconstructing the kinematics of pair-produced top quarks that decay to a charged lepton, a neutrino and four final state quarks in the subset of events where only three jets are reconstructed. We present a figure of merit that allows for a fair comparison of reconstruction algorithms without requiring their calibration. As a result, the new reconstruction of events with only three jets is fully competitive with the full reconstruction typically used for four-jet events.

  10. Searches for Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Silke; /SLAC

    2012-04-25

    Measurements of the branching fractions of purely leptonic decays of B-mesons translate into constraints in the plane of the charged Higgs mass versus tan {beta} which are relatively insensitive to the particular theoretical model. Using the full BABAR dataset of 450 million B-decays we search for these decays. No significant signal is found in the decays into electrons or muons and we set upper limits on the branching fractions of the order of a 10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. We measure the branching fraction of B {yields} {tau}{mu} to be (1.7 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -4}.

  11. Recent BaBar Results on $B$ Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, P.J.; /Edinburgh U.

    2011-11-15

    Several recent key results from the BABAR experiment are presented, most using 383.6 fb{sup -1} of data. In particular, the search for B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}, inclusive and exclusive measurements of |V{sub ub}|, measurements of b {yields} d{gamma} decays and new observations of rare charmless hadronic decays. The new results provide important experimental constraints on the Standard Model and new physics models. Keywords: B decays; flavor; leptonic; semi-leptonic, radiative, hadronic.

  12. Microsoft Word - PR 25 Vernita Bar Final.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists estimate 200,000 chinook are spawning in the Hanford Reach, the most fish ever counted in this area since dams were constructed in the 1930s. Overall, this...

  13. Microsoft Word - Energy Storage 092209 BAR.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Key Enabler of the Smart Grid 6 * Rapid charging of PHEVs or EVs, without expanding the existing distribution system. * Provision for islanding of a grid into multiple micro-grids. ...

  14. Tau Lepton Flavor Violation Results from BaBar (Conference) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Prepared for CIPANP 2009: 10th Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics, San Diego, California, 26-31 May 2009 Research Org: SLAC...

  15. Picture of the Week: Raising the bar on carbon capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a lab View on Flickr An explosion of 3D printing technology An explosion of 3D printing technology View on Flickr Hot cells for isotopes Hot cells for isotopes View on Flickr...

  16. Microsoft Word - Energy Storage 092209 BAR.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ENERGY STORAGE-A KEY ENABLER OF THE SMART GRID Developed for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability by the National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2009 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Storage - A Key Enabler of the Smart Grid 1 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of

  17. Penguin and rare decays in BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akar, Simon

    2015-04-29

    We present recent results from the BABAR Collaboration on radiative decays. These include searches for new physics via measurements of several observables such as the time- dependent CP asymmetry in B0 ? K0S? ?+? exclusive decays, as well as direct CP asymmetries and branching fractions in B ? Xs? and B ? Xs?+? inclusive decays.

  18. Measurement of $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $ production with additional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mathrm t bart production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at sqrts 8 TeV Citation Details...

  19. Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cloning and sequencing antibody genes from hybridomas, the cells that traditionally make monoclonal antibodies. However, it will require a paradigm shift in the way antibodies are...

  20. Bar Nunn, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nunn, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.9135767, -106.3433606 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  1. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-09-12

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

  2. STEP Utility Bill Analysis Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Utility Bill Analysis Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  3. NREL: Energy Analysis - Jobs and Economic Competitiveness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Policy Impacts Analysis Workforce Development Competitive Advantage Competitve ... Energy Analysis Home Capabilities & Expertise Key Activities Analysis of Project Finance ...

  4. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

    2013-03-11

    The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a “bottom-up” costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with DFMA® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target. In general, tank costs are the largest component of system cost, responsible for at least 30 percent of total system cost, in all but two of the 12 systems. Purchased BOP cost also drives system cost, accounting for 10 to 50 percent of total system cost across the various storage systems. Potential improvements in these cost drivers for all storage systems may come from new manufacturing processes and higher production volumes for BOP components. In addition, advances in the production of storage media may help drive down overall costs for the sodium alanate, SBH, LCH2, MOF, and AX-21 systems.

  5. NREL: Energy Analysis - David Hurlbut

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hurlbut Photo of David Hurlbut David Hurlbut is a member of the Market and Policy Impact Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Senior Analyst On staff since January 2007 Phone number: 303-384-7334 E-mail: david.hurlbut@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Policy and legislative analysis Statistical analysis and econometrics Optimization modeling Cost-benefit analysis Primary research interests Economic incentives and market behavior affecting energy efficiency and renewable energy

  6. Category:Core Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis page? For detailed information on Core Analysis as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Core Analysis Add.png Add a new Core Analysis Technique Pages in...

  7. System Analysis Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Analysis Success Stories System Analysis Success Stories Program Links System Analysis Projects System Analysis Success Stories Economic Impact Tools National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Initiative

  8. NREL: Energy Analysis - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bookmark and Share News The Decision Insight and Market Impacts newsletter highlights the lab's analysts and analysis activities in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies are having an impact on U.S. energy goals. The newsletter features recent publications and websites, updates to our models and tools, and staff activities. You can subscribe to receive the newsletter monthly by email. March 2016 NREL is the nation's leader in clean energy technologies, practices, and strategies.

