Sample records for analysis techniques fluid

  1. Automated fluid analysis apparatus and techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Szecsody, James E.

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated device that couples a pair of differently sized sample loops with a syringe pump and a source of degassed water. A fluid sample is mounted at an inlet port and delivered to the sample loops. A selected sample from the sample loops is diluted in the syringe pump with the degassed water and fed to a flow through detector for analysis. The sample inlet is also directly connected to the syringe pump to selectively perform analysis without dilution. The device is airtight and used to detect oxygen-sensitive species, such as dithionite in groundwater following a remedial injection to treat soil contamination.

  2. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  3. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  4. Three region analysis of a bounded plasma using particle in cell and fluid techniques. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, D.F.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed collisionless sheath theory and a three-region collisional model of a bounded plasma are presented, and the suitability of the collisional model for analysis of ignited mode thermionic converters is investigated. The sheath theory extends previous analyses to regimes in which the sheath potential and electron temperatures are comparable in magnitude. In all operating regimes typical of a ignited mode thermionic converter, the predicted sheaths extend several mean-free paths. The apparent collisionality of the sheaths prompted development of a collisional, three-region model of the converter plasma. By interfacing Particle-in-Cell regions (for the sheaths) and fluid regions (for the bulk of the plasma), a time-dependent, wall-to-wall model of the plasma in the inter-electrode space is created. The components of the model are tested and validated against analytic solutions and against one another, then applied to the analysis of an ignited mode thermionic converter. Under ignited mode operating conditions, the electron velocity distribution at the plasma/sheath boundary is found to be inconsistent with that assumed in the model development, and the calculation diverges. The observed distribution is analyzed and a new basis set of distribution functions is suggested that should permit application of the hybrid model to ignited mode thermionic converters.

  5. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1981 - 1981 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration...

  6. Fluid Gravity Engineering Rocket motor flow analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand, Mahesh

    Fluid Gravity Engineering Capability · Rocket motor flow analysis -Internal (performance) -External (plume / contamination) · Effect on landing site (surface alteration) -In-depth flow through porous young scientists/engineers Fluid Gravity Engineering Ltd #12;

  7. A blurred interface formulation of The Reference Map Technique for Fluid-Solid Interactions and Fluid-Solid-Solid Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valkov, Boris Ivanov

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present a blurred interface method for Fluid-Solid Interactions (FSI) and multiple solids immersed in a fluid or FSSI (Fluid-Solid-Solid Interactions) based on the reference map technique as presented by ...

  8. Fluid Jet Polishing -possibilities and limitations of a new fabrication technique -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fluid Jet Polishing - possibilities and limitations of a new fabrication technique - #12;#12;Fluid Jet Polishing - possibilities and limitations of a new fabrication technique - Proefschrift ter and polishing techniques 7 2.1.1 Classical grinding and Preston's equation 7 2.1.2 Abrasive jet cutting 8 2

  9. Model building techniques for analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walther, Howard P.; McDaniel, Karen Lynn; Keener, Donald; Cordova, Theresa Elena; Henry, Ronald C.; Brooks, Sean; Martin, Wilbur D.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The practice of mechanical engineering for product development has evolved into a complex activity that requires a team of specialists for success. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has product engineers, mechanical designers, design engineers, manufacturing engineers, mechanical analysts and experimentalists, qualification engineers, and others that contribute through product realization teams to develop new mechanical hardware. The goal of SNL's Design Group is to change product development by enabling design teams to collaborate within a virtual model-based environment whereby analysis is used to guide design decisions. Computer-aided design (CAD) models using PTC's Pro/ENGINEER software tools are heavily relied upon in the product definition stage of parts and assemblies at SNL. The three-dimensional CAD solid model acts as the design solid model that is filled with all of the detailed design definition needed to manufacture the parts. Analysis is an important part of the product development process. The CAD design solid model (DSM) is the foundation for the creation of the analysis solid model (ASM). Creating an ASM from the DSM currently is a time-consuming effort; the turnaround time for results of a design needs to be decreased to have an impact on the overall product development. This effort can be decreased immensely through simple Pro/ENGINEER modeling techniques that summarize to the method features are created in a part model. This document contains recommended modeling techniques that increase the efficiency of the creation of the ASM from the DSM.

  10. Complex Fluid Analysis with the Advanced Distillation Curve Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Complex Fluid Analysis with the Advanced Distillation Curve Approach Thomas J. Bruno, Lisa S. Ott for measuring distillation curves reveals the physicochemical properties of complex fluids such as fuels distillation curves of complex fluids. The distillation curve provides the only practical avenue to assess

  11. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sasada & Goff, 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

  12. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

  13. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et...

  14. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gerlach, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Taylor & Gerlach,...

  15. Medial Techniques for Automating Finite Element Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitton, Mary C.

    Medial Techniques for Automating Finite Element Analysis by Jessica Renee Crawford Crouch Analysis. (Under the direction of Stephen M. Pizer.) Finite element analysis provides a principled method the simulation of tissue deformation. The drawback to using finite element analysis for imaging problems

  16. Stratigraphic statistical curvature analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengtson, C.A.; Ziagos, J.P.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCAT applies statistical techniques to dipmeter data to identify patterns of bulk curvature, determine transverse and longitudinal structural directions, and reconstruct cross sections and contour maps. STRAT-SCAT applies the same concepts to geometric interpretation of multistoried unimodal, bimodal, or trough-type cross-bedding and also to seismic stratigraphy-scale stratigraphic structures. Structural dip, which comprises the bulk of dipmeter data, is related to beds that (statistically) were deposited with horizontal attitudes; stratigraphic dip is related to beds that were deposited with preferentially oriented nonhorizontal attitudes or to beds that assumed such attitudes because of differential compaction. Stratigraphic dip generates local zones of departure from structural dip on special SCAT plots. The RMS (root-mean-square) of apparent structural dip is greatest in the (structural) T-direction and least in the perpendicular L-direction; the RMS of stratigraphic dip (measured with respect to structural dip) is greatest in the stratigraphic T*-direction and least in the stratigraphic L*-direction. Multistoried, cross-bedding appears on T*-plots as local zones of either greater scatter or statistically significant departure of stratigraphic median dip from structural dip. In contrast, the L*-plot (except for trough-type cross-bedding) is sensitive to cross-bedding. Seismic stratigraphy-scale depositional sequences are identified on Mercator dip versus azimuth plots and polar tangent plots as secondary cylindrical-fold patterns imposed on global structural patterns. Progradational sequences generate local cycloid-type patterns on T*-plots, and compactional sequences generate local cycloid-type patterns on T*-plots, and compactional sequences generate local half-cusp patterns. Both features, however, show only structural dip on L*-plots.

  17. 16th Int Symp on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics Lisbon, Portugal, 912 July, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    16th Int Symp on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics Lisbon, Portugal, 9­12 July we compare state-of-the-art fluid motion estimation algorithms with respect to the application information to retrieve the motion. 1. Introduction Todays image motion algorithms in fluid dynamics

  18. NMR imaging techniques and applications in the flow behavior of fluids in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halimi, Hassan I

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proton magnetic resonance technique can be used to determine the oil saturation in the pores of a rock. The NMR system can produce images of the molecules under investigation because the signals recorded are obtained directly from fluids contained... in liquids as well. This should enable us to obtain additional information about the fluids in the rock '4. Spin-spin relaxation has a characteristic time T~. T~ is the time constant for the decay of the precessing R-Zo component of the magnetization...

  19. Characterization of fracture networks for fluid flow analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J.C.S.; Billaux, D.; Hestir, K.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.; Karasaki, K.; Nihei, K.; Gentier, S.; Cox, L.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of fluid flow through fractured rocks is difficult because the only way to assign hydraulic parameters to fractures is to perform hydraulic tests. However, the interpretation of such tests, or ''inversion'' of the data, requires at least that we know the geometric pattern formed by the fractures. Combining a statistical approach with geophysical data may be extremely helpful in defining the fracture geometry. Cross-hole geophysics, either seismic or radar, can provide tomograms which are pixel maps of the velocity or attenuation anomalies in the rock. These anomalies are often due to fracture zones. Therefore, tomograms can be used to identify fracture zones and provide information about the structure within the fracture zones. This structural information can be used as the basis for simulating the degree of fracturing within the zones. Well tests can then be used to further refine the model. Because the fracture network is only partially connected, the resulting geometry of the flow paths may have fractal properties. We are studying the behavior of well tests under such geometry. Through understanding of this behavior, it may be possible to use inverse techniques to refine the a priori assignment of fractures and their conductances such that we obtain the best fit to a series of well test results simultaneously. The methodology described here is under development and currently being applied to several field sites. 4 refs., 14 figs.

  20. Air Ingress Benchmarking with Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Air Ingress Benchmarking with Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis Tieliang Zhai Professor by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission #12;2 Air Ingress Accident Objectives and Overall Strategy: Depresurization Pure Diffusion Natural Convection Challenging: Natural convection Multi-component Diffusion (air

  1. Air Ingress Benchmarking with Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Ingress Benchmarking with Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis Andrew C. Kadak Department District Beijing, China September 22-24, 2004 Abstract Air ingress accident is a complicated accident scenario is compounded by multiple physical phenomena that are involved in the air ingress event

  2. An FDTD Method for Analysis of Scattering from Rough FluidFluid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, John B.

    results are presented for fluidfluid cases modeling watersediment inter faces. Two different roughness speeds in shallowwater sediment bottoms are relatively slow, a fluid fluid model is a reasonable to the interface, and a correc tion for the numerical dispersion inherent to the FDTD algorithm. Numeri cal

  3. activation analysis technique: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Dr of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Remote...

  4. activation analysis techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Dr of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Remote...

  5. Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by this program can be applied to geothermal exploration, which may expand geothermal production. Knowledge of the gas contents in reservoir fluids can be applied to fluid...

  6. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geothermal resources with deep, fault hosted permeable fluid flow pathways and the helium Isotopic composition of the surface fluids. The authors suggest that helium isotopes...

  7. ISpace: Interactive Volume Data Classification Techniques Using Independent Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Kwan-Liu

    , multivariate data analysis, multimodality data, scientific visualization, seg- mentation, volume rendering 1ISpace: Interactive Volume Data Classification Techniques Using Independent Component Analysis, which uses Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and a multi- dimensional histogram of the volume data

  8. Category:Fluid Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual Model Add.png AddTechniquesTechniquesAnalysis

  9. A combination of air and fluid drilling technique for zones of lost circulation in the Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, S.L.; Niederhofer, J.D.; Beavers, W.M.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural geologic information available for the coal-bearing formations in the Black Warrior basin documents the occurrence of numerous fault and fracture zones. A combination air/fluid drilling technique may be advantageous to coalbed-methane operations in this and other areas with similar hydrologic and geologic conditions. The authors successfully used this technique recently on coalbed-methane wells in Tuscaloosa County, AL.

