National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for analysis type cu

  1. Bi-Se doped with Cu, p-type semiconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Raghu Nath; Phok, Sovannary; Parilla, Philip Anthony

    2013-08-20

    A Bi--Se doped with Cu, p-type semiconductor, preferably used as an absorber material in a photovoltaic device. Preferably the semiconductor has at least 20 molar percent Cu. In a preferred embodiment, the semiconductor comprises at least 28 molar percent of Cu. In one embodiment, the semiconductor comprises a molar percentage of Cu and Bi whereby the molar percentage of Cu divided by the molar percentage of Bi is greater than 1.2. In a preferred embodiment, the semiconductor is manufactured as a thin film having a thickness less than 600 nm.

  2. Analysis of the structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation of solid target in liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santillan, J. M. J.; Videla, F. A.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.; Fernandez van Raap, M. B.

    2013-04-07

    We report on the analysis of structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles (Nps) produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of solid copper target in liquids. Laser pulse energy ranged between 500 {mu}J and 50 {mu}J. Water and acetone were used to produce the colloidal suspensions. The study was performed through optical extinction spectroscopy using Mie theory to fit the full experimental spectra, considering free and bound electrons size dependent contributions to the metal dielectric function. Raman spectroscopy and AFM technique were also used to characterize the sample. Considering the possible oxidation of copper during the fabrication process, two species (Cu and Cu{sub 2}O) arranged in two structures (bare core or core-shell) and in two configuration types (Cu-Cu{sub 2}O or Cu{sub 2}O-Cu) were considered for the fitting depending on the laser pulse energy and the surrounding media. For water at high energy, it can be observed that a Cu-Cu{sub 2}O configuration fits the experimental spectra of the colloidal suspension, while for decreasing energy and below a certain threshold, a Cu{sub 2}O-Cu configuration needs to be included for the optimum fit. Both species coexist for energies below 170 {mu}J for water. On the other hand, for acetone at high energy, optimum fit of the full spectrum suggests the presence a bimodal Cu-Cu{sub 2}O core-shell Nps distribution while for decreasing energy and below a 70 {mu}J threshold energy value, Cu{sub 2}O-Cu core-shell Nps must be included, together with the former configuration, for the fit of the full spectrum. We discuss possible reasons for the changes in the structural configuration of the core-shell Nps.

  3. Function Specific Analysis of the Thermal Durability of Cu-Zeolite...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Function Specific Analysis of the Thermal Durability of Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalyst Function Specific Analysis of the Thermal Durability of Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalyst Presentation given...

  4. Thermoelectric properties of chalcopyrite type CuGaTe{sub 2} and chalcostibite CuSbS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar Gudelli, Vijay; Kanchana, V., E-mail: kanchana@iith.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, Ordnance Factory Estate, Yeddumailaram 502 205, Andhra Pradesh (India); Vaitheeswaran, G. [Advanced Centre of Research in High Energy Materials (ACRHEM), University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Gachibowli, Hyderabad 500 046, Andhra Pradesh (India); Svane, A.; Christensen, N. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2013-12-14

    Electronic and transport properties of CuGaTe{sub 2}, a hole-doped ternary copper based chalcopyrite type semiconductor, are studied using calculations within the Density Functional Theory and solving the Boltzmann transport equation within the constant relaxation time approximation. The electronic band structures are calculated by means of the full-potential linear augmented plane wave method, using the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential. The calculated band gap of 1.23?eV is in agreement with the experimental value of 1.2?eV. The carrier concentration- and temperature dependent thermoelectric properties of CuGaTe{sub 2} are derived, and a figure of merit of zT?=?1.69 is obtained at 950?K for a hole concentration of 3.7·10{sup 19}?cm{sup ?3}, in agreement with a recent experimental finding of zT?=?1.4, confirming that CuGaTe{sub 2} is a promising material for high temperature thermoelectric applications. The good thermoelectric performance of p-type CuGaTe{sub 2} is associated with anisotropic transport from a combination of heavy and light bands. Also for CuSbS{sub 2} (chalcostibite), a better performance is obtained for p-type than for n-type doping. The variation of the thermopower as a function of temperature and concentration suggests that CuSbS{sub 2} will be a good thermoelectric material at low temperatures, similarly to the isostructural CuBiS{sub 2} compound.

  5. Ab-initio study of donor-acceptor codoping for n-type CuO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Yuan; Wang, Junling, E-mail: jlwang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Zheng, Jianwei [Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Wu, Ping [Engineering Product Development, Singapore University of Technology and Design, 20 Dover Drive, Singapore 138682 (Singapore)

    2014-10-28

    Single n-type dopant in CuO has either a deep donor level or limited solubility, inefficient in generating free electrons. We have performed ab-initio study of the donor-acceptor codoping to obtain n-type CuO. Our results show that N codoping can slightly improve the donor level of Zr and In by forming shallower n-type complexes (Zr{sub Cu}-N{sub O} and 2In{sub Cu}-N{sub O}), but their formation energies are too high to be realized in experiments. However, Li codoping with Al and Ga is found to be relatively easy to achieve. 2Al{sub Cu}-Li{sub Cu} and 2Ga{sub Cu}-Li{sub Cu} have shallower donor levels than single Al and Ga by 0.14?eV and 0.08?eV, respectively, and their formation energies are reasonably low to act as efficient codopants. Moreover, Li codoping with both Al and Ga produce an empty impurity band just below the host conduction band minimum, which may reduce the donor ionization energy at high codoping concentrations.

  6. Optical and electronic properties of delafossite CuBO{sub 2}p-type transparent conducting oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruttanapun, Chesta E-mail: krchesta@kmitl.ac.th

    2013-09-21

    CuBO{sub 2} delafossite was prepared by solid state reaction and calcined/sintered at 1005?°C. The optical properties of this p-type transparent conducting oxide were investigated. Its crystal structure, morphology, composition, oxygen decomposition, and optical and electronic properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-VIS-NIR) and fluorescence spectroscopies, Seebeck coefficient, and electrical conductivity measurements. CuBO{sub 2} delafossite possesses a hexagonal space group R3{sup ¯}m. TGA indicated a weight loss of 10%, which was attributed to excess oxygen. The positive Seebeck coefficient confirmed p-type behavior. Emission at 355?nm indicated a direct band type transition, and the UV-VIS-NIR spectrum indicated an optical direct gap of 3.6?eV. Activation energies for carrier production and electrical conduction were 0.147 and 0.58?eV, respectively, indicating the thermal activation of carriers. CuBO{sub 2} delafossite is a p-type transparent conducting oxide with a wide band gap and may have potential in industrial p-type electrodes.

  7. Annotated Type Systems Program Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palsberg, Jens

    Danish Summary xi 1 Introduction 1 1.1 The Standard Type System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 2.1.3 The Conjunction Type System . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 2.2 The Power of tAnnotated Type Systems for Program Analysis Kirsten Lackner Solberg Computer Science Department

  8. Impedance analysis of MnCoCuO NTC ceramic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, S.G. . E-mail: song-ph0@wpmail.paisley.ac.uk; Ling, Z.; Placido, F.

    2005-07-12

    Impedance spectroscopy is often used to analyse the electrical properties of ceramic materials having high-resistive grain boundaries, such as ZnO and SrTiO{sub 3}. Fewer attempts have been made at using this technique for the analysis of inhomogeneous electronic ceramics consisting of grains with differing composition, such as those occurring in negative temperature coefficient (NTC) thermistors. In this study, we have attempted to adopt ac impedance spectroscopy together with other techniques to analyse an NTC thermistor ceramic material. An Mn, Co and Cu multielements transition metal oxide (MnCoCuO) ceramic was prepared by using homogeneous precipitation employing oxalic acid. This material displayed a typical NTC effect, showing an electrical resistance decrease with temperature when dc electrical measurement was performed. The ac impedance spectroscopy analysis showed that there were two peaks in impedance and conductance versus frequency plot. By using an alternative representation of impedance spectra Z'/f versus Z', three distinct relaxation frequency ranges were identified. They are believed to originate, respectively, from the electrode, phase 1 (rich-Cu phase) and phase 2 (poor-Cu phase) grains existing in this ceramic. SEM observation and EDX analysis clearly showed existence of two distinct phase grains. The resistance values were derived from phases 1 and 2 grains based on ac impedance data. The sum of the resistance values was in good agreement with that from dc measurement in the temperature range of 30-95 deg. C. The material constant, B, for the two phases was also calculated, giving 3100 and 3600 K for phases 1 and 2, respectively.

  9. Cu

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding in ActinideRail between PADCrystalDouglasApplications |Cu

  10. Effects of the Cu off-stoichiometry on transport properties of wide gap p-type semiconductor, layered oxysulfide LaCuSO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goto, Yosuke, E-mail: ygoto@z8.keio.jp; Tanaki, Mai; Okusa, Yuki; Matoba, Masanori; Kamihara, Yoichi [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Shibuya, Taizo; Yasuoka, Kenji [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2014-07-14

    Layered oxysulfide LaCu{sub 1?x}SO (x?=?0–0.03) was prepared to elucidate the effect of Cu off-stoichiometry on their electrical and thermal transport properties. Electrical resistivity drastically decreases down from ?10{sup 5} ?·cm to ?10{sup ?1} ?·cm as a result of Cu deficiency (x?=?0.01) at 300?K. Thermal conductivity of the samples at 300?K, which is dominated by lattice components, is estimated to be 2.3(3) Wm{sup ?1}K{sup ?1}. Stoichiometric LaCuSO has an optical band gap of 3.1?eV, while broad optical absorption at photon energies of approximately 2.1?eV was observed for Cu-deficient samples. Density functional theory calculation suggests that these broad absorption structures probably originate from the in-gap states generated by the sulfur vacancies created to compensate the charge imbalance due to Cu off-stoichiometry. These results clearly demonstrate that Cu deficiency plays a crucial role in determining the electrical transport properties of Cu-based p-type transparent semiconductors.

  11. Aging behavior and precipitates analysis of the CuCrZrCe alloy Yi Zhang a,b,d,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Aging behavior and precipitates analysis of the Cu­Cr­Zr­Ce alloy Yi Zhang a,b,d,n , Alex A October 2015 Keywords: Cu­Cr­Zr­Ce alloy Cold rolling Aging treatment Microstructure Physical properties rolling and aging for 16 h at 300 °C. Under the same aging conditions, without cold rolling, the hardness

  12. Band offsets of n-type electron-selective contacts on cuprous oxide (Cu[subscript 2]O) for photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Riley E.

    The development of cuprous oxide (Cu [subscript 2]O) photovoltaics (PVs) is limited by low device open-circuit voltages. A strong contributing factor to this underperformance is the conduction-band offset between Cu ...

  13. Measurement of the $?$-asymmetry parameter of $^{67}$Cu in search for tensor type currents in the weak interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Soti; F. Wauters; M. Breitenfeldt; P. Finlay; P. Herzog; A. Knecht; U. Köster; I. S. Kraev; T. Porobic; P. N. Prashanth; I. S. Towner; C. Tramm; D. Zákoucký; N. Severijns

    2014-09-05

    Precision measurements at low energy search for physics beyond the Standard Model in a way complementary to searches for new particles at colliders. In the weak sector the most general $\\beta$ decay Hamiltonian contains, besides vector and axial-vector terms, also scalar, tensor and pseudoscalar terms. Current limits on the scalar and tensor coupling constants from neutron and nuclear $\\beta$ decay are on the level of several percent. The goal of this paper is extracting new information on tensor coupling constants by measuring the $\\beta$-asymmetry parameter in the pure Gamow-Teller decay of $^{67}$Cu, thereby testing the V-A structure of the weak interaction. An iron sample foil into which the radioactive nuclei were implanted was cooled down to milliKelvin temperatures in a $^3$He-$^4$He dilution refrigerator. An external magnetic field of 0.1 T, in combination with the internal hyperfine magnetic field, oriented the nuclei. The anisotropic $\\beta$ radiation was observed with planar high purity germanium detectors operating at a temperature of about 10\\,K. An on-line measurement of the $\\beta$ asymmetry of $^{68}$Cu was performed as well for normalization purposes. Systematic effects were investigated using Geant4 simulations. The experimental value, $\\tilde{A}$ = 0.587(14), is in agreement with the Standard Model value of 0.5991(2) and is interpreted in terms of physics beyond the Standard Model. The limits obtained on possible tensor type charged currents in the weak interaction hamiltonian are -0.045 $< (C_T+C'_T)/C_A <$ 0.159 (90\\% C.L.). The obtained limits are comparable to limits from other correlation measurements in nuclear $\\beta$ decay and contribute to further constraining tensor coupling constants.

  14. Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis in Type Erasure Semantics # Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trifonov, Valery

    Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis in Type Erasure Semantics # Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao Department of Computer Science Yale University {saha,trifonov,shao}@cs.yale.edu Abstract

  15. Genomic analysis of control of cell type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frampton, Garrett M

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian development, a single fertilized egg grows into a complex organism, comprised of organs and tissues made up of hundreds of different specialized cell types. All of these cells contain the same genome, but ...

  16. Transport, Analyte Detection, and Opto-Electronic Response of p-Type CuO Nanowires Benjamin J. Hansen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    -cost approaches to synthesizing quality nanostruc- tures in metal-oxides such as ZnO, In2O3, TiO2, and Cu. In particular, semiconductor nanowires (NWs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as promising

  17. Backwards Type Analysis of Asynchronous Method Calls #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnsen, Einar Broch

    and synchronization, as found # This work is in the context of the EU project IST­33826 CREDO: Modeling and analysis of evolutionary structures for distributed services (http://credo.cwi.nl). # Corresponding author. Email addresses

  18. Backwards Type Analysis of Asynchronous Method Calls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnsen, Einar Broch

    and synchronization, as found This work is in the context of the EU project IST-33826 CREDO: Modeling and analysis of evolutionary structures for distributed services (http://credo.cwi.nl). Corresponding author. Email addresses

  19. Modeling and Analysis of Two-Part Type Manufacturing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Young Jae

    This paper presents a model and analysis of a synchronous tandem flow line that produces different part types on unreliable machines. The machines operate according to a static priority rule, operating on the highest ...

  20. Effect of reinforcing particle type on morphology and age-hardening behavior of Al–4.5 wt.% Cu based nanocomposites synthesized through mechanical milling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mostaed, A.; Saghafian, H.; Mostaed, E.; Shokuhfar, A.; Rezaie, H.R.

    2013-02-15

    The effects of reinforcing particle type (SiC and TiC) on morphology and precipitation hardening behavior of Al–4.5%Cu based nanocomposites synthesized via mechanical milling were investigated in the current work. In order to study the microstructure and morphology of mechanically milled powder, X-ray diffraction technique, scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were utilized. Results revealed that at the early stages of mechanical milling, when reinforcing particles are polycrystal, the alloying process is enhanced more in the case of using the TiC particles as reinforcement. But, at the final stages of mechanical milling, when reinforcing particles are single crystal, the alloying process is enhanced more in the case of using the SiC ones. Transmission electron microscopy results demonstrated that Al–4.5 wt.%Cu based nanocomposite powders were synthesized and confirmed that the mutual diffusion of aluminum and copper occurs through the interfacial plane of (200). The hardness results showed that not only does introducing 4 vol.% of reinforcing particles (SiC or TiC) considerably decrease the porosity of the bulk composite samples, but also it approximately doubles the hardness of Al–4.5 wt.%Cu alloy (53.4 HB). Finally, apart from TEM and scanning electron microscopy observation which are localized, a decline in hardness in the TiC and SiC contained samples, respectively, after 1.5 and 2 h aging time at 473 K proves the fact that the size of SiC particles is smaller than the size of the TiC ones. - Highlights: ? HRTEM results show mutual diffusion of Al and Cu occurs through the (200) planes. ? TiC particles enhance alloying process more than the SiC ones at the early stages of MM. ? SiC particles enhance alloying process more than the TiC ones at the final stages of MM.

  1. Ternary CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type pnictides AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Khatun, Mansura; Scott Mullen, C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G2 (Canada); Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2012-08-15

    Four ternary pnictides AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb) were prepared by reactions of the elements at 850 Degree-Sign C and their crystal structures were determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. These silver-containing pnictides AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} adopt the trigonal CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type structure (Pearson symbol hR21, space group R3-bar m, Z=3; a=4.5555(6) A, c=24.041(3) A for SrAg{sub 4}As{sub 2}; a=4.5352(2) A, c=23.7221(11) A for EuAg{sub 4}As{sub 2}; a=4.7404(4) A, c=25.029(2) A for SrAg{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}; a=4.7239(3) A, c=24.689(2) A for EuAg{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}), which can be derived from the trigonal CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure of the isoelectronic zinc-containing pnictides AZn{sub 2}Pn{sub 2} by insertion of additional Ag atoms into trigonal planar sites within [M{sub 2}Pn{sub 2}]{sup 2-} slabs built up of edge-sharing tetrahedra. Band structure calculations on SrAg{sub 4}As{sub 2} and SrAg{sub 4}Sb{sub 2} revealed that these charge-balanced Zintl phases actually exhibit no gap at the Fermi level and are predicted to be semimetals. - Graphical abstract: SrAg{sub 4}As{sub 2} and related pnictides adopt a CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type structure in which additional Ag atoms enter trigonal planar sites within slabs built from edge-sharing tetrahedra. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} are the first Ag-containing members of the CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag atoms are stuffed in trigonal planar sites within CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type slabs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag-Ag bonding develops through attractive d{sup 10}-d{sup 10} interactions.

  2. Solidification analysis of a centrifugal atomizer using the Al-32.7wt.% Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, M.G.

    1998-02-23

    A centrifugal atomizer (spinning disk variety) was designed and constructed for the production of spherical metal powders, 100--1,000 microns in diameter in an inert atmosphere. Initial atomization experiments revealed the need for a better understanding of how the liquid metal was atomized and how the liquid droplets solidified. To investigate particle atomization, Ag was atomized in air and the process recorded on high-speed film. To investigate particle solidification, Al-32.7 wt.% Cu was atomized under inert atmosphere and the subsequent particles were examined microscopically to determine solidification structure and rate. This dissertation details the experimental procedures used in producing the Al-Cu eutectic alloy particles, examination of the particle microstructures, and determination of the solidification characteristics (e.g., solidification rate) of various phases. Finally, correlations are proposed between the operation of the centrifugal atomizer and the observed solidification spacings.

  3. Surface and grain boundary scattering in nanometric Cu thin films: A quantitative analysis including twin boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barmak, Katayun [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Darbal, Amith [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Ganesh, Kameswaran J.; Ferreira, Paulo J. [Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Rickman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Sun, Tik; Yao, Bo; Warren, Andrew P.; Coffey, Kevin R., E-mail: kb2612@columbia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The relative contributions of various defects to the measured resistivity in nanocrystalline Cu were investigated, including a quantitative account of twin-boundary scattering. It has been difficult to quantitatively assess the impact twin boundary scattering has on the classical size effect of electrical resistivity, due to limitations in characterizing twin boundaries in nanocrystalline Cu. In this study, crystal orientation maps of nanocrystalline Cu films were obtained via precession-assisted electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope. These orientation images were used to characterize grain boundaries and to measure the average grain size of a microstructure, with and without considering twin boundaries. The results of these studies indicate that the contribution from grain-boundary scattering is the dominant factor (as compared to surface scattering) leading to enhanced resistivity. The resistivity data can be well-described by the combined Fuchs–Sondheimer surface scattering model and Mayadas–Shatzkes grain-boundary scattering model using Matthiessen's rule with a surface specularity coefficient of p?=?0.48 and a grain-boundary reflection coefficient of R?=?0.26.

  4. Property:EnvironmentalAnalysisType | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETE Inc d b aEnvironmentalAnalysisType Jump to:

  5. Category:NEPA Environmental Analysis Types | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla, Georgia:GeothermalNEPA Environmental Analysis Types Jump to:

  6. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis of gold nanoparticles on Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7??}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bochmann, A.; Teichert, S.; Katzer, C.; Schmidl, F.

    2015-06-07

    It has been shown recently that the incorporation of gold nanoparticles into Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7??} enhances the superconducting properties of this material in a significant way. Previous XRD and TEM investigations suggest different crystallographic relations of the gold nanoparticles with respect to the epitaxial Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7??}. Here, detailed investigations of the crystal orientations for a large ensemble of gold nanoparticles with electron backscatter diffraction are reported. The average size of the gold nanoparticles is in the range of 60?nm–80?nm. We identified five different types of heteroepitaxial relationships between the gold nanoparticles and the superconductor film, resulting in complex pole figures. The observed different types of crystallographic orientations are discussed based on good lattice matching and the formation of low energy interfaces.

  7. Doping Cu{sub 2}O in Electrolyte Solution: Dopant Incorporation, Atomic Structures and Electrical Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Meng; Zhang, Qiming

    2013-11-24

    We have pursued a number of research activities between April 2010 and April 2011: ? A detailed study on n-type doping in Cu2O by Br; ? An analysis of natural resource limitations to terawatt-scale solar cells; ? Attempt to achieve a 1.4-eV direct band gap in Ni sulfides (NiSx); ? First-principles studies of doping in Cu2O and electronic structures of NiSx.

  8. Coupled differential and integral data analysis for improved uncertainty quantification of the ?³,??Cu cross section evaluations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobes, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    A new methodology has been developed that couples differential cross section data evaluation with integral benchmark analysis for improved uncertainty quantification. The new methodology was applied to the two new copper ...

  9. Phase transformation between Cu(In,Sn){sub 2} and Cu{sub 2}(In,Sn) compounds formed on single crystalline Cu substrate during solid state aging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Feifei; Liu, Zhi-Quan Guo, Jingdong

    2014-01-28

    Interfacial reactions between eutectic SnIn and single crystalline Cu during solid-state aging at low temperature were investigated systematically. Three types of phase transformations between Cu(In,Sn){sub 2} layer and Cu{sub 2}(In,Sn) layer were observed, which are Cu(In,Sn){sub 2} grows and Cu{sub 2}(In,Sn) consumes at 40?°C, Cu(In,Sn){sub 2} and Cu{sub 2}(In,Sn) grow simultaneously at 60?°C, as well as Cu(In,Sn){sub 2} consumes and Cu{sub 2}(In,Sn) grows at 80 and 100?°C. According to physicochemical approach, the chemical reactions at Cu/Cu{sub 2}(In,Sn)/Cu(In,Sn){sub 2}/SnIn interfaces were discussed in detail. It was concluded that the diffusion ability of Cu and In atoms dominated different phase transformations. When diffusion constants k{sub 1In2}?>?8/3k{sub 1Cu2} Cu(In,Sn){sub 2} will grow, and if k{sub 1Cu2}???k{sub 1In2} Cu{sub 2}(In,Sn) will grow. Both Cu(In,Sn){sub 2} and Cu{sub 2}(In,Sn) can grow in the condition of k{sub 1In2} ? k{sub 1Cu2}. The values of k{sub 1Cu2} and k{sub 1In2} at different temperatures on (100)Cu and (111)Cu substrate were also calculated or estimated by analyzing the growth kinetics of the compound layers.

  10. Frequency Dependence Modulus of Pd??Ni??Cu??P?? Amorphous Alloy around the Glass Transition by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, M.L.

    Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) was used to study the frequency dependence of storage and loss modulus of amorphous Pd??Ni??Cu??P?? alloy over a broad frequency range around its glass transition temperature. The amorphous ...

  11. STATIC ANALYSIS FOR RUBY IN THE PRESENCE OF GRADUAL TYPING MICHAEL JOSEPH EDGAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATIC ANALYSIS FOR RUBY IN THE PRESENCE OF GRADUAL TYPING MICHAEL JOSEPH EDGAR Department Advisor i #12;STATIC ANALYSIS FOR RUBY IN THE PRESENCE OF GRADUAL TYPING by MICHAEL JOSEPH EDGAR THESIS challenges to traditional static analysis techniques, leaving most errors to be detected at runtime

  12. A Practical Type Analysis for Verification of Modular Prolog Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puebla, Germán

    in the libraries. We claim that, for the purpose of verifying type signatures given in the form of asser- tions of reanalysis performed, especially for library modules. Borrowing some ideas from polymorphic type systems, we, Diagnostics, Symbolic execution; D.3.2 [Software Engineering]: Language Classifications--Constraint and logic

  13. Type curve analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs (infinite-acting reservoir case): a new approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angel Restrepo, Juan Alejandro

    2000-01-01

    . The objectives of this work are as follows: First, we generated new type curves for the analysis of pressure drawdown and buildup tests performed in naturally fractured reservoirs. Next, we develop a systematic approach for the analysis and interpretation...

  14. Film Deposition, Cryogenic RF Testing and Materials Analysis of a Nb/Cu Single Cell SRF Cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xin; Geng, Rongli; Palczerski, Ari; Li, Yongming

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we present preliminary results on using a cathodic-arc-discharge Nb plasma ion source to establish a Nb film-coated single-cell Cu cavity for SRF research. The polycrystalline Cu cavity was fabricated and mirror-surface-finished by a centrifugal barrel polishing (CBP) process at Jefferson Lab. Special pre-coating processes were conducted, in order to create a template-layer for follow-on Nb grain thickening. A sequence of cryogenic RF testing demonstrated that the Nb film does show superconductivity. But the quality factor of this Nb/Cu cavity is low as a result of high residual surface resistance. We are conducting a thorough materials characterization to explore if some microstructural defects or hydrogen impurities, led to such a low quality factor.

  15. A Type-Based Locality Analysis for a Functional Distributed Language 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreira, Alvaro F

    In this thesis we give a type-based analysis for an ML-like distributed language that detects references certain not to escape from one processor to another. We assume a model of distribution based on distributed shared ...

  16. Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis # Valery Trifonov Bratin Saha Zhong Shao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis # Valery Trifonov Bratin Saha Zhong Shao Department of Computer Science Yale University New Haven, CT 06520­8285 {trifonov, saha, shao}@cs.yale.edu ABSTRACT

  17. Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis # Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis # Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao Department of Computer Science Yale University New Haven, CT 06520­8285 {saha,trifonov,shao}@cs.yale.edu Technical Report

  18. Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao Department of Computer Science Yale University New Haven, CT 06520-8285 {saha,trifonov,shao}@cs.yale.edu Technical Report

  19. ZnO/ZnS(O,OH)/Cu(In,Ga)Se2/Mo SOLAR CELL WITH 18.6% EFFICIENCY M.A. Contreras, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    ZnO/ZnS(O,OH)/Cu(In,Ga)Se2/Mo SOLAR CELL WITH 18.6% EFFICIENCY 1 M.A. Contreras, 2 T. Nakada, 2 M analysis between this type of solar cell and the slightly more efficient ZnO/CdS/Cu(In,Ga)Se2/Mo solar cell for conversion efficiency above 20% in thin-film polycrystalline solar cells. It quantifies the gains in current

  20. Relationship between morphologies and orientations of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} grains in Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu solder joints on different Cu pads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Yanhong, E-mail: tianyh@hit.edu.cn; Zhang, Rui; Hang, Chunjin; Niu, Lina; Wang, Chunqing

    2014-02-15

    The morphologies and orientations of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic compounds in the Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu solder joints both on polycrystalline and single crystal Cu pads under different peak reflow temperatures and times above liquids were investigated. The relationship between Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} grain orientations and morphologies was clarified. At the interface of Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/polycrystalline Cu pad, scalloped Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic compounds formed at 250 °C and roof shape Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} formed at 300 °C. Both scalloped Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} and roof shape Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} had a preferred orientation of (0001) plane being parallel to polycrystalline Cu pad surface. Besides, the percentage of large angle grain boundaries increased as the peak reflow temperature rose. At the interface of Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/(111) single crystal Cu pad, the Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic compounds were mainly scallop-type at 250 °C and were prism type at 300 °C. The prismatic Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} grains grew along the three preferred directions with the inter-angles of 60° on (111) single crystal Cu pad while along two perpendicular directions on (100) single crystal Cu pad. The orientation relationship between Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} grains and the single crystal Cu pads was investigated by electron backscatter diffraction technology. In addition, two types of hollowed Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic compounds were found inside the joints of polycrystalline Cu pads. The long hexagonal Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} strips were observed in the joints reflowing at 250 °C while the hollowed Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} strips with the ‘?’ shape cross-sections appeared at 300 °C, which was attributed to the different grain growth rates of different Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} crystal faces. - Highlights: • The orientation of interfacial Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} grains was obtained by EBSD technology. • Two types of hollowed Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} strips were found at different temperatures. • The formation mechanism of hollowed Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} was elaborated based on Bravais law. • The relationship between Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} grain orientations and morphologies was clarified.

  1. A Type System and Analysis for the Automatic Extraction and Enforcement of Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rinard, Martin

    the primary source of information about the program. This paper presents a new type system and an associated a primary source of in- formation about the program for its entire lifetime. But the standard practice analysis that to- gether support the automatic extraction of design-level information from the source code

  2. Analysis of Impossible, Integral and Zero-Correlation Attacks on Type-II Generalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Analysis of Impossible, Integral and Zero-Correlation Attacks on Type-II Generalized Feistel-correlation distinguishers as well as between zero-correlation and integral distinguishers, we analyze in this paper some of the round function, we show that we can not only find impossible, integral and multidimensional zero

  3. Intensional Analysis of Quantified Types BRATIN SAHA, VALERY TRIFONOV, and ZHONG SHAO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intensional Analysis of Quantified Types BRATIN SAHA, VALERY TRIFONOV, and ZHONG SHAO Yale, CT 06520 USA; email: {saha, trifonov, shao}@cs.yale.edu. Permission to make digital/hard copy of all, Pages 1--51. #12; 2 · Bratin Saha et al. 1995; Crary et al. 1998] and makes several important new

  4. Intensional Analysis of Quantified Types BRATIN SAHA, VALERY TRIFONOV, and ZHONG SHAO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intensional Analysis of Quantified Types BRATIN SAHA, VALERY TRIFONOV, and ZHONG SHAO Yale, CT 06520 USA; email: {saha, trifonov, shao}@cs.yale.edu. Permission to make digital/hard copy of all, Pages 1­51. #12;2 · Bratin Saha et al. 1995; Crary et al. 1998] and makes several important new

  5. Growth, characterization and electrochemical properties of hierarchical CuO nanostructures for supercapacitor applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Karthikeyan; Kim, Sang-Jae

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Hierarchical CuO nanostructures were grown on Cu foil. • Monoclinic phase of CuO was grown. • XPS analysis revealed the presence of Cu(2p{sub 3/2}) and Cu(2p{sub 1/2}) on the surfaces. • Specific capacitance of 94 F/g was achieved for the CuO using cyclic voltammetry. • Impedance spectra show their pseudo capacitor applications. - Abstract: In this paper, we have investigated the electrochemical properties of hierarchical CuO nanostructures for pseudo-supercapacitor device applications. Moreover, the CuO nanostructures were formed on Cu substrate by in situ crystallization process. The as-grown CuO nanostructures were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform-infra red spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) analysis. The XRD and FT-IR analysis confirm the formation of monoclinic CuO nanostructures. FE-SEM analysis shows the formation of leave like hierarchical structures of CuO with high uniformity and controlled density. The electrochemical analysis such as cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies confirms the pseudo-capacitive behavior of the CuO nanostructures. Our experimental results suggest that CuO nanostructures will create promising applications of CuO toward pseudo-supercapacitors.

  6. Formation of self-organized quantum dot structures and quasi-perfect CuPt-type ordering by gas-source MBE growth of (GaP){sub n}(InP){sub n} superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.J.; Asahi, H.; Takemoto, M.; Asami, K.; Takeuchi, M.; Gonda, S.

    1996-12-31

    (GaP){sub n}(InP){sub n} short period superlattices (SLs) are grown on GaAs(N11) substrates by gas-source MBE. Transmission electron microscopy observations show that the SLs grown on GaAs(311)A and (411)A have dot structures with a size of about 10--20nm. Photoluminescence (PL) peak energies are greatly dependent on substrate orientation and monolayer number n. On the other hand, the (GaP){sub 1}(InP){sub 1} SLs grown on (111) have no composition modulation and have quasi-perfect CuPt-type ordering along the [111] growth direction. The PL peak energy is 321 meV lower than that of disordered InGaP alloy. Self-organized (GaP){sub n}(InP){sub m} SL(dot/barrier)/In{sub 0.49}Ga{sub 0.51}P(barrier) quantum dot structures exhibit strong 77K PL with a full width at half maximum of about 70 meV.

  7. [Vietnamese] Tiu Nghin cu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biederman, Irving

    . Nhn c mt bn sao có ch ký và ngày tháng ca t mu chp thun cho cuc nghiên cu ó. 10. C hi tùy ý chp thun

  8. Measurement of Omega_m, Omega_Lambda from a blind analysis of Type Ia supernovae with CMAGIC: Using color information to verify the acceleration of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    analysis of Type Ia supernovae with CMAGIC: Using colorof 21 high redshift supernovae using a new technique (lightcurves of Type Ia supernovae, ?rst introduced in Wang

  9. Synthesis and characterization of CuInS{sub 2} nanostructure by ultrasonic-assisted method and different precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mousavi-Kamazani, Mehdi; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167 ; Emadi, Hamid

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? CuInS{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized by ultrasonic assisted method. ? CuInS{sub 2} nanoparticles obtained after annealing at 350 °C for 1 h. ? The effect of some parameters including ultrasonic was investigated. -- Abstract: This paper reports on the synthesis of CuInS{sub 2} nanostructure via an ultrasonic assisted method by employing different sulfur source. Morphology, structure and composition of the obtained products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), infrared (IR) spectrum, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The effects of ultrasonic irradiation, power and time of irradiation, surfactant, and type of copper source were investigated.

  10. Antiferromagnetism in EuCu2As2 and EuCu1.82Sb2 single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anand, V. K.; Johnston, D. C.

    2015-05-07

    Single crystals of EuCu2As2 and EuCu2Sb2 were grown from CuAs and CuSb self-flux, respectively. The crystallographic, magnetic, thermal, and electronic transport properties of the single crystals were investigated by room-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD), magnetic susceptibility ? versus temperature T, isothermal magnetization M versus magnetic field H, specific heat Cp(T), and electrical resistivity ?(T) measurements. EuCu2As2 crystallizes in the body-centered tetragonal ThCr2Si2-type structure (space group I4/mmm), whereas EuCu2Sb2 crystallizes in the related primitive tetragonal CaBe2Ge2-type structure (space group P4/nmm). The energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and XRD data for the EuCu2Sb2 crystals showed the presence of vacancies on the Cu sites, yielding themore »actual composition EuCu1.82Sb2. The ?(T) and Cp(T) data reveal metallic character for both EuCu2As2 and EuCu1.82Sb2. Antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering is indicated from the ?(T),Cp(T), and ?(T) data for both EuCu2As2 (TN = 17.5 K) and EuCu1.82Sb2 (TN = 5.1 K). In EuCu1.82Sb2, the ordered-state ?(T) and M(H) data suggest either a collinear A-type AFM ordering of Eu+2 spins S = 7/2 or a planar noncollinear AFM structure, with the ordered moments oriented in the tetragonal ab plane in either case. This ordered-moment orientation for the A-type AFM is consistent with calculations with magnetic dipole interactions. As a result, the anisotropic ?(T) and isothermal M(H) data for EuCu2As2, also containing Eu+2 spins S = 7/2, strongly deviate from the predictions of molecular field theory for collinear AFM ordering and the AFM structure appears to be both noncollinear and noncoplanar.« less

  11. The LTS timing analysis program : user%3CU%2B2019%3Es manual and description of the methods of analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Darrell Jewell; Schwarz, Jens

    2013-08-01

    The LTS Timing Analysis program described in this report uses signals from the Tempest Lasers, Pulse Forming Lines, and Laser Spark Detectors to carry out calculations to quantify and monitor the performance of the the Z-Accelerator's laser triggered SF6 switches. The program analyzes Z-shots beginning with Z2457, when Laser Spark Detector data became available for all lines.

  12. The Electrochemical Behavior and Surface Analysis of Ti49.6Ni45.1Cu5Cr0.3 Alloy for Orthodontic Usage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    : shape memory alloys; dental materials; Ni-Ti-Cu-Cr; electrochemical behavior; electrochemical impedance in various medical devi- ces, for example, dental archwire, endodontic file, orthope- dic instruments fluids has been reported,1 and the authors con- clude that nickel-containing dental alloys do not pose

  13. Trace element analysis of soil type collected from the Manjung and central Perak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azman, Muhammad Azfar Hamzah, Suhaimi; Rahman, Shamsiah Abdul; Elias, Md Suhaimi; Abdullah, Nazaratul Ashifa; Hashim, Azian; Shukor, Shakirah Abd; Kamaruddin, Ahmad Hasnulhadi Che

    2015-04-29

    Trace elements in soils primarily originated from their parent materials. Parents’ material is the underlying geological material that has been undergone different types of chemical weathering and leaching processes. Soil trace elements concentrations may be increases as a result of continuous input from various human activities, including power generation, agriculture, mining and manufacturing. This paper describes the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) method used for the determination of trace elements concentrations in part per million (ppm) present in the terrestrial environment soil in Perak. The data may indicate any contamination of trace elements contributed from human activities in the area. The enrichment factors were used to check if there any contamination due to the human activities (power plants, agricultural, mining, etc.) otherwise the values would serve as a baseline data for future study. The samples were collected from 27 locations of different soil series in the area at two different depths: the top soil (0-15cm) and the sub soil (15-30cm). The collected soil samples were air dried at 60°C and passed through 2 µm sieve. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) has been used for the determination of trace elements. Samples were activated in the Nuclear Malaysia TRIGA Mark II reactor followed by gamma spectrometric analysis. By activating the stable elements in the samples, the elements can be determined from the intensities of gamma energies emitted by the respected radionuclides.

  14. Photoelectrochemistry, Electronic Structure, and Bandgap Sizes of Semiconducting Cu(I)-Niobates and Cu(I)-Tantalates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maggard, Paul A.

    2013-11-14

    Semiconducting metal-oxides have remained of intense research interest owing to their potential for achieving efficient solar-driven photocatalytic reactions in aqueous solutions that occur as a result of their bandgap excitation. The photocatalytic reduction of water or carbon dioxide to generate hydrogen or hydrocarbon fuels, respectively, can be driven on p-type (photocathodic) electrodes with suitable band energies. However, metal-oxide semiconductors are typically difficult to dope as p-type with a high mobility of carriers. The supported research led to the discovery of new p-type Cu(I)-niobate and Cu(I)-tantalate film electrodes that can be prepared on FTO glass. New high-purity flux syntheses and the full structural determination of several Cu(I)-containing niobates and tantalates have been completed, as well as new investigations of their optical and photoelectrochemical properties and electronic structures via density-functional theory calculations. For example, CuNbO3, Cu5Ta11O30 and CuNb3O8 were prepared in high purity and their structures were characterized by both single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. These two classes of Cu(I)-containing compounds exhibit optical bandgap sizes ranging from ~1.3 eV to ~2.6 eV. Photoelectrochemical measurements of these compounds show strong photon-driven cathodic currents that confirm the p-type semiconductor behavior of CuNbO3, CuNb3O8, and Cu5Ta11O30. Incident-photon-to-current efficiencies are measured that approach greater than ~1%. Electronic-structure calculations based on density functional theory reveal the visible-light absorption stems from a nearly-direct bandgap transition involving a copper-to-niobium or tantalum (d10 to d0) charge-transfer excitations.

  15. Development of HELIOS/CAPP code system for the analysis of block type VHTR cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, H. C.; Han, T. Y.; Jo, C. K.; Noh, J. M.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the HELIOS/CAPP code system developed for the analysis of block type VHTR cores is presented and verified against several VHTR core configurations. Verification results shows that HELIOS code predicts less negative MTC and RTC than McCARD code does and thus HELIOS code overestimates the multiplication factors at the states with high moderator and reflector temperature especially when the B{sub 4}C BP is loaded. In the depletion calculation for the VHTR single cell fuel element, the error of HELIOS code increases as burnup does. It is ascribed to the fact that HELIOS code treats some fission product nuclides with large resonances as non-resonant nuclides. In the 2-D core depletion calculation, a relatively large reactivity error is observed in the case with BP loading while the reactivity error in the case without BP loading is less than 300 pcm. (authors)

  16. Experimental and vector analysis on gamma type Stirling engine with hot power cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isshiki, Naotsugu; Tsukahara, Shigeji; Ohtomo, Michihiro

    1995-12-31

    In 1993, the superiority of hot end connected power cylinder gamma type Stirling engine (HEC) compared to the conventional cold end connected power cylinder engine (CEC) was reported by Prof. J.Kentfield of the University of Calgary. It is a great thing that he introduced the HEC engine, and it reminded the authors that in 1980, they built and experimented with a three cylinder 3kW Stirling engine SRI-1, in which two cylinders are positively heated by gas, that is called HCH (Hot, Cold and Hot) engine as shown in a figure, and having similarity to the above HEC. The authors have developed a quite simple and understandable approximate harmonic vector analysis method for Stirling machines. By this, Kentfield`s HEC engine and their HCH engine are expressed by the same figure as shown in the paper. The similarity and superiority of HEC and HCH compared to CEC and CHC are easily shown by the vector analysis method with physical reason.

  17. A NMR-Based Carbon-Type Analysis of Diesel Fuel Blends From Various Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bays, J. Timothy; King, David L.

    2013-05-10

    In collaboration with participants of the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Advanced Vehicle/Fuels/Lubricants (AVFL) Committee, and project AVFL-19, the characteristics of fuels from advanced and renewable sources were compared to commercial diesel fuels. The main objective of this study was to highlight similarities and differences among the fuel types, i.e. ULSD, renewables, and alternative fuels, and among fuels within the different fuel types. This report summarizes the carbon-type analysis from 1H and 13C{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of 14 diesel fuel samples. The diesel fuel samples come from diverse sources and include four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels (ULSD), one gas-to-liquid diesel fuel (GTL), six renewable diesel fuels (RD), two shale oil-derived diesel fuels, and one oil sands-derived diesel fuel. Overall, the fuels examined fall into two groups. The two shale oil-derived samples and the oil-sand-derived sample closely resemble the four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesels, with SO1 and SO2 most closely matched with ULSD1, ULSD2, and ULSD4, and OS1 most closely matched with ULSD3. As might be expected, the renewable diesel fuels, with the exception of RD3, do not resemble the ULSD fuels because of their very low aromatic content, but more closely resemble the gas-to-liquid sample (GTL) in this respect. RD3 is significantly different from the other renewable diesel fuels in that the aromatic content more closely resembles the ULSD fuels. Fused-ring aromatics are readily observable in the ULSD, SO, and OS samples, as well as RD3, and are noticeably absent in the remaining RD and GTL fuels. Finally, ULSD3 differs from the other ULSD fuels by having a significantly lower aromatic carbon content and higher cycloparaffinic carbon content. In addition to providing important comparative compositional information regarding the various diesel fuels, this report also provides important information about the capabilities of NMR spectroscopy for the detailed characterization and comparison of fuels and fuel blends.

  18. Complete genome sequencing and evolutionary analysis of Indian isolates of Dengue virus type 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, Paban Kumar, E-mail: pabandash@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Shashi; Soni, Manisha; Agarwal, Ankita; Parida, Manmohan; Rao, P.V.Lakshmana

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Complete genome of Indian DENV-2 was deciphered for the first time in this study. •The recent Indian DENV-2 revealed presence of many unique amino acid residues. •Genotype shift (American to Cosmopolitan) characterizes evolution of DENV-2 in India. •Circulation of a unique clade of DENV-2 in South Asia was identified. -- Abstract: Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of global public health significance. It is now endemic in most parts of the South East Asia including India. Though Dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) is predominantly associated with major outbreaks in India, complete genome information of Indian DENV-2 is not available. In this study, the full-length genome of five DENV-2 isolates (four from 2001 to 2011 and one from 1960), from different parts of India was determined. The complete genome of the Indian DENV-2 was found to be 10,670 bases long with an open reading frame coding for 3391 amino acids. The recent Indian DENV-2 (2001–2011) revealed a nucleotide sequence identity of around 90% and 97% with an older Indian DENV-2 (1960) and closely related Sri Lankan and Chinese DENV-2 respectively. Presence of unique amino acid residues and non-conservative substitutions in critical amino acid residues of major structural and non-structural proteins was observed in recent Indian DENV-2. Selection pressure analysis revealed positive selection in few amino acid sites of the genes encoding for structural and non-structural proteins. The molecular phylogenetic analysis based on comparison of both complete coding region and envelope protein gene with globally diverse DENV-2 viruses classified the recent Indian isolates into a unique South Asian clade within Cosmopolitan genotype. A shift of genotype from American to Cosmopolitan in 1970s characterized the evolution of DENV-2 in India. Present study is the first report on complete genome characterization of emerging DENV-2 isolates from India and highlights the circulation of a unique clade in South Asia.

  19. Spectroscopic Observations and Analysis of the Unusual Type Ia SN1999ac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garavini, G.; Aldering, G.; Amadon, A.; Amanullah, R.; Astier,P.; Balland, C.; Blanc, G.; Conley, A.; Dahlen, T.; Deustua, S.E.; Ellis,R.; Fabbro, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Fan, X.; Folatelli, G.; Frye, B.; Gates,E.L.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goldman, B.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.E.; Haissinski, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.; Howell, D.A.; Kent, S.; Kim, A.G.; Knop, R.A.; Kowalski, M.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lee, B.C.; Lidman, C.; Mendez,J.; Miller, G.J.; Moniez, M.; Mouchet, M.; Mourao, A.; Newberg, H.; Nobili, S.; Nugent, P.E.; Pain, R.; Perdereau, O.; Perlmutter, S.; Quimby, R.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Richards, G.T.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schaefer, B.E.; Schahmaneche, K.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A.L.; Stanishev,V.; Thomas, R.C.; Walton, N.A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.

    2005-07-12

    The authors present optical spectra of the peculiar Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 1999ac. The data extend from -15 to +42 days with respect to B-band maximum and reveal an event that is unusual in several respects. prior to B-band maximum, the spectra resemble those of SN 1999aa, a slowly declining event, but possess stronger Si II and Ca II signatures (more characteristic of a spectroscopically normal SN). Spectra after B-band maximum appear more normal. The expansion velocities inferred from the Iron lines appear to be lower than average; whereas, the expansion velocity inferred from Calcium H and K are higher than average. The expansion velocities inferred from the Iron lines appear to be lower than average; whereas, the expansion velocity inferred from Calcium H and K are higher than average. The expansion velocities inferred from Si II are among the slowest ever observed, though SN 1999ac is not particularly dim. The analysis of the parameters v{sub 10}(Si II), R(Si II), v, and {Delta}m{sub 15} further underlines the unique characteristics of SN 1999ac. They find convincing evidence of C II {lambda}6580 in the day -15 spectrum with ejection velocity v > 16,000 km s{sup -1}, but this signature disappears by day -9. This rapid evolution at early times highlights the importance of extremely early-time spectroscopy.

  20. Long-term leaching test of incinerator bottom ash: Evaluation of Cu partition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Cheng-Fang Wu, Chung-Hsin; Liu, Yen-Chiun

    2007-07-01

    Two types of leaching tests were performed on the bottom ash from municipal solid waste incinerators. A short-term batch test specified by the America Nuclear Society (ANS) and long-term column tests with acetic acid (pH 5.2) as leaching solution were used to evaluate copper leachability. The Cu leaching after the 5-d ANS test is about 1% of the original Cu content of 5300 mg/kg. Upon addition of a stabilizing agent, the Cu leaching quantity is reduced; the extent of reduction depends on the type of chemical used (phosphate, carbonate and sulfide). The 1.6% Na{sub 2}S addition showed negligible Cu leaching, and Na{sub 2}S was, therefore, used in subsequent column tests. The 30-d column test indicates a steady increase of Cu leaching amount with time and reaches about 1.5% of the original Cu content after 30 d. A 180-d column test further increased the Cu leaching to about 5.1% of the original Cu content, whereas no appreciable Cu leaching was found with the addition of 1.6% Na{sub 2}S. A sequential extraction was conducted on the raw ash, ash with the addition of Na{sub 2}S and the residue ash after 30 d of operation to characterize Cu affinity for different solid fractions. The data were used to evaluate the fate of Cu through these interactions.

  1. Power Series Power series are one of the most useful type of series in analysis. For example,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, John K.

    Chapter 6 Power Series Power series are one of the most useful type of series in analysis functions (and many other less familiar functions). 6.1. Introduction A power series (centered at 0 coefficients. If all but finitely many of the an are zero, then the power series is a polynomial function

  2. Robustness analysis of State-of-Charge estimation methods for two types of Li-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Huei

    Robustness analysis of State-of-Charge estimation methods for two types of Li-ion batteries i g h l i g h t s battery model parameters are optimized. 2012 Accepted 1 June 2012 Available online 9 June 2012 Keywords: Battery management systems SOC

  3. Probabilistic Analysis of a Monod-type equation by use of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for our society. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a new form of renewable energy by convertingProbabilistic Analysis of a Monod-type equation by use of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Eric A. Zielke December 9, 2005 #12;Abstract Renewable energy forms have become an increasing need

  4. Plastic deformation in Al (Cu) interconnects stressed by electromigration and studied by synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Advanced Light Source; UCLA; Chen, Kai; Chen, Kai; Tamura, Nobumichi; Valek, Bryan C.; Tu, King-Ning

    2008-05-14

    We report here an in-depth synchrotron radiation based white beam X-ray microdiffraction study of plasticity in individual grains of an Al (Cu) interconnect during the early stage of electromigration. The study shows a rearrangement of the geometrically necessary dislocations (GND) in bamboo typed grains during that stage. We find that about 90percent of the GNDs are oriented so that their line direction is the closest to the current flow direction. In non-bamboo typed grains, the Laue peak positions shift, indicating that the grains rotate. An analysis in terms of force directions has been carried out and is consistent with observed electromigration induced grain rotation and bending.

  5. Microcomputer Energy Analysis Studies of Selected Building Types in a Hot, Humid Climatic Zone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQueen, T. M.; Leaver, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    The DOE-2 building energy analysis computer program has been used in both the design and analysis of new or retrofitted buildings. The combination of ease of use, economy, and the capability of producing a comprehensive ...

  6. Room-temperature thermally induced relaxation effect in a two-dimensional cyano-bridged Cu-Mo bimetal assembly and thermodynamic analysis of the relaxation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umeta, Yoshikazu; Ozaki, Noriaki; Tokoro, Hiroko; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi

    2013-04-15

    We observed a photo-switching effect in [Cu{sup II}(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclodecane)]{sub 2}[Mo{sup IV}(CN){sub 8}]{center_dot}10H{sub 2}O by irradiation with 410-nm light around room temperature using infrared spectroscopy. This photo-switching is caused by the photo-induced charge transfer from Mo{sup IV} to Cu{sup II}. The photo-induced phase thermally relaxed to the initial phase with a half-life time of 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 1}, 6.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 1}, and 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 2} s at 293, 283, and 273 K, respectively. The relaxation process was analyzed using Hauser's equation, k=k{sub 0}exp[-(E{sub a}+E{sub a}{sup *}{gamma}) /k{sub B}T], where k is the rate constant of relaxation, k{sub 0} is the frequency factor, E{sub a} is the activation energy, E{sub a}{sup *} is the additional activation energy due to the cooperativity, and {gamma} is the fraction of the photo-induced phase. k{sub 0}, E{sub a}, and E{sub a}{sup *} were evaluated as 1.28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7}{+-} 2.6 s{sup -1}, 4002 {+-} 188 cm{sup -1}, and 546 {+-} 318 cm{sup -1}, respectively. The value of E{sub a} is much larger than that of the relaxation process for the typical light-induced spin crossover effect (E{sub a} Almost-Equal-To 1000 cm{sup -1}). Room-temperature photo-switching is an important issue in the field of optical functional materials. The present system is useful for the demonstration of high-temperature photo-switching material.

  7. An in-situ phosphorus source for the synthesis of Cu3P and the subsequent conversion to Cu3PS4 nanoparticle clusters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sheets, Erik J.; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Wei -Chang; Balow, Robert B.; Wang, Yunjie; Walker, Bryce C.; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-09-20

    The search for alternative earth abundant semiconducting nanocrystals for sustainable energy applications has brought forth the need for nanoscale syntheses beyond bulk synthesis routes. Of particular interest are metal phosphides and derivative I-V-VI chalcogenides including copper phosphide (Cu3P) and copper thiophosphate (Cu3PS4). Herein, we report a one-pot, solution-based synthesis of Cu3P nanocrystals utilizing an in-situ phosphorus source: phosphorus pentasulfide (P2S5) in trioctylphosphine (TOP). By injecting this phosphorus source into a copper solution in oleylamine (OLA), uniform and size controlled Cu3P nanocrystals with a phosphorous-rich surface are synthesized. The subsequent reaction of the Cu3P nanocrystals with decomposing thiourea forms nanoscale Cu3PS4more »particles having p-type conductivity and an effective optical band gap of 2.36 eV.« less

  8. Analysis of MODIS 250 m NDVI Using Different Time-Series Data for Crop Type Separability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Eunmok

    2014-08-31

    The primary objectives of this research were to: (1) investigate the use of different compositing periods of NDVI values of time-series MODIS 250 m data for distinguishing major crop types on the central Great Plains of ...