  9. NREL: Energy Analysis - Webmaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Webmaster Please enter your name and email address in the boxes provided, then type your message below. When you are finished, click "Send Message." NOTE: If you enter your e-mail address incorrectly, we will be unable to reply. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version Energy Analysis Home Capabilities & Expertise Key Activities Models & Tools Data & Resources Publications Partnerships Staff Working with Us Related Links News Did you find

  10. Transportation Energy Systems Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Analysis - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  11. Modeling & Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nrt_blade_tip Permalink Gallery National Rotor Testbed aerodynamic design complete Modeling & Analysis, News, Renewable Energy, SWIFT, Wind Energy, Wind News National Rotor Testbed aerodynamic design complete The aerodynamic design of the National Rotor Testbed (NRT) blade has been completed (see example, above). The goal of the NRT rotor is to replicate the wake characteristics of a utility-scale rotor at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) test site. This will allow researchers at

  12. Modeling & Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NearyFig1 Permalink Gallery University of Illinois uses Sandia Labs' reference hydrokinetic turbine to study potential bed erosion effects Energy, Modeling & Analysis, News, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Water Power University of Illinois uses Sandia Labs' reference hydrokinetic turbine to study potential bed erosion effects Sandia Labs Water Power Technologies Department promotes open-source marine hydrokinetic research by disseminating information on MHK technology designs initially

  13. Residual gas analysis device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

    2012-07-31

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  14. safety analysis report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analysis report - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  15. Independent Statistics & Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Annual Coal Distribution Report 2013 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as

  16. Independent Statistics & Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Quarterly Coal Report (Abbreviated) July - September 2015 January 2016 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore

  17. Mesh Morphing Pier Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Application of Mesh Morphing in STAR-CCM+ to Analysis of Scour at Cylindrical Piers Mesh morphing is a fluid structure interaction capability in STAR-CCM+ to move vertices in the computational mesh in a way that preserves mesh quality when a boundary moves. The equations being solved include terms that account for the motion of the mesh maintaining mass and property balances during the solution process. Initial work on leveraging the mesh morphing FSI capability for efficient application to

  18. Characterization and Failure Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Failure Analysis - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  19. Independent Statistics & Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2016 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Quarterly Coal Distribution Report October - December 2014 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should

  20. Automated Job Hazards Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AJHA Program - The Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) computer program is part of an enhanced work planning process employed at the Department of Energy's Hanford worksite. The AJHA system is routinely used to performed evaluations for medium and high risk work, and in the development of corrective maintenance work packages at the site. The tool is designed to ensure that workers are fully involved in identifying the hazards, requirements, and controls associated with tasks.

  1. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

    2007-02-09

    Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

  2. Statistical Analysis.indd

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications June 2014 Page 1 OVERVIEW The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offi ce of Legacy Management (LM) makes every effort to communicate with its stakeholders through public and small group meetings, conferences, briefi ngs, news releases, telephone, e-mail, informational materials, and through the LM website. To assess the effectiveness of LM's communication with stakeholders across the nation, an analysis of stakeholder interaction was performed.

  3. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-02-01

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  4. Text analysis methods, text analysis apparatuses, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitney, Paul D; Willse, Alan R; Lopresti, Charles A; White, Amanda M

    2014-10-28

    Text analysis methods, text analysis apparatuses, and articles of manufacture are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a text analysis method includes accessing information indicative of data content of a collection of text comprising a plurality of different topics, using a computing device, analyzing the information indicative of the data content, and using results of the analysis, identifying a presence of a new topic in the collection of text.

  5. Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis. No abstract prepared. Authors: Ohlhausen, James Anthony Publication Date: 2010-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1022188 Report Number(s): SAND2010-5304C TRN: US201117%%662 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the

  6. Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative | Department of Energy Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative This report provides detailed analyses of the following policies to determine the impact they may have on ratepayers, businesses, and the state in terms of energy

  7. Arundo Donax Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corrie I. Nichol, Ph.D.; Tyler L. Westover, Ph.D.

    2012-01-01

    This is a summary report of preliminary analysis conducted on Arundo Donax. Arundo Donax was received from Greenwood Resources via Portland General Electric. PGE plans to transition a coal-fired boiler to 100% biomass by 2020, and has partnered with EPRI and INL to conduct the necessary testing and development to understand what needs to take place to make this transition. Arundo Donax is a promising energy crop for biopower, and is as yet relatively untested and uncharacterized. The INL has begun initial characterization of this material, and this summary report presents the initial findings.

  8. Building Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-02

    DOE2.1E-121SUNOS is a set of modules for energy analysis in buildings. Modules are included to calculate the heating and cooling loads for each space in a building for each hour of a year (LOADS), to simulate the operation and response of the equipment and systems that control temperature and humidity and distribute heating, cooling and ventilation to the building (SYSTEMS), to model energy conversion equipment that uses fuel or electricity to provide the required heating,more » cooling and electricity (PLANT), and to compute the cost of energy and building operation based on utility rate schedule and economic parameters (ECONOMICS).« less

  9. PCard Data Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-04-01

    The Procurement Card data analysis and monitoring tool enables due-diligence review using predefined user-created queries and reports. The system tracks individual compliance emails. More specifically, the tool: - Helps identify exceptions or questionable and non-compliant purchases, - Creates audit random sample on request, - Allows users to create and run new or ad-hoc queries and reports, - Monitors disputed charges, - Creates predefined Emails to Cardholders requesting documentation and/or clarification, - Tracks audit status, notes,more » Email status (date sent, response), audit resolution.« less

  10. Dynamic cable analysis models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palo, P.A.; Meggitt, D.J.; Nordell, W.J.

    1983-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the development and validation of undersea cable dynamics computer models by the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory (NCEL) under the sponsorship of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command. These models allow for the analysis of both small displacement (strumming) and large displacement (static and dynamic) deformations of arbitrarily configured cable structures. All of the large displacement models described in this paper are available to the public. This paper does not emphasize the theoretical development of the models (this information is available in other references) but emphasizes the various features of the models, the comparisons between model output and experimental data, and applications for which the models have been used.

  11. Drift Degradation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal stress. (3) The DRKBA code, which determines structurally controlled key-block failure, is not applicable for stress-controlled failure in the lithophysal units. To address these limitations, additional numerical codes have been included that can explicitly apply seismic and thermal loads, providing significant improvements to the analysis of drift degradation and extending the validity of drift degradation models.