  10. Hierarchical multi-touch selection techniques for collaborative geospatial analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wartell, Zachary

    Hierarchical multi-touch selection techniques for collaborative geospatial analysis Thomas and military use. Keywords: Multi-touch, hierarchical selection, geospatial analysis, GIS, collaborative selection of complex regions-of-interest within a hierarchical geospatial environment, as well as methods

  11. Application Of Fluid Inclusion And Rock-Gas Analysis In Mineral...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Analysis In Mineral Exploration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Application Of Fluid Inclusion And Rock-Gas Analysis In...

  12. NISTIR 7078 TIN Techniques for Data Analysis and Surface Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal, Javier

    NISTIR 7078 TIN Techniques for Data Analysis and Surface Construction Building and Fire Research Institute of Standards and Technology #12;NISTIR 7078 TIN Techniques for Data Analysis and Surface This report addresses the task of meshing point clouds by triangulated elevated surfaces referred to as TIN

  13. ascitic fluid analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to quantify the randomness degree in river flow time series of two mountain rivers in Bosnia and Herzegovina, representing the turbulent environmental fluid, for the period...

  14. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fields; hence fluid-flow plots as presented here can be accomplished with little cost. Gas analytical data, therefore, are useful in developing management procedures for...

  15. A combination air and fluid drilling technique for zones of lost circulation in the Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, S.L.; Beavers, W.M.; Niederhofer, J.D.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the drilling of coalbed methane wells in the Black Warrior Basin, the possibility of penetrating a highly permeable fault or fracture zone is likely. These fracture zones, and occasionally the faults, are the source of large quantities of water. When air is being used as the drilling medium, problems may arise with producing and disposing of the formation water. When rotary drilling with fluid, loss of returns may also become a problem. The use of conventional lost circulation materials have been demonstrated-in this situation--to be both ineffective and expensive. Also, lost circulation materials substantially reduce the effective secondary permeability of the coal seams, severely limiting the ultimate methane production potential of the well. If the wellbore is generally competent, one inexpensive solution to the problem is to drill with air to a point where surface recovery tanks are full of produced formation water. Drilling can continue by switching to conventional fluid drilling until the surface storage tanks are pumped dry. This process of alternating fluid and air drilling can be continued until reaching total depth. Structural geologic information, available for the coal-bearing formations in the Black Warrior Basin, documents the occurrence of numerous fault and fracture zones. A combination air and fluid drilling technique may prove to be advantageous to coalbed methane operations in this and other areas with similar hydrologic and geologic conditions. Recently, this technique was successfully utilized on TRW, Inc., coalbed methane wells in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama.

  16. Uncertainty Analysis Technique for OMEGA Dante Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, M J; Widmann, K; Sorce, C; Park, H; Schneider, M

    2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dante is an 18 channel X-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g. hohlraums, etc.) at X-ray energies between 50 eV to 10 keV. It is a main diagnostics installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the X-ray diodes, filters and mirrors and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte-Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  17. An Analysis of Heat and Fluid Flow Phenomena 1n Electroslag Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    and temperature distri- bution~ are given for several idealized models of the electroslag welding process) ) An Analysis of Heat and Fluid Flow Phenomena 1n Electroslag Welding Two physical models created and fluid flow phenom- ena in metals processing operations have been applied to electroslag weld- ing

  18. APPLICATION OF DATA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES TO NUCLEAR REACTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunz, Robert Francis

    1 APPLICATION OF DATA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES TO NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEMS CODE ACCURACY ASSESSMENT) has been developed by the authors to provide quantitative comparisons between nuclear reactor systems. 1. INTRODUCTION In recent years, the commercial nuclear reactor industry has focused significant

  19. analysis techniques part: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Handbook of Numerical Analysis. Volume V. Techniques of Scientific Computing. (Part 2)....

  20. Design, measurement, and analysis of oxygenated fluid pump system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Alexander M., IV (Alexander Martin)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author sought out the opportunity to design and implement a system for pumping oxygenated fluid and mixing it with saline, for the purpose of providing sufficient levels of oxygen for patients undergoing forms of ...

  1. Madonne: Document Image Analysis Techniques for Cultural Heritage Documents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Madonne: Document Image Analysis Techniques for Cultural Heritage Documents Jean-Marc Ogier and Karl Tombre Abstract. This paper presents the Madonne project, a French initiative to use document image anal- ysis techniques for the purpose of preserving and exploiting heritage documents. 1

  2. System and technique for characterizing fluids using ultrasonic diffraction grating spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining property of multiphase fluids based on ultrasonic diffraction grating spectroscopy includes a diffraction grating on a solid in contact with the fluid. An interrogation device delivers ultrasound through the solid and a captures a reflection spectrum from the diffraction grating. The reflection spectrum exhibits peaks whose relative size depends on the properties of the various phases of the multiphase fluid. For example, for particles in a liquid, the peaks exhibit dependence on the particle size and the particle volume fraction. Where the exact relationship is know know a priori, data from different peaks of the same reflection spectrum or data from the peaks of different spectra obtained from different diffraction gratings can be used to resolve the size and volume fraction.

  3. A technique for human error analysis (ATHEANA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, S.E.; Ramey-Smith, A.M.; Wreathall, J.; Parry, G.W. [and others

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has become an important tool in the nuclear power industry, both for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the operating utilities. Human reliability analysis (HRA) is a critical element of PRA; however, limitations in the analysis of human actions in PRAs have long been recognized as a constraint when using PRA. A multidisciplinary HRA framework has been developed with the objective of providing a structured approach for analyzing operating experience and understanding nuclear plant safety, human error, and the underlying factors that affect them. The concepts of the framework have matured into a rudimentary working HRA method. A trial application of the method has demonstrated that it is possible to identify potentially significant human failure events from actual operating experience which are not generally included in current PRAs, as well as to identify associated performance shaping factors and plant conditions that have an observable impact on the frequency of core damage. A general process was developed, albeit in preliminary form, that addresses the iterative steps of defining human failure events and estimating their probabilities using search schemes. Additionally, a knowledge- base was developed which describes the links between performance shaping factors and resulting unsafe actions.

  4. The interdisciplinary field of Biomedical Engineering combines elements of engineering (electronics, systems analysis, fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    32 The interdisciplinary field of Biomedical Engineering combines elements of engineering (electronics, systems analysis, fluid mechanics) with the life sciences (biology, physiology, biochemistry) to define and solve problems in biology and medicine. Students choose this growing branch of engineering

  5. IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL 38C...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL...

  6. IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST...

  7. Coupling of a multizone airflow simulation program with computational fluid dynamics for indoor environmental analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Yang, 1974-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current design of building indoor environment comprises macroscopIC approaches, such as CONT AM multizone airflow analysis tool, and microscopic approaches that apply Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Each has certain ...

  8. A fluid pressure and deformation analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Bonneville, Alain

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a hydro-mechanical model and deformation analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account the two-way coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow process in greater detail. In order for analytical solutions, the simplified hydro-mechanical model includes the geomechanical part that relies on the theory of linear elasticity, while the fluid flow is based on the Darcys law. The model was derived through coupling the two parts using the standard linear poroelasticity theory. Analytical solutions for fluid pressure field were obtained for a typical geological sequestration scenario and the solutions for ground deformation were obtained using the method of Greens function. Solutions predict the temporal and spatial variation of fluid pressure, the effect of permeability and elastic modulus on the fluid pressure, the ground surface uplift, and the radial deformation during the entire injection period.

  9. Category:Lab Analysis Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual Model Add.pngpage?sourcehelpFluidLab Analysis

  10. Studies on In-situ Chelation/Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Lanthanides and Actinides Using a Radiotracer Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yuehe; Wu, Hong; Smart, Neil G.; Wai, Chien M.

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioisotope tracer techniques were used to study the process of in-situ chelation/supercritical fluid extraction(SFE) of La3+ and Lu3+ from solid matrix using mixed ligand hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA) and tributylphosphate (TBP) as chelating agents. A lab-built SFE extactor was used in this study and the extractor design was optimized based on the experimental results. Quantitative recovery of La and Lu was achieved when the extrator design was optimized. Extraction of uranium from real world samples was also investigated to demonstrate the capability of this chelation/SFE technology for environmental remediation applications. A novel on-line back extraction technique for the recovery of metal ions and regeneration of ligands is also reported.

  11. analysis interaction fluide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interaction, air particles are generated on the fly only where needed. We also model dynamic phase changes and interface forces. Our technique makes possible the...

  12. Stability and Asymptotic Analysis of a Fluid-Particle Interaction Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goudon, Thierry

    -particle interaction is of primarily importance in sedimentation analysis of disperse suspen- sions of particlesStability and Asymptotic Analysis of a Fluid-Particle Interaction Model Jose A. Carrillo1-mail: Thierry.Goudon@math.univ-lille1.fr Abstract We are interested in coupled microscopic/macroscopic models

  13. Electrothermal Analysis and Optimization Techniques for Nanoscale Integrated Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    of finite difference methods, finite element methods, or Green function based methods, each of which in the design of electrical circuits. This paper overviews several methods for the analysis and optimization overview a restricted set of thermal optimization methods, specifically, placement techniques for thermal

  14. Category:Isotopic Analysis- Fluid | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual Model Add.pngpage?sourcehelpFluid Jump to:

  15. Improved techniques for fluid diversion in oil recovery. First annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seright, R.S.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-year project has two general objectives. The first objective is to compare the effectiveness of gels in fluid diversion with those of other types of processes. Several different types of fluid-diversion processes are being compared, including those using gels, foams, emulsions, and particulates. The ultimate goals of these comparisons are to (1) establish which of these processes are most effective in a given application, and (2) determine whether aspects of one process can be combined with those of other processes to improve performance. Analyses and experiments are being performed to verify which materials are the most effective in entering and blocking high-permeability zones. Another objective of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which materials (particularly gels) selectively reduce permeability to water more than to oil. This report describes work performed during the first year of the project. Following the introduction, Chapters 2 through 5 present several surveys concerning field applications of gel treatments. Based on the results of the surveys, guidelines are proposed in Chapter 5 for the selection of candidates for gel treatments (both injection wells and production wells). Chapters 6, 7, 8, and 11 discuss theoretical work that was performed during the project. Chapter 6 examines whether Hall plots indicated selectivity during gelant placement. Chapter 7 discusses several important theoretical aspects of gel treatments in production wells with water-coning problems. Chapter 8 considers exploitation of density differences during gelant placement. Chapter 11 presents a preliminary consideration of the use of precipitates as blocking agents. Chapters 9 and 10 detail the experimental work for the project. Chapter 9 describes an experimental investigation of gelant placement in fractured systems. Chapter 10 describes experiments that probe the mechanisms for disproportionate permeability reduction by gels.