  9. Effect of CNTs dispersion on the thermal and mechanical properties of Cu/CNTs nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhsan, Ali Samer, E-mail: alisameer2007@gmail.com, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: alisameer2007@gmail.com, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Yusoff, Puteri Sri Melor Megat Bt, E-mail: puteris@petronas.com.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (UTP) (Malaysia); Mohamed, Norani M., E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my [Centre of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices (COINN), UTP (Malaysia); Raza, M. Rafi, E-mail: rafirazamalik@gmail.com [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Modified technique of metal injection molding (MIM) was used to fabricate multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced Cu nanocomposites. The effect of adding different amount of CNTs (0-10 vol.%) on the thermal and mechanical behaviour of the fabricated nanocomposites is presented. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed homogenous dispersion of CNTs in Cu matrices at different CNTs contents. The experimentally measured thermal conductivities of Cu/CNTs nanocomposites showed extraordinary increase (76% higher than pure sintered Cu) with addition of 10 vol.% CNTs. As compared to the pure sintered Cu, increase in modulus of elasticity (Young's modulus) of Cu/CNTs nanocomposites sintered at 1050°C for 2.5 h was measured to be 48%. However, in case of 7.5 vol.% CNTs, Young's modulus was increased significantly about 51% compared to that of pure sintered Cu.

  10. Hydrodynamic evolution and jet energy loss in Cu + Cu collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenke, Bjoern; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2011-04-15

    We present results from a hybrid description of Cu + Cu collisions using (3 + 1)-dimensional hydrodynamics (music) for the bulk evolution and a Monte Carlo simulation (martini) for the evolution of high-momentum partons in the hydrodynamical background. We explore the limits of this description by going to small system sizes and determine the dependence on different fractions of wounded nucleon and binary collisions scaling of the initial energy density. We find that Cu + Cu collisions are well described by the hybrid description at least up to 20% central collisions.

  11. Reconciliation of local and long range tilt correlations in underdoped La??xBaxCuO? (0 ? x ? 0.155)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bozin, Emil S.; Zhong, Ruidan; Knox, Kevin R.; Gu, Genda; Hill, John P.; Tranquada, John M.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2015-02-26

    A long standing puzzle regarding the disparity of local and long range CuO? octahedral tilt correlations in the underdoped regime of La??xBaxCuO? is addressed by utilizing complementary neutron powder diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) approaches. Long-range and static CuO? tilt order with orthogonally inequivalent Cu-O bonds in the CuO? planes in the low temperature tetragonal (LTT) phase is succeeded on warming through the low-temperature transition by one with orthogonally equivalent bonds in the low temperature orthorhombic (LTO) phase. In contrast, the signatures of LTT-type tilts in the instantaneous local atomic structure persist on heating throughout the LTO crystallographic phasemore »on the nanoscale, although becoming weaker as temperature increases. Analysis of the INS spectra for the x = 1/8 composition reveals the dynamic nature of the LTT-like tilt fluctuations within the LTO phase and their 3D character. The doping dependence of relevant structural parameters indicates that the magnitude of the Cu-O bond anisotropy has a maximum at x = 1/8 doping where bulk superconductivity is most strongly suppressed, suggesting that the structural anisotropy might be influenced by electron-phonon coupling and the particular stability of the stripe-ordered phase at this composition. The bond-length modulation that pins stripe order is found to be remarkably subtle, with no anomalous bond length disorder at low temperature, placing an upper limit on any in-plane Cu-O bondlength anisotropy. The results further reveal that although appreciable octahedral tilts persist through the high-temperature transition and into the high temperature tetragonal (HTT) phase, there is no significant preference between different tilt directions in the HTT regime. This study also exemplifies the importance of a systematic approach using complementary techniques when investigating systems exhibiting a large degree of complexity and subtle structural responses.« less

  12. Reconciliation of local and long-range tilt correlations in underdoped La2-xBaxCuO4(0 ? x ? 0.155)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bozin, Emil S.; Zhong, Ruidan; Knox, Kevin R.; Gu, Genda; Hill, John P.; Tranquada, John M.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2015-02-26

    A long standing puzzle regarding the disparity of local and long range CuO? octahedral tilt correlations in the underdoped regime of La??xBaxCuO? is addressed by utilizing complementary neutron powder diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) approaches. Long-range and static CuO? tilt order with orthogonally inequivalent Cu-O bonds in the CuO? planes in the low temperature tetragonal (LTT) phase is succeeded on warming through the low-temperature transition by one with orthogonally equivalent bonds in the low temperature orthorhombic (LTO) phase. In contrast, the signatures of LTT-type tilts in the instantaneous local atomic structure persist on heating throughout the LTO crystallographic phasemore »on the nanoscale, although becoming weaker as temperature increases. Analysis of the INS spectra for the x = 1/8 composition reveals the dynamic nature of the LTT-like tilt fluctuations within the LTO phase and their 3D character. The doping dependence of relevant structural parameters indicates that the magnitude of the Cu-O bond anisotropy has a maximum at x = 1/8 doping where bulk superconductivity is most strongly suppressed, suggesting that the structural anisotropy might be influenced by electron-phonon coupling and the particular stability of the stripe-ordered phase at this composition. The bond-length modulation that pins stripe order is found to be remarkably subtle, with no anomalous bond length disorder at low temperature, placing an upper limit on any in-plane Cu-O bondlength anisotropy. The results further reveal that although appreciable octahedral tilts persist through the high-temperature transition and into the high temperature tetragonal (HTT) phase, there is no significant preference between different tilt directions in the HTT regime. As a result, this study also exemplifies the importance of a systematic approach using complementary techniques when investigating systems exhibiting a large degree of complexity and subtle structural responses.« less

  13. Experimental and theoretical analysis of the performance of Stirling engine with pendulum type displacer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isshiki, Seita; Isshiki, Naotsugu; Takanose, Eiichiro; Igawa, Yoshiharu

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the detailed experimental and theoretical performance of new type Stirling engine with pendulum type displacer (PDSE) which was proposed last year. This kind of engine has a pendulum type displacer suspended by the hinge shaft, and swings right and left in displacer space. The present paper mainly discusses the PDSE-3B which is an atmospheric 30[W] engine heated by fuel and cooled by water. It is clear that power required to provide a pendulum type displacer motion is expressed as a simple equation consisting of viscous flow loss term proportional to the square of rotational speed and dynamic pressure loss term proportional to the cube of rotational speed. It is also clear that theoretical engine power defined as the difference between experimental indicated power and power required to provide pendulum type displacer motion agrees well with the experimental engine power. It is also clear that measured Nusselt number of regenerator`s wire meshes agreed with the equation of previous study. In conclusion, PDSE is considered effective for measuring many aspects of performance of the Stirling engine.

  14. Analysis of the thermoelectric properties of n-type ZnO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, Khuong P [IHPC, Singapore; Singh, David J [ORNL; Wu, Ping [IHPC, Singapore

    2011-01-01

    We report an investigation of the temperature- and doping-dependent thermoelectric behavior of n-type ZnO. The results are based on a combination of experimental data from the literature and calculated transport functions obtained from Boltzmann transport theory applied to the first-principles electronic structure. From this we obtain the dependence of the figure of merit ZT on doping and temperature. We find that improvement of the lattice thermal conductivity is essential for obtaining high ZT in n-type ZnO.

  15. Charged and strange hadron elliptic flow in Cu+Cu collisions at [sqrt]sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surrow, Bernd

    We present the results of an elliptic flow, v2, analysis of Cu+Cu collisions recorded with the solenoidal tracker detector (STAR) at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at ?sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV. Elliptic flow as a ...

  16. Analysis of Rollover Shape and Energy Storage and Return in Cantilever Beam-Type Prosthetic Feet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olesnavage, Kathryn

    This paper presents an analysis of the rollover shape and energy storage and return in a prosthetic foot made from a compliant cantilevered beam. The rollover shape of a prosthetic foot is defined as the path of the center ...

  17. Interaction of Participant Characteristics and Type of AAC with Individuals with ASD: A Meta-Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganz, Jennifer B.; Mason, Rose A.; Goodwyn, Fara D.; Boles, Margot B.; Heath, Amy K.; Davis, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and complex communication needs often rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) as a means of functional communication. This meta-analysis investigated how ...

  18. Modified Ni-Cu catalysts for ethanol steam reforming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan, M.; Mihet, M.; Almasan, V.; Borodi, G.; Katona, G.; Muresan, L.; Lazar, M. D.

    2013-11-13

    Three Ni-Cu catalysts, having different Cu content, supported on ?-alumina were synthesized by wet co-impregnation method, characterized and tested in the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction. The catalysts were characterized for determination of: total surface area and porosity (N{sub 2} adsorption - desorption using BET and Dollimer Heal methods), Ni surface area (hydrogen chemisorption), crystallinity and Ni crystallites size (X-Ray Diffraction), type of catalytic active centers (Hydrogen Temperature Programmed Reduction). Total surface area and Ni crystallites size are not significantly influenced by the addition of Cu, while Ni surface area is drastically diminished by increasing of Cu concentration. Steam reforming experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure, temperature range 150-350°C, and ethanol - water molar ration of 1 at 30, using Ar as carrier gas. Ethanol conversion and hydrogen production increase by the addition of Cu. At 350°C there is a direct connection between hydrogen production and Cu concentration. Catalysts deactivation in 24h time on stream was studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) on used catalysts. Coke deposition was observed at all studied temperatures; at 150°C amorphous carbon was evidenced, while at 350°C crystalline, filamentous carbon is formed.

  19. Science DMZ Implemented at CU Boulder

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CU Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ @ UF Science DMZ @ CU...

  20. Crystallization of Zr2PdxCu(1-x) and Zr2NixCu(1-x) Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min Xu

    2008-08-18

    One interesting aspect of rretallic glasses is the numerous instances of the deviation of the phase selection from the amorphous state to thermodynamically stable phases during the crystallization process. Their devitrification pathways allow us to study the relationship between the original amorphous structure and their crystalline counter parts. Among the various factors of phase selections, size and electronic effects have been most extensively studied. Elucidating the phase selection process of a glassy alloy will be helpful to fill in the puzzle of the changes from disordered to ordered structures. In this thesis, Two model Zr{sub 2}Pd{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} and Zr{sub 2}Ni{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1) glassy systems were investigated since: (1) All of the samples can be made into a homogenous metallic glass; (2) The atomic radii differ from Pd to Cu is by 11%, while Ni has nearly the identical atomic size compare to Cu. Moreover, Pd and Ni differ by only one valence electron from Cu. Thus, these systems are ideal to test the idea of the effects of electronic structure and size factors; (3) The small number of components in these pseudo binary systems readily lend themselves to theoretical modeling. Using high temperature X-ray diffraction {HTXRD) and thermal analysis, topological, size, electronic, bond and chemical distribution factors on crystallization selections in Zr{sub 2}Pd{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} and Zr{sub 2}Ni{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} metallic glass have been explored. All Zr{sub 2}Pd{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} compositions share the same Cu11b phase with different pathways of meta-stable, icosahedral quasicrystalline phase (i-phase), and C16 phase formations. The quasicrystal phase formation is topologically related to the increasing icosahedral short range order (SRO) with Pd content in Zr{sub 2}Pd{sub x}Cu{sub (1·x)} system. Meta-stable C16 phase is competitive with C11b phase at x = 0.5, which is dominated by electronic structure rather than size effects. Cu-rich and Ni-rich compositions in Zr{sub 2}Ni{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} trend to divitrify to C11b or C16 phases respectively. In the proposed pseudo binary phase diagram, the domain of C16, C11b and co-existence phases are mainly related with the topology in the amorphous structure and formation enthalpies of crystalline phases.

  1. Practical Thermal Evaluation Methods For HAC Fire Analysis In Type B Radiaoactive Material (RAM) Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramczyk, Glenn; Hensel, Stephen J; Gupta, Narendra K.

    2013-03-28

    Title 10 of the United States Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR Part 71.73) requires that Type B radioactive material (RAM) packages satisfy certain Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) thermal design requirements to ensure package safety during accidental fire conditions. Compliance with thermal design requirements can be met by prototype tests, analyses only or a combination of tests and analyses. Normally, it is impractical to meet all the HAC using tests only and the analytical methods are too complex due to the multi-physics non-linear nature of the fire event. Therefore, a combination of tests and thermal analyses methods using commercial heat transfer software are used to meet the necessary design requirements. The authors, along with his other colleagues at Savannah River National Laboratory in Aiken, SC, USA, have successfully used this 'tests and analyses' approach in the design and certification of several United States' DOE/NNSA certified packages, e.g. 9975, 9977, 9978, 9979, H1700, and Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP). This paper will describe these methods and it is hoped that the RAM Type B package designers and analysts can use them for their applications.

  2. Fluctuation analysis of mechanochemical coupling depending on the type of bio-molecular motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masatoshi Nishikawa; Hiroaki Takagi; Atsuko H. Iwane; Toshio Yanagida

    2008-01-09

    Mechanochemical coupling was studied for two different types of myosin motors in cells: myosin V, which carries cargo over long distances by as a single molecule; and myosin II, which generates a contracting force in cooperation with other myosin II molecules. Both mean and variance of myosin V velocity at various [ATP] obeyed Michaelis-Menten mechanics, consistent with tight mechanochemical coupling. Myosin II, working in an ensemble, however, was explained by a loose coupling mechanism, generating variable step sizes depending on the ATP concentration and realizing a much larger step (200 nm) per ATP hydrolysis than myosin V through its cooperative nature at zero load. These different mechanics are ideal for the respective myosin's physiological functions.

  3. Flow Characteristics Analysis of Widows' Creek Type Control Valve for Steam Turbine Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Yong H.; Sohn, Myoung S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    The steam turbine converts the kinetic energy of steam to mechanical energy of rotor blades in the power conversion system of fossil and nuclear power plants. The electric output from the generator of which the rotor is coupled with that of the steam turbine depends on the rotation velocity of the steam turbine bucket. The rotation velocity is proportional to the mass flow rate of steam entering the steam turbine through valves and nozzles. Thus, it is very important to control the steam mass flow rate for the load following operation of power plants. Among various valves that control the steam turbine, the control valve is most significant. The steam flow rate is determined by the area formed by the stem disk and the seat of the control valve. While the ideal control valve linearly controls the steam mass flow rate with its stem lift, the real control valve has various flow characteristic curves pursuant to the stem lift type. Thus, flow characteristic curves are needed to precisely design the control valves manufactured for the operating conditions of nuclear power plants. OMEGA (Optimized Multidimensional Experiment Geometric Apparatus) was built to experimentally study the flow characteristics of steam flowing inside the control valve. The Widows' Creek type control valve was selected for reference. Air was selected as the working fluid in the OMEGA loop to exclude the condensation effect in this simplified approach. Flow characteristic curves were plotted by calculating the ratio of the measured mass flow rate versus the theoretical mass flow rate of the air. The flow characteristic curves are expected to be utilized to accurately design and operate the control valve for fossil as well as nuclear plants. (authors)

  4. Mass of Cu-57 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagliardi, Carl A.; Semon, D. R.; Tribble, Robert E.; Vanausdeln, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    at temperatures of T9 0.4?7 and 0.70 with the two hypotheses. In Fig. 3(b}, we show the calculated ratio of the Cu photodisintegration rate to its beta-decay rate as a function of temperature, again ac- cording to our two hypotheses. %hen this ratio is much... PROCEDURES AND RESULTS A 76.5 MeV Li + beam from the Texas A&M cyclo- tron irradiated a target consisting of 1-52 mg/cmz ss&i (99.98%%uo purity), backed by 1.10 mg/cm of Al. Outgoing ejectiles at 7.0 deg were detected with an Enge split...

  5. Synthetic Spectral Analysis of the Hot Component in the S-Type Symbiotic Variable EG Andromeda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Kolb; J. Miller; E. M. Sion; J. Mikolajewska

    2004-07-26

    We have applied grids of NLTE high gravity model atmospheres and optically thick accretion disk models for the first time to archival IUE and FUSE spectra of the S-type symbiotic variable EG And taken at superior spectroscopic conjunction when Rayleigh scattering should be minimal and the hot component is viewed in front of the red giant. For EG And's widely accepted, published hot component mass, orbital inclination and distance from the Hipparcos parallax, we find that hot, high gravity, NLTE photosphere model fits to the IUE spectra yield distances from the best-fitting models which agree with the Hipparcos parallax distance but at temperatures substantially lower than the modified Zanstra temperatures. NLTE fits to an archival FUSE spectrum taken at the same orbital phase as the IUE spectra yield the same temperature as the IUE temperature (50,000K). However, for the same hot component mass, inclination and parallax-derived distance, accretion disk models at moderately high inclinations, $\\sim 60-75^{\\circ}$ with accretion rates $\\dot{M} = 1\\times 10^{-8}$ to $1\\times 10^{-9} M_{\\sun}/yr$ for white dwarf masses $M_{wd} = 0.4 M_{\\sun}$ yield distances grossly smaller than the distance from the Hipparcos parallax. Therefore, we rule out an accretion disk as the dominant source of the FUV flux. Our findings support a hot bare white dwarf as the dominant source of FUV flux.

  6. Comparative analysis of the atomization characteristics of fifteen biodiesel fuel types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, C.A.W.; Watts, K.C.

    2000-04-01

    Engine results using biofuels have varied considerably in the reported literature. This article addresses two potential sources of this variation, atomization differences and impurities due to lack of quality control during production. Atomization is the first process encountered during the combustion of fuels in a compression ignition engine and is largely determined by the fuel's viscosity and surface tension. Previous work using five experimentally produced methyl ester biodiesel fuels showed that the viscosity and surface tension could be predicted from their fatty acid ester composition, and the atomization characteristics in turn could be predicted from their viscosity and surface tension. This article utilizes the results of that work to give a quantitative comparison of the atomization characteristics of fifteen biodiesel fuel types using the fuel's viscosity and surface tension, predicted directly from the fatty acid composition of the fuels. Except for coconut and rapeseed biodiesel fuels, all of the rest of the 15 biodiesel fuels had similar atomization characteristics. Since the most likely contaminant in the fuel from the processing was residual glycerides, their effect on viscosity and surface tension was studied experimentally and their effect on the atomization characteristics was computed.

  7. Statistical analysis of the dynamics of secondary electrons in the flare of a high-voltage beam-type discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demkin, V. P.; Mel'nichuk, S. V.

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, results of investigations into the dynamics of secondary electrons with helium atoms in the presence of the reverse electric field arising in the flare of a high-voltage pulsed beam-type discharge and leading to degradation of the primary electron beam are presented. The electric field in the discharge of this type at moderate pressures can reach several hundred V/cm and leads to considerable changes in the kinetics of secondary electrons created in the process of propagation of the electron beam generated in the accelerating gap with a grid anode. Moving in the accelerating electric field toward the anode, secondary electrons create the so-called compensating current to the anode. The character of electron motion and the compensating current itself are determined by the ratio of the field strength to the concentration of atoms (E/n). The energy and angular spectra of secondary electrons are calculated by the Monte Carlo method for different ratios E/n of the electric field strength to the helium atom concentration. The motion of secondary electrons with threshold energy is studied for inelastic collisions of helium atoms and differential analysis is carried out of the collisional processes causing energy losses of electrons in helium for different E/n values. The mechanism of creation and accumulation of slow electrons as a result of inelastic collisions of secondary electrons with helium atoms and selective population of metastable states of helium atoms is considered. It is demonstrated that in a wide range of E/n values the motion of secondary electrons in the beam-type discharge flare has the character of drift. At E/n values characteristic for the discharge of the given type, the drift velocity of these electrons is calculated and compared with the available experimental data.

  8. EARLY OBSERVATIONS AND ANALYSIS OF THE TYPE Ia SN 2014J IN M82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, G. H.; Vinkó, J. [University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Sand, D. J. [Physics Department, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Hsiao, E. Y. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Banerjee, D. P. K.; Joshi, V.; Venkataraman, V.; Ashok, N. M. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangapura, Ahmedabad - 380009, Gujarat (India); Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Stritzinger, M. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Amanullah, R.; Johansson, J. [The Oskar Klein Centre, Physics Department, Stockholm University, Albanova University Center, SE 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Binzel, R. P. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Bochanski, J. J. [Haverford College, 370 Lancaster Avenue, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States); Bryngelson, G. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Francis Marion University, 4822 East Palmetto Street, Florence, SC 29506 (United States); Burns, C. R. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Drozdov, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, 8304 University Station, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Fieber-Beyer, S. K. [Department of Space Studies, University of North Dakota, University Stop 9008, ND 58202 (United States); Graham, M. L., E-mail: hman@astro.as.utexas.edu [Astronomy Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2015-01-01

    We present optical and near infrared (NIR) observations of the nearby Type Ia SN 2014J. Seventeen optical and 23 NIR spectra were obtained from 10 days before (–10d) to 10 days after (+10d) the time of maximum B-band brightness. The relative strengths of absorption features and their patterns of development can be compared at one day intervals throughout most of this period. Carbon is not detected in the optical spectra, but we identify C I ?1.0693 in the NIR spectra. Mg II lines with high oscillator strengths have higher initial velocities than other Mg II lines. We show that the velocity differences can be explained by differences in optical depths due to oscillator strengths. The spectra of SN 2014J show that it is a normal SN Ia, but many parameters are near the boundaries between normal and high-velocity subclasses. The velocities for O I, Mg II, Si II, S II, Ca II, and Fe II suggest that SN 2014J has a layered structure with little or no mixing. That result is consistent with the delayed detonation explosion models. We also report photometric observations, obtained from –10d to +29d, in the UBVRIJH and K{sub s} bands. The template fitting package SNooPy is used to interpret the light curves and to derive photometric parameters. Using R{sub V} = 1.46, which is consistent with previous studies, SNooPy finds that A{sub V} = 1.80 for E(B – V){sub host} = 1.23 ± 0.06 mag. The maximum B-band brightness of –19.19 ± 0.10 mag was reached on February 1.74 UT ± 0.13 days and the supernova has a decline parameter, ?m {sub 15}, of 1.12 ± 0.02 mag.

  9. [Purification of {sup 67}Cu]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1994-09-01

    This report documents progress made in several areas of research and describes results which have not yet been published. These areas include: Purification of {sup 67}Cu; Macrocyclic chelates for targeted therapy; Studies of biologic activation associated with molecular receptor increase and tumor response in ChL6/L6 protocol patients; Lym-1 single chain genetically engineered molecules; Analysis of molecular genetic coded messages to enhance tumor response; Human dosimetry and therapeutic human use radiopharmaceuticals; studies in phantoms; Quantitative SPECT; Preclinical studies; and Clinical studies.

  10. Synthesis, crystal and electronic structure, and physical properties of the new lanthanum copper telluride La{sub 3}Cu{sub 5}Te{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelinska, Mariya; Assoud, Abdeljalil [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Kleinke, Holger, E-mail: kleinke@uwaterloo.c [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    The new lanthanum copper telluride La{sub 3}Cu{sub 5-x}Te{sub 7} has been obtained by annealing the elements at 1073 K. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the title compound crystallizes in a new structure type, space group Pnma (no. 62) with lattice dimensions of a=8.2326(3) A, b=25.9466(9) A, c=7.3402(3) A, V=1567.9(1) A{sup 3}, Z=4 for La{sub 3}Cu{sub 4.86(4)}Te{sub 7}. The structure of La{sub 3}Cu{sub 5-x}Te{sub 7} is remarkably complex. The Cu and Te atoms build up a three-dimensional covalent network. The coordination polyhedra include trigonal LaTe{sub 6} prisms, capped trigonal LaTe{sub 7} prisms, CuTe{sub 4} tetrahedra, and CuTe{sub 3} pyramids. All Cu sites exhibit deficiencies of various extents. Electrical property measurements on a sintered pellet of La{sub 3}Cu{sub 4.86}Te{sub 7} indicate that it is a p-type semiconductor in accordance with the electronic structure calculations. -- Graphical abstract: Oligomeric unit comprising interconnected CuTe{sub 3} pyramids and CuTe{sub 4} tetrahedra. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} La{sub 3}Cu{sub 5-x}Te{sub 7} adopts a new structure type. {yields} All Cu sites exhibit deficiencies of various extents. {yields} The coordination polyhedra include trigonal LaTe{sub 6} prisms, capped trigonal LaTe{sub 7} prisms, CuTe{sub 4} tetrahedra and CuTe{sub 3} pyramids. {yields} La{sub 3}Cu{sub 5-x}Te{sub 7} is a p-type semiconductor.

  11. Array of Cu{sub 2}O nano-columns fabricated by oblique angle sputter deposition and their application in photo-assisted proton reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Chaudhary, Y. S.; Thakur, I.; Kulkarni, N. A.; Ayyub, P.

    2015-01-14

    Nano-columnar arrays of Cu{sub 2}O were grown by the oblique angle sputter deposition technique based on the self-shadowing principle. The as-grown nano-columnar samples are oriented along (111) direction, and they are highly transmitting in the visible range with a low reflectance. In this work, we show the photo-electrochemical activity of nano-columnar array of Cu{sub 2}O, which shows a higher (?25%) photocurrent density and a two-fold enhancement in the incident-to-photon conversion efficiency as compared to continuous thin film of Cu{sub 2}O in photo-assisted proton reduction type reaction. The improvement in electrochemical activity of nano-columnar Cu{sub 2}O photocathode can be attributed to the change in morphology, crystal structure, as well as electrical property, which shows a higher degree of band bending, increased donor carrier (e?) density and lower width of space charge region as revealed by capacitance measurements and Mott-Schottky analysis.

  12. Reconciliation of local and long-range tilt correlations in underdoped La2-xBaxCuO4(0 ? x ? 0.155)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozin, Emil S.; Zhong, Ruidan; Knox, Kevin R.; Gu, Genda; Hill, John P.; Tranquada, John M.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2015-02-26

    A long standing puzzle regarding the disparity of local and long range CuO? octahedral tilt correlations in the underdoped regime of La??xBaxCuO? is addressed by utilizing complementary neutron powder diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) approaches. Long-range and static CuO? tilt order with orthogonally inequivalent Cu-O bonds in the CuO? planes in the low temperature tetragonal (LTT) phase is succeeded on warming through the low-temperature transition by one with orthogonally equivalent bonds in the low temperature orthorhombic (LTO) phase. In contrast, the signatures of LTT-type tilts in the instantaneous local atomic structure persist on heating throughout the LTO crystallographic phase on the nanoscale, although becoming weaker as temperature increases. Analysis of the INS spectra for the x = 1/8 composition reveals the dynamic nature of the LTT-like tilt fluctuations within the LTO phase and their 3D character. The doping dependence of relevant structural parameters indicates that the magnitude of the Cu-O bond anisotropy has a maximum at x = 1/8 doping where bulk superconductivity is most strongly suppressed, suggesting that the structural anisotropy might be influenced by electron-phonon coupling and the particular stability of the stripe-ordered phase at this composition. The bond-length modulation that pins stripe order is found to be remarkably subtle, with no anomalous bond length disorder at low temperature, placing an upper limit on any in-plane Cu-O bondlength anisotropy. The results further reveal that although appreciable octahedral tilts persist through the high-temperature transition and into the high temperature tetragonal (HTT) phase, there is no significant preference between different tilt directions in the HTT regime. As a result, this study also exemplifies the importance of a systematic approach using complementary techniques when investigating systems exhibiting a large degree of complexity and subtle structural responses.

  13. Structural, optical and ethanol sensing properties of Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johari, Anima Sharma, Manish; Johari, Anoopshi; Bhatnagar, M. C.

    2014-04-24

    In present work, one-dimensional nanostructure of Cu-doped Tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) was synthesized by using thermal evaporation method in a tubular furnace under Nitrogen (N{sub 2}) ambience. The growth was carried out at atmospheric pressure. SEM and TEM images reveal the growth of wire-like nanostructures of Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} on Si substrate. The XRD analysis confirms that the synthesized SnO{sub 2} nanowires have tetragonal rutile structure with polycrystalline nature and X-ray diffraction pattern also showed that Cu gets incorporated into the SnO{sub 2} lattice. EDX spectra confirm the doping of Cu into SnO{sub 2} nanowires and atomic fraction of Cu in nanowires is ? 0.5 at%. The Vapor Liquid Solid (VLS) growth mechanism for Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowires was also confirmed by EDX spectra. The optical properties of as grown Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowires were studied by using UV-vis spectra which concludes the band gap of about 3.7 eV. As synthesized single Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowire based gas sensor exhibit relatively good performance to ethanol gas. This sensing behaviour offers a suitable application of the Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowire sensor for detection of ethanol gas.

  14. Criticality Analysis for Proposed Maximum Fuel Loading in a Standardized SNF Canister with Type 1a Baskets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chad Pope; Larry L. Taylor; Soon Sam Kim

    2007-02-01

    This document represents a summary version of the criticality analysis done to support loading SNF in a Type 1a basket/standard canister combination. Specifically, this engineering design file (EDF) captures the information pertinent to the intact condition of four fuel types with different fissile loads and their calculated reactivities. These fuels are then degraded into various configurations inside a canister without the presence of significant moderation. The important aspect of this study is the portrayal of the fuel degradation and its effect on the reactivity of a single canister given the supposition there will be continued moderation exclusion from the canister. Subsequent analyses also investigate the most reactive ‘dry’ canister in a nine canister array inside a hypothetical transport cask, both dry and partial to complete flooding inside the transport cask. The analyses also includes a comparison of the most reactive configuration to other benchmarked fuels using a software package called TSUNAMI, which is part of the SCALE 5.0 suite of software.

  15. Impact of deformation on the atomic structures and dynamics of a Cu-Zr metallic glass: A molecular dynamics study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y.; Mendelev, M. I.; Wang, C. Z.; Ott, R.; Zhang, F.; Besser, M. F.; Ho, K. M.; Kramer, M. J.

    2014-11-03

    Despite numerous studies on the atomic structures of Cu-Zr metallic glasses (MGs), their inherent structural ordering, e.g., medium-range order (MRO), remains difficult to describe. Specifically lacking is an understanding of how the MRO responds to deformation and the associated changes in atomic mobility. In this paper, we focus on the impact of deformation on MRO and associated effect on diffusion in a well-relaxed Cu64.5Zr35.5 MG by molecular dynamics simulations. The Cu-Zr MG exhibits a larger elastic limit of 0.035 and a yield stress of 3.5 GPa. The cluster alignment method was employed to characterize the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) andmore »Bergman-type medium-range order (BMRO) in the models upon loading and unloading. From this analysis, we find the disruption of both ISRO and BMRO occurs as the strain reaches about 0.02, well below the elastic limit. Within the elastic limit, the total fractions of ISRO or BMRO can be fully recovered upon unloading. The diffusivity increases six to eight times in regions undergoing plastic deformation, which is due to the dramatic disruption of the ISRO and BMRO. As a result, by mapping the spatial distributions of the mobile atoms, we demonstrate the increase in atomic mobility is due to the extended regions of disrupted ISRO and more importantly BMRO.« less

  16. Impact of deformation on the atomic structures and dynamics of a Cu-Zr metallic glass: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Mendelev, M. I.; Wang, C. Z.; Ott, R.; Zhang, F.; Besser, M. F.; Ho, K. M.; Kramer, M. J.

    2014-11-03

    Despite numerous studies on the atomic structures of Cu-Zr metallic glasses (MGs), their inherent structural ordering, e.g., medium-range order (MRO), remains difficult to describe. Specifically lacking is an understanding of how the MRO responds to deformation and the associated changes in atomic mobility. In this paper, we focus on the impact of deformation on MRO and associated effect on diffusion in a well-relaxed Cu64.5Zr35.5 MG by molecular dynamics simulations. The Cu-Zr MG exhibits a larger elastic limit of 0.035 and a yield stress of 3.5 GPa. The cluster alignment method was employed to characterize the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) and Bergman-type medium-range order (BMRO) in the models upon loading and unloading. From this analysis, we find the disruption of both ISRO and BMRO occurs as the strain reaches about 0.02, well below the elastic limit. Within the elastic limit, the total fractions of ISRO or BMRO can be fully recovered upon unloading. The diffusivity increases six to eight times in regions undergoing plastic deformation, which is due to the dramatic disruption of the ISRO and BMRO. As a result, by mapping the spatial distributions of the mobile atoms, we demonstrate the increase in atomic mobility is due to the extended regions of disrupted ISRO and more importantly BMRO.

  17. Route Type Determination Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett Stone

    2011-09-01

    According to the 2009 National Household Travel Survey 44.4 percent of all miles travelled by Americans in 2009 (including airplanes, trains, boats, golf carts, subways, bikes, etc.) were travelled in cars. If vans, SUV's and pickup trucks are included, that level increases to 86 percent. We do a lot of travelling on the road in personal vehicles - it's important to be able to understand how we get there and how to rate the fuel economy of our trips. An essential part of this is knowing how to decide if a trip is a city or highway trip.

  18. A Theoretical Study of Methanol Synthesis from CO(2) Hydrogenation on Metal-doped Cu(111) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu P.; Yang, Y.; White, M.G.

    2012-01-12

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations were employed to investigate the methanol synthesis reaction from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation (CO{sub 2} + 3H{sub 2} {yields} CH{sub 3}OH + H{sub 2}O) on metal-doped Cu(111) surfaces. Both the formate pathway and the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction followed by a CO hydrogenation pathway (RWGS + CO-Hydro) were considered in the study. Our calculations showed that the overall methanol yield increased in the sequence: Au/Cu(111) < Cu(111) < Pd/Cu(111) < Rh/Cu(111) < Pt/Cu(111) < Ni/Cu(111). On Au/Cu(111) and Cu(111), the formate pathway dominates the methanol production. Doping Au does not help the methanol synthesis on Cu(111). Pd, Rh, Pt, and Ni are able to promote the methanol production on Cu(111), where the conversion via the RWGS + CO-Hydro pathway is much faster than that via the formate pathway. Further kinetic analysis revealed that the methanol yield on Cu(111) was controlled by three factors: the dioxomethylene hydrogenation barrier, the CO binding energy, and the CO hydrogenation barrier. Accordingly, two possible descriptors are identified which can be used to describe the catalytic activity of Cu-based catalysts toward methanol synthesis. One is the activation barrier of dioxomethylene hydrogenation, and the other is the CO binding energy. An ideal Cu-based catalyst for the methanol synthesis via CO{sub 2} hydrogenation should be able to hydrogenate dioxomethylene easily and bond CO moderately, being strong enough to favor the desired CO hydrogenation rather than CO desorption but weak enough to prevent CO poisoning. In this way, the methanol production via both the formate and the RWGS + CO-Hydro pathways can be facilitated.

  19. Preparation and structure characterization of SmCo{sub 5}(0001) epitaxial thin films grown on Cu(111) underlayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohtake, Mitsuru; Nukaga, Yuri; Futamoto, Masaaki; Kirino, Fumiyoshi

    2009-04-01

    SmCo{sub 5}(0001) epitaxial films were prepared on Cu(111) single-crystal underlayers formed on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates at 500 deg. C. The nucleation and growth mechanism of (0001)-oriented SmCo{sub 5} crystal on Cu(111) underlayer is investigated and a method to control the nucleation is proposed. The SmCo{sub 5} epitaxial thin film formed directly on Cu underlayer consists of two types of domains whose orientations are rotated around the film normal by 30 deg. each other. By introducing a thin Co seed layer on the Cu underlayer, a SmCo{sub 5}(0001) single-crystal thin film is successfully obtained. Nucleation of SmCo{sub 5} crystal on Cu underlayer seems controllable by varying the interaction between the Cu underlayer and the SmCo{sub 5} layer.

  20. Direct spectroscopic evidence for completely filled Cu 3d shell in BaCu?As? and ? – BaCu?Sb?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, S. F.; Richard, P.; van Roekeghem, A.; Nie, S. M.; Miao, H.; Xu, N.; Qian, T.; Saparov, B.; Fang, Z.; Biermann, S.; et al

    2015-06-08

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to extract the band dispersion and the Fermi surface of BaCu?As? and ? - BaCu?Sb?. While the Cu 3d bands in both materials are located around 3.5 eV below the Fermi level, the low-energy photoemission intensity mainly comes from As 4p states, suggesting a completely filled Cu 3d shell. The splitting of the As 3d core levels and the lack of pronounced three-dimensionality in the measured band structure of BaCu?As? indicate a surface state likely induced by the cleavage of this material in the collapsed tetragonal phase, which is consistent with our observation of amore »Cu?¹ oxidation state. However, the observation of Cu states at similar energy in ? - BaCu?Sb? without the pnictide-pnictide interlayer bonding characteristic of the collapsed tetragonal phase suggests that the short interlayer distance in BaCu?As? follows from the stability of the Cu?¹ rather than the other way around. Our results confirm the prediction that BaCu?As? is an sp metal with weak electronic correlations.« less

  1. [Type here] Copper Indium Selenide (CIS) Solar Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    [Type here] Copper Indium Selenide (CIS) Solar Cell CIS cells are made with a thin layer of CuInSe2) Solar Cell CIGs cells are made with a thin layer of copper indium gallium diselenide Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS). CIGS cells have up to 10% efficiency with similar durability as silicon solar cells. Since

  2. Abundance analysis of prime B-type targets for asteroseismology I. Nitrogen excess in slowly-rotating beta Cephei stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Morel; K. Butler; C. Aerts; C. Neiner; M. Briquet

    2006-07-12

    We present the results of a detailed NLTE abundance study of nine beta Cephei stars, all of them being prime targets for theoretical modelling: gamma Peg, delta Cet, nu Eri, beta CMa, xi1 CMa, V836 Cen, V2052 Oph, beta Cep and DD (12) Lac. The following chemical elements are considered: He, C, N, O, Mg, Al, Si, S and Fe. Our abundance analysis is based on a large number of time-resolved, high-resolution optical spectra covering in most cases the entire oscillation cycle of the stars. Nitrogen is found to be enhanced by up to 0.6 dex in four stars, three of which have severe constraints on their equatorial rotational velocity, \\Omega R, from seismic or line-profile variation studies: beta Cep (\\Omega R~26 km/s), V2052 Oph (\\Omega R~56 km/s), delta Cet (\\Omega R < 28 km/s) and xi1 CMa (\\Omega R sin i < 10 km/s). The existence of core-processed material at the surface of such largely unevolved, slowly-rotating objects is not predicted by current evolutionary models including rotation. We draw attention to the fact that three stars in this subsample have a detected magnetic field and briefly discuss recent theoretical work pointing to the occurrence of diffusion effects in beta Cephei stars possibly capable of altering the nitrogen surface abundance. On the other hand, the abundances of all the other chemical elements considered are, within the errors, indistinguishable from the values found for OB dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood. Despite the mild nitrogen excess observed in some objects, we thus find no evidence for a significantly higher photospheric metal content in the studied beta Cephei stars compared to non-pulsating B-type stars of similar characteristics.

  3. Carbon-Type Analysis and Comparison of Original and Reblended FACE Diesel Fuels (FACE 2, FACE 4, and FACE 7)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bays, J. Timothy; King, David L.; O'Hagan, Molly J.

    2012-10-01

    This report summarizes the carbon-type analysis from 1H and 13C{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) diesel blends, FD-2B, FD 4B, and FD-7B, and makes comparison of the new blends with the original FACE diesel blends, FD 2A, FD 4A, and FD-7A, respectively. Generally, FD-2A and FD-2B are more similar than the A and B blends of FD-4 and FD-7. The aromatic carbon content is roughly equivalent, although the new FACE blends have decreased monoaromatic content and increased di- and tri-cycloaromatic content, as well as a higher overall aromatic content, than the original FACE blends. The aromatic components of the new FACE blends generally have a higher alkyl substitution with longer alkyl substituents. The naphthenic and paraffinic contents remained relatively consistent. Based on aliphatic methyl and methylene carbon ratios, cetane numbers for FD-2A and -2B, and FD-7A and -7B are predicted to be consistent, while the cetane number for FD-4B is predicted to be higher than FD-4A. Overall, the new FACE fuel blends are fairly consistent with the original FACE fuel blends, but there are observable differences. In addition to providing important comparative compositional information on reformulated FACE diesel blends, this report also provides important information about the capabilities of the team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in the use of NMR spectroscopy for the detailed characterization and comparison of fuels and fuel blends.

  4. Systematic uncertainties associated with the cosmological analysis of the first Pan-STARRS1 type Ia supernova sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scolnic, D.; Riess, A.; Brout, D.; Rodney, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Huber, M. E.; Tonry, J. L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Stubbs, C. W.; Kirshner, R. P.; Challis, P.; Czekala, I.; Drout, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Narayan, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Smartt, S. J.; Botticella, M. T. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Schlafly, E. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2014-11-01

    We probe the systematic uncertainties from the 113 Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) in the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) sample along with 197 SN Ia from a combination of low-redshift surveys. The companion paper by Rest et al. describes the photometric measurements and cosmological inferences from the PS1 sample. The largest systematic uncertainty stems from the photometric calibration of the PS1 and low-z samples. We increase the sample of observed Calspec standards from 7 to 10 used to define the PS1 calibration system. The PS1 and SDSS-II calibration systems are compared and discrepancies up to ?0.02 mag are recovered. We find uncertainties in the proper way to treat intrinsic colors and reddening produce differences in the recovered value of w up to 3%. We estimate masses of host galaxies of PS1 supernovae and detect an insignificant difference in distance residuals of the full sample of 0.037 ± 0.031 mag for host galaxies with high and low masses. Assuming flatness and including systematic uncertainties in our analysis of only SNe measurements, we find w =?1.120{sub ?0.206}{sup +0.360}(Stat){sub ?0.291}{sup +0.269}(Sys). With additional constraints from Baryon acoustic oscillation, cosmic microwave background (CMB) (Planck) and H {sub 0} measurements, we find w=?1.166{sub ?0.069}{sup +0.072} and ?{sub m}=0.280{sub ?0.012}{sup +0.013} (statistical and systematic errors added in quadrature). The significance of the inconsistency with w = –1 depends on whether we use Planck or Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe measurements of the CMB: w{sub BAO+H0+SN+WMAP}=?1.124{sub ?0.065}{sup +0.083}.

  5. Local structure order in Pd??Cu?Si?? liquid

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, G. Q.; Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; Zhang, Y.; Sun, Y.; Shen, B.; Dong, F.; Wang, Z. Y.; Zhang, R. J.; Zheng, Y. X.; Kramer, M. J.; et al

    2015-02-05

    The short-range order (SRO) in Pd??Cu?Si?? liquid was studied by high energy x-ray diffraction and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The calculated pair correlation functions at different temperatures agree well with the experimental results. The partial pair correlation functions from ab intio MD simulations indicate that Si atoms prefer to be uniformly distributed while Cu atoms tend to aggregate. By performing structure analysis using Honeycutt-Andersen index, Voronoi tessellation, and atomic cluster alignment method, we show that the icosahedron and face-centered cubic SRO increase upon cooling. The dominant SRO is the Pd-centered Pd?Si? motif, namely the structure of which motifmore »is similar to the structure of Pd-centered clusters in the Pd?Si? crystal. The study further confirms the existence of trigonal prism capped with three half-octahedra that is reported as a structural unit in Pd-based amorphous alloys. The majority of Cu-centered clusters are icosahedra, suggesting that the presence of Cu is benefit to promote the glass forming ability.« less

  6. A matrix operator approach to the analysis of ruin-related quantities in the phase-type renewal risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Runhuan

    risk model. This paper presents a new matrix operator approach to derive a parallel defective renewal equation for the expected present value of total operating costs in a phase-type renewal risk model-type distribution; compound geometric distribution. 1 Introduction In classical renewal risk models, it is assumed

  7. Synthesis and catalytic application of nanofibrous La{sub 0.9}A{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} (A = Ca, Cu, Ag) with macroscopic shapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Qiang Zhao, Li; Wu, Jiang; Yao, Weifeng

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Fabrication of nanofibrous La{sub 0.9}A{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} (A = Ca, Cu, Ag) perovskite-type oxides with macroscopic shapes was successfully obtained using carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as templates. Furthermore, their application for the combustion of carbon black (CB), which is a model of particulate matter exhausted from diesel engines, was demonstrated. - Highlights: • Nanofibrous La{sub 0.9}A{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} with macroscopic shapes was successfully obtained. • CNFs template method used here is facile, effective and reproducible. • The obtained materials show superior catalytic activity in soot combustion. • The catalytic order is La{sub 0.9}Ag{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} > La{sub 0.9}Cu{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} > La{sub 0.9}Ca{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3}. - Abstract: Fabrication of nanofibrous La{sub 0.9}A{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} (A = Ca, Cu, Ag) perovskite-type oxides with macroscopic shapes can be successfully obtained by using CNFs as templates. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the template effect and formation of nanofibrous perovskite-type oxides on macroscopic silica fiber. It turned out that it is reliable to control the desired single-phase La{sub 0.9}A{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} (A = Ca, Cu, Ag) perovskite-type oxides formation by tuning the corresponding metal ratio during preparation process. Furthermore, it showed that the as-prepared nanofibrous La{sub 0.9}A{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} (A = Ca, Cu, Ag) perovskite-type oxides can greatly decrease the combustion temperature of nanosized carbon black particles, and follows the order of La{sub 0.9}Ag{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} > La{sub 0.9}Cu{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} > La{sub 0.9}Ca{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3}, indicating their high potential application prospects in diesel soot particles treatment.

  8. Quantitative analysis of carbon fluxes for fat biosynthesis in wild-type and IRS-1 knockout brown adipocytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Hyun-Tae, 1973-

    2005-01-01

    Excessive fat synthesis and the subsequent dysregulation of lipid metabolism constitute the major pathological factors of obesity and type 2 diabetes through triggering insulin resistance. Thus, controlling fat synthesis ...

  9. Gluconeogenesis as a system : development of in vivo flux analysis of hepatic glucose production in Type 2 Diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alemán, José O. (José Orlando)

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic diseases are an increasing health concern in the developed world. Type 2 Diabetes, (T2D) affects over 100 million people worldwide and significantly contributes to chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis and ...

  10. An analysis of winter precipitation in the northeast and a winter weather precipitation type forecasting tool for New York City 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Christopher James

    1999-01-01

    Winter storms produce a wide array of precipitation types across the northeast United States. Immense problems are created for all parts of today's society when the precipitation falls in the form of snow or freezing rain. ...

  11. $J/?$ Production in $p+p$, $d+Au$, and $Cu+Cu$ Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vince Cianciolo; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2006-01-05

    PHENIX results for $J/\\psi$ production in $p+p$, $d+Au$, and $Cu+Cu$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV are presented.

  12. The role of interparticle heterogeneities in the selenization pathway of Cu-Zn-Sn-S nanoparticle thin films: A real-time study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carter, Nathaniel J.; Mainz, Roland; Walker, Bryce C.; Hages, Charles J.; Just, Justus; Klaus, Manuela; Schmidt, Sebastian S.; Weber, Alfons; Yang, Wei -Chang D.; Zander, Ole; et al

    2015-06-10

    Real-time energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) analysis has been utilized to observe the selenization of Cu-Zn-Sn-S nanoparticle films coated from three nanoparticle populations: Cu- and Sn-rich particles roughly 5 nm in size, Zn-rich nanoparticles ranging from 10 to 20 nm in diameter, and a mixture of both types of nanoparticles (roughly 1:1 by mass), which corresponds to a synthesis recipe yielding CZTSSe solar cells with reported total-area efficiencies as high as 7.9%. The EDXRD studies presented herein show that the formation of copper selenide intermediates during the selenization of mixed-particle films can be primarily attributed to the small, Cu- andmore »Sn-rich particles. Moreover, the formation of these copper selenide phases represents the first stage of the CZTSSe grain growth mechanism. The large, Zn-rich particles subsequently contribute their composition to form micrometer-sized CZTSSe grains. In conclusion, these findings enable further development of a previously proposed selenization pathway to account for the roles of interparticle heterogeneities, which in turn provides a valuable guide for future optimization of processes to synthesize high quality CZTSSe absorber layers.« less

  13. Investigation of solar cells based on Cu/sub 2/O. Progress report, June 1, 1980-November 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1981-02-01

    Progress was made in three areas: microstructure of Cu/sub 2/O substrates; correlation of Cu/sub 2/O microstructure with Cu/Cu/sub 2/O cell properties; and in fabrication of Tl/Cu/sub 2/O Schottky barriers. Characterization of Cu/sub 2/O substrates with IMMA indicates that Cl is uniformly distributed through grains, Mg precipitates at grain boundaries and Na and Fe precipitates occur throughout the material. It is clear that the presence of Cl results in lower p-type resistivities. Previous photoresponse scans established that grain boundaries are not significantly active concerning minority carrier recombination. I-V analyses of Cu/Cu/sub 2/O cells indicate that leakage current components are a result of distributed effects, and not a grain boundary mechanism. It is not yet clear whether the distributed effects are strictly a surface effect, or a result of bulk defects such as Na and Fe precipitates. Tl/Cu/sub 2/O Schottky barrier studies are progressing well. This device structure is being used as a means of determining if a significant built-in voltage can be achieved with a Cu/sub 2/O cell. Problems were encountered concerning deposition of thin Tl films. The films tend to agglomerate. Substrates will be cooled to counter the apparent lateral diffusion. V/sub oc/ values greater than 0.6 volts were obtained with thick film Tl/Cu/sub 2/O cells, however. These results suggest an improved built-in potential was achieved.

  14. Structural and thermal properties of nanocrystalline CuO synthesized by reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, M.; Gupta, V. K.; Gautam, Y. K.; Dave, V.; Chandra, R.

    2014-01-28

    Recent research has shown immense application of metal oxides like CuO, MgO, CaO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, etc. in different areas which includes chemical warfare agents, medical drugs, magnetic storage media and solar energy transformation. Among the metal oxides, CuO nanoparticles are of special interest because of their excellent gas sensing and catalytic properties. In this paper we report structural and thermal properties of CuO synthesized by reactive magnetron DC sputtering. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometer. The XRD result reveals that as DC power increased from 30W to 80W, size of the CuO nanoparticles increased. The same results have been verified through TEM analysis. Thermal properties of these particles were studied using thermogravimetry.

  15. Room-temperature Formation of Hollow Cu2O Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hung, Ling-I; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Yang, Peidong

    2010-01-18

    Monodisperse Cu and Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized using tetradecylphosphonic acid as a capping agent. Dispersing the NPs in chloroform and hexane at room temperature results in the formation of hollow Cu2O NPs and Cu@Cu2O core/shell NPs, respectively. The monodisperse Cu2O NPs are used to fabricate hybrid solar cells with efficiency of 0.14percent under AM 1.5 and 1 Sun illumination.

  16. A New Type Curve Analysis for Shale Gas/Oil Reservoir Production Performance with Dual Porosity Linear System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdulal, Haider Jaffar

    2012-02-14

    With increase of interest in exploiting shale gas/oil reservoirs with multiple stage fractured horizontal wells, complexity of production analysis and reservoir description have also increased. Different methods and models were used throughout...

  17. Proton micro-probe analysis of framboidal pyrite and associated maceral types in a Devonian black shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, U.M.; Robl, T.L. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research); Robertson, J.D. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-01-01

    Framboids are spherical, raspberry-like aggregates of pyrite which are typically associated with organic matter in black shales. Because framboids are often intimately intergrown with macerals of the kerogen in black shales the objectives of this study were to: (1) Select tramboidal pyrite with close spatial relationship to distinct maceral types; (2) Determine the trace-element variations within different maceral types and that of framboidal pyrite occurring adjacent to those macerals and; (3) Examine whether the S/Fe ratios of the tramboids vary based on different maceral-type association. This study investigates a Devonian-Mississippian black shale from East-Central Kentucky. The organic-rich matrix consists predominantly of bituminite, alginite and to lesser extent of vitrinite. Most framboids range between < 1[mu]m and 27 [mu]m in size and typically occur as clusters which are engulfed by lamellar flowing vitrinite, indicating that the framboids were already present before compaction. 161 PIXE-analyses were performed in both macerals and framboids. To understand the likelihood of framboid precursors in macerals the authors checked the constancy of the S, Fe and trace-element content in the immediate vicinity of the framboid particle. Moreover, the authors analyzed traverses through framboids associated with the three different maceral types. The S/Fe ratio of the framboids is always that of stoichiometric pyrite. The combined results suggest that the framboids may have formed independent of the sulfur and trace-element concentration among the macerals. Globular, partly translucent grains were observed to have great resemblances in size and trace-element contents compared to those of framboids. The S/Fe ratio of these grains was typically well in excess of 2.0 suggesting that the transparent matrix may have been a sulfur-rich phase that possibly serves as precursor for the framboids.