  12. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons), 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)

  13. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons),more4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)less

  14. Time-dependent Dalitz-Plot Analysis of the Charmless Decay B^0 -> K^0S Pi Pi- at BABAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilic, J

    2009-10-17

    A time-dependent amplitude analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays is performed in order to extract the CP violation parameters of f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0} and {rho}{sup 0}(770)K{sub S}{sup 0} and direct CP asymmetries of K*{sup +}(892){pi}{sup -}. The results are obtained from the final BABAR data sample of (465 {+-} 5)10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. The time dependent CP asymmetry for f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0} and {rho}{sup 0}(770)K{sub S}{sup 0} are measured to be S(f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0}) = -0.97 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.01, and S({rho}{sup 0}(770)K{sub S}{sup 0}) = 0.67 {+-} 0.20 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.04, respectively. In decays to K*{sup +}(892){pi}{sup -} the direct CP asymmetry is found to be A{sub CP}(K*{sup {+-}}(892){pi}{sup {-+}}) = -0.18 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.00. The relative phases between B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}(892){pi}{sup -} and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup -}(892){pi}{sup +}, relevant for the extraction of the unitarity triangle angle {gamma}, is measured to be {Delta}{phi}(K*(892){pi}) = (34.9 {+-} 23.1 {+-} 7.5 {+-} 4.7){sup o}, where uncertainties are statistical, systematic and model-dependent, respectively. Fit fractions, direct CP asymmetries and the relative phases of different other resonant modes have also been measured. A new method for extracting longitudinal shower development information from longitudinally unsegmented calorimeters is also presented. This method has been implemented as a part of the BABAR final particle identification algorithm. A significant improvement in low momenta muon identification at BABAR is obtained.

  15. Amplitude Analysis and Measurement of the Time-dependent CP Asymmetry of B0 to KsKsKs Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-04-11

    We present the first results on the Dalitz-plot structure and improved measurements of the time-dependent CP-violation parameters of the process B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} obtained using 468 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. The Dalitz-plot structure is probed by a time-integrated amplitude analysis that does not distinguish between B{sup 0} and {bar B}{sup 0} decays. We measure the total inclusive branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}) = (6.19 {+-} 0.48 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third represents the Dalitz-plot signal model dependence. We also observe evidence for the intermediate resonant states f{sub 0}(980), f{sub 0}(1710), and f{sub 2}(2010). Their respective product branching fractions are measured to be (2.70{sub -1.19}{sup +1.25} {+-} 0.36 {+-} 1.17) x 10{sup -6}, (0.50{sub -0.24}{sup +0.46} {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.10) x 10{sup -6}, and (0.54{sub -0.20}{sup +0.21} {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.52) x 10{sup -6}. Additionally, we determine the mixing-induced CP-violation parameters to be S = -0.94{sub -0.21}{sup +0.24} {+-} 0.06 and C = -0.17 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.04, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. These values are in agreement with the standard model expectation.

  16. Fast Analysis and Simulation Team | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SheetsFast Analysis and Simulation Team content top Fast Analysis and Simulation Team

  17. Systems Analysis Workshop Discussion Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discussion Summary from DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  18. Systems Analysis Workshop Welcome & Introductions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Welcome and introduction to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  19. Crude Oil Analysis Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shay, Johanna Y.

    The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

  20. Risk Analysis Virtual ENvironment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-02-10

    RAVEN has 3 major functionalities: 1. Provides a Graphical User Interface for the pre- and post-processing of the RELAP-7 input and output. 2. Provides the capability to model nuclear power plants control logic for the RELAP-7 code and dynamic control of the accident scenario evolution. This capability is based on a software structure that realizes a direct connection between the RELAP-7 solver engine (MOOSE) and a python environment where the variables describing the plant statusmore » are accessible in a scripting environment. RAVEN support the generation of the probabilistic scenario control by supplying a wide range of probability and cumulative distribution functions and their inverse functions. 3. Provides a general environment to perform probability risk analysis for RELAP-7, RELAP-5 and any generic MOOSE based applications. The probabilistic analysis is performed by sampling the input space of the coupled code parameters and it is enhanced by using modern artificial intelligence algorithms that accelerate the identification of the areas of major risk (in the input parameter space). This environment also provides a graphical visualization capability to analyze the outcomes. Among other approaches, the classical Monte Carlo and Latin Hypercube sampling algorithms are available. For the acceleration of the convergence of the sampling methodologies, Support Vector Machines, Bayesian regression, and collocation stochastic polynomials chaos are implemented. The same methodologies here described could be used to solve optimization and uncertainties propagation problems using the RAVEN framework.« less

  1. Sensitivity testing and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neyer, B.T.

    1991-01-01

    New methods of sensitivity testing and analysis are proposed. The new test method utilizes Maximum Likelihood Estimates to pick the next test level in order to maximize knowledge of both the mean, {mu}, and the standard deviation, {sigma} of the population. Simulation results demonstrate that this new test provides better estimators (less bias and smaller variance) of both {mu} and {sigma} than the other commonly used tests (Probit, Bruceton, Robbins-Monro, Langlie). A new method of analyzing sensitivity tests is also proposed. It uses the Likelihood Ratio Test to compute regions of arbitrary confidence. It can calculate confidence regions, for {mu}, {sigma}, and arbitrary percentiles. Unlike presently used methods, such as the program ASENT which is based on the Cramer-Rao theorem, it can analyze the results of all sensitivity tests, and it does not significantly underestimate the size of the confidence regions. The new test and analysis methods will be explained and compared to the presently used methods. 19 refs., 12 figs.

  2. analysis | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alaska analysis appropriations Categorical Exclusions Coordinating Permit Office Cost Mechanisms Cost Recovery geothermal Hawaii NEPA permitting quarterly meeting White...