  16. Experimental thin film deposition and surface analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, W.E.; Rambabu, B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt has been made to present some of the thin-film deposition and surface analysis techniques which may be useful in growing superionic conducting materials. Emphasis is made on the importance of being careful in selecting process parameters and materials in order to produce films with properties outlined in this article. Also, special care should be given to proper consideration of grain boundary effects.

  17. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    water for anions; 2) 125-mL filtered acidified water for cations; 3) a 500-mL glass bottle of unfiltered water for tritium analysis; 4) a 30-mL glass bottle of unfiltered...

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beach, R.; Prahl, D.; Lange, R.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

  19. Perturbation Analysis for Stochastic Fluid Queueing Systems Yong Liu and Weibo Gong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yong

    Perturbation Analysis for Stochastic Fluid Queueing Systems Yong Liu and Weibo Gong Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Massachusetts, Amherst yonliu,gong@ecs.umass.edu Abstract different from ours. A simpler version of this work was first presented in Liu and Gong (1999). Although

  20. Cannulation of the equine oviduct and chemical analysis of oviduct fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Donald Lee

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in this experiment as it 9, 21 has been in previous work ' . The presence of the organisms di. d not seem to affect the chemical composition of the fluids ~ Close observation of mares wi. th more than 1 cycle showed no consistent 31 change, either increase... of Department Member Member Member Member Member December 1972 4. "-I 8. :: 0-": ABSTRACT Cannulation of the Equine Oviduct and Chemical Analysis of Oviduct Fluid. (December 1972) Donald Lee Campbell, D. V. M. , University of Georgia Directed by: Dr...

  1. Cold Plasma Wave Analysis in Magneto-Rotational Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Umber Sheikh

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to investigate the cold plasma wave properties. The analysis has been restricted to the neighborhood of the pair production region of the Kerr magnetosphere. The Fourier analyzed general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical equations are dealt under special circumstances and dispersion relations are obtained. We find the $x$-component of the complex wave vector numerically. The corresponding components of the propagation vector, attenuation vector, phase and group velocities are shown in graphs. The direction and dispersion of waves are investigated.

  2. PDM performance Test Results and Preliminary Analysis: Incompressible and Compressible Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreesen, D.S.; Gruenhagan, E.; Cohen, J.C.; Moran, D.W.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three, small diameter, Moineau, positive displacement (drilling) motors (PDMs) were dynamometer tested using water, air-water mist, air-water foam, and aerated water. The motors included (1) a 1.5-inch OD, single-lobe mud motor; (2) a 1.69-inch OD, 5:6 multi-lobe mud motor; and (3) a 1.75-inch OD, 5:6 multi-lobe air motor. This paper describes the test apparatus, procedures, data analysis, and results. Incompressible and compressible fluid performance are compared; linear performance, predicted by a positive displacement motor model, is identified where it occurs. Preliminary results and conclusions are (1) the performance of all three motors is accurately modeled using a two-variable, linear model for incompressible fluid and (2) the model was not successfully adapted to model compressible fluid performance.

  3. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2003) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergyInformation Analysis Activity

  4. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergyInformation Analysis

  5. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathies, Richard A. (Moraga, CA); Grover, William H. (Berkeley, CA); Skelley, Alison (Berkeley, CA); Lagally, Eric (Oakland, CA); Liu, Chung N. (Albany, CA)

    2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  6. PVUSA instrumentation and data analysis techniques for photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmiller, J.; Hutchinson, P.; Townsend, T.; Whitaker, C.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) project tests two types of PV systems at the main test site in Davis, California: new module technologies fielded as 20-kW Emerging Module Technology (EMT) arrays and more mature technologies fielded as 70- to 500-kW turnkey Utility-Scale (US) systems. PVUSA members have also installed systems in their service areas. Designed appropriately, data acquisition systems (DASs) can be a convenient and reliable means of assessing system performance, value, and health. Improperly designed, they can be complicated, difficult to use and maintain, and provide data of questionable validity. This report documents PVUSA PV system instrumentation and data analysis techniques and lessons learned. The report is intended to assist utility engineers, PV system designers, and project managers in establishing an objective, then, through a logical series of topics, facilitate selection and design of a DAS to meet the objective. Report sections include Performance Reporting Objectives (including operational versus research DAS), Recommended Measurements, Measurement Techniques, Calibration Issues, and Data Processing and Analysis Techniques. Conclusions and recommendations based on the several years of operation and performance monitoring are offered. This report is one in a series of 1994--1995 PVUSA reports documenting PVUSA lessons learned at the demonstration sites in Davis and Kerman, California. Other topical reports address: five-year assessment of EMTs; validation of the Kerman 500-kW grid support PV plant benefits; construction and safety experience in installing and operating PV systems; balance-of-system design and costs; procurement, acceptance, and rating practices for PV power plants; experience with power conditioning units and power quality.

  7. Toward compressed DMD: spectral analysis of fluid flows using sub-Nyquist-rate PIV data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Jonathan H; Kutz, J Nathan; Shang, Jessica K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is a powerful and increasingly popular tool for performing spectral analysis of fluid flows. However, it requires data that satisfy the Nyquist-Shannon sampling criterion. In many fluid flow experiments, such data are impossible to capture. We propose a new approach that combines ideas from DMD and compressed sensing. Given a vector-valued signal, we take measurements randomly in time (at a sub-Nyquist rate) and project the data onto a low-dimensional subspace. We then use compressed sensing to identify the dominant frequencies in the signal and their corresponding modes. We demonstrate this method using two examples, analyzing both an artificially constructed test dataset and particle image velocimetry data collected from the flow past a cylinder. In each case, our method correctly identifies the characteristic frequencies and oscillatory modes dominating the signal, proving the proposed method to be a capable tool for spectral analysis using sub-Nyquist-rate sampling.

  8. Ionic Liquid and Supercritical Fluid Hyphenated Techniques for Dissolution and Separation of Lanthanides, Actinides, and Fission Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wai, Chien M. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Bruce Mincher

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is investigating techniques involving ionic liquids (IL) and supercritical (SC) fluids for dissolution and separation of lanthanides, actinides, and fission products. The research project consists of the following tasks: Study direct dissolution of lanthanide oxides, uranium dioxide and other actinide oxides in [bmin][Tf{sub 2}N] with TBP(HNO{sub 3}){sub 1.8}(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.6} and similar types of Lewis acid-Lewis base complexing agents; Measure distributions of dissolved metal species between the IL and the sc-CO{sub 2} phases under various temperature and pressure conditions; Investigate the chemistry of the dissolved metal species in both IL and sc-CO{sub 2} phases using spectroscopic and chemical methods; Evaluate potential applications of the new extraction techniques for nuclear waste management and for other projects. Supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO{sub 2}) and ionic liquids are considered green solvents for chemical reactions and separations. Above the critical point, CO{sub 2} has both gas- and liquid-like properties, making it capable of penetrating small pores of solids and dissolving organic compounds in the solid matrix. One application of sc-CO{sub 2} extraction technology is nuclear waste management. Ionic liquids are low-melting salts composed of an organic cation and an anion of various forms, with unique properties making them attractive replacements for the volatile organic solvents traditionally used in liquid-liquid extraction processes. One type of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) based on the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cation [bmin] with bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion [Tf{sub 2}N] is of particular interest for extraction of metal ions due to its water stability, relative low viscosity, high conductivity, and good electrochemical and thermal stability. Recent studies indicate that a coupled IL sc-CO{sub 2} extraction system can effectively transfer trivalent lanthanide and uranyl ions from nitric acid solutions. Advantages of this technique include operation at ambient temperature and pressure, selective extraction due to tunable sc-CO{sub 2} solvation strength, no IL loss during back-extraction, and no organic solvent introduced into the IL phase.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF PIV TECHNIQUE UNDER MAGNETIC FIELDS AND MEASUREMENT OF TURBULENT PIPE FLOW OF FLIBE SIMULANT FLUID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    sufficiently large heat transfer using high Prandtl number fluid coolant, high turbulence is required, and the heat transfer characteristics of low Prandtl number fluids are con heat transfer (low film temperature drop) to cool first wall structures. In order to obtain

  10. Analysis techniques for background rejection at the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuesta, C; Arnquist, I J; Avignone, F T; Baldenegro-Barrera, C X; Barabash, A S; Bertrand, F E; Bradley, A W; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Buuck, M; Byram, D; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Detwiler, J A; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilliss, T; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guinn, I S; Guiseppe, V E; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Jasinski, B R; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J; MacMullin, J; Martin, R D; Meijer, S J; Mertens, S; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Poon, A W P; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Shanks, B; Shirchenko, M; Snyder, N; Suriano, A M; Tedeschi, D; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Yu, C -H; Yumatov, V; Zhitnikov, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, an ultra-low background, 40-kg modular HPGe detector array to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in 76Ge. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale Ge-based 0nbb-decay searches that will probe the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region, a major goal of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 count/tonne/year in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value at 2039 keV. The background rejection techniques to be applied to the data include cuts based on data reduction, pulse shape analysis, event coincidences, and time correlations. The Point Contact design of the DEMONSTRATOR 0s germanium detectors allows for significant reduction of gamma background.

  11. The interdisciplinary field of Biomedical Engineering combines elements of engineering (electronics, systems analysis, fluid mechanics) with the life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    34 The interdisciplinary field of Biomedical Engineering combines elements of engineering (electronics, systems analysis, fluid mechanics) with the life sciences (biology, physiology, biochemistry) to define and solve problems in biology and medicine. Students choose this growing branch of engineering

  12. The effects of fracture fluid cleanup upon the analysis of pressure buildup tests in tight gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Atle Thomas

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF FRACTURE FLUID CLEANUP UPON THE ANALYSIS OF PRESSURE BUILDUP TESTS IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ATLE THOMAS JOHANSEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE EFFECTS OF FRACTURE FLUID CLEANUP UPON THE ANALYSIS OF PRESSURE BUILDUP TESTS IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ATLE THOMAS JOHANSEN Approved...

  13. Multivariate analysis of remote LIBS spectra using partial least squares, principal component analysis, and related techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sklute, Elizabeth [MT HOLYOKE COLLEGE; Dyare, Melinda D [MT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative analysis with LIBS traditionally employs calibration curves that are complicated by the chemical matrix effects. These chemical matrix effects influence the LIBS plasma and the ratio of elemental composition to elemental emission line intensity. Consequently, LIBS calibration typically requires a priori knowledge of the unknown, in order for a series of calibration standards similar to the unknown to be employed. In this paper, three new Multivariate Analysis (MV A) techniques are employed to analyze the LIBS spectra of 18 disparate igneous and highly-metamorphosed rock samples. Partial Least Squares (PLS) analysis is used to generate a calibration model from which unknown samples can be analyzed. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) are employed to generate a model and predict the rock type of the samples. These MV A techniques appear to exploit the matrix effects associated with the chemistries of these 18 samples.

