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1

Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is state policy to manage groundwater and surface water resources from the perspective of aquifers, watersheds, and river basins to achieve protection, preservation, enhancement, and restoration...

2

Southern Region Watershed Management Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coordinators and the organization, management and activities of the Southern Region Water Quality Planning1 Southern Region Watershed Management Project September 15, 2000 to September 14, 2005 Terminal responding to water quality and conservation issues with educational assistance, technology development

3

Watershed Management & Science Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organic compounds, trace metals, and nutrients as indicators of wastewater treatment plant discharge Name Affiliation e-mail Aingworth, Catherine Binghamton wastewater treatment caingworth the Binghamton--to--Catskill urban-rural gradient. Homyak, P.M., Wood Chips: A potential best management practice

Suzuki, Masatsugu

4

Watershed Management And Modeling Development and Application of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

30% of ponds, lakes and reservoirs 40% of estuaries #12;Watershed Management And Modeling Sources-transpiration Elemental responses are integrated to determine system response #12;Watershed Management And ModelingWatershed Management And Modeling Development and Application of Watershed Models for Simulation

Sukop, Mike

5

SWAT TO IDENTIFY WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTIONS: (ANJENI WATERSHED, BLUE NILE BASIN, ETHIOPIA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SWAT TO IDENTIFY WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTIONS: (ANJENI WATERSHED, BLUE NILE BASIN, ETHIOPIA Biniam Biruk Ashagre #12;ABSTRACT Ethiopia is known for its wealth of natural resources. These result Basin, Ethiopia) #12;iv This study is dedicated to my

Walter, M.Todd

6

Watershed Analysis1 Alan Gallegos2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watershed Analysis1 Alan Gallegos2 Abstract Watershed analyses and assessments for the Kings River delivery attributable to roads indicate concern for several stream reaches as well. The Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project area is located in Fresno County, approximately 32 air miles northeast

Standiford, Richard B.

7

Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

Geist, David R.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - area watershed management Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: area watershed management Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Environmental and Resource Studies Program Department of Geography Summary: Watershed...

9

Watershed Management: An Evaluation of the Mullen Slough Capital Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Action Plan King County, Washington, USA by Fiona Murray McNair B.Sc. McGill University 1995 RESEARCH Capital Improvement Project Study and Action Plan, King County, Washington, USA Examining Committee:_______________________________ #12;iii Abstract A watershed management process, for a sub-basin in King County, WA is examined

10

CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA? Oloro V. McHugh, Amy S, Ethiopia Gete Zeleke ARARI, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia Abstract: In the food insecure regions, short annual. Ethiopia's agricultural sector is driven by the subsistence strategies of smallholder farmers

Walter, M.Todd

11

Urban Retrofit: A Whole-Watershed Approach to Urban Stormwater Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rainwater  catchment  cisterns     Derby/Po)er  Creek  Watershed:  Urban  Stormwater  for   managing  stormwater.  Rainwater  catchment  can  be  Stormwater  Management. ”   Capturing  rainwater  runoff  

Lithander, Becky

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Local Policy Networks and Agricultural Watershed Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of environmental best management practices. Local networks facilitate diffusion of innovations, the development of adopting environmental practices. These findings have important implications for public administration agencies/organizations increase the rate at which pro- ducers adopt environmental ``best management

Lubell, Mark

13

Minimization of Cost, Sediment Load, and Sensitivity to Climate Change in a Watershed Management Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

caused by non-point source impacts from developed lands, structural Best Management Practices (BMPs management practice (BMP) plans for entire watersheds. Each of these alternative BMP configurations are non: multiobjective, differential evolution, robustness to uncertainty, stormwater management, best management

Eppstein, Margaret J.

14

WATERSHED MANAGEMENT FOR ENDANGERED AQUATIC AND RIPARIAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are rigorously tested. Some of the fallacies are: single species management works, extrinsic factors cause to T&E species must be founded on the basis of solid science. KEYWORDS: Threatened and endangered of the fallacies are: single species management works, extrinsic factors cause the problems, simple solutions

15

Non point source pollution modelling in the watershed managed by Integrated Conctructed Wetlands: A GIS approach.   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The non-point source pollution has been recognised as main cause of eutrophication in Ireland (EPA Ireland, 2001). Integrated Constructed Wetland (ICW) is a management practice adopted in Annestown stream watershed, located in the south county...

Vyavahare, Nilesh

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

16

Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Increasing Bare Ground Indicates Poor Watershed Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; the more variable the landscape within a unit, the more tran- sects are needed. There will be obvious seasonal changes in vegetative cover because of plant growth and death Increasing Bare Ground Indicates Poor Watershed Health K. Brian Hays, Barron S...

Hays, K. Brian

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

Potential impacts of global climate change on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis Achanges may impact the hydrology of the Tijuana Riverclimate changes might impact hydrology in the Tijuana River

Das, Tapash; Dettinger, Michael D; Cayan, Daniel R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Urban Stormwater and Watershed Management: A Case Study James P. Heaney, Len Wright, and David Sample  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

classified as Decision Support Systems (DSS) (Loucks 1995). Contemporary DSS's contain a mixture9-1 Chapter 9 Urban Stormwater and Watershed Management: A Case Study James P. Heaney, Len Wright. The concept of integrated water and land management was first articulated in the western U.S. by John Wesley

Pitt, Robert E.

19

Evaluating the Economics of Best Management Practices for Tarrant Regional Water District’s Eagle Mountain Lake Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manag e me n t unit of analys i s is one designated wetland project encompassing 20.6 acres. In-Lake BMPs Based on feedback from TRWD personne l , it was noted that BMP 20 (Hypolimnetic Aeration ) and BMP 21 (P Inactiva t i o n with Alum... years. The manage me n t unit of analysi s is one designa t e d hypol i mn e t i c aerat i o n proj ec t withi n the Eagle Mountai n Lake watersh e d . BMP 21 P Inactivation with Alum. T h e addition of powdered alum at variou s lake depths...

Johnson, Jason L.

20

Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bacterial survival in hydro- environmental systems such as sunlight, temperature, soil moisture conditions1559 Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management of impaired streams. Novel statistical time series analyses of coliform data can

Perfect, Ed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Brush Management/Water Yield Feasibility Study for Four Watersheds In Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2000) in which 8 watersheds were analyzed. Landsat 7 satellite imagery was used to classify land use, and the 1:24,000 scale digital elevation model (DEM) was used to delineate watershed boundaries and subbasins. SWAT was calibrated to measured stream... modeling by the USDA-ARS, including development of CREAMS (Knisel, 1980), SWRRB (Williams et al., 1985; Arnold et al., 1990), and ROTO (Arnold et al., 1995b). SWAT was developed to predict the impact of climate and management (e.g. vegetative changes...

Bednarz, Steven T.; Dybala, Tim; Amonett, Carl; Muttiah, Ranjan S.; Rosenthal, Wes; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Arnold, Jeff G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Education of Best Management Practices in the Arroyo Colorado Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Enviro n me n t a l Protec t i o n Agency (EPA). Since the progra m? s incept i o n in 2005, Extens i o n educat e d agricu l t u r a l produc e r s on proper nutrien t manageme n t and product i o n techniq u e s , pr omot e d progra ms associ a t e... and mercury and PCBs in edible fish tissue. Figure 3. Land use in the Arroyo Colorado Watershed. In 1998 the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) initiated an effort to develop a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for pollutants causing low...

23

The Texas Watershed Steward Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATERSHED PROTECTION AND MANAGEMENT · Importance of Local Watershed Involvement · Forming and Sustaining: ­ 7 AICP CM hours (planners) ­ 7 TBPE CPEs (engineers) ­ 7 CCA CEUs (soil & water management) ­ 7Life Extension Service Watershed Protection Planning Short Course January 1216, 2009 WATERSHED MANAGEMENT · Local

24

Factors influencing landowner willingness to enroll in a cost-share brush management program in the Pedernales River watershed, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACTORS INFLUENCING LANDOWNER WILLINGNESS TO ENROLL IN A COST-SHARE BRUSH MANAGEMENT PROGRAM IN THE PEDERNALES RIVER WATERSHED, TEXAS A Thesis by MARK ROBERT TAYS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial... WATERSHED, TEXAS A Thesis by MARK ROBERT TAYS Submitted to the Oftice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Urs P. Kreuter...

Tays, Mark Robert

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

This document is the result of a major interdisciplinary effort to synthesize our understanding of the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management. This  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understanding of the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management. This document is the product of more thanForeword This document is the result of a major interdisciplinary effort to synthesize our topics include overviews of the effects of fuel management on both terrestrial and aquatic watershed

26

431USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRSP13. 2000 Abstract.--Information and related literature on watershed manage-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Web Site The Internet's World Wide Web (Web) is a major tech- nology transfer vehicle. The Web is a cost-effective way to transfer information between world regions that are chal- lenged by similar components. Each Web page has a search engine and a list of related Web sites on watershed management

27

Area Study prior to Companion Modelling to Integrate Multiple Interests in Upper Watershed Management of Northern Thailand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management of Northern Thailand C. Barnaud*, G. Trébuil**, P. Dumrongrojwatthana***, J. Marie**** * CU of northern Thailand have long been accused of degrading the upper watersheds of the country's major basins communities and state agencies, calling for the need for adapted participatory methodologies to facilitate

Boyer, Edmond

28

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

A postdevelopmental evaluation of Langford Creek Watershed Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of Benefits and Costs Viewpoint of the Analysis 7 8 9 11 III DESCRIPTION OF T?. 'AREA AND THE FLOOD PROBLEM ~ ~ 12 PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGY ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 24 Determination of Costs Determination of Benefits Comparison of Results... of small watershed projects by providing informa- tion beneficial for planning procedures and tools for project evaluation. Multiple purpose watersheds . (agricultural land and water management; fish, wildlife and recreational development; municipal...

Rico, Luis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

30

Minimization of cost, sediment load, and sensitivity to climate change in a watershed management application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Multiobjective Differential evolution Robustness to uncertainty Stormwater management Best management practices-scale, multiobjective framework for generating a diverse family of stormwater best management practice (BMP) plans-point source impacts from developed lands, structural Best Management Practices (BMPs) such as detention ponds

Eppstein, Margaret J.

31

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sediment Damage in the Lower Running Draw Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a study on the economic impact of implementing potential agricultural NPS pollution controls in Lower Running Water Draw watershed. The study focuses on: (a) the effects of erosion control on farm income, (b) off-site sediment damages...

Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.; Lacewell, R. D.; Mueller, P. E.

32

Community Perceptions and Priorities for Managing Water and Environmental Resources in the River Njoro Watershed in Kenya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Njoro Watershed in Kenya M. W. Jenkins1 , F. K. Lelo2 , L.W. Chiuri2 , W. A. Shivoga2 and S. N. Miller3, respectively, in Environmental Science, Egerton University, Njoro, Kenya; Tel (+254) 51 62085, emails: lelo@uwyo.edu Abstract The Njoro Watershed, typical of the semi-arid basins in the Rift Valley of Kenya, is undergoing

Richner, Heinz

33

Nine Elements of Watershed Based Plans for EPA Section 319  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watershed Protection Plan Feb 2008 #12;a.) Identify sources and causes for impairment (load duration curve of concern Uhland sub-area Confidence intervals from regression analysis of load duration curve Management knowledge of: the nature and source of the WQ problem, the pollutant load reductions needed to meet WQS

34

Production System Planning for Natural Resource Conservation in a Micro-Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production System Planning for Natural Resource Conservationa case study watershed. Production Systems Planning (PSP) isWatershed Management, Production Systems Planning (PSP)

Ramakrishna, Nallathiga

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts-Amherst Concentration in Water, Wetlands and Watersheds 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Water, Wetlands and Watersheds 1 Environmental Conservation Graduate Program Water, Wetlands want scientific training in the multi-disciplinary field of water, wetlands and watershed conservation such as wetlands, hydrology, nonpoint source pollution, modeling, ecosystems, water resource management, watershed

Schweik, Charles M.

36

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase [Herrera Environmental Consultants, Inc.

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

37

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

May, Christopher; Geist, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Eugene Solid Waste Management Market Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eugene Solid Waste Management Market Analysis Prepared By: Mitchell Johnson Alex Sonnichsen #12;Eugene Solid Waste Management Market Analysis May 2012 Page 1 Summary This study examines the economic impact of the solid waste management system

Oregon, University of

39

An Analysis of Microbial Pollution in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet Watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This assessment of fecal coliform sources and pathways in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets is part of the Project ENVironmental InVESTment (ENVVEST) being conducted by the Navy's Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, the Suquamish Tribe, Kitsap County, the City of Bremerton, the City of Port Orchard, and other local stakeholders. The goal of this study was to identify microbial pollution problems within the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and to provide a comprehensive assessment of fecal coliform (FC) contamination from all identifiable sources in the watershed. This study quantifies levels of contamination and estimated loadings from known sources within the watersheds and describes pollutant transport mechanisms found in the study area. In addition, the effectiveness of pollution prevention and mitigation measures currently in place within the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed are discussed. This comprehensive study relies on historical data collected by several cooperating agencies, in addition to data collected during the study period from spring 2001 through summer 2005. This report is intended to provide the technical information needed to continue current water quality cleanup efforts and to help implement future efforts.

May, Christopher W.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

40

Simulating and Optimizing Storm Water Management Strategies in an Urban Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and more frequent flooding. Best Management Practices (BMP) and Low Impact development (LID) are a few of the set of measures which are used to mitigate the impact of urbanization. Peak flow, runoff volume are few of the conventional metrics which are used...

Damodaram, Chandana

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Estimating basin-wide hydraulic parameters of a semi-arid mountainous watershed by recession-flow analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating basin-wide hydraulic parameters of a semi-arid mountainous watershed by recession 2002; accepted 23 April 2003 Abstract Insufficient sub-surface hydraulic data from watersheds often and in watersheds with low population densities because well-drilling to obtain the hydraulic data is expensive

Walter, M.Todd

42

Texas Watershed Planning Short Course Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effectiveness of NPS outreach in Texas to reduce NPS and stormwater pollution, improve water quality on a priority watershed basis, and facilitate greater NPS TMDL and watershed-based plan implementation. #30;e Key EPA Internet Tools for Watershed Management... of protecting and restoring water quality from NPS pollution by providing training to water resource professionals in Texas, which will provide those individuals with knowledge and tools to 1) support the implementation of state, regional, and local programs...

Wagner, Kevin

43

PROGRESS TOWARD DEVELOPMENT OF A GIS BASED WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT TOOL FOR SMALL RURAL WATERSHEDS: MODIFICATION AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Palouse Region of the Pacific Northwest. We apply and modify the Soil Moisture Routing (SMR) model which in the Palouse Region provided that saturated hydraulic conductivities determined in the laboratory are adjusted University are developing a GIS-based problem-solving tool for small rural watersheds in the Palouse Region

Walter, M.Todd

44

The Watershed Management Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phosphorus loading by 25 percent or to develop a computer model that ac- curately predicts nitrogen and phosphorus loadings for a particular lake. What are water quality models? Water quality models use personal computers and mathematics to represent natural...

Persyn, Russell A.; Griffin, Molly; Williams, Amy T.; Wolfe, Clint

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

45

WATERSHED EDUCATION PROGRAM The Watershed Education Program (WEP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of watershed hydrology Lake and river systems Urban and rural runoff Best management practices Aquatic leaders, citizens, and natural resource professionals with knowledge and tools to make informed water and land use decisions to protect and restore the integrity of Minnesota's lakes, rivers, streams

Netoff, Theoden

46

Risk assessment of watershed erosion at Naesung Stream, South Korea Un Ji a,*, Mark Velleux b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulated runoff, channel flow, soil erosion, and stream sediment transport in the Naesung Stream watershed is a significant river management issue and critical environmental problem (Kane and Julien, 2007). Typically, land for analysis of precipitation, overland runoff, channel flow, soil erosion, and stream sediment transport

Julien, Pierre Y.

47

Protect and Restore Mill Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership, more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2000. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing. Starting in FY 2002, continuing into 2004, trees were planted in riparian areas in the meadow of the upper watershed. In addition, a complete inventory of culverts at road-stream crossings was completed. Culverts have been prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed, and one high priority culvert was replaced in 2004. Maintenance to the previously built fence was also completed.

McRoberts, Heidi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A watershed blueprint: Partners work together  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado Watershed,? he said. ?The storm drain markers and road signs are part of the partnership?s ongoing efforts to restore and protect the watershed.? A recently finished project, Education of Best Management Practices in the Arroyo Colorado... projects directed toward carrying out the WPP and restoring the arroyo. In addition to the implementation project, other projects monitor agricul- tural runoff to evaluate effects of implementing best management practices; educate farmers...

Wythe, Kathy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Runoff sources and land cover change in the Amazon: an end-member mixing analysis from small watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

watersheds Christopher Neill · Joaquin E. Chaves · Trent Biggs · Linda A. Deegan · Helmut Elsenbeer · Ricardo 02543, USA e-mail: cneill@mbl.edu T. Biggs Department of Geography, San Diego State University, San

50

Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A modeling approach to evaluate the impacts of water quality management plans implemented in a watershed in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

best management practices (BMPs) have been implemented through Water Quality Management Plans (WQMPs; Best management practices Software availability Name of the software: Soil and Water Assessment Tool. doi:10.1016/j.envsoft.2005.05.013 www.elsevier.com/locate/envsoft Environmental Modelling & Software

52

Protect and Restore Lolo Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed are coordinated with the Clearwater National Forest and Potlatch Corporation. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed of the Clearwater River in 1996. Fencing to exclude cattle for stream banks, stream bank stabilization, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts are the primary focuses of this effort. The successful completion of the replacement and removal of several passage blocking culverts represent a major improvement to the watershed. These projects, coupled with other recently completed projects and those anticipated in the future, are a significant step in improving habitat conditions in Lolo Creek.

McRoberts, Heidi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sedimentation in Lavon Reservoir Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Law 92-500 - the 1972 Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments - mandates the analysis of agricultural non-point source (NPS) pollution controls. This report presents the results of a study of the economic impact of implementing...

Taylor, C. R.; Reneau, D. R.; Harris, B. L.

54

Security Analysis and Project Management Systems | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Security Analysis and Project Management Systems SHARE Security Analysis and Project Management Systems ORNL brings together the subject matter experts with programmers to design,...

55

Earned Value Management System (EVMS) and Project Analysis Standard...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management System (EVMS) and Project Analysis Standard Operating Procedure (EPASOP)- March 2014 Earned Value Management System (EVMS) and Project Analysis Standard Operating...

56

An Economic Analysis of Stream Restoration in an Urban Watershed: Austin, Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

County Appraisal District (TCAD), for providing relevant real estate data and making this research analysis possible. Thank you Dr. Ronald Kaiser and Dr. Val Silvy for continuous encouragement and making my study possible in the Water Program. Thank... to the bank stabilization within 600 feet were selected as restoration site. In addition, each housing value was joined with the ArcMap and matched up with housing ID number provided by the TCAD. Figure 10 shows the selection of houses along the Walnut...

Huang, Chi-Ying

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

57

Encouraging low-impact-development stormwater-management practices / Assabet River Watershed sub-basin case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory codes and ordinances create a framework that guide stormwater management decision processes. These regulations are designed to protect the health and safety of the public and to preserve the natural integrity ...

Brown, James E. (James Edward), 1969-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Economic and ecological implications of alternative brush management and restoration scenarios designed to improve water yield in two Texas watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Costs of additional water are lower for sub-basins within the Edwards study area (ranging from $32 to $70 per acre-foot of water added) than in the Twin Buttes (ranging from $63 to $218 per acre-foot), meaning that brush management efforts are more...

Olenick, Keith Layne

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Getting Our Feet Wet: Water Management at Mt. Laguna in Cleveland National Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Water Quality Control Board, “Watershed Managementof Land Management (BLM) Tests preserve water quality, whichRegional Water Quality Control Board. “Watershed Management

Mumby, William Cade

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowellfor 2013MalcolmManagement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowellfor 2013MalcolmManagement4-25-2014.

62

Melton Valley Watershed  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

watershed. Wastes disposed in Melton Valley reside at a variety of locations, including solid waste landfills, trenches, liquid waste tanks and pipelines, surface structures,...

63

Analysis of Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level: Work Planning and Control, Final Report Analysis of Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level: Work Planning and...

64

Management issues in automated audit analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses management issues associated with the design and implementation of an automated audit analysis system that we use to detect security events. It gives the viewpoint of a team directly responsible for developing and managing such a system. We use Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR) as a case in point. We examine issues encountered at Los Alamos, detail our solutions to them, and where appropriate suggest general solutions. After providing an introduction to NADIR, we explore four general management issues: cost-benefit questions, privacy considerations, legal issues, and system integrity. Our experiences are of general interest both to security professionals and to anyone who may wish to implement a similar system. While NADIR investigates security events, the methods used and the management issues are potentially applicable to a broad range of complex systems. These include those used to audit credit card transactions, medical care payments, and procurement systems.

Jackson, K.A.; Hochberg, J.G.; Wilhelmy, S.K.; McClary, J.F.; Christoph, G.G.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A unifying framework for watershed thermodynamics: balance equations for mass,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A unifying framework for watershed thermodynamics: balance equations for mass, momentum, energy Hassanizadehb a Centre for Water Research, Department of Environmental Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 6907 Nedlands, Australia b Department of Water Management, Environmental and Sanitary Engineering

Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

66

Watershed Modeling for Biofuels | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Watershed Modeling for Biofuels Argonne's watershed modeling research addresses water quality in tributary basins of the Mississippi River Basin Argonne's watershed modeling...

67

EIS-0265-SA-57: Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Watershed Management Program - Idaho Fish Screening Improvement (Champion, Iron, Fourth of July, Goat Creeks)

68

A Spatial Planning and Analysis System for Wildland Fire Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STARFIRE 11/29/2011 A Spatial Planning and Analysis System for Wildland Fire Management Welcome is an advanced and powerful spatial fire management planning and analysis system which is designed to provide visual and analytic support for fire management planning, decisions and communication. The system

69

Visual Data Analysis as an Integral Part of Environmental Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visual Data Analysis as an Integral Part of Environmental Management Jšorg Meyer, E. Wes Bethel). This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, Office of Environmental of California. ii #12;Visual Data Analysis as an Integral Part of Environmental Management Joerg Meyer, E. Wes

70

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

14, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOEEIS-0285SA-35) James Jellison - TFOOlympia...

71

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPZ992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOEEIS-0285SA-25) Elizabeth Johnson - TFRThe...

72

Using Petiole Analysis for Nitrogen Management in Cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For cotton growers, maintaining proper nitrogen balance is a major concern. Petiole analysis, the laboratory analysis of the nitrogen content of leaf stems, can be coupled with plant monitoring to form an effective nitrogen management program...

Livingston, Stephen; Hickey, M. G.; Stichler, Charles

1996-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Stormwater Management Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The policy and purpose of this act is to encourage planning and management of storm water runoff in each watershed consistent with sound water and land use practices.

74

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Systems (VTMS) Analysis...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Characterization and Development of Advanced Heat Transfer Technologies...

75

COMPLEXITY AND ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT IN WASHINGTON STATE FOREST POLICY, 1987-2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPLEXITY AND ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT IN WASHINGTON STATE FOREST POLICY, 1987-2001 by Mark Kepkay BA and Adaptive Management in Washington State Forest Policy, 1987-2001 PROJECT NUMBER: 345 SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE programs within Washington State forest policy. I focus on the Watershed Analysis program, 1992 to 1997

76

Modeling Harry's Brook Watershed Alexandra Konings, REU 2006 Tracing the Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Undergraduates, 2006 #12;Modeling Harry's Brook Watershed Alexandra Konings, REU 2006 Urban Hydrology Water's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) Solves differential and algebraic equations involved in calculatingModeling Harry's Brook Watershed Alexandra Konings, REU 2006 Tracing the Water: Detailed Modeling

Petta, Jason

77

An economic evaluation of the Green Creek Watershed Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can never be given their true value. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Page INTRODUCTION Statement of the Problem Purpose of the Study Objectives II. BENEFIT-COST ANALYSIS III DESCRIPTION OF THE AREA AND THE FLOOD PROBLEH IV. PROCEDURE AND NETEODOLOGY...: DISCOUNTING PROCEDURES 64 74 VITA LlST CF TABLES Table Page Completion Schedule of Flood Water Retarding Structures 17 Design Features of Flood Mater Retarding Structures Green Creek Watershed Project 18 3. Rainfall Record - Green Creek Watershed...

Gray, Roy Mack

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

78

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site is largely developed yet its surface water system encompasses two arroyos, an engineered detention basin (Lake Haussmann), storm channels, and wetlands. Conversely, the more rural Site 300 includes approximately 7,000 acres of largely undeveloped land with many natural tributaries, riparian habitats, and wetland areas. These wetlands include vernal pools, perennial seeps, and emergent wetlands. The watersheds within which the Laboratory's sites lie provide local and community ecological functions and services which require protection. These functions and services include water supply, flood attenuation, groundwater recharge, water quality improvement, wildlife and aquatic habitats, erosion control, and (downstream) recreational opportunities. The Laboratory employs a watershed approach to protect these surface water systems. The intent of this approach, presented in this document, is to provide an integrated effort to eliminate or minimize any adverse environmental impacts of the Laboratory's operations and enhance the attributes of these surface water systems, as possible and when reasonable, to protect their value to the community and watershed. The Laboratory's watershed approach to surface water protection will use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed Framework and guiding principles of geographic focus, scientifically based management and partnerships1 as a foundation. While the Laboratory's unique site characteristics result in objectives and priorities that may differ from other industrial sites, these underlying guiding principles provide a structure for surface water protection to ensure the Laboratory's role in environmental stewardship and as a community partner in watershed protection. The approach includes pollution prevention, continual environmental improvement, and supporting, as possible, community objectives (e.g., protection of the San Francisco Bay watershed).

Coty, J

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

79

Stochastic Models and Analysis for Resource Management in Server Farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

farms. State-of-the-art servers come with multiple knobs to control energy consumption, but traditionalStochastic Models and Analysis for Resource Management in Server Farms Varun Gupta CMU-CS-11, Multi-server systems, Load balancing, Scheduling, M/G/k, Time-varying load, Energy management

80

MANAGEMENT AND COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DATASET ENSEMBLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary Phase I technical objective was to develop a prototype that demonstrates the functionality of all components required for an end-to-end meta-data management and comparative visualization system.

Geveci, Berk [Senior Director, Scientific Computing

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Appalachian Rivers II Conference: Technology for Monitoring, Assessing, and Restoring Streams, Rivers, and Watersheds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 28-29, 1999, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and the WMAC Foundation co-sponsored the Appalachian Rivers II Conference in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting brought together over 100 manufacturers, researchers, academicians, government agency representatives, watershed stewards, and administrators to examine technologies related to watershed assessment, monitoring, and restoration. Sessions included presentations and panel discussions concerning watershed analysis and modeling, decision-making considerations, and emerging technologies. The final session examined remediation and mitigation technologies to expedite the preservation of watershed ecosystems.

None available

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

82

A watershed blueprint: Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado Watershed,? he said. ?The storm drain markers and road signs are part of the partnership?s ongoing efforts to restore and protect the watershed.? A recently finished project, Education of Best Management Practices in the Arroyo Colorado... projects directed toward carrying out the WPP and restoring the arroyo. In addition to the implementation project, other projects monitor agricul- tural runoff to evaluate effects of implementing best management practices; educate farmers...

Wythe, Kathy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A watershed blueprint: partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado Watershed,? he said. ?The storm drain markers and road signs are part of the partnership?s ongoing efforts to restore and protect the watershed.? A recently finished project, Education of Best Management Practices in the Arroyo Colorado... projects directed toward carrying out the WPP and restoring the arroyo. In addition to the implementation project, other projects monitor agricul- tural runoff to evaluate effects of implementing best management practices; educate farmers...

Wythe, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A water quality assessment of the import of turfgrass sod grown with composted dairy manure into a suburban watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) have caused water quality concerns in many rural watersheds, sometimes forcing the State of Texas to conduct Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) assessments of stream nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). One suggested Best Management... Practice (BMP) is the export of phosphorus (P) through turfgrass sod produced with composted dairy manure from an impaired rural watershed to an urban watershed. The manure-grown sod releases P slowly and would not require additional P fertilizer for up...