  3. NREL: Energy Analysis - Anelia Milbrandt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anelia Milbrandt Photo of Anelia Milbrandt. Anelia Milbrandt is a member of the Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. She is also a member of the NREL International Studies Team. Senior Energy Resources Analyst On staff since 2003 Phone number: 303-275-4633 Email: anelia.milbrandt@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Biomass resource assessment Geospatial modeling and analysis Integrated resource, infrastructure, and market analysis Primary research

  4. NREL: Energy Analysis - Daniel Inman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inman Photo of Daniel Inman. Daniel Inman is a member of the Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Research Scientist On staff since February 2008 Phone number: 303-384-6845 E-mail: Daniel.Inman@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Life-cycle modeling of renewable fuels Feedstock production and handling Biofuel sustainability Statistical analysis of temporal and spatial datasets System dynamics Primary research interests Sustainability analysis

  5. NREL: Energy Analysis - Eric Lantz

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eric Lantz Photo of Eric Lantz Eric Lantz is a member of the Market and Policy Impact Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Energy Analyst On staff since September 2008 Phone number: 303-384-7418 E-mail: eric.lantz@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Economic development impacts analysis State and federal policy analysis Primary research interests Policy applications for expanding renewable energy markets Evaluating economic and fiscal impacts of energy policy alternatives Social

  6. NREL: Energy Analysis - Ethan Warner

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ethan Warner Photo of Ethan Warner Ethan Warner is a member of the Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Sustainability Analyst On staff since August 2009 Phone number: 303-384-7471 E-mail: ethan.warner@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Life cycle assessment System dynamics modeling Energy policy Policy analysis Risk analysis Primary research interests System dynamics modeling of renewable technologies and energy systems Technological, social,

  7. NREL: Energy Analysis - Lori Bird

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lori Bird Photo of Lori Bird Lori Bird is a member of the Market and Policy Impact Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Principal Analyst On staff since early 1999 Phone number: 303-384-7412 E-mail: lori.bird@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Market analysis Policy analysis Primary research interests Renewable energy and carbon markets Renewable energy policy Interplay of emissions and renewables policies Education and background training M.E.S. in environmental management, 1997,

  8. NREL: Energy Analysis - Margaret Mann

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Margaret Mann Photo of Margaret Mann Margaret Mann is the group manager of the Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Group Manager On staff since 1993 Phone number: 303-275-2921 E-mail: margaret.mann@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Technical and economic feasibility analysis Environmental analysis Strategic planning for market development Primary research interests Life cycle assessment of renewable energy and conventional technologies

  9. NREL: Energy Analysis - Monisha Shah

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monisha Shah Photo of Monisha Shah. Monisha Shah is a member of the Washington D.C. Office in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Senior Energy Analyst Phone number: 202-488-2229 Email: monisha.shah@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Energy, environmental, and economic modeling and analysis Benefits analysis (environmental, economic, health) Strategic analysis, program development and management, international capacity building Primary research interests International and domestic climate change

  10. NREL: Energy Analysis - Philipp Beiter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Philipp Beiter Photo of Philipp Beiter Philipp Beiter is a member of the Market and Policy Impact Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Energy Markets and Policy Analyst On staff since October 2014 Phone number: 303-275-4383 E-mail: Philipp.Beiter@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Energy policy analysis Regulatory policy Data analysis and statistical modeling Primary research interests Electricity markets Utility business models for distributed generation Regulatory analysis Grid integration

  11. NREL: Energy Analysis - Scott Jenne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scott Jenne Photo of Scott Jenne Scott Jenne is a member of the Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Multidisciplinary Energy Engineer On staff since 2011 Phone number: 303-384-7248 E-mail: scott.jenne@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Techno-Economic Analysis Mechanical design 3D modeling and finite element analysis (FEA) Wave energy conversion Geothermal power cycles Primary research interests Cost reduction pathways of RE systems Integration

  12. NREL: Energy Analysis - Timothy Remo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Timothy Remo Photo of Timothy Remo Timothy Remo is a member of the Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Solar PV Technologies Analyst and Engineer On staff since March 2015 Phone number: 303-275-3882 E-mail: Timothy.Remo@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Photovoltaic and Semiconductor Manufacturing Cost analysis Process development and process optimization Design of Experiments and data analysis Primary research interests PV growth as cost

  13. Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Previous and Ongoing * HYDS ME - Evaluates best infrastructure options * Interstate Infrastructure Analysis - Minimal infrastructure to facilitate interstate travel during ...

  14. Financial Analysis | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Financial Analysis Financial Analysis The first step in financing a street lighting retrofit is a detailed financial analysis. Because street lighting systems are designed to last ten or twenty years, or even longer, all aspects of first costs, ongoing expenses, and long-term savings are important. While a preliminary or first-level analysis can be used to determine such things as simple payback, rate of return, and cost of light, the results may neglect a number of important economic

  15. Supply Forecast and Analysis (SFA)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Matthew Langholtz Science Team Leader Oak Ridge National Laboratory DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Supply Forecast and Analysis (SFA) 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office Goal Statement * Provide timely and credible estimates of feedstock supplies and prices to support - the development of a bioeconomy; feedstock demand analysis of EISA, RFS2, and RPS mandates - the data and analysis of other projects in Analysis and Sustainability, Feedstock Supply and Logistics,

  16. Project Analysis Standard Operating Procedure

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Project Analysis Standard Operating Procedure (EPASOP) Issued by Office of Acquisition and Project Management MA-63 March 12, 2014 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Acquisition and Project Management (OAPM) EVMS & PROJECT ANALYSIS SOP MARCH 2014 ii Earned Value Management System (EVMS) and Project Analysis Standard Operating Procedure (EPASOP) OPR: MA-63 March 2014 1. PURPOSE. This EVMS and Project Analysis Standard Operating Procedure (EPASOP) will serve as a primary reference for MA-631

  17. NREL: Energy Analysis - Key Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Sector Integration Energy-Water Nexus Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Manufacturing Analysis Resource Assessment Models & Tools Data & Resources Publications...

  18. Systems Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems Analysis Systems Analysis Systems analysis provides direction, focus, and support for the development and introduction of hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies, and provides a basis for recommendations on a balanced portfolio of activities. All areas of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office-hydrogen production, delivery, storage, fuel cells, technology validation, and safety, codes and standards-rely on the conclusions and recommendations drawn from systems analysis results

  19. Renewable Fuels Legislation Impact Analysis

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    An analysis based on an extension of the ethanol supply curve in our model to allow for enough ethanol production to meet the requirements of S. 650. This analysis provides an update of the May 23, 2005 analysis, with revised ethanol production and cost assumptions.