  18. Surface chemistry of BORAZON: I, Analysis of the three cubic boron nitride materials: Type 1, 510, and 550

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moddeman, W.E.; Foose, D.S.; Bowling, W.C.; Burke, A.R.; Kasten, L.S.; Cassidy, R.T.

    1992-03-25

    Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the surface chemistry of three BORAZON* materials: Type I, 510, and 550. Samples were examined in the ``as-received`` condition and following heat treatments in air. Boron oxides were found on the Type I and 550 BORAZON crystals; oxide thicknesses were estimated to be 15A. The titanium-coated product, 510, was found to have a discontinuous titanium coating with a TiO{sub 2} layer that was approximately 20A thick. Following heat treatment at 800{degrees}C for 1 hr in air, the boron oxide layer on the Type I crystals was found to increase in thickness to approximately 30A. The same heat treatment on the 510 crystals yielded a multi-layered structure consisting of an enriched outer layer of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} over a predominantly TiO{sub 2} one. The entire initial titanium coating was oxidized, and segregated patches of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (``islands``) were observed. The segregated patches can be explained in terms of the coalescence of liquid B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (melting point = 450{degrees}C). The 550 crystals were oxidized at 500{degrees}C. The oxide formed at this temperature was B{sub x}O (x > 0.67). These results were interpreted in terms of their potential use in sealing BORAZON to glass in vitreous bonding.

  19. Property:NEPA CU Document | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, searchContDiv JumpTechDscType Jump to:CU Document

  20. Nanostructural considerations in giant magnetoresistive Co-Cu-based symmetric spin valves Harsh Deep Chopra*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chopra, Harsh Deep

    , for example, magnetic-field sensors and read-heads in data- storage devices.11 A key impedimentNanostructural considerations in giant magnetoresistive Co-Cu-based symmetric spin valves Harsh, on the nanostructure and resulting giant magnetoresistive properties of symmetric spin valves of the type Ni

  1. Fundamental Studies of Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation on Cu(111), Cu Clusters, and Cu/ZnO(000?)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, P.; Yang, Y.; Evans, J.; Rodriguez, J.A.; White, M.G.

    2010-06-21

    A combination of experimental and theoretical methods were employed to investigate the synthesis of methanolvia CO{sub 2}hydrogenation (CO{sub 2} + 3H{sub 2} {yields} CH{sub 3}OH + H{sub 2}O) on Cu(111) and Cunanoparticle surfaces. High pressure reactivity studies show that Cunanoparticles supported on a ZnO(000{bar 1}) single crystal exhibit a higher catalytic activity than the Cu(111) planar surface. Complementary density functional theory (DFT) calculations of methanol synthesis were also performed for a Cu(111) surface and unsupported Cu{sub 29} nanoparticles, and the results support a higher activity for Cu nanoparticles. The DFT calculations show that methanol synthesis on Cu surfaces proceeds through a formate intermediate and the overall reaction rate is limited by both formate and dioxomethylene hydrogenation. Moreover, the superior activity of the nanoparticle is associated with its fluxionality and the presence of low-coordinated Cu sites, which stabilize the key intermediates, e.g. formate and dioxomethylene, and lower the barrier for the rate-limiting hydrogenation process. The reverse water-gas-shift (RWGS) reaction (CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2} {yields} CO + H{sub 2}O) was experimentally observed to compete with methanol synthesis and was also considered in our DFT calculations. In agreement with experiment, the rate of the RWGS reaction on Cu nanoparticles is estimated to be 2 orders of magnitude faster than methanol synthesis at T = 573 K. The experiments and calculations also indicate that CO produced by the fast RWGS reaction does not undergo subsequent hydrogenation to methanol, but instead simply accumulates as a product. Methanol production from CO hydrogenation via the RWGS pathway is hindered by the first hydrogenation of CO to formyl, which is not stable and prefers to dissociate into CO and H atoms on Cu. Our calculated results suggest that the methanol yield over Cu-based catalysts could be improved by adding dopants or promoters which are able to stabilize formyl species or facilitate the hydrogenation of formate and dioxomethylene. the RWGS pathway is hindered by the first hydrogenation of CO to formyl, which is not stable and prefers to dissociate into CO and H atoms on Cu. Our calculated results suggest that the methanol yield over Cu-based catalysts could be improved by adding dopants or promoters which are able to stabilize formyl species or facilitate the hydrogenation of formate and dioxomethylene.

  2. Multiple Regression Analysis of the Variable Component in the Near-Infrared Region for Type 1 AGN MCG+08-11-011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroyuki Tomita; Yuzuru Yoshii; Yukiyasu Kobayashi; Takeo Minezaki; Keigo Enya; Masahiro Suganuma; Tsutomu Aoki; Shintaro Koshida; Masahiro Yamauchi

    2006-10-12

    We propose a new method of analysing a variable component for type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the near-infrared wavelength region. This analysis uses a multiple regression technique and divides the variable component into two components originating in the accretion disk at the center of AGNs and from the dust torus that far surrounds the disk. Applying this analysis to the long-term $VHK$ monitoring data of MCG+08-11-011 that were obtained by the MAGNUM project, we found that the $(H-K)$-color temperature of the dust component is $T = 1635$K $\\pm20$K, which agrees with the sublimation temperature of dust grains, and that the time delay of $K$ to $H$ variations is $\\Delta t\\approx 6$ days, which indicates the existence of a radial temperature gradient in the dust torus. As for the disk component, we found that the power-law spectrum of $f_\

  3. Cu-Cu direct bonding achieved by surface method at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Utsumi, Jun [Advanced Technology Research Center, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 1-8-1 Sachiura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-8515 (Japan); Ichiyanagi, Yuko, E-mail: yuko@ynu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2014-02-20

    The metal bonding is a key technology in the processes for the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and the semiconductor devices to improve functionality and higher density integration. Strong adhesion between surfaces at the atomic level is crucial; however, it is difficult to achieve close bonding in such a system. Cu films were deposited on Si substrates by vacuum deposition, and then, two Cu films were bonded directly by means of surface activated bonding (SAB) at room temperature. The two Cu films, with the surface roughness Ra about 1.3nm, were bonded by using SAB at room temperature, however, the bonding strength was very weak in this method. In order to improve the bonding strength between the Cu films, samples were annealed at low temperatures, between 323 and 473 K, in air. As the result, the Cu-Cu bonding strength was 10 times higher than that of the original samples without annealing.

  4. Direct Epoxidation of Propylene over Stabilized Cu+ Surface Sites on Ti Modified Cu2O

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, X.; Kattel, S.; Xiong, K.; Mudiyanselage, K.; Rykov, S.; Senanayake, S. D.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Liu, P.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Chen, J. G.

    2015-07-17

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility to tune the epoxidation selectivity by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu+ active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene.

  5. Seismic Performance Evaluation of the Jacket Type Offshore Platforms through Incremental Dynamic Analysis considering Soil-Pile-Structure Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asgarian, Behrouz [K.N. Toosi University of Technology Tehran Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Hamed R.; Talarposhti, Ali Shakeri [K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-08

    Of great interest in Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering (PBEE) is the accurate estimation of the seismic performance of structures. A performance prediction and evaluation procedure is based on nonlinear dynamics and reliability theory. In this method, a full integration over the three key stochastic models is as follow: ground motion hazard curve, nonlinear dynamic displacement demand, and displacement capacity. Further, both epistemic and aleatory uncertainties are evaluated and carried through the analysis.In this paper, jacket and soil-pile system have been modeled using Finite Element program (OpenSees) and the incremental dynamic analysis (IDA) are performed to investigate nonlinear behavior of offshore platforms. The system demand is determined by performing time history response analyses of the jacket under a suite of FEMA/SAC uniform hazard ground motions. The system capacity in terms of the drift ratio against incipient collapse is generally difficult to predict since the structural response goes into nonlinear range before collapse. All the analyses are performed in two directions and the results are compared with each others. The confidence level of a jacket in each direction for a given hazard level is calculated using the procedure described.

  6. CuCo2O4 ORR/OER Bi-functional catalyst: Influence of synthetic approach on performance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Serov, Alexey; Andersen, Nalin I.; Roy, Aaron J.; Matanovic, Ivana; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen

    2015-02-07

    A series of CuCo2O4 catalysts were synthesized by pore forming, sol-gel, spray pyrolysis and sacrificial support methods. Catalysts were characterized by XRD, SEM, XPS and BET techniques. The electrochemical activity for the oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions (ORR and OER) was evaluated in alkaline media by RRDE. Density Functional Theory was used to identify two different types of active sites responsible for ORR/OER activity of CuCo2O4 and it was found that CuCo2O4 can activate the O-O bond by binding molecular oxygen in bridging positions between Co or Co and Cu atoms. It was found that the sacrificial support methodmore »(SSM) catalyst has the highest performance in both ORR and OER and has the highest content of phase-pure CuCo2O4. It was shown that the presence of CuO significantly decreases the activity in oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions. As a result, the half-wave potential (E1/2) of CuCo2O4-SSM was found as 0.8 V, making this material a state-of-the-art, unsupported oxide catalyst.« less

  7. The 0.4-Mo Eclipsing Binary CU Cancri: Absolute Dimensions, Comparison with Evolutionary Models and Possible Evidence for a Circumstellar Dust Disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ribas

    2002-11-05

    Photometric observations in the R and I bands of the detached M-type double-lined eclipsing binary CU Cnc have been acquired and analysed. The photometric elements obtained from the analysis of the light curves have been combined with an existing spectroscopic solution to yield high-precision (errors<2%) absolute dimensions: M_A=0.4333+/-0.0017 Mo, M_B=0.3980+/-0.0014 Mo, R_A=0.4317+/-0.0052 Ro, and R_B=0.3908+/-0.0094 Ro. The mean effective temperature of the system has been estimated to be Teff=3140+/-150 K by comparing multi-band photometry with synthetic colors computed from model atmospheres. Additionally, we have been able to obtain an estimate for the age (~320 Myr) and chemical composition ([Fe/H]~0.0) of the binary system through its membership of the Castor moving group. With all these observational constraints, we have carried out a critical test of recent stellar models for low-mass stars. The comparison reveals that most evolutionary models underestimate the radius of the stars by as much as 10%, thus confirming the trend observed by Torres & Ribas (2002) for YY Gem and V818 Tau. In the mass-absolute magnitude diagram, CU Cnc is observed to be dimmer than other stars of the same mass. After ruling out a number of different scenarios, the apparent faintness of CU Cnc can be explained if its components are some 10% cooler than similar-mass stars or if there is some source of circumstellar dust absorption. The latter could be a tantalizing indirect evidence for a coplanar (Vega-like) dusty disk around this relatively young M-type binary.

  8. Sol-gel synthesis of mesoporous CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} thin films and their gas sensing response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, R., E-mail: rparra@fi.mdp.edu.a [Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales (INTEMA), CONICET-UNMdP, J. B. Justo 4302, B7608FDQ Mar del Plata (Argentina); Savu, R. [Instituto de Quimica, UNESP, Rua F. Degni s/n, 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Ramajo, L.A.; Ponce, M.A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales (INTEMA), CONICET-UNMdP, J. B. Justo 4302, B7608FDQ Mar del Plata (Argentina); Varela, J.A. [Instituto de Quimica, UNESP, Rua F. Degni s/n, 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Castro, M.S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales (INTEMA), CONICET-UNMdP, J. B. Justo 4302, B7608FDQ Mar del Plata (Argentina); Bueno, P.R. [Instituto de Quimica, UNESP, Rua F. Degni s/n, 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Joanni, E. [Instituto de Quimica, UNESP, Rua F. Degni s/n, 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Centro de Tecnologia da Informacao Renato Archer, Rodovia Dom Pedro I (SP-65) km 143, 6, 13069-901 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2010-06-15

    A new sol-gel synthesis procedure of stable calcium copper titanate (CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12}-CCTO) precursor sols for the fabrication of porous films was developed. The composition of the sol was selected in order to avoid the precipitation of undesired phases; ethanol was used as solvent, acetic acid as modifier and poly(ethyleneglycol) as a linker agent. Films deposited by spin-coating onto oxidized silicon substrates were annealed at 700 {sup o}C. The main phase present in the samples, as detected by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, was CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12}. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that mesoporous structures, with thicknesses between 200 and 400 nm, were developed as a result of the processing conditions. The films were tested regarding their sensibility towards oxygen and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure using working temperatures from 200 to 290 {sup o}C. The samples exhibited n-type conductivity, high sensitivity and short response times. These characteristics indicate that CCTO mesoporous structures obtained by sol-gel are suitable for application in gas sensing. - Graphical abstract: A sol-gel synthesis procedure toward stable CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12}-precursor sols avoiding the precipitation of undesired compounds is proposed. Films deposited by spin-coating onto oxidized silicon substrates were annealed at 700 {sup o}C. The thickness varied between 200 and 400 nm depending on sol composition. The films, tested as gas sensors for O{sub 2}, showed n-type conductivity, good sensitivity and short response times.

  9. The optimization of the production of ??Cu 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauny, Ronnie Dean

    1971-01-01

    THE OPTIMIZATION OF THE PRODUCTION OF CU A Thesis by RONNIE DEAN GAUNY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1971 Major Subject...: Biophysics (Health Physics) THE OPTIMIZATION OF THE PRODUCTION OF CU A Thesis by RONNIE DEAN GAUNY Approved as to style and content by: Co-Chairman o Committee Mem er C - hairman ommittee Hea o Department May 1971 ABSTRACT The Optimization...

  10. PROGRAMMING WITH TYPES A Dissertation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weirich, Stephanie

    WITH TYPES Stephanie Claudene Weirich, Ph.D. Cornell University 2002 Run-time type analysis, facilities to support type analysis often require complicated language semantics that allow little freedom to list. Steve's parents Arthur and Deborah Zdancewic have encouraged me as long as I have known them. I

  11. Abundance analysis of prime B-type targets for asteroseismology I. Nitrogen excess in slowly-rotating beta Cephei stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morel, T; Aerts, C; Neiner, C; Briquet, M

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of a detailed NLTE abundance study of nine beta Cephei stars, all of them being prime targets for theoretical modelling: gamma Peg, delta Cet, nu Eri, beta CMa, xi1 CMa, V836 Cen, V2052 Oph, beta Cep and DD (12) Lac. The following chemical elements are considered: He, C, N, O, Mg, Al, Si, S and Fe. Our abundance analysis is based on a large number of time-resolved, high-resolution optical spectra covering in most cases the entire oscillation cycle of the stars. Nitrogen is found to be enhanced by up to 0.6 dex in four stars, three of which have severe constraints on their equatorial rotational velocity, \\Omega R, from seismic or line-profile variation studies: beta Cep (\\Omega R~26 km/s), V2052 Oph (\\Omega R~56 km/s), delta Cet (\\Omega R < 28 km/s) and xi1 CMa (\\Omega R sin i < 10 km/s). The existence of core-processed material at the surface of such largely unevolved, slowly-rotating objects is not predicted by current evolutionary models including rotation. We draw attention to ...

  12. Electrodeposition, characterization and morphological investigations of NiFe/Cu multilayers prepared by pulsed galvanostatic, dual bath technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esmaili, S.; Bahrololoom, M.E.; Kavanagh, K.L.

    2011-02-15

    NiFe/Cu multilayers were grown sequentially by pulsed electrodeposition on copper (Cu) substrates. The layers were prepared in galvanostatic mode using a dual bath technique. The morphology, thickness, roughness and composition of the layers were studied using scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Analysis showed that the resulting multilayers were continuous layers with a root mean square roughness of 30 nm and a grain size of 20-60 nm. The Cu substrate and the electrodeposited Cu layer were preferentially (200) oriented while the NiFe layers were polycrystalline but with a preferred (200) texture. The thinnest multilayers produced were 20/40, NiFe/Cu, respectively. - Research Highlights: {yields} Thin MLs of Cu and Py can be ED utilizing a pulsed-galvanostatic, DBT. {yields} The resulting multilayers were continuous layers with an rms of 30 nm. {yields} The smallest average thickness achieved by DBT was 40 nm/20 nm for Cu/NiFe.

  13. DOI: 10.1002/celc.201402182 Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide on Cu/CuO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    DOI: 10.1002/celc.201402182 Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide on Cu/CuO Core/Shell Catalysts Yangchun Lan,[a, b] Chao Gai,[c] Paul J. A. Kenis,*[b] and Jiaxing Lu*[a] 1. Introduction Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most notorious greenhouse gas, which is released by both natural and artificial

  14. $J/?$ production in $Cu+Cu$ and $Au+Au$ collisions measured by PHENIX at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andry M. Rakotozafindrabe

    2006-07-11

    PHENIX preliminary results on the $J/\\Psi$ production in $Cu+Cu$ and $Au+Au$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV are presented. They are compared to results from lower energy experiments NA50 and NA60 at CERN SPS and to expectations from various theoretical models.

  15. Electronic band structure imaging of three layer twisted graphene on single crystal Cu(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marquez Velasco, J.; Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens, Athens ; Kelaidis, N.; Xenogiannopoulou, E.; Tsoutsou, D.; Tsipas, P.; Speliotis, Th.; Pilatos, G.; Likodimos, V.; Falaras, P.; Dimoulas, A.; Raptis, Y. S.

    2013-11-18

    Few layer graphene (FLG) is grown on single crystal Cu(111) by Chemical Vapor Deposition, and the electronic valence band structure is imaged by Angle-Resolved Photo-Emission Spectroscopy. It is found that graphene essentially grows polycrystalline. Three nearly ideal Dirac cones are observed along the Cu ?{sup ¯}K{sup ¯} direction in k-space, attributed to the presence of ?4° twisted three layer graphene with negligible interlayer coupling. The number of layers and the stacking order are compatible with Raman data analysis demonstrating the complementarity of the two techniques for a more accurate characterization of FLG.

  16. Microstructure, impurity and metal cap effects on Cu electromigration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, C.-K.; Gignac, L. G.; Ohm, J.; Breslin, C. M.; Huang, E.; Bonilla, G.; Liniger, E.; Rosenberg, R. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Choi, S.; Simon, A. H. [IBM Microelectronic Division, Hopewell Junction, NY 12533 (United States)

    2014-06-19

    Electromigration (EM) lifetimes and void growth of pure Cu, Cu(Mn) alloy, and pure Cu damascene lines with a CoWP cap were measured as a function of grain structure (bamboo, near bamboo, and polycrystalline) and sample temperature. The bamboo grains in a bamboo-polycrystalline grained line play the key role in reducing Cu mass flow. The variation in Cu grain size distribution among the wafers was achieved by varying the metal line height and wafer annealing process step after electroplating Cu and before or after chemical mechanical polishing. The Cu grain size was found to have a large impact on Cu EM lifetime and activation energy, especially for the lines capped with CoWP. The EM activation energy for pure Cu with a CoWP cap from near-bamboo, bamboo-polycrystalline, mostly polycrystalline to polycrystalline only line grain structures was reduced from 2.2 ± 0.2 eV, to 1.7 ± 0.1 eV, to 1.5 ± 0.1 eV, to 0.72 ± 0.05 eV, respectively. The effect of Mn in Cu grain boundary diffusion was found to be dependent on Mn concentration in Cu. The depletion of Cu at the cathode end of the Cu(Mn) line is preceded by an incubation period. Unlike pure Cu lines with void growth at the cathode end and hillocks at the anode end of the line, the hillocks grew at a starting position roughly equal to the Blech critical length from the cathode end of the Cu(Mn) polycrystalline line. The effectiveness of Mn on Cu grain boundary migration can also be qualitatively accounted for by a simple trapping model. The free migration of Cu atoms at grain boundaries is reduced by the presence of Mn due to Cu-solute binding. A large binding energy of 0.5 ± 0.1 eV was observed.

  17. Interpretation of thermoelectric properties of Cu substituted LaCoO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhary, K. K.; Kaurav, N.; Sharma, U.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2014-04-24

    The thermoelectric properties of LaCo{sub 1?x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 3??} is theoretically analyzed, it is observed that thermoelectric figure of merit ZT (=S{sup 2}?T/?) is maximized by Cu substitution in LaCoO{sub 3} Ceramics at x=0.15. The lattice thermal conductivity and thermoelectric power were estimated by the scattering of phonons with defects, grain boundaries, electrons and phonons to evaluate the thermoelectric properties. We found that Cu substitution increase the phonon scattering with grain boundaries and defects which significantly increase the thermoelectric power and decrease the thermal conductivity. The present numerical analysis will help in designing more efficient thermoelectric materials.

  18. Role of polycrystallinity in CdTe and CuInSe sub 2 photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sites, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The polycrystalline nature of thin-film CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells continues to be a major factor in several individual losses that limit overall cell efficiency. This report describes progress in the quantitative separation of these losses, including both measurement and analysis procedures. It also applies these techniques to several individual cells to help document the overall progress with CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} cells. Notably, CdTe cells from Photon Energy have reduced window photocurrent losses to 1 mA/Cm{sup 2}; those from the University of South Florida have achieved a maximum power voltage of 693 mV; and CuInSe{sub 2} cells from International Solar Electric Technology have shown a hole density as high as 7 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}3}, implying a significant reduction in compensation. 9 refs.

  19. TYPE OF OPERATION R Research & Development T& Facility Type

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -- R Research & Development T& Facility Type 0 Production scale testing a Pilat scale Y-. Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis 0 Productian 0 Disposal...

  20. Exponentially decaying magnetic coupling in sputtered thin film FeNi/Cu/FeCo trilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Yajun Akansel, Serkan; Thersleff, Thomas; Brucas, Rimantas; Lansaker, Pia; Leifer, Klaus; Svedlindh, Peter; Harward, Ian; Celinski, Zbigniew; Ranjbar, Mojtaba; Dumas, Randy K.; Jana, Somnath; Pogoryelov, Yevgen; Karis, Olof; Åkerman, Johan

    2015-01-26

    Magnetic coupling in trilayer films of FeNi/Cu/FeCo deposited on Si/SiO{sub 2} substrates have been studied. While the thicknesses of the FeNi and FeCo layers were kept constant at 100?Å, the thickness of the Cu spacer was varied from 5 to 50?Å. Both hysteresis loop and ferromagnetic resonance results indicate that all films are ferromagnetically coupled. Micromagnetic simulations well reproduce the ferromagnetic resonance mode positions measured by experiments, enabling the extraction of the coupling constants. Films with a thin Cu spacer are found to be strongly coupled, with an effective coupling constant of 3?erg/cm{sup 2} for the sample with a 5?Å Cu spacer. The strong coupling strength is qualitatively understood within the framework of a combined effect of Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida and pinhole coupling, which is evidenced by transmission electron microscopy analysis. The magnetic coupling constant surprisingly decreases exponentially with increasing Cu spacer thickness, without showing an oscillatory thickness dependence. This is partially connected to the substantial interfacial roughness that washes away the oscillation. The results have implications on the design of multilayers for spintronic applications.

  1. Structure and magnetic properties of RE{sub 2}CuIn{sub 3} (RE=Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm and Gd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyvanchuk, Yuriy B. Szytula, Andrzej; Zarzycki, Arkadiusz; Rodewald, Ute Ch.; Kalychak, Yaroslav M.; Poettgen, Rainer

    2008-12-15

    The ternary copper indides RE{sub 2}CuIn{sub 3}{identical_to}RECu{sub 0.5}In{sub 1.5} (RE=Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm and Gd) were synthesized from the elements in sealed tantalum tubes in an induction furnace. They crystallize with the CaIn{sub 2}-type structure, space group P6{sub 3}/mmc, with a statistical occupancy of copper and indium on the tetrahedral substructure. These indides show homogeneity ranges RECu{sub x}In{sub 2-x}. Single crystal structure refinements were performed for five crystals: CeCu{sub 0.66}In{sub 1.34} (a=479.90(7) pm, c=768.12(15) pm), PrCu{sub 0.52}In{sub 1.48} (a=480.23(7) pm, c=759.23(15) pm), NdCu{sub 0.53}In{sub 1.47} (a=477.51(7) pm, c=756.37(15) pm), SmCu{sub 0.46}In{sub 1.54} (a=475.31(7) pm, c=744.77(15) pm), and GdCu{sub 0.33}In{sub 1.67} (a=474.19(7), c=737.67(15) pm). Temperature-dependent susceptibility measurements show antiferromagnetic ordering at T{sub N}=4.7 K for Pr{sub 2}CuIn{sub 3} and Nd{sub 2}CuIn{sub 3} and 15 K for Sm{sub 2}CuIn{sub 3}. Fitting of the susceptibility data of the samarium compound revealed an energy gap {delta}E=39.7(7) K between the ground and the first excited levels. - Graphical abstract: The CaIn{sub 2}-type structure of Sm{sub 2}CuIn{sub 3}.

  2. Modification of carbon nanotubes by CuO-doped NiO nanocomposite for use as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mustansar Abbas, Syed; Tajammul Hussain, Syed; Ali, Saqib; Ahmad, Nisar; Ali, Nisar; Abbas, Saghir; Ali, Zulfiqar

    2013-06-15

    CuO-doped NiO (CuNiO) with porous hexagonal morphology is fabricated via a modified in-situ co-precipitation method and its nanocomposite is prepared with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The electrochemical properties of CuNiO/CNT nanocomposite are investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge–discharge tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Since Cu can both act as conductor and a catalyst, the CuNiO/CNT nanocomposite exhibits higher initial coulombic efficiency (82.7% of the 2nd cycle) and better capacity retention (78.6% on 50th cycle) than bare CuNiO (78.9% of the 2nd cycle), CuO/CNT (76.8% of the 2nd cycle) and NiO/CNT (77.7% of the 2nd cycle) at the current density of 100 mA /g. This high capacity and good cycling ability is attributed to the partial substitution of Cu{sup +2} for Ni{sup +2}, resulting in an increase of holes concentration, and therefore improved p-type conductivity along with an intimate interaction with CNTs providing large surface area, excellent conduction, mechanical strength and chemical stability. - Graphical abstract: The porous CuNiO/CNT nanocomposite synthesized via a modified co-precipitation method in combination with subsequent calcination was applied in the negative electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries and exhibited high electrochemical performance. - Highlights: • CuO doped NiO/CNTs nano composite is achieved via a simple co-precipitation method. • Monodispersity, shape and sizes of sample particles is specifically controlled. • Good quality adhesion between CNTs and CuNiO is visible from TEM image. • High electrochemical performance is achieved. • Discharge capacity of 686 mA h/g after 50 cycles with coulombic efficiency (82.5%)

  3. Complex catalytic behaviors of CuTiOx mixed-oxide during CO oxidation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    reactivity, and selectivity. Here, the activity and stability of the CuTiOx monolayer film supported on Cu(111), CuTiOxCu(111), during CO oxidation was explored using density...

  4. Low voltage tunneling magnetoresistance in CuCrO{sub 2}-based semiconductor heterojunctions at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X. R.; Han, M. J.; Shan, C.; Hu, Z. G. Zhu, Z. Q.; Chu, J. H.; Wu, J. D.

    2014-12-14

    CuCrO{sub 2}-based heterojunction diodes with rectifying characteristics have been fabricated by combining p-type Mg-doped CuCrO{sub 2} and n-type Al-doped ZnO. It was found that the current for the heterojunction in low bias voltage region is dominated by the trap-assisted tunneling mechanism. Positive magnetoresistance (MR) effect for the heterojunction can be observed at room temperature due to the tunneling-induced antiparallel spin polarization near the heterostructure interface. The MR effect becomes enhanced with the magnetic field, and shows the maximum at a bias voltage around 0.5?V. The phenomena indicate that the CuCrO{sub 2}-based heterojunction is a promising candidate for low-power semiconductor spintronic devices.

  5. Band alignment at Cu{sub 2}O/La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} interface: A combined experimental-theoretical determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantoni, M.; Petti, D.; Bertacco, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, L-NESS, Politecnico di Milano, Via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy); Pallecchi, I.; Marre, D. [CNR-SPIN, C.so Perrone 24, 16152 Genova (Italy); Colizzi, G.; Filippetti, A.; Fiorentini, V. [CNR-IOM SLACS and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Cagliari, S.P. Monserrato-Sestu Km. 0.700, Monserrato, 09042 Cagliari (Italy)

    2010-07-19

    Cu{sub 2}O/La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} is a promising heterostructure for the realization of all-oxide spintronics devices, with La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO) and Cu{sub 2}O playing the roles of ferromagnet and semiconductor, respectively. Here we use x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and first principles calculations to determine the valence band offset at the Cu{sub 2}O/LSMO interface. The interface band alignment is typical of a p-type semiconductor/metal contact, with an interface barrier of 0.3-0.5 eV depending on Cu{sub 2}O thickness. The calculated energetics indicates that the prevailing interface is between SrO-terminated LSMO and Cu planes of Cu{sub 2}O.

  6. Study of carbon dioxide adsorption on a Cu-nitroprusside polymorph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roque-Malherbe, R., E-mail: RRoque@suagm.ed [Institute for Physical Chemical Applied Research, School of Science, University of Turabo, P.O. Box 3030, Gurabo, PR 00778-3030 (United States); Lozano, C.; Polanco, R.; Marquez, F.; Lugo, F. [Institute for Physical Chemical Applied Research, School of Science, University of Turabo, P.O. Box 3030, Gurabo, PR 00778-3030 (United States); Hernandez-Maldonado, A.; Primera-Pedrozo, J.N. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico-Mayagueez Campus, Mayagueez, PR 00681-9000 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    A careful structural characterization was carried out to unequivocally determine the structure of the synthesized material. The TGA, DRIFTS and a Pawley fitting of the XRD powder profiles indicate that the hydrated and in situ dehydrated polymorph crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pnma. Meanwhile, the CO{sub 2} isosteric heat of adsorption appears to be independent of loading with an average value of 30 kJ/mol. This translates to a physisorption type interaction, where the adsorption energy corresponding to wall and lateral interactions are mutually compensated to produce, an apparently, homogeneous adsorption energy. The somewhat high adsorption energy is probably due to the confinement of the CO{sub 2} molecules in the nitroprusside pores. Statistical Physics and the Dubinin theory for pore volume filling allowed model the CO{sub 2} equilibrium adsorption process in Cu-nitroprusside. A DRIFTS test for the adsorbed CO{sub 2} displayed a peak at about 2338 cm{sup -1} that was assigned to a contribution due to physical adsorption of the molecule. Another peak found at 2362 cm{sup -1} evidenced that this molecule interacts with the Cu{sup 2+}, which appears to act as an electron accepting Lewis acid site. The aim of the present paper is to report a Pnma stable Cu-nitroprusside polymorph obtained by the precipitation method that can adsorb carbon dioxide. -- Graphical abstract: The adsorption space of a very well characterized Cu-nitroprusside polymorph, applying carbon dioxide as probe molecule, was studied. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Accurate information about the geometry of the adsorption space was provided. {yields} Truthful data about the interactions within the adsorption space was presented. {yields} The structure of the tested Cu-NP polymorph was established. {yields} Was evidenced adsorbed CO{sub 2} molecules in the form of weakly bonded adducts. {yields} Is proposed that adsorbed molecules could change the Cu-NP magnetic properties.

  7. The Effects of Hydrothermal Agingon a Commercial Cu SCR Catalyst...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrothermal Agingon a Commercial Cu SCR Catalyst Examines the effect of hydrothermal aging on the Nox reduction over a commercial Cu-zeolite SCR catalyst. deer11lee.pdf More...

  8. Two different cationic positions in Cu-SSZ-13?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhu, Haiyang; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

    2012-04-18

    H2-TPR and FTIR were used to characterize the Cu ions present in Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite at different ion exchange levels. The results obtained are consistent with the presence of Cu ions in two distinct cationic positions of the SSZ-13 framework.

  9. In-situ energy dispersive x-ray diffraction study of the growth of CuO nanowires by annealing method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, Himanshu; Ganguli, Tapas; Deb, S. K.; Sant, Tushar; Poswal, H. K.; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2013-10-14

    The in-situ growth of CuO nanowires was studied by Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (EDXRD) to observe the mechanism of growth. The study was carried out for comparison at two temperatures—at 500 °C, the optimum temperature of the nanowires growth, and at 300 °C just below the temperature range of the growth. The in situ observation revealed the successive oxidation of Cu foil to Cu{sub 2}O layer and finally to CuO layer. Further analysis showed the presence of a compressive stress in CuO layer due to interface at CuO and Cu{sub 2}O layers. The compressive stress was found to increase with the growth of the nanowires at 500 °C while it relaxed with the growth of CuO layer at 300 °C. The present results do not support the existing model of stress relaxation induced growth of nanowires. Based on the detailed Transmission Electron Microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope, and EDXRD results, a microstructure based growth model has been suggested.

  10. Crystal and electronic structures of CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type rare-earth copper zinc phosphides RECuZnP{sub 2} (RE=Pr, Nd, Gd-Tm, Lu)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, Peter E.R.; Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Cavell, Ronald G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada); Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.c [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2011-01-15

    The quaternary rare-earth phosphides RECuZnP{sub 2} (RE=Pr, Nd, Gd-Tm, Lu) have been prepared by reaction of the elements at 900 {sup o}C, completing this versatile series which forms for nearly all RE metals. They adopt the trigonal CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure (Pearson symbol hP5, space group P3-bar m1, Z=1), as confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis on ErCuZnP{sub 2} and powder X-ray diffraction analysis on the remaining members. The Cu and Zn atoms are assumed to be disordered over the single transition-metal site. Band structure calculations on a hypothetically ordered YCuZnP{sub 2} model suggest a semimetal, with a zero band gap between the valence and conduction bands. This electronic structure is supported by XPS valence band spectra for RECuZnP{sub 2} (RE=Gd-Er), in which the intensity drops off smoothly at the Fermi edge. The absence of a band gap permits the electron count to deviate from the precise value of 16 e{sup -} per formula unit, as demonstrated by the formation of a solid solution in GdCu{sub x}Zn{sub 2-x}P{sub 2} (1.0{<=}x{<=}1.3), while still retaining the CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure. Because the Cu 2p XPS spectra indicate that the Cu atoms are always monovalent, the substitution of Cu for Zn leads to a decrease in electron count and a lowering of the Fermi level in the valence band. The magnetic susceptibility of RECuZnP{sub 2} (RE=Gd-Er), which obeys the Curie-Weiss law, confirms the presence of trivalent RE atoms. -- Graphical abstract: The absence of a band gap in the semimetallic quaternary rare-earth phosphides RECuZnP{sub 2} permits the formation of a solid solution such as GdCu{sub x}Zn{sub 2-x}P{sub 2} through hole-doping of the valence band. Display Omitted

  11. Improved heterojunction quality in Cu2O-based solar cells through the optimization of atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposited Zn1-xMgxO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ievskaya, Yulia; Hoye, Robert L. Z.; Sadhanala, Aditya; Musselman, Kevin P.; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition (AP-SALD) was used to deposit n-type ZnO and Zn1-xMgxO thin films onto p-type thermally oxidized Cu2O substrates outside vacuum at low temperature. The performance of photovoltaic devices...

  12. Fast-neutron induced pre-equilibrium reactions on 55Mn and 63,65Cu at energies up to 40 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Avrigeanu; S. V. Chuvaev; A. A. Filatenkov; R. A. Forrest; M. Herman; A. J. Koning; A. J. M. Plompen; F. L. Roman; V. Avrigeanu

    2007-12-05

    Excitation functions were measured for the $^{55}$Mn(n,2n)$^{54}$Mn, $^{55}$Mn(n,$\\alpha$)$^{52}$V, $^{63}$Cu(n,$\\alpha$)$^{60}$Co, $^{65}$Cu(n,2n)$^{64}$Cu, and $^{65}$Cu(n,p)$^{65}$Ni reactions from 13.47 to 14.83 MeV. The experimental cross sections are compared with the results of calculations including all activation channels for the stable isotopes of Mn and Cu, for neutron incident energies up to 50 MeV. Within the energy range up to 20 MeV the model calculations are most sensitive to the parameters related to nuclei in the early stages of the reaction, while the model assumptions are better established by analysis of the data in the energy range 20-40 MeV. While the present analysis has taken advantage of both a new set of accurate measured cross sections around 14 MeV and the larger data basis fortunately available between 20 and 40 MeV for the Mn and Cu isotopes, the need of additional measurements below as well as above 40 MeV is pointed out. Keywords: 55Mn, 63,65Cu, E$\\leq$40 MeV, Neutron activation cross section measurements, Nuclear reactions, Model calculations, Manganese, Copper

  13. University of Alberta SafeType: Detecting Type Violations for Type-Based Alias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amaral, José Nelson

    University of Alberta SafeType: Detecting Type Violations for Type-Based Alias Analysis of C Edmonton, Alberta Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other

  14. Mechanism of Methanol Synthesis on Cu through CO2 and CO Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grabow, Lars C.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2011-03-04

    We present a comprehensive mean-field microkinetic model for the methanol synthesis and water-gas-shift (WGS) reactions that includes novel reaction intermediates, such as formic acid (HCOOH) and hydroxymethoxy (CH?O?) and allows for the formation of formic acid (HCOOH), formaldehyde (CH?O), and methyl formate (HCOOCH?) as byproducts. All input model parameters were initially derived from periodic, self-consistent, GGA-PW91 density functional theory calculations on the Cu(111) surface and subsequently fitted to published experimentalmethanol synthesis rate data, which were collected under realistic conditions on a commercial Cu/ZnO/Al?O? catalyst. We find that the WGS reaction follows the carboxyl (COOH)-mediated path and that both CO and CO? hydrogenation pathways are active for methanol synthesis. Under typical industrial methanol synthesis conditions, CO? hydrogenation is responsible for ?2/3 of the methanol produced. The intermediates of the CO? pathway for methanol synthesis include HCOO*, HCOOH*, CH?O?*, CH?O*, and CH?O*. The formation of formate (HCOO*) from CO?* and H* on Cu(111) does not involve an intermediate carbonate (CO?*) species, and hydrogenation of HCOO* leads to HCOOH* instead of dioxymethylene (H?CO?*). The effect of CO is not only promotional; CO* is also hydrogenated in significant amounts to HCO*, CH?O *, CH?O*, and CH?OH*. We considered two possibilities for CO promotion: (a) removal of OH* via COOH* to form CO? and hydrogen (WGS), and (b) CO-assisted hydrogenation of various surface intermediates, with HCO* being the H-donor. Only the former mechanism contributes to methanol formation, but its effect is small compared with that of direct CO hydrogenation to methanol. Overall, methanol synthesis rates are limited by methoxy (CH?O*) formation at low CO?/(CO+CO?) ratios and by CH?O* hydrogenation in CO?-rich feeds. CH?O* hydrogenation is the common slow step for both the CO and the CO? methanol synthesis routes; the relative contribution of each route is determined by their respective slow steps HCO*+H*?CH?O*+* and HCOOH*+H*?CH?O?*+* as well as by feed composition and reaction conditions. An analysis of the fitted parameters for a commercial Cu/ZnO/Al?O? catalyst suggests that a more open Cu surface, for example, Cu(110), Cu(100), and Cu(211) partially covered by oxygen, may provide a better model for the active site of methanol synthesis, but our studies cannot exclude a synergistic effect with the ZnO support.

  15. Understanding the Cu-Zn brass alloys using a short-range-order cluster model: Significance of specific compositions of industrial alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hong, H. L.; Wang, Q.; Dong, C.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-11-17

    Metallic alloys show complex chemistries that are not yet understood so far. It has been widely accepted that behind the composition selection lies a short-range-order mechanism for solid solutions. The present paper addresses this fundamental question by examining the face-centered-cubic Cu-Zn a-brasses. A new structural approach, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model, is introduced, which suits specifically for the description of short-range-order structures in disordered systems. Two types of formulas are pointed out, [Zn-Cu12]Zn1,6 and [Zn-Cu12](Zn,Cu)6, which explain the a-brasses listed in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications. In these formulas, the bracketed parts represent the 1st-neighbor cluster, and eachmore »cluster is matched with one to six 2nd-neighbor Zn atoms or with six mixed (Zn,Cu) atoms. Such a cluster-based formulism describes the 1st- and 2nd-neighbor local atomic units where the solute and solvent interactions are ideally satisfied. The Cu-Ni industrial alloys are also explained, thus proving the universality of the cluster-formula approach in understanding the alloy selections. The revelation of the composition formulas for the Cu-(Zn,Ni) industrial alloys points to the common existence of simple composition rules behind seemingly complex chemistries of industrial alloys, therefore offering a fundamental and practical method towards composition interpretations of all kinds of alloys.« less

  16. Local structure order in Pd78Cu6Si16 liquid

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, G. Q.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, Y.; Shen, B.; Dong, F.; Wang, Z. Y.; Zhang, R. J.; Zheng, Y. X.; Kramer, M. J.; Wang, S. Y.; et al

    2015-02-05

    The short-range order (SRO) in Pd78Cu6Si16 liquid was studied by high energy x-ray diffraction and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The calculated pair correlation functions at different temperatures agree well with the experimental results. The partial pair correlation functions from ab intio MD simulations indicate that Si atoms prefer to be uniformly distributed while Cu atoms tend to aggregate. By performing structure analysis using Honeycutt-Andersen index, Voronoi tessellation, and atomic cluster alignment method, we show that the icosahedron and face-centered cubic SRO increase upon cooling. The dominant SRO is the Pd-centered Pd9Si2 motif, namely the structure of which motifmore »is similar to the structure of Pd-centered clusters in the Pd9Si2 crystal. The study further confirms the existence of trigonal prism capped with three half-octahedra that is reported as a structural unit in Pd-based amorphous alloys. The majority of Cu-centered clusters are icosahedra, suggesting that the presence of Cu is benefit to promote the glass forming ability.« less

  17. Effects of charge inhomogeneities on elementary excitations in La2-xSrxCuO?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, S. R.; Hamann, A.; Pintschovius, L.; Lamago, D.; Khaliullin, G.; Fujita, M.; Yamada, K.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.; Reznik, D.

    2011-12-12

    Purely local experimental probes of many copper oxide superconductors show that their electronic states are inhomogeneous in real space. For example, scanning tunneling spectroscopic imaging shows strong variations in real space, and according to nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies, the charge distribution in the bulk varies on the nanoscale. However, the analysis of the experimental results utilizing spatially averaged probes often ignores this fact. We have performed a detailed investigation of the doping dependence of the energy and linewidth of the zone-boundary Cu-O bond-stretching vibration in La2-xSrxCuO? by inelastic neutron scattering. Both our results as well as previously reported angle-dependentmore »momentum widths of the electronic spectral function detected by angle-resolved photoemission can be reproduced by including the same distribution of local environments extracted from the NQR analysis.« less

  18. Method of producing .sup.67 Cu

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Jr., Harold A. (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, John W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Thomas, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bentley, Glenn E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A method of producing carrier-free .sup.67 Cu by proton spallation combined with subsequent chemical separation and purification is disclosed. A target consisting essentially of pressed zinc oxide is irradiated with a high energy, high current proton beam to produce a variety of spallogenic nuclides, including .sup.67 Cu and other copper isotopes. The irradiated target is dissolved in a concentrated acid solution to which a palladium salt is added. In accordance with the preferred method, the spallogenic copper is twice coprecipitated with palladium, once with metallic zinc as the precipitating agent and once with hydrogen sulfide as the precipitating agent. The palladium/copper precipitate is then dissolved in an acid solution and the copper is separated from the palladium by liquid chromatography on an anion exchange resin.

  19. A new Cu–cysteamine complex: structure and optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Lun; Chen, Wei; Schatte, Gabriele; Wang, Wei; Joly, Alan G.; Huang, Yining; Sammynaiken, Ramaswami; Hossu, Marius

    2014-06-07

    Here we report the structure and optical properties of a new Cu–cysteamine complex (Cu–Cy) with a formula of Cu3Cl(SR)2 (R ¼ CH2CH2NH2). This Cu–Cy has a different structure from a previous Cu–Cy complex, in which both thio and amine groups from cysteamine bond with copper ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance results show that the oxidation state of copper in Cu3Cl(SR)2 is +1 rather than +2. Further, Cu3Cl(SR)2 has been observed to show intense photoluminescence and X-ray excited luminescence. More interesting is that Cu3Cl(SR)2 particles can produce singlet oxygen under irradiation by light or X-ray. This indicates that Cu3Cl(SR)2 is a new photosensitizer that can be used for deep cancer treatment as X-ray can penetrate soft tissues. All these findings mean that Cu3Cl(SR)2 is a new material with potential applications for lighting, radiation detection and cancer treatment.

  20. Growth and Oxidation of Thin Film Al(2)Cu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SON,KYUNG-AH; MISSERT,NANCY A.; BARBOUR,J. CHARLES; HREN,J.J.; COPELAND,ROBERT GUILD; MINOR,KENNETH G.

    2000-01-18

    Al{sub 2}Cu thin films ({approx} 382 nm) are fabricated by melting and resolidifying Al/Cu bilayers in the presence of a {micro} 3 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivating layer. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measures a 1.0 eV shift of the Cu2p{sub 3/2} peak and a 1.6 eV shift of the valence band relative to metallic Cu upon Al{sub 2}Cu formation. Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM) and Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) show that the Al{sub 2}Cu film is composed of 30-70 {micro}m wide and 10-25 mm long cellular grains with (110) orientation. The atomic composition of the film as estimated by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) is 67 {+-} 2% Al and 33 {+-} 2% Cu. XPS scans of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}Cu taken before and after air exposure indicate that the upper Al{sub 2}Cu layers undergo further oxidation to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} even in the presence of {approx} 5 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The majority of Cu produced from oxidation is believed to migrate below the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers, based upon the lack of evidence for metallic Cu in the XPS scans. In contrast to Al/Cu passivated with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, melting/resolidifying the Al/Cu bilayer without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} results in phase-segregated dendritic film growth.

  1. Subcellular fractionation of Cu exposed oysters, Crassostrea virginica, and Cu accumulation from a biologically incorporated Cu rich oyster diet in Fundulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosell, Martin

    and a pellet supplement (20.5±1.0 µg Cu g-1 d.w.) both at 5% body mass day-1 . In killifish, Cu increased ~7 and Wood, 2008). This may account for the high toxicity observed in experiments using naturally

  2. The effect of Cu/Zn molar ratio on CO{sub 2} hydrogenation over Cu/ZnO/ZrO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaharun, Salina, E-mail: salinashaharun@gmail.com, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Shaharun, Maizatul S., E-mail: salinashaharun@gmail.com, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Taha, Mohd F., E-mail: faisalt@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Science, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Mohamad, Dasmawati, E-mail: dasmawati@kck.usm.my [School of Dental Sciences, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to methanol is an attractive way to recycle and utilize CO{sub 2}. A series of Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ZrO{sub 2} catalysts (CZAZ) containing different molar ratios of Cu/Zn were prepared by the co-precipitation method and investigated in a stirred slurry autoclave system. The catalysts were characterized by temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), field emission scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive analysis (FESEM-EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption. Higher surface area, SA{sub BET} values (42.6–59.9 m{sup 2}/g) are recorded at low (1) and high (5) Cu/Zn ratios with the minimum value of 35.71 m{sup 2}/g found for a Cu/Zn of 3. The reducibility of the metal oxides formed after calcination of catalyst samples was also affected due to change in metal-support interaction. At a low reaction temperature of 443 K, total gas pressure of 3.0 MPa and 0.1 g/mL of the CZAZ catalyst, the selectivity to methanol decreased as the Cu/Zn molar ratio increased, and the maximum selectivity of 67.73 was achieved at Cu/Zn molar ratio of 1. With a reaction time of 3h, the best performing catalyst was CZAZ75 with Cu/Zn molar ratio of 5 giving methanol yield of 79.30%.

  3. Blood Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2007-03-14

    Sox spent a hundred mil to acquire pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka; they probably weren't even aware that he is a Type O and that they make the best bankers, politicians and... you guessed it... professional baseball players. #ceas #hacker #japan #tsutsuien...

  4. The magnetic structure of EuCu2Sb2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ryan, D. H.; Cadogan, J. M.; Anand, V. K.; Johnston, D. C.; Flacau, R.

    2015-05-06

    Antiferromagnetic ordering of EuCu2Sb2 which forms in the tetragonal CaBe2Ge2-type structure (space group P4/nmm #129) has been studied using neutron powder diffraction and 151Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy. The room temperature 151Eu isomer shift of –12.8(1) mm/s shows the Eu to be divalent, while the 151Eu hyperfine magnetic field (Bhf) reaches 28.7(2) T at 2.1 K, indicating a full Eu2+ magnetic moment. Bhf(T) follows a smooth $S=\\frac{7}{2}$ Brillouin function and yields an ordering temperature of 5.1(1) K. Refinement of the neutron diffraction data reveals a collinear A-type antiferromagnetic arrangement with the Eu moments perpendicular to the tetragonal c-axis. As a result, themore »refined Eu magnetic moment at 0.4 K is 7.08(15) ?B which is the full free-ion moment expected for the Eu2+ ion with $S=\\frac{7}{2}$ and a spectroscopic splitting factor of g = 2.« less

  5. Charged Particle Multiplicities in Ultra-relativistic Au+Au and Cu+Cu Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2006-04-26

    The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5 to 179.5 deg. corresponding to |eta|<5.4. The general features of the charged particle multiplicity distributions as a function of pseudo-rapidity, collision energy and centrality, as well as system size, are discussed.

  6. CU Comae: a new field double-mode RR Lyrae, the most metal poor discovered to date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Clementini; S. Di Tomaso; L. Di Fabrizio; A. Bragaglia; R. Merighi; M. Tosi; E. Carretta; R. G. Gratton; I. I. Ivans; A. Kinard; M. Marconi; H. A. Smith; R. Wilhelm; T. Woodruff; C. Sneden

    2000-06-13

    We report the discovery of a new double-mode RR Lyrae variable (RRd) in the field of our Galaxy: CU Comae. CU Comae is the sixth such RRd identified to date and is the most metal-poor RRd ever detected. Based on BVI CCD photometry spanning eleven years of observations, we find that CU Comae has periods P0=0.5441641 +/-0.0000049d and P1=0.4057605 +/-0.0000018d. The amplitude of the primary (first-overtone) period of CU Comae is about twice the amplitude of the secondary (fundamental) period. The combination of the fundamental period of pulsation P0 and the period ratio of P1/P0=0.7457 places the variable on the metal-poor side of the Petersen diagram, in the region occupied by M68 and M15 RRd's. A mass of 0.83 solar masses is estimated for CU Comae using an updated theoretical calibration of the Petersen diagram. High resolution spectroscopy (R=30,000) covering the full pulsation cycle of CU Comae was obtained with the 2.7 m telescope of the Mc Donald Observatory, and has been used to build up the radial velocity curve of the variable. Abundance analysis done on the four spectra taken near minimum light (phase: 0.54 -- 0.71) confirms the metal poor nature of CU Comae, for which we derive [Fe/H]=-2.38 +/-0.20. This value places this new RRd at the extreme metal-poor edge of the metallicity distribution of the RR Lyrae variables in our Galaxy.