Richards, Chad Edward

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

85

Project Management and Analysis Project Conception and Execution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TD 608 Project Management and Analysis Part I Project Conception and Execution Milind Sohoni of the paper? How does the author compare India and Pakistan? Do you agree with the cost-benefit analysis? What are your criticisms? Compare the CBA with our 6-goat system. Comment on the viability of the project

Sohoni, Milind

86

FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card – Construction Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap Analysis Qualification Cards outline the differences between the last and latest version of the FAQ Standard.

87

An Experimental Metagenome Data Management and AnalysisSystem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of shotgun sequencing to environmental samples has revealed a new universe of microbial community genomes (metagenomes) involving previously uncultured organisms. Metagenome analysis, which is expected to provide a comprehensive picture of the gene functions and metabolic capacity of microbial community, needs to be conducted in the context of a comprehensive data management and analysis system. We present in this paper IMG/M, an experimental metagenome data management and analysis system that is based on the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system. IMG/M provides tools and viewers for analyzing both metagenomes and isolate genomes individually or in a comparative context.

Markowitz, Victor M.; Korzeniewski, Frank; Palaniappan, Krishna; Szeto, Ernest; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Burbank Transportation Management Organization: Impact Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Burbank Transportation Management Organization (BTMO), a private, membership-based, nonprofit organization dedicated to traffic reduction and air quality improvement, contracted with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a U.S. Department of Energy-owned, contractor-operated national laboratory, to analyze its member programs and their benefits and effects. This report uses trip data collected by the BTMO, and defines and implements a methodology for quantifying non-traffic benefits such as gasoline savings, productivity, and pollution reduction.

Brown, E.; Aabakken, J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Cumulative watershed effects (CWEs) result from the overlapping effects of management activities in time or space. The routing and downstream accumulation of sediment from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activities in time or space. The routing and downstream accumulation of sediment from forest management range from the short-term variability of sediment transport rates to the variability in annual sediment data indicated that 13-95% of the variation in sediment transport rates could be explained by discharge

MacDonald, Lee

90

An economic analysis of conservation and management measures carried out on the Blacklands Experimental Watershed, Riesel, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? NO too ? c^\\ vO ON C"? cv cncv ? LT\\ S B B c\\i s **4 CV rH C M ON CV cn... the technical and economic assistance to farmers in establishing a soil conservation system. 3 Thornton, M. K., Soils and How to Improve Them. Texas Agricultural Extension Service, College Station, Texas, Bulletin No. 189, p. 11. U Southern, John H., Whv...

Decker, Robert David

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

EIS-0265-SA-67: Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Watershed Management Program - Install Fish Screens to Protect ESA Listed Steelhead and Bull Trout in the Walla Walla Basin

92

Management decisions for cogeneration : a survey analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study explores the underlying factors in the decision by private, private non-profit, and public sector facility owners to invest in cogeneration technology. It employs alpha factor analysis techniques to develop ...

Radcliffe, Robert R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -LowellforRates BPA has9-2011. Management's

94

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -LowellforRates BPA4-26-2013. Management's

95

The Texas Watershed Steward Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

San Antonio Bay Other April 2011 Victoria Victoria Urban Watersheds in City of Temple Other May 2011 Pecos River 1 WPP August 2011 Pecos Reeves Pecos River 2 WPP August 2011 Sheffield Pecos Concho River

96

Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon``. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity. The watershed coordinator for the Asotin County Conservation District led a locally based process that combined local concerns and knowledge with technology from several agencies to produce the Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan.

Browne, D.; Holzmiller, J.; Koch, F.; Polumsky, S.; Schlee, D.; Thiessen, G.; Johnson, C.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Restore McComas Meadows; Meadow Creek Watershed, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Meadow Creek watershed are coordinated and cost shared with the Nez Perce National Forest. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Meadow Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, planting trees in riparian areas within the meadow and its tributaries, prioritizing culverts for replacement to accommodate fish passage, and decommissioning roads to reduce sediment input. During this contract period work was completed on two culvert replacement projects; Doe Creek and a tributary to Meadow Creek. Additionally construction was also completed for the ditch restoration project within McComas Meadows. Monitoring for project effectiveness and trends in watershed conditions was also completed. Road decommissioning monitoring, as well as stream temperature, sediment, and discharge were completed.

McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Test of APEX for Nine Forested Watersheds in East Texas X. Wang,* A. Saleh, M. W. McBroom, J. R. Williams, and L. Yin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with best management practices (BMPs) in forested watersheds due to the limited number of and cost and policy alternatives for managing water quality and quantity from intensive silvicultural practices of conducting watershed monitoring. The Agricultural Policy/ Environmental eXtender (APEX) model was field

99

Project Management and Analysis Project Conception and Execution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the World Bank at a cost of $ 600,000. The objectives of the project are: Analyze the supply and demandTD 608 Project Management and Analysis Part I Project Conception and Execution Milind Sohoni Discussion () January 29, 2008 1 / 3 #12;The K-East Ward Water Project Proceed to the web location: www

Sohoni, Milind

100

Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

TRU Waste Management Program. Cost/schedule optimization analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Current Year Work Plan presents in detail a description of the activities to be performed by the Joint Integration Office Rockwell International (JIO/RI) during FY86. It breaks down the activities into two major work areas: Program Management and Program Analysis. Program Management is performed by the JIO/RI by providing technical planning and guidance for the development of advanced TRU waste management capabilities. This includes equipment/facility design, engineering, construction, and operations. These functions are integrated to allow transition from interim storage to final disposition. JIO/RI tasks include program requirements identification, long-range technical planning, budget development, program planning document preparation, task guidance development, task monitoring, task progress information gathering and reporting to DOE, interfacing with other agencies and DOE lead programs, integrating public involvement with program efforts, and preparation of reports for DOE detailing program status. Program Analysis is performed by the JIO/RI to support identification and assessment of alternatives, and development of long-term TRU waste program capabilities. These analyses include short-term analyses in response to DOE information requests, along with performing an RH Cost/Schedule Optimization report. Systems models will be developed, updated, and upgraded as needed to enhance JIO/RI's capability to evaluate the adequacy of program efforts in various fields. A TRU program data base will be maintained and updated to provide DOE with timely responses to inventory related questions.

Detamore, J.A.; Raudenbush, M.H.; Wolaver, R.W.; Hastings, G.A.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Job Task Analysis: Energy Manager; November 2013 - December 2014  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the process for and results of a comprehensive job task analysis of Energy Managers. This study was performed by Professional Testing on behalf of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The competency (domains, tasks and associated knowledge) list, which defines the work performed by practitioners, was initially developed by a representative panel of practitioners during a meeting held on January 22?24, 2014 in Orlando Florida. Following the identification of the job tasks and associated knowledge and skills, a validation survey was conducted of the finding of the JTA and the results of the validation study were reviewed by a representative panel of practitioners during a conference call held on June 2, 2014. The committee finalized the JTA and examination blueprints for the Energy Manager credential scheme based on the survey results.

Woodley, C. D.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

2001, HCS Research Lab. All Rights Reserved. Achieving Scalable Cluster System Analysis and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based cluster system analysis and management. Among these services is the ability to detect network and node for distributed computing integrated into a cluster management system. Previous approaches to cluster management in a non-proprietary fashion. This cluster management system employs gossip techniques to address

George, Alan D.

104

Water Quality Monitoring in the Buck Creek Watershed and Facilitation of Buck Creek Watershed Partnership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

around well-publicized events in the watershed including the two watershed partnership meetings and the announcement of the Texas Environmental Excellence Award winners. www.buckcreek.tamu.edu Educational Programming Providing educational...

Gregory, L.; Dyer, P.

105

chApter 1. Introduction to Synthesis of Current Science 1 Regarding Cumulative Watershed Effects of Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watershed Effects of Fuel Reduction Treatments Douglas F. Ryan chApter 2. Fire Regimes and Ecoregions 7 Robert G. Bailey chApter 3. Fuel Management in Forests of the Inland West 19 Russell T. Graham, Theresa B. Jain, Susan Matthews chApter 4. Tools for Fuel Management 69 Bob Rummer chApter 5. Fuel Management

106

Visual Data Analysis as an Integral Part of Environmental Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) currently supports an effort to understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. Geologists, hydrologists, physicists and computer scientists are working together to create models of existing contaminated sites and to simulate their behavior. Simulation results are verified based on historical data and extrapolated into the future. Visualization is used for model setup verification, visual analysis of high-performance computing simulation results, and uncertainty quantification. This article describes the challenges and solutions for visual data analysis, which impacts the decision-making process for each of the contaminated sites. Lessons learned from these simulations will also have an impact on deciding on treatment measures for other, similarly contaminated areas, including those affected by more recent events, such as Chernobyl and Fukushima.

Meyer, Joerg; Bethel, E. Wes; Horsman, Jennifer L.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Krishnan, Hari; Romosan, Alex; Keating, Elizabeth; Monroe, Laura M.; Strelitz, Richard; Moore, Philip; Taylor, Glenn; Torkian, Ben; Johnson, Timothy C.; Gorton, Ian

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Upper White River Watershed Alliance Upper White River Watershed Alliance (UWRWA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Upper White River Watershed Alliance Upper White River Watershed Alliance (UWRWA) P.O. Box 2065 integrity of the White River ecosystem. To successfully accomplish the vision of UWRWA, a 16-county was formed. It exists to improve and protect water quality on a watershed basis in the larger Upper White

108

Crossing innovation & product projects management: A comparative analysis in automotive industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Crossing innovation & product projects management: A comparative analysis in automotive industry Keywords: organizational learning, new product projects portfolio, innovation management, automotive in automotive industry INTRODUCTION Projectification and platform approaches have been two main transformation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

109

RISK MANAGEMENT AND RISK ANALYSIS-BASED DECISION TOOLS FOR ATTACKS ON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RISK MANAGEMENT AND RISK ANALYSIS- BASED DECISION TOOLS FOR ATTACKS ON ELECTRIC POWER Simonoff, J.usc.edu/create Report #04-004DRAFT #12;Risk Management and Risk Analysis-Based Decision Tools for Attacks on Electric for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events University of Southern California Los Angeles

Wang, Hai

110

Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan: Asotin County, Washington, 1995.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council completed its ``Strategy for Salmon'' in 1992. This is a plan, composed of four specific elements,designed to double the present production of 2.5 million salmon in the Columbia River watershed. These elements have been called the ``four H's'': (1) improve harvest management; (2) improve hatcheries and their production practices; (3) improve survival at hydroelectric dams; and (4) improve and protect fish habitat. The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon''. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity.

Browne, Dave

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Watershed Science/Hydrology Graduate Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watershed Science/Hydrology Graduate Schools University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721://www.ag.arizona.edu/srnr/academicprograms/watershedresources/graduatestudies.html University of California, Davis Davis, California 95616 Program: Hydrologic Sciences http://www.warnercnr.colostate.edu/frws/watershed/graduate/index.html University of Florida Gainesville, Florida 326118140 Programs: Hydrologic Science http

112

Agriculture and Natural Resources Arkansas Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provide the natural catchment boundaries for isolating geographical areas with similar hydrological Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines a watershed as "the area of land where all of the waterAgriculture and Natural Resources FSA9521 Arkansas Watersheds Mike Daniels Professor

113

Fuse Control for Demand Side Management: A Stochastic Pricing Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a service contract for load curtailment. Index Terms--Demand side management, aggregated demand response

Oren, Shmuel S.

114

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NPPC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

117

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Coupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Such models lack the capacity to simulate the hydrodynamics and water quality processes of larger waterCoupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models (SWAT and CE-QUAL-W2) for better water resources management in complex river basins B. Debele & R. Srinivasan

119

Design of a cluster analysis heuristic for the configuration and capacity management of manufacturing cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation presents the configuration and capacity management of manufacturing cells using cluster analysis. A heuristic based on cluster analysis is developed to solve cell formation in cellular manufacturing systems (CMS). The clustering...

Shim, Young Hak

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

120

Organic waste management for EBI in Quebec, feedstock analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EBI is a company located in the province of Quebec in Canada with the mission to integrate waste management. Great challenges in regards to organic waste management are faced and anaerobic digestion is considered by EBI ...

Sylvestre, Olivier, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Comparative analysis of selected broodmare management practices employed at Claiborne Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Record of Study A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SELECTED BROOD~ MANAGEMENT PRACTICES EMPLOYED AT CLAIBORNE FARM A PROFESSIONAL PAPER Jerry M. Green Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF AGRICULTURE December 1991 Animal Science Equine Breeding Management A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SELECTED BROOD~ MANAGEMENT PRACTICES EMPLOYED AT CLAIBORNE FARM A PROFESSIONAL PAPER Jerry M. Green Approved...

Green, Jerry M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Environmental Decision Analysis: Meeting the Challenges of Making Good Decisions at CALFED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Water Account, Drinking Water Quality, Watershed Management,environmental collaborations, formed with the express goal of improving ecological health and water management

Tomkins, Claire D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. Its goal is also to re-establish normal patterns of production, dispersal, and exchange of genetic information within the 1855 Treaty Area. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Visual Data Analysis as an Integral Part of Environmental Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) currently supports an effort to understand and predict the fate of nuclear contaminants and their transport in natural and engineered systems. Geologists, hydrologists, physicists and computer scientists are working together to create models of existing nuclear waste sites, to simulate their behavior and to extrapolate it into the future. We use visualization as an integral part in each step of this process. In the first step, visualization is used to verify model setup and to estimate critical parameters. High-performance computing simulations of contaminant transport produces massive amounts of data, which is then analyzed using visualization software specifically designed for parallel processing of large amounts of structured and unstructured data. Finally, simulation results are validated by comparing simulation results to measured current and historical field data. We describe in this article how visual analysis is used as an integral part of the decision-making process in the planning of ongoing and future treatment options for the contaminated nuclear waste sites. Lessons learned from visually analyzing our large-scale simulation runs will also have an impact on deciding on treatment measures for other contaminated sites.

Meyer, Joerg; Bethel, E. Wes; Horsman, Jennifer L.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Krishnan, Harinarayan; Romosan,, Alexandru; Keating, Elizabeth H.; Monroe, Laura; Strelitz, Richard; Moore, Phil; Taylor, Glenn; Torkian, Ben; Johnson, Timothy C.; Gorton, Ian

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. The key objective of the Nez Perce Tribe Focus Coordinator position is to overcome fragmentation within the basin by managing communications with the subbasin, providing an overall framework and process for coordinated fisheries restoration and managing the planning, assessment, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation process. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, restoring fish passage, as well as other watershed restoration projects. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira; McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Historical narratives of Big Chico Creek Watershed Alliance and Butte Creek Watershed Conservancy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

King and Mike Matz LA227 December 19, 2003 Abstract This study analyzes the histories of two non-governmental watershed organizations in Butte County, California:

King, Mary Ann; Matz, Mike

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Record of Decision (ROD). Planning Steps 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. The work involved will be to clear tall growing vegetation that is...

128

A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

Marmorek, David

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Techniques for remotely sensing watershed runoff potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Techniques for Remotely Sensing Watershed Runoff Potential. (August 1978) Jerry Don Walker, B. S. , Texas ASM University Directed by: Dr. Bruce J. Blanchard The Soil Conservation Service runoff equation is widely used for predicting the watershed runoff... cases, no outflow occurs through the spillway of an overdes1gned structure. Since evaporation losses are high 1n these areas, the salinity of the water stored in the structure gradually increases with time. With insufficient flow through...

Walker, Jerry Don

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Collection Policy: Policy Analysis & Management 1.0 The Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The economics of the health care system: covering issues such as Medicare, Medicaid, managed care delivery systems, the organization and financing of #12;2 personal health services; the structure of health care health networks. o Access to, and quality of, health care services: covering issues such as managed care

Angenent, Lars T.

131

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relating to hydroelectricity generation, irrigation water,resources to generate hydroelectricity Managing watershedsFor example, micro-hydroelectricity generation may be an

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

NGNP Data Management and Analysis System Analysis and Web Delivery Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Projects for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the very high temperature reactor. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high-temperature and high-fluence environments. The NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) at the Idaho National Laboratory has been established to ensure that VHTR data are (1) qualified for use, (2) stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and (3) analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the third NDMAS objective. It describes capabilities for displaying the data in meaningful ways and for data analysis to identify useful relationships among the measured quantities. The capabilities are described from the perspective of NDMAS users, starting with those who just view experimental data and analytical results on the INL NDMAS web portal. Web display and delivery capabilities are described in detail. Also the current web pages that show Advanced Gas Reactor, Advanced Graphite Capsule, and High Temperature Materials test results are itemized. Capabilities available to NDMAS developers are more extensive, and are described using a second series of examples. Much of the data analysis efforts focus on understanding how thermocouple measurements relate to simulated temperatures and other experimental parameters. Statistical control charts and correlation monitoring provide an ongoing assessment of instrument accuracy. Data analysis capabilities are virtually unlimited for those who use the NDMAS web data download capabilities and the analysis software of their choice. Overall, the NDMAS provides convenient data analysis and web delivery capabilities for studying a very large and rapidly increasing database of well-documented, pedigreed data.

Cynthia D. Gentillon

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Wind energy Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) : data collection recommendations for reliability analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the general data requirements for reliability analysis of fielded wind turbines and other wind plant equipment. The report provides a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and gives specific recommendations for a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) to support automated analysis. This data collection recommendations report was written by Sandia National Laboratories to address the general data requirements for reliability analysis of fielded wind turbines. This report is intended to help the reader develop a basic understanding of what data are needed from a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) and other data systems, for reliability analysis. The report provides: (1) a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis; and (2) specific recommendations for a CMMS to support automated analysis. Though written for reliability analysis of wind turbines, much of the information is applicable to a wider variety of equipment and a wider variety of analysis and reporting needs.

Peters, Valerie A.; Ogilvie, Alistair; Veers, Paul S.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT: CASE nutrient management, organic waste, wastewater and septage that contained high concentration of nutrients area. The nitrogen fluxes in relation to organic waste and wastewater were chosen as indicators

Richner, Heinz

135

Risk Management Analysis of Our Water Infrastructure's Soft, Chewy Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's water infrastructure is designed, constructed and managed is changing. More fencing, better alarm systems and high-tech cameras will be a part of this change in thinking. These physical security features may be considered the "hard outer shell...

Wolff, Mark

2005-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

136

2014 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Office of Environmental Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

137

UPP 589 Syllabus 1 DATA ANALYSIS FOR PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPP 589 Syllabus 1 DATA ANALYSIS FOR PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT II COURSE: UPP 589 CALL NO.: 22738 and Policy Program University of Illinois at Chicago #12;UPP 589 Syllabus 2 1) Understanding statistical

Illinois at Chicago, University of

138

Mixed Waste Management Facility Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Chapters 1 to 20  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on waste management practices, occupational safety, and a site characterization of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A facility description, safety engineering analysis, mixed waste processing techniques, and auxiliary support systems are included.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Decision Analysis on Water Resources Planning and Management for an Arid Metropolitan Center in West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR- 54 1973 Decision Analysis on Water Recourses Planning and Management for an Arid Metropolitan Center in West Texas C.S. Shih J.H. Dean Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A...

Shih, C. S.; Dean, J. H.

140

2010 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Office of Environmental Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Office of Environmental Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

142

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Office of Environmental Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

143

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Office of Environmental Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

144

Identification of sediment sources in forested watersheds with surface coal mining disturbance using carbon and nitrogen isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sediments and soils were analyzed using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio mass spectrometry and carbon and nitrogen elemental analyses to evaluate the their ability to indicate land-use and land management disturbance and pinpoint loading from sediment transport sources in forested watersheds disturbed by surface coal mining. Samples of transported sediment particulate organic matter were collected from four watersheds in the Southern Appalachian forest in Kentucky. The four watersheds had different surface coal mining history that were classified as undisturbed, active mining, and reclaimed conditions. Soil samples were analyzed including reclaimed grassland soils, undisturbed forest soils, geogenic organic matter associated with coal fragments in mining spoil, and soil organic matter from un-mined grassland soils. Statistically significant differences were found for all biogeochemical signatures when comparing transported sediments from undisturbed watersheds and surface coal mining disturbed watersheds and the results were attributed to differences in erosion sources and the presence of geogenic organic matter. Sediment transport sources in the surface coal mining watersheds analyzed using Monte Carlo mass balance un-mixing found that: {delta}{sup 15}N showed the ability to differentiate streambank erosion and surface soil erosion; and {delta} {sup 13}C showed the ability to differentiate soil organic matter and geogenic organic matter. This suggests that streambank erosion downstream of surface coal mining sites is a significant source of sediment in coal mining disturbed watersheds. The results suggest that the sediment transport processes governing streambank erosion loads are taking longer to reach geomorphologic equilibrium in the watershed as compared with the surface erosion processes.

Fox, J.F. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Managing the Yellowstone River System with Place-based Cultural Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resource management (NRM) and planning (e.g., community-based planning, watershed-based and collaborative management, others). By examining one decentralized riparian management planning effort along the Yellowstone River (Montana), this study finds...

Hall, Damon M.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

146

Sport fishery management in East Matagorda Bay (Texas): an analysis of decision making  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPORT FISHERY MANAGEMENT IN EAST MATAGORDA BAY (TEXAS) AN ANALYSIS OP DECISION MARING A Thesis by MARY CHRISTINE RITTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences SPORT FISHERY MANAGEMENT IN EAST WLTAGORDA BAY (TEXAS): AN ANALYSIS OF DECISION lQLKING A Thesis by Mary Christine Ritter Approved as to style and content by...

Ritter, Mary Christine

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

An economic analysis of costs of solid waste management in rural Texas communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF COSTS OF SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN RURAL TEXAS COMMUNITIES A Thesis by John Patrick Hall Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF COSTS OF SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN RURAL TEXAS COMMUNITIES A Thesis by John Patrick Hall Approved as to style and content by: hairman of mmi, ttee j ead...

Hall, John Patrick

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Optimal Operation of Large Agricultural Watersheds with Water Quality Restraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Nonpoint-source pollution (watersheds) is widely dispersed and not easily measured. Mathematical models are needed to predict nonpoint-source pollution as affected by watershed characteristics, land use, conservation practices, chemical fertilizers...

Williams, J. R.; Hann, R. W.

149

WATER QUALITY CHANGES AS A RESULT OF COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT IN A ROCKY MOUNTAIN WATERSHED1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER QUALITY CHANGES AS A RESULT OF COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT IN A ROCKY MOUNTAIN WATERSHED1 Xixi Wang, Assefa M. Melesse, Michael E. McClain, and Wanhong Yang2 ABSTRACT: Coalbed methane (CBM the Powder River. (KEY TERMS: coalbed methane, produced water; Montana; natural gas; pattern analysis

McClain, Michael

150

Assistant Professor of Wildland Watershed Hydrology University of California, Berkeley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assistant Professor of Wildland Watershed Hydrology University of California, Berkeley The faculty invites applications for a tenure-track, academic year appointment in Wildland Watershed Hydrology recognized research program in landscape-scale watershed hydrology related to the fields of climatology

Silver, Whendee

151

Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2001-2002 Kootenai River Network Annual Report reflects the organization's defined set of goals and objectives, and how by accomplishing these goals, we continue to meet the needs of communities and landowners throughout the Kootenai River Basin by protecting the resource. Our completed and ongoing projects throughout the watershed reflect the cooperation and support received and needed to accomplish the rehabilitation and restoration of critical habitat. They show that our mission of facilitation through collaboration with public and private interests can lead to improved resource management, the restoration of water quality and the preservation of pristine aquatic resources. Our vision to empower local citizens and groups from two states, one province, two countries and affected tribal nations to collaborate in natural resource management within the basin is largely successful due to the engagement of the basin's residents--the landowners, town government, local interest groups, businesses and agency representatives who live and work here. We are proof that forging these types of cooperative relationships, such as those exhibited by the Kootenai River subbasin planning process, leads to a sense of entitlement--that the quality of the river and its resources enriches our quality of life. Communication is essential in maintaining these relationships. Allowing ourselves to network and receive ideas and information, as well as to produce quality, accessible research data such as KRIS, shared with like organizations and individuals, is the hallmark of this facilitative organization. We are fortunate in the ability to contribute such information, and continue to strive to meet the standards and the needs of those who seek us out as a model for watershed rehabilitative planning and restoration. Sharing includes maintaining active, ongoing lines of communication with the public we serve--through our web site, quarterly newsletter, public presentations and stream table education--at every opportunity. We continue to seek ideas to guide us as we grow. We want to enlarge that sense of ownership that the river does indeed run through it, and belongs to us all. Through a continued and common effort, we hope to carry forward the good work and the momentum that underscores our intent. We are proud to report our accomplishments of this past year because they reflect our renewed sense of purpose. In alliance with diverse citizen groups, individuals, business, industry and tribal and government water resource management agencies, we strive to continue to protect and restore the beauty and integrity that is the Kootenai River watershed.

Kruse, Gretchen (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education--Objective 8: Promote watershed stewardship among students, the community, private landowners, and local governments. Progress towards six of eight of these objectives is described within nine separate reports included in a four-volume document.

Connolly, Patrick J.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Pesticide use in Kentucky reservoir watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes information on the types, uses, and amounts of pesticides applied to Kentucky Reservoir and its immediate watershed. Estimates for the quantities and types of the various pesticides used are based primarily on the land uses in the watershed. A listing of commonly used pesticides is included describing their uses, mode of action, and potential toxicological effects. This report will inform the the public and the Kentucky Reservoir Water Resources Task Force of the general extent of pesticide usage and is not an assessment of pesticide impacts. 10 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

Butkus, S.R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

A Quantitative Analysis of Disk Drive Power Management in Portable Computers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the question of power management begins with an analysis of where the energy is being consumed. Table 1 gives) Percent of Total Display Compaq monochrome lite25c 3.5 68% Disk Drive (105 Mbytes) Maxtor MXL­105 III 1 of inactivity. In this paper, we perform a quantitative analysis of the potential costs and benefits of spinning

Anderson, Tom

155

Characterization of coastal urban watershed bacterial communities leads to alternative community-based indicators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial communities in aquatic environments are spatially and temporally dynamic due to environmental fluctuations and varied external input sources. A large percentage of the urban watersheds in the United States are affected by fecal pollution, including human pathogens, thus warranting comprehensive monitoring. Using a high-density microarray (PhyloChip), we examined water column bacterial community DNA extracted from two connecting urban watersheds, elucidating variable and stable bacterial subpopulations over a 3-day period and community composition profiles that were distinct to fecal and non-fecal sources. Two approaches were used for indication of fecal influence. The first approach utilized similarity of 503 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) common to all fecal samples analyzed in this study with the watershed samples as an index of fecal pollution. A majority of the 503 OTUs were found in the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The second approach incorporated relative richness of 4 bacterial classes (Bacilli, Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and a-proteobacteria) found to have the highest variance in fecal and non-fecal samples. The ratio of these 4 classes (BBC:A) from the watershed samples demonstrated a trend where bacterial communities from gut and sewage sources had higher ratios than from sources not impacted by fecal material. This trend was also observed in the 124 bacterial communities from previously published and unpublished sequencing or PhyloChip- analyzed studies. This study provided a detailed characterization of bacterial community variability during dry weather across a 3-day period in two urban watersheds. The comparative analysis of watershed community composition resulted in alternative community-based indicators that could be useful for assessing ecosystem health.

Wu, C.H.; Sercu, B.; Van De Werhorst, L.C.; Wong, J.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Hazen, T.C.; Holden, P.A.; Andersen, G.L.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

TEXAS WATERSHED PLANNING Short Course What's a Watershed Protection Plan?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for achieving water resource goals that provides assessment & management information for a geographically: 5. Plans only succeed if implemented. 6. Partnerships equal power. 7. Good tools are available. 8 B. Estimate of load reductions needed C. Description of mgt measures needed D. Technical & financial

157

Water quality changes as a result of coalbed methane development in a Rocky mountain watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) development raises serious environmental concerns. In response, concerted efforts have been made to collect chemistry, salinity, and sodicity data on CBM produced water. However, little information on changes of stream water quality resulting from directly and/or indirectly received CBM produced water is available in the literature. The objective of this study was to examine changes in stream water quality, particularly sodicity and salinity, due to CBM development in the Powder River watershed, which is located in the Rocky Mountain Region and traverses the states of Wyoming and Montana. To this end, a retrospective analysis of water quality trends and patterns was conducted using data collected from as early as 1946 up to and including 2002 at four U.S. Geological Survey gauging stations along the Powder River. Trend analysis was conducted using linear regression and Seasonal Kendall tests, whereas, Tukey's test for multiple comparisons was used to detect changes in the spatial pattern. The results indicated that the CBM development adversely affected the water quality in the Powder River. First, the development elevated the stream sodicity, as indicated by a significant increase trend of the sodium adsorption ratio. Second, the development tended to shrink the water quality differences among the three downstream stations but to widen the differences between these stations and the farthest upstream station. In contrast, the development had only a minor influence on stream salinity. Hence, the CBM development is likely an important factor that can be managed to lower the stream sodicity. The management may need to take into account that the effects of the CBMdevelopment were different from one location to another along the Powder River.