  14. Viscous potential flow analysis of electrified miscible finitely conducting fluid through porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obied Allah, M. H. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut (Egypt)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a viscous potential flow analysis is used to investigate capillary surface waves between two horizontal finite fluid layers. The two layers have finite conductivities and admit mass and heat transfer. A general dispersion relation is derived. The presence of finite conductivities together with the dielectric permeabilities makes the horizontal electric field play a dual role in the stability criterion. The phenomenon of negative viscosity is observed. A new growth rate parameter, depending on the kinematical viscosity of the lower fluid layer, is found and has a stabilizing effect on the unstable modes. The growth rates and neutral stability curve are given and applied to air-water interface. The effects of various parameters are discussed for the Kelvin-Helmholtz and the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities.

  15. Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN); Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration.

  16. Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, D.D.; Hiller, J.M.

    1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration. 1 fig.

  17. 15th Int Symp on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics Lisbon, Portugal, 05-08 July, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    in a continuously stratified fluid, here applied to internal waves. Iso-density surfaces are marked with thin requires high- quality optical windows in the test tank walls, with fairly limited field of view. Another

  18. An Investigation of the Latent Semantic Analysis Technique for Document Retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Investigation of the Latent Semantic Analysis Technique for Document Retrieval STUDENT PROJECT;_________________________________________________________________________ An Investigation of the Latent Semantic Analysis Technique for Document Retrieval. Report by: David Mugo Page 2. These term-matching techniques have always relied on matching query terms with document terms to retrieve

  19. MINET: transient analysis of fluid-flow and heat-transfer networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Tuyle, G.J.; Guppy, J.G.; Nepsee, T.C.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MINET, a computer code developed for the steady-state and transient analysis of fluid-flow and heat-transfer networks, is described. The code is based on a momentum integral network method, which offers significant computational advantages in the analysis of large systems, such as the balance of plant in a power-generating facility. An application is discussed in which MINET is coupled to the Super System Code (SSC), an advanced generic code for the transient analysis of loop- or pool-type LMFBR systems. In this application, the ability of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant to operate in a natural circulation mode following an assumed loss of all electric power, was assessed. Results from the MINET portion of the calculations are compared against those generated independently by the Clinch River Project, using the DEMO code.

  20. Development of MELCOR Input Techniques for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corson, James

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and other HTGRs. In the present study, new input techniques have been developed for MELCOR HTGR analysis. These new techniques include methods for modeling radiation heat transfer between solid surfaces in an HTGR, calculating fuel and cladding geometric...

  1. Pointer analysis for Java programs : novel techniques and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S?lcianu, Alexandru D. (Alexandru Doru), 1975-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents a pointer analysis for Java programs, together with several practical analysis applications. For each program point, the analysis is able to construct a points-to graph that describes how local ...

  2. Performance analysis of interference suppression techniques for multiple antenna systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amihood, Patrick

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pre-BLAST-DFE Technique for MISO Channels with DecentralizedPrecoding Operating over MISO Frequency Selec- tive Fadingon a Nonlinear Precoder for MISO Channels with Decentralized

  3. Global Stability Analysis of Fluid Flows using Sum-of-Squares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 1, 2011 ... For finite dimensional approximations of fluid ...... if and only if there exist non-

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of the VHTR Lower Plenum Standard Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard W. Johnson; Richard R. Schultz

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy is promoting the resurgence of nuclear power in the U. S. for both electrical power generation and production of process heat required for industrial processes such as the manufacture of hydrogen for use as a fuel in automobiles. The DOE project is called the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) and is based on a Generation IV reactor concept called the very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which will use helium as the coolant at temperatures ranging from 450 C to perhaps 1000 C. While computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has not been used for past safety analysis for nuclear reactors in the U. S., it is being considered for safety analysis for existing and future reactors. It is fully recognized that CFD simulation codes will have to be validated for flow physics reasonably close to actual fluid dynamic conditions expected in normal and accident operational situations. To this end, experimental data have been obtained in a scaled model of a narrow slice of the lower plenum of a prismatic VHTR. The present report presents results of CFD examinations of these data to explore potential issues with the geometry, the initial conditions, the flow dynamics and the data needed to fully specify the inlet and boundary conditions; results for several turbulence models are examined. Issues are addressed and recommendations about the data are made.

  5. Preliminary Analysis of Grande Ronde Basalt Formation Flow Top Transmissivity as it Relates to Assessment and Site Selection Applications for Fluid/Energy Storage and Sequestration Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary Analysis of Grande Ronde Basalt Formation Flow Top Transmissivity as it Relates to Assessment and Site Selection Applications for Fluid/Energy Storage and Sequestration Projects

  6. Analysis of power estimation techniques in CDMA systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pei, Ying

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    estimation techniques, the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm, the decorrelating estimator and the averaging method, on both AWGN and Rayleigh fading channels. The implementation of the EM algorithm on TMS320C62 is also presented. The performance...

  7. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, C.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment's final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  8. QA-Pagelet: Data Preparation Techniques for Large Scale Data Analysis of the Deep Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Ling

    1 QA-Pagelet: Data Preparation Techniques for Large Scale Data Analysis of the Deep Web James data preparation technique for large scale data analysis of the Deep Web. To support QA the Deep Web. Two unique features of the Thor framework are (1) the novel page clustering for grouping

  9. QA-Pagelet: Data Preparation Techniques for Large-Scale Data Analysis of the Deep Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caverlee, James

    QA-Pagelet: Data Preparation Techniques for Large-Scale Data Analysis of the Deep Web James the QA-Pagelet as a fundamental data preparation technique for large-scale data analysis of the Deep Web-Pagelets from the Deep Web. Two unique features of the Thor framework are 1) the novel page clustering

  10. A scanning AC calorimetry technique for the analysis of nano-scale quantities of materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A scanning AC calorimetry technique for the analysis of nano-scale quantities of materials Kechao OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 83, 114901 (2012) A scanning AC calorimetry technique for the analysis of nano 2012) We present a scanning AC nanocalorimetry method that enables calorimetry measurements at heating

  11. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF THERMAL TENSIONING TECHNIQUES MITIGATING WELD BUCKLING DISTORTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaleris, Panagiotis

    FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF THERMAL TENSIONING TECHNIQUES MITIGATING WELD BUCKLING DISTORTION. This paper presents a finite element analysis model of the thermal tensioning technique. A series of finite by the finite element simulations, the residual stresses of large size and high heat input welds are reduced

  12. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, C.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis? It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment`s final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis? A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  13. Natural Circulation and Linear Stability Analysis for Liquid-Metal Reactors with the Effect of Fluid Axial Conduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Qiao Wu; James J. Sienicki

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of fluid axial thermal conduction on one-dimensional liquid metal natural circulation and its linear stability was performed through nondimensional analysis, steady-state assessment, and linear perturbation evaluation. The Nyquist criterion and a root-search method were employed to find the linear stability boundary of both forward and backward circulations. The study provided a relatively complete analysis method for one-dimensional natural circulation problems with the consideration of fluid axial heat conduction. The results suggest that fluid axial heat conduction in a natural circulation loop should be considered only when the modified Peclet number is {approx}1 or less, which is significantly smaller than the practical value of a lead liquid metal-cooled reactor.

  14. Improved techniques for fluid diversion in oil recovery. Second annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seright, R.S.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is directed at reducing water production and increasing oil recovery efficiency. Today, the cost of water disposal is typically between $0.25 and $0.50 per bbl. Therefore, there is a tremendous economic incentive to reduce water production if that can be accomplished without sacrificing hydrocarbon production. Environmental considerations also provide a significant incentive to reduce water production during oilfield operations. This three-year project has two technical objectives. The first objective is to compare the effectiveness of gels in fluid diversion (water shutoff) with those of other types of processes. Several different types of fluid-diversion processes are being compared, including those using gels, foams, emulsions, and particulates. The ultimate goals of these comparisons are to (1) establish which of these processes are most effective in a given application and (2) determine whether aspects of one process can be combined with those of other processes to improve performance. Analyses and experiments are being performed to verify which materials are the most effective in entering and blocking high-permeability zones. The second objective of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which materials (particularly gels) selectively reduce permeability to water more than to oil. Topics covered in this report include (1) comparisons of the use of gels, foams, emulsions, and particulates as blocking agents; (2) propagation of aluminum-citrate-HPAM gels through porous rock; (3) gel properties in fractured systems; (4) gel placement in unfractured anisotropic flow systems; and (5) an investigation of why some gels can reduce water permeability more than oil permeability.

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angelo Frisani; Yassin A. Hassan; Victor M. Ugaz

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of passive heat removal systems is one of the main concerns for the modular very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR) vessel cavity. The reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) is a key heat removal system during normal and off-normal conditions. The design and validation of the RCCS is necessary to demonstrate that VHTRs can survive to the postulated accidents. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) STAR-CCM+/V3.06.006 code was used for three-dimensional system modeling and analysis of the RCCS. A CFD model was developed to analyze heat exchange in the RCCS. The model incorporates a 180-deg section resembling the VHTR RCCS experimentally reproduced in a laboratory-scale test facility at Texas A&M University. All the key features of the experimental facility were taken into account during the numerical simulations. The objective of the present work was to benchmark CFD tools against experimental data addressing the behavior of the RCCS following accident conditions. Two cooling fluids (i.e., water and air) were considered to test the capability of maintaining the RCCS concrete walls' temperature below design limits. Different temperature profiles at the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall obtained from the experimental facility were used as boundary conditions in the numerical analyses to simulate VHTR transient evolution during accident scenarios. Mesh convergence was achieved with an intensive parametric study of the two different cooling configurations and selected boundary conditions. To test the effect of turbulence modeling on the RCCS heat exchange, predictions using several different turbulence models and near-wall treatments were evaluated and compared. The comparison among the different turbulence models analyzed showed satisfactory agreement for the temperature distribution inside the RCCS cavity medium and at the standpipes walls. For such a complicated geometry and flow conditions, the tested turbulence models demonstrated that the realizable k-epsilon model with two-layer all y+ wall treatment performs better than the other k-epsilon and k-omega turbulence models when compared to the experimental results and the Reynolds stress transport turbulence model results. A scaling analysis was developed to address the distortions introduced by the CFD model in simulating the physical phenomena inside the RCCS system with respect to the full plant configuration. The scaling analysis demonstrated that both the experimental facility and the CFD model achieve a satisfactory resemblance of the main flow characteristics inside the RCCS cavity region, and convection and radiation heat exchange phenomena are properly scaled from the actual plant.