  20. Cross-impacts analysis development and energy policy analysis applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roop, J.M.; Scheer, R.M.; Stacey, G.S.

    1986-12-01

    Purpose of this report is to describe the cross-impact analysis process and microcomputer software developed for the Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis (PPA) of DOE. First introduced in 1968, cross-impact analysis is a technique that produces scenarios of future conditions and possibilities. Cross-impact analysis has several unique attributes that make it a tool worth examining, especially in the current climate when the outlook for the economy and several of the key energy markets is uncertain. Cross-impact analysis complements the econometric, engineering, systems dynamics, or trend approaches already in use at DOE. Cross-impact analysis produces self-consistent scenarios in the broadest sense and can include interaction between the economy, technology, society and the environment. Energy policy analyses that couple broad scenarios of the future with detailed forecasting can produce more powerful results than scenario analysis or forecasts can produce alone.

  1. Photovoltaic systems are often described and marketed in terms of the DC power rating of their modules, expressed in $'s/Watt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rd IEEE PVSC, San Diego, CA 2008 1 COMPARISON OF PV SYSTEM PERFORMANCE-MODEL PREDICTIONS WITH MEASURED PV SYSTEM PERFORMANCE Christopher P. Cameron, William E. Boyson, Daniel M. Riley Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy has supported development of the Solar Advisor Model (SAM) to provide a common platform for evaluation of the solar energy technologies being developed with the support of the Department. This report describes a detailed

  2. SDI CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2011-05-05

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Organization requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method to mix and blend the miscible contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank; such as, Tank 50H, to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The work described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the mixing modeling analysis during miscible liquid blending operation, and the flow pattern analysis during transfer operation of the blended liquid. The transient CFD governing equations consisting of three momentum equations, one mass balance, two turbulence transport equations for kinetic energy and dissipation rate, and one species transport were solved by an iterative technique until the species concentrations of tank fluid were in equilibrium. The steady-state flow solutions for the entire tank fluid were used for flow pattern analysis, for velocity scaling analysis, and the initial conditions for transient blending calculations. A series of the modeling calculations were performed to estimate the blending times for various jet flow conditions, and to investigate the impact of the cooling coils on the blending time of the tank contents. The modeling results were benchmarked against the pilot scale test results. All of the flow and mixing models were performed with the nozzles installed at the mid-elevation, and parallel to the tank wall. From the CFD modeling calculations, the main results are summarized as follows: (1) The benchmark analyses for the CFD flow velocity and blending models demonstrate their consistency with Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) and literature test results in terms of local velocity measurements and experimental observations. Thus, an application of the established criterion to SRS full scale tank will provide a better, physically-based estimate of the required mixing time, and elevation of transfer pump for minimum sludge disturbance. (2) An empirical equation for a tank with no cooling coils agrees reasonably with the current modeling results for the dual jet. (3) From the sensitivity study of the cooling coils, it was found that the tank mixing time for the coiled tank was about two times longer than that of the tank fluid with no coils under the 1/10th scale, while the coiled tank required only 50% longer than the one without coils under the full scale Tank 50H. In addition, the time difference is reduced when the pumping U{sub o}d{sub o} value is increased for a given tank. (4) The blending time for T-shape dual jet pump is about 20% longer than that of 15{sup o} upward V-shape pump under the 1/10th pilot-scale tank, while the time difference between the two pumps is about 12% for the full-scale Tank 50H. These results are consistent with the literature information. (5) A transfer pump with a solid-plate suction screen operating at 130 gpm can be located 9.5 inches above settled sludge for 2 in screen height in a 85 ft waste tank without disturbing any sludge. Detailed results are summarized in Table 13. Final pump performance calculations were made by using the established CW pump design, and operating conditions to satisfy the two requirements of minimum sludge disturbance, and adequate blending of tank contents. The final calculation results show that the blending times for the coiled and uncoiled tanks coupled with the CW pump design are 159 and 83 minutes, respectively. All the results are provided in Table 16.

  3. Malware detection and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Ken; Lloyd, Levi; Crussell, Jonathan; Sanders, Benjamin; Erickson, Jeremy Lee; Fritz, David Jakob

    2016-03-22

    Embodiments of the invention describe systems and methods for malicious software detection and analysis. A binary executable comprising obfuscated malware on a host device may be received, and incident data indicating a time when the binary executable was received and identifying processes operating on the host device may be recorded. The binary executable is analyzed via a scalable plurality of execution environments, including one or more non-virtual execution environments and one or more virtual execution environments, to generate runtime data and deobfuscation data attributable to the binary executable. At least some of the runtime data and deobfuscation data attributable to the binary executable is stored in a shared database, while at least some of the incident data is stored in a private, non-shared database.

  4. Sensitivity Test Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-20

    SENSIT,MUSIG,COMSEN is a set of three related programs for sensitivity test analysis. SENSIT conducts sensitivity tests. These tests are also known as threshold tests, LD50 tests, gap tests, drop weight tests, etc. SENSIT interactively instructs the experimenter on the proper level at which to stress the next specimen, based on the results of previous responses. MUSIG analyzes the results of a sensitivity test to determine the mean and standard deviation of the underlying population bymore » computing maximum likelihood estimates of these parameters. MUSIG also computes likelihood ratio joint confidence regions and individual confidence intervals. COMSEN compares the results of two sensitivity tests to see if the underlying populations are significantly different. COMSEN provides an unbiased method of distinguishing between statistical variation of the estimates of the parameters of the population and true population difference.« less

  5. Building Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-01-24

    DOE2.1E-121 is a set of modules for energy analysis in buildings. Modules are included to calculate the heating and cooling loads for each space in a building for each hour of a year (LOADS), to simulate the operation and response of the equipment and systems that control temperature and humidity and distribute heating, cooling and ventilation to the building (SYSTEMS), to model energy conversion equipment that uses fuel or electricity to provide the required heating,more » cooling and electricity (PLANT), and to compute the cost of energy and building operation based on utility rate schedule and economic parameters (ECONOMICS). DOE2.1E-121 contains modifications to DOE2.1E which allows 1000 zones to be modeled.« less