  7. Composition and grain size effects on the structural and mechanical properties of CuZr nanoglasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adibi, Sara [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, 138632 Singapore (Singapore); Mechanical Engineering Department, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore); Branicio, Paulo S., E-mail: branicio@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg; Zhang, Yong-Wei [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, 138632 Singapore (Singapore); Joshi, Shailendra P., E-mail: Shailendra@nus.edu.sg [Mechanical Engineering Department, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore)

    2014-07-28

    Nanoglasses (NGs), metallic glasses (MGs) with a nanoscale grain structure, have the potential to considerably increase the ductility of traditional MGs while retaining their outstanding mechanical properties. We investigated the effects of composition on the structural and mechanical properties of CuZr NG films with grain sizes between 3 to 15?nm using molecular dynamics simulations. Results indicate a transition from localized shear banding to homogeneous superplastic flow with decreasing grain size, although the critical average grain size depends on composition: 5?nm for Cu{sub 36}Zr{sub 64} and 3?nm for Cu{sub 64}Zr{sub 36}. The flow stress of the superplastic NG at different compositions follows the trend of the yield stress of the parent MG, i.e., Cu{sub 36}Zr{sub 64} yield/flow stress: 2.54?GPa/1.29?GPa and Cu{sub 64}Zr{sub 36} yield/flow stress: 3.57?GPa /1.58?GPa. Structural analysis indicates that the differences in mechanical behavior as a function of composition are rooted at the distinct statistics of prominent atomic Voronoi polyhedra. The mechanical behavior of NGs is also affected by the grain boundary thickness and the fraction of atoms at interfaces for a given average grain size. The results suggest that the composition dependence of the mechanical behavior of NGs follows that of their parent MGs, e.g., a stronger MG will generate a stronger NG, while the intrinsic tendency for homogeneous deformation occurring at small grain size is not affected by composition.

  8. Understanding NOx SCR Mechanism and Activity on Cu/Chabazite...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Book: Understanding NOx SCR Mechanism and Activity on CuChabazite Structures throughout the Catalyst Life Cycle Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Understanding NOx SCR...

  9. Enhanced hydrogenation and reduced lattice distortion in size selected Pd-Ag and Pd-Cu alloy nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengar, Saurabh K.; Mehta, B. R.; Kulriya, P. K.; Khan, S. A.

    2013-10-21

    Important correlation between valence band spectra and hydrogenation properties in Pd alloy nanoparticles is established by studying the properties of size selected and monocrystalline Pd, Ag, Cu, Pd-Ag, and Pd-Cu nanoparticles. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and elastic recoil detection analysis show that size induced Pd4d centroid shift is related to enhanced hydrogenation with H/Pd ratio of 0.57 and 0.49 in Pd-Ag and Pd-Cu nanoparticles in comparison to reported bulk values of 0.2 and 0.1, respectively. Pd-alloy nanoparticles show lower hydrogen induced lattice distortion. The reduced distortion and higher hydrogen reactivity of Pd-alloy nanoparticles is important for numerous hydrogen related applications.

  10. Defects introduced into electroplated Cu films during room-temperature recrystallization probed by a monoenergetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uedono, A.; Suzuki, T.; Nakamura, T.; Ohdaira, T.; Suzuki, R. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Semiconductor Technology Academic Research Center, 17-2, Shin Yokohama 3-chome, Kohoku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 222-0033 (Japan); National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2005-08-15

    Positron annihilation was used to probe vacancy-type defects in electroplated Cu films deposited on Ta/SiO{sub 2}/Si. Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation were measured for the Cu films during grain growth at room temperature (i.e., self-annealing). The line-shape parameter S increased during self-annealing, and the observed time dependence of S was well described by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov kinetics. After self-annealing, the values of S were found to be larger than the S value for annealed pure Cu, suggesting that the positrons annihilated from the trapped state by vacancy-type defects in grains. From a comparison with the results of previous isochronal annealing experiments, the major species of defects introduced during self-annealing was found to be vacancy clusters. The size of these defects increased, but their concentration decreased, with increasing film thickness. In thicker Cu films, an enhanced flow of atoms and subsequent rapid grain growth cause such defect behavior.

  11. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63Cu and 65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Forget, Benoit; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-01-01

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63Cu and 65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation was based on three experimental transmission data sets; two measured at ORELA and one from MITR, and two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identied for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope was based on the identied resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) were determined to match the dierential thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Double dierential elastic scattering cross sections were calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks. This work is in support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

  12. Non-uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea Cu/Zeolite...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea CuZeolite SCR Catalysts Non-uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea CuZeolite SCR Catalysts CuZeolite SCR catalysts...

  13. Derived Types What Are Derived Types?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Derived Types #12;What Are Derived Types? As usual, a hybrid of two, unrelated concepts C++, Python orientation comes in #12;Simple Derived Types TYPE Wheel INTEGER :: spokes REAL :: diameter, width CHARACTER(LEN=15) :: material END TYPE Wheel That defines a derived type Wheel Using derived types needs a special

  14. Derived Types What Are Derived Types?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Derived Types #12;What Are Derived Types? As usual, a hybrid of two, unrelated concepts C object orientation comes in This course will only describe the former. #12;Simple Derived Types TYPE That defines a derived type Wheel Using derived types needs a special syntax TYPE(Wheel) :: w1 #12;More

  15. Science DMZ Implemented at CU Boulder

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcoming ReleaseSecurityPediatric CancerSchedulesItemActivitiesScienceCU

  16. Determination of lateral size distribution of type-II ZnTe/ZnSe stacked submonolayer quantum dots via spectral analysis of optical signature of the Aharanov-Bohm excitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Haojie; Dhomkar, Siddharth; Roy, Bidisha; Kuskovsky, Igor L.; Shuvayev, Vladimir; Deligiannakis, Vasilios; Tamargo, Maria C.; Ludwig, Jonathan; Smirnov, Dmitry; Wang, Alice

    2014-10-28

    For submonolayer quantum dot (QD) based photonic devices, size and density of QDs are critical parameters, the probing of which requires indirect methods. We report the determination of lateral size distribution of type-II ZnTe/ZnSe stacked submonolayer QDs, based on spectral analysis of the optical signature of Aharanov-Bohm (AB) excitons, complemented by photoluminescence studies, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy, and numerical calculations. Numerical calculations are employed to determine the AB transition magnetic field as a function of the type-II QD radius. The study of four samples grown with different tellurium fluxes shows that the lateral size of QDs increases by just 50%, even though tellurium concentration increases 25-fold. Detailed spectral analysis of the emission of the AB exciton shows that the QD radii take on only certain values due to vertical correlation and the stacked nature of the QDs.

  17. Type: Renewal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsStateof Energy TwoEvent at the Pu Facility,Type IV COPV1

  18. The spin-dependent transport of Co-encapsulated Si nanotubes contacted with Cu electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Yan-Dong; Yan, Xiao-Hong; Xiao, Yang

    2014-02-10

    Unlike carbon nanotubes, silicon ones are hard to form. However, they could be stabilized by metal-encapsulation. Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the spin-dependent electronic transport of Co-encapsulated Si nanotubes, which are contacted with Cu electrodes. For the finite tubes, as the tube-length increases, the transmission changes from spin-unpolarized to spin-polarized. Further analysis shows that, not only the screening of electrodes on Co's magnetism but also the spin-asymmetric Co-Co interactions are the physical mechanisms. As Cu and Si are the fundamental elements in semiconductor industry, our results may throw light on the development of silicon-based spintronic devices.

  19. Devitrification kinetics and phase selection mechanisms in Cu-Zr metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalay, Ilkay

    2010-12-15

    Metallic glasses have been a promising class of materials since their discovery in the 1960s. Indeed, remarkable chemical, mechanical and physical properties have attracted considerable attention, and several excellent reviews are available. Moreover, the special group of glass forming alloys known as the bulk metallic glasses (BMG) become amorphous solids even at relatively low cooling rates, allowing them to be cast in large cross sections, opening the scope of potential applications to include bulk forms and net shape structural applications. Recent studies have been reported for new bulk metallic glasses produced with lower cooling rates, from 0.1 to several hundred K/s. Some of the application products of BMGs include sporting goods, high performance springs and medical devices. Several rapid solidification techniques, including melt-spinning, atomization and surface melting have been developed to produce amorphous alloys. The aim of all these methods is to solidify the liquid phase rapidly enough to suppress the nucleation and growth of crystalline phases. Furthermore, the production of amorphous/crystalline composite (ACC) materials by partial crystallization of amorphous precursor has recently given rise to materials that provide better mechanical and magnetic properties than the monolithic amorphous or crystalline alloys. In addition, these advances illustrate the broad untapped potential of using the glassy state as an intermediate stage in the processing of new materials and nanostructures. These advances underlie the necessity of investigations on prediction and control of phase stability and microstructural dynamics during both solidification and devitrification processes. This research presented in this dissertation is mainly focused on Cu-Zr and Cu-Zr-Al alloy systems. The Cu-Zr binary system has high glass forming ability in a wide compositional range (35-70 at.% Cu). Thereby, Cu-Zr based alloys have attracted much attention according to fundamental research on the behaviors of glass forming alloys. Further motivation arising from the application of this system as a basis for many BMGs and ACC materials; the Cu-Zr system warrants this attention and offers great potential for the development of new materials. However, the prediction and control of microstructural evolution during devitrification remains challenging because of the complex devitrification behavior of the Cu-Zr binary alloy which is arising from the competition of metastable and stable phases and diversity of crystal structures. This dissertation details a systematic fundamental investigation into the mechanisms and kinetics of the various crystallization transformation processes involved in the overall devitrification response of Cu-Zr and Cu-Zr-Al glasses. Various isothermal and nonisothermal treatments are employed, and the structural response is characterized using bulk X-ray and thermal analysis methods as well as nanoscale microscopic analysis methods, revealing structural and chemical details down to the atomic-scale. By carefully combining techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in-situ synchrotron high energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to quantify the characterization transformations, this research has uncovered numerous details concerning the atomistic mechanisms of crystallization and has provided much new understanding related to the dominant phases, the overall reaction sequences, and the rate-controlling mechanisms. As such this work represents a substantial step forward in understanding these transformations and provides a clear framework for further progress toward ultimate application of controlled devitrification processing for the production of new materials with remarkable properties.

  20. Effect of the Keggin anions on assembly of Cu{sup I}-bis(tetrazole) thioether complexes containing multinuclear Cu{sup I}-cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xiuli; Gao Qiang; Tian Aixiang; Hu Hailiang; Liu Guocheng

    2012-03-15

    In order to investigate the effect of polyoxometalate (POM) on the assembly of transition metal-bis(tetrazole) thioether complexes, three new complexes based on different Keggin anions and multinuclear Cu{sup I}-cluster [Cu{sup I}{sub 12}(bmtr){sub 9}(HSiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}){sub 4}] (1), [Cu{sup I}{sub 3}(bmtr){sub 3}(PM{sub 12}O{sub 40})] (M=W for 2; Mo for 3) (bmtr=1,3-bis(1-methyl-5-mercapto-1,2,3,4-tetrazole)propane), have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by routine physical methods and single crystal X-ray diffraction. In compound 1, two kinds of nanometer-scale tetranuclear subunits linked by [SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 4-} polyanions assemble a (3, 4)-connected three-dimensional (3D) self-penetrating framework. Compounds 2 and 3 are isostructural, exhibiting a 1D chain with [PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 3-}/[PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 3-} polyanions and trinuclear clusters arranging alternately. The distinct structural differences between these POM-based Cu{sup I}-bmtr complexes of 1 and 2/3 maybe rest on the contrast of Keggin-type polyoxometalate with different central heteroatoms, which have been discussed in detail. In addition, the electrochemical properties of the title complexes have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three new complexes based on different Keggin anions and multinuclear Cu{sup I}-cluster have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The Keggin polyanions with different central heteroatoms play a key role. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The flexible bis(tetrazole)-based thioether ligand with some advantages have been used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Keggin anions with different central heteroatoms has been discussed in detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrochemical behaviors and electrocatalysis property have been investigated.

  1. Microwave characteristics of the high temperature superconductor YBa?Cu?O??[delta] 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skrehot, Michael Kevin

    1989-01-01

    . The recent discovery of superconductivity above the boiling point of Nitrogen in copper oxides has opened the experimental door to virtually anyone who is inter- ested. As a result, every aspect of the new materials is being intensely studied... YBaCuO, or more specifically YBazCusOr s, is an oxygen deficient orthorhombic perovskite structure. 6 varies from 0 to 0. 6, with 6 = 0 12 01 (382 A) 9 Cu ~ Cu I 0 o Cu o w 04 0 0 Cu o 0 Cu ~ CuZ (11. 88 A) 0 02 0 Qv 0 o*ygeu Cu oy oooo...

  2. In situ visualization of metallurgical reactions in nanoscale Cu/Sn diffusion couples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Qiyue [State Univ. of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY (United States); Stach, Eric A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gao, Fan [Univ. of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA (United States); Zhou, Guangwen [State Univ. of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY (United States); Gu, Zhiyong [Univ. of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Cu–Sn metallurgical soldering reaction in two-segmented Cu–Sn nanowires is visualized by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. By varying the relative lengths of Cu and Sn segments, we show that the metallurgical reaction starts at ~ 200 ° with the formation of a Cu–Sn solid solution for the Sn/Cu length ratio smaller than 1:5 while the formation of Cu–Sn intermetallic compounds (IMCs) for larger Sn/Cu length ratios. Upon heating the nanowires up to ~ 500 °C, two phase transformation pathways occur, ?-Cu?Sn? ? ?-Cu?Sn ? ?-Cu??Sn?? for nanowires with a long Cu segment and ?-Cu?Sn? ? ?-Cu?Sn ? ?-Cu?Sn with a short Cu segment. The dynamic in situ TEM visualization of the evolution of Kirkendall voids demonstrates that Cu diffuses faster both in Sn and IMCs than that of Sn in Cu? and IMCs, which is the underlying cause of the dependence of the IMC formation and associated phase evolution on the relative lengths of the Cu and Sn segments.

  3. In situ visualization of metallurgical reactions in nanoscale Cu/Sn diffusion couples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yin, Qiyue; Stach, Eric A.; Gao, Fan; Zhou, Guangwen; Gu, Zhiyong

    2015-02-10

    The Cu–Sn metallurgical soldering reaction in two-segmented Cu–Sn nanowires is visualized by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. By varying the relative lengths of Cu and Sn segments, we show that the metallurgical reaction starts at ~ 200 ° with the formation of a Cu–Sn solid solution for the Sn/Cu length ratio smaller than 1:5 while the formation of Cu–Sn intermetallic compounds (IMCs) for larger Sn/Cu length ratios. Upon heating the nanowires up to ~ 500 °C, two phase transformation pathways occur, ?-Cu?Sn? ? ?-Cu?Sn ? ?-Cu??Sn?? for nanowires with a long Cu segment and ?-Cu?Sn? ? ?-Cu?Sn ? ?-Cu?Sn with amore »short Cu segment. The dynamic in situ TEM visualization of the evolution of Kirkendall voids demonstrates that Cu diffuses faster both in Sn and IMCs than that of Sn in Cu? and IMCs, which is the underlying cause of the dependence of the IMC formation and associated phase evolution on the relative lengths of the Cu and Sn segments.« less

  4. Deactivation Mechanism of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mechanism of CuZeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive Hydrothermal Aging Deactivation Mechanism of CuZeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive Hydrothermal Aging Better control for...

  5. Analysis of Hippocampal Cell Proliferation, Survival, and Neuronal Morphology in P/Q-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Mutant Mice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigussie, Fikru

    2013-01-16

    Tottering and leaner mutant mice carry mutations in the pore-forming subunit (?1A) of P/Q-type (CaV 2.1) voltage-gated calcium ion (Ca2+) channels that result in reduced Ca2+ current density. Since Ca2+ influx via ...

  6. An analysis of area type and the availability of alternative transportation services on subjective well-being : are people happiest in cities?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Janet (Janet I.)

    2013-01-01

    This study is a comprehensive analysis of how rural, suburban, and urban areas compare in terms of the subjective well-being (SWB) of their residents and how the availability of transportation services affects SWB. Because ...

  7. Application of cluster-plus-glue-atom model to barrierless Cu–Ni–Ti and Cu–Ni–Ta films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiaona, E-mail: lixiaona@dlut.edu.cn; Ding, Jianxin; Wang, Miao; Dong, Chuang [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); Chu, Jinn P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-01

    To improve the thermal stability of copper and avoid its diffusion into surrounding dielectrics or interfacial reactions with them, the authors applied the cluster-plus-glue-atom model to investigate barrierless Cu–Ni–M (M?=?Ti or Ta) seed layers. The dissolution of the third element (Ti or Ta) in the Cu lattice with the aid of Ni significantly improved the thermal stability of the Cu seed layer. The appropriate M/Ni (M?=?Ti or Ta) ratio was selected to obtain a low resistivity: the resistivity was as low as 2.5??? cm for the (Ti{sub 1.5/13.5}Ni{sub 12/13.5}){sub 0.3}Cu{sub 99.7} film and 2.8??? cm for the (Ta{sub 1.1/13.1}Ni{sub 12/13.1}){sub 0.4}Cu{sub 99.6} film after annealing at 500?°C for 1?h. After annealing at 500?°C for 40?h, the two films remained stable without forming a Cu{sub 3}Si compound. The authors confirmed that the range of applications of the cluster-plus-glue-atom model could be extended. Therefore, a third element M with negative enthalpies of mixing with both Cu and Ni could be selected, under the premise that the mixing enthalpy of M–Ni is more negative than that of M–Cu.

  8. System size dependence of cluster properties from two-particle angular correlations in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sq root(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alver, B.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Kulinich, P.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Nieuwenhuizen, G. J. van; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wyslouch, B.; Back, B. B.

    2010-02-15

    We present results on two-particle angular correlations in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 200 GeV over a broad range of pseudorapidity (eta) and azimuthal angle (phi) values as a function of collision centrality. The PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has a uniquely large angular coverage for inclusive charged particles, which allows for the study of correlations on both long- and short-range scales. A complex two-dimensional correlation structure in {Delta}{eta} and {Delta}{phi} emerges, which is interpreted in the context of a cluster model. The effective cluster size and decay width are extracted from the two-particle pseudorapidity correlation functions. The effective cluster size found in semicentral Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions is comparable to that found in proton-proton collisions but a nontrivial decrease in size with increasing centrality is observed. Moreover, a comparison of results from Cu+Cu versus Au+Au collisions shows an interesting scaling of the effective cluster size with the measured fraction of total cross section (which is related to the ratio of the impact parameter to the nuclear radius, b/2R), suggesting a geometric origin. Further analysis for pairs from restricted azimuthal regions shows that the effective cluster size at {Delta}{phi}{approx}180 deg. drops more rapidly toward central collisions than the size at {Delta}{phi}{approx}0 deg. The effect of limited {eta} acceptance on the cluster parameters is also addressed, and a correction is applied to present cluster parameters for full {eta} coverage, leading to much larger effective cluster sizes and widths than previously noted in the literature. These results should provide insight into the hot and dense medium created in heavy ion collisions.

  9. Cu-doping effect on dielectric properties of organic gel synthesized Ba{sub 4}YMn{sub 3?x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 11.5±?}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbier, Tristan, E-mail: tristan.barbier@gmail.com [Université François Rabelais de Tours, CNRS, CEA, ENIVL, GREMAN UMR 7347, 37200 Tours (France); Autret-Lambert, Cécile [Université François Rabelais de Tours, CNRS, CEA, ENIVL, GREMAN UMR 7347, 37200 Tours (France); Andreazza, Pascal [Centre de Recherche sur la matière divisée (CRMD), Université d'Orléans, CNRS, FRE3520, 1B rue de la Férollerie, 45071 Orléans (France); Ruyter, Antoine; Honstettre, Christophe [Université François Rabelais de Tours, CNRS, CEA, ENIVL, GREMAN UMR 7347, 37200 Tours (France); Lambert, Sébastien [CEA—DAM, Le Ripault, 37260 Monts (France); Gervais, François; Lethiecq, Marc [Université François Rabelais de Tours, CNRS, CEA, ENIVL, GREMAN UMR 7347, 37200 Tours (France)

    2013-10-15

    Copper doped-Ba{sub 4}YMn{sub 3?x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 11.5±?} samples were synthesized by an organic gel assisted citrate process. X-ray diffraction of compositions with x=0.002, 0.005, 0.01, 0.02 and 0.04 does not reveal any change of hexagonal perovskite structure on doping. The effects of Cu-doping on the microstructure and dielectric properties were investigated. Cu doping modifies the electrical properties at the level of the impedance characteristics of both grain and grain boundary and to understand these different behaviours, we have carried out high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis. Among the Ba{sub 4}YMn{sub 3?x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 11.5±?} specimens studied, the composition x=0.002 shows a permittivity (??{sub r}) higher than the undoped compound and a lower loss tangent (tan?) over several orders of magnitude of frequency. - Graphical abstract: Highlighting of many stacking faults (intergrowths) in substituted compounds with x>0.01 (right picture), which could explain the different dielectric properties observed in these compounds. However compounds with x>0.01 remain with a better stacking sequence as we can see on the left picture. Display Omitted - Highlights: • High permittivity of the Ba{sub 4}YMn{sub 3?x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 11.5±?}. • Substitution leads to a mixed oxidation state for manganese: Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+}. • Creation of oxygen vacancies which are responsible for stacking faults. • Highlighting relationship between Cu substitution and dielectric properties.

  10. Method for isotopic analysis of chlorinated organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holt, B.D.; Sturchio, N.C.

    1999-08-24

    The present invention provides a method for preparing a VOC sample for carbon and chlorine isotope ratio analysis by mass spectrometer. A VOC sample is placed in a combustion tube and reacted with CuO to form CO{sub 2} and CuCl. The CO{sub 2} is then extracted and analyzed for the carbon isotope ratio. The CuCl is separated from the excess CuO and reacted with CH{sub 3}I to form CH{sub 3}Cl, extracted and analyzed for chlorine isotope ratio. 9 figs.

  11. Objectively measured sedentary time, physical activity and kidney function in people with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes: a prospective cohort analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, V. Y. W.; Brage, S.; Ekelund, U.; Griffin, S. J.; Simmons, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    during the day, which might lead to misclassification of sleep time as sedentary time and vice versa. Also, participants may mis-report sleep duration. A more precise measure of sleep duration, such as polysomnography recording biophysiological changes... physical activity and kidney function over four-years in people with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Individuals (120 women and 206 men) participating in the ADDITION-Plus trial underwent assessment of sedentary time (SED-time), time spent in moderate...

  12. Colloidal synthesis and characterization of carbon-supported Pd-Cu nanoparticle oxygen reduction electrocatalysts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kariuki, N. N.; Wang, X.; Mawdsley, J. R.; Ferrandon, M. S.; Niyogi, S. G.; Vaughey, J. T.; Myers, D. J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-07-27

    The ability to control the size and composition of metal or alloys nanoparticles is important in preparing catalysts. This paper reports a colloidal synthesis methodology for the preparation of monodisperse palladium-copper (Pd-Cu) alloy nanoparticles with an average diameter of 3 nm for the as-prepared particles and 5-10 nm upon removal of the capping agents. Our approach involves the use of metal precursors, capping agents, and reducing agents in controlled ratios for nanoparticle formation in a single organic phase, followed by deposition of the capped nanoparticles on high surface area carbon and removal of the capping agents via heat treatment in either oxidizing or reducing atmosphere. The results of characterizations using transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), temperature programmed oxidation and reduction combined with mass spectrometry (TPO/TPR-MS), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) are discussed. The resulting high-surface-area-carbon-supported Pd-Cu catalysts (PdCu/C) showed high activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic electrolyte. Our study revealed composition and heat-treatment dependent ORR activity.

  13. Type I error and power of the mean and covariance structure confirmatory factor analysis for differential item functioning detection: Methodological issues and resolutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jaehoon

    2009-01-01

    or not a given level of measurement equivalence holds, different scaling methods can lead to different conclusions when a researcher locates DIF in a scale. This dissertation evaluates the MACS analysis for DIF detection by means of a Monte Carlo simulation...

  14. STUDY TYPES What is a "Study Type"?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorf, Martin E.

    #12;STUDY TYPES What is a "Study Type"? A Study Type is a defined business process. Study Types work together to streamline workflow, track data & keep users informed. There are 2 Study Types in eCOMS: COMS and IACUC. The COMS Study: The COMS Study is an online form that a Principal Investigator fills

  15. Nanopore Structure and Sorption Properties of Cu-BTC Metal-Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    Nanopore Structure and Sorption Properties of Cu-BTC Metal-Organic Framework Aleksey Vishnyakov on the copper(II) benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate metal-organic framework (Cu-BTC). We constructed a molecular structural model of Cu-BTC. The pore network of Cu-BTC has a simple cubic symmetry. It consists of main

  16. Effects of residual impurities in electroplated Cu on the Kirkendall void formation during soldering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, J. Y.; Yu Jin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-03

    Additions of bis-(sodium sulfopropyl)-disulfide (SPS) to the Cu electroplating bath strongly affected the characteristics of Kirkendall void formation when the Cu film is soldered with Sn-3.5Ag solder and subsequently aged. Voids were predominantly distributed near the Cu{sub 3}Sn/Cu interface with SPS, but randomly distributed in the Cu{sub 3}Sn layer without SPS. In situ Auger electron spectroscopy of voids at the Cu{sub 3}Sn/Cu interface revealed surface segregation of S atoms, which came from SPS put into the bath as an additive. The S segregation to Cu{sub 3}Sn/Cu interface lowers the interface energy, thereby accelerating the void nucleation. Assisted by the high surface diffusivity of Cu and the presence of excess vacancies arising from the Kirkendall effect, voids tend to localize at the interface, which would result in serious degradation of the joint reliability.

  17. Carbon abundances of the reference late-type stars from 1D analysis of atomic C I and molecular CH lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexeeva, S A

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive model atom was constructed for C I using the most up-to-date atomic data. We evaluated non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) line formation for neutral carbon in classical 1D models representing atmospheres of late-type stars, where carbon abundance varies from solar value down to [C/H] = $-$3. NLTE leads to stronger C I lines compared with their LTE strength and negative NLTE abundance corrections, $\\Delta_{\\rm NLTE}$. The deviations from LTE are large for the strong lines in the infrared (IR), with $\\Delta_{\\rm NLTE}$ = $-$0.10 dex to $-$0.45 dex depending on stellar parameters, and they are minor for the weak lines in the visible spectral range, with |$\\Delta_{\\rm NLTE}| \\le$ 0.03 dex. The NLTE abundance corrections were found to be dependent of the carbon abundance in the model. As the first application of the treated model atom, carbon NLTE abundances were determined for the Sun and eight late-type stars with well-determined stellar parameters that cover the $-2.56 \\le$ [Fe/H] $\\le...

  18. Shape memory properties and microstructural evolution of rapidly solidified CuAlBe alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ergen, Semra; Uzun, Orhan; Yilmaz, Fikret; Kiliçaslan, M. Fatih

    2013-06-15

    In this work, the effects of Be addition on the microstructure and phase transformation temperatures of Cu–12Al–xBe (x = 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6 wt.%) shape memory alloys fabricated by using the arc-melting and melt-spinning techniques have been investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the arc-melted alloys consisted of austenitic ?{sub 1}, martensitic ?{sub 1}? and ?{sub 2} precipitate phases, whereas melt-spun ribbons were composed of a fully martensitic phase. The average grain size of martensitic phases in melt-spun ribbons was determined by electron microscopy images, showing a decrease with increasing Beryllium (Be) amount. Moreover, it was found that the Be addition in the arc-melted alloys had a distinct effect on the morphology of the ?{sub 2} precipitate phase. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that the thickness of martensitic plates in the melt-spun ribbons reduced with increasing Be addition. In a differential scanning calorimeter analysis, no martensitic transformation (M{sub s}) peak was observed in arc-melted alloys, but it was clearly detected in melt-spun ribbons, in which M{sub s} decreased dramatically with increasing Be addition. The improvement in the shape memory ability of melt-spun ribbons was explained in terms of the refinement in grain size and martensitic plates. - Highlights: • The CuAlBe SMAs were produced by means of arc-melter and melt-spinner techniques. • MT was directly obtained in melt-spuns without any intermediate process. • The transformation temperatures decreased with increasing Be amount. • The thickness of martensitic plates in the ribbons reduced with increasing Be. • SMP of CuAl was improved by the addition of Be together with rapid solidification.

  19. Nitrogen-doped cuprous oxide as a p-type hole-transporting layer in thin-film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitrogen-doped cuprous oxide as a p-type hole- transporting layer in thin-film solar cells Yun Seog-transparent tunnel junction to a back-contact. We fabricate Cu2O-based heterojunction thin-film solar cells-factor and power conversion efficiency of the solar cells. Cu2O:N thin-films may also be useful in other

  20. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ELECTROPLATED Cu THIN FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ELECTROPLATED Cu THIN FILMS A.A. Volinsky* , J. Vella microns were electroplated on top of the adhesion-promoting barrier layers on single crystal silicon

  1. Improving properties of Mg with Al–Cu additions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rashad, Muhammad; Pan, Fusheng; Asif, Muhammad; Hussain, Shahid; Saleem, Muhammad

    2014-09-15

    The present work reports improvement in tensile properties of the Mg matrix reinforced with micron-sized copper–aluminum particulate hybrids. The Al–Cu particulate hybrids were incorporated into the Mg matrix through powder metallurgy method. The synthesized alloys exhibited homogeneously dispersed Mg{sub 2}Cu particles in the matrix, therefore leading to a 110% increase in yield strength (221 MPa) and a 72% enhancement in ultimate tensile strength (284 MPa) by addition of 1.0 wt.%Al–0.6 wt.%Cu particle hybrids. Optical microscopy, scanning election microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the microstructure and intermetallic phases of the synthesized alloys. - Highlights: • Mg matrix is reinforced with Al–Cu particulate hybrids. • Powder metallurgic method is used to fabricate the alloys. • Tensile strength and ductility were increased simultaneously.

  2. Understanding the Deactivation Mechanisms of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of CuZeolite urea-SCR catalysts in diesel applications, the effects of engine and lab aging on catalyst reactivity and material properties were investigated. deer08cheng.pdf...

  3. Performance and mix measurements of indirect drive Cu doped Be...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    indirect drive Cu doped Be implosions Authors: Casey, D T ; Woods, T ; Smalyuk, V A ; Hurricane, O A ; Glebov, V Y ; Stoeckl, C ; Theobald, W ; Wallace, R ; Nikroo, A ; Shuldberg,...

  4. Microstructure versus Size: Mechanical Properties of Electroplated Single Crystalline Cu Nanopillars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Andrew T.; Greer, Julia R. [Engineering and Applied Sciences, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Burek, Michael J. [University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2010-04-02

    We report results of uniaxial compression experiments on single-crystalline Cu nanopillars with nonzero initial dislocation densities produced without focused ion beam (FIB). Remarkably, we find the same power-law size-driven strengthening as FIB-fabricated face-centered cubic micropillars. TEM analysis reveals that initial dislocation density in our FIB-less pillars and those produced by FIB are on the order of 10{sup 14} m{sup -2} suggesting that mechanical response of nanoscale crystals is a stronger function of initial microstructure than of size regardless of fabrication method.

  5. Polarization-dependent infrared reflectivity study of Sr???Ca????Cu??O?? under pressure: Charge dynamics, charge distribution, and anisotropy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Frank, S.; Huecker, M.; Huber, A.; Ammerahl, U.; Kuntscher, C. A.

    2014-12-18

    We present a polarization-dependent infrared reflectivity study of the spin-ladder compound Sr???Ca????Cu??O?? under pressure. The optical response is strongly anisotropic, with the highest reflectivity along the ladders/chains (E?c) revealing a metallic character. For the polarization direction perpendicular to the ladder plane, an insulating behavior is observed. With increasing pressure the optical conductivity for E?c shows a strong increase, which is most pronounced below 2000cm?¹. According to the spectral weight analysis of the E?c optical conductivity the hole concentration in the ladders increases with increasing pressure and tends to saturate at high pressure. At ~7.5 GPa the number of holes permore »Cu atom in the ladders has increased by ??=0.09(±0.01), and the Cu valence in the ladders has reached the value +2.33. The optical data suggest that Sr???Ca????Cu??O?? remains electronically highly anisotropic up to high pressure, also at low temperatures.« less

  6. Polarization-dependent infrared reflectivity study of Sr???Ca????Cu??O?? under pressure: Charge dynamics, charge distribution, and anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, S.; Huecker, M.; Huber, A.; Ammerahl, U.; Kuntscher, C. A.

    2014-12-18

    We present a polarization-dependent infrared reflectivity study of the spin-ladder compound Sr???Ca????Cu??O?? under pressure. The optical response is strongly anisotropic, with the highest reflectivity along the ladders/chains (E?c) revealing a metallic character. For the polarization direction perpendicular to the ladder plane, an insulating behavior is observed. With increasing pressure the optical conductivity for E?c shows a strong increase, which is most pronounced below 2000cm?¹. According to the spectral weight analysis of the E?c optical conductivity the hole concentration in the ladders increases with increasing pressure and tends to saturate at high pressure. At ~7.5 GPa the number of holes per Cu atom in the ladders has increased by ??=0.09(±0.01), and the Cu valence in the ladders has reached the value +2.33. The optical data suggest that Sr???Ca????Cu??O?? remains electronically highly anisotropic up to high pressure, also at low temperatures.

  7. Adsorption and Deactivation Characteristics of Cu/ZnO-Based Catalysts for Methanol Synthesis from Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesakhawat, Sittichai; Ohodnicki, Paul R., Jr.; Howard, Bret H.; Lekse, Jonathan W.; Baltrus, John P.; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-12-01

    The adsorption and deactivation characteristics of coprecipitated Cu/ZnO-based catalysts were examined and correlated to their performance in methanol synthesis from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. The addition of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} promoters is shown to increase the Cu surface area and CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} adsorption capacities of the catalysts and enhance methanol synthesis activity. Infrared studies showed that CO{sub 2} adsorbs spontaneously on these catalysts at room temperature as both monoand bi-dentate carbonate species. These weakly bound species desorb completely from the catalyst surface by 200 °C while other carbonate species persist up to 500 °C. Characterization using N{sub 2}O decomposition, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis clearly indicated that Cu sintering is the main cause of catalyst deactivation. Ga and Y promotion improves the catalyst stability by suppressing the agglomeration of Cu and ZnO particles under pretreatment and reaction conditions.

  8. Understanding the Cu-Zn brass alloys using a short-range-order cluster model: Significance of specific compositions of industrial alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, H. L.; Wang, Q.; Dong, C.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-11-17

    Metallic alloys show complex chemistries that are not yet understood so far. It has been widely accepted that behind the composition selection lies a short-range-order mechanism for solid solutions. The present paper addresses this fundamental question by examining the face-centered-cubic Cu-Zn a-brasses. A new structural approach, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model, is introduced, which suits specifically for the description of short-range-order structures in disordered systems. Two types of formulas are pointed out, [Zn-Cu12]Zn1,6 and [Zn-Cu12](Zn,Cu)6, which explain the a-brasses listed in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications. In these formulas, the bracketed parts represent the 1st-neighbor cluster, and each cluster is matched with one to six 2nd-neighbor Zn atoms or with six mixed (Zn,Cu) atoms. Such a cluster-based formulism describes the 1st- and 2nd-neighbor local atomic units where the solute and solvent interactions are ideally satisfied. The Cu-Ni industrial alloys are also explained, thus proving the universality of the cluster-formula approach in understanding the alloy selections. The revelation of the composition formulas for the Cu-(Zn,Ni) industrial alloys points to the common existence of simple composition rules behind seemingly complex chemistries of industrial alloys, therefore offering a fundamental and practical method towards composition interpretations of all kinds of alloys.

  9. Synthesis, crystal structure, and properties of the rhombohedral modification of the thiospinel CuZr{sub 1.86(1)}S{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Yongkwan; McGuire, Michael A.; Yun, Hoseop; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2010-03-15

    The rhombohedral modification of the thiospinel, CuZr{sub 1.86(1)}S{sub 4}, has been synthesized by the reaction of the constituent elements in an alkali metal halide flux and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The title compound crystallizes in the rhombohedral space group D{sub 3d}{sup 5}-R3-barm (no. 166, a=7.3552(2) A, c=35.832(2) A, V=1678.76(13) A{sup 3}, Z=12, and R/wR=0.0239/0.0624). The structure is composed of close packed S layers, with a stacking order of ...ABCBCABABCACAB....along the c axis. The Zr and Cu atoms occupy the octahedral and tetrahedral holes between S layers, respectively. Three different kinds of S-M-S layers exist in the structure: layer I has fully occupied Zr and Cu sites, layer II has fully occupied Zr sites but no Cu, and layer III has partially occupied Zr and fully occupied Cu sites. Transport and optical properties indicate that the title compound is a small band gap (1.26 eV) n-type semiconductor. - Graphical abstract: The projected view of the rhombohedral modification, CuZr{sub 1.86(1)}S{sub 4}, down the [100] direction. Large letters denote the packing sequence of the S atoms (yellow circles) along the c axis. Zr (black circles) and Cu (red circles) atoms occupy the octahedral and tetrahedral holes, respectively, between close packed S layers.

  10. Reaction kinetics of a-CuInSe2 formation from an In2Se3/CuSe bilayer precursor film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Timothy J.

    with Ga or S are proven absorber materials for high efficiency thin film solar cells. Interestingly CIGS system using the stacked elemental film precursors (e.g. glass/Cu/In/Se, glass/Cu/Se, glass

  11. Characteristics of Cu stabilized Nb3Al strands with low Cu ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kikuchi, A.; Yamada, R.; Barzi, E.; Kobayashi, M.; Lamm, M.; Nakagawa, K.; Sasaki, K.; Takeuchi, T.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /NIMC, Tsukuba /Fermilab /Hitachi, Tsuchiura Works /KEK, Tsukuba

    2008-12-01

    Characteristics of recently developed F4-Nb{sub 3}Al strand with low Cu ratio are described. The overall J{sub c} of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand could be easily increased by decreasing of the Cu ratio. Although the quench of a pulse-like voltage generation is usually observed in superconducting unstable conductor, the F4 strand with a low Cu ratio of 0.61 exhibited an ordinary critical transition of gradual voltage generation. The F4 strand does not have magnetic instabilities at 4.2 K because of the tantalum interfilament matrix. The overall J{sub c} of the F4 strand achieved was 80-85% of the RRP strand. In the large mechanical stress above 100 MPa, the overall J{sub c} of the F4 strand might be comparable to that of high J{sub c} RRP-Nb{sub 3}Sn strands. The Rutherford cable with a high packing factor of 86.5% has been fabricated using F4 strands. The small racetrack magnet, SR07, was also fabricated by a 14 m F4 cable. The quench current, I{sub q}, of SR07 were obtained 22.4 kA at 4.5 K and 25.2 kA at 2.2 K. The tantalum matrix Nb{sub 3}Al strands are promising for the application of super-cooled high-field magnets as well as 4.2 K operation magnets.

  12. Strangeness Enhancement in Cu+Cu and Au+Au Collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; H. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; C. D. Anson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; D. R. Beavis; N. K. Behera; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; S. G. Brovko; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. G. Jones; C. Jena; F. Jin; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; H. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; V. Kizka; A. G. Knospe; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. Naglis; B. K. Nandi; T. K. Nayak; P. K. Netrakanti; J. M. Nelson; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; H. Pei; T. Peitzmann; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; S. G. Steadman; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; W. Witzke; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva

    2012-01-04

    We report new STAR measurements of mid-rapidity yields for the $\\Lambda$, $\\bar{\\Lambda}$, $K^{0}_{S}$, $\\Xi^{-}$, $\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$, $\\Omega^{-}$, $\\bar{\\Omega}^{+}$ particles in Cu+Cu collisions at \\sNN{200}, and mid-rapidity yields for the $\\Lambda$, $\\bar{\\Lambda}$, $K^{0}_{S}$ particles in Au+Au at \\sNN{200}. We show that at a given number of participating nucleons, the production of strange hadrons is higher in Cu+Cu collisions than in Au+Au collisions at the same center-of-mass energy. We find that aspects of the enhancement factors for all particles can be described by a parameterization based on the fraction of participants that undergo multiple collisions.

  13. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Properties of the Rhomboheral Modification of the Thiospinel CuZr1.86(1)S4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Yongkwan; McGuire, Michael A; Hoseop, Yun; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2009-01-01

    The rhombohedral modification of the thiospinel, CuZr{sub 1.86(1)}S{sub 4}, has been synthesized by the reaction of the constituent elements in an alkali metal halide flux and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The title compound crystallizes in the rhombohedral space group D{sub 3d}{sup 5}-R{bar 3}m (166, a=7.3552(2) {angstrom}, c=35.832(2) {angstrom}, V=1678.76(13) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z=12, and R/wR=0.0239/0.0624). The structure is composed of close packed S layers, with a stacking order of ABCBCABABCACAB along the c axis. The Zr and Cu atoms occupy the octahedral and tetrahedral holes between S layers, respectively. Three different kinds of S-M-S layers exist in the structure: layer I has fully occupied Zr and Cu sites, layer II has fully occupied Zr sites but no Cu, and layer III has partially occupied Zr and fully occupied Cu sites. Transport and optical properties indicate that the title compound is a small band gap (1.26 eV) n-type semiconductor.

  14. Cu--Pd--M hydrogen separation membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Do{hacek over }an, Omer N; Gao, Michael C; Young, Rongxiang Hu; Tafen, De Nyago

    2013-12-17

    The disclosure provides an H2 separation membrane comprised of an allow having the composition Cu.Sub.(100-x-y)Pd.sub.xM.sub.y, where x is from about 35 to about 50 atomic percent and where y is from greater than 0 to about 20 atomic percent, and where M consists of magnesium, yttrium, aluminum, titanium, lanthanum, or combinations thereof. The M elements act as strong stabilizers for the B2 phase of the allow, and extend the critical temperature of the alloy for a given hydrogen concentration and pressure. Due to the phase stabilization and the greater temperature range over which a B2 phase can be maintained, the allow is well suited for service as a H2 separation membrane, particularly when applicable conditions are established or cycled above about 600.degree. C. over the course of expected operations. In certain embodiments, the B2 phase comprises at least 60 estimated volume percent of the allow at a steady-state temperature of 400.degree. C. The B2 phase stability is experimentally validated through HT-XRD.

  15. A p ? n transition for Sn-doped Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} bulk materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monsefi, Mehrdad; Kuo, Dong-Hau, E-mail: dhkuo@mail.ntust.edu.tw

    2013-08-15

    Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) pellets at different Sn contents were fabricated by reactive liquid-phase sintering at 600–700 °C with the help of sintering aids of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Te. Powder preparation was based upon the molecular formula of Cu{sub 0.9}[(In{sub 0.7?x}Sn{sub x}Ga{sub 0.3}){sub 0.9}Sb{sub 0.1}](S{sub 0.15}Te{sub 0.2}Se{sub 1.65}) or Sn-x-CIGSe. Morphology, structure, and electrical property of Sn-doped CIGSe bulks were investigated. The composition of Sn-doped CIGSe is purposely designed for studying the doping effect on the CIGSe performance. The unexpected increase in hole concentration of CIGSe due to the donor doping is rationalized. A controllable n-type semiconductor is deliberately achieved for Sn-0.15-CIGSe and important for making a p/n homojunction in CIGSe solar cells. - Graphical abstract: The controls in defect type and electrical properties of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} by doping Sn{sup 4+} on the In{sup 3+} site. Highlights: • n-type Sn-CIGSe with n{sub e} of 6.4×10{sup 16} cm{sup ?3} and ?{sub e} of 2.3 cm{sup 2}/V s was obtained. • This n-type Sn-CIGSe was obtained by material design and composition control. • The reported n-type CIGSe was obtained from the Zn/CIGSe and CdS/CIGSe bilayers. • Extrinsic donor doping was explored through the results of electrical properties. • A n/p homojunction with Sn-CIGSe and undoped one can be used for solar cell devices.

  16. Synthesis, structure and characterization of two new copper(I)-thioarsenates (III) constructed by the [AsS{sub 3}]{sup 3-} and CuS{sub x} units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Hua-Gang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Zhongshan 528458 (China)] [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Zhongshan 528458 (China); Ji, Min [Department of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Ji, Shou-Hua [Departments of Materials, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Departments of Materials, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); An, Yong-Lin, E-mail: hgyao@gdpu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Two new copper(I)-thioarsenates(III), CsCu{sub 2}AsS{sub 3}(1) and KCu{sub 4}AsS{sub 4}(2), have been synthesized solvothermally in the presence of copper powder. Compound 1 is built up of trigonal AsS{sub 3} pyramid, tetrahedral CuAsS{sub 3} and CuS{sub 3} moieties forming 4-membered, 5-membered and 6-membered rings. The fusion of these rings produces layered anions [Cu{sub 2}AsS{sub 3}]{sup -}, and cesium cations are located between metal-sulfide layers. The structure of 2 consists of infinite [Cu{sub 2}S{sub 2}]{sup 2-} chain and layered [Cu{sub 6}As{sub 2}S{sub 6}] linked to form a three-dimensional anionic framework, [Cu{sub 4}AsS{sub 4}]{sup -}, and containing channels in which the potassium cations reside. - Graphical abstract: Qne layered CsCu{sub 2}AsS{sub 3} and one framework KCu{sub 4}AsS{sub 4} possessing noncondensed [AsS{sub 3}]{sup 3-} unit have been synthesized solvothermally. The optical band gaps of the two compounds are 2.3 and 1.8 eV, respectively. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtained two new copper(I)-thioarsenate(III), CsCu{sub 2}AsS{sub 3} and KCu{sub 4}AsS{sub 4}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds possess noncondensed [AsS{sub 3}]{sup 3-} unit and represent new structure types. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optical band gaps of the two compounds are 2.3 eV and 1.8 eV, respectively.

  17. Spectroscopic and photometric analysis of the early-type spectroscopic binary HD 161853 in the centre of an H II region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamen, R; Barbá, R H; Arias, J I; Apellániz, J Maíz; Walborn, N R; Sota, A; Alfaro, E J

    2015-01-01

    We study the O-type star HD 161853, which has been noted as a probable double-lined spectroscopic binary system. We secured high-resolution spectra of HD 161853 during the past nine years. We separated the two components in the system and measured their respective radial velocities for the first time. We confirm that HD 161853 is an $\\sim$1 Ma old binary system consisting of an O8 V star ($M_{\\rm A,RV} \\geq 22$ M$_\\odot$) and a B1--3 V star ($M_{\\rm B,RV} \\geq 7.2$ M$_\\odot$) at about 1.3 kpc. From the radial velocity curve, we measure an orbital period $P$ = 2.66765$\\pm$0.00001 d and an eccentricity $e$ = 0.121$\\pm$0.007. Its $V$-band light curve is constant within 0.014 mag and does not display eclipses, from which we impose a maximum orbital inclination $i=54$ deg. HD 161853 is probably associated with an H II region and a poorly investigated very young open cluster. In addition, we detect a compact emission region at 50 arcsec to HD 161853 in 22$\\mu$m-WISE and 24$\\mu$m-Spitzer images, which may be identif...

  18. Thermodynamic properties of a spin-1/2 spin-liquid state in a -type organic salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Thermodynamic properties of a spin-1/2 spin-liquid state in a -type organic salt SATOSHI-based organic charge-transfer salt -(BEDT-TTF)2Cu2(CN)3, with a triangular lattice structure down to 75 m-dimensional triangular lattice is still unclear. The -type salts consisting of BEDT-TTF donors show an interesting phase

  19. Methanol conversion to light olefins over nanostructured CeAPSO-34 catalyst: Thermodynamic analysis of overall reactions and effect of template type on catalytic properties and performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aghamohammadi, Sogand; Haghighi, Mohammad; Charghand, Mojtaba

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: In this research nanostructured CeAPSO-34 was synthesized to explore the effect of TEAOH and morpholine on its physiochemical properties and MTO performance. Prepared catalysts were characterized with XRD, FESEM, BET, FTIR and NH3-TPD techniques. The results indicated that the nature of the template determines the physiochemical properties of CeAPSO-34 due to different rate of crystal growth. The catalyst obtained by using morpholine showed longer life time as well as sustaining light olefins selectivity at higher values. Furthermore, a comprehensive thermodynamic analysis of overall reactions network was carried out to address the major channels of methanol to olefins conversion. - Highlights: • Introduction of Ce into SAPO-34 framework. • Comparison of CeAPSO-34 synthesized using morpholine and TEAOH. • The nature of the template determines the physiochemical properties of CeAPSO-34. • Morpholine enhances catalyst lifetime in MTO process. • Presenting a complete reaction network for MTO process. - Abstract: TEAOH and morpholine were employed in synthesis of nanostructured CeAPSO-34 molecular sieve and used in methanol to olefins conversion. Prepared samples were characterized by XRD, FESEM, EDX, BET, FTIR and NH{sub 3}-TPD techniques. XRD patterns reflected the higher crystallinity of the catalyst synthesized with morpholine. The FESEM results indicated that the nature of the template determines the morphology of nanostructured CeAPSO-34 due to different rate of crystal growth. There was a meaningful difference in the strength of both strong and weak acid sites for CeAPSO-34 catalysts synthesized with TEAOH and morpholine templates. The catalyst synthesized with morpholine showed higher desorption temperature of both weak and strong acid sites evidenced by NH{sub 3}-TPD characterization. The catalyst obtained using morpholine template had the longer lifetime and sustained desired light olefins at higher values. A comprehensive thermodynamic analysis of overall reactions network was carried out to address the major channels of methanol to olefins conversion.

  20. Assignment Types UTS LIBRARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    Assignment Types UTS LIBRARY February 2013 Academic Writing Guide Part 2 ­ Assignment Types: This section outlines the basic types of written assignments, providing structural elements and examples. #12;2 II. Assignment Types 1. Essay Writing

  1. Cu{sup II} coordination polymers based on 5-methoxyisophthalate and flexible N-donor ligands: Structures and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Xin-Hong; Qin, Jian-Hua; Ma, Lu-Fang; Wang, Li-Ya

    2014-04-01

    Three Cu{sup II} coordination polymers, ([Cu{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}O-ip){sub 2}(bmib)]){sub n} (1), ([Cu{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}O-ip){sub 2}(bmib){sub 2}]){sub n} (2) and ([Cu(CH{sub 3}O-ip)(bbip)]?2H{sub 2}O){sub n} (3) (CH{sub 3}O-H{sub 2}ip is 5-methoxyisophthalic acid, bmib is 1,4-bis(2-methylimidazol-1-yl)butane and bbip is 1,3-bis(1H-benzimidazolyl)propane), have been synthesized by hydrothermal methods. Complexes 1–3 were structurally characterized by elemental analysis, infrared (IR) spectra and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. Complex 1 shows a 3D six-connected self-penetrating network based on paddlewheel secondary building units. Complex 2 has a 3-fold interpenetrating 3D diamond framework. Complex 3 possesses a 1D tube-like chain. Thermo-gravimetric and magnetic properties of 1–3 were also investigated. - Graphical abstract: Structures and magnetic properties of copper(II) coordination polymers constructed from 5-methoxyisophthalate linker and two flexible N-donor ancillary ligands. Three copper(II) coordination polymers with 5-methoxyisophthalate and two related flexible N-donor ancillary ligands have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Moreover, thermal behaviors and magnetic properties of these complexes have also been investigated. - Highlights: • Three Cu(II) coordination polymers were synthesized. • The conformations of N-donor ligands and pH value have an effect on the final structures. • The magnetic properties of 1–3 have been investigated.

  2. Large-scale synthesis of hierarchical-structured weissite (Cu{sub 2?x}Te) flake arrays and their catalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Xinjiang [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics (Chien-Shiung Wu Lab), School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Si Pai Lou 2#, Nanjing 210096 (China); Yan, Shancheng [School of Geography and Biological Information, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210046 (China); Ortiz, Lazarus Santiago; Liang, Gaofeng; Sun, Bo; Huang, Ningping [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics (Chien-Shiung Wu Lab), School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Si Pai Lou 2#, Nanjing 210096 (China); Xiao, Zhongdang, E-mail: zdxiao@seu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics (Chien-Shiung Wu Lab), School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Si Pai Lou 2#, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Large-scale Cu{sub 2?x}Te flake arrays grown on copper foam were synthesized. • They possess superior catalytic efficiency on methylene blue with the assistance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • The effects of preparing conditions on the growth of Cu{sub 2?x}Te flake arrays were investigated. - Abstract: Large-scale weissite (Cu{sub 2?x}Te) flake arrays with three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical structure have been successfully fabricated via a facile one-step solution-phase strategy through the reaction of tellurium powder and copper foam. At the end of the reaction Cu{sub 2?x}Te flakes were distributed evenly on the surface of a porous solid copper substrate. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed the abundance of flakes grown on the 3D porous copper architecture, while X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) were used to determine the crystal structure and phase composition of these products. A series of experiments discovered that the size and morphology of the products could be affected by some reactive parameters including the reaction time, synthesis temperature and volume ratio of absolute ethanol/deionized water. Catalysis experiments using the in situ synthesized of Cu{sub 2?x}Te flakes to catalyze the degradation of methylene blue (MB) demonstrated the strong catalytic ability of these flakes.