Wang, X.; Melesse, A.M.; McClain, M.E.; Yang, W. [Tarleton State University, Stephenville, TX (USA)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

On-site vs off-site management of environmental restoration waste: A cost effectiveness analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Project is expected to generate relatively large volumes of hazardous waste as a result of cleanup operations. These volumes will exceed the Laboratories existing waste management capacity. This paper presents four options for managing remediation wastes, including three alternatives for on-site waste management utilizing a corrective action management unit (CAMU). Costs are estimated for each of the four options based on current volumetric estimates of hazardous waste. Cost equations are derived for each of the options with the variables being waste volumes, the major unknowns in the analysis. These equations provide a means to update cost estimates as volume estimates change. This approach may be helpful to others facing similar waste management decisions.

Morse, M.A. [Terradigm, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aamodt, P.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cox, W.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The “Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed” project was developed in response to the creek’s listing on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List due to a bacterial impairment and subsequent total maximum daily load (TMDL...

160

BEE 473. Watershed Engineering Fall Semester 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering requirements for Engineering Laboratory and Design Elective Prerequisites: Fluid Mechanics (eBEE 473. Watershed Engineering Fall Semester 2007 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description representative of real-life engineering problems and will involve as much hands-on experience as possible. Some

Walter, M.Todd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Office of Nuclear Energy Knowledge Management Program Situational Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge management (KM) has been a high priority for the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the past several years. NE Programs are moving toward well-established knowledge management practices and a formal knowledge management program has been established. Knowledge management is being practiced to some level within each of the NE programs. Although it continues to evolve as NE programs evolve, a formal strategic plan that guides the implementation of KM has been developed. Despite the acceptance of KM within DOE NE, more work is necessary before the NE KM program can be considered fully successful. Per Dr. David J. Skyrme[1], an organization typically moves through the following evolutionary phases: (1) Ad-hoc - KM is being practiced to some level in some parts of the organization; (2) Formal - KM is established as a formal project or program; (3) Expanding - the use of KM as a discipline grows in practice across different parts of the organization; (4) Cohesive - there is a degree of coordination of KM; (5) Integrated - there are formal standards and approaches that give every individual access to most organizational knowledge through common interfaces; and (6) Embedded - KM is part-and-parcel of everyday tasks; it blends seamlessly into the background. According to the evolutionary phases, the NE KM program is operating at the two lower levels, Ad-hoc and Formal. Although KM is being practiced to some level, it is not being practiced in a consistent manner across the NE programs. To be fully successful, more emphasis must be placed on establishing KM standards and processes for collecting, organizing, sharing and accessing NE knowledge. Existing knowledge needs to be prioritized and gathered on a routine basis, its existence formally recorded in a knowledge inventory. Governance to ensure the quality of the knowledge being used must also be considered. For easy retrieval, knowledge must be organized according to a taxonomy that mimics nuclear energy programs. Technologies need to be established to make accessing the knowledge easier for the user. Finally, knowledge needs to be used as part of a well defined work process.

Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

TRU Waste Management Program cost/schedule optimization analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost/schedule optimization task is a necessary function to insure that program goals and plans are optimized from a cost and schedule aspect. Results of this study will offer DOE information with which it can establish, within institutional constraints, the most efficient program for the long-term management and disposal of contact handled transuranic waste (CH-TRU). To this end, a comprehensive review of program cost/schedule tradeoffs has been made, to identify any major cost saving opportunities that may be realized by modification of current program plans. It was decided that all promising scenarios would be explored, and institutional limitations to implementation would be described. Since a virtually limitless number of possible scenarios can be envisioned, it was necessary to distill these possibilities into a manageable number of alternatives. The resultant scenarios were described in the cost/schedule strategy and work plan document. Each scenario was compared with the base case: waste processing at the originating site; transport of CH-TRU wastes in TRUPACT; shipment of drums in 6-Packs; 25 year stored waste workoff; WIPP operational 10/88, with all sites shipping to WIPP beginning 10/88; and no processing at WIPP. Major savings were identified in two alternate scenarios: centralize waste processing at INEL and eliminate rail shipment of TRUPACT. No attempt was made to calculate savings due to combination of scenarios. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab. (MHB)

Detamore, J.A. (Rockwell International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Joint Integration Office); Raudenbush, M.H.; Wolaver, R.W.; Hastings, G.A. (Stoller (S.M.) Corp., Boulder, CO (United States))

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

Asotin County Conservation District

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

164

Analysis of Landscape Character for Visual Resource Management1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the comprehensive planning process, along with social planning and economic plan- ning. In all three types, Sinatra and Uban 1973). The Land Use Analysis Laboratory is an interdisciplinary research team with active) is a computer program for the static modeling and display of data on spatially-distributed land characteristics

Standiford, Richard B.

165

Wind energy Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) : data collection recommendations for reliability analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the general data requirements for reliability analysis of fielded wind turbines and other wind plant equipment. The report provides a rationale for why this data should be collected, a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and specific data recommendations for a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) to support automated analysis. This data collection recommendations report was written by Sandia National Laboratories to address the general data requirements for reliability analysis of operating wind turbines. This report is intended to help develop a basic understanding of the data needed for reliability analysis from a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) and other data systems. The report provides a rationale for why this data should be collected, a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and specific recommendations for a CMMS to support automated analysis. Though written for reliability analysis of wind turbines, much of the information is applicable to a wider variety of equipment and analysis and reporting needs. The 'Motivation' section of this report provides a rationale for collecting and analyzing field data for reliability analysis. The benefits of this type of effort can include increased energy delivered, decreased operating costs, enhanced preventive maintenance schedules, solutions to issues with the largest payback, and identification of early failure indicators.

Peters, Valerie A.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Task 11 - systems analysis of environmental management technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review was conducted of three systems analysis (SA) studies performed by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) on integrated thermal treatment systems (ITTs) and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTSs) for the remediation of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team led by the Energy & Environment Research Center (EERC), including Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), and Virginia Tech.

Musich, M.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Needs analysis of a flexible computerized management infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States' Energy Policy Act of 2005 is expected to facilitate construction of new commercial nuclear power plants. In the meanwhile, current plants are in the process of obtaining licenses for extended operation beyond their predetermined design life. In this beneficial yet challenging situation, it seems desirable to develop a strategic plan for smooth and seamless transition from paper based procedure systems to computer based procedure systems for improved performance and safety of the existing nuclear power plants. Many utilities already maintain procedures using word processing software, but it is common to print paper copies for daily use. At this time it is highly desirable to better understand the collective as well as individual document management needs of a commercial nuclear power plant as they migrate to a computer based system. As a contributory role in initiating a strategic plan, this paper offers a comprehensive questionnaire that is suitable for conducting a survey to determine the related needs of the utilities. The questionnaire covers three major areas: Formatting and User Friendly Features; Technical and Environmental Considerations; and Safety, System Integrity and Regulatory Considerations. A plan to conduct the proposed survey is also outlined in the future work section of this paper. (authors)

Usman, S. [Univ. of Missouri-Rolla, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 63409 (United States); Hajek, B. K. [NETS, Inc., NPP Operations Consultant, Columbus, OH (United States); Ali, S. F. [Tuskegee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

organized in cooperation with TU Vienna, (Institute for Water Quality, Resource and Waste Management) Analysis, Evaluation and Design of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organized in cooperation with TU Vienna, (Institute for Water Quality, Resource and Waste Management) Analysis, Evaluation and Design of Sustainable Waste Management Systems Goal The objective of the ISWA-TU Vienna Summer School (iTOOL) is to provide advanced knowledge in the field of waste management

Szmolyan, Peter

169

Analysis of Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level: Work  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysis of Crossover Points forNEPA

170

Analysis and Management of Heterogeneous User Mobility in Large-scale Downlink Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis and Management of Heterogeneous User Mobility in Large-scale Downlink Systems Axel Mšuller§, Emil Bjšornson§, Romain Couillet, and MŽerouane Debbah§ Intel Mobile Communications, Sophia Antipolis, France ACCESS Linnaeus Centre, Signal Processing Lab, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

171

Numerical Analysis of Non-constant Discounting with an Application to Renewable Resource Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical Analysis of Non-constant Discounting with an Application to Renewable Resource Management illustrate the approach by studying welfare and observational equivalence for a particular renewable resource man- agement problem. Keywords: Non-constant discounting, numerical methods, non-renewable resources

Karp, Larry S.

172

Topology, design, analysis and thermal management of power electronics for hybrid electric vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topology, design, analysis and thermal management of power electronics for hybrid electric vehicle an important role in the success of electric, hybrid and fuel cell vehicles. Typical power electronics circuits/DC converter; electric drives; electric vehicles; fuel cell; hybrid electric vehicles; power electronics, motor

Mi, Chunting "Chris"

173

National Inventory of Woodland and Trees Analysis of Management and Biodiversity Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Inventory of Woodland and Trees 1995-1999 Analysis of Management and Biodiversity Data collected during the first National Inventory of Woodland and Trees (NIWT1) that were not published this National Inventory project. The new types of data reflect the rapid expansion in the information needs

174

TOURISM ONTOLOGY AND SEMANTIC MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: STATE-OF-THE-ARTS ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 TOURISM ONTOLOGY AND SEMANTIC MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: STATE-OF-THE-ARTS ANALYSIS Kathrin Prantner Vienna, Austria christoph.herzog@ec3.at ABSTRACT The global importance of tourism is steadily rising tasks of tourism intermediaries are still at an early stage from a semantic point of view. This paper

Menczer, Filippo

175

South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Data Management and Analysis for the Earth System Grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The international climate community is expected to generate hundreds of petabytes of simulation data within the next five to seven years. This data must be accessed and analyzed by thousands of analysts worldwide in order to provide accurate and timely estimates of the likely impact of climate change on physical, biological, and human systems. Climate change is thus not only a scientific challenge of the first order but also a major technological challenge. To address this technological challenge, the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) has been established within the U.S. Department of Energy's Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC)-2 program, with support from the offices of Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Biological and Environmental Research. ESG-CET's mission is to provide climate researchers worldwide with access to the data, information, models, analysis tools, and computational capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate simulation datasets. Its specific goals are to (1) make data more useful to climate researchers by developing Grid technology that enhances data usability; (2) meet specific distributed database, data access, and data movement needs of national and international climate projects; (3) provide a universal and secure web-based data access portal for broad multi-model data collections; and (4) provide a wide-range of Grid-enabled climate data analysis tools and diagnostic methods to international climate centers and U.S. government agencies. Building on the successes of the previous Earth System Grid (ESG) project, which has enabled thousands of researchers to access tens of terabytes of data from a small number of ESG sites, ESG-CET is working to integrate a far larger number of distributed data providers, high-bandwidth wide-area networks, and remote computers in a highly collaborative problem-solving environment.

Williams, D N; Ananthakrishnan, R; Bernholdt, D; Bharathi, S; Brown, D; Chen, M; Chervenak, A L; Cinquini, L; Drach, R; Foster, I T; Fox, P; Hankin, S; Henson, V; Jones, P; Middleton, D E; Schwidder, J; Schweitzer, R; Schuler, R; Shoshani, A; Siebenlist, F; Sim, A; Strand, W G; Wilhelmi, N; Su, M

2008-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

177

Subtask 1.18 - A Decision Tool for Watershed-Based Effluent Trading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Handling produced water in an economical and environmentally sound manner is vital to coalbed methane (CBM) development, which is expected to increase up to 60% in the next 10-15 years as the demand for natural gas increases. Current produced water-handling methods (e.g., shallow reinjection and infiltration impoundments) are too costly when implemented on a well-by-well basis. A watershed-based effluent credit trading approach may be a means of managing produced water at reduced cost while meeting or surpassing water quality regulations. This market-based approach allows for improved water quality management by enabling industrial, agricultural, and municipal discharge facilities to meet water quality permit requirements by purchasing pollutant reduction credits from other entities within the same watershed. An evaluation of this concept was conducted for the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Montana and Wyoming by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). To conduct this assessment, the EERC collected and evaluated existing water quality information and developed the appropriate tools needed to assess the environmental and economic feasibility of specific trading scenarios. The accomplishments of this study include (1) an exploration of the available PRB water quantity and quality data using advanced statistical techniques, (2) development of an integrated water quality model that predicts the impacts of CBM produced water on stream salinity and sodicity, (3) development of an economic model that estimates costs and benefits from implementing potential trading options, (4) evaluation of hypothetical trading scenarios between select watersheds of the PRB, and (5) communication of the project concept and results to key state and federal agencies, industry representatives, and stakeholders of the PRB. The preliminary results of a basinwide assessment indicate that up to $684 million could be saved basinwide without compromising water quality as a result of implementing a watershed-based credit-trading approach.

Xixi Wang; Bethany A. Kurz; Marc D. Kurz

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Hydrologic and Ecological Effects of Watershed Urbanization: Implication for Watershed Management in Hillslope Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experienced rapid urbanization. For each study period, an impervious surface map was generated from Landsat TM image by a support vector machine (SVM) with pairwise coupling. SVM more accurately estimated impervious surface than other subpixel mapping methods...

Sung, Chan Yong

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

179

DEFINING PERCEPTIONS OF WATERSHED MANAGEMENT IN A GREAT PLAINS AND IN AN ANDEAN WATERSHED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interest in the expansion of this study. The innumerable lessons learned during this thesis project and specifically, the lessons learned from using the Q method, are invaluable as I proceed onward to doctoral studies and research. The goal... statements, and the chapter closes with a short summary found in the conclusion. Chapter 4 presents the thesis conclusion as a reflection of what was learned during the process of writing this thesis. This reflection includes personal lessons involving...

Restrepo-Osorio, Diana L

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Jocko River Watershed conservation easement protects trout habitat...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6.25 acre habitat acquisition in Montana's Jocko River Watershed for fish habitat mitigation (see map). Located in Lake County in northwestern Montana, this property was selected...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Watershed Scale Evaluation of the Sustainability and Productivity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biomass Crop Production: Watershed Scale Evaluation of the Sustainability and Productivity of Dedicated Energy Crop and Woody Biomass Operations DOE Bioenergy Technologies...

182

Understanding Nutrient Loading to the Coastal Zone from Urban Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Land Use in the Carpinteria Valley, California.TIONS: Speaker: Carpinteria Creek Watershed Coalition annualand Forecasts for Carpinteria Creek", Lions' Club,

Robinson, Timothy H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Energy Management and Cost Analysis (A case study)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract — Lighting constitutes a main portion of energy consumption in commercial and industrial sector. The Energy Auditing is the key of the consumption which stabilize the situation of energy crisis by providing the conservation schemes. Any organization so called bulk consumer of electrical energy propose to adopt suitable technology or scheme of energy conservation to minimize the unwanted power shutdown either incidentally or by load shedding. In educational buildings a significant component of the energy used is spent in illuminating the interior of the building. As the energy costs increases, possible efforts are to be done to minimize the energy consumption of lighting installations. This follow three basic directions: new more efficient equipment (lamps, control gear, etc.), utilization of improved lighting design practices, improvements in lighting control systems to avoid energy waste for unoccupied and daylight hours. In this paper an Energy audit has been conducted in the educational Institute to estimate the Energy consumption. In this Energy audit the cost analysis and pay back periods have been calculated by replacing the higher consumption lamps with Energy efficient Lightning. The profit of implementing the energy efficiency measures in buildings are considerable both in terms of energy savings and cost savings.

unknown authors

184

Summary of the cost analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the Cost Analysis Report which provides comparative cost data for the management strategy alternatives. The PEIS and the Cost Analysis Report will help DOE select a management strategy. The Record of Decision, expected in 1998, will complete the first part of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. The second part of the Program will look at specific sites and technologies for carrying out the selected strategy. The Cost Analysis Report estimates the primary capital and operating costs for the different alternatives. It reflects the costs of technology development construction of facilities, operation, and decontamination and decommissioning. It also includes potential revenues from the sale of by-products such as anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (ABF). These estimates are based on early designs. They are intended to help in comparing alternatives, rather than to indicate absolute costs for project budgets or bidding purposes. More detailed estimates and specific funding sources will be considered in part two of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program.

Dubrin, J.W.; Rahm-Crites, L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The process of life-cycle cost analysis on the Fernald Environmental Management Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Estimating Services Department of the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) is formalizing the process of life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA) for the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). The LCCA process is based on the concepts, principles, and guidelines described by applicable Department of Energy`s (DOE) orders, pertinent published literature, and the National Bureau of Standards handbook 135. LCC analyses will be performed following a ten-step process on the FEMP at the earliest possible decision point to support the selection of the least-cost alternatives for achieving the FERMCO mission.

Chang, D.Y.; Jacoboski, J.A.; Fisher, L.A.; Beirne, P.J.

1993-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

186

Coming to a watershed near you!: Texas Watershed Steward educates stakeholders across the state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, assistant professor and AgriLife Extension water resources specialist. ] Story by Leslie Jordan tx H2O | pg. 12 The TWS team created the program in response to federal and state strategies regarding watersheds. According to the U.S. Environmental...

Jordan, Leslie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, total nitrogen, orthophosphate and total phosphorus. Several water quality parameters indicatedENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS 2004-2005 by Michael A Hanover County Tidal Creeks Project and Year 7 of the Wilmington Watersheds Project. Water quality data

Mallin, Michael

188

Certification process of safety analysis and risk management computer codes at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commitment by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to bring safety analysis and risk management codes into compliance with national and sitewide quality assurance requirements necessitated a systematic, structured approach. As a part of this effort, WSRC, in cooperation with the Westinghouse Hanford Company, has developed and implemented a certification process for the development and control of computer software. Safety analysis and risk management computer codes pertinent to reactor analyses were selected for inclusion in the certification process. As a first step, documented plans were developed for implementing verification and validation of the codes, and establishing configuration control. User qualification guidelines were determined. The plans were followed with an extensive assessment of the codes with respect to certification status. Detailed schedules and work plans were thus determined for completing certification of the codes considered. Although the software certification process discussed is specific to the application described, it is sufficiently general to provide useful insights and guidance for certification of other software.

Ades, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Toffer, H.; Lewis, C.J.; Crowe, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Certification process of safety analysis and risk management computer codes at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commitment by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to bring safety analysis and risk management codes into compliance with national and sitewide quality assurance requirements necessitated a systematic, structured approach. As a part of this effort, WSRC, in cooperation with the Westinghouse Hanford Company, has developed and implemented a certification process for the development and control of computer software. Safety analysis and risk management computer codes pertinent to reactor analyses were selected for inclusion in the certification process. As a first step, documented plans were developed for implementing verification and validation of the codes, and establishing configuration control. User qualification guidelines were determined. The plans were followed with an extensive assessment of the codes with respect to certification status. Detailed schedules and work plans were thus determined for completing certification of the codes considered. Although the software certification process discussed is specific to the application described, it is sufficiently general to provide useful insights and guidance for certification of other software.

Ades, M.J. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Toffer, H.; Lewis, C.J.; Crowe, R.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The buffer management scheme for the new Triumf VAX-based data acquisition and analysis system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new TRIUMF VAX-based DAAS requires data to be exchanged between acquisition, monitoring and analysis processes executing on a VAX. Data records are passed via a set of buffers contained in a region of memory shared by all processes. The responsibility for buffer management is distributed among the processes and synchronized access to the region is achieved by using the VAX self-relative queue instructions and common event flags.

Ludgate, G.A.; Haley, B.; Lee, L.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Management, visualization, and analysis of environmental and geotechnical data. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a topical report evaluating current technology on the management, visualization, and analysis of engineering and environmental data. This report gives an overview and assessment of the Integrated Computer Assisted Site Evaluation /Graphical Remedial Assessment and Cost Evaluation (ISACE/GRACE) system and includes brief descriptions of the Environmental Technology `94: Computing and Information Conference and the National Conference on Environmental Problem Solving with GIS.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that connects the pump, distribution tank and holding ponds. As of April 15, 2013, three of the ponds were completed and have been lined with a synthetic liner to prevent seepage and leakage as this was a major problem in early projects. Pecos River WPP...Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update Funding Provided by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board through a Clean Water Act §319(h) Nonpoint Source Grant from the U.S Environmental Protection Agency TR-447 October 2013 Pecos River...

Gregory, L.; Hauck, L.; Blumenthal, B.; Brown, M.; Porter, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Bethel Valley Watershed | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchTheMarketing,Energy and NaturalBethel Valley Watershed. Topics include: * The

194

Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3: Appendix C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions. The industrial and recreational exposure scenarios are used to provide a risk assessment reference context to evaluate levels of contamination in surface water, groundwater, soil, and sediment within each subbasin of the Melton Valley watershed. All available analytical results for the media of interest that could be qualified for use in the risk assessment were screened to determine carcinogenic risk values and noncarcinogenic hazard indexes and to identify the chemicals of concern (COCs) for each evaluated media in each subbasin.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The effects of agricultural land use patterns on pollutant runoff from watersheds: rangeland/pastureland and row cropping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M University in partial fu! fillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF AGRICULTURE December 1995 Rangeland Ecology and Management Range Science THE EFFECTS OF AGRICULTURAL LAND USE PATTERNS ON POLLUTANT RUNOFF FROM WATERSHEDS: RANGELAND.../PASTUREI ttND AND ROW CROPPING A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Andrew A. Jayne IV Approved as to style and content by: Way T. amilton (Committee Chair) Thomas L. Thurow (Member) Robert D. Baker (Member) Robert Whitson (Department Head) December 1995...

Jayne, Andrew A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

TIMOTHY O. RANDHIR Associate Professor -Watershed Management and Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

million USDA-CSREES project (SDSS- Spatial Decision Support System) of Purdue Univ., Texas A&M Univ, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), multi-attribute decision-making, and nonpoint source pollution. M, biodiversity, urbanization, community science, sus- tainable development, GIS, multi-criteria decision making

Schweik, Charles M.

197

Eagle Mountain Watershed: Calibration, Validation, and Best Management Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from WWTP of Boyd Daily Loads Flow (m3) TN (kg) TP (kg) Jan-02 262.22 2.60 0.40 Feb-02 314.26 4.97 0.77 Mar-02 335.74 5.36 1.00 Apr-02 341.79 1.27 1.22 May-02 327.19 1.15 0.29 Jun-02 270.73 0.45 0.24 Jul-02 279.61 1.06 0.19 Aug-02 274.05 0....23 4.52 Mar-02 2923.10 11.67 2.61 Apr-02 2057.62 15.15 1.58 May-02 2143.35 12.97 1.44 Jun-02 2347.75 24.82 6.31 Jul-02 2283.40 40.05 11.17 Aug-02 2211.48 39.17 6.63 Sep-02 2061.02 41.98 4.91 Oct-02 2167.39 29.69 4.36 Nov-02 2164.17 7.46 2...

Lee, Taesoo; Narasimhan, Balaji; Srinivasan, Raqhavan

198

Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Are Your Pastures Healthy?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landscape: Are Your Pastures Healthy? Larry D. White, Barron S. Rector and K. Brian Hays Professor and Extension Range Specialist; Associate Professor and Extension Range Specialist; and Extension Assistant-Water Conservation; The Texas A&M University...

White, Larry D.; Rector, Barron S.; Hays, K. Brian

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Are Your Streams Healthy?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heavy rainfall. Determine whether or not they have adequate vegetative cover and whether or not they are eroding. Then classify stream banks into one of four categories (Fig. 1). Are Your Streams Healthy? Larry D. White, Barron S. Rector and K. Brian...

White, Larry D.; Rector, Barron S.; Hays, K. Brian

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety Decisions and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decisions and Management DRAFT FOR REVIEW ONLY Portfolio Risk Assessment: A Tool for Managing Dam SafetyICOLD 20th Congress Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety in the Context of the Owner's Business David S. Bowles Professor and Director, Institute for Dam Safety Risk

Bowles, David S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus: The Long and Winding Road Andrew Sharpley #12;In the beginning Agriculture and water quality Targeted watershed P management Linking ecosystem;#12;Optimal soil PO concentrations for plant growth ~0.20 mg/L #12;For flowing waters ~0.01 to 0.10 mg/L #12

202

Analysis of Assembly Bill 264: Pediatric Asthma Self-Management Training and Education Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

self- management training and education on quality of lifes asthma and its management. Quality-of-life effects Qualityself-management training and education on the quality of

California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT); Rogers, Rox (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Libby, MT)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Trout Creek, Oregon Watershed Assessment; Findings, Condition Evaluation and Action Opportunities, 2002 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the assessment is to characterize historical and current watershed conditions in the Trout Creek Watershed. Information from the assessment is used to evaluate opportunities for improvements in watershed conditions, with particular reference to improvements in the aquatic environment. Existing information was used, to the extent practicable, to complete this work. The assessment will aid the Trout Creek Watershed Council in identifying opportunities and priorities for watershed restoration projects.

Runyon, John

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

ELEMENT C: Management Measures Necessary to Achieve Your Load Reductions,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, public education, ordinances, pet waste programs, erosion control plans. Regulatory Tools as Management · Identify new management opportunities · Identify critical areas in watershed where additional measures1 ELEMENT C: Management Measures Necessary to Achieve Your Load Reductions, Along with the Critical

206

Management of fetal malposition in the second stage of labor: a propensity score analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Management of Fetal Malposition in the Second Stage of Labor: A Propensity 1 Score Analysis 2 3 Abigail R. AIKEN MB/BChir, MPHa,b, Catherine E. AIKEN MB/BChir, PhDc*, 4 Medhat S. ALBERRY MBBS, PhDc, Jeremy C. BROCKELSBY MBBS, PhDc, and 5... , Princeton, NJ 11 c Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Cambridge; NIHR 12 Cambridge Comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre, CB2 2SW, UK 13 d Red McCombs School of Business and Division of Statistics and Scientific 14 Computation...

Aiken, Abigail R.; Aiken, Catherine E.; Alberry, Medhat S.; Brockelsby, Jeremy C.; Scott, James G.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Pacific Northwest Region MAPS dataset retrospective analysis Project Title: USFS Region Six MAPS Dataset Re-analysis for the Development of Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Northwest Region MAPS dataset ­ retrospective analysis Project Title: USFS Region Six MAPS Dataset Re-analysis for the Development of Management and Climate Change Support Tools for Landbird) demographic dataset may reveal how predicted patterns of climate-related forest fragmentation, pest outbreak

DeSante, David F.

208

Quantification of NPS Pollution Loads Within Pennsylvania Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantification of NPS Pollution Loads Within Pennsylvania Watersheds Final Report for Task 9 - BLWC for Atmospheric Deposition .................................... 2.4.5 Data Analyses for Urban Storm Runoff-Agricultural Fertilization ...................................................... 3.4 Atmospheric Deposition

Guiltinan, Mark

209

Modeling Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems in the Dickinson Bayou Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) are a commonly used means of wastewater treatment in the Dickinson Bayou watershed which is located between Houston and Galveston. The Dickinson Bayou is classified as "impaired" by the Texas Commission...