  6. Integrated fluorescence analysis system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buican, Tudor N. (Los Alamos, NM); Yoshida, Thomas M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01

    An integrated fluorescence analysis system enables a component part of a sample to be virtually sorted within a sample volume after a spectrum of the component part has been identified from a fluorescence spectrum of the entire sample in a flow cytometer. Birefringent optics enables the entire spectrum to be resolved into a set of numbers representing the intensity of spectral components of the spectrum. One or more spectral components are selected to program a scanning laser microscope, preferably a confocal microscope, whereby the spectrum from individual pixels or voxels in the sample can be compared. Individual pixels or voxels containing the selected spectral components are identified and an image may be formed to show the morphology of the sample with respect to only those components having the selected spectral components. There is no need for any physical sorting of the sample components to obtain the morphological information.

  7. Ultrasound Analysis of Slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soong, Yee and Blackwell, Arthur G.

    2005-11-01

    An autoclave reactor allows for the ultrasonic analysis of slurry concentration and particle size distribution at elevated temperatures and pressures while maintaining the temperature- and pressure-sensitive ultrasonic transducers under ambient conditions. The reactor vessel is a hollow stainless steel cylinder containing the slurry which includes a stirrer and a N, gas source for directing gas bubbles through the slurry. Input and output transducers are connected to opposed lateral portions of the hollow cylinder for respectively directing sound waves through the slurry and receiving these sound waves after transmission through the slurry, where changes in sound wave velocity and amplitude can be used to measure slurry parameters. Ultrasonic adapters connect the transducers to the reactor vessel in a sealed manner and isolate the transducers from the hostile conditions within the vessel without ultrasonic signal distortion or losses.

  8. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-01-16

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallel application. STAT uses the MRNet free based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to form a single call prefix tree.more » The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence classes. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.« less

  9. Ultrasound Analysis Of Slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soong, Yee (Monroeville, PA); Blackwell, Arthur G. (Duquesne, PA)

    2005-11-01

    An autoclave reactor allows for the ultrasonic analysis of slurry concentration and particle size distribution at elevated temperatures and pressures while maintaining the temperature- and pressure-sensitive ultrasonic transducers under ambient conditions. The reactor vessel is a hollow stainless steel cylinder containing the slurry which includes a stirrer and a N.sub.2 gas source for directing gas bubbles through the slurry. Input and output transducers are connected to opposed lateral portions of the hollow cylinder for respectively directing sound waves through the slurry and receiving these sound waves after transmission through the slurry, where changes in sound wave velocity and amplitude can be used to measure slurry parameters. Ultrasonic adapters connect the transducers to the reactor vessel in a sealed manner and isolate the transducers from the hostile conditions within the vessel without ultrasonic signal distortion or losses.

  10. Sandia PUF Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-06-11

    This program is a graphical user interface for measuring and performing inter-active analysis of physical unclonable functions (PUFs). It is intended for demonstration and education purposes. See license.txt for license details. The program features a PUF visualization that demonstrates how signatures differ between PUFs and how they exhibit noise over repeated measurements. A similarity scoreboard shows the user how close the current measurement is to the closest chip signatures in the database. Other metrics suchmore » as average noise and inter-chip Hamming distances are presented to the user. Randomness tests published in NIST SP 800-22 can be computed and displayed. Noise and inter-chip histograms for the sample of PUFs and repeated PUF measurements can be drawn.« less

  11. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-02-19

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallell application. STAT uses the MRNet tree based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to from a single call prefix tree.more » The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence slasses. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.« less

  12. Chemical process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  13. Accident tolerant fuel analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis; Chichester, Heather; Johns, Jesse; Teague, Melissa; Tonks, Michael Idaho National Laboratory; Youngblood, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced ''RISMC toolkit'' that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional ''accident-tolerant'' (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and evaluate margin recovery strategies.

  14. Accident Tolerant Fuel Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Heather Chichester; Jesse Johns; Melissa Teague; Michael Tonks; Robert Youngblood

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced RISMC toolkit that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional accident-tolerant (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and evaluate margin recovery strategies.

  15. Hypothesis analysis methods, hypothesis analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P. (Richland, WA); Cowell, Andrew J. (Kennewick, WA); Gregory, Michelle L. (Richland, WA); Baddeley, Robert L. (Richland, WA); Paulson, Patrick R. (Pasco, WA); Tratz, Stephen C. (Richland, WA); Hohimer, Ryan E. (West Richland, WA)

    2012-03-20

    Hypothesis analysis methods, hypothesis analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a hypothesis analysis method includes providing a hypothesis, providing an indicator which at least one of supports and refutes the hypothesis, using the indicator, associating evidence with the hypothesis, weighting the association of the evidence with the hypothesis, and using the weighting, providing information regarding the accuracy of the hypothesis.

  16. NREL: Energy Analysis - Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technology Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technology Analysis NREL's hydrogen systems analysis activities provide direction, insight, and support for the development, demonstration, and deployment of a broad range of hydrogen technologies. Analysis focuses on hydrogen production, storage, and delivery systems for fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) as well as stationary fuel cells and emerging-market applications such as material handling and backup power. NREL's hydrogen systems analysts evaluate R&D goals

  17. Top Quark Produced Through the Electroweak Force: Discovery Using the Matrix Element Analysis and Search for Heavy Gauge Bosons Using Boosted Decision Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pangilinan, Monica; /Brown U.