  3. A Typed Operational Semantics for Type Theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goguen, Healfdene

    Untyped reduction provides a natural operational semantics for type theory. Normalization results say that such a semantics is sound. However, this reduction does not take type information into account and gives no information ...

  4. Ultramicroscopy 52(1993)404-414 ultramicr0sc0pyNorth-Holland The defocus contrast of a 0' precipitate in A1-4wt%Cu: Fresnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    1993-01-01

    ' precipitate in A1-4wt%Cu: Fresnel fringe analysis applied to an atomically abrupt interface R.E. Dunin of the work presented here is to establish whether Fresnel contrast analysis can be used to characterise with matching experiment and theory are discussed. I. Introduction The Fresnel method appears to be a powerful

  5. X-ray-absorption study of CuBr at high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tranquada, J.M.; Ingalls, R.

    1986-09-15

    The x-ray-absorption spectrum of cuprous bromide has been measured as a function of pressure. The x-ray-absorption near-edge structure proved to be an excellent indicator of high-pressure phase transitions in this material. The normalized ''white-line'' peak heights at both the Cu and Br K-italic edges decreased on entering the tetragonal phase and increased in going to the NaCl structure. The zinc-blende to tetragonal phase transition took place over a very narrow pressure range centered at 46 +- 5 kbar. The transformation from the tetragonal to the NaCl structure, on the other hand, showed a broad mixed-phase region, suggesting a nucleation-and-growth mechanism for the transition. The mixed-phase region was centered at 75 +- 6 kbar. No evidence of a phase between the zinc-blende and tetragonal phases was observed, presumably because it does not exist. Analysis of the extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) clearly showed that there is no change in coordination in going from the zinc-blende to the tetragonal phase although the nearest-neighbor distance increases slightly. A much larger increase in R-italic/sub 1/ occurs at the transition to the NaCl structure, where the coordination increases from 4 to 6. The mean-square deviation in the nearest-neighbor bond length, sigma/sub 1//sup 2/, appears to be a fairly smooth function of nearest-neighbor distance, decreasing (or increasing) as R-italic/sub 1/ decreases (or increases) more or less independent of structure. Evidence from the literature was presented to suggest that the zinc-blende to tetragonal transition in CuBr (and also CuCl) should occur by shear deformation.

  6. Three approaches to economical photovoltaics: conformal Cu2S, organic luminescent films, and PbSe nanocrystal superlattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbone, Ian Anthony

    2013-01-01

    approaches to economical photovoltaics: conformal Cu 2 S,routes to more efficient photovoltaics using conformal Cu 2on grid-parity. Progress in Photovoltaics: Research and

  7. Elucidating efficiency losses in cuprous oxide (Cu?O) photovoltaics and identifying strategies for efficiency improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Riley Eric

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, I fabricated and characterized a series of thin-film cuprous oxide (Cu?O) photovoltaic devices. I constructed several different device designs, using sputtered and electrochemically deposited Cu?O. ...

  8. Bridging the Pressure Gap in Water and Hydroxyl Chemistry on Metal Surfaces: the Cu(110) case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    the Pressure Gap in Water and Hydroxyl Chemistry on Metalresults on the water and hydroxyl chemistry on Cu(110) whichhave studied the water and hydroxyl chemistry on Cu(110) at

  9. High Chalcocite Cu2S: A Solid-Liquid Hybrid Phase (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High Chalcocite Cu2S: A Solid-Liquid Hybrid Phase Prev Next Title: High Chalcocite Cu2S: A Solid-Liquid Hybrid Phase Authors: Wang, Lin-Wang Publication Date: 2012-02-24 OSTI...

  10. Distribution and Chemical State of Cu-rich Clusters in Silicon: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buonassisi, T.; Marcus, M. A.; Istratov, A. A.; Heuer, M.; Ciszek, T. F.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Weber, E. R.

    2004-08-01

    the chemical state and distribution of Cu-rich clusters were determined in four different silicon-based materials with varying contamination pathways and degrees of oxygen concentration, including as-grown multicrystalline silicon. In all four samples, Cu3Si was the only chemical state observed. Cu3Si clusters were observed at structural defects within all four materials; XBIC measurements revealed that the presence of Cu3Si corresponds to increased recombination activity. Oxidized Cu compounds are not likely to form in silicon. The +1 eV edge shift in the -XAS absorption spectrum of Cu3Si relative to Cu metal is believed to be an indication of a degree of covalent bonding between Cu atoms and their silicon neighbors.

  11. Distinct oxygen hole doping in different layers of Sr?CuO4-?/La?CuO? superlattices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smadici, S.; Lee, J. C. T.; Rusydi, A.; Logvenov, G.; Bozovic, I.; Abbamonte, P.

    2012-03-28

    X-ray absorption in Sr?CuO4-?/La?CuO? (SCO/LCO) superlattices shows a variable occupation with doping of a hole state different from holes doped for x?xoptimal in bulk La2-xSrxCuO? and suggests that this hole state is on apical oxygen atoms and polarized in the a-b plane. Considering the surface reflectivity gives a good qualitative description of the line shapes of resonant soft x-ray scattering. The interference between superlattice and surface reflections was used to distinguish between scatterers in the SCO and the LCO layers, with the two hole states maximized in different layers of the superlattice.

  12. High strength-high conductivity Cu--Fe composites produced by powder compaction/mechanical reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Spitzig, William A. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA)

    1991-08-27

    A particulate mixture of Cu and Fe is compacted and mechanically reduced to form an "in-situ" Cu-Fe composite having high strength and high conductivity. Compaction and mechanical reduction of the particulate mixture are carried out at a temperature and time at temperature selected to avoid dissolution of Fe into the Cu matrix particulates to a harmful extent that substantially degrades the conductivity of the Cu-Fe composite.

  13. High strength-high conductivity Cu-Fe composites produced by powder compaction/mechanical reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Spitzig, W.A.; Gibson, E.D.; Anderson, I.E.

    1991-08-27

    A particulate mixture of Cu and Fe is compacted and mechanically reduced to form an ''in-situ'' Cu-Fe composite having high strength and high conductivity. Compaction and mechanical reduction of the particulate mixture are carried out at a temperature and time at temperature selected to avoid dissolution of Fe into the Cu matrix particulates to a harmful extent that substantially degrades the conductivity of the Cu-Fe composite. 5 figures.

  14. Suppression of activation energy and superconductivity by the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles in CuTl-1223 matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabbar, Abdul; Qasim, Irfan; Mumtaz, M.; Zubair, M.; Nadeem, K.; Khurram, A. A.

    2014-05-28

    Low anisotropic (Cu{sub 0.5}Tl{sub 0.5})Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10??} (CuTl-1223) high T{sub c} superconducting matrix was synthesized by solid-state reaction and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were prepared separately by co-precipitation method. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were added with different concentrations during the final sintering cycle of CuTl-1223 superconducting matrix to get the required (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub y}/CuTl-1223, y?=?0.0, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, and 1.5?wt.?%, composites. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, and dc-resistivity (?) measurements. The activation energy and superconductivity were suppressed with increasing concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles in (CuTl-1223) matrix. The XRD analysis showed that the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles did not affect the crystal structure of the parent CuTl-1223 superconducting phase. The suppression of activation energy and superconducting properties is most probably due to weak flux pinning in the samples. The possible reason of weak flux pinning is reduction of weak links and enhanced inter-grain coupling due to the presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles at the grain boundaries. The presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles at the grain boundaries possibly reduced the number of flux pinning centers, which were present in the form of weak links in the pure CuTl-1223 superconducting matrix. The increase in the values of inter-grain coupling (?) deduced from the fluctuation induced conductivity analysis with the increased concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles is a theoretical evidence of improved inter-grain coupling.

  15. Types of Commissioning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several commissioning types exist to address the specific needs of equipment and systems across both new and existing buildings. The following commissioning types provide a good overview.

  16. Postdoc Appointment Types

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Appointment Types Postdoc Appointment Types Most postdocs will be offered a postdoctoral research associate appointment. Each year, approximately 30 Postdoctoral Fellow...

  17. Isothermal stress relaxation in electroplated Cu films. I. Mass transport measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Rui

    Isothermal stress relaxation in electroplated Cu films. I. Mass transport measurements Dongwen Gan-boundary mass transport measured from isothermal stress relaxation in electroplated Cu thin films. Thermal stresses in electroplated Cu films with and without passivation, subjected to thermal cycling

  18. Kinetics and Equilibrium of Gas Adsorption on RPM1-Co and Cu-BTC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    Kinetics and Equilibrium of Gas Adsorption on RPM1-Co and Cu-BTC Metal-Organic Frameworks and equilibrium adsorption measurements for two gases, CF4 and Ar, on RPM1-Co and Cu-BTC metal-organic framework.597) on both adsorbents. The results show that both gases behave differently on Cu-BTC from the way they do

  19. Cationanion versus cationframework interactions in sodalites: First-principles study of model Cu-exchanged sodalites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selloni, Annabella

    as catalysts for the reduction of NOx compounds.6­8 In this respect, Cu- exchanged sodalites may represent for silver-exchanged sodalites. The reduction of the lattice parameter is accompanied by the formation of Cu ions per cage, resulting in a simultaneous reduction of Cu­framework distances. For fully

  20. Strength of joints produced by transient liquid phase bonding in the CuSn system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zok, Frank

    ; Intermetallic phases; Electron beam methods; Fracture; Toughness 1. Introduction Transient liquid phase (TLP focuses on the strength and toughness of joints produced by transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding in the Cu the d-phase and a dispersion of ductile (Cu) particles, and a uniform Cu solid solution. Notched

  1. Effects of annealing on antiwear and antibacteria behaviors of TaN-Cu nanocomposite thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, J. H.; Cheng, M. K.; Chang, Y. K.; Li, C.; Chang, C. L.; Liu, P. C.

    2008-07-15

    TaN-Cu nanocomposite films were deposited by reactive cosputtering on Si and tool steel substrates. The films were then annealed using rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 400 deg. C for 2, 4, and 8 min, respectively, to induce the nucleation and growth of Cu particles in TaN matrix and on film surface. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was applied to characterize Cu nanoparticles emerged on the surface of TaN-Cu thin films. The effects of annealing on the antiwear and antibacterial properties of these films were studied. The results reveal that annealing by RTA can cause Cu nanoparticles to form on the TaN surface. Consequently, the tribological behaviors, as well as the antibacterial behavior may vary depending on particle size, particle distribution, and total exposed Cu amount. For the samples with large Cu particles, the reduction of averaged friction and wear rate is obvious. Apparently, it is due to the smeared Cu particles adhered onto the wear tracks. This Cu layer may act as a solid lubricant. From the antibacterial testing results, it is found that both Cu particle size and total exposed Cu amount are critical in making short-term antibacterial effect. Overall, all the annealed TaN-Cu samples can reach >99% antibacterial efficiency in 24 h, with respect to uncoated Si substrate.

  2. Physicochemical investigations of carbon nanofiber supported Cu/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Din, Israf Ud E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Shaharun, Maizatul S. E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Subbarao, Duvvuri; Naeem, A.

    2014-10-24

    Zirconia-promoted copper/carbon nanofiber catalysts (Cu?ZrO{sub 2}/CNF) were prepared by the sequential deposition precipitation method. The Herringbone type of carbon nanofiber GNF-100 (Graphite nanofiber) was used as a catalyst support. Carbon nanofiber was oxidized to (CNF-O) with 5% and 65 % concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The CNF activated with 5% HNO{sub 3} produced higher surface area which is 155 m{sup 2}/g. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption. The results showed that increase of HNO{sub 3} concentration reduced the surface area and porosity of the catalyst.

  3. Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wray, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Type of Analysis CrossFlow; ! - Heat ExchangerType of Analysis CrossFlow; ! - Heat Exchanger ConfigurationType of Analysis CrossFlow; ! - Heat Exchanger Configuration

  4. Investigation of variation of energy of laser beam on structural, electrical and optical properties of pulsed laser deposited CuO thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahiya, V., E-mail: vinitadce@gmail.com; Kumar, A. [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Delhi (India); Kaur, G.; Mitra, A. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee (India)

    2014-04-24

    In this paper, copper oxide (CuO) thin films have been deposited successfully by pulsed laser deposition technique using copper metal as target material. Thin films have been prepared under different energy of laser pulses ranging from 100mJ/pulse to 250 mJ/pulse. These films have been characterized for their structural, electrical and optical properties by using X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD), Four probe method and UV spectroscopy. Morphological and structural studies show that there is increase in crystallite size with the increase in energy of laser beam. Thus resulting in improved crystallinity and degree of orientation of the CuO thin films. Optoelectrical properties show direct relation between conductivity and energy of laser beam. Optical analysis of CuO thin films prepared under different energy of laser beam shows good agreement with structural analysis. The prepared CuO thin films show high absorbance in the UV and visible range and thus are suitable candidate for thin films solar cell application.

  5. Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of bis(aqua)[?-(terepthalato-?o,?o´)]copper(II)monohydrate [Cu(C?O?)(OH?)?]·H?O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nfor, Emmanuel N., E-mail: nforemman@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Buea, PO Box 63, Buea, SWR (Cameroon); Majoumo-Mbe, Felicite [Department of Chemistry, University of Buea, PO Box 63, Buea, SWR (Cameroon); Ndifon, Peter T. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Coordination Chemistry Laboratory, University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaounde (Cameroon); Duke, Emmanuel O. [Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Calabar, PMB 1115, Calabar, CRS (Nigeria); Mainsah, Evans N. [Department of Chemistry, University of Buea, PO Box 63, Buea, SWR (Cameroon); Offiong, Offiong E.; Eno, Ededet A. [Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Calabar, PMB 1115, Calabar, CRS (Nigeria)

    2013-05-01

    A novel one dimensional Cu(II) coordination polymer [Cu(C?O?)(OH?)?] ·H?O 1 has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, X-ray crystal diffraction and magnetic measurements. Single-crystal structural analysis shows that complex 1 consist of 1D Cu(II) chain containing threefold bridging ligands, one (syn–syn) carboxylate and two water molecules. The magnetic study of 1 has been investigated, indicating an overall antiferromagnetic interaction in the complex. - Graphical abstract: The complex [Cu(C?O?)(OH?)?] ·H?O was prepared by the reaction of solid copper(II)basic carbonate with an aqueous solution of sodium terephthalate under heating at 50–60 {sup o}C after which it was allowed to crystallize at room temperature. The structure of the complex is distorted octahedral. Magnetic study of the complex reveals antiferromagnetic behaviour. Highlights: • A novel copper(II) coordination polymer with terepthalate dianion was grown in an aqueous solution. • The single crystal growth temperature was 25 °C for period of two weeks. • The magnetic property of the complex was studied using SQUID. • The complex showed antiferromagnetic properties.

  6. Phonological Analysis in Typed Feature Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -formedness (Paradis 1988; Goldsmith 1993; McCarthy and Prince 1993; Prince and Smolensky 1993). While this work has

  7. Women and Physics Laura McCu!ough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    ;Getting women into physics Strong case for encouraging women in physics and STEM fields in general NeedWomen and Physics Laura McCu!ough University of Wisconsin-Stout Physics Department Purdue University April 2015 #12;Overview Participation of women in physics Issues faced at different levels What

  8. CU Science Education Seminar Series Assessment & Improvement of Problem Solving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    CU Science Education Seminar Series Assessment & Improvement of Problem Solving Problem solving problem solving abilities, and many students never develop competence. A great deal of effort has been devoted to developing heuristics to help students solve problems, but there is little evidence

  9. The Current Status of Women Laura McCu!ough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    physics; 33% of females** 4.1% of males and 2.4% of females took AP/IB physics** *http the Physics Enterprise in Universities and National Laboratories. APS Workshop, May 6-8, 2007. AvailableThe Current Status of Women in Physics Laura McCu!ough Physics Department University of Wisconsin

  10. Types of Lights Types of Lights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Types of Lights Types of Lights q So far we have studied point lights ­ Radiate in all direc7ons q Other lights ­ Direc7onal lights (posi7on-independent) ­ Spotlights #12;2 Direc1onal Lights q Shine in a single, uniform direc7on q All rays

  11. NO Chemisorption on Cu/SSZ-13: a Comparative Study from Infrared Spectroscopy and DFT Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Renqin; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Kollar, Marton; Gao, Feng; Wang, Yilin; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2014-11-07

    The locations and energies of Cu ions in a Cu/SSZ-13 zeolite catalyst were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For 'naked' Cu2+ ions (i.e., Cu2+ ions with no ligands in their coordination spheres other than zeolite lattice oxygen atoms), the more energetically favorable sites are within a 6-membered ring. However, with the presence of various adsorbates, the energy difference between 6- and 8-membered ring locations greatly diminishes. Specifically, Cu2+ ions are substantially stabilized by -OH ligands (as [CuII(OH)]+), making the extra-framework sites in an 8-membered ring energetically more favorable than 6-membered ring sites. Under fully dehydrated high vacuum conditions with different Si/Al and Cu/Al ratios, three chemisorbed NO species coexist upon exposure of NO to Cu/SSZ-13: NO+, Cu2+-NO and Cu+-NO. The relative signal intensities for these bands vary greatly with Si/Al ratios. The vibrational frequency of chemisorbed NO was found to be very sensitive to the location of Cu2+ ions. On the one hand, with the aid from DFT calculations, the nature for these vibrations can be assigned in detail. On the other hand, the relative intensities for various Cu2+-NO species provide a good measure of the nature of Cu2+ ions as functions of Si/Al and Cu/Al ratios and the presence of humidity. These new findings cast doubt on the generally accepted proposal that only Cu2+ ions located in 6-membered rings are catalytically active for NH3-SCR.

  12. STELLAR KINEMATICS AND STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VIRGO CLUSTER DWARF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM THE SMAKCED PROJECT. II. THE SURVEY AND A SYSTEMATIC ANALYSIS OF KINEMATIC ANOMALIES AND ASYMMETRIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Peletier, R. F. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Postbus 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Boselli, A. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille-LAM, Université d'Aix-Marseille and CNRS, UMR 7326, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Lisker, T. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstraße 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Falcón-Barroso, J.; Ry?, A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s/n, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Simon, J. D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Van de Ven, G. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Paudel, S. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Emsellem, E. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Janz, J. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Den Brok, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Gorgas, J. [Departamento de Astrofísica y Física de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Hensler, G. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstraße 17, 1180 Vienna (Austria); Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H. [Division of Astronomy, Department of Physics, PO Box 3000, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Niemi, S.-M., E-mail: toloba@ucolick.org [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    We present spatially resolved kinematics and global stellar populations and mass-to-light ratios for a sample of 39 dwarf early-type (dE) galaxies in the Virgo cluster studied as part of the SMAKCED stellar absorption-line spectroscopy and imaging survey. This sample is representative of the early-type population in the Virgo cluster in the absolute magnitude range –19.0 < M{sub r} < –16.0 and of all morphological subclasses found in this galaxy population. For each dE, we measure the rotation curve and velocity dispersion profile and fit an analytic function to the rotation curve. We study the significance of the departure of the rotation curve from the best-fit analytic function (poorly fit) and of the difference between the approaching and receding sides of the rotation curve (asymmetry). Our sample includes two dEs with kinematically decoupled cores that have been previously reported. We find that 62 ± 8% (23 out of the 39) of the dEs have a significant anomaly in their rotation curve. Analysis of the images reveals photometric anomalies for most galaxies. However, there is no clear correlation between the significance of the photometric and kinematic anomalies. We measure age-sensitive (H{sub ?} and H{sub ?A}) and metallicity sensitive (Fe4668 and Mgb) Lick spectral indices in the LIS-5 Å system. This population of galaxies exhibits a wide range of ages and metallicities; we also find that 4 dEs show clear evidence of emission partially filling in the Balmer absorption lines. Finally, we estimate the total masses and dark matter fractions of the dEs and plot them in the mass-size, the mass-velocity dispersion, and the fundamental plane scaling relations. The dEs seem to be the bridge between massive early-type galaxies and dSphs, and have a median total mass within the R{sub e} of log M{sub e} = 9.1 ± 0.2 and a median dark matter fraction within the R{sub e} of f {sub DM} = 46 ± 18%. Any formation model for the dE galaxy class must account for this diversity of kinematic and photometric anomalies and stellar populations.

  13. Typing Progress in Communication-Centred Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasconcelos, Vasco Thudichum

    Typing Progress in Communication-Centred Systems Hugo Torres Vieira and Vasco Thudichum Vasconcelos for the analysis of progress in session-based communication centred systems. Our development is car- ried out LaSIGE, Faculdade de Ci^encias, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal Abstract. We present a type system

  14. Energy and system size dependence of ?meson production in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration

    2008-10-28

    We study the beam-energy and system-size dependence of \\phi meson production (using the hadronic decay mode \\phi -- K+K-) by comparing the new results from Cu+Cu collisions and previously reported Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV measured in the STAR experiment at RHIC. Data presented are from mid-rapidity (|y|energy, the transverse momentum distributions for \\phi mesons are observed to be similar in yield and shape for Cu+Cu and Au+Au colliding systems with similar average numbers of participating nucleons. The \\phi meson yields in nucleus-nucleus collisions, normalised by the average number of participating nucleons, are found to be enhanced relative to those from p+p collisions with a different trend compared to strange baryons. The enhancement for \\phi mesons is observed to be higher at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 200 GeV compared to 62.4 GeV. These observations for the produced \\phi(s\\bar{s}) mesons clearly suggest that, at these collision energies, the source of enhancement of strange hadrons is related to the formation of a dense partonic medium in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions and cannot be alone due to canonical suppression of their production in smaller systems.

  15. Ethyl iodide decomposition on Cu(1 1 1) and Cu(2 2 1) Dougyong Sung, Andrew J. Gellman *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gellman, Andrew J.

    of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA Received 18 and adsorbed iodine atoms. The ethyl groups decompose by b-hydride elimination to desorb as ethylene leaving adsorbed iodine atoms. The kinetics of b-hydride elimination on the Cu(2 2 1) surface are similar to those

  16. Type Ia Supernovae: Spectroscopic Surprises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Branch

    2003-10-23

    Recent observations have extended the range of diversity among spectra of Type Ia supernovae. I briefly discuss SN Ia explosion models in the spectroscopic context, the observed diversity, and some recent results from direct analysis with the Synow code for one normal and two peculiar SNe Ia. Relating the observational manifestations of diversity to their physical causes is looking like an ever more challenging problem.

  17. Utility of reactively sputtered CuN{sub x} films in spintronics devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang Yeyu; Persson, J.; Zha, C.; Willman, J.; Miller, Casey W.; Aakerman, Johan

    2012-04-01

    We have studied nitrified copper (CuN{sub x}) thin films grown by reactive sputtering in the context of spintronic devices. The Ar-to-N{sub 2} flow ratio enables tunability of the electrical resistivity and surface roughness of the CuN{sub x} films, with the former increasing to nearly 20 times that of Cu, and the latter reduced to the atomic scale. Incorporating this into a Ta/CuN{sub x}/Ta seed stack for spin valves improves the current-in-plane (CIP) magnetoresistance; maximum magnetoresistance results with CuN{sub x} seed layer and Cu interlayer. Finally, finite element modeling results are presented that suggest the use of CuN{sub x} in nanocontact spin torque oscillators can enhance current densities by limiting the current spread through the device. This may positively impact threshold currents, power requirements, and device reliability.

  18. Comparative Study of the Defect Point Physics and Luminescence of the Kesterites Cu2ZnSnS4 and Cu2ZnSnSe4 and Chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)Se2: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, M. J.; Repins, I.; Teeter, G.; Contreras, M.; Al-Jassim, M.; Noufi, R.

    2012-08-01

    In this contribution, we present a comparative study of the luminescence of the kesterites Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) and Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) and their related chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe). Luminescence spectroscopy suggests that the electronic properties of Zn-rich, Cu-poor kesterites (both CZTS and CZTSe) and Cu-poor CIGSe are dictated by fluctuations of the electrostatic and chemical potentials. The large redshift in the luminescence of grain boundaries in CIGSe, associated with the formation of a neutral barrier is clearly observed in CZTSe, and, to some extent, in CZTS. Kesterites can therefore replicate the fundamental electronic properties of CIGSe.

  19. Aspects of the SrO-CuO-TiO2 Ternary System Related to the Deposition of SrTiO3 and Copper-Doped SrTiO3 Thin-Film Buffer Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Ayala

    2004-12-20

    YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) coated conductors are promising materials for large-scale superconductivity applications. One version of a YBCO coated conductor is based on ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) of magnesium oxide (MgO) onto polycrystalline metal substrates. SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) is often deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) methods as a buffer layer between the YBCO and IBAD MgO due to its chemical stability and lattice mismatch of only {approx}1.5% with YBCO. In this work, some aspects of the stability of STO with respect to copper (Cu) and chemical solution deposition of STO on IBAD MgO templates were examined. Solubility limits of Cu in STO were established by processing Cu-doped STO powders by conventional bulk preparation techniques. The maximum solubility of Cu in STO was {approx}1% as determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rietveld refinements of x-ray diffraction (XRD) data. XRD analysis, performed in collaboration with NIST, on powder compositions on the STO/SrCuO{sub 2} tie line did not identify any ternary phases. SrCu{sub 0.10}Ti{sub 0.90}O{sub y} buffer layers were prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and CSD on IBAD MgO flexible metallic textured tapes. TEM analysis of a {approx}100 nm thick SrCu{sub 0.10}Ti{sub 0.90}O{sub y} buffer layer deposited by PLD showed a smooth Cu-doped STO/MgO interface. A {approx}600 nm thick YBCO film, deposited onto the SrCu{sub 0.10}Ti{sub 0.90}O{sub y} buffer by PLD, exhibited a T{sub c} of 87 K and critical current density (J{sub c}) of {approx}1 MA/cm{sup 2}. STO and Cu-doped STO thin films by CSD were {approx}30 nm thick. The in plane alignment (FWHM) after deposition of the STO improved by {approx}1{sup o} while it degraded by {approx}2{sup o} with the SrCu{sub 0.05}TiO{sub y} buffer. YBCO was deposited by PLD on the STO and SrCu{sub 0.05}TiO{sub y} buffers. The in plane alignment (FWHM) of the YBCO with the STO buffer layer slightly improved while that of the YBCO with the SrCu{sub 0.05}TiO{sub y} buffer layer remained constant. A goal of the CSD approach to fabrication of coated conductors is process simplicity. In this study, single layer textured films were obtained without a nucleating seed layer that has been deemed necessary by several investigators. These results indicate that Cu-doped STO buffer layers deposited by PLD or CSD are compatible with IBAD MgO and YBCO and that CSD is a viable approach to coated conductor fabrication.

  20. Types of Reuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following provides greater detail regarding the types of reuse pursued for LM sites. It should be noted that many actual reuses combine several types of the uses listed below.

  1. Polarization-dependent infrared reflectivity study of Sr2.5Ca11.5Cu24O41 under pressure: Charge dynamics, charge distribution, and anisotropy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Frank, S.; Huber, A.; Ammerahl, U.; Hücker, M.; Kuntscher, C. A.

    2014-12-18

    We present a polarization-dependent infrared reflectivity study of the spin-ladder compound Sr???Ca????Cu??O?? under pressure. The optical response is strongly anisotropic, with the highest reflectivity along the ladders/chains (E?c) revealing a metallic character. For the polarization direction perpendicular to the ladder plane, an insulating behavior is observed. With increasing pressure the optical conductivity for E?c shows a strong increase, which is most pronounced below 2000cm?¹. According to the spectral weight analysis of the E?c optical conductivity the hole concentration in the ladders increases with increasing pressure and tends to saturate at high pressure. At ~7.5 GPa the number of holes permore »Cu atom in the ladders has increased by ??=0.09(±0.01), and the Cu valence in the ladders has reached the value +2.33. Thus, the optical data suggest that Sr???Ca????Cu??O?? remains electronically highly anisotropic up to high pressure, also at low temperatures.« less

  2. Novel approaches to low temperature transient liquid phase bonding in the In-Sn/Cu and In-Sn-Bi/Cu systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, David S., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    A fluxless low temperature transient liquid phase (LTTLP) bonding process was studied as a method of producing Cu/Cu joints below 125°C and 75°C using interlayer alloys from the In-Sn and In-Sn-Bi systems. Using thermodynamic ...

  3. Deposition and characterization of YBa2Cu3O7 /LaMnO3 / MgO/TiN heterostructures on Cu metal substrates for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    ) superconductors on Cu metal surfaces. Using techniques such as high-energy electron diffraction and scanning as a barrier to Cu diffusion, oxide formation is suppressed, interfaces are clean, and a single cube will be determined by several key factors, including ma- terial and processing costs, robustness and reproducibil

  4. Systematic study of azimuthal anisotropy in Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions at ?sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy v2 for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of v2 as a function of transverse momentum pT and centrality in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu+Cu collisions we observe a decrease in v2 values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4 GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions we find that v2 depends both on eccentricity and themore »number of participants, Npart. We observe that v2 divided by eccentricity (?) monotonically increases with Npart and scales as N1/3part. Thus, the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled v2 data. For identified hadrons, v2 divided by the number of constituent quarks nq is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy KET=mT–m between 0.1T/nq2/(nq???N1/3part) vs KET/nq for all measured particles.« less

  5. Effects of Cu Diffusion from ZnTe:Cu/Ti Contacts on Carrier Lifetime of CdS/CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, T. A.; Metzger, W. K.; Asher, S. E.; Young, M. R.; Johnston, S.; Dhere, R. G.; Duda, A.

    2008-05-01

    We study the performance of CdS/CdTe thin film PV devices processed with a ZnTe:Cu/Ti contact to investigate how carrier lifetime in the CdTe layer is affected by Cu diffusion from the contact.

  6. Study of Interaction of the Heavy Quarks with Nuclear Matter in Cu+Cu at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Krus; for the STAR Collaboration

    2009-01-29

    In this paper we present the study of the azimuthal correlation function of non-photonic electrons with low-pT hadrons produced in Cu+Cu collision at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV measured by STAR experiment at RHIC. Possible modification of the awayside peak is observed.

  7. Magnetic structure of the low-dimensional magnet NaCu{sub 2}O{sub 2}: {sup 63,65}Cu and {sup 23}Na NMR studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadykov, A. F., E-mail: sadykov@imp.uran.ru; Gerashchenko, A. P.; Piskunov, Yu. V.; Ogloblichev, V. V.; Smol’nikov, A. G.; Verkhovskii, S. V.; Buzlukov, A. L.; Arapova, I. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Furukawa, Y. [Iowa State University, Ames Laboratory (United States); Yakubovskii, A. Yu. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Bush, A. A. [Moscow State Technical University of Radio Engineering, Electronics, and Automation (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    The magnetic structure of a quasi-one-dimensional frustrated NaCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} magnet single crystal is studied by NMR. The spatial orientation of the planar spin spirals in the copper-oxygen Cu{sup 2+}-O chains is determined, and its evolution as a function of the applied magnetic field direction is analyzed.

  8. Spectra of identified high-pT pi± and p(p[over-bar]) in Cu+Cu collisions at [sqrt]sNN=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    We report new results on identified (anti)proton and charged pion spectra at large transverse momenta (3Cu+Cu collisions at [sqrt]sNN=200 GeV using the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider ...

  9. K[superscript *0] production in Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=62.4 GeV and 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    We report on K[superscript *0] production at midrapidity in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=62.4 and 200 GeV collected by the Solenoid Tracker at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider detector. The ...

  10. J/psi production at high transverse momenta in p plus p and Cu plus Cu collisions at [sqrt] s(NN)=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Matthew H.

    The STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider presents measurements of J/psi-->e+e- at midrapidity and high transverse momentum (pT>5?GeV/c) in p+p and central Cu+Cu collisions at [sqrt]sNN=200 GeV. The ...

  11. Complex catalytic behaviors of CuTiOx mixed-oxide during CO oxidation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Hyun You; Liu, Ping

    2015-09-21

    Mixed metal oxides have attracted considerable attention in heterogeneous catalysis due to the unique stability, reactivity, and selectivity. Here, the activity and stability of the CuTiOx monolayer film supported on Cu(111), CuTiOx/Cu(111), during CO oxidation was explored using density functional theory (DFT). The unique structural frame of CuTiOx is able to stabilize and isolate a single Cu+ site on the terrace, which is previously proposed active for CO oxidation. Furthermore, it is not the case, where the reaction via both the Langmuir–Hinshelwood (LH) and the Mars-van Krevelen (M-vK) mechanisms are hindered on such single Cu+ site. Upon the formation ofmore »step-edges, the synergy among Cu?+ sites, TiOx matrix, and Cu(111) is able to catalyze the reaction well. Depending on temperatures and partial pressure of CO and O2, the surface structure varies, which determines the dominant mechanism. In accordance with our results, the Cu?+ ion alone does not work well for CO oxidation in the form of single sites, while the synergy among multiple active sites is necessary to facilitate the reaction.« less

  12. Predicting hip fracture type with cortical bone mapping (CBM) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drummond, Tom

    Predicting hip fracture type with cortical bone mapping (CBM) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men, for the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study CUED/F-INFENG/TR 695 January 2015 Cambridge University Engineering;1 Abstract Hip fracture risk is known to be related to material properties of the proximal femur, but prospec

  13. CuC1 thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Qinbai (Chicago, IL); Liu, Renxuan (Chicago, IL)

    2012-01-03

    An electrochemical cell for producing copper having a dense graphite anode electrode and a dense graphite cathode electrode disposed in a CuCl solution. An anion exchange membrane made of poly(ethylene vinyl alcohol) and polyethylenimine cross-linked with a cross-linking agent selected from the group consisting of acetone, formaldehyde, glyoxal, glutaraldehyde, and mixtures thereof is disposed between the two electrodes.

  14. Growth and oxidation of thin film Al{sub 2}Cu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, K.A.; Missert, N.A.; Barbour, J.C.; Hren, J.J.; Copeland, R.G.; Minor, K.G.

    1999-11-09

    Al{sub 2}Cu thin films ({approximately}382 nm) are fabricated by melting and resolidifying Al/Cu bilayers in the presence of a {approximately}3 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivating layer. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measures a 1.0 eV shift of the Cu2p{sub 3/2} peak and a 1.6 eV shift of the valence band relative to metallic Cu upon Al{sub 2}Cu formation. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) show that the Al{sub 2}Cu film is composed of 30--70 {mu}m wide and 10--25 mm long cellular grains with (110) orientation. The atomic composition of the film as estimated by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) is 67{+-}2% Al and 33{+-}2% Cu. XPS scans of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}Cu taken before and after air exposure indicate that the upper Al{sub 2}Cu layers undergo further oxidation to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} even in the presence of {approximately}5 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The majority of Cu produced from oxidation is believed to migrate below the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers, based upon the lack of evidence for metallic Cu in the XPS scans. In contrast to Al/Cu passivated with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, melting/resolidifying the Al/Cu bilayer without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} results in phase-segregated dendritic film growth.

  15. Three series of quaternary rare-earth transition-metal pnictides with CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structures: RECuZnAs{sub 2}, REAgZnP{sub 2}, and REAgZnAs{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Ramachandran, Krishna K.; Blanchard, Peter E.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada); Rosmus, Kimberly A.; Aitken, Jennifer A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2014-05-01

    Three series of quaternary rare-earth transition-metal pnictides REMM?Pn{sub 2} (M=Cu, Ag; M?=Zn; Pn=P, As) have been prepared by reaction of the elements at 800 °C, with crystal growth promoted through the addition of iodine. The extent of RE substitution is broad in these series: RECuZnAs{sub 2} (RE=Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd–Lu), REAgZnP{sub 2} (RE=La–Nd, Sm, Gd–Dy), and REAgZnAs{sub 2} (RE=La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Dy). Powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that they adopt the trigonal CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure (space group P3{sup ¯}m1, Z=1), in which Cu or Ag atoms are disordered with Zn atoms over the unique tetrahedrally coordinated transition-metal site. Magnetic measurements indicated Curie–Weiss behavior for several members of the RECuZnAs{sub 2} and REAgZnP{sub 2} series. Core-line X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) collected on some RECuZnAs{sub 2} members corroborate the charge assignment deduced by the Zintl concept for these compounds, (RE{sup 3+})(M{sup 1+})(Zn{sup 2+})(Pn{sup 3?}){sub 2}. Optical diffuse reflectance spectra and valence band XPS spectra established that these compounds are small band-gap semiconductors (up to ?0.8 eV in REAgZnP{sub 2}) or semimetals (RECuZnAs{sub 2}). Band structure calculations also support this electronic structure and indicate that the band gap can be narrowed through appropriate chemical substitution (RE=smaller atoms, M=Cu, and Pn=As). - Graphical abstract: Cu or Ag atoms are disordered with Zn atoms over the tetrahedral site within relatively rigid [M{sub 2}Pn{sub 2}] slabs in three series of quaternary pnictides adopting the CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure. - Highlights: • Three series (comprising 25 compounds) of pnictides REMM'Pn{sub 2} were prepared. • Cu or Ag atoms are disordered with Zn atoms within relatively rigid [M{sub 2}Pn{sub 2}] slabs. • They are semimetals or small band-gap semiconductors. • RECuZnAs{sub 2} and REAgZnP{sub 2} are generally paramagnetic.

  16. Type Ia Supernova Intrinsic Magnitude Dispersion and the Fitting of Cosmological Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Alex G

    2011-01-01

    Applied to Type Ia supernovae, my strategy provides adata sets. Subject headings: Supernovae: Data Analysis andhomogeneous nature of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) makes them

  17. The Thermal Stability of Nanocrystalline Au-Cu Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankowski, A F; Saw, C K; Hayes, J P

    2006-02-15

    Grain refinement to the nanocrystalline scale is known to enhance physical properties as strength and surface hardness. For the case of Au-Cu alloys, development of the pulsed electroplating has led to the functional control of nanocrystalline grain size in the as-deposited condition. The thermal aging of Au-Cu electrodeposits is now investigated to assess the stability of the nanocrystalline grain structure and the difference between two diffusion mechanisms. The mobility of grain boundaries, dominant at low temperatures, leads to coarsening of grain size whereas at high temperature the process of bulk diffusion dominates. Although the kinetics of bulk diffusion are slow below 500 K at 10{sup -20} cm{sup 2} {center_dot} sec, the kinetics of grain boundary diffusion are faster at 10{sup -16} cm{sup 2} {center_dot} sec. The diffusivity values indicate that the grain boundaries of the as-deposited nanocrystalline Au-Cu are mobile and sensitive to low-temperature anneal treatments affecting the grain size, hence the strength of the material.

  18. Synthesis of BiPbSrCaCuO superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hults, William L. (Los Alamos, NM); Kubat-Martin, Kimberly A. (Espanola, NM); Salazar, Kenneth V. (Espanola, NM); Phillips, David S. (Los Alamos, NM); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    A process and a precursor composition for preparing a lead-doped bismuth-strontium-calcium-copper oxide superconductor of the formula Bi.sub.a Pb.sub.b Sr.sub.c Ca.sub.d Cu.sub.e O.sub.f wherein a is from about 1.7 to about 1.9, b is from about 0.3 to about 0.45, c is from about 1.6 to about 2.2, d is from about 1.6 to about 2.2, e is from about 2.97 to about 3.2 and f is 10.+-.z by reacting a mixture of Bi.sub.4 Sr.sub.3 Ca.sub.3 Cu.sub.4 O.sub.16.+-.z, an alkaline earth metal cuprate, e.g., Sr.sub.9 Ca.sub.5 Cu.sub.24 O.sub.41, and an alkaline earth metal plumbate, e.g., Ca.sub.2-x Sr.sub.x PbO.sub.4 wherein x is about 0.5, is disclosed.

  19. Synthesis of BiPbSrCaCuO superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hults, W.L.; Kubat-Martin, K.A.; Salazar, K.V.; Phillips, D.S.; Peterson, D.E.

    1994-04-05

    A process and a precursor composition for preparing a lead-doped bismuth-strontium-calcium-copper oxide superconductor of the formula Bi[sub a]Pb[sub b]Sr[sub c]Ca[sub d]Cu[sub e]O[sub f] wherein a is from about 1.7 to about 1.9, b is from about 0.3 to about 0.45, c is from about 1.6 to about 2.2, d is from about 1.6 to about 2.2, e is from about 2.97 to about 3.2 and f is 10[+-]z by reacting a mixture of Bi[sub 4]Sr[sub 3]Ca[sub 3]Cu[sub 4]O[sub 16[+-]z], an alkaline earth metal cuprate, e.g., Sr[sub 9]Ca[sub 5]Cu[sub 24]O[sub 41], and an alkaline earth metal plumbate, e.g., Ca[sub 2[minus]x]Sr[sub x]PbO[sub 4] wherein x is about 0.5, is disclosed.

  20. Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band lightsuch an analysis on the supernovae of the Nearby Supernovaheadings: distance scale, supernovae: general 1 Physics

  1. Systematic Study of Azimuthal Anisotropy in Cu$+$Cu and Au$+$Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 62.4$ and 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; A. Al-Jamel; J. Alexander; K. Aoki; L. Aphecetche; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; J. G. Boissevain; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; J. -S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J. -L. Charvet; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; V. Cianciolo; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; K. Das; G. David; M. B. Deaton; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; A. Durum; V. Dzhordzhadze; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S. -Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H. -Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; H. Hamagaki; R. Han; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; S. Huang; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; H. Iinuma; K. Imai; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; H. Kanou; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; Y. -S. Kim; E. Kinney; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; M. K. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; X. Li; X. H. Li; H. Lim; T. Liška; A. Litvinenko; M. X. Liu; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; Y. Mao; L. Mašek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; Y. Miake; P. Mikeš; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; G. C. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; B. E. Norman; R. Nouicer; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; M. Oka; K. Okada; O. O. Omiwade; A. Oskarsson; I. Otterlund; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; J. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J. -C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; M. Reuter; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; G. Roche; A. Romana; M. Rosati; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; P. Rukoyatkin; V. L. Rykov; S. S. Ryu; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; S. Sakai; H. Sakata; V. Samsonov; H. D. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; J. Seele; R. Seidl; V. Semenov; R. Seto; D. Sharma; T. K. Shea; I. Shein; A. Shevel; T. -A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; M. Shimomura; T. Shohjoh; K. Shoji; A. Sickles; C. L. Silva; D. Silvermyr; C. Silvestre; K. S. Sim; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; S. Skutnik; M. Slune?ka; W. C. Smith; A. Soldatov; R. A. Soltz; W. E. Sondheim; S. P. Sorensen; I. V. Sourikova; F. Staley; P. W. Stankus; E. Stenlund; M. Stepanov; A. Ster; S. P. Stoll; T. Sugitate; C. Suire; J. P. Sullivan; J. Sziklai; T. Tabaru; S. Takagi; E. M. Takagui; A. Taketani; K. H. Tanaka; Y. Tanaka; K. Tanida; M. J. Tannenbaum; A. Taranenko; P. Tarján; T. L. Thomas; T. Todoroki; M. Togawa; A. Toia; J. Tojo; L. Tomášek; H. Torii; R. S. Towell; V-N. Tram; I. Tserruya; Y. Tsuchimoto; S. K. Tuli; H. Tydesjö; N. Tyurin; C. Vale; H. Valle

    2015-09-18

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy $v_2$ for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of $v_2$ as a function of transverse momentum $p_T$ and centrality in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200 GeV and 62.4 GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu$+$Cu collisions we observe a decrease in $v_2$ values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4 GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions we find that $v_2$ depends both on eccentricity and the number of participants, $N_{\\rm part}$. We observe that $v_2$ divided by eccentricity ($\\varepsilon$) monotonically increases with $N_{\\rm part}$ and scales as ${N_{\\rm part}^{1/3}}$. The Cu$+$Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled $v_{2}$ data. For identified hadrons, $v_2$ divided by the number of constituent quarks $n_q$ is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy $KE_T=m_T-m$ between $0.1Cu$+$Cu data at 62.4 GeV, of $v_2/(n_q\\cdot\\varepsilon\\cdot N^{1/3}_{\\rm part})$ vs $KE_T/n_q$ for all measured particles.

  2. Systematic Study of Azimuthal Anisotropy in Cu$+$Cu and Au$+$Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 62.4$ and 200~GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; A. Al-Jamel; J. Alexander; K. Aoki; L. Aphecetche; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; J. G. Boissevain; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; J. -S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J. -L. Charvet; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; V. Cianciolo; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; K. Das; G. David; M. B. Deaton; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; A. Durum; V. Dzhordzhadze; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S. -Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H. -Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; H. Hamagaki; R. Han; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; S. Huang; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; H. Iinuma; K. Imai; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; H. Kanou; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; Y. -S. Kim; E. Kinney; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; M. K. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; X. Li; X. H. Li; H. Lim; T. Liška; A. Litvinenko; M. X. Liu; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; Y. Mao; L. Mašek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; Y. Miake; P. Mikeš; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; G. C. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; B. E. Norman; R. Nouicer; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; M. Oka; K. Okada; O. O. Omiwade; A. Oskarsson; I. Otterlund; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; J. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J. -C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; M. Reuter; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; G. Roche; A. Romana; M. Rosati; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; P. Rukoyatkin; V. L. Rykov; S. S. Ryu; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; S. Sakai; H. Sakata; V. Samsonov; H. D. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; J. Seele; R. Seidl; V. Semenov; R. Seto; D. Sharma; T. K. Shea; I. Shein; A. Shevel; T. -A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; M. Shimomura; T. Shohjoh; K. Shoji; A. Sickles; C. L. Silva; D. Silvermyr; C. Silvestre; K. S. Sim; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; S. Skutnik; M. Slune?ka; W. C. Smith; A. Soldatov; R. A. Soltz; W. E. Sondheim; S. P. Sorensen; I. V. Sourikova; F. Staley; P. W. Stankus; E. Stenlund; M. Stepanov; A. Ster; S. P. Stoll; T. Sugitate; C. Suire; J. P. Sullivan; J. Sziklai; T. Tabaru; S. Takagi; E. M. Takagui; A. Taketani; K. H. Tanaka; Y. Tanaka; K. Tanida; M. J. Tannenbaum; A. Taranenko; P. Tarján; T. L. Thomas; T. Todoroki; M. Togawa; A. Toia; J. Tojo; L. Tomášek; H. Torii; R. S. Towell; V-N. Tram; I. Tserruya; Y. Tsuchimoto; S. K. Tuli; H. Tydesjö; N. Tyurin; C. Vale; H. Valle

    2014-12-02

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy $v_2$ for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of $v_2$ as a function of transverse momentum $p_T$ and centrality in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200~GeV and 62.4~GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu$+$Cu collisions we observe a decrease in $v_2$ values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4~GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions we find that $v_2$ depends both on eccentricity and the number of participants, $N_{\\rm part}$. We observe that $v_2$ divided by eccentricity ($\\varepsilon$) monotonically increases with $N_{\\rm part}$ and scales as ${N_{\\rm part}^{1/3}}$. The Cu$+$Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled $v_{2}$ data. For identified hadrons, $v_2$ divided by the number of constituent quarks $n_q$ is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy $KE_T=m_T-m$ between $0.1Cu$+$Cu data at 62.4 GeV, of $v_2/(n_q\\cdot\\varepsilon\\cdot N^{1/3}_{\\rm part})$ vs $KE_T/n_q$ for all measured particles.

  3. Association between As and Cu renal cortex accumulation and physiological and histological alterations after chronic arsenic intake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubatto Birri, Paolo N.; Perez, Roberto D.; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas , Buenos Aires ; Cremonezzi, David; Perez, Carlos A.; Rubio, Marcelo; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas , Buenos Aires ; Bongiovanni, Guillermina A.

    2010-07-15

    Arsenic (As) is one of the most abundant hazards in the environment and it is a human carcinogen. Related to excretory functions, the kidneys in humans, animal models or naturally exposed fauna, are target organs for As accumulation and deleterious effects. Previous studies carried out using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry by synchrotron radiation (SR-{mu}XRF) showed a high concentration of As in the renal cortex of chronically exposed rats, suggesting that this is a suitable model for studies on renal As accumulation. This accumulation was accompanied by a significant increase in copper (Cu) concentration. The present study focused on the localization of these elements in the renal cortex and their correlation with physiological and histological As-related renal effects. Experiments were performed on nine male Wistar rats, divided into three experimental groups. Two groups received 100 {mu}g/ml sodium arsenite in drinking water for 60 and 120 consecutive days, respectively. The control group received water without sodium arsenite (<50 ppb As). For histological analysis, 5-{mu}m-thick sections of kidneys were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Biochemical analyses were used to determine concentrations of plasma urea and creatinine. The As and Cu mapping were carried out by SR-{mu}XRF using a collimated white synchrotron spectrum (300 {mu}mx300 {mu}m) on kidney slices (2 mm thick) showing As and Cu co-distribution in the renal cortex. Then, renal cortical slices (100 {mu}m thick) were scanned with a focused white synchrotron spectrum (30 {mu}mx30 {mu}m). Peri-glomerular accumulation of As and Cu at 60 and 120 days was found. The effects of 60 days of arsenic consumption were seen in a decreased Bowman's space as well as a decreased plasma blood urea nitrogen (BUN)/creatinine ratio. Major deleterious effects; however, were seen on tubules at 120 days of exposition. This study supports the hypothesis that tubular accumulation of As-Cu may have some bearing on the arsenic-associated nephrotoxicological process.

  4. TYPES OF NONIMMIGRANT VISAS Type Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for pleasure and cannot receive any type of payments. C-1*, Aliens in travel status while travelling directly through the C-2*, United States. C-3* D-1 Alien crewman on shore leave or transferring to another vessel is grounds for deportation. E-1 Aliens who conduct trade or inventories between the United States

  5. Oxygen-induced Y surface segregation in a CuPdY ternary alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tafen, D. N.; Miller, J. B.; Dogan, O. N.; Baltrus, J. P.; Kondratyuk, P.

    2013-01-01

    We present a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of the segregation behavior of the ternary alloy CuPdY in vacuum (i.e., the clean surface) and in the presence of oxygen. Theoretical prediction shows that for clean surface, yttrium will substitute first for Cu and then for Pd at the subsurface lattice site before segregating to the surface where it substitutes for Cu. XRD characterization of the surface of CuPdY indicates the presence of two major phases, B2 CuPd and Pd{sub 3}Y. In the presence of adsorbed oxygen, theory predicts that Y preferentially occupies surface sites due to its stronger oxygen affinity compared to Cu and Pd. XPS experiments confirm the computational results in the adsorbed oxygen case, showing that surface segregation of yttrium is induced by the formation of Y-oxides at the top-surface of the alloy.

  6. Method of fabricating high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)(SeS).sub.2 thin films for solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CO); Gabor, Andrew M. (Boulder, CO); Tuttle, John R. (Denver, CO); Tennant, Andrew L. (Denver, CO); Contreras, Miguel A. (Golden, CO); Albin, David S. (Denver, CO); Carapella, Jeffrey J. (Evergreen, CO)

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing a slightly Cu-poor thin film of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S).sub.2 comprises depositing a first layer of (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y followed by depositing just enough Cu+(Se,S) or Cu.sub.x (Se,S) to produce the desired slightly Cu-poor material. In a variation, most, but not all, (about 90 to 99%) of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y is deposited first, followed by deposition of all the Cu+(Se,S) or Cu.sub.x (Se,S) to go near stoichiometric, possibly or even preferably slightly Cu-rich, and then in turn followed by deposition of the remainder (about 1 to 10%) of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y to end with a slightly Cu-poor composition. In yet another variation, a small portion (about 1 to 10%) of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y is first deposited as a seed layer, followed by deposition of all of the Cu+(Se,S) or Cu.sub.x (Se,S) to make a very Cu-rich mixture, and then followed deposition of the remainder of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y to go slightly Cu-poor in the final Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S).sub.2 thin film.

  7. Method of fabricating high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} thin films for solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noufi, R.; Gabor, A.M.; Tuttle, J.R.; Tennant, A.L.; Contreras, M.A.; Albin, D.S.; Carapella, J.J.