Forbis-Stokes, Aaron

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

210

Pinole Creek Watershed Sediment Source Assessment: A sediment budget approach highlighting watershed-scale sediment-related processes and supply to the Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pinole Creek Watershed Sediment Source Assessment: A sediment budget approach highlighting watershed-scale sediment-related processes and supply to the Bay Pearce,S.1 ,McKee,L.1 ,Arnold,C.2 ,and,landowners,stakeholders,agencies and regula- tors are facing many watershed-scale sediment-related issues such as erosion,degraded water

211

Lesson 1: Data Types and Watershed Populations In this first lesson, you will discover some information about each of the two watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of people per block. This is a good summary of how many people are in the watershed and where they live the condition of the watersheds regarding how people are currently living on and using the land. We will use Arc watershed (2000 census), the population density (average number of people per hectare), and to visualize how

212

Feasibility Study of Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed of Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chesapeake Rivers conservation area encompasses approximately 2,000 square miles of agricultural and forest lands in four Virginia watersheds that drain to the Chesapeake Bay. Consulting a time series of classified Landsat imagery for the Chesapeake Rivers conservation area, the project team developed a GIS-based protocol for identifying agricultural lands that could be reforested, specifically agricultural lands that had been without forest since 1990. Subsequent filters were applied to the initial candidate reforestation sites, including individual sites > 100 acres and sites falling within TNC priority conservation areas. The same data were also used to produce an analysis of baseline changes in forest cover within the study period. The Nature Conservancy and the Virginia Department of Forestry identified three reforestation/management models: (1) hardwood planting to establish old-growth forest, (2) loblolly pine planting to establish working forest buffer with hardwood planting to establish an old-growth core, and (3) loblolly pine planting to establish a working forest. To assess the relative carbon sequestration potential of these different strategies, an accounting of carbon and total project costs was completed for each model. Reforestation/management models produced from 151 to 171 tons carbon dioxide equivalent per acre over 100 years, with present value costs of from $2.61 to $13.28 per ton carbon dioxide equivalent. The outcome of the financial analysis was especially sensitive to the land acquisition/conservation easement cost, which represented the most significant, and also most highly variable, single cost involved. The reforestation/management models explored all require a substantial upfront investment prior to the generation of carbon benefits. Specifically, high land values represent a significant barrier to reforestation projects in the study area, and it is precisely these economic constraints that demonstrate the economic additionality of any carbon benefits produced via reforestation--these are outcomes over and above what is currently possible given existing market opportunities. This is reflected and further substantiated in the results of the forest cover change analysis, which demonstrated a decline in area of land in forest use in the study area for the 1987/88-2001 period. The project team collected data necessary to identify sites for reforestation in the study area, environmental data for the determining site suitability for a range of reforestation alternatives and has identified and addressed potential leakage and additionality issues associated with implementing a carbon sequestration project in the Chesapeake Rivers Conservation Area. Furthermore, carbon emissions reductions generated would have strong potential for recognition in existing reporting systems such as the U.S. Department of Energy 1605(b) voluntary reporting requirements and the Chicago Climate Exchange. The study identified 384,398 acres on which reforestation activities could potentially be sited. Of these candidate sites, sites totaling 26,105 acres are an appropriate size for management (> 100 acres) and located in priority conservation areas identified by The Nature Conservancy. Total carbon sequestration potential of reforestation in the study area, realized over a 100 year timeframe, ranges from 58 to 66 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, and on the priority sites alone, potential for carbon sequestration approaches or exceeds 4 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. In the absence of concerted reforestation efforts, coupled with policy strategies, the region will likely face continued declines in forest land.

Andy Lacatell; David Shoch; Bill Stanley; Zoe Kant

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Public Service Announcements for the Arroyo Colorado Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-396 2011 Public Service Announcements for the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Final Report By T. Allen Berthold Texas Water Resources Institute Prepared... for Texas General Land Office March 2011 Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report No. 396 Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas 77843-2118 Public Service Announcements for the Arroyo Colorado Watershed By T...

Berthold, Allen

214

Applications of life cycle assessment and cost analysis in health care waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three Health Care Waste (HCW) scenarios were assessed through environmental and cost analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCW treatment using microwave oven had the lowest environmental impacts and costs in comparison with autoclave and lime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lime had the worst environmental and economic results for HCW treatment, in comparison with autoclave and microwave. - Abstract: The establishment of rules to manage Health Care Waste (HCW) is a challenge for the public sector. Regulatory agencies must ensure the safety of waste management alternatives for two very different profiles of generators: (1) hospitals, which concentrate the production of HCW and (2) small establishments, such as clinics, pharmacies and other sources, that generate dispersed quantities of HCW and are scattered throughout the city. To assist in developing sector regulations for the small generators, we evaluated three management scenarios using decision-making tools. They consisted of a disinfection technique (microwave, autoclave and lime) followed by landfilling, where transportation was also included. The microwave, autoclave and lime techniques were tested at the laboratory to establish the operating parameters to ensure their efficiency in disinfection. Using a life cycle assessment (LCA) and cost analysis, the decision-making tools aimed to determine the technique with the best environmental performance. This consisted of evaluating the eco-efficiency of each scenario. Based on the life cycle assessment, microwaving had the lowest environmental impact (12.64 Pt) followed by autoclaving (48.46 Pt). The cost analyses indicated values of US$ 0.12 kg{sup -1} for the waste treated with microwaves, US$ 1.10 kg{sup -1} for the waste treated by the autoclave and US$ 1.53 kg{sup -1} for the waste treated with lime. The microwave disinfection presented the best eco-efficiency performance among those studied and provided a feasible alternative to subsidize the formulation of the policy for small generators of HCW.

Soares, Sebastiao Roberto, E-mail: soares@ens.ufsc.br [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); Finotti, Alexandra Rodrigues, E-mail: finotti@ens.ufsc.br [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); Prudencio da Silva, Vamilson, E-mail: vamilson@epagri.sc.gov.br [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); EPAGRI, Rod. Admar Gonzaga 1347, Itacorubi, Florianopolis, Santa Catarina 88034-901 (Brazil); Alvarenga, Rodrigo A.F., E-mail: alvarenga.raf@gmail.com [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); Ghent University, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, Coupure Links 653/9000 Gent (Belgium)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

IMG/M: A data management and analysis system for metagenomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMG/M is a data management and analysis system for microbial community genomes (metagenomes) hosted at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). IMG/M consists of metagenome data integrated with isolate microbial genomes from the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system. IMG/M provides IMG's comparative data analysis tools extended to handle metagenome data, together with metagenome-specific analysis tools. IMG/M is available at http://img.jgi.doe.gov/m. Studies of the collective genomes (also known as metagenomes) of environmental microbial communities (also known as microbiomes) are expected to lead to advances in environmental cleanup, agriculture, industrial processes, alternative energy production, and human health (1). Metagenomes of specific microbiome samples are sequenced by organizations worldwide, such as the Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), the Venter Institute and the Washington University in St. Louis using different sequencing strategies, technology platforms, and annotation procedures. According to the Genomes OnLine Database, about 28 metagenome studies have been published to date, with over 60 other projects ongoing and more in the process of being launched (2). The Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is one of the major contributors of metagenome sequence data, currently sequencing more than 50% of the reported metagenome projects worldwide. Due to the higher complexity, inherent incompleteness, and lower quality of metagenome sequence data, traditional assembly, gene prediction, and annotation methods do not perform on these datasets as well as they do on isolate microbial genome sequences (3, 4). In spite of these limitations, metagenome data are amenable to a variety of analyses, as illustrated by several recent studies (5-10). Metagenome data analysis is usually set up in the context of reference isolate genomes and considers the questions of composition and functional or metabolic potential of individual microbiomes, as well as differences between microbiome samples. Such analysis relies on efficient management of genome and metagenome data collected from multiple sources, while taking into account the iterative nature of sequence data generation and processing. IMG/M aims at providing support for comparative metagenome analysis in the integrated context of microbial genome and metagenome data generated with diverse sequencing technology platforms and data processing methods.

Markowitz, Victor M.; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Szeto, Ernest; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chu, Ken; Dalevi, Daniel; Chen, I-Min A.; Grechkin,Yuri; Dubchak,Inna; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Mavromatis,Konstantinos; Hug enholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Analysis of Assembly Bill 264: Pediatric Asthma Self-Management Training and Education Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management and training, individual and group education, and patient education materials); •management and training, individual and group education, and patient education materials)management training and education, individual health education, patient education materials,

California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Numerical Analysis of Non-Constant Discounting with an Application to Renewable Resource Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND K. G. L OFGREN (2000): “Renewable Resources and Economican Application to Renewable Resource Management Tomoki Fujiiwith an Application to Renewable Resource Management Tomoki

Fujii, Tomoki; Karp, Larry

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Applying geologic sensitivity analysis to environmental risk management: The financial implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The financial risks associated with environmental contamination can be staggering and are often difficult to identify and accurately assess. Geologic sensitivity analysis is gaining recognition as a significant and useful tool that can empower the user with crucial information concerning environmental risk management and brownfield redevelopment. It is particularly useful when (1) evaluating the potential risks associated with redevelopment of historical industrial facilities (brownfields) and (2) planning for future development, especially in areas of rapid development because the number of potential contaminating sources often increases with an increase in economic development. An examination of the financial implications relating to geologic sensitivity analysis in southeastern Michigan from numerous case studies indicate that the environmental cost of contamination may be 100 to 1,000 times greater at a geologically sensitive location compared to the least sensitive location. Geologic sensitivity analysis has demonstrated that near-surface geology may influence the environmental impact of a contaminated site to a greater extent than the amount and type of industrial development.

Rogers, D.T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

acid d13c analysis: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: itself against acidification and is used to monitor the effect of acid rain on watersheds. From 1993MASTERS REPORT ANALYSIS AND MODELING OF ACID...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cognitive Task Analysis of Network Analysts and Managers for Network Situational Awareness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to create a set of next generation cyber situational awareness capabilities with applications to other domains in the long term. The goal is to improve the decision making process such that decision makers can choose better actions. To this end, we put extensive effort into ensuring we had feedback from network analysts and managers and understood what their needs truly were. Consequently, this is the focus of this portion of the research. This paper discusses the methodology we followed to acquire this feedback from the analysts, namely a cognitive task analysis. Additionally, this paper provides the details we acquired from the analysts. This essentially provides details on their processes, goals, concerns, the data and meta-data they analyze, etc. A final result we describe is the generation of a task-flow diagram.

Erbacher, Robert; Frincke, Deborah A.; Wong, Pak C.; Moody, Sarah; Fink, Glenn A.

2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

222

Statistical Directions for the Analysis of Participatory Mobile Health Asthma Management Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using mobile phone technology for the management of theirmanagement. Usage studies of modern mobile technologies have

Hasenstab, Kyle Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Emerald Lake Watershed study: Introduction and site description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Emerald Lake Watershed study was organized to investigate the effects of acidic deposition on high-elevation watersheds and surface waters of the Sierra Nevada, California. Some of the results of this comprehensive study of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at a small, headwater basin are presented in four papers in this series. The watershed study site is in Sequoia National Park, on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada. This glacial cirque is located in the upper Marble Fork of the Kaweah River. This 120-ha watershed ranges from Alta Peak (3,416 m) down to Emerald Lake (2,400 m). Most of the watershed surface area is exposed granite and granodiorite rocks, with limited coverage (about 20%) by thin, acidic soils. The hydrology of the basin is dominated by snowmelt runoff during March-June. Emerald Lake, a glacial tarn, is 2.72 ha in area, with a maximum depth of 10.5 m. Surface waters are poorly buffered and dominated by calcium and bicarbonate. Most of the yearly precipitation falls as dilute snow (pH5.2-5.4), with acidic rain storms sampled during May-October.

Tonnessen, K.A. (California Air Resources Board, Sacramento (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

Rachel Henderson

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Investigation of Coupled Hydrologic and Geochemical Impacts of Wildfire on Southern California Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water is routed through the reach network to the watershed outlet using storage routing, or kinematic wave

Burke, Megan Patricia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Friends or Foes? A Conceptual Analysis of Self-Adaptation and IT Change Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the current practice in ITIL Change Management as initial reference point. We define the required responsibilities and a generic conceptual object model and map them to the ITIL Change Management roles to evaluate the current practice in ITIL Change Management as initial reference point. We define the required

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

227

Assessment of thermal analysis software for the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This assessment uses several recent assessments and the more general code compilations that have been completed to produce a list of 116 codes that can be used for thermal analysis. This list is then compared with criteria prepared especially for the Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE/OCRWM). Based on these criteria, fifteen codes are narrowed to three primary codes and four secondary codes for use by the OCRWM thermal analyst. The analyst is cautioned that since no single code is sufficient for all applications, a code must be selected based upon the predominate heat transfer mode of the problem to be solved, but the codes suggested in this report have been used successfully for a range of OCRWM applications. The report concludes with a series of recommendations for additional work of which the major points include the following: The codes suggested by this report must be benchmarked with the existing US and international problems and validated when possible; An interactive code selection tool could be developed or, perhaps even more useful, a users group could be supported to ensure the proper selection of thermal codes and dissemination of information on the latest version; The status of the 116 codes identified by this report should be verified, and methods for maintaining the still active codes must be established; and special capabilities of each code in phase change, convection and radiation should be improved to better enable the thermal analyst to model OCRWM applications. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

Williams, P.T.; Graham, R.F.; Lagerberg, G.N.; Chung, T.C.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

WIPP Sampling and Analysis Plan for Solid Waste Management Units and Areas of Concern.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to fulfill requirements of Module VII, Section VII.M.2 and Table VII.1, requirement 4 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED [New Mexico Environment Department], 1999a). This SAP describes the approach for investigation of the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU) and Areas of Concern (AOC) specified in the Permit. This SAP addresses the current Permit requirements for a RCRA Facility Investigation(RFI) investigation of SWMUs and AOCs. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the RFI specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI work plan and report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the facility's Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can beentered either before or after a RFI work plan. According to NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare a RFI work plan or SAP for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2000-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

229

Simple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'' and spatial variations of gaseous dry N deposition (i.e., nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ammonia (NH3)), thoughSimple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds Heather E. Golden the effects of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on surface water quality requires accurate accounts

Elliott, Emily M.

230

AIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER WATERSHED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) provides a summary of major scientific reports on air pollution and public health. The reports includeAIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER WATERSHED Annual Progress Report for FY 2005 through the US Department of Interior #12;PROGRESS REPORT: AIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER

District of Columbia, University of the

231

ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a significant increase in total phosphorus. Several water quality parameters indicated a subsequent worseningENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS 2005-2006 by Michael A: The City of Wilmington, New Hanover County and the US EPA 319 Program (through NC Division of Water quality

Mallin, Michael

232

University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Tennessee Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.state.tn.us/environment/wpc/wshed1.htm Watts Bar Watershed McMinn Monroe Pond Creek #12;University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Water Quality in Pond Creek 35.6 miles of Mud Creek, Greasy Branch and Pond Creek listed on 2002? #12;University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Pond Creek · Pasture based beef and dairy

233

Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan incorporates U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) standard operating procedures (SOPs) into environmental monitoring activities and will be implemented at all sites managed by LM. This document provides detailed procedures for the field sampling teams so that samples are collected in a consistent and technically defensible manner. Site-specific plans (e.g., long-term surveillance and maintenance plans, environmental monitoring plans) document background information and establish the basis for sampling and monitoring activities. Information will be included in site-specific tabbed sections to this plan, which identify sample locations, sample frequencies, types of samples, field measurements, and associated analytes for each site. Additionally, within each tabbed section, program directives will be included, when developed, to establish additional site-specific requirements to modify or clarify requirements in this plan as they apply to the corresponding site. A flowchart detailing project tasks required to accomplish routine sampling is displayed in Figure 1. LM environmental procedures are contained in the Environmental Procedures Catalog (LMS/PRO/S04325), which incorporates American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), DOE, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance. Specific procedures used for groundwater and surface water monitoring are included in Appendix A. If other environmental media are monitored, SOPs used for air, soil/sediment, and biota monitoring can be found in the site-specific tabbed sections in Appendix D or in site-specific documents. The procedures in the Environmental Procedures Catalog are intended as general guidance and require additional detail from planning documents in order to be complete; the following sections fulfill that function and specify additional procedural requirements to form SOPs. Routine revision of this Sampling and Analysis Plan will be conducted annually at the beginning of each fiscal year when attachments in Appendix D, including program directives and sampling location/analytical tables, will be reviewed by project personnel and updated. The sampling location/analytical tables in Appendix D, however, may have interim updates according to project direction that are not reflected in this plan. Deviations from location/analytical tables in Appendix D prior to sampling will be documented in project correspondence (e.g., startup letters). If significant changes to other aspects of this plan are required before the annual update, then the plan will be revised as needed.

None

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

234

Sustainability of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Partnership and Continued Implementation of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Partnership (ACWP) to address these impairments over a 10-year implantation period. The ACWPP primarily addresses the low DO levels in the tidal segment of the AC. The goal of the ACWPP is to reduce the addition of pollutants...

Flores, J.; Berthold, A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

An Institutional Analysis of Oil and Gas Sector Development and Environmental Management in the Yukon Territory.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis investigates the ways in which oil and gas development priorities and concern for the environment are integrated within strategic planning and management frameworks,… (more)

May, Jason C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Characterization of options and their analysis requirements for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is examining alternative strategies for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) currently stored at the gaseous diffusion plants at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, and on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This paper describes the methodology for the comprehensive and ongoing technical analysis of the options being considered. An overview of these options, along with several of the suboptions being considered, is presented. The long-term management strategy alternatives fall into three broad categories: use, storage, or disposal. Conversion of the depleted UF6 to another form such as oxide or metal is needed to implement most of these alternatives. Likewise, transportation of materials is an integral part of constructing the complete pathway between the current storage condition and ultimate disposition. The analysis of options includes development of pre-conceptual designs; estimates of effluents, wastes, and emissions; specification of resource requirements; and preliminary hazards assessments. The results of this analysis will assist DOE in selecting a strategy by providing the engineering information necessary to evaluate the environmental impacts and costs of implementing the management strategy alternatives.

Dubrin, J.W.; Rosen, R.S.; Zoller, J.N.; Harri, J.W.; Schwertz, N.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Composite Analysis for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a Composite Analysis (CA) for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The Area 5 RWMS is a US Department of Energy (DOE)-operated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management site located in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS has disposed of low-level radioactive waste in shallow unlined pits and trenches since 1960. Transuranic waste (TRU) and high-specific activity waste was disposed in Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes from 1983 to 1989. The purpose of this CA is to determine if continuing operation of the Area 5 RWMS poses an acceptable or unacceptable risk to the public considering the total waste inventory and all other interacting sources of radioactive material in the vicinity. Continuing operation of the Area 5 RWMS will be considered acceptable if the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) is less than 100 mrem in a year. If the TEDE exceeds 30 mrem in a year, a cost-benefit options analysis must be performed to determine if cost-effective management options exist to reduce the dose further. If the TEDE is found to be less than 30 mrem in a year, an analysis may be performed if warranted to determine if doses are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

V. Yucel

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 3 Appendix C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides details on the baseline ecological risk assessment conducted in support of the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for the Melton Valley areas of the White Oak Creek watershed (WOCW). The RI presents an analysis meant to enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. The ecological risk assessment builds off of the WOCW screening ecological risk assessment. All information available for contaminated sites under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy`s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Federal Facilities Agreement within the White Oak Creek (WOC) RI area has been used to identify areas of potential concern with respect to the presence of contamination posing a potential risk to ecological receptors within the Melton Valley area of the White Oak Creek watershed. The risk assessment report evaluates the potential risks to receptors within each subbasin of the watershed as well as at a watershed-wide scale. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminant releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent waste area groupings.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Assistant Professor in Water Resources Management and Policy POSITION: This is a 12-month tenure track faculty position with an 80% extension and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assistant Professor in Water Resources Management and Policy POSITION: This is a 12-month tenure an extension/applied research program focused on water resources management in Georgia. Working closely systems Watershed management and restoration Water Conservation programs Water policy and management

Arnold, Jonathan

240

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Techniques for estimating flood hydrographs for ungaged urban watersheds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clark Method, modified slightly, was used to develop a synthetic dimensionless hydrograph that can be used to estimate flood hydrographs for ungaged urban watersheds. Application of the technique results in a typical (average) flood hydrograph for a given peak discharge. Input necessary to apply the technique is an estimate of basin lagtime and the recurrence interval peak discharge. Equations for this purpose were obtained from a recent nationwide study on flood frequency in urban watersheds. A regression equation was developed which relates flood volumes to drainage area size, basin lagtime, and peak discharge. This equation is useful where storage of floodwater may be a part of design or flood prevention. 6 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

Stricker, V.A.; Sauer, V.B.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Analysis of benefits of sargassum on Galveston Island and indications for beach management policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sargassum fluitans and natans, types of brown algae, wash up on Galveston Island, Texas annually from May to August. Sargassum smells bad, hurts tourism and impairs sea turtle hatchings. Coastal managers are confronted with the difficult choice...

Williams, Amy M.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Analysis of Energy Management System Control Philosophies Utilizing Collected Field Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small commercial and light industrial operations are turning to low-cost energy management controllers in efforts to reduce their electrical usage and demand. These controllers offer a variety of techniques to obtain this goal. To study the effects...

Russell, B. D.; Gerloff, G. W.; Heller; R. P.; Perry, L. W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Life cycle analysis of waste management options for EBI in Quebec  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quebec has issued a mandate requiring all waste management facilities to ban the landfilling of organic waste by 2020. EBI is considering Anaerobic Digestion as one of its alternative options, but is uncertain if it is the ...

Wilson, Jaclyn D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Operation Management and Energy Consumption Analysis of the District Cooling System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the operation management. It can be concluded that the district cooling system not only can save energy and protect the environment, but also is economically feasible. It should be developed and popularized in China because of its significant advantages....

Xu, Q.; Li, D.; Xu, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Multifamily Retrofit Project Manager Job/Task Analysis and Report: September 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of job/task analyses (JTAs) is one of three components of the Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project and will allow industry to develop training resources, quality assurance protocols, accredited training programs, and professional certifications. The Multifamily Retrofit Project Manager JTA identifies and catalogs all of the tasks performed by multifamily retrofit project managers, as well as the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) needed to perform the identified tasks.

Owens, C. M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans: Texas water resources professionals gather  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tx H2O | pg. 6 Story by Ric Jensen Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans | pg. 6 tx H2O | pg. 7 W ater resources professionals wanting training on watershed protection plan development are benefiting from a course... AgriLife Research, the River Systems Institute at Texas State University, Texas Institute for Applied Environmental Research at Tarleton State University, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to create the Texas Watershed Planning...

Jensen, Ric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Analysis of Assembly 264 - Amended: Pediatric Asthma Self-Management Training and Education Services for Children at High Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

self- management training and education on quality of lifeasthma and its management. Quality-of-life effects Qualityself-management training and education on the quality of

California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Analysis of Assembly 264 - Amended: Pediatric Asthma Self-Management Training and Education Services for Children at High Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

health management (59%), and patient education materials ineducational materials Education in clinic and management (w/management and training, individual and group education, and patient education materials);

California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC SEDIMENTS. A smaller organic contaminant database indicates sediment PAH levels exceed probable effect level criteria

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - asotin creek watershed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Units Calwater Subbasins ---(Planning Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: ForemanCreek Manson Creek Mill Creek Malosky Creek...

252

Assessment of Water Resources and Watershed Conditions in Moores Creek National Battlefield, North Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Water Resources and Watershed Conditions in Moores Creek National Battlefield, North Assessment of Park Water Resources.......................................................................25 resources........................................................................15 Biological resources

Mallin, Michael

253

WASTE-ACC: A computer model for analysis of waste management accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Argonne National Laboratory has developed WASTE-ACC, a computational framework and integrated PC-based database system, to assess atmospheric releases from facility accidents. WASTE-ACC facilitates the many calculations for the accident analyses necessitated by the numerous combinations of waste types, waste management process technologies, facility locations, and site consolidation strategies in the waste management alternatives across the DOE complex. WASTE-ACC is a comprehensive tool that can effectively test future DOE waste management alternatives and assumptions. The computational framework can access several relational databases to calculate atmospheric releases. The databases contain throughput volumes, waste profiles, treatment process parameters, and accident data such as frequencies of initiators, conditional probabilities of subsequent events, and source term release parameters of the various waste forms under accident stresses. This report describes the computational framework and supporting databases used to conduct accident analyses and to develop source terms to assess potential health impacts that may affect on-site workers and off-site members of the public under various DOE waste management alternatives.

Nabelssi, B.K.; Folga, S.; Kohout, E.J.; Mueller, C.J.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Summary of the engineering analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is reviewing ideas for the long-term management and use of its depleted uranium hexafluoride. DOE owns about 560,000 metric tons (over a billion pounds) of depleted uranium hexafluoride. This material is contained in steel cylinders located in storage yards near Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and at the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the K-25 Site) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. On November 10, 1994, DOE announced its new Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program by issuing a Request for Recommendations and an Advance Notice of Intent in the Federal Register (59 FR 56324 and 56325). The first part of this program consists of engineering, costs and environmental impact studies. Part one will conclude with the selection of a long-term management plan or strategy. Part two will carry out the selected strategy.

Dubrin, J.W., Rahm-Crites, L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Terrestrial Carbon Management Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, and models and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Collections under the broad heading of Terrestrial Carbon Management are organized as Carbon Accumulation with Cropland Management, Carbon Accumulation with Grassland Management, Carbon Loss Following Cultivation, Carbon Accumulation Following Afforestation, and Carbon Sources and Sinks Associated with U.S. Cropland Production.

256

Electronic document management system analysis report and system plan for the Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) has established and maintains Document Management Centers (DMCs) to support Environmental Restoration Program (ER) activities undertaken at three Oak Ridge facilities: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; and two sister sites: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky. The role of the DMCs is to receive, store, retrieve, and properly dispose of records. In an effort to make the DMCs run more efficiently and to more proactively manage the records` life cycles from cradle to grave, ER has decided to investigate ways in which Electronic Document Management System (EDMS) technologies can be used to redefine the DMCs and their related processes. Specific goals of this study are tightening control over the ER documents, establishing and enforcing record creation and retention procedures, speeding up access to information, and increasing the accessibility of information. A working pilot of the solution is desired within the next six months. Based on a series of interviews conducted with personnel from each of the DMCs, key management, and individuals representing related projects, it is recommended that ER utilize document management, full-text retrieval, and workflow technologies to improve and automate records management for the ER program. A phased approach to solution implementation is suggested starting with the deployment of an automated storage and retrieval system at Portsmouth. This should be followed with a roll out of the system to the other DMCs, the deployment of a workflow-enabled authoring system at Portsmouth, and a subsequent roll out of this authoring system to the other sites.

Frappaolo, C. [Delphi Consulting Group, Boston, MA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Managing site remediation using pathway analysis, application to a semi-arid site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the application of pathway analysis methodology to evaluate alternatives associated with remediation of a semi-arid site. Significant aspects of remediation include potential land uses, soil cleaning techniques and restoration alternatives. Important environmental transport pathways and dominant radionuclides are identified using pathway analysis. The remediation strategy is optimized based on results of the analysis.

Rutz, E.E.; Ijaz, T.; Wood, R.P.; Eckart, R.E. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Industrial and Nuclear Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Market Technical Analysis for the iMarket Meter Data Management System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on recent success with Swift’s iMarket Meter Data Management System (MDMS) product in the Southwest Power Pool (SPP), additional wholesale energy markets need to be analyzed to determine the feasibility of marketing and selling the MDMS...

Lowe, Patrick

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

259

Proposal to Establish the Center for Extreme Data Management Analysis and Visualization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

new power and cooling systems, such as the ones being built for the new National Security Agency (NSA acquired with high- resolution sensors from aircrafts, robots, satellites, increasingly high, and image processing. Once extreme data is securely housed and efficiently managed, the real work begins

Capecchi, Mario R.

260

Climate change versus urban drinking water supply and management: a case analysis on the coastal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Informatics, Brandenburg University of Technology at Cottbus, P.O. Box. 101344, D-03013 Cottbus, GERMANY (E-mail: shafinoor@yahoo.com; ishafin@yahoo.com) Abstract Clean urban drinking water supply is now a crucial problem; management. INTRODUCTION Clean urban drinking water supply is now a global problem, and most of the countries

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed Presented in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed A Thesis Presented Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed," has been reviewed in final form ____________________________________Date____________ Margrit von Braun #12;iii iii A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment

Fiedler, Fritz R.