    2010-02-01

    The top quark produced through the electroweak channel provides a direct measurement of the V{sub tb} element in the CKM matrix which can be viewed as a transition rate of a top quark to a bottom quark. This production channel of top quark is also sensitive to different theories beyond the Standard Model such as heavy charged gauged bosons termed W{prime}. This thesis measures the cross section of the electroweak produced top quark using a technique based on using the matrix elements of the processes under consideration. The technique is applied to 2.3 fb{sup -1} of data from the D0 detector. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the signal and background model using Bayesian statistics, we measure the cross section of the top quark produced through the electroweak mechanism {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.30{sub -1.20}{sup +0.98} pb. The measured result corresponds to a 4.9{sigma} Gaussian-equivalent significance. By combining this analysis with other analyses based on the Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) and Boosted Decision Tree (BDT) method, the measured cross section is 3.94 {+-} 0.88 pb with a significance of 5.0{sigma}, resulting in the discovery of electroweak produced top quarks. Using this measured cross section and constraining |V{sub tb}| < 1, the 95% confidence level (C.L.) lower limit is |V{sub tb}| > 0.78. Additionally, a search is made for the production of W{prime} using the same samples from the electroweak produced top quark. An analysis based on the BDT method is used to separate the signal from expected backgrounds. No significant excess is found and 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section are set for W{prime} with masses within 600-950 GeV. For four general models of W{prime} boson production using decay channel W{prime} {yields} t{bar b}, the lower mass limits are the following: M(W{prime}{sub L} with SM couplings) > 840 GeV; M(W{prime}{sub R}) > 880 GeV or 890 GeV if the right-handed neutrino is lighter or heavier than W{prime}{sub R}; and M(W{prime}{sub L+R}) > 915 GeV.

  18. Real time analysis under EDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneberk, D.

    1985-07-01

    This paper describes the analysis component of the Enrichment Diagnostic System (EDS) developed for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Four different types of analysis are performed on data acquired through EDS: (1) absorption spectroscopy on laser-generated spectral lines, (2) mass spectrometer analysis, (3) general purpose waveform analysis, and (4) separation performance calculations. The information produced from this data includes: measures of particle density and velocity, partial pressures of residual gases, and overall measures of isotope enrichment. The analysis component supports a variety of real-time modeling tasks, a means for broadcasting data to other nodes, and a great degree of flexibility for tailoring computations to the exact needs of the process. A particular data base structure and program flow is common to all types of analysis. Key elements of the analysis component are: (1) a fast access data base which can configure all types of analysis, (2) a selected set of analysis routines, (3) a general purpose data manipulation and graphics package for the results of real time analysis. Each of these components are described with an emphasis upon how each contributes to overall system capability. 3 figs.

  19. Analysis Models and Tools: Systems Analysis of Hydrogen and Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power (FCPower) Model PDF icon Global Pathways Analysis Tool (GPAT) PDF icon Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) Model PDF icon ...

  20. NREL: Energy Analysis - About the Strategic Energy Analysis Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resource Assessment Electric Sector Integration Jobs and Economic Competitiveness Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Analysis of Project Finance What is the SEAC? NREL and the...

  1. NREL: Energy Analysis - Vehicles and Fuels Research Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis and Integration Evaluates advanced vehicle technologies to determine their impact on fuel economy, vehicle performance, exhaust emissions, and more. Transportation...

  2. Structure analysis of O,O-propane-1,3-diyl bis[diphenyl(phosphinothioate)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karaman, M.; Irisli, S.; Bykgngr, O.

    2013-12-15

    A new diphosphine disulphide compound with the formula C{sub 27}H{sub 26}O{sub 2} vertical bar P{sub 2}S{sub 2}, was synthesized from the reaction between PPh{sub 2}SCl and 1,3-propanediol and characterized with different spectroscopic methods. Its structure has also been studied by X-ray diffraction. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-bar1. Pentavalent phosphorus atoms in the molecule are in distorted tetrahedral environments.

  3. Pulse Analysis Spectroradiometer System (PASS) Software - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Find More Like This Return to Search Pulse Analysis ... SummaryFlashing artificial light sources are used extensively in photovoltaic ...

  4. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stochastic Analysis of Injection-Induced Seismicity Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of Injection-Induced Seismicity ...

  5. Threat Analysis Framework | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Threat Analysis Framework Threat Analysis Framework The need to protect national critical infrastructure has led to the development of a threat analysis framework. The threat ...

  6. EA-1975: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5: Supplement Analysis EA-1975: Supplement Analysis LINAC Coherent Light Source-Il, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California This document provides an analysis...

  7. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Kosterev, Dmitry; Dai, T.

    2014-12-31

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  8. Residential Building Energy Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1990-09-01

    PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) provides an easy-to-use and accurate method of estimating the energy and cost savings associated with various energy conservation measures in site-built single-family homes. Measures such as ceiling, wall, and floor insulation; different window type and glazing layers; infiltration levels; and equipment efficiency can be considered. PEAR also allows the user to consider the effects of roof and wall color, movable night insulation on the windows, reflective and heatmore » absorbing glass, an attached sunspace, and use of a night temperature setback. Regression techniques permit adjustments for different building geometries, window areas and orientations, wall construction, and extension of the data to 880 U.S. locations determined by climate parameters. Based on annual energy savings, user-specified costs of conservation measures, fuel, lifetime of measure, loan period, and fuel escalation and interest rates, PEAR calculates two economic indicators; the Simple Payback Period (SPP) and the Savings-to-Investment Ratio (SIR). Energy and cost savings of different sets of conservation measures can be compared in a single run. The program can be used both as a research tool by energy policy analysts and as a method for nontechnical energy calculation by architects, home builders, home owners, and others in the building industry.« less

  9. Community Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-21

    The TDIST3 program performs an analysis of large integrated community total energy systems (TES) supplying thermal and electrical energy from one or more power stations. The program models the time-dependent energy demands of a group of representative building types, distributes the thermal demands within a thermal utility system (TUS), simulates the dynamic response of a group of power stations in meeting the TUS demands, and designs an optimal base-loaded (electrically) power plant and thermal energymore » storage reservoir combination. The capital cost of the TES is evaluated. The program was developed primarily to analyze thermal utility systems supplied with high temperature water (HTW) from more than one power plant. The TUS consists of a transmission loop and secondary loops with a heat exchanger linking each secondary loop to the transmission loop. The power stations electrical output supplies all community buildings and the HTW supplies the thermal demand of the buildings connected through the TUS, a piping network. Basic components of the TES model are one or more power stations connected to the transmission loop. These may be dual-purpose, producing electricity and HTW, or just heating plants producing HTW. A thermal storage reservoir is located at one power station. The secondary loops may have heating plants connected to them. The transmission loop delivers HTW to local districts; the secondary loops deliver the energy to the individual buildings in a district.« less