    1995-08-15

    A process for producing a slightly Cu-poor thin film of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} comprises depositing a first layer of (In,Ga){sub x} (Se,S){sub y} followed by depositing just enough Cu+(Se,S) or Cu{sub x} (Se,S) to produce the desired slightly Cu-poor material. In a variation, most, but not all, (about 90 to 99%) of the (In,Ga){sub x} (Se,S){sub y} is deposited first, followed by deposition of all the Cu+(Se,S) or Cu{sub x} (Se,S) to go near stoichiometric, possibly or even preferably slightly Cu-rich, and then in turn followed by deposition of the remainder (about 1 to 10%) of the (In,Ga){sub x} (Se,S){sub y} to end with a slightly Cu-poor composition. In yet another variation, a small portion (about 1 to 10%) of the (In,Ga){sub x} (Se,S){sub y} is first deposited as a seed layer, followed by deposition of all of the Cu+(Se,S) or Cu{sub x} (Se,S) to make a very Cu-rich mixture, and then followed deposition of the remainder of the (In,Ga){sub x} (Se,S){sub y} to go slightly Cu-poor in the final Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} thin film. 5 figs.

  8. Adsorbate-driven morphological changes on Cu(111) nano-pits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudiyanselage, K.; Xu, F.; Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Waluyo, I.; Boscoboinik, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    Adsorbate-driven morphological changes of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces have been investigated following the adsorption and desorption of CO and H. The morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surfaces, prepared by Ar+ sputtering, exposed a few atomic layers deep nested hexagonal pits of diameters from 8 to 38 nm with steep step bundles. The roughness of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces can be healed by heating to 450-500 K in vacuum. Adsorption of CO on the pitted-Cu(111) surface leads to two infrared peaks at 2089-2090 and 2101-2105 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites in addition to the peak at 2071 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on atop sites of the close-packed Cu(111) surface. CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites is thermally more stable than that of atop Cu(111) sites. Annealing of the CO-covered surface from 100 to 300 K leads to minor changes of the surface morphology. In contrast, annealing of a H covered surface to 300 K creates a smooth Cu(111) surface as deduced from infrared data of adsorbed CO and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging. The observation of significant adsorbate-driven morphological changes with H is attributed to its stronger modification of the Cu(111) surface by the formation of a sub-surface hydride with a hexagonal structure, which relaxes into the healed Cu(111) surface upon hydrogen desorption. These morphological changes occur ~150 K below the temperature required for healing of the pitted-Cu(111) surface by annealing in vacuum. In contrast, the adsorption of CO, which only interacts with the top-most Cu layer and desorbs by 160 K, does not significantly change the morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surface.

  9. Adsorbate-driven morphological changes on Cu(111) nano-pits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudiyanselage, K.; Xu, F.; Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Waluyo, I.; Boscoboinik, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.

    2014-12-09

    Adsorbate-driven morphological changes of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces have been investigated following the adsorption and desorption of CO and H. The morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surfaces, prepared by Ar+ sputtering, exposed a few atomic layers deep nested hexagonal pits of diameters from 8 to 38 nm with steep step bundles. The roughness of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces can be healed by heating to 450-500 K in vacuum. Adsorption of CO on the pitted-Cu(111) surface leads to two infrared peaks at 2089-2090 and 2101-2105 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites in addition to the peak at 2071 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on atop sites of the close-packed Cu(111) surface. CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites is thermally more stable than that of atop Cu(111) sites. Annealing of the CO-covered surface from 100 to 300 K leads to minor changes of the surface morphology. In contrast, annealing of a H covered surface to 300 K creates a smooth Cu(111) surface as deduced from infrared data of adsorbed CO and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging. The observation of significant adsorbate-driven morphological changes with H is attributed to its stronger modification of the Cu(111) surface by the formation of a sub-surface hydride with a hexagonal structure, which relaxes into the healed Cu(111) surface upon hydrogen desorption. These morphological changes occur ~150 K below the temperature required for healing of the pitted-Cu(111) surface by annealing in vacuum. In contrast, the adsorption of CO, which only interacts with the top-most Cu layer and desorbs by 160 K, does not significantly change the morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surface.

  10. Adsorbate-driven morphological changes on Cu(111) nano-pits

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mudiyanselage, K.; Xu, F.; Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Waluyo, I.; Boscoboinik, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.

    2014-12-09

    Adsorbate-driven morphological changes of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces have been investigated following the adsorption and desorption of CO and H. The morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surfaces, prepared by Ar+ sputtering, exposed a few atomic layers deep nested hexagonal pits of diameters from 8 to 38 nm with steep step bundles. The roughness of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces can be healed by heating to 450-500 K in vacuum. Adsorption of CO on the pitted-Cu(111) surface leads to two infrared peaks at 2089-2090 and 2101-2105 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites in addition to the peak at 2071 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on atop sitesmore »of the close-packed Cu(111) surface. CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites is thermally more stable than that of atop Cu(111) sites. Annealing of the CO-covered surface from 100 to 300 K leads to minor changes of the surface morphology. In contrast, annealing of a H covered surface to 300 K creates a smooth Cu(111) surface as deduced from infrared data of adsorbed CO and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging. The observation of significant adsorbate-driven morphological changes with H is attributed to its stronger modification of the Cu(111) surface by the formation of a sub-surface hydride with a hexagonal structure, which relaxes into the healed Cu(111) surface upon hydrogen desorption. These morphological changes occur ~150 K below the temperature required for healing of the pitted-Cu(111) surface by annealing in vacuum. In contrast, the adsorption of CO, which only interacts with the top-most Cu layer and desorbs by 160 K, does not significantly change the morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surface.« less

  11. High Pressure Transformation of La4Cu3MoO12 to a Layered Perovskite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

    High Pressure Transformation of La4Cu3MoO12 to a Layered Perovskite Douglas A. Vander Griend it stabilizes the perovskite structure. In this paper, we describe the HP synthesis of a new copper-rich layered perovskite, La4Cu3MoO12, which is isotypic with La2- CuSnO6.1 When synthesized at ambient pressure (AP

  12. Adsorbate-driven morphological changes on Cu(111) nano-pits

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mudiyanselage, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; BMCC-CUNY, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Science; Xu, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Hoffmann, F. M. [BMCC-CUNY, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Science; Hrbek, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Waluyo, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Boscoboinik, J. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials; Stacchiola, D. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    2015-01-01

    Adsorbate-driven morphological changes of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces have been investigated following the adsorption and desorption of CO and H. The morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surfaces, prepared by Ar+ sputtering, exposed a few atomic layers deep nested hexagonal pits of diameters from 8 to 38 nm with steep step bundles. The roughness of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces can be healed by heating to 450-500 K in vacuum. Adsorption of CO on the pitted-Cu(111) surface leads to two infrared peaks at 2089-2090 and 2101-2105 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites in addition to the peak at 2071 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on atop sites of the close-packed Cu(111) surface. CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites is thermally more stable than that of atop Cu(111) sites. Annealing of the CO-covered surface from 100 to 300 K leads to minor changes of the surface morphology. In contrast, annealing of a H covered surface to 300 K creates a smooth Cu(111) surface as deduced from infrared data of adsorbed CO and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging. The observation of significant adsorbate-driven morphological changes with H is attributed to its stronger modification of the Cu(111) surface by the formation of a sub-surface hydride with a hexagonal structure, which relaxes into the healed Cu(111) surface upon hydrogen desorption. These morphological changes occur ~150 K below the temperature required for healing of the pitted-Cu(111) surface by annealing in vacuum. In contrast, the adsorption of CO, which only interacts with the top-most Cu layer and desorbs by 160 K, does not significantly change the morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surface.

  13. DISSERTATION DEVICE PHYSICS OF Cu(In,Ga)Se2 THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    OF Cu(In,Ga)Se2 THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS Thin-film solar cells have the potential to be an important contributor to the global energy demand by the mid-21st-century. Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells, which haveDISSERTATION DEVICE PHYSICS OF Cu(In,Ga)Se2 THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS Submitted by Markus Gloeckler

  14. In-situ surface composition measurements of CuGaSe{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fons, P.; Yamada, A.; Niki, S.; Oyanagi, H.

    1998-12-31

    Two CuGaSe{sub 2} films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy onto GaAs (001) substrates with varying Cu/Ga flux ratios under Se overpressure conditions. Growth was interrupted at predetermined times and the surface composition was measured using Auger electron spectroscopy after which growth was continued. After growth, the film composition was analyzed using voltage dependent electron microprobe spectroscopy. Film structure and morphology were also analyzed using x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The film with a Cu/Ga ratio larger than unity showed evidence of surface segregation of a second Cu-rich phase with a Cu/Se composition ratio slightly greater than unity. A second CuGaSe{sub 2} film with a Cu/Ga ratio of less than unity showed no change in surface composition with time and was also consistent with bulk composition measurements. Diffraction measurements indicated a high concentration of twins as well as the presence of domains with mixed c and a axes in the Ga-rich film. The Cu-rich films by contrast were single domain and had a narrower mosaics. High sensitivity scans along the [001] reciprocal axis did not exhibit any new peaks not attributable to either the substrate or the CuGaSe{sub 2} thin film.

  15. Enthalpy of mixing of liquid Ni-Zr and Cu-Ni-Zr alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witusiewicz, V.T.; Sommer, F.

    2000-04-01

    Since the Al-Cu-Ni-Zr system is a basis for the production of bulk amorphous materials by rapid solidification techniques from the liquid state, it is of great scientific interest to determine the partial and the integral thermodynamic functions of liquid and undercooled liquid alloys. Such data, as was pointed out previously, are important in order to understand their extremely good glass-forming ability in multicomponent metallic systems as well as for processing improvements. In order to measure the thermodynamic properties of the Al-Cu-Ni-Zr quaternary, it is necessary to have reliable thermochemical data for its constituent canaries and ternaries first. In a series of articles, the authors have reported in detail the thermodynamic properties of liquid Al-Cu, Al-Ni, Cu-Ni, Cu-Zr, Al-Zr, Al-Cu-Ni, and Al-Cu-Zr alloys. This article deals with the direct calorimetric measurements of the partial and the integral enthalpies of mixing of liquid Ni-Zr and Cu-Ni-Zr alloys and the heat capacity of liquid Ni{sub 26}Zr{sub 74}. In a subsequent article, the authors will present similar data for the liquid ternary Al-Ni-Zr and for the liquid quaternary Al-Cu-Ni-Zr alloys.

  16. Deactivation Mechanism of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive Hydrothermal Aging

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better control for preventing catalyst deactivation resulted from study of and proposed mechanism for deactivation of Cu/zeolite under rich conditions.

  17. Photoelectron spectroscopic study of the surface reactivity of the high T[c] material YBa?Cu?O? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hong-Xia

    1988-01-01

    of the high T, Y-Ba-Cu-0 system . . . . . 1. 2. A review of the spectroscopic study of the Y-Ba-Cu-0 system. 1. 3. Properties of metal oxide surfaces. 1. 4. Influence of the effective escape depth of the electrons on surface studies . 1. 5. Objectives... extensive in the area of the high T, Y-Ba-Cu-0 system. 1. 1. Properties of the high T, Y-Ba-Cu-0 system The high T, Y-Ba-Cu-0 system is the single phase compound YBagCu309 8 with 5=2 (Cava et al 1987). It is an orthorhombically distorted perovskite...

  18. Fermi surface measurements in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x and La sub 1. 874 Sr sub. 126 CuO sub 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Solal, F.; Fluss, M.J. ); Haghighi, H.; Kaiser, J.H.; Rayner, S.L.; West, R.N. ); Liu, J.Z; Shelton, R. ); Kojima, H. ); Kitazawa, K. )

    1991-06-25

    We report new, ultra high precision measurements of the electron-positron momentum spectra of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} and La{sub 1.874}Sr{sub 126}CuO{sub 4}. The YBCO experiments were performed on twin free, single crystals and show discontinuities with the symmetry of the Fermi surface of the CuO chain bands. Conduction band and underlying features in LSCO share the same symmetry and can only be separated with the aid of LDA calculations. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Reflection type of terahertz imaging system using a high-T{sub c} superconducting oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwagi, T.; Minami, H.; Kadowaki, K. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Division of Materials Science, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Nakade, K.; Saiwai, Y.; Kitamura, T.; Watanabe, C.; Ishida, K.; Sekimoto, S.; Asanuma, K.; Yasui, T.; Shibano, Y. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Markovi?, B.; Mirkovi?, J. [Faculty of Sciences, University of Montenegro, George Washington Str., 81000 Podgorica (Montenegro); Tsujimoto, M. [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Wide Bandgap Materials Group, Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, Environment and Energy Materials Division, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-01-13

    A reflection type of imaging system is shown at sub-terahertz frequencies generated from high-T{sub c} superconducting intrinsic Josephson junction mesa structures fabricated by single crystalline Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+?} to demonstrate how the sub-terahertz imaging technique using monochromatic radiation is powerful and unique for the variety of practical applications. Several examples are discussed in detail and are compared to other terahertz imaging systems.

  20. Typed Self-Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Matt

    2013-01-01

    type T y[O]. The operator IsIs is self-applicative, in thatargument t is any of Is[O] or IsIs, and otherwise behavesproof constant introduced by IsIs proves that the type of t

  1. Spectroscopic characterization of some Cu(II) complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Puja, E-mail: sharma.shivadhar@gmail.com; Sharma, S., E-mail: sharma.shivadhar@gmail.com [University Department of Chemistry, Magadh University, Bodh-Gaya, 824234, Bihar (India)

    2014-10-15

    3-hydroxy-4-methoxy benzaldehyde semicarbazone (HMBS) is a biologically active compound which has several potential donor sites. This compound has been used for complexation with Cu(II) ions to synthesize complexes of general formula [Cu(HMBS){sub 2}X{sub 2}] where X is Cl{sup ?}, NO{sub 3}{sup ?} and CH{sub 3}COO{sup ?}. Cu(II) is a d{sup 9} system for which {sup 2}D term is generated. Under O{sub h} symmetry, this term splits into {sup 2}E{sub g} and {sup 2}T{sub 2g}. the ground term {sup 2}Eg is doubly degenerate and hence suffers strong Jahn-Teller effect and accordingly the further splitting of terms occur to lower the symmetry from perfect O{sub h}. Here, the ligand occupies four planar positions while the two axial positions have been varied by using different ions like Cl{sup ?}, NO{sub 3}{sup ?} and CH{sub 3}COO{sup ?}. These variations on the axial positions also add to the distortion in O{sub h} symmetry. Under strong distortion, the electronic spectral band splits into multiplets exhibiting tetragonal distortion in complexes. The extent of distortion has been derived by the derivation of the two radial parameters D{sub s} and D{sub t} from electronic spectral bands. The ESR spectra of complexes reveal the real position of the only unpaired electron of the d{sup 9} system in complexes.

  2. La??xSrxCuO? superconductor nanowire devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Litombe, N. E.; Bollinger, A. T.; Hoffman, J. E.; Bozovic, I.

    2014-07-02

    La??xSrxCuO? nanowire devices have been fabricated and characterized using electrical transport measurements. Nanowires with widths down to 80 nm are patterned using high-resolution electron beam lithography. However, the narrowest nanowires show incomplete superconducting transitions with some residual resistance at T = 4 K. Here, we report on refinement of the fabrication process to achieve narrower nanowire devices with complete superconducting transitions, opening the path to the study of novel physics arising from dimension-limited superconductivity on the nanoscale.

  3. Carbon dioxide reduction to alcohols using perovskite-type electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, M.; Cook, R.L.; Kehoe, V.M.; MacDuff, R.C.; Patel, J.; Sammells, A.F. (Eltron Research, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Electrochemical reduction of CO[sub 2] under ambient conditions to methanol, ethanol, and n-propanol is reported at perovskite-type A[sub 1.8]A[prime][sub 0.2]CuO[sub 4] (A = La, Pr, and Gd; A[prime] = Sr and Th) electrocatalysts when incorporated into gas diffusion electrodes. In the absence of copper at the perovskite B lattice site, no activity was found. This investigation resulted in the identification of electrochemical conditions whereby perovskite-type electrocatalysts could achieve cumulative Faradaic efficiencies for CO[sub 2] reduction to methanol, ethanol, and n-propanol up to [congruent] 40% at current densities of 180 mA/cm[sup 2].

  4. Multiferroic CuCrO? under high pressure: In situ X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garg, Alka B. Mishra, A. K.; Pandey, K. K.; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2014-10-07

    The compression behavior of delafossite compound CuCrO? has been investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopic measurements up to 23.2 and 34 GPa, respectively. X-ray diffraction data show the stability of ambient rhombohedral structure up to ~23 GPa. Material shows large anisotropy in axial compression with c-axis compressibility, ?{sub c} = 1.26 × 10?³(1) GPa?¹ and a-axis compressibility, ?{sub a} = 8.90 × 10?³(6) GPa?¹. Our XRD data show an irreversible broadening of diffraction peaks. Pressure volume data when fitted to 3rd order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state give the value of bulk modulus, B? = 156.7(2.8) GPa with its pressure derivative, B?{sup ’} as 5.3(0.5). All the observed vibrational modes in Raman measurements show hardening with pressure. Appearance of a new mode at ~24 GPa indicates the structural phase transition in the compound. Our XRD and Raman results indicate that CuCrO{sub 2} may be transforming to an ordered rocksalt type structure under compression.

  5. J/psi production at high transverse momenta in p+p and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, B. I.

    2009-10-27

    The STAR collaboration at RHIC presents measurements of J/{psi} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} at mid-rapidity and high transverse momentum (p{sub T} > 5 GeV/c) in p+p and central Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}sNN = 200 GeV. The inclusive J/{psi} production cross section for Cu+Cu collisions is found to be consistent at high p{sub T} with the binary collision-scaled cross section for p+p collisions, in contrast to previous measurements at lower p{sub T}, where a suppression of J/{psi} production is observed relative to the expectation from binary scaling. Azimuthal correlations of J/{psi} with charged hadrons in p+p collisions provide an estimate of the contribution of B-meson decays to J/{psi} production of 13% {+-} 5%.

  6. $J/?$ production at low $p_T$ in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ = 200 GeV at STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; A. Banerjee; Z. Barnovska; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; D. Grosnick; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; Zhang; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2014-09-12

    The $\\jpsi$ $\\pt$ spectrum and nuclear modification factor ($\\raa$) are reported for $\\pt < 5 \\ \\gevc$ and $|y|<1$ from 0\\% to 60\\% central Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\snn = 200 \\ \\gev$ at STAR. A significant suppression of $\\pt$-integrated $\\jpsi$ production is observed in central Au+Au events. The Cu+Cu data are consistent with no suppression, although the precision is limited by the available statistics. $\\raa$ in Au+Au collisions exhibits a strong suppression at low transverse momentum and gradually increases with $\\pt$. The data are compared to high-$\\pt$ STAR results and previously published BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider results. Comparing with model calculations, it is found that the invariant yields at low $\\pt$ are significantly above hydrodynamic flow predictions but are consistent with models that include color screening and regeneration.

  7. In situ measurement of electromigration-induced transient stress in Pb-free Sn-Cu solder joints by synchrotron radiation based X-ray polychromatic microdiffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kai

    2009-01-01

    elastic stress in Pb-free SnCu solder joints was studied byeffective charge number for SnCu solder is calculated and

  8. In situ measurement of electromigration-induced transient stress in Pb-free Sn-Cu solder joints by synchrotron radiation based X-ray polychromatic microdiffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kai

    2011-01-01

    elastic stress in Pb-free SnCu solder joints was studied byeffective charge number for SnCu solder is calculated and

  9. Residual Stress and Microstructure of Electroplated Cu Film on Different Barrier Layers Alex A. Volinsky1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Residual Stress and Microstructure of Electroplated Cu Film on Different Barrier Layers Alex A.2 and 2 microns were electroplated on adhesion-promoting TiW and Ta barrier layers on single crystal from a leading semiconductor manufacturer such as Motorola that contains electroplated Cu interconnects

  10. Interaction of CuS and sulfur in Li-S battery system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Ke; Su, Dong; Zhang, Qing; Bock, David C.; Marschilok, Amy C.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Takeuchi, Esther S.; Gan, Hong

    2015-10-27

    Lithium-Sulfur (Li-S) battery has been a subject of intensive research in recent years due to its potential to provide much higher energy density and lower cost than the current state of the art lithiumion battery technology. In this work, we have investigated Cupric Sulfide (CuS) as a capacitycontributing conductive additive to the sulfur electrode in a Li-S battery. Galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling has been used to compare the performance of both sulfur electrodes and S:CuS hybrid electrodes with various ratios. We found that the conductive CuS additive enhanced the utilization of the sulfur cathode under a 1C rate discharge. However, undermore »a C/10 discharge rate, S:CuS hybrid electrodes exhibited lower sulfur utilization in the first discharge and faster capacity decay in later cycles than a pure sulfur electrode due to the dissolution of CuS. The CuS dissolution is found to be the result of strong interaction between the soluble low order polysulfide Li2S3 and CuS. As a result, we identified the presence of conductive copper-containing sulfides at the cycled lithium anode surface, which may degrade the effectiveness of the passivation function of the solid-electrolyte-interphase (SEI) layer, accounting for the poor cycling performance of the S:CuS hybrid cells at low rate.« less

  11. Growth and magnetic property of antiperovskite manganese nitride films doped with Cu by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Fengmei; Ren, Lizhu; Meng, Meng; Wang, Yunjia; Yang, Mei; Wu, Shuxiang; Li, Shuwei

    2014-04-07

    Manganese nitrides thin films on MgO (100) substrates with and without Cu-doping have been fabricated by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Antiperovskite compounds Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N have been grown in the case of Cu-doping, and the pure Mn{sub 3}N{sub 2} single crystal has been obtained without Cu-doping. The Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N exhibits ferrimagnetism, and the magnetization of Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N increases upon the temperature decreasing from 300?K to 5?K, similar to Mn{sub 4}N. The exchange bias (EB) effects emerge in the Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N films. The EB behavior is originated from the interfaces between ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N and antiferromagnetic metal Mn, which is verified to be formed by the data of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The present results not only provide a strategy for producing functional antiperovskite manganese nitrides, but also shed promising light on fabricating the exchange bias part of spintronic devices.

  12. DISSERTATION ANTICIPATED PERFORMANCE OF Cu(In,Ga)Se2 SOLAR CELLS IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    i DISSERTATION ANTICIPATED PERFORMANCE OF Cu(In,Ga)Se2 SOLAR CELLS IN THE THIN-FILM LIMIT Submitted ENTITLED `ANTICIPATED PERFORMANCE OF Cu(In,Ga)Se2 SOLAR CELLS IN THE THIN-FILM LIMIT' BE ACCEPTED(In,Ga)Se2 SOLAR CELLS IN THE THIN-FILM LIMIT The demand for alternative sources of energy is rapidly

  13. Chemisorption of benzene and STM dehydrogenation products on Cu,,100... N. Lorente*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persson, Mats

    Chemisorption of benzene and STM dehydrogenation products on Cu,,100... N. Lorente* Laboratoire of individual chemisorbed benzene molecules on Cu 100 has recently been performed in atomic manipulation experiments J. Phys. Chem. A. 104, 2463 2000 ; Surf. Sci 451, 219 2000 . Benzene dissociates under controlled

  14. Adsorption of Benzene, Fluorobenzene and Meta-di-Fluorobenzene on Cu(110): A Computational Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    Adsorption of Benzene, Fluorobenzene and Meta-di-Fluorobenzene on Cu(110): A Computational Study L.interscience.wiley.com). Abstract: We modelled the adsorption of benzene, fluorobenzene and meta-di-fluorobenzene on Cu(110) by Den geometry is favoured. Function- alizing the benzene ring with one or two fluorine atoms weakens the bonding

  15. Photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of Cu (H2O)1,2 anion complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lineberger, W. Carl

    structure calculations for the neutral, the adiabatic electron affinity is derived. Ó 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Recent experiments [1] and calculations [2,3] of the structure and rearrangement dynamics of CuH2O fol- lowing electron photodetachment from CuÀ H2O have afforded considerable

  16. Field-induced cation migration in Cu oxide films by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    into the oxide, and Al cations in the oxide layer rapidly diffused away.14 Field-induced ion migration substrate was cleaned by the RCA method and a thin oxide layer was grown on the Si surface. The Cu film. The formation of an oxide layer on Cu thin film was examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy XPS in another

  17. DISSERTATION Role of the Cu-O Defect in CdTe Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    DISSERTATION Role of the Cu-O Defect in CdTe Solar Cells Submitted by Caroline R. Corwine OF THE CU-O DEFECT COMPLEX IN CDTE SOLAR CELLS Thin-film CdTe is one of the leading materials used in photovoltaic (PV) solar cells. One way to improve device performance and stability is through understanding how

  18. Evolution of Graphene Growth on Ni and Cu by Carbon Isotope Labeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and acceptance by the semiconductor industry, Ni and Cu have received the most attention as a graphene substrateEvolution of Graphene Growth on Ni and Cu by Carbon Isotope Labeling Xuesong Li, Weiwei Cai, Luigi Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, Texas 75243 Received August 3, 2009 ABSTRACT Large-area graphene growth

  19. 2 Gbps SerDes Design Based on IBM Cu-11 (130nm) Standard Cell Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draper, Jeff

    2 Gbps SerDes Design Based on IBM Cu-11 (130nm) Standard Cell Technology Rashed Zafar Bhatti EE Denneau IBM T.J. Watson Research Center Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 denneau@us.ibm.com Jeff Draper of jitter. Power consumption of the proposed SerDes design is 30 mW per serial link targeted to IBM Cu-11

  20. RETENTION OF Cd, Cu, Pb AND Zn BY WOOD ASH, LIME AND FUME DUST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    RETENTION OF Cd, Cu, Pb AND Zn BY WOOD ASH, LIME AND FUME DUST TAIT CHIRENJE1 , LENA Q. MA2 and ecosystem health. This study investigated the effectiveness of wood ash in immobilizing the heavy metals Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn from aqueous solutions. The effects of initial metal concentrations, solution pH, ash

  1. Development of a Low Cost Insulated Foil Substrate for Cu(InGaSe)2 Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ERTEN ESER

    2012-01-22

    The project validated the use of stainless steel flexible substrate coated with silicone-based resin dielectric, developed by Dow Corning Corporation, for Cu(InGa)Se2 based photovoltaics. The projects driving force was the high performance of Cu(InGa)Se2 based photovoltaics coupled with potential cost reduction that could be achieved with dielectric coated SS web substrate.

  2. Effect of doping in Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ertekin, Abdullah

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to analyze the solid solubility limit of dopants in Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors. We have studied the effect of Mn doping Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O. The electrical resistivity and critical temperature were measured for samples...

  3. CU scientists amongst recipients of awards and grants bestowed by Neuron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    CU scientists amongst recipients of awards and grants bestowed by Neuron Compiled 4.12.2013 23:35:59 by Document Globe ® 1 CU scientists amongst recipients of awards and grants bestowed by Neuron Foundation Neuron Award for Lifelong Achievement. During their presentation at Malostranská beseda on 5 November

  4. Cu, Cr and As distribution in soils adjacent to pressure-treated decks, fences and poles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Cu, Cr and As distribution in soils adjacent to pressure-treated decks, fences and poles Tait with depth in areas close to CCA-treated poles. Abstract Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood has), and copper (Cu), in soils surrounding CCA-treated wood structures such as decks, fences and poles; and (2

  5. Measurement of K0S and K*0 in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.

    2014-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a systematic study of K0S and K*0 meson production at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV. The K0S and K*0 mesons are reconstructed via their K0S and ?0(???)?0 (???) and K*0 ? K ±#25;?± decay modes, respectively. The measured transverse-momentum spectra are used to determine the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons in d+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at different centralities. In the d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons is almost constant as a function ofmore »transverse momentum and is consistent with unity showing that cold-nuclear-matter effects do not play a significant role in the measured kinematic range. In Cu+Cu collisions, within the uncertainties no nuclear modification is registered in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, both mesons show suppression relative to the expectations from the p+p yield scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in the Cu+Cu system. In the pT range 2–5 GeV/c, the strange mesons ( K0S, K*0) similarly to the #30;? meson with hidden strangeness, show an intermediate suppression between the more suppressed light quark mesons (?0) and the nonsuppressed baryons (p, p-bar). At higher transverse momentum, pT > 5 GeV/c, production of all particles is similarly suppressed by a factor of ?2. (auth)« less

  6. Measurement of K0S and K*0 in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Aidala, C. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). et al.

    2014-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a systematic study of K0S and K*0 meson production at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV. The K0S and K*0 mesons are reconstructed via their K0S and ?0(???)?0 (???) and K*0 ? K ±#25;?± decay modes, respectively. The measured transverse-momentum spectra are used to determine the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons in d+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at different centralities. In the d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons is almost constant as a function of transverse momentum and is consistent with unity showing that cold-nuclear-matter effects do not play a significant role in the measured kinematic range. In Cu+Cu collisions, within the uncertainties no nuclear modification is registered in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, both mesons show suppression relative to the expectations from the p+p yield scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in the Cu+Cu system. In the pT range 2–5 GeV/c, the strange mesons ( K0S, K*0) similarly to the #30;? meson with hidden strangeness, show an intermediate suppression between the more suppressed light quark mesons (?0) and the nonsuppressed baryons (p, p-bar). At higher transverse momentum, pT > 5 GeV/c, production of all particles is similarly suppressed by a factor of ?2. (auth)

  7. Bio-corrosion and cytotoxicity studies on novel Zr55Co30Ti15 and Cu60Zr20Ti20 metallic glasses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vincent, S.; Daiwile, A.; Devi, S. S.; Kramer, M. J.; Besser, M. F.; Murty, B. S.; Bhatt, Jatin

    2014-09-26

    Metallic glasses are a potential and compatible implant candidate for biomedical applications. In the present investigation, a comparative study between novel Zr55Co30Ti15 and Cu60Zr20Ti20 metallic glasses is carried out to evaluate in vitro biocompatibility using simulated body fluids. The bio-corrosion behavior of Zr- and Cu-based metallic glasses in different types of artificial body fluids such as artificial saliva solution, phosphate-buffered saline solution, artificial blood plasma solution, and Hank’s balanced saline solution is evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization studies at a constant body temperature of 310.15 K (37 °C). Surface morphology of samples after bio-corrosion experiments was observed by scanning electron microscopy.more »In vitro cytotoxicity test on glassy alloys were performed using human osteosarcoma cell line as per 10993-5 guidelines from International Organization for Standardization. As a result, the comparative study between Zr- and Cu-based glassy alloys provides vital information about the effect of elemental composition on biocompatibility of metallic glasses.« less

  8. Hybrid type checking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flanagan, C

    2006-01-01

    O’Callahan and J. -D. Choi. Hybrid dynamic data race detec-subtyping is sound, the hybrid compilation algorithmHybrid Type Checking Cormac Flanagan Department of Computer

  9. Fejer-type inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitroi, F C

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present some new Fejer-type results for convex functions. Improvements of Young's inequality (the arithmetic-geometric mean inequality) and other applications to special means are pointed as well.

  10. Mechanical properties of Al-Cu alloy-SiC composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anggara, B. S., E-mail: anggorobs1960@yahoo.com [Jurusan Fisika, FMIPA Universitas Negeri Jakarta, Indonesia 13220 and PPS Ilmu Material, Department Fisika, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia (Indonesia); Handoko, E. [Jurusan Fisika, FMIPA Universitas Negeri Jakarta, 13220 (Indonesia); Soegijono, B. [PPS Ilmu Material, Department Fisika, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    The synthesis of aluminum (Al) alloys, Al-Cu, from mixture 96.2 % Al and 3.8 % Cu has been prepared by melting process at a temperature of 1200°C. The adding 12.5 wt% up to 20 wt% of SiC on Al-Cu alloys samples has been investigated. The structure analyses were examined by X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Moreover, the morphology of Al-Cu alloys has been seen as structure in micrometer range. The hardness was measured by hardness Vickers method. According to the results, it can be assumed that the 15 wt% of SiC content is prefer content to get better quality of back to back hardness Vickers of Al-Cu alloys.

  11. First results about hydrogen loading by means of pulsed electrolysis of Y$_{1}$Ba$_{2}$Cu$_{3}$O$_{7}$ pellets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Celani, F; Di Gioacchino, D; Spallone, A; Tripodi, P; Pace, S; Polichetti, M; Marini, P

    1994-01-01

    First results about hydrogen loading by means of pulsed electrolysis of Y$_{1}$Ba$_{2}$Cu$_{3}$O$_{7}$ pellets

  12. CuInSe/sub 2/-based photoelectrochemical cells: their use in characterization of thin CuInSe/sub 2/ films, and as photovoltaic cells per se

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahen, D.; Chen, Y.W.; Ireland, P.J.; Noufi, R.; Turner, J.A.; Rincon, C.; Bachmann, K.J.

    1984-05-01

    Photoelectrochemistry has been employed to characterize the p-CuInSe/sub 2/ component of the CdS/CuInSe/sub 2/ on-metal and a nonaqueous electrolyte containing a redox couple not specifically adsorbed onto the semiconductor, we can test the films for photovoltaic activity and obtain effective electronic properties of them, before CdS deposition, in a nondestructive manner. Electrochemical decomposition of CuInSe/sub 2/ was investigated in acetonitrile solutions to determine the mechanism of decomposition (n and p) in the dark and under illumination. Electrochemical, solution chemical and surface analyses confirmed at the light-assisted decomposition of CuInSe/sub 2/ resulted in metal ions and elemental chalcogen. On the basis of the results from the electrochemical decomposition, and studies on the solid state chemistry of the (Cu/sub 2/Se)/sub x/(In/sub 2/Se/sub 3/)/sub 1-x/ system and surface analyses, the CuInSe/sub 2//polyiodide interface was stabilized and up to 11.7% conversion efficiencies were obtained.

  13. Directed and elliptic flow of charged particles in Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{\\bm {s_{NN}}} =$ 22.4 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; C. D. Anson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; D. R. Beavis; N. K. Behera; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; S. G. Brovko; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; Cui; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; F. Geurts; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. G. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; F. Jin; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; V. Kizka; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; 1 L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; M. K. Mitrovski; Y. Mohammed; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; M. Naglis; B. K. Nandi; T. K. Nayak; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; H. Pei; T. Peitzmann; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; J. Schaub; A. M. Schmah; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; S. G. Steadman; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; W. Witzke; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva

    2011-12-07

    This paper reports results for directed flow $v_{1}$ and elliptic flow $v_{2}$ of charged particles in Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$ 22.4 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The measurements are for the 0-60% most central collisions, using charged particles observed in the STAR detector. Our measurements extend to 22.4 GeV Cu+Cu collisions the prior observation that $v_1$ is independent of the system size at 62.4 and 200 GeV, and also extend the scaling of $v_1$ with $\\eta/y_{\\rm beam}$ to this system. The measured $v_2(p_T)$ in Cu+Cu collisions is similar for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 22.4-200$ GeV. We also report a comparison with results from transport model (UrQMD and AMPT) calculations. The model results do not agree quantitatively with the measured $v_1(\\eta), v_2(p_T)$ and $v_2(\\eta)$.

  14. Three 3D hybrid networks based on octamolybdates and different Cu{sup I}/Cu{sup II}-bis(triazole) motifs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Chun-Jing; Pang, Hai-Jun; Tang, Qun; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Chen, Ya-Guang

    2010-12-15

    Three 3D compounds based on octamolybdate clusters and various Cu{sup I}/Cu{sup II}-bis(triazole) motifs, [Cu{sup I}{sub 2}btb][{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sub 0.5} (1), [Cu{sup I}{sub 2}btpe][{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sub 0.5} (2), and [Cu{sup II}(btpe){sub 2}][{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sub 0.5} (3) [btb=1,4-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)butane, btpe=1,5-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)pentane], were isolated via tuning flexible ligand spacer length and metal coordination preferences. In 1, the copper(I)-btb motif is a one-dimensional (1D) chain which is further linked by hexadentate {beta}-[Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} clusters via coordinating to Cu{sup I} cations giving a 3D structure. In 2, the copper(I)-btpe motif exhibits a 'stairs'-like [Cu{sup I}{sub 2}btpe]{sup 2+} sheet, and the tetradentate {beta}-[Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} clusters interact with two neighboring [Cu{sup I}{sub 2}btpe]{sup 2+} sheets constructing a 3D framework. In 3, the copper(II)-btpe motif possesses a novel (2D{yields}3D) interdigitated structure, which is further connected by the tetradentate {beta}-[Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} clusters forming a 3D framework. The thermal stability and luminescent properties of 1-3 are investigated in the solid state. -- Graphical abstract: Three 3D compounds based on {beta}-[Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} clusters with different Cu{sup I}/Cu{sup II}-bis(triazole) motifs were synthesized by regularly tuning flexible ligand spacer length and metal coordination preferences. Display Omitted

  15. A Certified Type-Preserving Compiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chlipala, Adam

    1 A Certified Type- Preserving Compiler from Lambda Calculus to Assembly Language Adam Chlipala University of California, Berkeley PLDI 2007 #12;2 Why Certified Compilers? Source Code Manual Code Auditing Static Analysis Formal Methods How do we know that these programs have the same behavior? Compiled

  16. Type Ia Supernovae

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two Electron Holes in HematiteType Ia Supernovae Type Ia

  17. Agreement Type Union

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReporteeo | National Nucleara min [Type the abstract of theType

  18. Kondo interactions from band reconstruction in YbInCu?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jarrige, I.; Kotani, A.; Yamaoka, H.; Tsujii, N.; Ishii, K.; Upton, M.; Casa, D.; Kim, J.; Gog, T.; Hancock, J. N.

    2015-03-27

    We combine resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and model calculations in the Kondo lattice compound YbInCu?, a system characterized by a dramatic increase in Kondo temperature and associated valence fluctuations below a first-order valence transition at T?42 K. The bulk-sensitive, element-specific, and valence-projected charge excitation spectra reveal an unusual quasi-gap in the Yb-derived state density which drives an instability of the electronic structure and renormalizes the low-energy effective Hamiltonian at the transition. Our results provide long-sought experimental evidence for a link between temperature-driven changes in the low-energy Kondo scale and the higher-energy electronic structure of this system.

  19. Fabrication of CuAl{sub 1?x}M{sub x}O{sub 2} (M = Fe, Cr)/Ni film delafossite compounds using spin coating and their microstructure and dielectric constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diantoro, Markus, E-mail: m-diantoro@yahoo.com; Yuwita, Pelangi Eka, E-mail: m-diantoro@yahoo.com; Olenka, Desyana, E-mail: m-diantoro@yahoo.com; Nasikhudin, E-mail: m-diantoro@yahoo.com [Jurusan Fisika, Fakultas Matematika dan Ilmu Pengetahuan Alam, Universitas Negeri Malang, Jalan Semarang 5, Malang 65145 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    The discovery of delafossite compound has encouraged more rapid technological developments particularly in transparent electronic devices. Copper oxide-based transparent thin films delafossite semiconductor recently give much attention in the field of optoelectronic technology, after the discovery of p-type CuAlO{sub 2}. The potential applications of a p-type semiconductor transparent conductive oxides (TCO) have been applied in broad field of optoelectronics. To explore a broad physical properties interms of magnetic conducting subtitution is understudied. In this work we report the fabrication of delafossite film on Ni substrate and their characterization of CuAl{sub 1?x}M{sub x}O{sub 2} delafossite compounds doped with Cr{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 3+} from the raw material of Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}@@‡3H{sub 2}O, Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}@@‡9H{sub 2}O, Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}@@‡9H{sub 2}O and Cr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}@@‡9H{sub 2}O. The films were prepared using spin coating through a sol-gel technique at various concentrations of x = 0, 0.03, 0.04, and 0.05 for chromium and x = 0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, and 0.08 for iron doped. Crystal and microstructure were characterized by means of Cu-K? Bragg-Brentano X-RD followed by High Score Plus and SEM-EDAX. The dielectric constants of the films were characterized using LCR meter. It was found that the CuAl{sub 1?x}M{sub x}O{sub 2}/Ni delafossite films were successfully fabricated. The CuAl{sub 1?x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 2} compound crystallized with lattice parameters of a = b ranged from 2.8603 Å to 2.8675 Å and c ranged from 16.9576 to 17.0763 Å. The increase of the dopant give rise to the increase of the lattice parameters. Since iron has bigger ionic radius (69 pm) than original site of Al{sup 3+} with radius of 53 pm the crystal volume lattice also increase. Further analyses of increasing volume of the crystal, as expected, affected to the decreasing of its dielectric constant. The similar trends also shown by Cr{sup 3+} doped of CuAl{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 2} films with smaller effects.

  20. Production of ?¹Cu by the natZn(p,?) reaction: Improved separation and specific activity determination by titration with three chelators

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Asad, Ali H.; Smith, Suzanne V.; Morandeau, Laurence M.; Chan, Sun; Jeffery, Charmaine M.; Price, Roger I.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the cyclotron-based production of position-emitting ?¹Cu using the (p,?) reaction at 11.7 MeV was investigated starting from natural-zinc (natZn) and enriched ??Zn-foil targets, as well as its subsequent purification. For natZn, a combination of three resins were assessed to separate ?¹Cu from contaminating 66,67,68Ga and natZn. The specific activity of the purified ?¹Cu determined using ICP-MS analysis ranged from 143.3±14.3(SD) to 506.2±50.6 MBq/?g while the titration method using p-SCN-Bn-DOTA, p-SCN-Bn-NOTA and diamsar gave variable results (4.7±0.2 to 412.5±15.3 MBq/?g), with diamsar lying closest to the ICP-MS values. Results suggest that the p-SCN-Bn-DOTA and p-SCN-Bn-NOTA titration methods aremore »significantly affected by the presence of trace-metal contaminants.« less

  1. Thermal chemistry of the Cu-KI5 atomic layer deposition precursor on a copper surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Qiang; Zaera, Francisco, E-mail: zaera@ucr.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The thermal chemistry of a Cu(I) ketoiminate complex, Cu-KI5, resulting from the modification of the known Air Products CupraSelect{sup ®} copper CVD precursor Cu(hfac)(tmvs) designed to tether the two ligands via an isopropoxide linker, was studied under ultrahigh vacuum on a Cu(110) single-crystal surface by using a combination of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Adsorption at low temperatures was determined to take place via the displacement of the vinyl ligand by the surface. Molecular desorption was seen at 210?K, and the evolution of Cu(II)-KI5{sub 2} was established to take place at 280?K, presumably from a disproportionation reaction that also leads to the deposition of Cu(0). Other sets of desorption products were seen at 150, 250, and 430?K, all containing copper atoms and small organic moieties with molecular masses below 100 amu. The latter TPD peak in particular indicates significant fragmentation of the ligands, likely at the C–N bond that holds the vinylsilane-isopropoxide moiety tethered to the ketoimine fragment, and possibly also at the union between the vinylsilane and the alkoxide linker. The 430?K temperature measured for this chemistry may set an upper limit for clean Cu film deposition, but since reactivity on the surface was also found to be inhibited at higher surface coverages, it may be delayed to higher temperatures under atomic layer deposition conditions.

  2. Isothermal Solid-State Transformation Kinetics Applied to Pd/Cu Alloy Membrane Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomerantz, Natalie L; Payzant, E Andrew; Ma, Yi Hua

    2010-01-01

    In this work, time-resolved, in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD) was used to study the solid-state transformation kinetics of the formation of the fcc Pd/Cu alloy from Pd/Cu bi-layers for the purpose of fabricating sulfur tolerant Pd/Cu membranes for H2 separation. Thin layers of Pd and Cu (total ~15 wt% Cu) were deposited on porous stainless steel (PSS) with the electroless deposition method and annealed in H2 at 500, 550 and 600 C. The kinetics of the annealing process were successfully described by the Avrami nucleation and growth model showing that the annealing process was diffusion controlled and one dimensional. The activation energy for the solid-state transformation was 175 kJ/mol, which was similar to the activation energy of Pd-Cu bulk interdiffusion. Furthermore, the Avrami model was able to successfully describe the changes in permeance and activation energy observed in Pd/Cu alloy membranes during characterization as they were annealed at high temperatures.

  3. Basics, types Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crenshaw, Michael

    to nuclear fusion. · Novae radiate primarily in the UV to X-ray region. · Types: ­ Classical Novae: only one is hot enough for explosive fusion. For classical novae, this happens on a time scale of 103 ­ 105 years. · Thermonuclear runaway (TNR): capture of protons by heavy elements (CNO cycle), happens in seconds #12;5 Novae

  4. Uniform Cu{sub 2}Cl(OH){sub 3} hierarchical microspheres: A novel adsorbent for methylene blue adsorptive removal from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Wei; Gao, Pin; Xie, Jimin Zong, Sekai; Cui, Henglv; Yue, Xuejie

    2013-08-15

    Using the solution phase method without any surfactants or templates, the hierarchical of Cu{sub 2}Cl(OH){sub 3} microspheres were synthesized by freeze drying. The size and surface area of the microspheres are ca. 1–2 µm and 76.61 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1}, respectively. A possible formation mechanism is presented based on the experimental results. Methylene blue was chosen to investigate the adsorption capacity of the as-prepared adsorbent. The effects of various experimental parameters, such as pH, initial dye concentration, and contact time were investigated. The results showed that the dye removal increased with the increasing in the initial concentration of the dye and also increased in the amount of microspheres used and initial pH. Adsorption data fitted well with the Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The thermodynamic analysis presented the exothermic, spontaneous and more ordered arrangement process. The microspheres could be employed effective for removal of dyes from aqueous solution. - Graphical abstract: The single-crystalline hierarchical Cu{sub 2}Cl(OH){sub 3} spheres can be prepared for the first time by using a template-free process through freeze-drying. Meanwhile, the hierarchical spheres exhibited high adsorption capacity to methylene blue. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}Cl(OH){sub 3} microspheres were successfully synthesized through a freeze drying process. • A possible formation mechanism of hierarchical microspheres was presented. • The Cu{sub 2}Cl(OH){sub 3} microspheres have high methylene blue adsorption capacity. • Methylene blue adsorption is a spontaneous and exothermic process. • The adsorption mechanism of microspheres onto dye was proposed in detail.

  5. Electronic structure and conductivity of nanocomposite metal (Au,Ag,Cu,Mo)-containing amorphous carbon films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endrino, Jose L.; Horwat, David; Gago, Raul; Andersson, Joakim; Liu, Y.S.; Guo, Jinghua; Anders, Andre

    2008-05-14

    In this work, we study the influence of the incorporation of different metals (Me = Au, Ag, Cu, Mo) on the electronic structure of amorphous carbon (a-C:Me) films. The films were produced at room temperature using a novel pulsed dual-cathode arc deposition technique. Compositional analysis was performed with secondary neutral mass spectroscopy whereas X-ray diffraction was used to identify the formation of metal nanoclusters in the carbon matrix. The metal content incorporated in the nanocomposite films induces a drastic increase in the conductivity, in parallel with a decrease in the band gap corrected from Urbach energy. The electronic structure as a function of the Me content has been monitored by x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the C K-edge. XANES showed that the C host matrix has a dominant graphitic character and that it is not affected significantly by the incorporation of metal impurities, except for the case of Mo, where the modifications in the lineshape spectra indicated the formation of a carbide phase. Subtle modifications of the spectral lineshape are discussed in terms of nanocomposite formation.

  6. Phosphorescence quenching by mechanical stimulus in CaZnOS:Cu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, Dong; Kamimura, Sunao [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Saga 841-0052 (Japan); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Xu, Chao-Nan, E-mail: cn-xu@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Saga 841-0052 (Japan); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Fujio, Yuki; Sakata, Yoshitaro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Saga 841-0052 (Japan); Ueno, Naohiro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Saga 841-0052 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2014-07-07

    We have found that phosphorescence intensity of CaZnOS:Cu decreased visibly under an applied load. This mechanical quenching (MQ) of phosphorescence in CaZnOS:Cu corresponded to the mechanical stimuli. We have thus demonstrated that the MQ of CaZnOS:Cu could be used for visualizing stress distributions in practical applications. We propose that MQ arises from non-radiative recombination due to electron-transfer from trap levels to non-radiative centers as a result of the mechanical load.

  7. On the origins of hardness of Cu–TiN nanolayered composites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pathak, S.; Li, N.; Maeder, X.; Hoagland, R. G.; Baldwin, J. K.; Michler, J.; Misra, A.; Wang, J.; Mara, N. A.

    2015-07-18

    We investigated the mechanical response of physical vapor deposited Cu–TiN nanolayered composites of varying layer thicknesses from 5 nm to 200 nm. Both the Cu and TiN layers were found to consist of single phase nanometer sized grains. The grain sizes in the Cu and TiN layers, measured using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, were found to be comparable to or smaller than their respective layer thicknesses. Indentation hardness testing revealed that the hardness of such nanolayered composites exhibits a weak dependence on the layer thickness but is more correlated to their grain size.

  8. Phase relationships in the BaO-Y?O?-Cu-O system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hegg, Turi

    1989-01-01

    -Cu ? 0 Febr. 1988 Jan. 1988 Febr. 1987 80 liquid N2 80 40 20 Pb Hg La-Sr ? Cu ? 0 NbaGe Nb- Al- Ge NbN Nb0 NQSn Nb Jan. 1987 (under pressure) Dec. 1988 April 1986 ~ La-Ba-Cu-0 Jan. 1988 0 1910 1930 1950 1970 1990 Figure 7... time temperature transforma- tion (TTT) diagram in air, as shown in Figure 14, which shape suggests that / / ORTHORHOMBIC g / E IZ + 10' cc n. Z X 0 X = 6. 8 / TETRAGONAL 0 P ~ / / / / 10 2 6. 6/ 66 64 63 62 I 0 OM I 6. 1 500 600...

  9. Structural relaxation and nanoindentation response in Zr-Cu-Ti amorphous thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, H. S.; Huang, J. C.; Chang, L. W. [Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Nieh, T. G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2008-11-10

    Ternary Zr-Cu-Ti system, especial with a high Ti content, is normally difficult to be fully vitrified. In this paper, we demonstrate that cosputtering can produce amorphous Zr-Cu-Ti thin films with an excessive Ti content even as high as 19%. Sub-T{sub g} annealing of the film induces the formation of medium-range-ordered clusters and to raise the nanohardness by 35% to 6.6 GPa. The promising mechanical properties of the sub-T{sub g} annealed Zr{sub 52}Cu{sub 29}Ti{sub 19} films offer great potential for microelectromechanical system applications.

  10. Y-Ba-Cu-O films prepared by a paint-on method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, I.; Qiu, C.X.

    1988-02-29

    Polycrystalline films of Y-Ba-Cu-O with a thickness of about 20--40 ..mu..m have been prepared on alumina substrates using a paint-on method. The liquid source used was obtained by mixing powder of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, BaCO/sub 3/, and CuO in liquid triethanolamine. Several Y-Ba-Cu-O films with an onset temperature of about 100 K and a zero resistance temperature of 85 K have been obtained after a short heat treatment at 1000 /sup 0/C in flowing O/sub 2/.

  11. Crystal structure and magnetic properties of NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin Tengteng; Liu Wei; Chen Shuang; Prots, Yurii; Schnelle, Walter; Zhao Jingtai; Kniep, Ruediger; Hoffmann, Stefan

    2012-08-15

    A new copper(II) oxide phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], has been synthesized by flux synthesis. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data show that the title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2{sub 1}/c (No. 14), with lattice parameters a=8.392(2) A, b=6.3960(10) A, c=16.670(2) A, {beta}=109.470(10) Degree-Sign , V=843.6(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4. The crystal structure is characterized by a complex chain of copper-centered polyhedra running along [0 1 0] which are connected by phosphate tetrahedra. The resulting three-dimensional polyhedra framework exhibits channels filled by additional copper and sodium atoms. Field and temperature dependent measurements of the specific heat and the magnetic susceptibility reveal low-dimensional magnetic behavior. The compound starts to decompose at 700 K under release of oxygen and evaporation of Cu{sup I}Cl as shown by simultaneous thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structure of the new copper(II) phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], exhibits linear chains of copper tetrahedra which show low-dimensional magnetic behavior proven by specific heat and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new copper(II) oxide phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], has been synthesized by flux synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure comprises chains of Cu{sub 4}O tetrahedra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-dimensional behavior has been proven by magnetic and specific heat measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer On heating, Cu{sup I}Cl and oxygen are released shown by simultaneous thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry.

  12. Type II and Type III Radio Bursts and their Correlation with Solar Energetic Proton Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, L M

    2015-01-01

    Using the Wind/WAVES radio observations from 2010-2013, we present an analysis of the 123 decametric-hectometric (DH) type II solar radio bursts during this period, the associated type III burst properties, and their correlation with solar energetic proton (SEP) properties determined from analysis of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations. We present a useful catalog of the type II burst, type III burst, Langmuir wave, and proton flux properties for these 123 events, which we employ to develop a statistical relationship between the radio properties and peak proton flux that can be used to forecast SEP events. We find that all SEP events with a peak > 10 MeV flux above 15 pfu are associated with a type II burst and virtually all SEP events, 92%, are also associated with a type III radio burst. Based on a principal component analysis, the radio burst properties that are most highly correlated with the occurrence of gradual SEP events and account for the most variance in the ra...