262

Report on Abatement Activities Related to Agriculture and Waste Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guidelines for Producers 9 2.3 Best Agricultural Waste Management Plans (BAWMPs) 9 3.0 AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES COMPLAINT RESPONSE SYSTEM 8 2.1 Agricultural Waste Control Regulation and Code 9 2.2 Environmental ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE 10 3.1 Watershed Farm Practices Study 10 3.2 Ongoing Farm Practices Evaluation 12 3

263

Sediment storage and yield in an urbanized karst watershed Evan A. Harta,*, Stephen G. Schurgerb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment storage and yield in an urbanized karst watershed Evan A. Harta,*, Stephen G. Schurgerb, sinkholes and other drainage features control the temporal and spatial pattern of sediment storage across the landscape. However, studies dealing with sedimentation in karst watersheds are scarce and the sediment

Hart, Evan

264

Seasonal controls on sediment delivery in a small coastal plain watershed, North Carolina, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seasonal controls on sediment delivery in a small coastal plain watershed, North Carolina, USA of drainage ditch sedimentation and suspended sediment transport were used to construct a simple sediment to sediment dynamics in a small agricultural watershed in North Carolina. Results indicate that seasonal

Lecce, Scott A.

265

Great Lakes Spatially Distributed Watershed Model of Water and Materials Runoff Thomas E. Croley II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Great Lakes Spatially Distributed Watershed Model of Water and Materials Runoff Thomas E. Croley II.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified contaminated sediments, urban runoff and storm sewers there are no integrated spatially distributed physically based watershed-scale hydrological/water quality models available

266

The Relative Importance of Road Density and Physical Watershed Features in Determining Coastal Marsh Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with overall Water Quality Index scores. Road density also showed positive correlations with total nitrate Marsh Water Quality in Georgian Bay Rachel DeCatanzaro Ă? Maja Cvetkovic Ă? Patricia Chow-Fraser Received and physical watershed features (watershed size, wetland cover, and bedrock type) on water quality in coastal

McMaster University

267

Impact of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrogen and Baseflow in Urban Watersheds of Metropolitan Atlanta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrogen and Baseflow in Urban Watersheds 2401, Miller Plant Sciences Building Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) are widely used Septic Wastewater-Treatment Systems on Base Flow in Selected Watersheds in Gwinnett County, Georgia

Arnold, Jonathan

268

Ecological Impacts of Contaminants in an Urban Watershed DOE FRAP 1998-25  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of metals on a "pristine" stream community. The Brunette watershed has concentrations of heavy metals largely absent from the Brunette River watershed were also those species most sensitive to heavy metal (Burnaby, BC) was studied as an example. We studied sediment chemistry, direct toxicity of sediments

269

Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed STAC Committee). 2013. Exploring the environmental effects of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The purpose of this workshop was to engage

270

Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers: Lampasas River Watershed Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................... 14 Laboratory Procedures ........................................................................................ 14 Results ................................................................................................................. 15 Known... forming units (CFU) per 100 mL .................................................................................... 15 Table 6 Known source fecal samples collected in the Lampasas River Watershed . 17 Table 7 City, volume, and discharge location...

Gregory, L.; Casarez, E.; Truesdale, J.; Di Giovanni, G.; Owen, T; Wolfe, J.

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

271

An analysis of the impact of alternative import management policies for shrimp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, particularly within the harvesting industry, have produced periodic calls for changes in government policy. Industry spokesmen are now advocating the regula- tion of imports through a system of tariffs and quotas. A recent House bill (H. R. 4041) proposed... the combination of a 210 million pound quota and a 30% ad valorem tariff. The extent and distribution of costs and bene- fits are not immediately clear. The research reported herein quantita- tively evaluates the effectiveness of alternative import management...

Hopkins, Jane Chadwick

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Integrated Chemical Complex and Cogeneration Analysis System: Energy Conservation and Greenhouse Gas Management Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

19f Integrated Chemical Complex and Cogeneration Analysis System: Energy Conservation and Cogeneration Analysis System is an advanced technology for energy conservation and pollution prevention, Beaumont, TX 77710, hopperjr@hal.lamar.edu, yawscl@hal.lamar.edu Key words; Energy Conservation, Greenhouse

Pike, Ralph W.

273

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres of shrub-steppe, riparian, and wetland habitat in northern Franklin County, Washington. Title to the land will be transferred initially to The Conservation Fund and ultimately for inclusion as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Passive management practices will take place on the land until an official management plan is developed and approved for the property. Some short-term control of invasive, exotic plant species may occur as necessary prior to the approval of a management plan. The compliance checklist for this project was completed by Randy Hill with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia National Wildlife Refuge and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). A comprehensive management plan will be prepared for the property after it is acquired and will follow the guidelines and mitigation measures detailed in the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and ROD. No plant or animal species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will be affected by the fee-title purchase of the subject property. Mark Miller with the Eastern Washington Ecological Services Office of USFWS concurred with this finding on August 3, 2001. Section 7 consultation will be conducted by BPA and USFWS, as necessary, prior to the implementation of any restoration or enhancement activities on the site. In accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) and USFWS policy, the addition of the Eagle Lakes property to the National Wildlife Refuge System does not constitute an undertaking as defined by the NHPA, or require compliance with Section 106 of the NHPA. Anan Raymond, Regional Archaeologist with USFWS Region 1 Cultural Resource Team, concurred with this finding on May 4, 2001. Compliance with NHPA, including cultural resources surveys, will be implemented, as necessary, once specific management activities are proposed for the property. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is encountered during developments that might occur prior to a cultural resource survey, an archeologist will immediately be notified and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. A Level I Contaminants Survey was completed on April 3, 2000 by Toni Davidson, Environmental Contaminants Specialist with the USFWS Upper Columbia River Basin Field Office. The survey found that overall the lakes, wetlands, and terrestrial habitats on the site appear to be in a healthy condition. The only concern expressed in the survey report was over the presence of two household/farm dumps. As a requirement of the Eagle Lakes sale, the landowner agreed to remove the dumps to the satisfaction of the USFWS contaminant specialist before the title to the land is transferred. A follow-up survey will be conducted to confirm compliance with this requirement of sale. Public involvement associated with this project has included written notification and solicitation of comments to interested parties, adjacent landowners, local tribes, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and sports clubs. Public response from the mail-out indicated general support for the project, although some questions were raised about the provision of seasonal hunting and fishing on the property. These types of questions will be addressed in the development of a management plan for the Eagle Lakes land. Because of initial favorable comments on this project, it was decided that subsequent public meetings and/or workshops were not warranted.

N /A

2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

274

On Managing Texas Rural Water Supply Systems: A Socioeconomic Analysis and Quality Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The study uses a set of indicators to identify effectiveness and efficiency of rural water projects. Such measures for analysis and appraisal of these projects may contribute to more informed and intelligent planning for the future. The study is also...

Singh, R.N.

275

Risk Analysis and Adaptive Response Planning for Water Distribution Systems Contamination Emergency Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are investigated. Pressure-driven hydraulic analysis is performed to simulate the complicated system hydraulics under pressure-deficit conditions. Performance of a novel preventive response action ? injection of food-grade dye directly into drinking water...

Rasekh, Amin

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

276

Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure development program: Cost analysis requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends, potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies.

Custer, W.R. Jr.; Messick, C.D.

1996-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Third annual Walker Branch Watershed research symposium. Program and abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methods and concepts of watershed research, originally applied in an experimental or monitoring mode to relatively small catchments, are increasingly being used at larger scales and for specific applied problems. Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the US Forest Service, and other agencies and institutions participating in this symposium reflects research over a broad range of spatial scales that is being integrated through large-scale experiments along with computer modeling and graphical interfaces. These research projects address the basic atmospheric, geophysical, biogeochemical, and biological processes that regulate the responses of forested ecosystems to natural environmental variation and anthropogenic stresses. Regional and global issues addressed by presentations include emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other hydrocarbons; deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and mercury; land-use changes; biological diversity; droughts; and water quality. The reports presented in this symposium illustrate a wide range of methods and approaches and focus more on concepts and techniques than on a specific physical site. Sites and projects that have contributed research results to this symposium include Walker Branch Watershed (DOE), the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory and LTER site (USFS and NSF), Great Smoky Mountains National Park (research funded by NPS, TVA, and EPRI), Imnavait Creek, Alaska (DOE), the TVA-Norris Whole-tree Facility (TVA and EPRI), and DOE`s Biomass Program.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Analysis of interrelationships between photovoltaic power and battery storage for electric utility load management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of photovoltaic power generation on the electric utility's load shape under supply-side peak load management conditions is explored. Results show that some utilities employing battery storage for peak load shaving might benefit from use of photovoltaic (PV) power, the extent of its usefulness being dependent on the specific load shapes as well as the photovoltaic array orientations. Typical utility load shapes both in the eastern and in the western parts of the U.S. are examined for this purpose. While photovoltaic power generation seems to present a bigger impact on the load of the western utility, both utilities will experience considerable savings on the size of the battery system required to shave the peak loads and also in the night-time base capacity required to charge the battery. Results show that when the cost of 2-axis tracking PV systems drop to $2/Wp, the southwestern utility will experience net cost savings when the PV-battery hybrid system is employed for load management. On the other hand, because of lesser availability of solar energy, the southeastern utility shows adverse economics for such a system.

Chowdhury, B.H.; Rahman, S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Waste-ACC: A computer model for radiological analysis of waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

WASTE-ACC, a computational framework and integrated PC-based database system, has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to assess radiological atmospheric releases from facility accidents in support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental. Impact Statement, (PEIS). WASTE-ACC facilitates the many calculations required in the accident analyses by the numerous combinations of waste types, treatment technologies, facility locations, and site consolidation strategies in the WM PEIS alternatives for each waste type across the DOE complex. This paper focuses on the computational framework used to assess atmospheric releases and health risk impacts from potential waste management accidents that may affect on-site workers and off-site members of the public. The computational framework accesses several relational databases as needed to calculate radiological releases for the risk dominant accidents. The databases contain throughput volumes, treatment process parameters, radionuclide characteristics, radiological profiles of the waste, site-specific dose conversion factors, and accident data such as frequencies of initiators, conditional probabilities of subsequent events, and source term release parameters of the various waste forms under accident stresses.

Nabelssi, B.K.; Folga, S.; Kohout, E. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)] [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

GridOPTICS(TM) A Novel Software Framework for Integrating Power Grid Data Storage, Management and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the architecture and design of GridOPTICSTM, a novel software framework to integrate a collection of software tools developed by PNNL’s Future Power Grid Initiative (FPGI) into a coherent, powerful operations and planning tool for the power grid of the future. GridOPTICSTM enables plug-and-play of various analysis, modeling and visualization software tools for fast and accurate control of the power grid. To bridge the data access for different control purposes, GridOPTICSTM provides a scalable and thin layer of event processing that hides the complexity of data storage and management. The initial prototype of GridOPTICSTM was demonstrated with several use cases from PNNL’s FPGI.

Gorton, Ian; Yin, Jian; Akyol, Bora A.; Ciraci, Selim; Critchlow, Terence; Liu, Yan; Gibson, Tara D.; Purohit, Sumit; Sharma, Poorva; Vlachopoulou, Maria

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

282

Scalable, Secure Energy Information Management for Demand-Response Analysis Yogesh Simmhan1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, pricing, and demand among utility providers and consumers. While the smart meter infrastructure the events streaming from smart meters through the smart grid, to meaningful analysis and feedback for these decisions comes from diverse sources: smart meters that report near real-time power usage and quality

Prasanna, Viktor K.

283

Baseline for Climate Change: Modeling Watershed Aquatic Biodiversity Relative to Environmental and Anthropogenic Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives of the two-year study were to (1) establish baselines for fish and macroinvertebrate community structures in two mid-Atlantic lower Piedmont watersheds (Quantico Creek, a pristine forest watershed; and Cameron Run, an urban watershed, Virginia) that can be used to monitor changes relative to the impacts related to climate change in the future; (2) create mathematical expressions to model fish species richness and diversity, and macroinvertebrate taxa and macroinvertebrate functional feeding group taxa richness and diversity that can serve as a baseline for future comparisons in these and other watersheds in the mid-Atlantic region; and (3) heighten people’s awareness, knowledge and understanding of climate change and impacts on watersheds in a laboratory experience and interactive exhibits, through internship opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, a week-long teacher workshop, and a website about climate change and watersheds. Mathematical expressions modeled fish and macroinvertebrate richness and diversity accurately well during most of the six thermal seasons where sample sizes were robust. Additionally, hydrologic models provide the basis for estimating flows under varying meteorological conditions and landscape changes. Continuations of long-term studies are requisite for accurately teasing local human influences (e.g. urbanization and watershed alteration) from global anthropogenic impacts (e.g. climate change) on watersheds. Effective and skillful translations (e.g. annual potential exposure of 750,000 people to our inquiry-based laboratory activities and interactive exhibits in Virginia) of results of scientific investigations are valuable ways of communicating information to the general public to enhance their understanding of climate change and its effects in watersheds.

Maurakis, Eugene G

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Financing Watershed Implementation Tools for Implementing the Vision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Guidebook of Financing Tools · Brownfield redevelopment financing · Financial & management capacity

285

Financing Watershed Implementation Tools for Implementing the Vision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" financing · Guidebook of Financing Tools · Brownfield redevelopment financing · Financial & management

286

Management Plan Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; and 5) consistency with the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act. In addition, the management plan Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have

287

John Day Watershed Restoration Projects, annual report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Brown, Linda (Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, John Day Basin Office, John Day, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

An economic analysis of integrated pest management strategies for Texas pecans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% ($306. 65) for improved irrigated orchards. A benefit-cost analysis was applied, measuring producers' and consumers' surplus against the funds appropriated for the development and maintenance of the program. Price flezibilities were estimated... impact of IPM adoptions on prices received by Texas pecan producers. The results suggested that the IPM program, using the 1985 survey data, increased total producers' surplus as well as consumers' surplus. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The writer wishes...

Woods, Timothy Alan

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Management of Male Breast Cancer in the United States: A Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To analyze the stage-specific management of male breast cancer (MBC) with surgery and radiation therapy (RT) and relate them to outcomes and to female breast cancer (FBC). Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried for all primary invasive MBC and FBC diagnosed from 1973 to 2008. Analyzable data included age, race, registry, grade, stage, estrogen and progesterone receptor status, type of surgery, and use of RT. Stage was defined as localized (LocD): confined to the breast; regional (RegD): involving skin, chest wall, and/or regional lymph nodes; and distant: M1. The primary endpoint was cause-specific survival (CSS). Results: A total of 4276 cases of MBC and 718,587 cases of FBC were identified. Male breast cancer constituted 0.6% of all breast cancer. Comparing MBC with FBC, mastectomy (M) was used in 87.4% versus 38.3%, and breast-conserving surgery in 12.6% versus 52.6% (P<10{sup ?4}). For males with LocD, CSS was not significantly different for the 4.6% treated with lumpectomy/RT versus the 70% treated with M alone (hazard ratio [HR] 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49-3.61; P=.57). Postmastectomy RT was delivered in 33% of males with RegD and was not associated with an improvement in CSS (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.88-1.41; P=.37). There was a significant increase in the use of postmastectomy RT in MBC over time: 24.3%, 27.2%, and 36.8% for 1973-1987, 1988-1997, and 1998-2008, respectively (P<.0001). Cause-specific survival for MBC has improved: the largest significant change was identified for men diagnosed in 1998-2008 compared with 1973-1987 (HR 0.73; 95% CI 0.60-0.88; P=.0004). Conclusions: Surgical management of MBC is dramatically different than for FBC. The majority of males with LocD receive M despite equivalent CSS with lumpectomy/RT. Postmastectomy RT is greatly underutilized in MBC with RegD, although a CSS benefit was not demonstrated. Outcomes for MBC are improving, attributable to improved therapy and its use in this unscreened population.

Fields, Emma C., E-mail: emma.fields@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); DeWitt, Peter [Colorado Biostatistics Consortium, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Fisher, Christine M.; Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. Work also includes clearing of a small (<1/4 mile) section of access road. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for detailed information on each section of the referenced transmission lines. BPA will conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and where possible to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The vegetation needing control is mainly Douglas Fir, Alder, and blackberries as indicated in Section 1.2 of the attached checklist. The work involved in the ROW includes: clearing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon pose a hazard to the lines; treating the associated stumps and re-sprouts with herbicide to ensure that the roots are killed preventing new sprouts; and selectively eliminating tall growing vegetation before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing vegetation. All work will take place in existing rights-of-ways and around transmission structures. All work will be accomplished by selective vegetation control methods to assure that there is little potential harm to non-target vegetation and to low-growing plants. The work will provide system reliability and fire protection. Also, all off right-of-way trees that are potentially unstable and will fall within a minimum distance or into the zone where the conductors swing will be removed. Access roads will be treated using mowing and herbicide applications. The work will provide system reliability. The subject transmission lines range from 115kV to 230kV and are made up of accompanying access roads, steel and wooden transmission line structures and associated switching platforms. The minimum clearance ranges from 21 feet for 115kV lines to 23 feet for 230kV lines. ROW easement widths vary along the length of the project. Vegetation control for this project is designed to provide a 3 year maintenance free interval. In summary, the overall vegetation management scheme will be to selectively remove tall growing vegetation then apply selective herbicide treatment using cut stump applications.

N /A

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

291

Data file management in the DIII-D data acquisition and analysis computer systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DIII-D is a large tokamak plasma physics and fusion energy research experiment funded by the Department of Energy. Each shot of the experiment results in data files containing between 20 and 30 Mbytes of data. These shots occur about once every 10 minutes with 40 to 50 shots per operating day. Over 1.2 gigabytes have been acquired in one daily session. Most of this data is acquired by MODCOMP Classic computers and is transferred via a Network Systems Hyperchannel to the DIII-D DEC VAX cluster system which is connected via Ether-net to the User Service Center DEC VAX cluster system. Some other data is acquired by local MicroVAX based plasma diagnostic systems and is transferred via DECnet to the DIII-D cluster. A substantial part of these VAX cluster systems is devoted to handling the large data files so as to maintain availability of the data for users, provide for shot archiving and shot restoration capabilities, and at the same time allow for new data to be received into the systems. Many of these tasks are carried out in near real time in sequence with a tokamak shot while other tasks are performed periodically throughout operations or during off hours. These tasks include disk space management, data archiving to 6250 and/or 8 mm tape drives, data file migration from the DIII-D cluster to the User Service Center cluster, data file compression, and network wide data file access. 11 refs., 2 figs.

McHarg, B.B. Jr.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Failure Impact Analysis of Key Management in AMI Using Cybernomic Situational Assessment (CSA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In earlier work, we presented a computational framework for quantifying the security of a system in terms of the average loss a stakeholder stands to sustain as a result of threats to the system. We named this system, the Cyberspace Security Econometrics System (CSES). In this paper, we refine the framework and apply it to cryptographic key management within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) as an example. The stakeholders, requirements, components, and threats are determined. We then populate the matrices with justified values by addressing the AMI at a higher level, rather than trying to consider every piece of hardware and software involved. We accomplish this task by leveraging the recently established NISTR 7628 guideline for smart grid security. This allowed us to choose the stakeholders, requirements, components, and threats realistically. We reviewed the literature and selected an industry technical working group to select three representative threats from a collection of 29 threats. From this subset, we populate the stakes, dependency, and impact matrices, and the threat vector with realistic numbers. Each Stakeholder s Mean Failure Cost is then computed.

Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL] [ORNL; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL] [ORNL; Hauser, Katie R [ORNL] [ORNL; Lantz, Margaret W [ORNL] [ORNL; Mili, Ali [New Jersey Insitute of Technology] [New Jersey Insitute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Taking Risk Assessment and Management to the Next Level: Program-Level Risk Analysis to Enable Solid Decision-Making on Priorities and Funding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-level (facility and programmatic) risk assessment was conducted for the facilities in the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Readiness in Technical Base and Facilities (RTBF) Program and results were included in a new Risk Management Plan (RMP), which was incorporated into the fiscal year (FY) 2010 Integrated Plans. Risks, risk events, probability, consequence(s), and mitigation strategies were identified and captured, for most scope areas (i.e., risk categories) during the facilitated risk workshops. Risk mitigations (i.e., efforts in addition to existing controls) were identified during the facilitated risk workshops when the risk event was identified. Risk mitigation strategies fell into two broad categories: threats or opportunities. Improvement projects were identified and linked to specific risks they mitigate, making the connection of risk reduction through investments for the annual Site Execution Plan. Due to the amount of that was collected, analysis to be performed, and reports to be generated, a Risk Assessment/ Management Tool (RAMtool) database was developed to analyze the risks in real-time, at multiple levels, which reinforced the site-level risk management process and procedures. The RAMtool database was developed and designed to assist in the capturing and analysis of the key elements of risk: probability, consequence, and impact. The RAMtool calculates the facility-level and programmatic-level risk factors to enable a side-by-side comparison to see where the facility manager and program manager should focus their risk reduction efforts and funding. This enables them to make solid decisions on priorities and funding to maximize the risk reduction. A more active risk management process was developed where risks and opportunities are actively managed, monitored, and controlled by each facility more aggressively and frequently. risk owners have the responsibility and accountability to manage their assigned risk in real-time, using the RAMtool database.

Nelson, J. G.; Morton, R. L.; Castillo, C.; Dyer, G.; Johnson, N.; McSwain, J. T.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Urbanizing Watersheds and Changing River Flood Dynamics: Implications for Urban Wetland Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urbanization alters river hydrology, morphology, water quality, and habitat and ecology. Most of these associated changes are due to an increase in impervious surface cover (ISC) throughout the watershed. But the spatial location of urban areas...

Simmons, M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

NIFA Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (formerly NRI): Water and Watershed Competitive Grants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tracking to Identify Nonpoint Fecal Pollution in Agricultural Watersheds Principal Investigator: Nachabe, M of Award: Grant 2002-35102-12383; $204,862; 3 Years Title of Award: Variable-Frequency Acoustic Profiling

296

Dr. Lee MacDonald, a professor of Watershed Science, is retiring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

29 Dr. Lee MacDonald, a professor of Watershed Science, is retiring from active teaching after 22.f., MacDonald, 1993). Teaching field-based courses is expensive in terms of equipment and time

MacDonald, Lee

297

Nitrogen and Phosphorus Biogeochemistry of Watersheds Along the Western Slope of the Sierra Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

both EML and Pear Lake (PRL) (J. Sickman, unpublished data),hypolimnetic O 2 concentrations. PRL is a 8.0 ha 591,000 m 3hypolimnetic anoxia. The PRL watershed is 142 ha of which

Homyak, Peter Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Wind River Watershed Project; Volume I of III Reports A thru E, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the ongoing efforts to document life history strategies of steelhead in the Wind River watershed and to formulate criteria for ranking restoration needs and proposed projects.

Connolly, Patrick J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

200206100 Restoration Potlatch River Watershed/Request for Expanded SOW 1 Table 1. Proposal Metadata  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restore steelhead to a robust, self-sustaining population in the Potlatch River watershed (Chapter 7, page, farming, or housing, and these uses continue, which precludes natural or passive rehabilitation from

300

Achieving TMDL Goals in Imparied Watersheds through Manure Export in Turfgrass Sod  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Model Calibration: Flow: Sediment: Phosphorous Organic: Mineral: Future and Ongoing Research: References of Turfgrass Production Sites for Phosphorous Removal from an Impaired Watershed. Unpublished. M.S. Texas A

Mukhtar, Saqib

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay. The consequences for both the hydrology and 41 #12;42 HYDRO-ECOLOGIC RESPONSES TO LAND USE IN SMALL URBANIZING

Palmer, Margaret A.

302

Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322-8200, USA Abstract: In this work, we used the Regional Hydro

Tarboton, David

303

Assessment of intensive silvicultural practices and livestock grazing on watershed parameters, Kisatchie National Forest, Louisiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSESSMENT OF INTENSIVE SILVICULTURAL PRACTICES AND LIVESTOCK GRAZING ON WATERSHED PARAMETERS, KISATCHIE NATIONAL FOREST, LOUISIANA A Thesis by THOMAS KENNETH HUNTER JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Range Science ASSESSMENT OF INTENSIVE SILVICULTURAL PRACTICES AND LIVESTOCK GRAZING ON WATERSHED PARAMETERS, KISATCHIE NATIONAL FOREST, LOUISIANA A Thesis...

Hunter, Thomas Kenneth

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Evaluation of inorganic phosphate content of overland runoff from a rural watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Tests and Phosphate Potential Curves. . 71 Storm Events Encountered. Runoff Water Iluality. . . CONCLUSION REFERENCES APPENDICIES Appendix A. Variables Used in Text Appendix B. Phosphate Model Subroutines Listing. VITA 81 88 99 101 106... the watershed under consideration had undergone change such as urbanization or a shift from forested to cleared. Lawson identified 18 watershed modifications which would change water- shed characteristics and subsequently model empirical constants. He...

Cepeda, William Lohr

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Use of Statistical Entropy and Life Cycle Analysis to Evaluate Global Warming Potential of Waste Management Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of conservation of mass [4]. In order to fully account for the flows of materials through waste management systems Management Systems Scott Kaufman, Eilhann Kwon, Nikhil Krishnan, Marco Castaldi, Nickolas Themelis Earth management systems involving thermal treatment. Now, a simple lifecycle "net energy" metric ­ encompassing

Columbia University

306

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

The Bachelor of Management degree in Management Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses in length. Admission to the Faculty may occur at the end of Year One. Students are required to have the following courses for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bachelor of Management degree in Management Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses-language university. BachelorofManagement ManagementInformationSystems Name Technology Management 4090 - Management Policy and Strategy Management 4840 - Systems Analysis Management

Seldin, Jonathan P.

308

Seasonally-managed wetland footprint delineation using Landsat ETM+ satellite imagery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One major challenge in water resource management is the estimation of evapotranspiration losses from seasonally managed wetlands. Quantifying these losses is complicated by the dynamic nature of the wetlands’ areal footprint during the periods of flood-up and drawdown. In this study we present a data-lean solution to this problem using an example application in the San Joaquin River Basin of California, USA. Through analysis of high-resolution (30 meter) Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery, we develop a metric for more fully capturing the extent of total flooded wetland area. The procedure is validated using year-long, continuously-logged field datasets at two separate wetlands within the study area. Based on this record, the proposed classification using a Landsat ETM+ Band 5 (mid-IR wavelength) to Band 2 (visible green wavelength) ratio improves estimates by 30-50% relative to previous attempts at wetland delineation. Requiring modest ancillary data, the results of our study provide a practical and efficient option for wetland management in data-sparse regions or un-gauged watersheds.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Epshtein, O.

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

Chen, K.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

310

Addendum 1 Composite Analysis for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A disposal authorization statement (DAS) was issued by the U.S. Department of Energy/Headquarters (DOE/HQ) on December 5, 2000, authorizing the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office to continue the operation of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site for the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste. Prior to the issuance of the DAS, the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) had conducted reviews of the performance assessment (PA) and the composite analysis (CA) for the Area 5 RWMS, in accordance with the requirements of the DOE Radioactive Waste Management Order DOE O 435.1. A brief history of the reviews is as follows. (The reviews were conducted by independent review teams chartered by the LFRG; the review findings and recommendations were issued in review team reports to the LFRG.) The LFRG accepted the initial PA, with conditions, on August 30, 1996. Revision 2.1 to the PA was issued in January 1998, implementing the conditions of acceptance of the 1996 PA. The LFRG reviewed Revision 2.1 as part of the Area 5 RWMS CA review during 2000, and found it acceptable. The CA and the Supplemental Information provided in response to issues identified during the initial review of the CA were accepted by the LFRG. The Supplemental Information (including the responses to four key issues) is included in the Review Team Report to the LFRG, which recommends that it be incorporated into the CA and issued to all known holders of the CA. The Area 5 RWMS DAS requires that the Supplemental Information generated during the DOE/HQ review of the CA be incorporated into the CA within one year of the date of issuance of the DAS. This report, the first addendum to the Area 5 CA, is prepared to fulfill that requirement. The Supplemental Information includes the following: Issues Identified in the Review Team Report; Crosswalk Presentation; and Maintaining Doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable. A summary of this information is included in this report, with the complete text presented in the appendices.