  16. Processing and analysis techniques involving in-vessel material generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY)

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In at least one embodiment, the inventive technology relates to in-vessel generation of a material from a solution of interest as part of a processing and/or analysis operation. Preferred embodiments of the in-vessel material generation (e.g., in-vessel solid material generation) include precipitation; in certain embodiments, analysis and/or processing of the solution of interest may include dissolution of the material, perhaps as part of a successive dissolution protocol using solvents of increasing ability to dissolve. Applications include, but are by no means limited to estimation of a coking onset and solution (e.g., oil) fractionating.

  17. Processing and analysis techniques involving in-vessel material generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY)

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In at least one embodiment, the inventive technology relates to in-vessel generation of a material from a solution of interest as part of a processing and/or analysis operation. Preferred embodiments of the in-vessel material generation (e.g., in-vessel solid material generation) include precipitation; in certain embodiments, analysis and/or processing of the solution of interest may include dissolution of the material, perhaps as part of a successive dissolution protocol using solvents of increasing ability to dissolve. Applications include, but are by no means limited to estimation of a coking onset and solution (e.g., oil) fractionating.

  18. Comparative analysis of evaluation techniques for transport policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browne, David, E-mail: davidbrowne2@gmail.co [Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin (TCD), Dublin 2 (Ireland); Ryan, Lisa, E-mail: Lisa.RYAN@iea.or [International Energy Agency (IEA), Paris (France)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to examine and compare the use of a number of policy evaluation tools, which can be used to measure the impact of transport policies and programmes as part of a strategic environmental assessment (SEA) or sustainability appraisal. The evaluation tools that were examined include cost-benefit analysis (CBA), cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) and multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA). It was concluded that both CEA and CBA are useful for estimating the costs and/or benefits associated with transport policies but are constrained by the difficulty in quantifying non-market impacts and monetising total costs and benefits. Furthermore, CEA is limited to identifying the most 'cost-effective policy' for achieving a single, narrowly defined objective, usually greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction and is, therefore, not suitable for evaluating policy options with ancillary costs or a variety of potential benefits. Thus, CBA or CEA evaluation should be complemented by a complete environmental and socio-economic impact assessment approach such as MCDA. This method allows for participatory analysis and qualitative assessment but is subject to caveats such as subjectivity and value-laden judgments.

  19. Towards Effective Clustering Techniques for the Analysis of Electric Power Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Cotilla Sanchez, Jose E.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Wang, Shaobu; Mackey, Patrick S.; Hines, Paul; Huang, Zhenyu

    2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Clustering is an important data analysis technique with numerous applications in the analysis of electric power grids. Standard clustering techniques are oblivious to the rich structural and dynamic information available for power grids. Therefore, by exploiting the inherent topological and electrical structure in the power grid data, we propose new methods for clustering with applications to model reduction, locational marginal pricing, phasor measurement unit (PMU or synchrophasor) placement, and power system protection. We focus our attention on model reduction for analysis based on time-series information from synchrophasor measurement devices, and spectral techniques for clustering. By comparing different clustering techniques on two instances of realistic power grids we show that the solutions are related and therefore one could leverage that relationship for a computational advantage. Thus, by contrasting different clustering techniques we make a case for exploiting structure inherent in the data with implications for several domains including power systems.

  20. Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    he purpose of this DOE Standard is to establish guidance for the preparation and review of hazard categorization and accident analyses techniques as required in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  1. Trial application of a technique for human error analysis (ATHEANA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bley, D.C. [Buttonwood Consulting, Inc., Oakton, VA (United States); Cooper, S.E. [Science Applications International Corp., Reston, VA (United States); Parry, G.W. [NUS, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new method for HRA, ATHEANA, has been developed based on a study of the operating history of serious accidents and an understanding of the reasons why people make errors. Previous publications associated with the project have dealt with the theoretical framework under which errors occur and the retrospective analysis of operational events. This is the first attempt to use ATHEANA in a prospective way, to select and evaluate human errors within the PSA context.

  2. Fluid--Structure Interaction : : Physiologic Simulation of Pulsatile Ventricular Assist Devices using Isogeometric Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Christopher Curtis

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for prebending of wind turbine blades. 89:323336, 2012. [wind turbine rotors at full scale. Part II: Fluid structure interaction modeling with composite blades.

  3. Analysis of Solar Passive Techniques and Natural Ventilation Concepts in a Residential Building Including CFD Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quince, N.; Ordonez, A.; Bruno, J. C.; Coronas, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    step to increase energy performance in buildings is to use passive strategies, such as orientation, natural ventilation or envelope optimisation. This paper presents an analysis of solar passive techniques and natural ventilation concepts in a case...

  4. Storage and analysis techniques for fast 2-D camera data on W. M. Davisa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Storage and analysis techniques for fast 2-D camera data on NSTX W. M. Davisa *, D.M. Mastrovitoa, and this year, one new camera alone can acquire 2GB per pulse. The paper will describe the storage strategies

  5. Using citation analysis techniques for computer-assisted legal research in continental jurisdictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Anton

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following research investigates the use of citation analysis techniques for relevance ranking in computer-assisted legal research systems. Overviews on information retrieval, legal research, computer-assisted legal ...

  6. Asphaltene Aggregation: Techniques for Analysis Keith L. Gawrys and Peter K. Kilpatrick*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    Asphaltene Aggregation: Techniques for Analysis Keith L. Gawrys and Peter K. Kilpatrick* North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA ABSTRACT The study of asphaltene colloidal, hence, pose considerable challenges for the petroleum industry. Asphaltenes are defined as the toluene

  7. Mathematical Geology, Vol. 4, No. 3, 1972 Mathematical Techniques for Paleocurrent Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jammalamadaka, S. Rao

    Mathematical Geology, Vol. 4, No. 3, 1972 Mathematical Techniques for Paleocurrent Analysis procedure. Finally, theprocedures for testing the homogeneity of directional data from several geological directions from different geological formations belong to significantly different populations. KEY WORDS

  8. c Copyright by David Daly, 2001 ANALYSIS OF CONNECTION AS A DECOMPOSITION TECHNIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    c Copyright by David Daly, 2001 #12;ANALYSIS OF CONNECTION AS A DECOMPOSITION TECHNIQUE BY DAVID of the decomposition techniques introducing an error of less than 11%. iii #12;To my father, who will never see William H. Sanders, for technical advice and support on the Mobius project. Jenny Applequist

  9. Extending the Borders of Accident Investigation: Applying Novel Analysis Techniques to the Loss of the Brazilian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    -1- Extending the Borders of Accident Investigation: Applying Novel Analysis Techniques to the Loss. In consequence, it is becoming increasingly difficult to identify the causes of incidents and accidents back to the development of a number of novel accident investigation techniques. Most of these approaches are intended

  10. Flow control techniques for real-time media applications in best-effort networks using fluid models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantinou, Apostolos

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    at the application layer. An end-to-end ?uid model is used, including the source bu?er, the network and the destination bu?er. Traditional con- trol techniques, along with more advanced adaptive predictive control methods, are considered in order to provide... OF THE END-TO-END FLOW TRANSPORT SYSTEM : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 25 A. Source Bu?er Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 B. Network Dynamic Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 1. Time-Varying Time Delay Model...

  11. Automation of the Laguerre Expansion Technique for Analysis of Time-resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabir, Aditi Sandeep

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    AUTOMATION OF THE LAGUERRE EXPANSION TECHNIQUE FOR ANALYSIS OF TIME-RESOLVED FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY DATA A Thesis by ADITI SANDEEP DABIR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2009 Major Subject: Biomedical Engineering AUTOMATION OF THE LAGUERRE EXPANSION TECHNIQUE FOR ANALYSIS OF TIME-RESOLVED FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY DATA A Thesis...

  12. Evaluation of new techniques for two dimensional finite element analysis of woven composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundapaneni, Sitaram Chowdary

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF NEW TECHNIQUES FOR TWO DIMENSIONAL FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF WOVEN COMPOSITES A Thesis by SITARAM CHOWDARY GUNDAPANENI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE DECEMBER 1992 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering EVALUATION OF NEW TECHNIQUES FOR TWO DIMENSIONAL FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF WOVEN COMPOSITES A Thesis by SITARAM CHOWDARY GUNDAPANENI Approved...

  13. Application of thermal analysis techniques in activated carbon production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnals, G.L.; DeBarr, J.A.; Brady, T.A. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several current research programs at the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) relate to the development of activated carbons from Illinois coal, fly ash, and scrap tires. Preparation of activated carbons involves thermal processing steps that include preoxidation, pyrolysis and activation. Reaction time, temperature and gas composition during these processing steps ultimately determine the nature of the activated carbon produced. Thermal analysis plays a significant role in developing carbons by providing fundamental and engineering data that are useful in carbon production and characterization for process development.

  14. One-dimensional fluid diffusion induced by constant-rate flow injection: Theoretical analysis and application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is essential in the exploitation of natural fluid resources, such as water, steam, petroleum, and natural gas advantages of our method are the reliability of the testing method, its economy of time, and the flexibility wastes. [3] In general, the nature of fluids in reservoir rocks can be characterized in terms of quantity

  15. Studies of fly ash using thermal analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hanxu; Shen, Xiang-Zhong; Sisk, B. [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved thermoanalytical methods have been developed that are capable of quantitative identification of various components of fly ash from a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustion system. The thermogravimetric procedure developed can determine quantities of H{sub 2}O, Ca(OH){sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, CaSO{sub 4} and carbonaceous matter in fly ash with accuracy comparable to more time-consuming ASTM methods. This procedure is a modification of the Mikhail-Turcotte methods that can accurately analyze bed ash, with higher accuracy regarding the greater amount of carbonaceous matter in fly ash. In addition, in conjunction with FTIR and SEM/EDS analysis, the reduction mechanism of CaSO{sub 4} as CaSO{sub 4} + 4H{sub 2} = CaS + 4H{sub 2}O has been confirmed in this study. This mechanism is important in analyzing and evaluating sulfur capture in fluidized-bed combustion systems.

  16. Methods for magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jian Zhi (Richland, WA); Wind, Robert A. (Kennewick, WA); Minard, Kevin R. (Kennewick, WA); Majors, Paul D. (Kennewick, WA)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object are disclosed that include placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. In particular embodiments the method includes pulsing the radio frequency to provide at least two of a spatially selective read pulse, a spatially selective phase pulse, and a spatially selective storage pulse. Further disclosed methods provide pulse sequences that provide extended imaging capabilities, such as chemical shift imaging or multiple-voxel data acquisition.