  13. Energy.gov Page Types

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn about the standard page types available in the Energy.gov Drupal content management system. For information about other available page types, or to request a new kind of page type, contact...

  14. Practical pluggable types for Java

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papi, Matthew M

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the Checker Framework, which supports adding pluggable type systems to the Java language in a backward-compatible way. A type system designer defines type qualifiers and their semantics, and a compiler ...

  15. Window Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    aluminum or vinyl cladding reduces maintenance requirements. Types of Window Glazing or Glass In addition to choosing a frame type, you will need to consider what type of glazing...

  16. Step-by-step thermal transformations of a new porous coordination polymer [(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}CuBa(Me{sub 2}mal){sub 2}]{sub n} (Me{sub 2}mal{sup 2-}=dimethylmalonate): Thermal degradation to barium cuprate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zauzolkova, Natalya; Dobrokhotova, Zhanna; Lermontov, Anatoly; Zorina, Ekaterina; Emelina, Anna; Bukov, Mikhail; Sidorov, Aleksey; Kiskin, Mikhail; Bogomyakov, Artem; Lytvynenko, Anton; Kolotilov, Sergey; Velikodnyi, Yuriy; Kovba, Maksim

    2013-01-15

    The reactions of CuSO{sub 4}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O, dimethylmalonic acid and Ba(OH){sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (Cu: H{sub 2}Me{sub 2}mal: Ba=1: 2: 2) in aqueous and aqueous-ethanol solutions (H{sub 2}O: EtOH=1: 1) resulted in formation of 3D-porous coordination polymers [(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}({mu}-H{sub 2}O){sub 2}CuBa({mu}{sub 3}-Me{sub 2}mal)(Me{sub 2}mal)]{sub n} (1) and [({mu}-H{sub 2}O)CuBa({mu}{sub 3}-Me{sub 2}mal)({mu}{sub 4}-Me{sub 2}mal)]{sub n} (2), respectively. It has been shown that compound 2 was an intermediate in the thermal degradation of compound 1. Thorough studies of solid-state thermolysis of 1 and 2 allowed to detect formation of coordination polymer [CuBa({mu}{sub 4}-Me{sub 2}mal)({mu}{sub 5}-Me{sub 2}mal)]{sub n} (3), structure of which was determined by X-ray powder diffraction. It has been found that the channels in polymer 3 were accessible for guest molecules (MeOH). Theoretical estimation of methanol diffusion barrier was carried out. Complete solid-phase thermolysis of 1 and 2 leads to a mixture of BaCuO{sub 2}, BaCO{sub 3}, and CuO. Special conditions for obtaining of a crystalline phase of pure cubic BaCuO{sub 2} were determined. - Graphical abstract: Step-by-step transformation of new coordination polymer [(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}CuBa(Me{sub 2}mal){sub 2}]{sub n} to [(H{sub 2}O)CuBa(Me{sub 2}mal){sub 2}]{sub n} and [CuBa(Me{sub 2}mal){sub 2}]{sub n} were performed. Dehydration of initial compound leads to structural changes of 12-membered ring fragment. All compounds have porous structure. The final product of thermal decomposition is crystalline phase of individual cubic BaCuO{sub 2}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New 3D-polymers [(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}CuBa(Me{sub 2}mal){sub 2}]{sub n} and [(H{sub 2}O)CuBa(Me{sub 2}mal){sub 2}]{sub n} were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis showed step-by-step transformations of [(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}CuBa(Me{sub 2}mal){sub 2}]{sub n}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystalline phase of pure cubic BaCuO{sub 2} is the product solid-phase thermolysis.

  17. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-01-01

    Dust around Type Ia supernovae Lifan Wang 1,2 LawrenceIa. Subject headings: Supernovae: General, Dust, Extinctionline) bands for Type Ia supernovae. (a), upper panel, shows

  18. Effect of Cu substitution on the magnetic and dielectric properties of La{sub 2}NiMnO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswal, A. K.; Ray, J.; Vishwakarma, P. N. E-mail: pnviisc@gmail.com; Babu, P. D.; Siruguri, V.

    2015-05-07

    In the continuation of our previous work [Biswal et al., J. Appl. Phys. 115, 194106 (2014)] of biphasic La{sub 2}NiMnO{sub 6} (LNM) prepared via sol-gel technique, here we are reporting the effect of Cu substitution at Ni site of LNM. The powder x-ray diffraction results of La{sub 2}Ni{sub 1?x}Cu{sub x}MnO{sub 6} (x?=?0, 0.05, 0.1) confirm the biphasic nature (Pbnm + R-3c) for all samples along with increasing R-3c phase with Cu content in the sample. The temperature variation of magnetization (M) plot shows sharp ferromagnetic transitions of R-3c phase at 285?K, 278?K, and 270?K (obtained from dM/dT plot) and that of Pbnm phase at 165?K, 145?K, and 145?K for x?=?0, 0.05, and 0.1, respectively. Weak antiferromagnetic type feature at 25?K (x?=?0), is getting pronounced with Cu content in the sample and is now seen at 32?K and 266?K (for x?=?0.05) and 32K and 257?K (for x?=?0.1). Fitting of Curie-Weiss law in the paramagnetic region of ?{sup ?1} vs T plot results slightly lower values of corresponding T{sub c}'s of R-3?c phase (277?K, 270?K, and 260?K), thus manifesting possibility of Griffiths like singularity. The onset temperature of Griffiths singularity occurs at 295?K (x?=?0) and 281?K (x?=?0.05 and 0.1), such that 295–277?K in x?=?0, 281–270?K in x?=?0.05, and 281–260?K in x?=?0.1 sample is in Griffith's phase. Temperature dependent dielectric constant (?{sub r}) shows usual step-like transitions with corresponding relaxation peaks in the dielectric loss (D) part. Cu substitution in LNM makes the entire dielectric plot shifts towards lower temperature such that high temperature plateau of step transition becomes evident. The peaks in dielectric loss for all compositions are found to obey Arrhenius law with activation energies 237?meV, 207?meV, and 180?meV for x?=?0, 0.05, and 0.1, respectively.

  19. NOVEL DATA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE TO EVALUATE FIELD NOx AND CO2 CONTINUOUS EMISSION DATA, BASED ON THE EVALUATION OF: (1) AN OFF-ROAD DIESEL COMPACTOR RUNNING ON THREE FUEL TYPES AND (2) TWO COMPACTORS RUNNING ON DIESEL FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra, Sergio

    2012-12-31

    profiles; (4) evaluate the emission variability between two pieces of equipment of the same model; and (5) develop a standard, systematic analysis for handling large emission data sets. The study is based on the tailpipe emission sampling of a diesel fueled...

  20. Ordered structures in YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-y/, La/sub 2-x/Sr/sub x/CuO/sub 4-par. delta/ and related perovskites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, T.E.; Roy, T.; Fisk, Z.; Smith, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Electron microscopy and electron diffraction studies have been performed on the superconducting oxides YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-y/, GdBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-y/ and La/sub 2-x/Sr/sub x/CuO/sub 4-par. delta/ as well as the related perovskites La/sub 2/CuO/sub 4/, Eu/sub 2/CuO/sub 4/ and Gd/sub 2/CuO/sub 4/. Extra reflections are commonly observed in all the cases. For example, in the 123 compounds, in situ heating leads to transformations from orthorhombic to tetragonal with a loss of twin structure; on cooling the oxygen vacancies re-order in the basal plane to give 1/3(100)* or 1/4(110)* diffraction spots. In tetragonal Eu/sub 2/CuO/sub 4/ and Gd/sub 2/CuO/sub 4/, the (001) diffraction patterns often have extra spots at 1/2(110)* or at 1/4(110)* positions. Extra spots are also observed in La/sub 2/CuO/sub 4/ (orthorhombic) but this is probably due to the space group being primitive rather than centered. These observations are discussed in terms of the ordering of oxygen vacancies in the Cu-O planes of the various perovskite structures. 6 figs.

  1. Comprehensive Study of the CuF2 Conversion Reaction Mechanism in a Lithium Ion Battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Xiao; Robert, Rosa; Du, Lin-Shu; Wiaderek, Kamila M.; Leskes, Michal; Chapman, Karena W.; Chupas, Peter J.; Grey, Clare P.

    2014-06-11

    Conversion materials for lithium ion batteries have recently attracted considerable attention due to their exceptional specific capacities. Some metal fluorides, such as CuF2, are promising candidates for cathode materials owing to their high...

  2. Shape memory and superelasticity in polycrystalline Cu-Al-Ni microwires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ying

    We report a strategy to significantly improve the ductility and achieve large superelastic and shape memory strains in polycrystalline Cu–Al–Ni shape memory alloys that are normally brittle. We use a liquid-phase (Taylor) ...

  3. GaN/Cu[subscript 2]O Heterojunctions for Photovoltaic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hering, K.P.

    Several growth methods were employed to investigate the photovoltaic behavior of GaN/Cu[subscript 2]O heterojunctions by depositing cuprous oxide thin films on top of gallium nitride templates. The templates consist of a ...

  4. Method of synthesizing and growing copper-indium-diselenide (CuInSe/sub 2/) crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1984-11-29

    A process for preparing CuInSe/sub 2/ crystals includes melting a sufficient quantity of B/sub 2/O/sub 2/ along with stochiometric quantities of Cu, In, and Se in a crucible in a high-pressure atmosphere of inert gas to encapsulate the CuInSe/sub 2/ melt and confine the Se to the crucible. Additional Se in the range of 1.8 to 2.2% over the stochiometric quantity is preferred to make up for small amounts of Se lost in the process. The melt can then be cooled slowly to form the crystal as direct solidification, or the crystal can be grown by inserting a seed crystal through the B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ encapsulate into contact with the CuInSe/sub 2/ melt and withdrawing the seed upwardly to grow the crystal thereon from the melt.

  5. Theoretical investigation of the magnetic structure in YBa_2Cu_3O_6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekkehard Krüger

    2006-08-07

    As experimentally well established, YBa_2Cu_3O_6 is an antiferromagnet with the magnetic moments lying on the Cu sites. Starting from this experimental result and the assumption, that nearest-neighbor Cu atoms within a layer have exactly antiparallel magnetic moments, the orientation of the magnetic moments has been determined within a nonadiabatic extension of the Heisenberg model of magnetism, called nonadiabatic Heisenberg model. Within this group-theoretical model there exist four stable magnetic structures in YBa_2Cu_3O_6, two of them are obviously identical with the high- and low-temperature structure established experimentally. However, not all the magnetic moments which appear to be antiparallel in neutron-scattering experiments are exactly antiparallel within this group-theoretical model. Furthermore, within this model the magnetic moments are not exactly perpendicular to the orthorhombic c axis.

  6. Understanding the Deactivation Mechanisms of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To understand the durability of Cu/Zeolite urea-SCR catalysts in diesel applications, the effects of engine and lab aging on catalyst reactivity and material properties were investigated.

  7. Morphological stability of Cu-Nb nanocomposites under high-energy collision cascades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Liang

    We use molecular dynamics and phase field simulations to demonstrate that Cu-Nb multilayered nanocomposites with individual layer thicknesses above 2–4?nm remain morphologically stable when subjected to 100?keV collision ...

  8. Hidden Itinerant-Spin Phase in Heavily Overdoped La2-xSrxCuO4...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Overdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 Superconductors Revealed by Dilute Fe Doping: A Combined Neutron Scattering and Angle-Resolved Photoemission Study Citation Details In-Document Search...

  9. Evaluation of Quasicrystal Al-Cu-Fe Alloys for Tribological Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabelsi, Nezar

    2013-07-22

    This research investigated the tribological performance of a composite material, formed from an ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) matrix and quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders. An evaluation was conducted for the microstructure...

  10. Effects of mechanical properties on the reliability of Cu/low-k metallization systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Frank L. (Frank Lili), 1977-

    2007-01-01

    Cu and low-dielectric-constant (k) metallization schemes are critical for improved performance of integrated circuits. However, low elastic moduli, a characteristic of the low-k materials, lead to significant reliability ...

  11. Supported Au-CuO Catalysts for Low Temperature CO Oxidation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Catalytic properties of Au-CuOx/SiO2 are investigated in removing pollutants from simulated automotive exhaust to meet an increasing demand for high emissions control at low temperatures.

  12. Ab initio Investigation of Effect of Vacancy on Dissociation of Water Molecule on Cu(111) Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaware, Vaibhav

    2015-01-01

    Water dissociation is a rate limiting step in many industrially important chemical reactions. In this investigation, climbing image nudged elastic band (CINEB) method, within the framework of density functional theory, is used to report the activation energies (E a ) of water dissociation on Cu(111) surface with a vacancy. Introduction of vacancy results in a reduced coordination of the dissociated products, which facilitates their availability for reactions that involve water dissociation as an intermediate step. Activation energy for dissociation of water reduces by nearly 0.2 eV on Cu(111) surface with vacancy, in comparison with that of pristine Cu(111) surface. We also find that surface modification of the Cu upper surface is one of the possible pathways to dissociate water when the vacancy is introduced. Activation energy, and the minimum energy path (MEP) leading to the transition state remain same for various product configurations. CINEB corresponding to hydrogen gas evolution is also performed which...

  13. Non-Equilibrium Superconductivity and Quasiparticle Dynamics in YBaCuO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siders, J.L.W.; Jacobs, R.N.; Siders, C.W.; Trugman, S.A.; Taylor, A.J.

    1999-05-21

    The authors use optical pump, coherent terahertz probe spectroscopy to transiently excite nonequilibrium populations of quasiparticles in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7.{delta}} and monitor, with picosecond resolution, the superfluid and quasiparticle dynamics.

  14. Nanocrystal Photovoltaics: The Case of Cu2S-CdS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivest, Jessica Louis Baker

    2011-01-01

    of Cu 2 S-CdS Thin- Film Solar Cells Thin Solid Films 2003,of CZTS- based thin film solar cells. Thin Solid Films 2009,comprised the original thin film solar cell in 1954. 33,44

  15. Sources and distribution of CuO-derived benzene carboxylic acids in soils and sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    Sources and distribution of CuO-derived benzene carboxylic acids in soils and sediments Angela F vas- cular plant-derived OC, through the environment. The method produces a suite of benzene

  16. Bond polarons and high-Tc superconductivity in single layer La_(2-x)Sr_xCuO_4: normal state currents and pairing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladen Georgiev

    2011-03-16

    We use the term "bond polaron" for a phonon coupled entity which makes the link between neighboring conductive CuO_2 layers in high-Tc superconductive materials. The link is essential for the superconductivity which requires a long range phase coherence in addition to pairing of carriers. The linkage features studied point to a process which is less dependent on the doped hole density implanted as x in the solid solution. The analysis applies to single layered materials mostly but may help understand multilayer ones as well.

  17. High Schottky barrier at grain boundaries observed in Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somphan, Weeraya; Thongbai, Prasit; Yamwong, Teerapon; Maensiri, Santi

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • NSCTO exhibits a high ?? of 7.0–8.4 × 10{sup 3} and low tan ? of 0.030–0.041. • NSCTO exhibits a high E{sub b} of ?2208 V cm{sup ?1} and large ? of 15.6. • Giant ?? response is attributed to the electrically heterogeneous microstructure. • High ?{sub b} values at grain boundaries are found to be 0.925–0.964 eV. • Formation of a potential barrier at grain boundaries is caused by Schottky effect. - Abstract: The dielectric properties and nonlinear current–voltage characteristics of Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics prepared by a conventional solid state reaction method were investigated. Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics exhibited a high dielectric permittivity of 7.0–8.4 × 10{sup 3} and low loss tangent (tan ??0.030–0.041). Non-Ohmic properties with a high breakdown voltage of ?2208 V cm{sup ?1} and large nonlinear coefficient of 15.6 were observed in Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics. Using complex impedance analysis, Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics were shown to be electrically heterogeneous consisting of semiconducting grains and insulating grain boundaries. Giant dielectric properties were described based on the electrically heterogeneous microstructure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis suggested that the semiconductive nature of grains may be related to the presence of Cu{sup +} and Ti{sup 3+}. The formation of an electrostatic potential barrier at the grain boundaries of Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics was suggested to be caused by the Schottky effect. Interestingly, high electrostatic potential barriers at grain boundaries in Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics were calculated and found to be 0.925–0.964 eV.

  18. Growth of large-domain YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} with new seeding crystals of CaNdAlO{sub 4} and SrLaGaO{sub 4}.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, D.; Hull, J. R.; LeBlanc, D.; LeBlanc, M. A. R.; Dabkowski, A.; Chang, Y.; Jiang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Fan, H.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Cincinnati; Univ. of Ottawa; McMaster Univ.; Chinese Academy of Sciences

    1995-05-10

    Single crystals of CaNdAlO{sub 4} and SrLaGaO{sub 4} were used as seeds to grow large domains of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} for levitation applications. These crystals have high melting temperatures (> 1500 C) and similar lattice structures to that of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}. In a seeded melt-texturing method developed previously, the single crystals of CaNdAlO{sub 4}, SrLaGaO{sub 4}, and NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} were used as seeds for comparison. After melt processing, scanning electron microscopy analysis did not reveal any major differences in all these seeded melt-textured samples. However, the levitation forces in the samples seeded with single crystals of CaNdAlO{sub 4} and SrLaGaO{sub 4} increased considerably compared to that of the sample seeded with NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}. A model is proposed to describe the domain growth mechanism during seeded melt processing.

  19. Nuclear Modification Factors of phi Mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au Collisions at s_NN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Awes, Terry C [ORNL; Cianciolo, Vince [ORNL; Efremenko, Yuri [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Enokizono, Akitomo [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Read Jr, Kenneth F [ORNL; Silvermyr, David O [ORNL; Sorensen, Soren P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Stankus, Paul W [ORNL; PHENIX, Collaboration [The

    2011-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed systematic measurements of {phi} meson production in the K{sup +}K{sup -} decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Results are presented on the {phi} invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and R{sub dA} for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1 < p{sub T} < 7 GeV/c) and centrality. In central and midcentral Au+Au collisions, the R{sub AA} of {phi} exhibits a suppression relative to expectations from binary scaled p+p results. The amount of suppression is smaller than that of the {pi}{sup 0} and the {eta} in the intermediate p{sub T} range (2-5 GeV/c), whereas, at higher p{sub T}, the {phi}, {pi}{sup 0}, and {eta} show similar suppression. The baryon (proton and antiproton) excess observed in central Au+Au collisions at intermediate p{sub T} is not observed for the {phi} meson despite the similar masses of the proton and the {phi}. This suggests that the excess is linked to the number of valence quarks in the hadron rather than its mass. The difference gradually disappears with decreasing centrality, and, for peripheral collisions, the R{sub AA} values for both particle species are consistent with binary scaling. Cu+Cu collisions show the same yield and suppression as Au+Au collisions for the same number of N{sub part}. The R{sub dA} of {phi} shows no evidence for cold nuclear effects within uncertainties.

  20. Understanding NOx SCR Mechanism and Activity on Cu/Chabazite Structures throughout the Catalyst Life Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro, Fabio; Delgass, Nick; Gounder, Rajmani; Schneider, William F.; Miller, Jeff; Yezerets, Aleksey; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken

    2014-12-09

    Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) compounds contribute to acid rain and photochemical smog and have been linked to respiratory ailments. NOx emissions regulations continue to tighten, driving the need for high performance, robust control strategies. The goal of this project is to develop a deep, molecular level understanding of the function of Cu-SSZ-13 and Cu-SAPO-34 materials that catalyze the SCR of NOx with NH3.

  1. J/psi production at high transverse momenta in p plus p and Cu plus Cu collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; Van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW C 80, 041902(R) (2009) J/? production at high transverse momenta in p + p and Cu + Cu collisions at ?sN N = 200 GeV B. I. Abelev,8 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,47 B. D. Anderson,18 D. Arkhipkin,12 G. S. Averichev,11 J. Balewski...,22 O. Barannikova,8 L. S. Barnby,2 J. Baudot,16 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,27 M. J. Betancourt,22 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,17 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,10 B. Biritz,6 L. C. Bland,3 M...

  2. Type B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    event and causal factor analysis. Type B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven National Laboratory, April 14, 2006 More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1092-1998...

  3. Hydrodechlorination of 1,2-Dichloroethane Catalyzedby Dendrimer-Derived Pt-Cu/SiO2 Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Hong; Howe, Jane Y; Schwartz, Viviane; Monnier, J. R.; Williams, Christopher T.; Ploehn, Harry J.

    2008-01-01

    Dendrimer-metal-nanocomposites (DMNs) were used as precursors to prepare SiO2 supported monometallic Pt, Cu and bimetallic Pt-Cu catalysts with Pt/Cu atomic ratios of 1:1 (Pt50Cu50) and 1:3 (Pt25Cu75). After impregnation of these DMNs onto the support, the catalysts were thermally treated and activated following an optimized protocol. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) shows that the metal nanoparticles in dendrimer-derived SiO2-supported catalysts are smaller and have a more narrow size distribution than those in conventional catalysts prepared using corresponding metal salts via the wet impregnation method. Slow deactivation was observed for hydrodechlorination of 1,2-dichloroethane over monometallic Cu catalysts, which showed an activity about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the Pt-containing catalysts. Hydrodechlorination of 1,2-dichloroethane over Pt and Pt50Cu50 catalysts mainly produces ethane and the selectivity towards ethane increases with temperature. For Pt25Cu75 catalyst, the selectivity towards ethane decreases in favor of ethylene. The overall activity decreases with increasing Cu loading in the catalysts. Activity based on surface Pt sites suggests the formation of bi-functional surfaces in Pt25Cu75 catalyst favoring C-Cl bond scission on Cu sites and hydrogenation of intermediate .CH2CH2. on Pt sites. Furthermore, kinetic analyses suggest different reaction mechanisms for hydrodechlorination of 1,2-dichloroethane over Pt and Cu-enriched surfaces in the Pt-Cu bimetallic catalysts.

  4. Cyclotron production of {sup 61}Cu using natural Zn and enriched {sup 64}Zn targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asad, A. H.; Smith, S. V.; Chan, S.; Jeffery, C. M.; Morandeau, L.; Price, R. I. [RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia, Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, Australia, and Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Australian National University, Can (Australia); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States) and Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, and Chemistry, University of Western Australia, Pe (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia and Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)

    2012-12-19

    Copper-61 ({sup 61}Cu) shares with {sup 64}Cu certain advantages for PET diagnostic imaging, but has a shorter half-life (3.4hr vs. 12.7hr) and a greater probability of positron production per disintegration (61% vs. 17.9%). One important application is for in vivo imaging of hypoxic tissue. In this study {sup 61}Cu was produced using the {sup 64}Zn(p,{alpha}){sup 61}Cu reaction on natural Zn or enriched {sup 64}Zn targets. The enriched {sup 64}Zn (99.82%) was electroplated onto high purity gold or silver foils or onto thin Al discs. A typical target bombardment used 30{mu}A; at 11.7, 14.5 or 17.6MeV over 30-60min. The {sup 61}Cu (radiochemical purity of >95%) was separated using a combination of cation and anion exchange columns. The {sup 64}Zn target material was recovered after each run, for re-use. In a direct comparison with enriched {sup 64}Zn-target results, {sup 61}Cu production using the cheaper {sup nat}Zn target proved to be an effective alternative.

  5. Magnetic order tuned by Cu substitution in Fe1.1–zCuzTe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wen, Jinsheng; Xu, Zhijun; Xu, Guangyong; Lumsden, M. D.; Valdivia, P. N.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.; Gu, Genda; Lee, Dung-Hai; Tranquada, J. M.; Birgeneau, R. J.

    2012-07-02

    We study the effects of Cu substitution in Fe?.?Te, the nonsuperconducting parent compound of the iron-based superconductor, Fe??yTe??xSex, utilizing neutron scattering techniques. It is found that the structural and magnetic transitions, which occur at ~60 K without Cu, are monotonically depressed with increasing Cu content. By 10% Cu for Fe, the structural transition is hardly detectable, and the system becomes a spin glass below 22 K, with a slightly incommensurate ordering wave vector of (0.5–?, 0, 0.5) with ? being the incommensurability of 0.02, and correlation length of 12 Å along the a axis and 9 Å along the cmore »axis. With 4% Cu, both transition temperatures are at 41 K, though short-range incommensurate order at (0.42, 0, 0.5) is present at 60 K. With further cooling, the incommensurability decreases linearly with temperature down to 37 K, below which there is a first-order transition to a long-range almost-commensurate antiferromagnetic structure. A spin anisotropy gap of 4.5 meV is also observed in this compound. Our results show that the weakly magnetic Cu has a large effect on the magnetic correlations; it is suggested that this is caused by the frustration of the exchange interactions between the coupled Fe spins.« less

  6. Enhanced thermoelectric performance in Cd doped CuInTe{sub 2} compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, N.; Liu, R.; Bai, S.; Shi, X. Chen, L.

    2014-04-28

    CuIn{sub 1?x}Cd{sub x}Te{sub 2} materials (x?=?0, 0.02, 0.05, and 0.1) are prepared using melting-annealing method and the highly densified bulk samples are obtained through Spark Plasma Sintering. The X-ray diffraction data confirm that nearly pure chalcopyrite structures are obtained in all the samples. Due to the substitution of Cd at In sites, the carrier concentration is greatly increased, leading to much enhanced electrical conductivity and power factor. The single parabolic band model is used to describe the electrical transport properties of CuInTe{sub 2} and the low temperature Hall mobility is also modeled. By combing theoretical model and experiment data, the optimum carrier concentration in CuInTe{sub 2} is proposed to explain the greatly enhanced power factors in the Cd doped CuInTe{sub 2}. In addition, the thermal conductivity is reduced by extra phonon scattering due to the atomic mass and radius fluctuations between Cd and In atoms. The maximum zTs are observed in CuIn{sub 0.98}Cd{sub 0.02}Te{sub 2} and CuIn{sub 0.9}Cd{sub 0.1}Te{sub 2} samples, which are improved by over 100% at room temperature and around 20% at 600?K.

  7. The Different Impacts of SO2 and SO3 on Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yisun; Lambert, Christine; Kim, Do Heui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Cho, Sung June; Peden, Charles HF

    2010-06-19

    The different impacts of SO2 and SO3 on Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts were investigated by SCR performance tests and multiple characterization techniques including temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results indicate that a larger amount of highly dispersed CuSO4 formed in the zeolite catalysts (Z-CuSO4) upon SO3 poisoning, explaining the much more significant deactivation of the Cu/zeolite catalysts that were exposed to SO3 compared to poisoning by SO2. This paper provides the first demonstration that active sites of Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts involved in the storage and removal of sulfur can react with SO2 and SO3 in very different ways. In particular, the significant differences in the extent of sulfur uptake account for the considerably different impacts of SO2 and SO3 poisoning on the performance of Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts.

  8. The Different Impacts of SO2 and SO3 on Cu/zeolite SCR Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Y.; Lambert, C; Kim, D; Kwak, J; Cho, S; Peden, C

    2010-01-01

    The different impacts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} on Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts were investigated by SCR performance tests and multiple characterization techniques including temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results indicate that a larger amount of highly dispersed CuSO{sub 4} formed in the zeolite catalysts (Z-CuSO{sub 4}) upon SO{sub 3} poisoning, explaining the much more significant deactivation of the Cu/zeolite catalysts that were exposed to SO{sub 3} compared to poisoning by SO{sub 2}. This paper provides the first demonstration that active sites of Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts involved in the storage and removal of sulfur can react with SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} in very different ways. In particular, the significant differences in the extent of sulfur uptake account for the considerably different impacts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} poisoning on the performance of Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts.

  9. Novel Approaches to Wide Bandgap CuInSe2 Based Absorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William N. Shafarman

    2011-04-28

    This project targeted the development of high performance wide bandgap solar cells based on thin film alloys of CuInSe2 to relax constraints on module design and enable tandem solar cell structures. This addressed goals of the Solar Energy Technologies Program for Next Generation PV to develop technology needed for higher thin film module efficiency as a means to reduce costs. Specific objectives of the research project were: 1) to develop the processes and materials required to improve the performance of wide bandgap thin film solar cells based on alloys of CuInSe2, and 2) to provide the fundamental science and engineering basis for the material, electronic, and device properties required to effectively apply these processes and materials to commercial manufacture. CuInSe2-based photovoltaics have established the highest efficiencies of the thin film materials at both the cell and module scales and are actively being scaled up to commercialization. In the highest efficiency cells and modules, the optical bandgap, a function of the CuInSe2-based alloy composition, is relatively low compared to the optimum match to the solar spectrum. Wider bandgap alloys of CuInSe2 produce higher cell voltages which can improve module performance and enable the development of tandem solar cells to boost the overall efficiency. A focus for the project was alloying with silver to form (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 pentenary thin films deposited by elemental co-evaporation which gives the broadest range of control of composition and material properties. This alloy has a lower melting temperature than Ag-free, Cu-based chalcopyrite compounds, which may enable films to be formed with lower defect densities and the (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 films give improved material properties and better device performance with increasing bandgap. A comprehensive characterization of optical, structural, and electronic properties of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 was completed over the complete compositional range 0 ? Ga/(In+Ga) ? 1 and 0 ? Ag/(Ag+Cu) ? 1. Evidence of improved material quality includes reduced sub-bandgap optical absorption, sharper bandtails, and increased grain size with Ag addition. The Ag alloying was shown to increase the range of bandgaps over which solar cells can be fabricated without any drop-off in performance. With bandgap greater than 1.6 eV, in the range needed for tandem solar cells, (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 gave higher efficiency than other CuInSe2-based alloys. Using a simple single-stage co-evaporation process, a solar cell with 17.6% efficiency using a film with bandgap = 1.3 eV was achieved, demonstrating the viability of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 for high efficiency devices. With a three-stage co-evaporation process for (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 deposition a device with efficiency = 13.0 % and VOC = 890 mV with JSC = 20.5 mA/cm2, FF = 71.3% was achieved. This surpasses the performance of other wide bandgap CuInSe2-based solar cells. Detailed characterization of the electronic properties of the materials and devices including the application of advanced admittance-based easements was completed.

  10. Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Peker, Atakan (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

    1997-01-01

    At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.a Cu.sub.b (Ni.sub.1-y Co.sub.y).sub.c wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y.cndot.c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b.

  11. Lessons learned during Type A Packaging testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Brien, J.H.; Kelly, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    For the past 6 years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Facility Safety Analysis (EH-32) has contracted Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct compliance testing on DOE Type A packagings. The packagings are tested for compliance with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A, general packaging, Type A requirements. The DOE has shared the Type A packaging information throughout the nuclear materials transportation community. During testing, there have been recurring areas of packaging design that resulted in testing delays and/or initial failure. The lessons learned during the testing are considered a valuable resource. DOE requested that WHC share this resource. By sharing what is and can be encountered during packaging testing, individuals will hopefully avoid past mistakes.

  12. Characterization of Cu-SSZ-13 NH3 SCR Catalysts: an in situ FTIR Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szanyi, Janos; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhu, Haiyang; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-01-23

    The adsorption of CO and NO over Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite catalysts, highly active in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3, was investigated by FTIR spectroscopy, and the results obtained were compared to those collected from other Cu-ion exchanged zeolites (Y,FAU and ZSM-5). At low CO pressures at room temperature (295 K) CO form monocarbonyls exclusively on the Cu+ ions, while in the presence of gas phase CO dicarbonyls on Cu+ and adsorbed CO on Cu2+ centers form, as well. At low (cryogenic) sample temperatures tricarbonyl formation on Cu+ sites was also observed. The adsorption of NO produces IR bands that can be assigned to nitrosyls bound to both Cu+ and Cu2+ centers, and NO+ species located in charge compensating cationic positions of the chabasite framework. On the reduced Cu-SSZ-13 samples the formation of N2O was also detected. The assignment of the adsorbed NOx species was aided by adsorption experiments with isotopically labeled 15NO. The movement of Cu ions from the sterically hindered six member ring position to the more accessible cavity positions as a result of their interaction with adsorbates (NO and H2O) was clearly evidenced. Comparisons of the spectroscopy data obtained in the static transmission IR system to those collected in the flow-through diffuse reflectance cell points out that care must be taken when conclusions are drawn about the adsorptive and reactive properties of metal cation centers based on a set of data collected under well defined, specific experimental conditions. Financial support was provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. This work was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The EMSL is a national scientific user facility supported by the US DOE, Office of Biological and Environmental Research. PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  13. Modeling Cu Migration in CdTe Solar Cells Under Device-Processing and Long-Term Stability Conditions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teeter, G.; Asher, S.

    2008-05-01

    An impurity migration model for systems with material interfaces is applied to Cu migration in CdTe solar cells. In the model, diffusion fluxes are calculated from the Cu chemical potential gradient. Inputs to the model include Cu diffusivities, solubilities, and segregation enthalpies in CdTe, CdS and contact materials. The model yields transient and equilibrium Cu distributions in CdTe devices during device processing and under field-deployed conditions. Preliminary results for Cu migration in CdTe photovoltaic devices using available diffusivity and solubility data from the literature show that Cu segregates in the CdS, a phenomenon that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing and/or stress conditions.

  14. Excellent activity and selectivity of Cu-SSZ-13 in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2010-10-21

    Superior activity and selectivity of a Cu ion-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolite in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 were observed, in comparison to Cu-beta and Cu-ZSM-5 zeolites. Cu-SSZ-13 was not only more active in the NOx SCR reaction over the entire temperature range studied (up to 550 °C), but also more selective toward nitrogen formation, resulting in significantly lower amounts of NOx by-products (i.e., NO2 and N2O) than the other two zeolites. In addition, Cu-SSZ-13 demonstrated the highest activity and N2 formation selectivity in the oxidation of NH3. The results of this study strongly suggest that Cu-SSZ-13 is a promising candidate as a catalyst for NOx SCR with great potential in after-treatment systems for either mobile or stationary sources.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of (H{sub 2}dab){sub 2}Cu{sub 8}Ge{sub 4}S{sub 14}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O: An expanded framework based on icosahedral Cu{sub 8}S{sub 12} cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Renchun; Zhang Chi [Department of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Ji Shouhua [Department of Materials, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Ji Min [Department of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); An Yonglin, E-mail: ylan@dlut.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-02-15

    A new three-dimensional framework copper-thiogermanate, (H{sub 2}dab){sub 2}Cu{sub 8}Ge{sub 4}S{sub 14}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (1), was prepared under solvothermal condition and characterized by elemental analysis, single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Compound 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c, a=11.444(4) A, b=12.984(4) A, c=12.455(6) A, {beta}=91.527(1) Degree-Sign , V=1850.2(3) A{sup 3}, Z=2. It contains a new three-dimensional Cu-Ge-S framework constructed from icosahedral [Cu{sub 8}S{sub 12}]{sup 16-} clusters linked by [GeS{sub 4}]{sup 4-} and dimeric [Ge{sub 2}S{sub 6}]{sup 4-} units, with diprotonated 1,4-dab (1,4-diaminobutane) and H{sub 2}O molecules located in the intersecting channels. UV-vis reflectance spectroscopy reveals the band gap of compound 1 is 2.5 eV. - Graphical abstract: Compound 1 contains a 3D expanded framework constructed from icosahedral Cu{sub 8}S{sub 12} clusters linked by GeS{sub 4} and dimeric Ge{sub 2}S{sub 6} units, with diprotonated 1,4-dab and H{sub 2}O molecules located in the channels. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new 3-D framework copper-thiogermanate was prepared under solvothermal condition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The framework is built up from icosahedral Cu{sub 8}S{sub 12} clusters linked by GeS{sub 4} and dimeric Ge{sub 2}S{sub 6} units. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result provides a new strategy to expand octahedral SBUs-based framework. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound 1 is a semiconductor with the band gap of 2.5 eV.

  16. Measurement of electrons from heavy-flavor decays from $p$+$p$, $d$+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions in the PHENIX experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanghoon Lim

    2014-08-18

    Charm and bottom quarks are formed predominantly by gluon fusion in the initial hard scatterings at RHIC, making them good probes of the full medium evolution. Previous measurements at RHIC have shown large suppression and azimuthal anisotropy of open heavy-flavor hadrons in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200~{\\rm GeV}$. Explaining the simultaneously large suppression and flow of heavy quarks has been challenging. To further understand the heavy-flavor transport in the hot and dense medium, it is imperative to also measure cold nuclear matter effects which affect the initial distribution of heavy quarks as well as the system size dependence of the final state suppression. In this talk, new measurements by the PHENIX collaboration of electrons from heavy-flavor decays in $p$+$p$, $d$+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200~{\\rm GeV}$ are presented. In particular, a surprising enhancement of intermediate transverse momentum heavy-flavor decay leptons in $d$+Au at mid and backward rapidity are also seen in mid-central Cu+Cu collisions. This enhancement is much larger than the expectation from anti-shadowing of the parton distributions and is theoretically unexplained.

  17. Pluggable type-checking for custom type qualifiers in Java

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papi, Matthew M.

    2007-09-17

    We have created a framework for adding custom type qualifiers to the Javalanguage in a backward-compatible way. The type system designer definesthe qualifiers and creates a compiler plug-in that enforces theirsemantics. ...

  18. DISSERTATION IMPACT OF SECONDARY BARRIERS ON CuIn1-xGaxSe2 SOLAR-CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    , it is important that red-light J-V of CIS solar cells be distortion-free. It was shown that one approach to reduceDISSERTATION IMPACT OF SECONDARY BARRIERS ON CuIn1-xGaxSe2 SOLAR-CELL OPERATION Submitted by Alexei Impact of Secondary Barriers on CuIn1-xGaxSe2 Solar-Cell Operation Thin-film solar cells based on CuInSe2

  19. The Effect of Copper Loading on the Selective Catalytic Reduction of Nitric Oxide by Ammonia Over Cu-SSZ-13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Tran, Diana N.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF; Lee, Jong H.

    2012-03-01

    The effect of Cu loading on the selective catalytic reduction of NOx by NH3 was examined over 20-80% ion-exchanged Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite catalysts. High NO reduction efficiency (80-95%) was obtained over all catalyst samples between 250 and 500°C, and the gas hourly space velocity of 200,000 h-1. Both NO reduction and NH3 oxidation activities under these conditions were found to increase slightly with increasing Cu loading at low temperatures. However, NO reduction activity was suppressed with increasing Cu loadings at high temperatures (>500oC) due to excess NH3 oxidation. The optimum Cu ion exchange level appears to be ~40-60% as higher than 80% NO reduction efficiency was obtained over 50% Cu ion-exchanged SSZ-13 up to 600oC. The NO oxidation activity of Cu-SSZ-13 was found to be low regardless of Cu loading, although it was somewhat improved with increasing Cu ion exchange level at high temperatures. During the “fast” SCR (i.e., NO/NO2 =1), only a slight improvement in NOx reduction activity was obtained for Cu-SSZ-13. Regardless of Cu loading, near 100% selectivity to N2 was observed; only a very small amount of N2O was produced even in the presence of NO2. Based on the Cu loading, the apparent activation energies for NO oxidation and NO SCR were estimated to be ~58 kJ/mol and ~41 kJ/mol, respectively.

  20. Normalisation by Evaluation in the Compilation of Typed Functional Programming Languages 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindley, Sam

    This thesis presents a critical analysis of normalisation by evaluation as a technique for speeding up compilation of typed functional programming languages. Our investigation focuses on the SML.NET compiler and its typed ...

  1. PICTURE GROUPS OF FINITE TYPE AND COHOMOLOGY IN TYPE An

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igusa, Kiyoshi

    PICTURE GROUPS OF FINITE TYPE AND COHOMOLOGY IN TYPE An KIYOSHI IGUSA, KENT ORR, GORDANA TODOROV a picture group. We construct a finite CW complex which is shown in another paper [10] to be a K(, 1) for this picture group. In [5] another independent proof was given for this fact in the special case of type

  2. Abstract Data Types 5 Algebraic Theory of Abstract Data Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Ulrich

    stack top: stack elts The following is an algebra for the signature STACK. Algebra SeqN Carriers N, N43 Part II Abstract Data Types #12;44 5 Algebraic Theory of Abstract Data Types An Abstract Data Type (ADT) is a collection of objects and functions, that is, an algebra, where one ignores how

  3. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 245429 (2012) Ab initio atomistic thermodynamics study of the early stages of Cu(100) oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    2012-01-01

    of Cu(100) oxidation Wissam A. Saidi,1,* Minyoung Lee,2 Liang Li,3 Guangwen Zhou,3 and Alan J. H. Mc

  4. Plastic deformation in Al (Cu) interconnects stressed by electromigration and studied by synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kai; Advanced Light Source; UCLA

    2008-01-01

    Plastic deformation in Al (Cu) interconnects stressed bygrain orientation [7], study plastic deformation [12-15] andThis aspect of EM-induced plastic deformation in grains

  5. Highly-enhanced reflow characteristics of sputter deposited Cu alloy thin films for large scale integrated interconnections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Takashi; Mizuno, Masao; Yoshikawa, Tetsuya; Munemasa, Jun; Mizuno, Masataka; Kihara, Teruo; Araki, Hideki; Shirai, Yasuharu

    2011-08-01

    An attempt to improve the reflow characteristics of sputtered Cu films was made by alloying the Cu with various elements. We selected Y, Sb, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, In, Sn, Mg, and P for the alloys, and ''the elasto-plastic deformation behavior at high temperature'' and ''the filling level of Cu into via holes'' were estimated for Cu films containing each of these elements. From the results, it was found that adding a small amount of Sb or Dy to the sputtered Cu was remarkably effective in improve the reflow characteristics. The microstructure and imperfections in the Cu films before and after high-temperature high-pressure annealing were investigated by secondary ion micrographs and positron annihilation spectroscopy. The results imply that the embedding or deformation mechanism is different for the Cu-Sb alloy films compared to the Cu-Dy alloy films. We consider that the former is embedded by softening or deformation of the Cu matrix, which has a polycrystalline structure, and the latter is embedded by grain boundary sliding.

  6. Effects of competing magnetic interactions on the electronic transport properties of CuCrSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, Girish C.; Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 ; Karppinen, Maarit; Rastogi, Ashok K.

    2013-02-15

    We have synthesized single-phase samples of the CuCrSe{sub 2} phase that exhibits hexagonal-rhombohedral layered crystal structure with space group R3m. Here we present a detailed study of electronic transport and magnetic properties of CuCrSe{sub 2}. We moreover investigate the heat capacity of CuCrSe{sub 2} in comparison to that of CuCrS{sub 2}. The electrical resistivity of CuCrSe{sub 2} shows metallic-like behavior down to 2 K, while the thermoelectric power is large around 100 {mu}V K{sup -1} at 300 K. A weak anomaly in resistivity and a rounded maximum in magnetic susceptibility are observed around 55 K. No sharp transition at 55 K is observed in the heat capacity of CuCrSe{sub 2}, rather a visible maximum is seen. At low temperatures from 2 to 14 K, the magnetic heat capacity follows T{sup 2}-dependence. We tentatively believe this behavior of CuCrSe{sub 2} to be due to competing magnetic interactions between intralayer Cr atoms. The ferromagnetic Cr-Se-Cr indirect exchange among intralayer Cr atoms is enhanced in the selenide compound (that is more metallic than the sulfide compound), and competes with the antiferromagnetic Cr-Cr direct interactions. The interlayer antiferromagnetic exchange through Cu atoms leads to magnetic ordering at low temperature at T{sub N}=55 K. - Graphical abstract: Comparison of magnetic properties of CuCrSe{sub 2} and CuCrS{sub 2} indicates a sharp cusp-like anomaly in magnetic susceptibility at the antiferromagnetic transition of CuCrS{sub 2} while the maximum of CuCrSe{sub 2} is well rounded. Magnetization is reversible after field-cooling (FC) and zero-field-cooling (ZFC) for both compounds. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Layered CuCrSe{sub 2} can be synthesized in both fully and partially cation-ordered forms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Contrary to previously believed insulating nature the cation-ordered phase is metallic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic property of CuCrSe{sub 2} is somewhat different from that of CuCrS{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetization and heat capacity data suggest complex short-range ordering for CuCrSe{sub 2}.

  7. Function Specific Analysis of the Thermal Durability of Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalyst

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  8. CuO nanoparticle filled vinyl-ester resin nanocomposites: Fabrication, characterization and property analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    Angeles, CA 90095, USA Received 28 August 2006; received in revised form 4 November 2006; accepted 30 such as photovoltaic (solar) cells [11,12] and magnetic data storage. The func- tional groups of the polymer are normally steric interaction forces, van der Waals forces, or Lewis acid­base interactions. However, in situ

  9. Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, X.; Peker, A.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-04-08

    At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3} K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM{sub 1{minus}x}Ti{sub x}){sub a} Cu{sub b} (Ni{sub 1{minus}y}Co{sub y}){sub c} wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y{center_dot}c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b. 2 figs.

  10. Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utilization of Geothermal Resources Project Type Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and DevelopmentAnalysis Project Type Topic 2...

  11. A reactive magnetron sputtering route for attaining a controlled core-rim phase partitioning in Cu{sub 2}O/CuO thin films with resistive switching potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogwu, A. A.; Darma, T. H.

    2013-05-14

    The achievement of a reproducible and controlled deposition of partitioned Cu{sub 2}O/CuO thin films by techniques compatible with ULSI processing like reactive magnetron sputtering has been reported as an outstanding challenge in the literature. This phase partitioning underlies their performance as reversible resistive memory switching devices in advanced microelectronic applications of the future. They are currently fabricated by thermal oxidation and chemical methods. We have used a combination of an understanding from plasma chemistry, thermo-kinetics of ions, and rf power variation during deposition to successfully identify a processing window for preparing partitioned Cu{sub 2}O/CuO films. The production of a core rich Cu{sub 2}O and surface rich Cu{sub 2}O/CuO mixture necessary for oxygen migration during resistive switching is confirmed by XRD peaks, Fourier transform infra red Cu (I)-O vibrational modes, XPS Cu 2P{sub 3/2} and O 1S peak fitting, and a comparison of satellite peak ratio's in Cu 2P{sub 3/2} fitted peaks. We are proposing based on the findings reported in this paper that an XPS satellite peak intensity(I{sub s}) to main peak intensity ratio (I{sub m}) {<=} 0.45 as an indicator of a core rich Cu{sub 2}O and surface rich Cu{sub 2}O/CuO formation in our prepared films. CuO is solely responsible for the satellite peaks. This is explained on the basis that plasma dissociation of oxygen will be limited to the predominant formation of Cu{sub 2}O under certain plasma deposition conditions we have identified in this paper, which also results in a core-rim phase partitioning. The deposited films also followed a Volmer-Weber columnar growth mode, which could facilitate oxygen vacancy migration and conductive filaments at the columnar interfaces. This is further confirmed by optical transmittance and band-gap measurements using spectrophotometry. This development is expected to impact on the early adoption of copper oxide based resistive memory electronic switching devices in advanced electronic devices of the future. The relative abundance of copper is another major complementary driver for the interest in copper oxide films.

  12. Tornado type wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Cheng-Ting (Ames, IA)

    1984-01-01

    A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

  13. Structure and Bonding of Tungsten Oxide Clusters on Nanostructured Cu-O Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Margareta; Surnev, Svetlozar; Ramsey, Michael; Barcaro, Giovanni; Sementa, Luca; Negreiros, Fabio R.; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Netzer, Falko P.

    2011-12-01

    (WO3)3 gas-phase clusters generated via vacuum sublimation are deposited under UHV and low temperature (5 K) conditions on a Cu(110) 'stripe' phase consisting of alternating Cu-O (2x1) and clean Cu regions. STM imaging shows that the clusters adsorb as intact units on both substrates, and the suggested adsorption geometries are confirmed by density-functional (DF) simulations. On the clean surface the overall distortion is minor and we are able to image the nodal structure of an individual molecular orbital in the STM at low bias, whereas on the Cu-O surface both the clusters and the substrate are significantly distorted, due to the strong oxygen affinity of W atoms. On both surfaces cluster and Cu electronic states are appreciably mixed, and electron charge is donated by the surface to the cluster. The experimentally STS-determined DOS signature of the adsorption complex consists in two peaks across the Fermi energy and is well reproduced by the DF calculations.

  14. Density functional study of CaN mono and bilayer on Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahedifar, Maedeh; Hashemifar, S. Javad, E-mail: hashemifar@cc.iut.ac.ir; Akbarzadeh, Hadi [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Density functional - pseudopotential calculations are performed to provide first-principles insights into magnetic behaviour of bulk CaN and CaN monolayers on Cu(001) in the rock-salt (RS) and zinc-blende (ZB) structures. Our results indicate that both RS- and ZB-CaN exhibit half-metallic ferromagnetism originated from the incomplete 2p shell of the nitrogen ion. In contrast to the bulk CaN, the CaN monolayers on Cu(001) generally favor ZB structure. We argue that the more stable ZB-CaN thin films on Cu(001) are nonmagnetic, because of strong Cu-N bonding at the interface, while the less stable Ca terminated ZB-CaN thin films exhibit half-metallic ferromagnetism. The transition path between the high energy ferromagnetic and the stable nonmagnetic configurations of the ZB-CaN monolayer on Cu(001) are studied by using the nudged elastic band method. We observe a two stages transition and an activation barrier of about 1.18 eV in the minimum energy path of this transition.

  15. Enhanced irreversibility by crystal defects in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salem-Sugui, S. Jr.; Shi, Donglu; McFarland, S.E.

    1991-04-01

    We measured magnetic irreversibility, H*(T), in liquid-quenched Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O samples with various microstructures at high applied field (up to 7 T). We found that H*(T) is considerably increased in the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Cu{sub 4}O{sub x} (2234) sample with a large amount of crystal defects, including severe lattice distortion and calcium and copper rich precipitates. We argue that the lattice distortion may affect the degree of anisotropy and the Josephson coupling between the Cu-O layers, which in turn enhance the irreversibility in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system. A critical current density, J{sub c}, of 8 {times} 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} at 8 kG and 40 K was obtained in the 2234 sample with many defects, while the J{sub c} dropped significantly at the same temperature and field in the near stoichiometry Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (2223) sample with a uniform microstructure.

  16. Impact of Sulfation and Desulfation on NOx Reduction Using Cu-Chabazite SCR Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brookshear, Daniel W; Nam, Jeong-Gil; Nguyen, Ke; Toops, Todd J; Binder, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This bench reactor study investigates the impact of gaseous sulfur on the NOx reduction activity of Cu-chabazite SCR (Cu-CHA) catalysts at SO2 concentrations representative of marine diesel engine exhaust. After two hours of 500 ppm SO2 exposure at 250 and 400 C in the simulated diesel exhaust gases, the NOx reduction activity of the sulfated Cu-CHA SCR catalysts is severely degraded at evaluation temperatures below 250 C; however, above 250 C the impact of sulfur exposure is minimal. EPMA shows that sulfur is located throughout the washcoat and along the entire length of the sulfated samples. Interestingly, BET measurements reveal that the sulfated samples have a 20% decrease in surface area. Furthermore, the sulfated samples show a decrease in NOx/nitrate absorption during NO exposure in a DRIFTS reactor which suggests that Cu sites in the catalyst are blocked by the presence of sulfur. SO2 exposure also results in an increase in NH3 storage capacity, possibly due to the formation of ammonium sulfate species in the sulfated samples. In all cases, lean thermal treatments as low as 500 C reverse the effects of sulfur exposure and restore the NOx reduction activity of the Cu-CHA catalyst to that of the fresh condition.

  17. Significant enhancement of the strength-to-resistivity ratio by using nanotwins in epitaxial Cu films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Amit; Ronningh, Filip; Anderoglu, Osman; Zhang, X

    2008-01-01

    Epitaxial nanotwinned Cu films, with an average twin spacing ranging from 7 to 16 nm, exhibit a high ratio of strength-to-electrical resisitivity, -400 MPa({mu}{Omega}cm){sup -1}. The hardness of these Cu films approaches 2.8 GPa, and their electrical resistivities are comparable to that of oxygen-free high-conductivity Cu. Compared to high-angle grain boundaries, coherent twin interfaces possess inherently high resistance to the transmission of single dislocations, and yet an order of magnitude lower electron scattering coefficient, determined to be 1.5-5 x 10{sup -7} {mu}{Omega}cm{sup 2} at room temperature. Analytical studies as well as experimental results show that, in polycrystalline Cu, grain refinement leads to a maximum of the strength-to-resistivity ratio, -250 MPa({mu}{Omega}cm){sup -1}, when grain size is comparable to the mean-free path of electrons. However, in twinned Cu, such a ratio increases continuously with decreasing twin spacing down to a few nanometers. Hence nanoscale growth twins are more effective to achieve a higher strength-to-resistivity ratio than high-angle grain boundaries.