Vefa Yucel

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hospitality Management Hospitality Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the global hospitality industry. Academic Offerings HOSPITALITY AND FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT MINOR HOSPITALITY AND FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT MINOR Students pursuing programs in other areas of study may choose a minor Lodging Management 3 HPM 309 Sports Arena Management 3 HPM 312* Cost Control in Food Services (Prereq

McConnell, Terry

312

Anesthesia management of patients undergoing hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion with melphalan for melanoma treatment: an analysis of 17 cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Department of Anesthesia & Perioperative Care,details Department of Anesthesia & Perioperative Care,as: Ruschulte et al. : Anesthesia management of patients

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Database Management Certificate Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Database Management Certificate Program DATABASE TECHNOLOGIES 13 Today, organizations in every to obtain general data analysis and management skills or apply both Oracle and Microsoft SQL Server database capabilities of relational databases in conjunction with the new "Big Data" management frameworks for data

Rose, Michael R.

314

Supplemental results of the human health risk analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy draft waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended as an information supplement to the human health risk analysis performed for the US Department of Energy`s Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste, hereinafter called the PEIS. This report provides the installation-by-installation human health risk analysis results from which the risk estimate summaries for the PEIS were drawn. Readers should bear in mind that the risk estimates presented here are the result of a program-wide (as opposed to site-specific) study. They are based on best available data; systematically applied assumptions; and professional judgment about DOE waste inventories, waste volumes generated annually, currently available treatment and disposal technologies, technical limitations of treatment, and facility capacities across the numerous installations in the DOE complex.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Hot Issue and Burning Options in Waste Management: A Social Cost Benefit Analysis of Waste-to-Energy in the UK.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Miranda and Hale, 1997). 20 4.3 External Costs and Benefits WtE plants emit some pollutants, which include sulphur dioxide, lead, and dioxins which are linked with damage to health and the environment if they occur in high enough concentrations... Hot Issue and Burning Options in Waste Management: A Social Cost Benefit Analysis of Waste-to-Energy in the UK Tooraj Jamasb* Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge Hande Kiamil Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Kiamil, H; Nepal, R

316

FY 2015 -Rates for Self-Sustaining Services Rates are contingent upon approval by UW Management Accounting & Analysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pager Feature - Group Call Retiring $2.30 Group Monthly Mobile Technology Basic Smartphone Support - iFY 2015 - Rates for Self-Sustaining Services Rates are contingent upon approval by UW Management Nebula Managed Desktop $36.50 $39.90 Computer Monthly Nebula Hourly Support $109.00 $109.00 Hour Each

Kaminsky, Werner

317

Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

self-funding and covers its costs by selling its products and services. BPA markets wholesale electrical power from 31 federal hydro projects in the Columbia River Basin, one...

318

Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to deliver on its mission. BPA also funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River...

319

Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy and new technologies. The agency funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish & wildlife populations affected by federal hydropower development and operations in the...

320

Local Perspectives: Watershed Protection for Hickory Creek, Denton, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

standards Protect / enhance water quality Lake Lewisville Implement cost-effective practices to manage investments in management practices, based on location, cost effectiveness, and opportunities Design tools to ensure the good returns on investments (in the form of reduced or avoided pollutant loads) Explore market

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Idaho Model Watershed Project : Annual Report to the Bonneville Power Administration January 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Model Watershed Project was initiated in the fall of 1992 with a grant from Bonneville Power Administration. The objective of this project is to protect, enhance and restore anadromous and resident fish habitat and achieve and maintain a balance between resource protection and resource use on a holistic watershed basis.

Bradbury, Allen; Slavin, Katie

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

322

Landowner survey of a cost-share brush management program in two Texas watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Edwards Plateau of Texas. In the Blackland Prairie site, honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) was treated with chemicals, while brush in the Edwards Plateau site, which was a mixture of mesquite, ashe and redberry juniper (Juniperus spp.) and live oak... depressions to store the runoff, which allowed a considerable amount of water to percolate into the soil, thus reducing runoff. A subsequent study conducted in northeast Uvalde County, Texas, reviewed the effects of ashe junipers on the ET and runoff...

Narayanan, Christopher Ram

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Impacts of Land Managers' Decisions on Landuse Transition within Missisquoi Watershed Vermont  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nutrient loads across the Lake. The exceedingly high nutrient loads, particularly the phosphorous (P) loads sources for increasing phosphorous influxes into the Missisquoi Bay (Ghebremichael et al., 2010[4]; Gaddis

Vermont, University of

324

Managing watershed services of tropical forests and plantations: can meta-analyses help?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is also relevant to reservoirs for drinking water or hydroelectricity production (Guo et al., 2000). Over

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

325

Introduction to GIS and Geospatial Analysis Project Presentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GIS 551 Introduction to GIS and Geospatial Analysis Fall 2009 Project Presentation Date Presenter-03 Huiqing Li Yungfei Li Hydrological Analysis of Alto Watershed, Texas 12-03 Erica Lundberg Wes Ward T Fire Department Service Call Density and Location Analysis 12-10 Rachel Blodgett Kelly Searles SFA

Hung, I-Kuai

326

Modeling, Performance Analysis and Comparison of Two Level Single Chain Pointer Forwarding Strategy For Location Management in Wireless Mobile Communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global wireless networks enable mobile users to communicate regardless of their locations. Location management is an important part of the emerging wireless and mobile technology. A Personal Communication System (PCS) network must have an efficient way to keep track of the mobile users to deliver services effectively. Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) is a commonly accepted standard for mobility management of mobile users. Location management involves location tracking, and location information storage. Location management requires mobile users to register at various registration areas whenever they are on the move. The registration process may cause excessive signaling traffic and long service delays. To improve the efficiency of location tracking and avoid call set up delays, several strategies such as local anchor scheme, per-user caching scheme and several pointer forwarding schemes have been proposed in the past. In this paper, we propose a new "Two Level Single Chain Pointer Forwarding (TLSCP...

Kant, C R; Prakash, N; Kant, Chhaya Ravi; Prakash, Nupur

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

A comparative analysis of supply chain management practices by Boeing and Airbus : long-term strategic implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this research is to develop an improved understanding of supply chain management strategies and practices being pursued by Boeing and Airbus in the 787 Dreamliner and the A380 Navigator programs, respectively, ...

Horng, Tzu-Ching

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Tritium production analysis and management strategies for a Fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature test reactor (FHTR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Fluoride-salt-cooled High-temperature Test Reactor (FHTR) is a test reactor concept that aims to demonstrate the neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, materials, tritium management, and to address other reactor operational ...

Rodriguez, Judy N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers: Lampasas River Watershed Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas Water Resources Institute TR 441 April 2013 Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers L. Gregory, E. Casarez, J. Truesdale, G. Di Giovanni, R... Oxygen E. coli Escherichia coli EPA Environmental Protection Agency ERIC-PCR Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Sequence Polymerase Chain Reaction ERIC-RP ERIC-PCR and RiboPrinting Composite DNA Fingerprints LRW Leon River...

Gregory, L.; Casarez, E.; Truesdale, J.; Di Giovanni, G.; Owen, T.; Wolfe, J.

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

330

ABSTRACT: Water resource management in West Africa is often a complicated process due to inadequate resources, climatic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Volta River Basin include high popu- lation densities, population growth rate, poverty, watershed sizeABSTRACT: Water resource management in West Africa is often a complicated process due to inadequate Basin, West Africa.) Taylor, Joie C., Nick van de Giesen, and Tammo S. Steenhuis, 2006. West Africa

Walter, M.Todd

331

Diurnal evapotranspiration estimates in the Walnut River Watershed.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evapotranspiration is an essential component of the surface hydrological balance, but obtaining accurate estimates of the water vapor flux over large terrestrial areas can be difficult because of the substantial temporal and spatial variability in surface moisture conditions that can occur. This variability is often very large in the Great Plains and other portions of the Mississippi River Basin. Nevertheless, variations in soil moisture content, groundwater levels, and runoff in streams and rivers cannot be fully assessed without some knowledge of evapotranspiration rates. Here, observations made at the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), which is near Wichita, Kansas, and has an area of approximately 5000 km{sup 2}, are used to improve and test a modeling system that estimates long-term evapotranspiration with use of satellite remote sensing data with limited surface measurements. The techniques may be applied to much larger areas. As is shown in Fig. 1, the WRW is located in the Red River Basin and is enclosed by the southern Great Plains Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART) of the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The functional relationships involving the satellite data, surface parameters, and associated subgrid-scale fluxes are modeled in this study by the parameterization of subgrid-scale surface (PASS) fluxes scheme (Gao, 1995; Gao et al., 1998), which is used in a modified and improved form (PASS2). The advantage of this modeling system is that it can make effective use of satellite remote sensing data and can be run for large areas for which flux data do not exist and surface meteorological data are available from only a limited number of ground stations. In this study, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) or simple ratio (SR) and surface brightness temperature at each pixel for the WRW were derived from advanced very high resolution radiometers data collected by a ground station at Argonne National Laboratory from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's NOAA-12 and NOAA-14 satellites. The satellite data were subjected to atmospheric corrections for three intensive observation days of the 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97) experiment, which was conducted in cooperation with the Argonne Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) effort and the ARM Program.

Song, J.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

332

Temporal Land Cover Analysis for Net Ecosystem Improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We delineated 8 watersheds contributing to previously defined river reaches within the 1,468-km2 historical floodplain of the tidally influenced lower Columbia River and estuary. We assessed land-cover change at the watershed, reach, and restoration site scales by reclassifying remote-sensing data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Change Analysis Program’s land cover/land change product into forest, wetland, and urban categories. The analysis showed a 198.3 km2 loss of forest cover during the first 6 years of the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program, 2001–2006. Total measured urbanization in the contributing watersheds of the estuary during the full 1996-2006 change analysis period was 48.4 km2. Trends in forest gain/loss and urbanization differed between watersheds. Wetland gains and losses were within the margin of error of the satellite imagery analysis. No significant land cover change was measured at restoration sites, although it was visible in aerial imagery, therefore, the 30-m land-cover product may not be appropriate for assessment of early-stage wetland restoration. These findings suggest that floodplain restoration sites in reaches downstream of watersheds with decreasing forest cover will be subject to increased sediment loads, and those downstream of urbanization will experience effects of increased impervious surfaces on hydrologic processes.

Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

333

A macro-micro system architecture analysis framework applied to Smart Grid meter data management systems by Sooraj Prasannan.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis proposes a framework for architectural analysis of a system at the Macro and Micro levels. The framework consists of two phases -- Formulation and Analysis. Formulation is made up of three steps -- Identifying ...

Prasannan, Sooraj

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Behavioral analysis of sources of occupational stress and responses of middle-level managers in the Gulf Coast petrochemical industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A behavioral assessment interview procedure was used to identify sources of occupational stress, responses and effectiveness of these responses to stress. Seventy-three middle-level managers in three petrochemical companies in the Texas gulf area were interviewed. Six categories of stress were used to categorize the sources of stress obtained during the interview. The frequencies in sources of stress reported by managers were not significantly different among areas of the plants; however, there were significant differences among companies. The most frequent source of stress for all companies is factors intrinsic to the job. The responses the managers made to sources of stress were categorized. Some of the types of responses were: making new policy, seeking information, and not addressing the problem. Each manager rated the effectiveness of his response in terms of its ability to reduce stress. There is an advantage when subjects list their responses to stress and then rate the effectiveness of each response. In research of this type subjects do not consciously select their best response, but give their most frequent response and then rate its effectiveness. The results of this study indicate that the most frequent response to a source of stress and the most effective response in reducing stress are not always the same. The most frequent response is direct/delayed problem resolution, while the most effective response in reducing stress is prevention. There is a significant difference among the effectiveness ratings of middle-level managers' responses to stress. Not addressing the problem proved to be the least effective response in reducing middle-level managers' stress.

Richard, H.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Calibration of Watershed Models using Cloud Computing Marty Humphrey, Norm Beekwilder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.e. runoff from agricultural and urban lands to water bodies. This difference in scope introduces-- Understanding hydrologic systems at the scale of large watersheds and river basins is critically important to society when faced with extreme events, such as floods and droughts, or with concerns about water quality

Humphrey, Marty

336

Mi Tierra-Mi Mundo Immersive Real/Virtual Watershed Experiences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mi Tierra-Mi Mundo Immersive Real/Virtual Watershed Experiences * SMITHSONIAN LATINO VIRTUAL MUSEUM (proprietary and open source) Games (standalone game quests in Unity 3D- Mi Tierra-Mi Mundo) Interactive Game Website (microsite for Mi Tierra-Mi Mundo) Delete text and place photo here. LVMinteractive.org/3dgames

Mathis, Wayne N.

337

IMPACT OF MINE DRAINAGE AND DISTRIBUTION OF METAL LOADING SOURCES IN THE JAMES CREEK WATERSHED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Creek watershed contributes directly to the water supply for Jamestown, Colorado, a town the past several decades has led to widespread concern about the adverse effects that heavy mining has had on the environment. These effects are felt particularly in the form of water contamination from acid mine drainage

Ryan, Joe

338

4. Lower Oregon Columbia Gorge Tributaries Watershed 4.1 Subbasin Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Weather The watershed lies in the transition zone between the wet marine climate to the west and the dry continental climate to the east. Precipitation amounts vary dramatically from east to west and with elevation, wet meadows, dryland balds, riparian woodlands, and subalpine communities on the higher peaks

339

SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO Belanger, Laura (M.S., Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering) Source and Effect of Acid Rock (the weathering of disseminated pyrite) sources of acid rock drainage (ARD). Stream waters

340

Modeling Sediment and Wood Storage and Dynamics in Small Mountainous Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

85 Modeling Sediment and Wood Storage and Dynamics in Small Mountainous Watersheds Stephen T controls on supply and transport of sediment and wood in a small (approximately two square kilometers) basin in the Oregon Coast Range, typical of streams at the interface between episodic sediment and wood

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Report on the Watershed Monitoring Program at the Paducah Site January-December 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Watershed Monitoring of Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks has been conducted since 1987. The monitoring was conducted by the University of Kentucky between 1987 and 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of monitoring are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for DOE protect and maintain the use of Little Bayour and Big Bayou creeks for frowth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota. The watershed (biological) monitoring discussed in this report was conducted under DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. Future monitoring will be conducted as required by the Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit issued to the Department of Energy (DOE) in March 1998. A draft Watershed Monitoring Program plan was approved by the Kentucky Division of Water and will be finalized in 1999. The DOE permit also requires toxicity monitoring of one continuous outfall and of three intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The Watershed Monitoring Program for the Paducah Site during calendar year 1998 consisted of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of fish communities. This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from january 1998 to December 1998, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Determining watershed response in data poor environments with remotely sensed small reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

synthetic aperture radar satellite images. The model is based on the Thornthwaite-Mather procedure of water supplies at the local level, but may reduce the overall yield from a watershed. In the Volta basin by remotely measuring their surface areas and converting these measure- ments to volume estimates

Walter, M.Todd

343

Fine Sediment Sources in Coastal Watersheds with Uplifted Marine Terraces in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

County, California Stephen Sungnome Madrone1 and Andrew P. Stubblefield1 Abstract Erosion in the Mill and Luffenholtz Creek watersheds in Humboldt County, California, with their extensive clay soils, can lead to high) there is still the potential for creation of a dangerous by-product, chloro-tri- halomethanes that can remain

Standiford, Richard B.

344

Urban Influences on Stream Chemistry and Biology in the Big Brushy Creek Watershed, South Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and rural sites. Discharge of wastewater treatment plant effluent at one rural location caused an increase land cover. wastewater treatment plant 1 Introduction The expansion of urban land areas affects between urban and rural sites may indicate that urban development in the Big Brushy Creek watershed has

345

Hydrogeochemistry and rare earth element behavior in a volcanically acidified watershed in Patagonia, Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogeochemistry and rare earth element behavior in a volcanically acidified watershed and analyzed for major ions, trace metals, and rare earth elements (REE). The concentrations of REE in the Rio to oxidation of sulfide minerals. D 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Rare earth elements

Royer, Dana

346

San Francisco Estuary Institute Regional Watershed Program Concentrations and Loads of Mercury,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

San Francisco Estuary Institute Regional Watershed Program Concentrations and Loads of Mercury #12;McKee, Leatherbarrow, and Oram, 2005 i CONCENTRATIONS AND LOADS OF MERCURY, PCBs, AND OC. Concentrations and loads of mercury, PCBs, and OC pesticides in the lower Guadalupe River, San Jose, California

347

The British Columbia Watershed Restoration Program: Summary of the Experimental Design, Monitoring and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hillslopes to stream channels are restored, a also low-level treatment, where only hillslope restoration work a restoration program would be over a 4-8 year period, using 8-16 experimental stream triplets. AppropriateThe British Columbia Watershed Restoration Program: Summary of the Experimental Design, Monitoring

Keeley, Ernest R.

348

Uniting software tools for the archival, management and analysis of linguistic data: lessons from developing the Language Data Repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and data management, discuss some of the current projects and tools in each of these areas, and present a summary of work currently being conducted by the Open Language Archive Community to support open web based access to the resources available...

Audenaert, Michael Neal

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

349

Water quality improvements in the Upper North Bosque River watershed due to phosphorous export through turfgrass sod  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Clyde L. Munster The Upper North Bosque River (UNBR) watershed is under a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) mandate to reduce Phosphorus (P) due to excess nutrients in the watershed. To address... of the manure applied P. Plot and field scale research has demonstrated the effectiveness of turfgrass to remove manure phosphorus (P). In order to assess the impact of the turfgrass BMP on a watershed scale, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used...

Stewart, George Russell

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

350

Master of Science in Engineering and Technology Management Engineering Management Concentration Management of Technology Concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

514 Statistical Analysis for Six Sigma INEN 502 Operations Research Methods for Six Sigma INEN 502 Operations Research Methods INEN 518 Project Management MGMT 470 Personnel Management ENGR 566 Six Sigma and Quality

Selmic, Sandra

351

Engineering evaluation/cost analysis for the proposed management of 15 nonprocess buildings (15 series) at the Weldon Spring Site Chemical Plant, Weldon Spring, Missouri  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy, under its Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), is responsible for cleanup activities at the Weldon-Spring site, located near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: (1) a raffinate pits and chemical plant area and (2) a quarry. This engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) report has been prepared to support a proposed removal action to manage 15 nonprocess buildings, identified as the 15 Series buildings, at the chemical plant on the Weldon Spring site. These buildings have been nonoperational for more than 20 years, and the deterioration that has occurred during this time has resulted in a potential threat to site workers, the general public, and the environment. The EE/CA documentation of this proposed action is consistent with guidance from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that addresses removal actions at sites subject to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. Actions at the Weldon Spring site are subject to CERCLA requirements because the site is on the EPA`s National Priorities List. The objectives of this report are to (1) identify alternatives for management of the nonprocess buildings; (2) document the selection of response activities that will mitigate the potential threat to workers, the public, and the environment associated with these buildings; and (3) address environmental impacts associated with the proposed action.

MacDonell, M M; Peterson, J M

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Special Analysis of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methods and results of a special analysis (SA) of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The purpose of the SA is to determine if the approved performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA) (Shott et al., 2001) remain valid. The Area 3 RWMS PA and CA were prepared as a single document and received conditional approval on October 6, 1999. A conditional Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) for the Area 3 RWMS was issued on October 20, 1999. Since preparation of the approved PA and CA, new information and additional environmental monitoring data have been used to update the PA and CA. At the same time, continual advancements in computer processors and software have allowed improvement to the PA and CA models. Annual reviews of the PA and CA required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 435.1 have documented multiple changes occurring since preparation of the PA and CA. Potentially important changes include: Development of a new and improved baseline PA and CA model implemented in the probabilistic GoldSim simulation platform. A significant increase in the waste inventory disposed at the site. Revision and updating of model parameters based on additional years of site monitoring data and new research and development results. Although changes have occurred, many important PA/CA issues remain unchanged, including the site conceptual model, important features, events, and processes, and the points of compliance. The SA is performed to document the current status of the PA/CA model and to quantitatively assess the impact of cumulative changes on the PA and CA results. The results of the SA are used to assess the validity of the approved PA/CA and make a determination if revision of the PA or CA is necessary. The SA was performed using the Area 3 RWMS, version 2.102, GoldSim model, the current baseline PA/CA model. Comparison of the maximum SA results with the PA performance objectives indicates that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of compliance. The resident exposure scenario was evaluated for compliance with the air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives. The maximum mean air pathway TED, 7E-6 millisievert (mSv) at 1,000 years (y) has decreased relative to the approved PA and is significantly less than the 0.1 mSv limit. The maximum mean all-pathways annual TED, 7E-5 mSv at 1,000 y has increased but remains a small fraction of the 0.25 mSv limit. The SA maximum mean radon-222 (222Rn) flux density, 0.03 becquerel per square meter per second (Bq m-2 s-1), has increased relative to the PA results but is significantly less than the 0.74 Bq m-2 s-1 limit. The SA results continue to support a conclusion that the disposed waste inventory is protective of intruders and groundwater resources. The maximum mean intruder TED, 0.01 mSv for an acute construction scenario at the U-3ah/at disposal unit, was less than the 5 mSv performance measure. Site monitoring data and research results continue to support a conclusion that a groundwater pathway will not exist within the 1,000 y compliance period. Projected releases to the environment are a small fraction of the performance objectives. Cost-effective options for reducing releases further are unlikely to exist. Therefore, releases from the Area 3 RWMS are judged to be as low as reasonably achievable. Comparison of the maximum CA result with the 0.3 mSv CA dose constraint indicates that no action is required to reduce the dose from the Area 3 RWMS and all interacting sources of residual radioactive contamination. The SA maximum mean CA annual TED, 0.02 mSv at 1,000 y, has increased from the approved CA result but remains less than 10% of the dose constraint. The CA TED continues to be due predominantly to inhalation of plutonium-239 resuspended from soils contaminated by nuclear weapons tests conducted near the Area 3 RWMS. The SA results estimated with the Area 3 RWMS version 2.102 model indicate that changes to the PA and CA do not

National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

Accident analysis for the low-level mixed waste ``No-Flame`` option in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the various steps pursued in performing a generic safety assessment of the various technologies considered for the low-level mixed waste (LLMW) ``No-Flame`` option in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The treatment technologies for the ``No-Flame`` option differ from previous LLMW technologies analyzed in the WM PEIS in that the incineration and thermal desorption technologies are replaced by sludge washing, soil washing, debris washing, and organic destruction. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios were selected for analysis by means of a screening process. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented.

Folga, S.; Kohout, E.; Mueller, C.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Wilkins, B. [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (United States); Mishima, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Network Management Network Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that pertain to the operation, administration, maintenance, and provisioning of networked systems · Operation deals with keeping the network up (and the service provided by the network) · Administration involvesNetwork Management Pag. 1 Network Management Andrea Bianco Telecommunication Network Group Network

355

Integration of stream and watershed data for hydrologic modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-resolution datasets are required, vector datasets have an advantage because they would present the same amount of information that raster would, but the vector file size increase is not as significant as that of raster. The evolution of DEMs suggests... can also be attributed with non-spatial information. Only features of one shape type can be collected together for storage. These storage types can be classified as file- based storage (e.g. shapefiles and coverages) or DBMS (Database Management...

Koka, Srikanth

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

IRO INTERNAL MANAGEMENT Funded by the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management · OGPI approach · Information and Management Systems #12;· The analysis will be focus "tools" that improve the quality of the costs management: The Economic Management Tool (IntranetIRO INTERNAL MANAGEMENT - UA - Funded by the European Union 3rd Workshop: IROs Models Tunisia, 30

357

MANUFACTURING & SERVICE OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANUFACTURING & SERVICE OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Vol. 14, No. 4, Fall 2012, pp. 495­511 ISSN 1523 research directions, expanding upon the key points raised by Green [Green LV (2012) The vital role of operations analysis in improving healthcare delivery. Manufacturing Service Oper. Management 14

Boucherie, Richard J.

358

Erosion and Sediment Damages and Economic Impacts of Potential 208 Controls: A Summary of Five Watershed Studies in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report summarizes results of economic analyses of erosion and sedimentation in five agricultural watersheds in Texas (see fig. 1). Economic analyses of the study areas considered both the on-farm economics of soil conservation and the economic...

Taylor, C. R.; Reneau, D. R.; Harris, B. L.

359

Phase II Final Project Report Paso del Norte Watershed Council Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Paso del Norte Watershed Council The Coordinated Water Resources Database Technical Committee with funding support provided by the El Paso Water Utilities http://www.pdnwatershed.org The work documented in this report was supported in part...

Brown, Christopher; Sheng, Zhuping; Bourdon, Marc

360

Note to Teachers : A Tale of Two Watersheds: Land Use, Topography, and the Potential for Urban Expansion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note to Teachers : A Tale of Two Watersheds: Land Use, Topography, and the Potential for Urban the upward limit of geographical features such as pediments, fans and depositional features of ice and wind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Management (WFP) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

today and in the future. Management Responsible Contacts Thomas Wheeler Director, Workforce Analysis & Planning Division E-mail thomas.wheeler@hq.doe.gov Phone (202)...

362

Watershed characteristics contributing to the 1983-84 debris flows in the Wasatch Range, Davis County, Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATERSHED CHARACTERISTICS CONTRIBUTING TO THE 3. 983-84 DEBRIS FLOWS IN THE WASATCH RANGE, DAVIS COUNTY ?UTAH A Thesis by WILLIAM KEVIN COLEMAN Submitted to Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Geology WATERSHED CHARACTERISTICS CONTRIBUTING TO THE 1. 983 ? 84 DEBRIS FLOWS IN THE WASATCH RANGE, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH A Thesis by WILLIAM KEVIN COLEMAN Approved...

Coleman, William Kevin

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Human Factors Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) Application in the Evaluation of Management Risks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.3.1. Mechanisms of Prevention ............................................................................................... 11 2.4. Human Factors Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) ....................... 11 2.5. FMEA Components... ........................................................................................... 15 2.5.5. Risk Priority Number ....................................................................................................... 17 2.6. FMEA Model...

Soguilon, Nenita M.

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

364

Analysis of the low-level waste radionuclide inventory for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a study to improve the estimates of the radionuclides in the low-level radioactive waste (LLW) inventory which is buried in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The work is done to support the RWMC draft performance assessment (PA). Improved radionuclide inventory estimates are provided for the INEL LLW generators. Engineering, environmental assessment or other research areas may find use for the information in this report. It may also serve as a LLW inventory baseline for data quality assurance. The individual INEL LLW generators, their history and their activities are also described in detail.

Plansky, L.E.; Hoiland, S.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The prediction of sediment yields from small blackland watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pect rainf'all erosion. The equation is as follous'. A = RKLSCP share A = average annual soil loss in tons psr acre~ R = rainfall Pactor, K = soil erodibility Pactor, LS = length and steepness oP slope factor, 0 = cropping and management factor... and summer. The data utilized mere rocords of' recording raingagos~ runofP records, and records oP depth integrated sediment samples taken during sediment producing storms. The 205 storms selected Por the study varied in magnitude Prom 0. 43 0 2a ~g2...

Williams, Jimmy Ray

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Transmittal of the Calculation Package that Supports the Analysis of Performance of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Based 5-Cell Design Issued 8/14/09)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results of an assessment of the performance of a build-out of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The EMWMF configuration that was assessed includes the as-constructed Cells 1 through 4, with a groundwater underdrain that was installed beneath Cell 3 during the winter of 2003-2004, and Cell 5, whose proposed design is an Addendum to Remedial Design Report for the Disposal of Oak Ridge Reservation Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 Waste, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DOE/OR/01-1873&D2/A5/R1. The total capacity of the EMWMF with 5 cells is about 1.7 million cubic yards. This assessment was conducted to determine the conditions under which the approved Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the EMWMF found in the Attainment Plan for Risk/Toxicity-Based Waste Acceptance Criteria at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee [U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2001a], as revised for constituents added up to October 2008, would remain protective of public health and safety for a five-cell disposal facility. For consistency, the methods of analyses and the exposure scenario used to predict the performance of a five-cell disposal facility were identical to those used in the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) and its addendum (DOE 1998a, DOE 1998b) to develop the approved WAC. To take advantage of new information and design changes departing from the conceptual design, the modeling domain and model calibration were upaded from those used in the RI/FS and its addendum. It should be noted that this analysis is not intended to justify or propose a change in the approved WAC.

Williams M.J.