  17. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Matthew W. [Ames Laboratory

    2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  18. TESEC 2001, Genova, Italy ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR SAFETY ANALYSIS APPLIED TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    TESEC 2001, Genova, Italy 1 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR SAFETY ANALYSIS APPLIED TO THE GAS TURBINE for safety analysis of complex computer based systems. Such approaches are applied to the gas turbine control and electrical power supply of the centre of ENEA CR Casaccia. The plant is based on a small gas turbine and has

  19. Energy analysis of substorms based on remote sensing techniques, solar wind measurements, and geomagnetic indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?stgaard, Nikolai

    Energy analysis of substorms based on remote sensing techniques, solar wind measurements wind Citation: ?stgaard, N., G. Germany, J. Stadsnes, and R. R. Vondrak, Energy analysis of substorms satellite have been used to examine the energy deposition in the Northern Hemisphere by precipitating

  20. Technique for continuous high-resolution analysis of trace substances in firn and ice cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roethlisberger, R.; Bigler, M.; Hutterli, M.; Sommer, S.; Stauffer, B.; Junghans, H.G.; Wagenbach, D.

    2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The very successful application of a CFA (Continuous flow analysis) system in the GRIP project (Greenland Ice Core Project) for high-resolution ammonium, calcium, hydrogen peroxide, and formaldehyde measurements along a deep ice core led to further development of this analysis technique. The authors included methods for continuous analysis technique. The authors included methods for continuous analysis of sodium, nitrate, sulfate, and electrolytical conductivity, while the existing methods have been improved. The melting device has been optimized to allow the simultaneous analysis of eight components. Furthermore, a new melter was developed for analyzing firn cores. The system has been used in the frame of the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) for in-situ analysis of several firn cores from Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, and for the new ice core drilled at Dome C, Antarctica.

  1. Design and analysis of active fluid-and-cellular solid composites for controllable stiffness robotic elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Nadia G. (Nadia Gen San)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the use of a new class of materials for realizing soft robots. Specifically, meso-scale composites--composed of cellular solids impregnated with active fluids-were be designed ...

  2. Analysis of drilling fluid rheology and tool joint effect to reduce errors in hydraulics calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viloria Ochoa, Marilyn

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a simplified and accurate procedure for selecting the rheological model which best fits the rheological properties of a given non- Newtonian fluid and introduces five new approaches to correct for tool joint losses from expansion...

  3. Analysis of multiphase fluid flows via high speed and synthetic aperture three dimensional imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharfman, Barry Ethan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spray flows are a difficult problem within the realm of fluid mechanics because of the complicated interfacial physics involved. Complete models of sprays having even the simplest geometries continue to elude researchers ...

  4. High Flash-point Fluid Flow System Aerosol Flammability Study and Combustion Mechanism Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Szu-Ying

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of flammable aerosols creates fire and explosion hazards in the process industry. Due to the operation condition of high pressure circumstances, heat transfer fluids tend to form aerosols when accidental leaking occurs on pipelines...

  5. Fluid Dynamics Models for Low Rank Discriminant Analysis Yung-Kyun Noh1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and velocity flow fields. We show how to apply the Gauss principle of least con- straint in fluids to obtain., 2000). Projection pursuit is a canonical approach to find a low dimen- sional subspace where

  6. Rapid Automated Dissolution and Analysis Techniques for Radionuclides in Recycle Process Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudowe, Ralf

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of process samples for radionuclide content is an important part of current procedures for material balance and accountancy in the different process streams of a recycling plant. The destructive sample analysis techniques currently available necessitate a significant amount of time. It is therefore desirable to develop new sample analysis procedures that allow for a quick turnaround time and increased sample throughput with a minimum of deviation between samples. In particular new capabilities for rapid sample dissolution and radiochemical separation are required. Most of the radioanalytical techniques currently employed for sample analysis are based on manual laboratory procedures. Such procedures are time and labor intensive and not well suited for situations in which a rapid sample analysis is requires and/or large number of samples needed to be analyzed.

  7. Analysis and applications of a combined nonlinear optimization and simulation technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Runkles, Richard Ralph

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - tive procedure leads to a solution to the general problem, while the search procedure is required to locate the optimal solution. The majority of this report deals with analysis of the iterative pro- cedure, although the relation of the solution... derived by this part of the technique and the optimal solution is discussed. The mathematical basis of the method is discussed and the prob- lems to which the technique is applicable are divided into three classes. Experimental example problems of two...

  8. Knowledge-base for the new human reliability analysis method, A Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, S.E. [Science Application International Corp., Reston, VA (United States); Wreathall, J. [John Wreathall & Co., Dublin, OH (United States); Thompson, C.M., Drouin, M. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Bley, D.C. [Buttonwood Consulting, Inc., Oakton, VA (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the knowledge base for the application of the new human reliability analysis (HRA) method, a ``A Technique for Human Error Analysis`` (ATHEANA). Since application of ATHEANA requires the identification of previously unmodeled human failure events, especially errors of commission, and associated error-forcing contexts (i.e., combinations of plant conditions and performance shaping factors), this knowledge base is an essential aid for the HRA analyst.

  9. Energy stability analysis for a hybrid fluid-kinetic plasma model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip J. Morrison; Emanuele Tassi; Cesare Tronci

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In plasma physics, a hybrid fluid-kinetic model is composed of a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) part that describes a bulk fluid component and a Vlasov kinetic theory part that describes an energetic plasma component. While most hybrid models in the plasma literature are non-Hamiltonian, this paper investigates a recent Hamiltonian variant in its two-dimensional configuration. The corresponding Hamiltonian structure is described along with its Casimir invariants. Then, the energy-Casimir method is used to derive explicit sufficient stability conditions, which imply a stable spectrum and suggest nonlinear stability.

  10. Parallel processing techniques applied to transient stability analysis of power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balachandra, Chandrakumar John

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : ( airman o Commattee Pv(Hea o Department (Mem er (Mem r (Member) December 1982 ABSTRACT Parallel Processing Techniques Applied 'to Transient Stability in Electric Power Systems. (December 1982) Chandrakumar John Balachandra, Bsc. , University of Sri... manually. 2. Comparision of the computational advantages of the above method with the conventional methods of analysis. Analysis of the same network as before, using the cluster algorithm to define the subnetwork boun- daries Tne same procedure...

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Best Practice Guidelines in the Analysis of Storage Dry Cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zigh, A.; Solis, J. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD MS (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are used to evaluate the thermal performance of a dry cask under long term storage conditions in accordance with NUREG-1536 [NUREG-1536, 1997]. A three-dimensional CFD model was developed and validated using data for a ventilated storage cask (VSC-17) collected by Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The developed Fluent CFD model was validated to minimize the modeling and application uncertainties. To address modeling uncertainties, the paper focused on turbulence modeling of buoyancy driven air flow. Similarly, in the application uncertainties, the pressure boundary conditions used to model the air inlet and outlet vents were investigated and validated. Different turbulence models were used to reduce the modeling uncertainty in the CFD simulation of the air flow through the annular gap between the overpack and the multi-assembly sealed basket (MSB). Among the chosen turbulence models, the validation showed that the low Reynolds k-{epsilon} and the transitional k-{omega} turbulence models predicted the measured temperatures closely. To assess the impact of pressure boundary conditions used at the air inlet and outlet channels on the application uncertainties, a sensitivity analysis of operating density was undertaken. For convergence purposes, all available commercial CFD codes include the operating density in the pressure gradient term of the momentum equation. The validation showed that the correct operating density corresponds to the density evaluated at the air inlet condition of pressure and temperature. Next, the validated CFD method was used to predict the thermal performance of an existing dry cask storage system. The evaluation uses two distinct models: a three-dimensional and an axisymmetrical representation of the cask. In the 3-D model, porous media was used to model only the volume occupied by the rodded region that is surrounded by the BWR channel box. In the axisymmetric model, porous media was used to model the entire region that encompasses the fuel assemblies as well as the gaps in between. Consequently, a larger volume is represented by porous media in the second model; hence, a higher frictional flow resistance is introduced in the momentum equations. The conservatism and the safety margins of these models were compared to assess the applicability and the realism of these two models. The three-dimensional model included fewer geometry simplifications and is recommended as it predicted less conservative fuel cladding temperature values, while still assuring the existence of adequate safety margins. (authors)

  12. A generalized likelihood ratio technique for automated analysis of bobbin coil eddy current dataq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polikar, Robi

    A generalized likelihood ratio technique for automated analysis of bobbin coil eddy current dataq M signals that are commonly found in bobbin coil eddy current data. The performance of the proposed for automated processing and classication of eddy current data. q 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights

  13. Evaluation of syngas production unit cost of bio-gasification facility using regression analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Yangyang; Parajuli, Prem B.

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of economic feasibility of a bio-gasification facility needs understanding of its unit cost under different production capacities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the unit cost of syngas production at capacities from 60 through 1800Nm 3/h using an economic model with three regression analysis techniques (simple regression, reciprocal regression, and log-log regression). The preliminary result of this study showed that reciprocal regression analysis technique had the best fit curve between per unit cost and production capacity, with sum of error squares (SES) lower than 0.001 and coefficient of determination of (R 2) 0.996. The regression analysis techniques determined the minimum unit cost of syngas production for micro-scale bio-gasification facilities of $0.052/Nm 3, under the capacity of 2,880 Nm 3/h. The results of this study suggest that to reduce cost, facilities should run at a high production capacity. In addition, the contribution of this technique could be the new categorical criterion to evaluate micro-scale bio-gasification facility from the perspective of economic analysis.