  18. Strong H...F hydrogen bonds as synthons in polymeric quantum magnets: structural, magnetic, and theoretical characterization of [Cu(HF)(pyrazine)]SbF, [CuF(HF)(FH)(pyrazine)].(SbF), and [CuAg(HF)(pyrazine)](SbF).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; Funk, K. A.; Southerland, H. I.; Twamley, B.; Lancaster, T.; Blundell, S. J.; Baker, P. J.; Pratt, F. L.; Singleton, J.; McDonald, R. D.; Goddard, P. A.; Sengupta, P.; Batista, C. D.; Ding, L.; Lee, C.; Whangbo, M.-H.; Franke, I.; Cox, S.; Baines, C.; Trail, D.; Eastern Washington Univ.; Univ. of Idaho; Oxford Univ.; Rutherford Appleton Lab.; LANL; Univ. of Southern California; North Carolina State Univ.; Paul Scherrer Inst.

    2009-01-01

    Three Cu{sup 2+}-containing coordination polymers were synthesized and characterized by experimental (X-ray diffraction, magnetic susceptibility, pulsed-field magnetization, heat capacity, and muon-spin relaxation) and electronic structure studies (quantum Monte Carlo simulations and density functional theory calculations). [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]SbF{sub 6} (pyz = pyrazine) (1a), [Cu{sub 2}F(HF)(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 4}](SbF{sub 6}){sub 2} (1b), and [CuAg(H{sub 3}F{sub 4})(pyz){sub 5}](SbF{sub 6}){sub 2} (2) crystallize in either tetragonal or orthorhombic space groups; their structures consist of 2D square layers of [M(pyz){sub 2}]{sup n+} that are linked in the third dimension by either HF{sub 2}{sup -} (1a and 1b) or H{sub 3}F{sub 4}{sup -} (2). The resulting 3D frameworks contain charge-balancing SbF{sub 6}{sup -} anions in every void. Compound 1b is a defective polymorph of 1a, with the difference being that 50% of the HF{sub 2}{sup -} links are broken in the former, which leads to a cooperative Jahn-Teller distortion and d{sub x{sup 2}-y{sup 2}} orbital ordering. Magnetic data for 1a and 1b reveal broad maxima in x at 12.5 and 2.6 K and long-range magnetic order below 4.3 and 1.7 K, respectively, while 2 displays negligible spin interactions owing to long and disrupted superexchange pathways. The isothermal magnetization, M(B), for 1a and 1b measured at 0.5 K reveals contrasting behaviors: 1a exhibits a concave shape as B increases to a saturation field, B{sub c}, of 37.6 T, whereas 1b presents an unusual two-step saturation in which M(B) is convex until it reaches a step near 10.8 T and then becomes concave until saturation is reached at 15.8 T. The step occurs at two-thirds of M{sub sat}, suggesting the presence of a ferrimagnetic structure. Compound 2 shows unusual hysteresis in M(B) at low temperature, although x vs T does not reveal the presence of a magnetic phase transition. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations based on an anisotropic cubic lattice were applied to the magnetic data of 1a to afford g = 2.14, J = ?13.4 K (Cu-pyz-Cu), and J = ?0.20 K (Cu?F {hor_ellipsis} H {hor_ellipsis} F?Cu), while x vs T for 1b could be well reproduced by a spin-1/2 Heisenberg uniform chain model for g = 2.127(1), J{sub 1} = ?3.81(1), and zJ{sub 2} = ?0.48(1) K, where J{sub 1} and J{sub 2} are the intra- and interchain exchange couplings, respectively, which considers the number of magnetic nearest-neighbors (z). The M(B) data for 1b could not be satisfactorily explained by the chain model, suggesting a more complex magnetic structure in the ordered state and the need for additional terms in the spin Hamiltonian. The observed variation in magnetic behaviors is driven by differences in the H {hor_ellipsis} F hydrogen-bonding motifs.

  19. Microstructural evolutions in converting epitaxial Tl2Ba2CaCu2Ox thin films to epitaxial HgBa2CaCu2O6+delta thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Judy; Siegal, M. P.; Xie, Y. Y.; Aytug, T.; Fang, L.

    2003-02-01

    Superconducting HgBa2CaCu2O6+delta (Hg-1212) thin films were obtained from Tl2Ba2CaCu2Ox (Tl-2212) precursor films using a cation-exchange process. In this process, Tl cations on the precursor lattice were thermally excited and then replaced with Hg...

  20. Quantitative analysis of tin alloy combined with artificial neural network prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oh, Seong Y.; Yueh, Fang-Yu; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was applied to quantitative analysis of three impurities in Sn alloy. The impurities analysis was based on the internal standard method using the Sn I 333.062-nm line as the reference line to achieve the best reproducible results. Minor-element concentrations (Ag, Cu, Pb) in the alloy were comparatively evaluated by artificial neural networks (ANNs) and calibration curves. ANN was found to effectively predict elemental concentrations with a trend of nonlinear growth due to self-absorption. The limits of detection for Ag, Cu, and Pb in Sn alloy were determined to be 29, 197, and 213 ppm, respectively.

  1. Stable N-CuInSe.sub.2 /iodide-iodine photoelectrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cahen, David (Rehovot, IL); Chen, Yih W. (Lakewood, CO)

    1985-01-01

    In a photoelectrochemical solar cell, stable output and solar efficiency in excess of 10% are achieved with a photoanode of n-CuInSe.sub.2 electrode material and an iodine/iodide redox couple used in a liquid electrolyte. The photoanode is prepared by treating the electrode material by chemical etching, for example in Br.sub.2 /MeOH; heating the etched electrode material in air or oxygen; depositing a surface film coating of indium on the electrode material after the initial heating; and thereafter again heating the electrode material in air or oxygen to oxidize the indium. The electrolyte is treated by the addition of Cu.sup.+ or Cu.sup.2+ salts and In.sup.3+ salts.

  2. Stable n-CuInSe/sub 2/iodide-iodine photoelectrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cahen, D.; Chen, Y.W.

    1984-09-20

    In a photoelectrochemical solar cell, stable output and solar efficiency in excess of 10% are achieved with a photoanode of n-CuInSe/sub 2/ electrode material and an iodine/iodide redox couple used in a liquid electrolyte. The photoanode is prepared by treating the electrode material by chemical etching, for example in Br/sub 2//MeOH; heating the etched electrode material in air or oxygen; depositing a surface film coating of indium on the electrode material after the initial heating; and thereafter again heating the electrode material in air or oxygen to oxidize the indium. The electrolyte is treated by the addition of Cu/sup +/ or Cu/sup 2 +/ salts and in In/sup 3 +/ salts.

  3. Oxidation induced amorphous stabilization of the subsurface region in Zr-Cu metallic glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, K. R. [Light Metal Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J. M. [Materials Research Center, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT) San 14-1, Nongseo-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Park, S. H.; Na, M. Y.; Kim, K. C.; Kim, D. H., E-mail: dohkim@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center for Non-crystalline Materials, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, W. T. [Department of Optical Engineering, Cheongju University, 36 Naedock-dong, Cheongju 360-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-20

    In the present study, we demonstrate that selective surface oxidation of Zr{sub 70}Cu{sub 30} metallic glass can stabilize the amorphous structure in the subsurface region of the matrix. The oxidation proceeds by selective oxidation of Zr, forming monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} layer on the surface, and the subsurface layer becomes Cu-enriched due to back diffusion of Cu atoms from the oxide layer. Interestingly, in this system, the composition change in the subsurface region leads to enhancement of glass stability, forming of a double layered surface structure consisted of inner amorphous layer and outer monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} layer even when the remaining matrix is completely crystallized.

  4. Effect of varying material anisotropy on critical current anistropy in vicinal YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durrell, John H; Roessler, Roman; Delmare, Marie-Pierre; Pedarnig, Johannes; Baeuerle, Dieter; Evetts, Jan E

    2003-01-01

    on fully oxygenated and de-oxygenated YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{7-\\delta}$ thin films and optimally oxygenated Y$_{0.75}$Ca$_{0.2}$Ba$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{7-\\delta}$ thin films. The films were grown on 10$^{\\circ}$ mis-cut SrTiO$_3$ substrates to enable the intrinsic vortex...

  5. Mass Transport Investigated with the Electrochemical and Electrogravimetric Impedance Techniques. 1. Water Transport in PPy/CuPTS Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwak, Juhyoun

    Mass Transport Investigated with the Electrochemical and Electrogravimetric Impedance Techniques. 1. Water Transport in PPy/CuPTS Films Haesik Yang and Juhyoun Kwak* Department of Chemistry, Korea AdVember 18, 1996X Water transport in poly(pyrrole/copper phthalocyaninetetrasulfonate) (PPy/CuPTS) films

  6. Growth, crystalline structure and magnetic properties of ultrathin alloy lms CoxNi1x/Cu(1 0 0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Minn-Tsong

    Growth, crystalline structure and magnetic properties of ultrathin alloy ®lms CoxNi1Àx/Cu(1 0 0) W 2001 Abstract Magnetic ultrathin alloy ®lms CoxNi1Àx/Cu(1 0 0) were prepared to characterize diraction oscillation and Auger electron spectroscopy, the composition of the alloy ®lms was controlled

  7. The Roles of Cu Impurity States in CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells Ken K. Chin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as commercially successful, second generation thin film photovoltaic (PV) products, at a production cost of $0 PV technologies, such as Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), which has a lower theoretical limit ~26% but a higher involves Cu impurities. The CdTe thin film uses low cost 5N tellurium, which, either as a byproduct

  8. Hole transport and doping states in epitaxial CuIn1 xGaxSe2 David J. Schroeder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockett, Angus

    . They have been shown to yield solar cells with efficiencies greater than 17%, and over time films of group III-rich CuIn1 xGaxSe2 CIGS . The films were produced using a hybrid sputtering interest in renewable energy sources such as photovoltaic devices. CuIn1 xGaxSe2 CIGS /CdS hetero- junction

  9. Journal of Crystal Growth 294 (2006) 231235 In situ investigation on selenization kinetics of CuIn precursor using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords: A1. X-ray diffraction; B1. Copper indium diselenide; B3. Solar cells 1. Introduction Chalcopyrite film solar cells. The commonly used techniques for CuInSe2 layer formation are co, reaction mechanisms, and kinetics for the formation of Cu(InxGa1Àx)Se2 (CIGS) and its sub- ternaries (i

  10. Fabrication of ZnO/Cu2O heterojunctions in atmospheric conditions: improved interface quality and solar cell performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ievskaya, Y.; Hoye, R. L. Z.; Sadhanala, A.; Musselman, K.; MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    ZnO/Cu2O 1.46 0.49 AALD ITO/Zn0.79Mg0.21O/Cu2O 2.2 0.65 AALD PLD – pulsed laser deposition, ALD – atomic layer deposition, ECD – electrochemi- cal deposition, IBS – ion beam sputtering, VAPE – vacuum arc plasma evaporation, dc-MSP – direct current...

  11. c2 2 Water-Hydroxyl Layer on Cu(110): AWetting Layer Stabilized by Bjerrum Defects Matthew Forster,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    cð2 Â 2Þ Water-Hydroxyl Layer on Cu(110): AWetting Layer Stabilized by Bjerrum Defects Matthew the composition and stability of mixed water-hydroxyl layers is a key step in describing wetting and how surfaces, structures containing an excess of water over hydroxyl are stabilized on Cu (110) by forming a distorted

  12. Polarized and unpolarized neutron-scattering study of the dynamical spin susceptibility of YBa2Cu3O7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    Polarized and unpolarized neutron-scattering study of the dynamical spin susceptibility of YBa2Cu3O to previous neutron- scattering data on YBa2Cu3O7 , theoretical interpretations of NMR data and current models, , is mea- sured by neutron scattering as a function of momentum q and energy . Neutron-scattering

  13. Absence of Static Phase Separation in the High Tc Cuprate YBa2Cu3O6y J. Bobroff,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud 11, Université de

    Absence of Static Phase Separation in the High Tc Cuprate YBa2Cu3O6y J. Bobroff,1 H. Alloul,1 S out any large static phase separation between underdoped and optimally doped regions in contrast with the one observed by STM in Bi2212 and by NQR in LaSrCuO. This establishes that static electronic phase

  14. Normal state properties of high-angle grain Y1-xCaxBa2Cu3O7-delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mennema, Sibe

    This dissertation describes the investigation of the normal-state properties of high-angle grain boundaries in YBa2Cu3O7-d (YBCO) and Y1-xCaxBa2Cu3O7-d (calcium-doped YBCO). YBCO is a high-temperature superconducting material with a...

  15. Device modeling and simulation of the performance of Cu(In1x,Gax)Se2 solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Timothy J.

    -junction Cu(In1Àx,Gax)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells. Increasing the open-circuit voltage (Voc) to improve the overallDevice modeling and simulation of the performance of Cu(In1Àx,Gax)Se2 solar cells Jiyon Song solar cell have been carried out. A variety of graded band-gap structures, including space charge region

  16. Effect of Y-211 particle size on the growth of single grain Y–Ba–Cu–O bulk superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thoma, Max; Shi, Yunhua; Dennis, Tony; Durrell, John; Cardwell, David

    2014-12-01

    , bulk HTS have consi- derable potential for use in a wide variety of applications, including magnetic bearings, flywheel energy storage systems and rotating ele- ctrical machines [2]. Practical Y–Ba–Cu–O (YBCO) bulk superconductors consist of a YBa2Cu3O...

  17. 1 Core/Shell Au/CuPt Nanoparticles and Their Dual Electrocatalysis for 2 Both Reduction and Oxidation Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    1 Core/Shell Au/CuPt Nanoparticles and Their Dual Electrocatalysis for 2 Both Reduction usage but also improves the 15 stability of the Au/CuPt catalyst for fuel cell reactions. The results nanoparticle catalysis for many different chemical reactions. 18 INTRODUCTION 19 Coupling fuel oxidation

  18. Precipitation In Al-Mg-Si Alloys with Cu Additions and the Role of the Q' and Related Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    Precipitation In Al-Mg-Si Alloys with Cu Additions and the Role of the Q' and Related Phases D Keywords: Al-Mg-Si, Al-Mg-Si-Cu, Balanced alloy, Excess-Si, Precipitation, Q, Metastable phase, Q the sequence of precipitation stages, GP"', during artificial aging. Recent results indicate

  19. Critical currents in vicinal YBa2Cu3O7-delta films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durrell, John H

    2004-01-01

    of these materials. For the case of YBCO the Ginzburg-Landau anisotropy param- eter, ?, is 5-7, whereas in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x (BSCCO 2212) the value is? 200. This large difference has been attributed to the cuprate chains found along the b-axis between the cuprate... -oxygenated YBCO films31. III. EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUE Thin films of YBa2Cu3O7?? were prepared by pulsed laser deposition. The films all had thicknesses of between 100 and 200 nm and were grown on single crystal SrTiO3 substrates mis-cut by an angle, ?v , towards...

  20. Synthesis of highly phase pure (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dorris, S.E.; Poeppel, R.B.; Prorok, B.C.; Lanagan, M.T.; Maroni, V.A.

    1994-10-11

    An article and method of manufacture of (Bi,Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor are disclosed. The superconductor is manufactured by preparing a first powdered mixture of bismuth oxide, lead oxide, strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. A second powdered mixture is then prepared of strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. The mixtures are calcined separately with the two mixtures then combined. The resulting combined mixture is then subjected to a powder in tube deformation and thermal processing to produce a substantially phase pure (Bi,Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor. 5 figs.

  1. Synthesis of highly phase pure (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dorris, Stephen E. (La Grange Park, IL); Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL); Prorok, Barton C. (Harrisville, PA); Lanagan, Michael T. (Woodridge, IL); Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL)

    1994-01-01

    An article and method of manufacture of (Bi,Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor. The superconductor is manufactured by preparing a first powdered mixture of bismuth oxide, lead oxide, strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. A second powdered mixture is then prepared of strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. The mixtures are calcined separately with the two mixtures then combined. The resulting combined mixture is then subjected to a powder in tube deformation and thermal processing to produce a substantially phase pure (Bi,Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor.

  2. (He-3, D) Reaction to Bound and Quasibound Levels in Cu-59 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindal, P. K.; Youngblood, David H.; Kozub, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    April 1976) The "Ni('He, d}' Cu reaction has been studied at bombarding energies of 35 and 39 MeV. Excitation energies and angular distributions were measured for levels up to 9.2 MeV in excitation. Distorted-wave-Born- approximation calculations were... performed using resonance form factors for the proton-unstable levels (E?&?3.4 MeV) in order to make t assignments and to extract the spectroscopic factors. Twelve levels in ' Cu are identified as possible analogs of states in Ni. A particle...

  3. Semiconductor bridge, SCB, ignition studies of Al/CuO thermite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Wackerbarth, D.E.; Mohler, J.H.

    1997-04-01

    The authors briefly summarize semiconductor bridge operation and review their ignition studies of Al/CuO thermite as a function of the capacitor discharge unit (CDU) firing set capacitance, charge holder material and morphology of the CuO. Ignition thresholds were obtained using a brass charge holder and a non-conducting fiber-glass-epoxy composite material, G10. At - 18 C and a charge voltage of 50V, the capacitance thresholds were 30.1 {mu}F and 2.0 {mu}F respectively. They also present new data on electrostatic discharge (ESD) and radio frequency (RF) vulnerability tests.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of organic SIMS with Cu{sub n} (n=1-3) clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townes, J. A.; White, A. K.; Krantzman, K. D.; Garrison, B. J.

    1999-06-10

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the effect of cluster size on the emission yield and damage cross section in organic SIMS. A model system composed of a monolayer of biphenyl molecules on a Cu(001) substrate was bombarded with Cu{sub n} (n=1-3) projectiles at kinetic energies of 0.100 keV per atom. The yield increases with cluster size, but a nonlinear enhancement in yield is not observed. The yield-to-damage ratio, on the other hand, increases with the use of clusters, indicating that clusters have the potential to improve the sensitivity of SIMS.

  5. Pion interferometry in Au plus Au and Cu plus Cu collisions at s(NN)=62.4 and 200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, N.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Walker, M.

    2009-01-01

    REVIEW C 80, 024905 (2009) Pion interferometry in Au+ Au and Cu+ Cu collisions at ?sN N = 62.4 and 200 GeV B. I. Abelev,8 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,47 B. D. Anderson,18 D. Arkhipkin,12 G. S. Averichev,11 J. Balewski,22 O. Barannikova,8 L. S. Barnby...,2 J. Baudot,16 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,27 M. J. Betancourt,22 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,17 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,10 B. Biritz,6 L. C. Bland,3 M. Bombara,2 B. E. Bonner,36 M. Botje...

  6. Spectra of identified high-p(T) pi(+/-) and p((p)over-bar ) in Cu + Cu collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Rehberg, J. M.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.

    2010-01-01

    REVIEW C 81, 054907 (2010) Spectra of identified high- pT pi? and p( p?) in Cu+Cu collisions at?sN N = 200 GeV B. I. Abelev,8 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,47 A. V. Alakhverdyants,17 B. D. Anderson,18 D. Arkhipkin,3 G. S. Averichev,17 J. Balewski,22 L.... S. Barnby,2 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,27 M. J. Betancourt,22 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,16 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz,6 L. C. Bland,3 B. E. Bonner,36 J. Bouchet,18 E. Braidot...

  7. Fabrication and characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} p-channel thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Xiaobo [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering and Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, C. W., E-mail: chee@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, and Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan and National Nano Device Labs, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-06

    Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin film transistors are demonstrated with the on-off ratio of ?10{sup 3} and the saturation hole mobility of 1.8?cm{sup 2}/V-s. Due to the high hole concentration (?5?×?10{sup 17?}cm{sup ?3}), the channel needs to be etched to turn off for the accumulation mode operation. The Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} film after etching reveals a larger mobility, and a narrower (112) X-ray diffraction line than the original thick layer, indicating the better crystallinity of the initial growth as compared to the subsequent Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} layer. Both the hole concentration and the saturation mobility increase with the decreasing Cu/(In?+?Ga) ratio probably due to the effect of Cu vacancies.

  8. ZnO/Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2 solar cells prepared by vapor phase Zn doping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramanathan, Kannan; Hasoon, Falah S.; Asher, Sarah E.; Dolan, James; Keane, James C.

    2007-02-20

    A process for making a thin film ZnO/Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2 solar cell without depositing a buffer layer and by Zn doping from a vapor phase, comprising: depositing Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2 layer on a metal back contact deposited on a glass substrate; heating the Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2 layer on the metal back contact on the glass substrate to a temperature range between about 100.degree. C. to about 250.degree. C.; subjecting the heated layer of Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2 to an evaporant species from a Zn compound; and sputter depositing ZnO on the Zn compound evaporant species treated layer of Cu(InGa)Se.sub.2.

  9. Composition dependence of the in-plane Cu-O bond-stretching LO phonon mode in YBa2Cu3O6+x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stercil, F.; Egami, T.; Mook Jr, Herbert A; Yethiraj, Mohana; Chung, J.-H.; Arai, M.; Frost, C.; Dogan, F.

    2008-01-01

    An inelastic pulsed neutron scattering study was performed on the dependence of the dispersion and spectral intensity of the in-plane Cu-O bond-stretching LO phonon mode on doped charge density. The measurements were made in the time-of-flight mode with the multiangle position sensitive spectrometer of the ISIS facility on single crystals of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} (x=0.15, 0.35, 0.6, 0.7, and 0.95). The focus of the study is the in-plane Cu-O bond-stretching LO phonon mode, which is known for strong electron-phonon coupling and unusual dependence on composition and temperature. It is shown that the dispersions for the samples with x=0.35, 0.6, and 0.7 are similar to the superposition of those for x=0.15 and 0.95 samples, and cannot be explained in terms of the structural anisotropy. It is suggested that the results are consistent with the model of nanoscale electronic phase separation, with the fraction of the phases being dependent on the doped charge density.

  10. Heun equation, Teukolsky equation, and type-D metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Batic; H. Schmid

    2007-01-15

    Starting with the whole class of type-D vacuum backgrounds with cosmological constant we show that the separated Teukolsky equation for zero rest-mass fields with spin $s=\\pm 2$ (gravitational waves), $s=\\pm 1$ (electromagnetic waves) and $s=\\pm 1/2$ (neutrinos) is an Heun equation in disguise.

  11. Maintenance Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    requirements of any physical asset within its operating context. Chapter 5 of the Federal Energy Management Program's O&M Best Practices Guide outlines these maintenance types in...

  12. Portfolio Manager Space Type Discussion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assistance Program (TAP), provides a discussion about space/type in regards to the Portfolio Manager Initiative.

  13. Window Types | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    its U-factor. There are advantages and disadvantages to all types of frame materials, but vinyl, wood, fiberglass, and some composite frame materials provide greater...

  14. Portfolio Manager Space Type Discussion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides a discussion about space/type in regards to the Portfolio Manager Initiative.

  15. Photocatalytic performances and activities of Ag-doped CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Zhengru; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Li, Yonghua; Sun, Caizhi; Cao, Yongqiang

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals were synthesized by a co-precipitation method. • Ag/CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} catalyst was prepared by the wetness impregnation strategy. • The structural properties of Ag/CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were investigated by XRD, TEM, DRS, and XPS techniques. • Ag/CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} has higher photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: In this work, CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized by a chemical co-precipitation route. The Ag/CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} catalyst was prepared based on the CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles by the incipient wetness impregnation strategy, which showed excellent photoelectric property and catalytic activity. The structural properties of these samples were systematically investigated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. The photo-induced charge separation in the samples was demonstrated by surface photovoltage (SPV) measurement. The photocatalytic degradation of 4-CP by the Ag/CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples were comparatively studied under xenon lamp irradiation. The results indicate that the Ag/CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} sample exhibited the higher efficiency for the degradation of 4-CP.

  16. Isothermal stress relaxation in electroplated Cu films. II. Kinetic modeling Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Rui

    Isothermal stress relaxation in electroplated Cu films. II. Kinetic modeling Rui Huanga Department experimental results obtained from isothermal stress relaxation tests of electroplated Cu thin films-boundary and interface diffusivities in electroplated Cu films, which pro- vides a useful method to evaluate

  17. Comparing the host galaxies of type Ia, type II, and type Ibc supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, X.; Liang, Y. C.; Chen, X. Y.; Zhong, G. H.; Deng, L. C.; Zhang, B.; Shi, W. B.; Zhou, L. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Dennefeld, M. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, and Universite P. et M. Curie, 98bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Hammer, F.; Flores, H., E-mail: xshao@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: ycliang@bao.ac.cn [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, F-92195 Meudon (France)

    2014-08-10

    We compare the host galaxies of 902 supernovae (SNe), including SNe Ia, SNe II, and SNe Ibc, which are selected by cross-matching the Asiago Supernova Catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. We selected an additional 213 galaxies by requiring the light fraction of spectral observations to be >15%, which could represent well the global properties of the galaxies. Among these 213 galaxies, 135 appear on the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagram, which allows us to compare the hosts in terms of whether they are star-forming (SF) galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs; including composites, LINERs, and Seyfert 2s) or absorption-line galaxies (Absorps; i.e., their related emission lines are weak or non-existent). The diagrams related to the parameters D{sub n}(4000), H?{sub A}, stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and specific SFRs for the SNe hosts show that almost all SNe II and most of the SNe Ibc occur in SF galaxies, which have a wide range of stellar masses and low D{sub n}(4000). The SNe Ia hosts as SF galaxies following similar trends. A significant fraction of SNe Ia occurs in AGNs and absorption-line galaxies, which are massive and have high D{sub n}(4000). The stellar population analysis from spectral synthesis fitting shows that the hosts of SNe II have a younger stellar population than hosts of SNe Ia. These results are compared with those of the 689 comparison galaxies where the SDSS fiber captures less than 15% of the total light. These comparison galaxies appear biased toward higher 12+log(O/H) (?0.1 dex) at a given stellar mass. Therefore, we believe the aperture effect should be kept in mind when the properties of the hosts for different types of SNe are discussed.

  18. Characterization of Zr-Fe-Cu Alloys for an Inert Matrix Fuel for Nuclear Energy Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnhart, Brian A.

    2013-08-09

    Spectroscopy EPMA Electron Probe Microanalyzer FCCI Fuel Clad Chemical Interaction FCMI Fuel Clad Mechanical Interaction IMF Inert Matrix Fuel LFA Light Flash Analysis LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Lab LWR Light Water Reactor MRF Materials... it appealing for use in a nuclear reactor. The UO2 crystal has a fluorite structure of the CaF2 type. At beginning of life (BOL), UO2 is manufactured to be as pure as possible; as such when it is loaded into the fuel bundles it is a single phase and has...

  19. Effects of temperature on serrated flows of Al0.5CoCrCuFeNi high-entropy alloy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Shuying; Xie, Xie; Chen, Bilin; Qiao, Junwei; Zhang, Yong; Ren, Yang; Dahmen, Karin A.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-08-14

    Compression behavior of the Al0.5CoCrCuFeNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) was studied at different temperatures from 673K to 873K at a low strain rate of 5 x 10-5/s to investigate the temperature effect on the mechanical properties and serration behavior. The face-centered cubic (FCC) structure is confirmed at the lower temperature of 673 K and 773 K, and a structure of mixed FCC and body-centered cubic (BCC) is identified at a higher temperature of 873 K after compression tests using high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. As a result, by comparing the stress-strain curves at different temperatures, two opposite directions of serrations types weremore »found, named upward serrations appearing at 673 K and 773 K and downward serrations at 873 K, which may be due to dynamic strain aging.« less

  20. p-Type Zinc Oxide Spinels: Application to Transparent Conductors and Spintronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoica, Maria

    2013-01-01

    We report on the electronic and optical properties of two theoretically predicted stable spinel compounds of the form ZnB2O4, where B = Ni or Cu; neither compound has been previously synthesized, so we compare them to the previously studied p-type ZnCo2O4 spinel. These new materials exhibit spin polarization that is ideal for spintronics applications, and broad conductivity maxima near the valence band edge that facilitate p-type dopability. We show that 3d electrons on the octahedrally coordinated Zn atom fall deep within the valence band and do not contribute significantly to the electronic structure of the material, while the O 2p and tetrahedrally coordinated B 3d electrons hybridize broadly in the shallow valence states, resulting in increasing curvature (i.e., decreased electron effective mass) of valence bands near the band edge. In particular, ZnCu2O4 exhibits high electrical conductivities near the valence band edge that, at sigma = 2 x 10^4 S/cm, are twice the maximum found for ZnCo2O4, a previously...

  1. Low-lying levels in Cu-57 and the rp process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, XG; Dejbakhsh, H.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Jiang, J.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    , and 2398 +/- 10 keV. The results are compared with well known excited states of the mirror nucleus Ni-57. Th, measured excited states of Cu-57 allow recalculation of the astrophysical reaction rate for the stellar radiative proton capture reaction Ni-56(p...

  2. High quality YBa2Cu307 Josephson junctions made by direct electron beam writing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadgorny, Boris

    High quality YBa2Cu307 Josephson junctions made by direct electron beam writing S. K. Tolpygo, S beam writing over YBa,C&O, thin-tilm microbridges, using scanning transmission electron microscope fabricated by the technologically attractive method of direct electron beam writing. The idea of using

  3. LABORATORY EXPERIMENT 11 Determination of microelements (Mn and Cu) in tea leaves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    : · Total contents - Mn and Cu in tea leaves by ashing and acid digestion · Extractable contents: hot water to determine the total contents of a component, such as a metal element, being measured. On the other hand used will depend on the purpose of the study. For example, it may be that the total content of a metal

  4. Nitric Oxide in Biological Denitrification: Fe/Cu Metalloenzyme and Metal Complex NOx Redox Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Imke

    Nitric Oxide in Biological Denitrification: Fe/Cu Metalloenzyme and Metal Complex NOx Redox Nitrite Reductase: 1204 2. Copper Nitrite Reductases 1206 B. Nitric Oxide Reductase 1208 1. Structure 1208 Nitric Oxide Sensors, Scavengers, and Delivery Agents 1227 IV. Concluding Remarks 1229 V. Acknowledgments

  5. Phase transitions in delafossite CuLaO{sub 2} at high pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salke, Nilesh P.; Rao, Rekha Gupta, M. K.; Mittal, R.; Garg, Alka B.; Achary, S. N.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2014-04-07

    Structural stability of a transparent conducting oxide CuLaO{sub 2} at high pressures is investigated using in-situ Raman spectroscopy, electrical resistance, and x-ray diffraction techniques. The present Raman investigations indicate a sequence of structural phase transitions at 1.8?GPa and 7?GPa. The compound remains in the first high pressure phase when pressure is released. Electrical resistance measurements carried out at high pressures confirm the second phase transition. These observations are further supported by powder x-ray diffraction at high pressures which also showed that a-axis is more compressible than c-axis in this compound. Fitting the pressure dependence of unit cell volume to 3{sup rd} order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, zero pressure bulk modulus of CuLaO{sub 2} is determined to be 154(25) GPa. The vibrational properties in the ambient delafossite phase of CuLaO{sub 2} are investigated using ab-initio calculations of phonon frequencies to complement the Raman spectroscopic measurements. Temperature dependence of the Raman modes of CuLaO{sub 2} is investigated to estimate the anharmonicity of Raman modes.

  6. Submicron YBa2Cu3Ox ramp Josephson junctions Philippe V. Komissinski,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Högberg, Björn

    into the submicron range, similar moves are likely in superconductor electronics. Smaller Josephson junctions with a high density of the superconducting critical current Jc permit, for ex- ample, rapid single flux on high-temperature superconductors, namely YBa2Cu3Ox YBCO , satisfy these conditions having high Ic

  7. High quality crystalline YBa2Cu307+ films on thin silicon substrates FL Haakenaasen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golovchenko, Jene A.

    High quality crystalline YBa2Cu307+ films on thin silicon substrates FL Haakenaasen Department) films with near perfect crystallinity have been grown epitaxially on Si(100) using two intermediate good crystallinity and be quite thin ((1 m)? Relativistic electrons are sent through the crystal

  8. Crystalline monolayer surface of liquid AuCuSiAgPd: Metallic glass former

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pershan, Peter S.

    Crystalline monolayer surface of liquid Au­Cu­Si­Ag­Pd: Metallic glass former S. Mechler,1,a E of a two-dimensional crystalline monolayer phase for temperatures of up to about 50 K above the eutectic freezing in which a 2D crystalline phase forms within a sur- face segregated monolayer of liquid Ga alloys

  9. Synthesis of YBa2CU3O7 using sub-atmospheric processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiesmann, Harold; Solovyov, Vyacheslav

    2004-09-21

    The present invention is a method of forming thick films of crystalline YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7 that includes forming a precursor film comprising barium fluoride (BaF.sub.2), yttrium (Y) and copper (Cu). The precursor film is heat-treated at a temperature above 500.degree. C. in the presence of oxygen, nitrogen and water vapor at sub-atmospheric pressure to form a crystalline structure. The crystalline structure is then annealed at about 500.degree. C. in the presence of oxygen to form the crystalline YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7 film. The YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7 film formed by this method has a resistivity of from about 100 to about 600 .mu.Ohm-cm at room temperature and a critical current density measured at 77 K in a magnetic field of 1 Tesla of about 1.0.times.10.sup.5 Ampere per square centimeter (0.1 MA/cm.sup.2) or greater.

  10. Charge Dynamics in Solution-Processed Nanocrystalline CuInS¬2 Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halpert, Jonathan E.; Morgenstern, Frederik S. F.; Ehrler, Bruno; Vaynzof, Yana; Credgington, Dan; Greenham, Neil C.

    2015-05-07

    We investigate charge dynamics in solar cells constructed using solution-processed layers of CuInS2 (CIS) nanocrystals (NCs) as the electron donor and CdS as the electron acceptor. By using time-resolved spectroscopic techniques, we are able...

  11. Diffusion of indium and gallium in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockett, Angus

    Diffusion of indium and gallium in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells O. Lundberga,*, J. Lua , A conversion efficiency of solar cells made from this material [1]. One of the special qualities of the CIGS improve the solar cell performance. In many of the different CIGS fabrication techniques, an in depth

  12. Selfdiffusion of adatoms, dimers, and vacancies on Cu(100) Ghyslain Boisvert ? and Laurent J. Lewis y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Laurent J.

    (GCM), Universit'e de Montr'eal, Case Postale 6128, Succursale Centre­Ville, Montr'eal, Qu'ebec, Canada of the diffusion of adatoms, dimers, and vacancies on Cu(100). It is found that the dynamical energy barriers is a ``prefactor'', kB the Boltzmann constant, T the absolute temperature, and EA the activation energy or barrier

  13. Magnetotransport properties of doped RuSr2GdCu2O8 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCrone, J E; Tallon, J L; Cooper, J R; MacLaughlin, A C; Attfield, J. Paul; Bernhard, C

    2003-01-01

    RuSr2GdCu2O8, in which magnetic order and superconductivity coexist with Tmag>Tc , is a complex material which poses new and important questions to our understanding of the interplay between magnetic and superconducting ...

  14. Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystals and graphene quantum dots for photovoltaics Xukai Xinab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystals and graphene quantum dots for photovoltaics Jun Wang,a Xukai Xinab advances in the synthesis and utilization of CZTS nanocrystals and colloidal GQDs for photovoltaics emerged to achieve low cost, high perfor- mance photovoltaics, including organic solar cells,2­6 dye

  15. Electrodeposition of CuGaSe2 from Thiocyanate-Containing Electrolytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suni, Ian Ivar

    . Manuscript received September 8, 2010. Published December 2, 2010. CuInxGa1-xSe2 CIGS thin film solar cells- nation velocities.1 Thin film solar cells promise significant economic benefits, because the optical, electrochemical deposition methods may be significantly less expensive for scale-up of thin film solar cells,3

  16. A thermogravimetric study of oxygen diffusion in YBa2Cu3O7-d

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vazquez-Navarro, Maria Dolores

    YBa2Cu3O7-d (YBCO) was one of the first high temperature superconductors discovered, and its superconducting properties are strongly dependent on oxygen stoichiometry. A large amount of work has been done on the variation of stoichiometry and its...

  17. Combustion synthesis of calcium phosphate bioceramic powders A. Cu neyt Tas *,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tas, A. Cuneyt

    Combustion synthesis of calcium phosphate bioceramic powders A. CuÈ neyt Tas *,1 Department)2; Combustion synthesis; Hydroxyapatite 1. Introduction Calcium hydroxyapatite (HA: Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2), the major), instead of water, as the precipitation medium. Self-propagating combustion synthesis (SPCS

  18. IAA-CU-13-11-06 Using independent combinations of CubeSat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    IAA-CU-13-11-06 Using independent combinations of CubeSat solar panels as sun sensors. Using solar panels on 5 of 6 sides of the NUTS CubeSat, we have a lot of atti- tude determinating information readily available during much of the periodical orbit. Using three or more solar panels

  19. Preparation of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors from oxide-glass precursors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hinks, David G. (Lemont, IL); Capone, II, Donald W. (Northbridge, MA)

    1992-01-01

    A superconductor and precursor therefor from oxide mixtures of Ca, Sr, Bi and Cu. Glass precursors quenched to elevated temperatures result in glass free of crystalline precipitates having enhanced mechanical properties. Superconductors are formed from the glass precursors by heating in the presence of oxygen to a temperature below the melting point of the glass.

  20. X-ray imaging and controlled solidification of Al-Cu alloys toward microstructures by design

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clarke, Amy J.; Tourret, Damien; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Cooley, Jason C.; Lee, Wah -Keat; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian M.; Papin, Pallas A.; et al

    2015-01-30

    X-ray imaging, which permits the microscopic visualization of metal alloy solidification dynamics, can be coupled with controlled solidification to create microstructures by design. This x-ray image shows a process-derived composite microstructure being made from a eutectic Al-17.1 at.%Cu alloy by successive solidification and remelting steps.

  1. Strong and ductile nanostructured Cu-carbon nanotube composite Hongqi Li,1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yuntian T.

    . Past research effort mainly focused on the polymer/ceramic-based CNT composites5­8 and studies on metal in the CNT-metallic matrix composites has been growing rapidly for the past five years.9­21 GenerallyStrong and ductile nanostructured Cu-carbon nanotube composite Hongqi Li,1,a Amit Misra,1 Zenji

  2. CuZero: Embracing the Frontier of Interactive Visual Search for Informed Users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Fu

    , statistical occurrence, and search result mining) are automatically recommended in real time after users enterCuZero: Embracing the Frontier of Interactive Visual Search for Informed Users Eric Zavesky Shih 10027 {emz,sfchang}@ee.columbia.edu ABSTRACT Users of most visual search systems suffer from two pri

  3. Magnetic and structural behavior of FeCo/Cu multilayers submitted to Kr irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penkov, Julian Geshev

    Magnetic and structural behavior of FeCo/Cu multilayers submitted to Kr irradiation I.L. Graff Cedex, France Available online 19 January 2007 Abstract We have studied the effects of ion irradiation a phase transformation of FeCo alloy from bcc for the as-deposited sample to fcc after irradiation

  4. Possible Origin of Improved High Temperature Performance of Hydrothermally Aged Cu/Beta Zeolite Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peden, Charles HF; Kwak, Ja Hun; Burton, Sarah D.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Lee, Jong H.; Jen, H. W.; Cavattaio, Giovanni; Cheng, Yisun; Lambert, Christine

    2012-04-30

    The hydrothermal stability of Cu/beta NH3 SCR catalysts are explored here. In particular, this paper focuses on the interesting ability of this catalyst to maintain and even enhance high-temperature performance for the "standard" SCR reaction after modest (900 °C, 2 hours) hydrothermal aging. Characterization of the fresh and aged catalysts was performed with an aim to identify possible catalytic phases responsible for the enhanced high temperature performance. XRD, TEM and 27Al NMR all showed that the hydrothermally aging conditions used here resulted in almost complete loss of the beta zeolite structure between 1 and 2 hours aging. While the 27Al NMR spectra of 2 and 10 hour hydrothermally-aged catalysts showed significant loss of a peak associated with tetrahedrally-coordinated Al species, no new spectral features were evident. Two model catalysts, suggested by these characterization data as possible mimics of the catalytic phase formed during hydrothermal aging of Cu/beta, were prepared and tested for their performance in the "standard" SCR and NH3 oxidation reactions. The similarity in their reactivity compared to the 2 hour hydrothermally-aged Cu/beta catalyst suggests possible routes for preparing multi-component catalysts that may have wider temperature windows for optimum performance than those provided by current Cu/zeolite catalysts.

  5. Physicochemical Characterization of the Bacterial Cu(I) Sensor CsoR 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Zhen

    2011-02-22

    from the pathogenic S. aureus Newman strain was identified and characterized, and was found to exhibit biochemical properties similar to those of Mtb and Bsu CsoRs. Parallels between Cu(I)-sensing CsoRs and functional orthologs in the CsoR/RcnR family...

  6. Cu(In,Ga)Se2based Photovoltaics: Challenges and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2­based Photovoltaics: Challenges and Opportunities William Shafarman Institute of Energy Conversion University of Delaware #12;Thin Film Photovoltaics Potential for low cost PV using a Thickness K.Kim, et al., IEEE J. Photovoltaics, 3, 446 (2013). 2 µm, 60 min reaction 1 µm, 25 min reaction 0

  7. DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600060 Cu2O Nanowires in an Alumina Template

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okamoto, Koichi

    performed to estimate the optical band gap of Cu2O [a] Dr. J. Lee Fuel Cell Research Center, Korea Institute] Dr. J. Choi Nanomaterials Application Division Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, attractive properties, as well as their unique applications compared with bulk materi- als.[1

  8. CU-CAS-02-08 CENTER FOR AEROSPACE STRUCTURES Volumetric Constraint Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felippa, Carlos A.

    CU-CAS-02-08 CENTER FOR AEROSPACE STRUCTURES Volumetric Constraint Models for Anisotropic Elastic 429 BOULDER, COLORADO 80309 #12;Volumetric Constraint Models for Anisotropic Elastic Solids Carlos A. Conclusion 5 #12;Volumetric Constraint Models for Anisotropic Elastic Solids Carlos A. Felippa and Eugenio O

  9. HIGH EFFICIENCY Cu(ln,Ga)SepBASED SOLAR CELLS: PROCESSING OF NOVEL ABSORBER STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scofield, John H.

    HIGH EFFICIENCY Cu(ln,Ga)SepBASED SOLAR CELLS: PROCESSING OF NOVEL ABSORBER STRUCTURES Miguel A conditions (ASTM E892-87, Global 1000 W/m'). The first attempts to translate this development to larger areas a device performance point of view. In terms of lightweight flexible substrate-for potential space

  10. Nominalization, Predication and Type Containment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamareddine, Fairouz

    of Eindhoven, for their nancial support and hospitality during the academic year 1991{92. yKlein's work has by the uk Economic and Social Research Council. 1 #12;Abstract In an attempt to accommodate natural language, by assigning each expression a family of types. Another line of work has moved in the direction of type

  11. Archived Reference Building Type: Warehouse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  12. Archived Reference Building Type: Warehouse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  13. Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements from Residential Diagnostics Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, W.R.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements from ResidentialType Previous analyses of air leakage data suggest that

  14. Reactive oxygen species on bone mineral density and mechanics in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) knockout mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smietana, Michael J. [Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 (United States)] [Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 (United States); Arruda, Ellen M. [Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 (United States) [Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 (United States); Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2250 GG Brown, 2350 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Program in Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, 2250 GG Brown, 2350 Hayward, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Faulkner, John A.; Brooks, Susan V. [Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 (United States) [Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 (United States); Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 (United States); Larkin, Lisa M., E-mail: llarkin@umich.edu [Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 (United States); Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan, 2025 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200 (United States)

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to be a factor in the onset of a number of age-associated conditions, including loss of BMD. {yields} Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) deficient mice have increased ROS, reduced bone mineral density, decreased bending stiffness, and decreased strength compared to WT controls. {yields} Increased ROS caused by the deficiency of Sod1, may be responsible for the changes in BMD and bone mechanics and therefore represent an appropriate model for studying mechanisms of age-associated bone loss. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a role in a number of degenerative conditions including osteoporosis. Mice deficient in Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) (Sod1{sup -/-} mice) have elevated oxidative stress and decreased muscle mass and strength compared to wild-type mice (WT) and appear to have an accelerated muscular aging phenotype. Thus, Sod1{sup -/-} mice may be a good model for evaluating the effects of free radical generation on diseases associated with aging. In this experiment, we tested the hypothesis that the structural integrity of bone as measured by bending stiffness (EI; N/mm{sup 2}) and strength (MPa) is diminished in Sod1{sup -/-} compared to WT mice. Femurs were obtained from male and female WT and Sod1{sup -/-} mice at 8 months of age and three-point bending tests were used to determine bending stiffness and strength. Bones were also analyzed for bone mineral density (BMD; mg/cc) using micro-computed tomography. Femurs were approximately equal in length across all groups, and there were no significant differences in BMD or EI with respect to gender in either genotype. Although male and female mice demonstrated similar properties within each genotype, Sod1{sup -/-} mice exhibited lower BMD and EI of femurs from both males and females compared with gender matched WT mice. Strength of femurs was also lower in Sod1{sup -/-} mice compared to WT as well as between genders. These data indicate that increased oxidative stress, due to the deficiency of Sod1 is associated with decreased bone stiffness and strength and Sod1{sup -/-} mice may represent an appropriate model for studying disease processes in aging bone.

  15. SU-E-I-09: Application of LiF:Mg,Cu (TLD-100H) Dosimeters for in Diagnostic Radiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sina, S; Zeinali, B; Karimipourfard, M; Lotfalizadeh, F; Sadeghi, M; Faghihi, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetery is very essential in diagnostic radiology. The goal of this study is to verify the application of LiF:Mg,Cu,P (TLD100H) in obtaining the Entrance skin dose (ESD) of patients undergoing diagnostic radiology. The results of dosimetry performed by TLD-100H, were compared with those obtained by TLD100, which is a common dosimeter in diagnostic radiology. Methods: In this study the ESD values were measured using two types of Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-100, and TLD-100H) for 16 patients undergoing diagnostic radiology (lumbar spine imaging). The ESD values were also obtained by putting the two types of TLDs at the surface of Rando phantom for different imaging techniques and different views (AP, and lateral). The TLD chips were annealed with a standard procedure, and the ECC values for each TLD was obtained by exposing the chips to equal amount of radiation. Each time three TLD chips were covered by thin dark plastic covers, and were put at the surface of the phantom or the patient. The average reading of the three chips was used for obtaining the dose. Results: The results show a close agreement between the dose measuered by the two dosimeters.According to the results of this study, the TLD-100H dosimeters have higher sensitivities (i.e.signal(nc)/dose) than TLD-100.The ESD values varied between 2.71 mGy and 26.29 mGy with the average of 11.89 mGy for TLD-100, and between 2.55 mGy and 27.41 mGy with the average of 12.32 mGy for measurements. Conclusion: The TLD-100H dosimeters are suggested as effective dosimeters for dosimetry in low dose fields because of their higher sensitivities.

  16. New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Woosley, Stan

    2007-01-01

    runaway in Type Ia supernovae: How to run away? oIgnition in Type Ia Supernovae. II. A Three- dimensionalnumber modeling of type Ia supernovae. I. hydrodynamics.

  17. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael

    2004-08-16

    The remarkable uniformity of Type Ia supernovae has allowed astronomers to use them as distance indicators to measure the properties and expansion history of the Universe. However, Type Ia supernovae exhibit intrinsic variation in both their spectra and observed brightness. The brightness variations have been approximately corrected by various methods, but there remain intrinsic variations that limit the statistical power of current and future observations of distant supernovae for cosmological purposes. There may be systematic effects in this residual variation that evolve with redshift and thus limit the cosmological power of SN Ia luminosity-distance experiments. To reduce these systematic uncertainties, we need a deeper understanding of the observed variations in Type Ia supernovae. Toward this end, the Nearby Supernova Factory has been designed to discover hundreds of Type Ia supernovae in a systematic and automated fashion and study them in detail. This project will observe these supernovae spectrophotometrically to provide the homogeneous high-quality data set necessary to improve the understanding and calibration of these vital cosmological yardsticks. From 1998 to 2003, in collaboration with the Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a systematic and automated searching program was conceived and executed using the computing facilities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the National Energy Research Supercomputing Center. An automated search had never been attempted on this scale. A number of planned future large supernovae projects are predicated on the ability to find supernovae quickly, reliably, and efficiently in large datasets. A prototype run of the SNfactory search pipeline conducted from 2002 to 2003 discovered 83 SNe at a final rate of 12 SNe/month. A large, homogeneous search of this scale offers an excellent opportunity to measure the rate of Type Ia supernovae. This thesis presents a new method for analyzing the true sensitivity of a multi-epoch supernova search and finds a Type Ia supernova rate from z {approx} 0.01-0.1 of r{sub V} = 4.26{sub -1.93 -0.10}{sup +1.39 +0.10} h{sup 3} x 10{sup -4} SNe Ia/yr/Mpc{sup 3} from a preliminary analysis of a subsample of the SNfactory prototype search. Several unusual supernovae were found in the course of the SNfactory prototype search. One in particular, SN 2002ic, was the first SN Ia to exhibit convincing evidence for a circumstellar medium and offers valuable insight into the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae.

  18. Synthesis and Evaluation of Cu/SAPO-34 Catalysts for NH3-SCR 2: Solid-state Ion Exchange and One-pot Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Washton, Nancy M.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-01-01

    Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts are synthesized using two methods: solid-state ion exchange (SSIE) and one-pot synthesis. SSIE is conducted by calcining SAPO-34/CuO mixtures at elevated temperatures. For the one-pot synthesis method, Cu-containing chemicals (CuO and CuSO4) are added during gel preparation. A high-temperature calcination step is also needed for this method. Catalysts are characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Catalytic properties are examined using standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) and ammonia oxidation reactions. In Cu-SAPO-34 samples formed using SSIE, Cu presents both as isolated Cu2+ ions and unreacted CuO. The former is highly active and selective in NH3-SCR, while the latter catalyzes a side reaction; notably, the non-selective oxidation of NH3 above 350 ºC. Using the one-pot method followed by a high-temperature aging treatment, it is possible to form Cu SAPO-34 samples with predominately isolated Cu2+ ions at low Cu loadings. However at much higher Cu loadings, isolated Cu2+ ions that bind weakly with the CHA framework and CuO clusters also form. These Cu moieties are very active in catalyzing non-selective NH3 oxidation above 350 ºC. Low-temperature reaction kinetics indicate that Cu-SAPO-34 samples formed using SSIE have core-shell structures where Cu is enriched in the shell layers; while Cu is more evenly distributed within the one-pot samples. Reaction kinetics also suggest that at low temperatures, the local environment next to Cu2+ ion centers plays little role on the overall catalytic properties. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle under contract number DE-AC05-76RL01830. The authors also thank Shari Li (PNNL) for surface area/pore volume measurements, and Bruce W. Arey (PNNL) for SEM measurements. Discussions with Drs. A. Yezerets, K. Kamasamudram, J.H. Li, N. Currier and J.Y. Luo from Cummins, Inc. and H.Y. Chen and H. Hess from Johnson-Matthey are greatly appreciated.

  19. Application of glucose as a green capping agent and reductant to fabricate CuI micro/nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavakoli, Farnosh; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Ghanbari, Davood; Saberyan, Kamal; Hosseinpour-Mashkani, S. Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CuI nanostructures were prepared via a simple precipitation method. • Glucose as a green capping agent and reductant was applied. • The effect of glucose concentration on the morphology of CuI was investigated. • According to XRD results, pure cubic phase CuI have been formed by using glucose. - Abstract: In this work, CuI micro/nanostructures have been successfully prepared via a simple precipitation route at room temperature. By using glucose as a clean reducing agent with different concentrations, CuI micro/nanostructures with various morphologies were obtained. Besides glucose, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}, KBH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O have been applied as reductant. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence spectroscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the as-produced CuI micro/nanostructures. According to the XRD results, it was found that pure cubic phase CuI have been formed by using glucose.

  20. P-type gallium nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Montara, CA); Fu, Tracy (Berkeley, CA); Ross, Jennifer (Pleasanton, CA); Chan, James (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.