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

367

Interaction of watershed scale and pollutant transport pathways on pollutant concentrations in rivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive studies of pollutant concentrations during both storm runoff events and non-storm periods have been underway in Ohio tributaries to lake Erie since 1974. More than 60,000 samples have been collected using automatic samplers located at US Geological Survey stream gauging stations. Drainage areas at the collection stations range from 11 km{sup 2} to 16,400 km{sup 2}. Samples have been analyzed for suspended sediments, various particulate pollutants attached to suspended sediments, current generation herbicides, nitrates, and chlorides. In general, for pollutants derived from nonpoint sources, peak concentrations decrease as watershed size increases. However, the duration of exposures to intermediate concentrations increases with increasing watershed size. these effects are most evident for suspended solids and associated particulate contaminants. For pollutants derived primarily from surface runoff but not attached to suspended sediments, the effects of watershed size on peak concentrations are evident, but not as pronounced as for suspended sediments. For compounds such as nitrates, which enter streams largely through interflow or tile drainage, scale effects are least evident. These scale effects are most likely attributable to dilution accompanying storm water routing through drainage networks. Longitudinal dispersion may also affect concentration patterns. These scale effects systematically affect exposure patterns in different positions in drainage networks and must be considered in designing sampling programs to assess impacts of nonpoint pollution on contaminant concentration patterns and loadings.

Baker, D.; Richards, R.P.; Kramer, J.W. [Heidelberg Coll., Tiffin, OH (United States). Water Quality Lab.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Mulholland, P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

utilities and a few federal agencies. About 80 percent of this power comes from hydroelectric generation. The agency owns and operates three-fourths of the high-voltage...

370

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

utilities. About 80 percent of this power comes from hydroelectric generation. The agency owns and operates three-fourths of the high-voltage transmission lines in the region....

371

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to deliver that power. Today, BPA markets wholesale power from 31 federal hydroelectric projects, most of which are located in the Columbia River Basin. BPA also markets power from...

372

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for that power. Today, BPA markets wholesale power from 31 federal hydroelectric projects, most of which are located in the Columbia River Basin. BPA also markets power from Energy...

373

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power Administration is a federal agency under the Department of Energy. BPA markets wholesale electrical power from 31 federal hydroelectric projects owned and operated by the...

374

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is a federal agency under the Department of Energy. BPA mar all sys ts by selling wholesale power, transmission and related serv ribal d ergy and new technologies. The agency...

375

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy and new technologies. The agency funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by federal hydropower development and operations in...

376

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy and new technologies. The agency funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by federal hydropower development in the Columbia...

377

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy and new technologies. The agency funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish & wildlife populations affected by federal hydropower development and operations in the...

378

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy and new technologies. The agency funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River...

379

Managements Discussion and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy and new technologies. The agency funds regional efforts to protect and rebuild fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River...

380

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Title Economic and Hydrologic Analysis of Integrated Wetland Reservoir and Subirrigated State University 02 #12;the watershed. Wetlands, however, may provide a means of managing water quality

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NETL Research: Energy and Water Interface  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water and Energy Interface Power Plant Water Management Systems Analysis & Policy Support Regulatory Drivers In-house Watershed Science & Technology R&D Water and energy are...

382

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A strategic analysis study-based approach to integrated risk assessment: Occupational health risks from environmental restoration and waste management activities at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of environmental restoration and waste management activities is to reduce public health risks or to delay risks to the future when new technology will be available for improved cleanup solutions. Actions to remediate the wastes on the Hanford Site will entail risks to workers, the public, and the environment that do not currently exist. In some circumstances, remediation activities will create new exposure pathways that are not present without cleanup activities. In addition, cleanup actions will redistribute existing health risks over time and space, and will likely shift health risks to cleanup workers in the short term. This report describes an approach to occupational risk assessment based on the Hanford Strategic Analysis Study and illustrates the approach by comparing worker risks for two options for remediation of N/K fuels, a subcategory of unprocessed irradiated fuels at Hanford.

Mahaffey, J.A.; Doctor, P.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Glantz, C.S.; Daling, P.M.; Sever, L.E.; Vargo, G.J. Jr.; Strachan, D.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Pajunen, A.L.; Hoyt, R.C.; Ludowise, J.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Emerging Issues in Wetland Loss Mitigation: A Policy Analysis in the Tar-Pamlico Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and applying a watershed approach in directing development toward areas of least environmental damage. #12;T submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Environmental Management degree a system for environmental decision makers to weigh available science, stakeholder input, and economic

385

Master of Science in Engineering and Technology Management Engineering Management Concentration Management of Technology Concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INEN 514 Statistical Analysis for Six Sigma INEN 509 Economics INEN 514 Statistical Analysis for Six Sigma Electives (Pick 5 Courses) 15 566 Six Sigma and Quality Control MGMT 510 Contemporary Management

Selmic, Sandra

386

Program Areas Nutrient Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grant University System. For example: · Stream Restoration Training and Demonstration-on experience to plan, design, construct, and evaluate stream restoration projects to improve water quality and Restoration Watershed Assessment and Modeling The Project promotes regional collaboration, enhances delivery

387

SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT  

Energy Savers [EERE]

0-1 CHAPTER 10 SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT (Revised October 19, 2011) WHAT ARE THE BASIC PRINCIPLES AND OBJECTIVES OF SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT? 1. To ensure contractors establish,...

388

Reducing methylmercury accumulation in the food webs of San Francisco Bay and its local watersheds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and its local watersheds present an interesting case study in estuarine mercury (Hg) contamination. This review focuses on the most promising avenues for attempting to reduce methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in Bay Area aquatic food webs and identifying the scientific information that is most urgently needed to support these efforts. Concern for human exposure to MeHg in the region has led to advisories for consumption of sport fish. Striped bass from the Bay have the highest average Hg concentration measured for this species in USA estuaries, and this degree of contamination has been constant for the past 40 years. Similarly, largemouth bass in some Bay Area reservoirs have some of the highest Hg concentrations observed in the entire US. Bay Area wildlife, particularly birds, face potential impacts to reproduction based on Hg concentrations in the tissues of several Bay species. Source control of Hg is one of the primary possible approaches for reducing MeHg accumulation in Bay Area aquatic food webs. Recent findings (particularly Hg isotope measurements) indicate that the decades-long residence time of particle-associated Hg in the Bay is sufficient to allow significant conversion of even the insoluble forms of Hg into MeHg. Past inputs have been thoroughly mixed throughout this shallow and dynamic estuary. The large pool of Hg already present in the ecosystem dominates the fraction converted to MeHg and accumulating in the food web. Consequently, decreasing external Hg inputs can be expected to reduce MeHg in the food web, but it will likely take many decades to centuries before those reductions are achieved. Extensive efforts to reduce loads from the largest Hg mining source (the historic New Almaden mining district) are underway. Hg is spread widely across the urban landscape, but there are a number of key sources, source areas, and pathways that provide opportunities to capture larger quantities of Hg and reduce loads from urban runoff. Atmospheric deposition is a lower priority for source control in the Bay Area due to a combination of a lack of major local sources. Internal net production of MeHg is the dominant source of MeHg that enters the food web. Controlling internal net production is the second primary management approach, and has the potential to reduce food web MeHg in some habitats more effectively and within a much shorter time-frame. Controlling net MeHg production and accumulation in the food web of upstream reservoirs and ponds is very promising due to the many features of these ecosystems that can be manipulated. The most feasible control options in tidal marshes relate to the design of flow patterns and subhabitats in restoration projects. Options for controlling MeHg production in open Bay habitat are limited due primarily to the highly dispersed distribution of Hg throughout the ecosystem. Other changes in these habitats may also have a large influence on food web MeHg, including temperature changes due to global warming, sea level rise, food web alterations due to introduced species and other causes, and changes in sediment supply. Other options for reducing or mitigating exposure and risk include controlling bioaccumulation, cleanup of contaminated sites, and reducing other factors (e.g., habitat availability) that limit at-risk wildlife populations.

Davis, J.A., E-mail: jay@sfei.org [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Looker, R.E. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); Yee, D. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Marvin-Di Pasquale, M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Grenier, J.L. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Austin, C.M. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); McKee, L.J.; Greenfield, B.K. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Brodberg, R. [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States)] [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States); Blum, J.D. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Joint Seminar Risk Management Institute &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joint Seminar Risk Management Institute & Department of Decision Sciences Details of Seminar Date and statistics is leading to a greatly broadened theory of regression which draws on tools of convex analysis with factor analysis in finance and economics. Risk Management Institute Joint Seminar #12;

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

390

Supplement analysis for a container system for the management of DOE spent nuclear fuel located at the INEEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing the NEPA, 40 CFR 1502.9 (c), directs federal agencies to prepare a supplement to an environmental impact statement when an agency makes substantial changes in the Proposed Action that are relevant to environmental concerns, or there are significant new circumstances or information relevant to environmental concerns and bearing on the Proposed Action or impacts. When it is unclear whether a supplemental environmental impact statement is required, DOE regulations (10 CFR 1021.314) direct the preparation of a supplement analysis to assist in making that determination. This supplement analysis evaluates the impacts of employing dual-purpose canisters (DPCs) to prepare DOE SNF located at the INEEL for interim onsite storage and transport outside the State of Idaho. Impacts associated with DPC manufacturing, loading and storage of DOE-ID SNF into DPCs, transport of loaded DPCs outside Idaho, and the cumulative impacts are compared with the impacts previously analyzed in the SNF and INEL EIS and the Navy Container System EIS. This SA provides information to determine whether: (1) an existing EIS should be supplemented; (2) a new EIS should be prepared; or (3) no further NEPA documentation is required.

NONE

1999-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

391

In: Annals of Operations Research, published online before print December 12, DOI: 10.1007/s10479-009-0678-1 On a Risk Management Analysis of Oil Spill Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrated on assessing the safety of individual vessels or marine structures, such as nuclear powered-009-0678-1 1 On a Risk Management Analysis of Oil Spill Risk using Maritime Transportation System Simulation ,J to be dockside? Is oil transportation risk reduced by lowering wind restrictions from 45 to 35 knots

van Dorp, Johan René

392

Conference Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish requirements and responsibilities with respect to managing conferences sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) or by DOE management and operating contractors and other contractors who perform work at DOE-owned or -leased facilities, including management and integration contractors and environmental restoration management contractors (when using funds that will be reimbursed by DOE). Cancels DOE N 110.3.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

393

Automotive Underhood Thermal Management Analysis Using 3-D Coupled Thermal-Hydrodynamic Computer Models: Thermal Radiation Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the radiation modeling effort was to develop and implement a radiation algorithm that is fast and accurate for the underhood environment. As part of this CRADA, a net-radiation model was chosen to simulate radiative heat transfer in an underhood of a car. The assumptions (diffuse-gray and uniform radiative properties in each element) reduce the problem tremendously and all the view factors for radiation thermal calculations can be calculated once and for all at the beginning of the simulation. The cost for online integration of heat exchanges due to radiation is found to be less than 15% of the baseline CHAD code and thus very manageable. The off-line view factor calculation is constructed to be very modular and has been completely integrated to read CHAD grid files and the output from this code can be read into the latest version of CHAD. Further integration has to be performed to accomplish the same with STAR-CD. The main outcome of this effort is to obtain a highly scalable and portable simulation capability to model view factors for underhood environment (for e.g. a view factor calculation which took 14 hours on a single processor only took 14 minutes on 64 processors). The code has also been validated using a simple test case where analytical solutions are available. This simulation capability gives underhood designers in the automotive companies the ability to account for thermal radiation - which usually is critical in the underhood environment and also turns out to be one of the most computationally expensive components of underhood simulations. This report starts off with the original work plan as elucidated in the proposal in section B. This is followed by Technical work plan to accomplish the goals of the project in section C. In section D, background to the current work is provided with references to the previous efforts this project leverages on. The results are discussed in section 1E. This report ends with conclusions and future scope of work in section F.

Pannala, S; D'Azevedo, E; Zacharia, T

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

394

A technical, financial, and policy analysis of the RAMSES RFID inventory management system for NASA's International Space Station: prospects for SBIR/STTR technology infusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering, management, and social science methodologies have been employed to analyze a new asset tracking and management system for human spaceflight applications. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Aurora ...

Grindle, Abraham T

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

MASTERS REPORT ANALYSIS AND MODELING OF ACID NEUTRALIZING CAPACITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

itself against acidification and is used to monitor the effect of acid rain on watersheds. From 1993MASTERS REPORT ANALYSIS AND MODELING OF ACID NEUTRALIZING CAPACITY IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS UNIVERSITY #12;ABSTRACT Acid Neutralizing Capacity (ANC) is a measure of a solution's ability to buffer

396

DISSERTATION FREQUENCY ANALYSIS AND TWO-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements For the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy Colorado State University Spring 2006 #12;COLORADO STATE ON A LARGE WATERSHED BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY of extreme floods and probabilities are needed in hydrologic engineering and in risk analysis to assess

Julien, Pierre Y.

397

Refining Landscape Change Models through Outlier Analysis in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Refining Landscape Change Models through Outlier Analysis in the Muskegon Watershed of Michigan significantly to the state economy, accounting for nearly 20% of its economic output (Michigan Land Use, 1965; Lee, 1973; Wegener, 1994), and model refinement/advancement, in large part due to advances

Walker, Robert T.

398

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sediment Damage in the Duck Creek Watershed, Dickens County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and voluntary policies are considered. Economic impacts examined include: (a) impacts of the policies on farm income; (b) government costs associated with the policies, including administration costs; (c) off-site sediment damages that would be abated; and (d...

Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.; Lacewell, R.D.; Mueller, P. E.

399

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis area watersheds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Hardin Hall, University of Nebraska Source: Nebraska-Lincoln, University of - Sand Hills Biocomplexity Project Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 34 Rainfall...

400

Potential impacts of global climate change on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

run at a daily time step in “water balance mode” at a 1/8 byBased Model of Land Surface Water and Energy Fluxes forwere obtained from the Surface Water Modeling Group at the

Das, Tapash; Dettinger, Michael D; Cayan, Daniel R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

An economic analysis of a large scale ashe juniper clearing project in the Leon River watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...............................................................................6 Study Objectives .......................................................................................7 Study Area ................................................................................................7 II LITERATURE REVIEW.......................................................................40 6 Distribution for pasture size (ha) represented by LRRP participants.. ..... 40 7 Percentage of total area for each land use category represented by the LRRP...

Flack, Rebecca Lynn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Flood forecasting with the A&M watershed model: a hydrometeorological study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'c 219R'? 67. 6R ' "' 66. 5R'w 204Rc o 205R' " ) 3PPR~? 450R' '" j 184R' '" 278R"'" 240R'""' 176R'" 15 I R "' 179R'" 227n'o 17 8R "c 150R"" 137R' "" 330R'? 298R''" ) 520Rwo 730Rcn ) 255R' " 426R' 'c Sal'man (1957) Shupiatskii (1957... procedure. The rain gage locations reporting valid data within or near the watershed boundary are identified. The rainfall measured by each gage is compared to the amount measured by the radar at the gage location. If the measured rainfall exceeds a...

Robinson, Cedric Glynn

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

The Bachelor of Management degree in Management Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses in length. Admission to the Faculty may occur at the end of Year One. Students are required to have the following courses for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bachelor of Management degree in Management Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses ManagementInformationSystems Name: __________________________________________________________ ID 4840 - Systems Analysis Management 4841 - Systems Design One of: Management 3380 - Technological Change

Seldin, Jonathan P.

404

Special Analysis of Transuranic Waste in Trench T04C at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Special Analysis (SA) was prepared to assess the potential impact of inadvertent disposal of a limited quantity of transuranic (TRU) waste in classified Trench 4 (T04C) within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is a low-level radioactive waste disposal site in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is regulated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under DOE Order 435.1 and DOE Manual (DOE M) 435.1-1. The primary objective of the SA is to evaluate if inadvertent disposal of limited quantities of TRU waste in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 RWMS is in compliance with the existing, approved Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued under DOE M 435.1-1. In addition, supplemental analyses are performed to determine if there is reasonable assurance that the requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, can be met. The 40 CFR 191 analyses provide supplemental information regarding the risk to human health and the environment of leaving the TRU waste in T04C. In 1989, waste management personnel reviewing classified materials records discovered that classified materials buried in trench T04C at the Area 5 RWMS contained TRU waste. Subsequent investigations determined that a total of 102 55-gallon drums of TRU waste from Rocky Flats were buried in trench T04C in 1986. The disposal was inadvertent because unclassified records accompanying the shipment indicated that the waste was low-level. The exact location of the TRU waste in T04C was not recorded and is currently unknown. Under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.5, low-level waste disposal facilities must obtain a DAS. The DAS specifies conditions that must be met to operate within the radioactive waste management basis, consisting of a performance assessment (PA), composite analysis (CA), closure plan, monitoring plan, waste acceptance criteria, and a PA/CA maintenance plan. The DOE issued a DAS for the Area 5 RWMS in 2000. The Area 5 RWMS DAS was, in part, based on review of a CA as required under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.(3). A CA is a radiological assessment required for DOE waste disposed before 26 September 1988 and includes the radiological dose from all sources of radioactive material interacting with all radioactive waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS. The approved Area 5 RWMS CA, which includes the inventory of TRU waste in T04C, indicates that the Area 5 RWMS waste inventory and all interacting sources of radioactive material can meet the 0.3 mSv dose constraint. The composite analysis maximum annual dose for a future resident at the Area 5 RWMS was estimated to be 0.01 mSv at 1,000 years. Therefore, the inadvertent disposal of TRU in T04C is protective of the public and the environment, and compliant with all the applicable requirements in DOE M 435.1-1 and the DAS. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated 40 CFR 191 to establish standards for the planned disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high level, and transuranic wastes in geologic repositories. Although not required, the National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office requested a supplemental analysis to evaluate the likelihood that the inadvertent disposal of TRU waste in T04C meets the requirements of 40 CFR 191. The SA evaluates the likelihood of meeting the 40 CFR 191 containment requirements (CRs), assurance requirements, individual protection requirements (IPRs), and groundwater protection standards. The results of the SA indicate that there is a reasonable expectation of meeting all the requirements of 40 CFR 191. The conclusion of the SA is that the Area 5 RWMS with the TRU waste buried in T04C is in compliance with all requirements in DOE M 435.1-1 and the DAS. Compliance with the DAS is demonstrated by the results of the Area 5 RWMS CA. Supplemental analyses in the SA indicate there is a

Greg Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Integrated Brush Management Systems for Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Brush Management Systems (IBMS) involve careful analysis of range resources and ranch goals in order to develop solutions to brush problems. Successful use of IBMS should result in improved management processes and greater profitability...

Hanselka, C. Wayne; Hamilton, Wayne T.; Rector, Barron S.

2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

406

Project Management Plan Resident Management System (RMS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Project Management Plan Resident Management System (RMS) And Quality Control System (QCS Resident Management System.........................................................................................................3 Project Management Plan - Purpose

US Army Corps of Engineers

407

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Oak...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management Managers perform an annual...

408

In 2005, Oregon State University established the Institute for Water and Watersheds as the hub for water-related  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2005, Oregon State University established the Institute for Water and Watersheds as the hub 541-737-4032 The State Water Resources Research Institute for Oregon IWW funded a graduate student Winter Water Film Series to a packed house and to the 2009 State Legislature. It is currently scheduled

Escher, Christine

409

Governance of the NHD and WBD By design, and in practice, the National Hydrography Dataset and Watershed Boundary Dataset are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dataset and Watershed Boundary Dataset are governed in a collaborative process consisting Agency jointly designed a hydrography feature dataset for nationwide use by all agencies in an effort number of stakeholders to ensure a "best fit" dataset that would meet as many needs as possible

Torgersen, Christian

410

The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed, Washington, to evaluate the effects of nutrient enhancement on measures of stream and fish production. We compared low level water chemistry, water quality, and periphyton, insect, and fish production

411

SOURCES OF FINE-GRAINED SUSPENDED SEDIMENT IN MILL STREAM BRANCH WATERSHED, CORSICA RIVER BASIN, A TRIBUTARY TO THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affected the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem (Phillips, 2002). In order to reduce sediment and nutrients Corsica River Basin from the State's impaired water bodies (303D) list (http://www.dnr.state.md.us watershed, the largest estuary in the United States, was listed as an "impaired water body" in 2000 under

412

Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering, UNL Background Concerns about water use have intensified and Republican River Basins, and the implementation of LB 962. To understand water use it is helpful to consider

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

413

Quantification of Water Quality Improvement in Sandy Creek, A Tributary Watershed of Jordan Lake in the Cape Fear River Basin,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Cape Fear River Basin, After Stream and Riparian Restoration and Wetland Treatment Cell Creation: Final to restoration. The Duke Forest Stream and Wetlands Restoration was established to rectify these problems delivery following watershed development, a three-phase stream and floodplain restoration was planned

414

NAME: Green Gulch Creek Stream Restoration Project LOCATION: Redwood Creek Watershed in Marin County, CA (closest town is Muir Beach)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAME: Green Gulch Creek Stream Restoration Project LOCATION: Redwood Creek Watershed in Marin County, CA (closest town is Muir Beach) ACRES: 1.5 acres riparian habitat; 0.3 miles of stream channel-modified, straightened, and downcut channel; relocate the farm road and fences paralleling the stream to provide

US Army Corps of Engineers

415

MBA Concentration in Analytics & Information Management A I M : Analytics & Information Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MBA Concentration Management Science and Information Systems Michael N. Katehakis, Chair Douglas Jones Sampling 16:540:580 Quality Management Take 3 courses from Area 2 and 1 course from Area 1. 5 / 9 #12;MBA Process Analysis Manager of Information System Analysis Health Care Revenue Cycle Consultant Investment

Lin, Xiaodong

416

Financial Management: The Key to Farm-Firm Business Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Those who succeed will manage their operations as farm/ranch businesses, with more emphasis on recordkeeping, planning, profitability analysis and repayment-based financing, and with better production and business monitoring and controls...

Pena, Jose G.; Klinefelter, Danny A.

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

417

Monitoring informs management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improved regional monitoring and reporting of greenhouse-gas emissions depends on accurate estimates of emissions from different land-use regimes. An analysis suggests that measuring emissions per crop yield may be an optimum metric for refining land-management decisions.

West, Tristram O.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

418

Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowellfor

419

Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund Las ConchasTrail5,722,326 SiteMammalianBudget |

420

Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Neutron Products Incorporated Sealed Source Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this special analysis (SA) is to determine if the Neutron Products Incorporated (NPI) Sealed Sources waste stream (DRTK000000056, Revision 0) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The NPI Sealed Sources waste stream consists of 850 60Co sealed sources (Duratek [DRTK] 2013). The NPI Sealed Sources waste stream requires a special analysis (SA) because the waste stream 60Co activity concentration exceeds the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels.

Shott, Gregory

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Supplemental analysis of accident sequences and source terms for waste treatment and storage operations and related facilities for the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents supplemental information for the document Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities for Waste Generated by US Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. Additional technical support information is supplied concerning treatment of transuranic waste by incineration and considering the Alternative Organic Treatment option for low-level mixed waste. The latest respirable airborne release fraction values published by the US Department of Energy for use in accident analysis have been used and are included as Appendix D, where respirable airborne release fraction is defined as the fraction of material exposed to accident stresses that could become airborne as a result of the accident. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios was selected for a screening-process analysis. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented.

Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Kohout, E.; Mishima, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems Presented by: Michael Marti SRF for implementing and monitoring research results (RIC) #12;LRRB Pavement Management Systems LRRB Structure LRRB Current Pavement Management System Used ICON (Goodpointe) Year of Pavement Management System

Minnesota, University of

423

Environmental Management (WFP) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and in the future. Environmental Management Responsible Contacts Thomas Wheeler Director, Workforce Analysis & Planning Division E-mail thomas.wheeler@hq.doe.gov Phone (202)...

424

White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 1 Main Text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Remedial Investigation (RI) report is to present an analysis of the Melton Valley portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, which will enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of cost-effective remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. In this RI existing levels of contamination and radiological exposure are compared to levels acceptable for future industrial and potential recreational use levels at the site. This comparison provides a perspective for the magnitude of remedial actions required to achieve a site condition compatible with relaxed access restrictions over existing conditions. Ecological risk will be assessed to evaluate measures required for ecological receptor protection. For each subbasin, this report will provide site-specific analyses of the physical setting including identification of contaminant source areas, description of contaminant transport pathways, identification of release mechanisms, analysis of contaminant source interactions with groundwater, identification of secondary contaminated media associated with the source and seepage pathways, assessment of potential human health and ecological risks from exposure to contaminants, ranking of each source area within the subwatershed, and outline the conditions that remedial technologies must address to stop present and future contaminant releases, prevent the spread of contamination and achieve the goal of limiting environmental contamination to be consistent with a potential recreational use of the site.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Senior Technical Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Senior Technical Safety Manager FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Senior Technical Safety Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard Gap...

426

Position Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order prescribes the policies, responsibilities, and procedures for position management within (DOE). Canceled by DOE N 1321.140. Cancels DOE 3510.1

1992-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

427

Water Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Management This department applies multi-disciplinary science and technology-based modeling to assess complex environmental systems. It integrates ecology, anthropology, and...

428

Program Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will participate in a wide spectrum of program and project management activities involving systems engineering and integration support for Defense Programs...

429

MANAGEMENT (MNG)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and recommendations is adequately implemented. (DOE Order 414.1A, Criterion 3; 10 CFR 830, Subpart A) Approach Record Review * Review the SWS issues management systems and...

430

Quality Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Quality Management, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security develops policies and procedures to ensure the classification and control of information is effective and...

431

South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1999, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) began a program aimed at conserving the genetically pure populations of westslope cutthroat trout in the South Fork Flathead River drainage. The objective of this program is to eliminate all of the exotic and hybrid trout that threaten the genetically pure westslope cutthroat populations in the South Fork Flathead. The exotic and hybrid trout populations occur in several headwater lakes and their outflow streams. In 2001 MFWP released a draft environmental assessment, pursuant to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), that addressed the use of motorized equipment to deliver personnel and materials to some of these lakes in the Bob Marshall and Great Bear Wildernesses (Grisak 2001). After a 30-day public comment period, MFWP determined that the complexity of issues was too great and warranted a more detailed analysis. These issues included transportation options for personnel, equipment and materials, the use of motorized equipment in wilderness, fish removal methods, fish stocking, and the status and distribution of amphibian populations in the project area. Because the program also involves the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the environmental analysis needs to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In October 2001, pursuant to NEPA, MFWP, along with the USFS and BPA initiated an environmental assessment to address these issues. In June 2002, the three agencies determined that the scope of these issues warranted an Environmental Impact Statement. This specialist report describes the logistical, technical and biological issues associated with this project and provides an analysis of options for fish removal, transportation and fish stocking. It further analyzes issues and concerns associated with amphibian populations and creating new domesticated stocks of westslope cutthroat trout. Finally, this document provides a description of each lake, the best method of fish removal that would achieve the goals of the project, logistics for carrying out the fish removal, and the immediate management direction for each lake following fish removal. The USFS is preparing a specialist report detailing land management issues that relate to National Forest, designated Hiking Areas, and Wilderness. Information from these two documents will be used by BPA to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement.

Grisak, Grant; Marotz, Brian

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Demonstration and analysis of tangible heritage management strategy using geographical information systems for the city of Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. But the second direction is lacking good strategic efforts for conservation, preservation methods and tourism promotion, especially among different authorities that are in charge of either management or implementation of conservation techniques. Therefore...

Al Zaabi, Azza Hasan

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

433

Use of Metering for Facility and Whole Building Energy Analysis by the U.S. Depratment of Energy Federal Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper details how the U.S. Department of Energy, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is applying metering technology to conduct empirically based analyses o f energy use by federal agencies. Continuing developments in sensors, data...

Devine, K. D.; Mazzucchi, R. P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Requirements Identification, Analysis and Measurement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis, and Management adds detail and rigor to the Mission Analysis output by: Refining the initial customer input into formal Customer Requirements Identifying any...

435

BachelorofManagement InternationalManagement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the official transcript (see Part 11 - Faculty of Management in the 2007/2008 Calendar). Program Planning Guide Management 3050/Political Science 3420 - Human Resource Management Management 3061 - Information Systems Environment Management 3640 - Cross-Cultural Management Practices Management 3660/Geography 3225 - Industrial

Seldin, Jonathan P.