  10. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1986-06-01

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible andmoreare indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.less

  11. Quantum Graph Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm; Sterk, Jonathan David; Lobser, Daniel; Parekh, Ojas D.; Ryan-Anderson, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, advanced network analytics have become increasingly important to na- tional security with applications ranging from cyber security to detection and disruption of ter- rorist networks. While classical computing solutions have received considerable investment, the development of quantum algorithms to address problems, such as data mining of attributed relational graphs, is a largely unexplored space. Recent theoretical work has shown that quan- tum algorithms for graph analysis can be more efficient than their classical counterparts. Here, we have implemented a trapped-ion-based two-qubit quantum information proces- sor to address these goals. Building on Sandia's microfabricated silicon surface ion traps, we have designed, realized and characterized a quantum information processor using the hyperfine qubits encoded in two 171 Yb + ions. We have implemented single qubit gates using resonant microwave radiation and have employed Gate set tomography (GST) to characterize the quan- tum process. For the first time, we were able to prove that the quantum process surpasses the fault tolerance thresholds of some quantum codes by demonstrating a diamond norm distance of less than 1 . 9 x 10 [?] 4 . We used Raman transitions in order to manipulate the trapped ions' motion and realize two-qubit gates. We characterized the implemented motion sensitive and insensitive single qubit processes and achieved a maximal process infidelity of 6 . 5 x 10 [?] 5 . We implemented the two-qubit gate proposed by Molmer and Sorensen and achieved a fidelity of more than 97 . 7%.

  12. MGR External Events Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Booth

    1999-11-06

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to apply an external events Hazards Analysis (HA) to the License Application Design Selection Enhanced Design Alternative 11 [(LADS EDA II design (Reference 8.32))]. The output of the HA is called a Hazards List (HL). This analysis supersedes the external hazards portion of Rev. 00 of the PHA (Reference 8.1). The PHA for internal events will also be updated to the LADS EDA II design but under a separate analysis. Like the PHA methodology, the HA methodology provides a systematic method to identify potential hazards during the 100-year Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) operating period updated to reflect the EDA II design. The resulting events on the HL are candidates that may have potential radiological consequences as determined during Design Basis Events (DBEs) analyses. Therefore, the HL that results from this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply during the performance of DBE analyses.

  13. Environmental Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Analysis Environmental Analysis Environmental Analysis is used by the Program to quantify the environmental impacts of hydrogen technologies. Specifically, life cycle assessment is used to identify and evaluate the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use of all processes required to make the process of interest operate, including raw material extraction, transportation, processing, and final disposal of all products and by-products. Also known as cradle-to-grave or

  14. ORISE: Data Collection and Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Collection and Analysis The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) assists government agencies and organizations in acquiring evidence from systematic data collection procedures and analyzing data before, during and after program implementation. ORISE performs data analysis and collection using one or more of the following tactics: Primary and secondary literature reviews Environmental scans Focus groups Key informant interview Surveys and questionnaires Media analysis and

  15. ORISE: Media Analysis and Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Media Analysis and Monitoring The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) uses comprehensive media analysis and monitoring tools to define media interest and the public's perceptions of a particular issue. ORISE's media analysis process includes analyzing news reports combined with media outlet data, such as circulation, readership, number of viewers and listeners; recording frequency of publication and collecting quotes from subject matter experts. To improve the overall

  16. NREL: Energy Analysis - Ahmad Mayyas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ahmad Mayyas Photo of Ahmad Mayyas Ahmad Mayyas is a member of the Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Clean Energy Manufacturing and Cost Analyst On staff since April, 2015 Phone number: 303-384-7446 E-mail: Ahmad.Mayyas@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Life cycle assessment of renewable and sustainable energy systems Design for sustainability/environment for automobiles Sustainable manufacturing and energy analysis Advanced engineering

  17. NREL: Energy Analysis - Anthony Lopez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anthony Lopez Photo of Anthony Lopez Anthony Lopez is the section supervisor of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. GIS Scientist IV - Section Supervisor On staff since April 2009 Phone number: 303-275-3654 E-mail: anthony.lopez@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Spatial Database Design and Utilization High Performance Computing Parallel Processing and Analysis of Large Geospatial Datasets Visualization of Complex Spatial-Temporal Datasets Renewable

  18. NREL: Energy Analysis - Cara Marcy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cara Marcy Photo of Cara Marcy Cara Marcy is a member of the Market and Policy Impact Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Renewable Electricity Analyst On staff since September 2015 Phone number: 303-275-3740 E-mail: Cara.Marcy@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Energy policy analysis Data analysis and modeling Utility-scale wind, solar, and energy storage Primary research interests Renewable electricity policy and market modelling Renewable generation and energy storage integration Regional

  19. NREL: Energy Analysis - Daniel Steinberg

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Steinberg Photo of Daniel Steinberg Daniel Steinberg is a section supervisor of the Energy Forecasting and Modeling Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Senior Policy and Economic Analyst - Electricity Planning Section Supervisor On staff since September 2009 Phone number: 303-275-4287 E-mail: daniel.steinberg@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Energy policy and regulatory analysis Econometric analysis Modeling of interactions between climate change and the energy sector Primary research

  20. NREL: Energy Analysis - Dave Bielen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dave Bielen Photo of Dave Bielen Dave Bielen is a member of the Energy Forecasting and Modeling Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Energy and Environmental Policy Analyst On staff since June 2015 Phone number: 303-275-4921 E-mail: david.bielen@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Environmental policy design Dynamic programming Time series and microeconometric analysis Primary research interests Distributional impact analysis of environmental and energy policy GHG emissions mitigation in the