  14. State-of-the-art Tools and Techniques for Quantitative Modeling and Analysis of Embedded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Alexandre

    1 State-of-the-art Tools and Techniques for Quantitative Modeling and Analysis of Embedded SystemsAalborgCNRS VerimagINRIA/IRISA Saarland University Embedded Systems Institute and Radboud University Abstract and stochastic aspects. Then, we will overview the BIP framework for modular design and code generation. Finally

  15. Redundancy Reduction Techniques and Content Analysis for Multimedia Services the European COST 211quat Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabbouj, Moncef

    Redundancy Reduction Techniques and Content Analysis for Multimedia Services the European COST, such as the ongoing ISO MPEG-4 standardisation phase as well as the new ISO MPEG-7 initiative. The aim is to define philosophy of COST projects is introduced before narrowing the focus to the COST 211 series. For more than 20

  16. Water Research 38 (2004) 25292536 The use of isotopic and lipid analysis techniques linking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , ethylbenzene and xylenes (i.e., BTEX) are common ground water pollutants that threaten water suppliesWater Research 38 (2004) 25292536 The use of isotopic and lipid analysis techniques linking used recently as an environmental forensics tool to demonstrate microbial degradation of pollutants

  17. Impact of Jitter-based Techniques on Flooding over Wireless Ad hoc Networks: Model and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Impact of Jitter-based Techniques on Flooding over Wireless Ad hoc Networks: Model and Analysis Philippe.Jacquet@inria.fr Emmanuel Baccelli INRIA, France Emmanuel.Baccelli@inria.fr Abstract--Jitter. This paper investigates on the impact of the standardized jitter mechanism on network-wide packet

  18. A Simulation Technique for Performance Analysis of Generic Petri Net Models of Computer Systems1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cintra, Marcelo

    A Simulation Technique for Performance Analysis of Generic Petri Net Models of Computer Systems1 Abstract Many timed extensions for Petri nets have been proposed in the literature, but their analytical solutions impose limitations on the time distributions and the net topology. To overcome these limitations

  19. Creep Compliance Analysis Technique for the Flattened Indirect Tension Test of Asphalt Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Creep Compliance Analysis Technique for the Flattened Indirect Tension Test of Asphalt Concrete: Cored Sample (Cylindrical) Indirect tensile testing (IDT) (Strength/Creep) AASHTO T-322 Damage under and Flattened IDT 1000-sec creep tests on three replicates 0, -10, and -20 deg. C Displacement

  20. Uncertainty Analysis on the Design of Thermal Conductivity Measurement by a Guarded Cut-Bar Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Phillips; Changhu Xing; Colby Jensen; Heng Ban1

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique adapted from the guarded-comparative-longitudinal heat flow method was selected for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of a nuclear fuel compact over a temperature range characteristic of its usage. This technique fulfills the requirement for non-destructive measurement of the composite compact. Although numerous measurement systems have been created based on the guarded comparative method, comprehensive systematic (bias) and measurement (precision) uncertainty associated with this technique have not been fully analyzed. In addition to the geometric effect in the bias error, which has been analyzed previously, this paper studies the working condition which is another potential error source. Using finite element analysis, this study showed the effect of these two types of error sources in the thermal conductivity measurement process and the limitations in the design selection of various parameters by considering their effect on the precision error. The results and conclusions provide valuable reference for designing and operating an experimental measurement system using this technique.

  1. Coupled computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer analysis of the VHTR lower plenum.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Rodriguez, Salvador B.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The very high temperature reactor (VHTR) concept is being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other groups around the world for the future generation of electricity at high thermal efficiency (> 48%) and co-generation of hydrogen and process heat. This Generation-IV reactor would operate at elevated exit temperatures of 1,000-1,273 K, and the fueled core would be cooled by forced convection helium gas. For the prismatic-core VHTR, which is the focus of this analysis, the velocity of the hot helium flow exiting the core into the lower plenum (LP) could be 35-70 m/s. The impingement of the resulting gas jets onto the adiabatic plate at the bottom of the LP could develop hot spots and thermal stratification and inadequate mixing of the gas exiting the vessel to the turbo-machinery for energy conversion. The complex flow field in the LP is further complicated by the presence of large cylindrical graphite posts that support the massive core and inner and outer graphite reflectors. Because there are approximately 276 channels in the VHTR core from which helium exits into the LP and a total of 155 support posts, the flow field in the LP includes cross flow, multiple jet flow interaction, flow stagnation zones, vortex interaction, vortex shedding, entrainment, large variation in Reynolds number (Re), recirculation, and mixing enhancement and suppression regions. For such a complex flow field, experimental results at operating conditions are not currently available. Instead, the objective of this paper is to numerically simulate the flow field in the LP of a prismatic core VHTR using the Sandia National Laboratories Fuego, which is a 3D, massively parallel generalized computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code with numerous turbulence and buoyancy models and simulation capabilities for complex gas flow fields, with and without thermal effects. The code predictions for simpler flow fields of single and swirling gas jets, with and without a cross flow, are validated using reported experimental data and theory. The key processes in the LP are identified using phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT). It may be argued that a CFD code that accurately simulates simplified, single-effect flow fields with increasing complexity is likely to adequately model the complex flow field in the VHTR LP, subject to a future experimental validation. The PIRT process and spatial and temporal discretizations implemented in the present analysis using Fuego established confidence in the validation and verification (V and V) calculations and in the conclusions reached based on the simulation results. The performed calculations included the helicoid vortex swirl model, the dynamic Smagorinsky large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence model, participating media radiation (PMR), and 1D conjugate heat transfer (CHT). The full-scale, half-symmetry LP mesh used in the LP simulation included unstructured hexahedral elements and accounted for the graphite posts, the helium jets, the exterior walls, and the bottom plate with an adiabatic outer surface. Results indicated significant enhancements in heat transfer, flow mixing, and entrainment in the VHTR LP when using swirling inserts at the exit of the helium flow channels into the LP. The impact of using various swirl angles on the flow mixing and heat transfer in the LP is qualified, including the formation of the central recirculation zone (CRZ), and the effect of LP height. Results also showed that in addition to the enhanced mixing, the swirling inserts result in negligible additional pressure losses and are likely to eliminate the formation of hot spots.

  2. The Statistical Analysis Techniques to Support the NGNP Fuel Performance Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bihn T. Pham; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development and application of statistical analysis techniques to support the AGR experimental program on NGNP fuel performance. The experiments conducted in the Idaho National Laboratorys Advanced Test Reactor employ fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel capsule. The tests are instrumented with thermocouples embedded in graphite blocks and the target quantity (fuel/graphite temperature) is regulated by the He-Ne gas mixture that fills the gap volume. Three techniques for statistical analysis, namely control charting, correlation analysis, and regression analysis, are implemented in the SAS-based NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) for automated processing and qualification of the AGR measured data. The NDMAS also stores daily neutronic (power) and thermal (heat transfer) code simulation results along with the measurement data, allowing for their combined use and comparative scrutiny. The ultimate objective of this work includes (a) a multi-faceted system for data monitoring and data accuracy testing, (b) identification of possible modes of diagnostics deterioration and changes in experimental conditions, (c) qualification of data for use in code validation, and (d) identification and use of data trends to support effective control of test conditions with respect to the test target. Analysis results and examples given in the paper show the three statistical analysis techniques providing a complementary capability to warn of thermocouple failures. It also suggests that the regression analysis models relating calculated fuel temperatures and thermocouple readings can enable online regulation of experimental parameters (i.e. gas mixture content), to effectively maintain the target quantity (fuel temperature) within a given range.

  3. Analysis of Fluid and Thermal Flow throughout a Three-Dimensional Microvascular Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    associated with micro-cooling techniques seems to focus on the cooling of electronics. Increase in micro critical restrictions on conventional microprocessor cooling techniques. Microvascular systems offer a new of microvascular systems for microscale cooling purposes has generated a significant amount of research in recent

  4. A generalized fitting technique for the LIFE2 fatigue analysis code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, H.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Research Dept.; Wilson, T. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Mexico Engineering Research Inst.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of component fatigue lifetime for a wind energy conversion system (WECS) requires that the component load spectrum be formulated in terms of stress cycles. Typically, these stress cycles are obtained from time series data using a cycle identification scheme. As discussed by many authors, the matrix or matrices of cycle counts that describe the stresses on a turbine are constructed from relatively short, representative samples of time series data. The ability to correctly represent the long-term behavior of the distribution of stress cycles from these representative samples is critical to the analysis of service lifetimes. Several techniques are currently used to convert representative samples to the lifetime cyclic loads on the turbine. There has been recently developed a set of fitting algorithms that is particularly useful for matching the body of the distribution of fatigue stress cycles on a turbine component. Fitting techniques are now incorporated into the LIFE2 fatigue/fracture analysis code for wind turbines. In this paper, the authors provide an overview of the fitting algorithms and describe the pre- and post-count algorithms developed to permit their use in the LIFE2 code. Typical case studies are used to illustrate the use of the technique.

  5. Non destructive multi elemental analysis using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis techniques: Preliminary results for concrete sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahing, Lahasen Normanshah [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), Bangi 43000, Kajang (Malaysia); Yahya, Redzuan [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yahya, Roslan; Hassan, Hearie [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), Bangi 43000, Kajang (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, principle of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis has been used as a technique to determine the elements in the sample. The system consists of collimated isotopic neutron source, Cf-252 with HPGe detector and Multichannel Analysis (MCA). Concrete with size of 101010 cm{sup 3} and 151515 cm{sup 3} were analysed as sample. When neutrons enter and interact with elements in the concrete, the neutron capture reaction will occur and produce characteristic prompt gamma ray of the elements. The preliminary result of this study demonstrate the major element in the concrete was determined such as Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Fe and H as well as others element, such as Cl by analysis the gamma ray lines respectively. The results obtained were compared with NAA and XRF techniques as a part of reference and validation. The potential and the capability of neutron induced prompt gamma as tool for multi elemental analysis qualitatively to identify the elements present in the concrete sample discussed.

  6. Analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a rib grit roughened surface solar air heater using CFD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karmare, S.V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Government College Engineering, Karad 415 124, Maharashtra (India); Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra (India); Tikekar, A.N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Walchand College of Engineering, Sangli (India); Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra (India)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the study of fluid flow and heat transfer in a solar air heater by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) which reduces time and cost. Lower side of collector plate is made rough with metal ribs of circular, square and triangular cross-section, having 60 inclinations to the air flow. The grit rib elements are fixed on the surface in staggered manner to form defined grid. The system and operating parameters studied are: e/D{sub h} = 0.044, p/e = 17.5 and l/s = 1.72, for the Reynolds number range 3600-17,000. To validate CFD results, experimental investigations were carried out in the laboratory. It is found that experimental and CFD analysis results give the good agreement. The optimization of rib geometry and its angle of attack is also done. The square cross-section ribs with 58 angle of attack give maximum heat transfer. The percentage enhancement in the heat transfer for square plate over smooth surface is 30%. (author)

  7. Uncertainty in soil-structure interaction analysis arising from differences in analytical techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maslenikov, O. R.; Chen, J. C.; Johnson, J. J.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study addresses uncertainties arising from variations in different modeling approaches to soil-structure interaction of massive structures at a nuclear power plant. To perform a comprehensive systems analysis, it is necessary to quantify, for each phase of the traditional analysis procedure, both the realistic seismic response and the uncertainties associated with them. In this study two linear soil-structure interaction techniques were used to analyze the Zion, Illinois nuclear power plant: a direct method using the FLUSH computer program and a substructure approach using the CLASSI family of computer programs. In-structure response from two earthquakes, one real and one synthetic, was compared. Structure configurations from relatively simple to complicated multi-structure cases were analyzed. The resulting variations help quantify uncertainty in structure response due to analysis procedures.

  8. Analysis Methods and Desired Outcomes of System Interface Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cliff B. Davis

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interface between the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and the hydrogen-generating process plant will contain an intermediate loop that will transport heat from the NGNP to the process plant. Seven possible configurations for the NGNP primary coolant system and the intermediate heat transport loop were identified. Both helium and liquid salts are being considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. A method was developed to perform thermal-hydraulic evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The evaluations will determine which configurations and coolants are the most promising from a thermal-hydraulic point of view and which, if any, do not appear to be feasible at the current time. Results of the evaluations will be presented in a subsequent report.