436

Traffic Management System Performance November 11, 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traffic Management System Performance November 11, 2002 David Levinson1 Wei Chen2 Department uses regression analysis to evaluate long-run traffic management system performance. Three important traffic management systems in the Twin Cities metro area - Ramp Metering, Variable Message Signs (VMS

Levinson, David M.

437

Fuzzy Typing for Document Management Alison HUETTNER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuzzy Typing for Document Management Alison HUETTNER Clairvoyance Corporation 5301 Fifth Avenue method of document analysis and management, based on a combination of techniques from NLP and fuzzy logic typing for document management. The fuzzy typing approach is general in scope and can be applied to many

Wu, Dekai

438

Earned Value Management Essentials 14 hours, $895  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earned Value Management Essentials 14 hours, $895 A growing demand for Earned Value Management (EVM in the tenets of work planned, work accomplished, and actual work cost. Earned Value terminology, formulae Management Analysis and Reporting 14 hours, $895 Government agencies and companies doing business

Fork, Richard

439

Business Process Management: A Comprehensive Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Business Process Management: A Comprehensive Survey Wil M.P. van der Aalst Department. Business Process Management (BPM) research resulted in a plethora of methods, techniques, and tools to support the design, enactment, management, and analysis of operational business processes. This survey

Aalst, W.M.P.van der

440

Assessment of Water Resources in A Humid Watershed and A Semi-arid Watershed; Neches River Basin, TX and Canadian River Basin, NM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water is the most important resource on Earth. Climate and land cover changes are two important factors that directly influenced water resources. This research provides important information for water resources management and contributes...

Heo, Joonghyeok

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Integrated Modeling and Decision-Support System for Water Management in the Puget Sound Basin: Snow Caps to White Caps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Report for the EPA-sponsored project Snow Caps to White Caps that provides data products and insight for water resource managers to support their predictions and management actions to address future changes in water resources (fresh and marine) in the Puget Sound basin. This report details the efforts of a team of scientists and engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) to examine the movement of water in the Snohomish Basin, within the watershed and the estuary, under present and future conditions, using a set of linked numerical models.

Copping, Andrea E.; Yang, Zhaoqing; Voisin, Nathalie; Richey, Jeff; Wang, Taiping; Taira, Randal Y.; Constans, Michael; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Tesfa, Teklu K.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Environmental Management of Grazing Lands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacteria levels are the number one cause of water quality impairment in Texas. Several recent Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) in Texas, such as those implemented in the Peach Creek and Leon River watersheds, have identified grazing cattle as a...

Wagner, K.; Redmon, L.; Gentry, T.; Harmel, D.; Jones, C. A.

443

Biomonitoring of fish communities, using the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) in Rabbit Creek-Cat Creek Watershed, Summer 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) is a method for evaluating the health of water bodies and watersheds by analyzing sample catches of fishes. Sites are scored on a numerical scale of 12--60 and on that basis assigned to a ``bioclass`` ranging from ``very poor`` to ``excellent.`` Overall, the major causes of depressed IBI scores in the Rabbit Creek watershed would appear to be: Organic pollution, mostly from livestock, but also from agricultural runoff and possible septic tank failures; sedimentation, principally from stream bank damage by cattle, also possibly from agriculture and construction; toxic pollution from agrochemicals applied to Holly Springs Golf course and agricultural fields` and Warming of water and evaporation loss due to elimination of shade on stream banks and construction of ponds.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Prong Features Detection of a 3D Model Based on the Watershed Algorithm Bing-Yu Chen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

detection, the water level decreases iteratively from the maximum value. The decreas- ing level effects is not in the traversed set, it is a new prong feature. The pseudo code is as follows: e-mail:{joyce, liang}@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw e-mail:robin@ntu.edu.tw e-mail:ming@csie.ntu.edu.tw Function watershed algorithm V =sort (S); //if

Ouhyoung, Ming

445

The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND ASSOCIATED MODELS DEVELOPED FOR THE PASO DEL NORTE WATERSHED MODFLOW – MODULAR Three-Dimensional Finite-Difference Groundwater FLOW Model MODFLOW is a modular, three-dimensional, finite-difference, groundwater flow model that numerically solves... the three-dimensional groundwater flow equation for a porous medium by using a finite-difference method (Harbaugh et al. 2000; McDonald and Harbaugh 1988). MODFLOW simulates steady and transient (nonsteady) flow in an irregularly shaped flow system...

Sheng, Zhuping; Tillery, Sue; King, Phillip J.; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo

446

Changes in ecosystem services and runoff due to land use change in the watersheds of San Antonio, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

services. Barbier (1994) identified wetland ecosystem services as prevention of storm damage, flood and water flow control, support of fisheries, nutrient and waste absorption, recreation and water transport, agriculture, wildlife products, wood products...CHANGES IN ECOSYSTEM SERVICES AND RUNOFF DUE TO LAND USE CHANGE IN THE WATERSHEDS OF SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS A Thesis by HEATHER GRACE HARRIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Harris, Heather Grace

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Forms Management Guide for use with DOE O 200.1, Information Management Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides guidance for the development, analysis, approval, and management of forms in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). No cancellations.

2000-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

448

Risk Management Procedures Category: Strategic Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/POLICY SUPPORTED Risk Management Policy Tertiary Education Quality Standards Agency Act 2011 (TEQSA Act 2011) 21 Risk Management Procedures Category: Strategic Management 1. LEGISLATION/ENTERPRISE AGREEMENT. PROCEDURAL DETAILS 2.1. Responsibilities Entity / Officer Responsibilities Planning and Management Committee

449

Stormwater A Toolbox for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impairment, source iden tification, trend analysis, determination of best management practice (BMP) effectiveness, storm- water quality monitoring for NPDES Phase I and II#12;Stormwater Effects Handbook A Toolbox for Watershed Managers, Scientists, and Engineers #12

Pitt, Robert E.

450

Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Water Resources Restoration Program for Fiscal Year 2009, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP) was established by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1996 to implement a consistent approach to long-term environmental monitoring across the ORR. The WRRP has four principal objectives: (1) to provide the data and technical analysis necessary to assess the performance of completed Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) actions on the ORR; (2) to perform monitoring to establish a baseline against which the performance of future actions will be gauged and to support watershed management decisions; (3) to perform interim-status and post-closure permit monitoring and reporting to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) requirements; and (4) to support ongoing waste management activities associated with WRRP activities. Water quality projects were established for each of the major facilities on the ORR: East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including Bethel Valley and Melton Valley; and the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex or Y-12), including Bear Creek Valley (BCV), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC), and Chestnut Ridge. Off-site (i.e., located beyond the ORR boundary) sampling requirements are also managed as part of the Y-12 Water Quality Project (YWQP). Offsite locations include those at Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC), the Clinch River/Poplar Creek (CR/PC), and Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR). The Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) South Campus Facility (SCF) is also included as an 'off-site' location, although it is actually situated on property owned by DOE. The administrative watersheds are shown in Fig. A.l (Appendix A). The WRRP provides a central administrative and reporting function that integrates and coordinates the activities of the water quality projects, including preparation and administration of the WRRP Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP). A brief summary is given of the organization of the SAP appendices, which provide the monitoring specifics and details of sampling and analytical requirements for each of the water quality programs on the ORR. Section 2 of this SAP provides a brief overview and monitoring strategy for the ETTP. Section 3 discusses monitoring strategy for Bethel Valley, and Melton Valley background information and monitoring strategy is provided in Section 4. BCV and UEFPC monitoring strategies are presented in Sect. 5 and 6, respectively. Section 7 provides background information and monitoring strategy for all off-site locations.

Ketelle R.H.

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

451

Conference Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for managing conferences sponsored or co-sponsored by the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 110.3. Canceled by DOE N 251.97.

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

452

Project Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a project manager in the Fuel Cell Technologies Office in the DOE-EERE Office of Transportation responsible for a wide variety of highly...

453

Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as ``Whiteoak`` Creek).

Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as Whiteoak'' Creek).

Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Stormwater Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management program must be developed that would meet the standard of reducing pollutants to the maximum extent practicable. Stormwater management programs for medium and large MS4s include measures to: ? Identify major outfalls and pollutant loadings... seeding: The vegetation used will be part of final landscaping, but during construction it prevents soil erosion. ? Mulching: Materials such as hay, grass, woodchips, gravel, or straw are placed on top of the soil to keep it from eroding. Structural...

Jaber, Fouad

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

456

The Bachelor of Management degree in Management Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses in length. Admission to the Faculty may occur at the end of Year One. Students are required to have completed the following  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bachelor of Management degree in Management Information Systems is a minimum of 40 courses completion of a recognized degree from an English-language university. BachelorofManagement ManagementInformationSystems 4090 - Management Policy and Strategy Management 4840 - Systems Analysis Management 4841 - Systems

Seldin, Jonathan P.

457

Operations Task Management (OTM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the steps taken by management at Ashland Oil to reduce expenses, including an analysis of every aspect of the refinery. It was determined that the areas most adaptable to improvement were the maintenance department, storerooms, the laboratory and energy utilization. The authors focus, however, on the difficulties met in implementing an effective cost control program in the operations area, detailing the reasons why and examining the system ultimately installed in this area.

Miller, C.B.; Duck, C.H.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Waste management project technical baseline description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systems engineering approach has been taken to describe the technical baseline under which the Waste Management Project is currently operating. The document contains a mission analysis, function analysis, requirement analysis, interface definitions, alternative analysis, system definition, documentation requirements, implementation definitions, and discussion of uncertainties facing the Project.

Sederburg, J.P.

1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

459

Environmental management system.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Environmental Management System (EMS) is identification of environmental consequences from SNL/NM activities, products, and/or services to develop objectives and measurable targets for mitigation of any potential impacts to the environment. This Source Document discusses the annual EMS process for analysis of environmental aspects and impacts and also provides the fiscal year (FY) 2010 analysis. Further information on the EMS structure, processes, and procedures are described within the programmatic EMS Manual (PG470222).

Salinas, Stephanie A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Managing the Management: CORBAbased Instrumentation of Management Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing the Management: CORBA­based Instrumentation of Management Systems A. Keller Munich Network to dynamically exchange customer­ and technology­related data. In this context, management systems are crucial providers: On the one hand, different service providers have chosen different management systems

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Business Management Analyst Business Manager Director of Communication Contracts Manager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Business Management Analyst · Business Manager · Director of Communication · Contracts Manager of Sales · President/Owner · Instructor of Business · Senior Buyer · North American Sales Manager · Talent graduation. You will have the skills & knowledge to manage and grow a successful business. You will be able

Maxwell, Bruce D.

462

Changes in Flood Management along the Pajaro River: A Transition to Watershed Management Approaches and Lessons from the Water Framework Directive and Flood Directive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

human actions causing environmental damage and the full-costand include the environmental damage and recovery costs (

Jagger, Stacie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

CNS-ProjectManagement-Guidelines-200010.doc 1 / 3 CNS Project Management Procedures and Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CNS-ProjectManagement-Guidelines-200010.doc 1 / 3 CNS Project Management Procedures and Guidelines (Rev. October 2000) Staffing and Project Management This section is intended to provide business an application. Following an analysis phase, which may be performed by CNS in collaboration with the project

Shihadeh, Alan

464

Northwest Sustainability Initiative Learn and Serve America Grant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Awarded to: Mary Ann Schmidt Director Student Watershed Research Project Environmental Science Watershed Research project in cooperation with the Environmental Science and management (ESM) Department and Management Department (ESM) Student Watershed Research Project The Student Watershed Research Project (SWRP

465

Persistence of Hydrologic Variables and Reactive Stream Solute Concentrations in an East Tennessee Watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time and frequency domain analyses were conducted on weekly time series of water chemistry (nitrate, sulfate and calcium concentrations) collected from November 1995 to December 2005 at the West Fork of Walker Branch in Oak Ridge, Tennessee to evaluate the extent of their persistence and the relationship of this persistence to discharge and rainfall. In this study, spectral and wavelet analyses provided a theoretical basis for insights into long-term water chemistry behavior. All water chemistry parameters showed some level of persistence that was influenced by rainfall and/or discharge. Short-term persistence (less than a year) was related to the persistence of rainfall and discharge, whereas long-term persistence (more than a year) was related to the persistence of discharge. The Walker Branch conceptual hydrology model is augmented by these results that relate characteristic periodicities with flowpaths through different zones: the vadose zone (< 20 week period), saturated zone (20-50 week period) and bedrock zone (> 50 week period) with implications for reactive chemistries within the watershed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Koirala, Shesh R [ORNL; Gentry, Randall W [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [ORNL; Schwartz, John S [ORNL; Sayler, Gary Steven [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Impact of Resolution on Simulation of Closed Mesoscale Cellular Convection Identified by Dynamically Guided Watershed Segmentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organized mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) is a common feature of marine stratocumulus that forms in response to a balance between mesoscale dynamics and smaller scale processes such as cloud radiative cooling and microphysics. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and fully coupled cloud-aerosol interactions to simulate marine low clouds during the VOCALS-REx campaign over the southeast Pacific. A suite of experiments with 3- and 9-km grid spacing indicates resolution-dependent behavior. The simulations with finer grid spacing have smaller liquid water paths and cloud fractions, while cloud tops are higher. The observed diurnal cycle is reasonably well simulated. To isolate organized MCC characteristics we develop a new automated method, which uses a variation of the watershed segmentation technique that combines the detection of cloud boundaries with a test for coincident vertical velocity characteristics. This ensures that the detected cloud fields are dynamically consistent for closed MCC, the most common MCC type over the VOCALS-REx region. We demonstrate that the 3-km simulation is able to reproduce the scaling between horizontal cell size and boundary layer height seen in satellite observations. However, the 9-km simulation is unable to resolve smaller circulations corresponding to shallower boundary layers, instead producing invariant MCC horizontal scale for all simulated boundary layers depths. The results imply that climate models with grid spacing of roughly 3 km or smaller may be needed to properly simulate the MCC structure in the marine stratocumulus regions.

Martini, Matus; Gustafson, William I.; Yang, Qing; Xiao, Heng

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

467

Environmental analysis & Re-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental analysis & Re- sources Manage- ment includes a range of careers. Environmental, and managers of land, water, and atmos- pheric resources. Their job titles include those listed in the bulleted to make you an attractive and competitive environmental management professional. The package is based

de Doncker, Elise

468

Modeling and Management of Nonlinear Dependencies Copulas in Dynamic Financial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an important tool for decision making and an essential part of enterprise risk management (ERM), particularly. Keywords: Non-Life Insurance, Risk Management, Dynamic Financial Analysis, Co- pulas, PerformanceModeling and Management of Nonlinear Dependencies ­ Copulas in Dynamic Financial Analysis Martin

Ulm, Universität

469

Managing Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tx H2O | pg. 19 Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) project managers work together with scientists and educators as well as government funding agencies to address water quality and quantity issues in Texas. Each of TWRI?s five project... the funds.? Gregory began his role at TWRI in 2006 upon com- pletion of a master?s degree in water management and hydrological science at Texas A&M University. A former Mills Scholar, Gregory was familiar with TWRI. He saw that the institute...

Baker, Emily

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Memo: Estimates of hydrology in small (<80 km2 urbanized watersheds under dry weather and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Johnson, 2004; Hetzel, 2007). The Bay Area Storm Water Management Agencies (BASMAA) that hold National management practices (BMPs) to achieve load reduction and demonstrate at the end of 20 years (2025 Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits have been asked to increase effort and implement best

471

An Integrated Modeling and Data Management Strategy for Cellulosic Biomass Production Decisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emerging cellulosic bioenergy markets can provide land managers with additional options for crop production decisions. Integrating dedicated bioenergy crops such as perennial grasses and short rotation woody species within the agricultural landscape can have positive impacts on several environmental processes including increased soil organic matter in degraded soils, reduced sediment loading in watersheds, lower green house gas (GHG) fluxes, and reduced nutrient loading in watersheds. Implementing this type of diverse bioenergy production system in a way that maximizes potential environmental benefits requires a dynamic integrated modeling and data management strategy. This paper presents a strategy for designing diverse bioenergy cropping systems within the existing row crop production landscape in the midwestern United States. The integrated model developed quantifies a wide range environmental processes including soil erosion from wind and water, soil organic matter changes, and soil GHG fluxes within a geospatial data management framework. This framework assembles and formats information from multiple spatial and temporal scales. The data assembled includes yield and productivity data from harvesting equipment at the 1m scale, surface topography data from LiDAR mapping at the less than 1m scale, soil data from US soil survey databases at the 10m to 100m scale, and climate data at the county scale. These models and data tools are assembled into an integrated computational environment that is used to determine sustainable removal rates for agricultural residues for bioenergy production at the sub-field scale under a wide range of land management practices. Using this integrated model, innovative management practices including cover cropping are then introduced and evaluated for their impact on bioenergy production and important environmental processes. The impacts of introducing dedicated energy crops onto high-risk landscape positions currently being manage in row crop production are also investigated.

David J. Muth Jr.; K. Mark Bryden; Joshua B. Koch

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Object Management Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Object-Oriented Database Management Systems for EngineeringR. Cassel. Distribution Management Systems: Functions and8-PWR 1988. Network Management Systems 52 Subodh Bapat.

Gollu, Aleks Ohannes

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R-3 • Environmental Management System Plan References 30.of Energy, Safety Management System Policy, DOE P 450.4 (E), Environmental Management Systems ? Requirements with

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management Program, R-3 • Environmental Management SystemEnvironmental policy 3. Environmental aspects 4. Legal andObjectives, targets, and Environmental Management Programs

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

A brief analysis and description of transuranic wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at INEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a brief summary of the wastes and waste types disposed of in the transuranic contaminated portions of the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from 1954 through 1970. Wastes included in this summary are organics, inorganics, metals, radionuclides, and atypical wastes. In addition to summarizing amounts of wastes disposed and describing the wastes, the document also provides information on disposal pit and trench dimensions and contaminated soil volumes. The report also points out discrepancies that exist in available documentation regarding waste and soil volumes and make recommendations for future efforts at waste characterization. 19 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

Arrenholz, D.A.; Knight, J.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry

477

Waste Management Program management plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the prime contractor to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) provides comprehensive waste management services to all contractors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) through the Waste Management (WM) Program. This Program Management Plan (PMP) provides an overview of the Waste Management Program objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. This document will be reviewed at least annually and updated as needed to address revisions to the Waste Management`s objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. Waste Management Program is managed by LMITCO Waste Operations Directorate. The Waste Management Program manages transuranic, low-level, mixed low-level, hazardous, special-case, and industrial wastes generated at or transported to the INEEL.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT -INVENTORY CONTROL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT - INVENTORY CONTROL Record of Property Transferred from ______ ___________________________________ 2. DEAN (If Applies) ______ ___________________________________ 5. UNIVERSITY DIRECTOR OF MATERIALS MANAGEMENT ______ ___________________________________ 3. HOSPITAL DIRECTOR (If Applies) ______ IF YOU NEED

Oliver, Douglas L.

479

Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, January--December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes, for the 12-month period January through December 1994, the available dynamic hydrologic data collected on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed as well as information collected on surface flow systems in the surrounding vicinity that may affect the quality or quantity of surface water in the watershed. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to characterize the quantity and quality of water in the surface flow system, assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities, provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance of these data, and support long-term measures of contaminant fluxes at a spatial scale to provide a comprehensive picture of watershed performance that is commensurate with future remedial actions.

Borders, D.M.; Ziegler, K.S.; Reece, D.K.; Watts, J.A.; Frederick, B.J.; McCalla, W.L.; Pridmore, D.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

CTUIR Grande Ronde River Watershed Restoration Program McCoy Creek/McIntyre Creek Road Crossing, 1995-1999 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) entered into a contract agreement beginning in 1996 to fund watershed restoration and enhancement actions and contribute to recovery of fish and wildlife resources and water quality in the Grande Ronde River Basin. The CTUIR's habitat program is closely coordinated with the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program and multiple agencies and organizations within the basin. The CTUIR has focused during the past 4 years in the upper portions of the Grande Ronde Subbasin (upstream of LaGrande, Oregon) on several major project areas in the Meadow, McCoy, and McIntyre Creek watersheds and along the mainstem Grande Ronde River. This Annual Report provides an overview of individual projects and accomplishments.

Childs, Allen B.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis watershed management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Managing Critical Management Improvement Initiatives  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides requirements and responsibilities for planning, executing and assessing critical management improvement initiatives within DOE. DOE N 251.59, dated 9/27/2004, extends this Notice until 10/01/2005. Archived 11-8-10. Does not cancel other directives.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

483

Best Management Practice #1: Water Management Planning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful water management program starts with developing a comprehensive water management plan. This plan should be included within existing facility operating plans.

484

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Technical Review Report: Oak Ridge Reservation Review of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge By Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE; William H....

485

Environmental Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Another key aspect of the NNSS mission is Environmental Management program, which addresses the environmental legacy from historic nuclear weapons related activities while also ensuring the health and safety of present day workers, the public, and the environment as current and future missions are completed. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management site receives low-level and mixed low-level waste from some 28 different generators from across the DOE complex in support of the legacy clean-up DOE Environmental Management project. Without this capability, the DOE would not be able to complete the clean up and proper disposition of these wastes. The program includes environmental protection, compliance, and monitoring of the air, water, plants, animals, and cultural resources at the NNSS. Investigation and implementation of appropriate corrective actions to address the contaminated ground water facilities and soils resulting from historic nuclear testing activities, the demolition of abandoned nuclear facilities, as well as installation of ground water wells to identify and monitor the extent of ground water contamination.

None

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

486

Environmental Management  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Another key aspect of the NNSS mission is Environmental Management program, which addresses the environmental legacy from historic nuclear weapons related activities while also ensuring the health and safety of present day workers, the public, and the environment as current and future missions are completed. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management site receives low-level and mixed low-level waste from some 28 different generators from across the DOE complex in support of the legacy clean-up DOE Environmental Management project. Without this capability, the DOE would not be able to complete the clean up and proper disposition of these wastes. The program includes environmental protection, compliance, and monitoring of the air, water, plants, animals, and cultural resources at the NNSS. Investigation and implementation of appropriate corrective actions to address the contaminated ground water facilities and soils resulting from historic nuclear testing activities, the demolition of abandoned nuclear facilities, as well as installation of ground water wells to identify and monitor the extent of ground water contamination.

None

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

487

Contract Management Certificate Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract Management Certificate Program Accelerate Your Career BusinessandManagement extension bearing the UC seal signifies a well- known, uncompromising standard of academic excellence. #12;Contract Management Certificate Program UC Irvine Extension's Contract Management Certificate Program focuses on core

Rose, Michael R.

488

Sources and Fates of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Rural and Urban Watersheds in Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to frequent exposure to high sodium irrigation water. The results indicate that sodium is a major driver of DOC in the system. Sound management decisions concerning irrigation water chemistry and urban development might eventually emerge to protect water...

Cioce, Danielle

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

489

Habitat relationships of seven breeding bird species in the Leon River Watershed investigated at local scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the past 100?150 years Texas rangelands have dramatically changed from native open savannahs to dense woodlands. On the Edwards plateau, a major management concern is the increasing encroachment of Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei). Preceding...

Juarez Berrios, Edwin Alfredo

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

490

Energy, Data Management, Reporting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

About Schneider Electric Enterprise wide Data Management Outputs Foundation and results Part of a complete energy management solution Schneider Electric...

491

Energy Savings Through Steam Trap Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Savings through Steam Trap Management Chris Gibbs, Account Manager, Armstrong International, Inc., Three Rivers, MI ESL-IE-08-05-08 Proceedings from theThirtieth Industrial Energy Technology Conference...-based steam trap management application developed by Armstrong International. The application calculates steam loss, fuel loss, dollar loss and CO 2 emission generation. The database allows for trend analysis, automatic energy report generation...

Gibbs, C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Compatibility of technologies with regulations in the waste management of H-3, I-129, C-14, and Kr-85. Part II. Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste forms of /sup 3/H, /sup 129/I, /sup 14/C, and /sup 85/Kr separated from fuel reprocessing streams and procedures for managing them were analyzed regarding compliance with regulations. Transportation of these wastes in certain DOT-specification packagings would be permissible, but some of these packagings may not be acceptable in some disposal situations. Transportation of gaseous /sup 85/Kr in a currently certified cylinder is possible, but a fuel reprocessor may wish to ship larger quantities per package. Disposal of tritium using a package designed by a DOE contractor and shallow land burial, in accord with the regulations of 10 CFR 61, seems practicable. Although 10 CFR 61 permits shallow land burial of /sup 129/I, the concentration limit requires distribution in a volume that may seem impractical to commercial fuel reprocessors. The concentration limit of 10 CFR 61 for shallow land burial of /sup 14/C requires distribution in a lesser, although still large, volume. For both /sup 129/I and /sup 14/C, management as high-level waste offers the advantage of smaller volumes. Similar advantages may be offered by greater confinement or non-near surface concepts for disposal. The concrete waste forms developed for these nuclides may not meet technical criteria being formulated for geologic disposal. The lack of accommodation of /sup 85/Kr at disposal facilities makes storage of the gaseous form at the fuel reprocessing plant, followed by dispersal after partial decay, seem attractive. Ocean disposal of /sup 129/I and /sup 14/C by the rules of the International Atomic Energy Agency-London Ocean Dumping Convention offers advantages over shallow land burial: higher allowed concentrations, resulting in smaller volumes and fewer packages. These rules, however, thwart ocean disposal of /sup 85/Kr since gaseous forms are banned, and for solid forms, concentration limits would require distribution of radioactivity in very large volumes. 80 references.

Trevorrow, L.E.; Kolba, V.M.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Steindler, M.J.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Idaho National Laboratory Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor Rods and Pellets Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this special analysis (SA) is to determine if the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Rods and Pellets waste stream (INEL103597TR2, Revision 2) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream consists of 24 containers with unirradiated fabricated rods and pellets composed of uranium oxide (UO2) and thorium oxide (ThO2) fuel in zirconium cladding. The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream requires an SA because the 229Th, 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U activity concentrations exceed the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels.

Shott, Gregory [NSTec

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

494

Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 16GTR-NRS-P-105 USING MULTIPLE RESEARCH METHODS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supplies, economic development, biomass for energy, forest health, watersheds, biodiversity, and globalMoving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 16GTR-NRS-P-105 USING MULTIPLE RESEARCH METHODS TO UNDERSTAND FAMILY FOREST OWNERS John Schelhas1 Abstract.--Applied research

495

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS) CONCENTRATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS) CONCENTRATION FOR UNDERGRADUATES The management information systems concentration, like a major, focuses on the use of information technology for value creation creation. Link to Rensselaer 2012-2013 Catalog Required Courses MGMT 4240 Systems Analysis & Design MGMT

Salama, Khaled

496

The development of an aquatic spill model for the White Oak Creek watershed, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study develops an aquatic spill model applicable to the White Oak Creek watershed draining the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hazardous, toxic, and radioactive chemicals are handled and stored on the laboratory reservation. An accidental spill into the White Oak Creek watershed could contaminate downstream water supplies if insufficient dilution did not occur. White Oak Creek empties into the Clinch River, which flows into the Tennessee River. Both rivers serve as municipal water supplies. The aquatic spill model provides estimates of the dilution at sequential downstream locations along White Oak creek and the Clinch River after an accidental spill of a liquid containing a radioactively decaying constituent. The location of the spill on the laboratory is arbitrary, while hydrologic conditions range from drought to extreme flood are simulated. The aquatic spill model provides quantitative estimates with which to assess water quality downstream from the site of the accidental spill, allowing an informed decision to be made whether to perform mitigating measures so that the integrity of affected water supplies is not jeopardized.

Johnson, R.O.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Landscape Management Systems The Visual Management System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landscape Management Systems The Visual Management System of the Forest Service, USDA1 Warren R presentation on how the Visual Management System (VMS) functions. 1/ Presented at the National Conference Manual 2380, Landscape Management, USDA. INTRODUCTION The American people are concerned about the quality

Standiford, Richard B.

498

EIS-0285-SA-41: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management around wood poles in Transmission Line ROW's in the Walla Walla Region. BPA proposes to clear...

499

Management Overview  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't HappenLow-Cost ProductionManagement Controls over

500

Management Overview  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't HappenLow-Cost ProductionManagement Controls overOverview -