  9. Compound Specific Stable Nitrogen Isotope Analysis of Amino Acids: What can this Novel Technique tell us about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    enrichment #12;Novel tool: Compound specific nitrogen isotope analysis of amino acids (AA-CSIA) - ProteinsCompound Specific Stable Nitrogen Isotope Analysis of Amino Acids: What can this Novel Technique trophic models, but relationships often complex and dynamic #12; Bulk tissue nitrogen isotope analysis

  10. Carbon-bearing fluids at nanoscale interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, David [Ohio State University; Ok, Salim [Ohio State University, Columbus; Phan, A [Ohio State University, Columbus; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Striolo, Alberto [Oklahoma University; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behaviour of fluids at mineral surfaces or in confined geometries (pores, fractures) typically differs from their bulk behaviour in many ways due to the effects of large internal surfaces and geometrical confinement. We summarize research performed on C-O-H fluids at nanoscale interfaces in materials of interest to the earth and material sciences (e.g., silica, alumina, zeolites, clays, rocks, etc.), emphasizing those techniques that assess microstructural modification and/or dynamical behaviour such as gravimetric analysis, small-angle (SANS) neutron scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations will be described that provide atomistic characterization of interfacial and confined fluid behaviour as well as aid in the interpretation of the neutron scattering results.

  11. Fluid-Rock Characterization for NMR Well Logging and Special Core Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Hirasaki; Kishore Mohanty

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this effort is to develop, build and test a high-speed drilling motor that can meet the performance guidelines of the announcement, namely: 'The motors are expected to rotate at a minimum of 10,000 rpm, have an OD no larger than 7 inches and work downhole continuously for at least 100 hours. The motor must have common oilfield thread connections capable of making up to a drill bit and bottomhole assembly. The motor must be capable of transmitting drilling fluid through the motor'. To these goals, APS would add that the motor must be economically viable, in terms of both its manufacturing and maintenance costs, and be applicable to as broad a range of markets as possible. APS has taken the approach of using a system using planetary gears to increase the speed of a conventional mud motor to 10,000 rpm. The mud flow is directed around the outside of the gear train, and a unique flow diversion system has been employed. A prototype of the motor was built and tested in APS's high-pressure flow loop. The motor operated per the model up to {approx}4200 rpm. At that point a bearing seized and the performance was severely degraded. The motor is being rebuilt and will be retested outside of this program.

  12. Analysis Of Residence Time Distribution Of Fluid Flow By Axial Dispersion Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugiharto [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Centre for Applications of Isotopes and Radiation Technology-National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jl. Lebak Bulus Raya No. 49, Jakarta 12440 (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Kurniadi, Rizal; Waris, Abdul [Centre for Applications of Isotopes and Radiation Technology-National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jl. Lebak Bulus Raya No. 49, Jakarta 12440 (Indonesia); Abidin, Zainal [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive tracer {sup 82}Br in the form of KBr-82 with activity {+-} 1 mCi has been injected into steel pipeline to qualify the extent dispersion of water flowing inside it. Internal diameter of the pipe is 3 in. The water source was originated from water tank through which the water flow gravitically into the pipeline. Two collimated sodium iodide detectors were used in this experiment each of which was placed on the top of the pipeline at the distance of 8 and 11 m from injection point respectively. Residence time distribution (RTD) curves obtained from injection of tracer are elaborated numerically to find information of the fluid flow properties. The transit time of tracer calculated from the mean residence time (MRT) of each RTD curves is 14.9 s, therefore the flow velocity of the water is 0.2 m/s. The dispersion number, D/uL, for each RTD curve estimated by using axial dispersion model are 0.055 and 0.06 respectively. These calculations are performed after fitting the simulated axial dispersion model on the experiment curves. These results indicated that the extent of dispersion of water flowing in the pipeline is in the category of intermediate.

  13. Fluorescence measurements for evaluating the application of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Jones, Howland D. T.; Sickafoose, Shane M.; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of cuvette-contained laser dye mixtures are made for evaluation of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments. Nine mixtures of Coumarin 500 and Rhodamine 610 are analyzed, as well as the pure dyes. For each sample, the cuvette is positioned on a two-axis translation stage to allow the interrogation at different spatial locations, allowing the examination of both primary (absorption of the laser light) and secondary (absorption of the fluorescence) inner filter effects. In addition to these expected inner filter effects, we find evidence that a portion of the absorbed fluorescence is re-emitted. A total of 688 spectra are acquired for the evaluation of multivariate analysis approaches to account for nonlinear effects.

  14. A Description of the Revised ATHEANA (A Technique for Human Event Analysis)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FORESTER,JOHN A.; BLEY,DENNIS C.; COOPER,SUSANE; KOLACZKOWSKI,ALAN M.; THOMPSON,CATHERINE; RAMEY-SMITH,ANN; WREATHALL,JOHN

    2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the most recent version of a human reliability analysis (HRA) method called ``A Technique for Human Event Analysis'' (ATHEANA). The new version is documented in NUREG-1624, Rev. 1 [1] and reflects improvements to the method based on comments received from a peer review that was held in 1998 (see [2] for a detailed discussion of the peer review comments) and on the results of an initial trial application of the method conducted at a nuclear power plant in 1997 (see Appendix A in [3]). A summary of the more important recommendations resulting from the peer review and trial application is provided and critical and unique aspects of the revised method are discussed.

  15. Materials Science and Engineering B 117 (2005) 5361 Finite element analysis-based design of a fluid-flow control nano-valve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials Science and Engineering B 117 (2005) 5361 Finite element analysis-based design A finite element method-based procedure is developed for the design of molecularly functionalized nano of a fluid-flow control nano-valve. The results obtained suggest that the finite element-based procedure

  16. Differences in geomagnetic Sq field representations due to variations in spherical harmonic analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, W.H. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various methods for the spherical harmonic analysis of the quiet daily variation of geomagnetic fields (Sq) measured at the Earth's surface have been used to represent the separation of the external (source) and internal (induced) currents. The results of such methods differ because the modeling techniques often reflect differing special objectives of the researcher. One method utilizes the observed field measurements at all world locations determined at a specific instant of time. A second method uses only observations in one primary hemisphere, appropriately mirroring field values for the analysis in the opposite hemisphere. The third method, a variation of the second, uses field values in the opposite hemisphere that are mirrored from a primary region that is shifted in time by 6 months. A variation of these three methods utilizes only a longitude line of observatories and assumes that the 24 hours of Sq field variation represents a 360{degree} rotation of the analysis sphere. For the comparison, power spectral representation, global current patterns in different seasons, and deviations of model-computed field values from the surface observations were all evaluated. The power spectral study showed that the spherical harmonic analysis of Sq should be extended to order m = 6 and degree n = m + 17. The northern hemisphere current system seemed to be consistently stronger than the southern hemisphere system. Exclusion of the mid-latitude vortex polynomials with (n {minus} m) = 0 and 1 was shown to be a useful technique for exposing the unique polar cap current pattern S{sup p}{sub q}. The global method was generally best for modeling; however, the hemisphere mirroring methods with 6-month time shift were almost as good in their representation of the Sq fields. Different special regions of effective and poor modeling were identified for all three methods.

  17. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT DYTRAN ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL PRIMARY TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The overall seismic analysis of the DSTs is being performed with the general-purpose finite element code ANSYS'. The global model used for the seismic analysis of the DSTs includes the DST structure, the contained waste, and the surrounding soil. The seismic analysis of the DSTs must address the fluid-structure interaction behavior and sloshing response of the primary tank and contained liquid. ANSYS has demonstrated capabilities for structural analysis, but has more limited capabilities for fluid-structure interaction analysis. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the capabilities and investigate the limitations of the finite element code MSC.Dytranz for performing a dynamic fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste. To this end, the Dytran solutions are benchmarked against theoretical solutions appearing in BNL 1995, when such theoretical solutions exist. When theoretical solutions were not available, comparisons were made to theoretical solutions to similar problems, and to the results from ANSYS simulations. Both rigid tank and flexible tank configurations were analyzed with Dytran. The response parameters of interest that are evaluated in this study are the total hydrodynamic reaction forces, the impulsive and convective mode frequencies, the waste pressures, and slosh heights. To a limited extent, primary tank stresses are also reported. The capabilities and limitations of ANSYS for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste were explored in a parallel investigation and documented in a companion report (Carpenter and Abatt [2006]). The results of this study were used in conjunction with the results of the global ANSYS analysis reported in Carpenter et al. (2006) and the parallel ANSYS fluid-structure interaction analysis to help determine if a more refined sub-model of the primary tank is necessary to capture the important fluid-structure interaction effects in the tank and if so, how to best utilize a refined sub-model of the primary tank. The results of this study demonstrate that Dytran has the capability to perform fluid-structure interaction analysis of a primary tank subjected to seismic loading. With the exception of some isolated peak pressures and to a lesser extent peak stresses, the results agreed very well with theoretical solutions. The benchmarking study documented in Carpenter and Abatt (2006) showed that the ANSYS model used in that study captured much of the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) behavior, but did have limitations for predicting the convective response of the waste. While Dytran appears to have stronger capabilities for the analysis of the FSI behavior in the primary tank, it is more practical to use ANSYS for the global evaluation of the tank. Thus, Dytran served the purpose of helping to identify limitations in the ANSYS FSI analysis so that those limitations can be addressed in the structural evaluation of the primary tank.

  18. An effective technique for the software requirements analysis of NPP safety-critical systems, based on software inspection, requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    &V) is therefore emphasized for nuclear safety. Inspection is widely believed to be an effective techniqueAn effective technique for the software requirements analysis of NPP safety-critical systems, based Seonga , Junbeom Yoob , Sung Deok Chab , Yeong Jae Yooc,1 a Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering

  19. Panel Session: Optimization Techniques in Voltage Collapse Analysis," IEEE PES Summer Meeting, San Diego, July 14, 1998. Applications of Optimization to Voltage Collapse Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    Panel Session: Optimization Techniques in Voltage Collapse Analysis," IEEE PES Summer Meeting, San Diego, July 14, 1998. Applications of Optimization to Voltage Collapse Analysis Claudio A. Ca|Thispaper describesseveralapplica- tions of optimization for voltage stability analysis VSA of power systems. Voltage stability prob

  20. Comparisons between measurement and analysis of fluid motion in internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witze, P.O. (ed.)

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Engine Combustion Technology Project was created for the purpose of promoting the development of advanced piston engine concepts by the development of techniques to measure, analyze, and understand the combustion process. The technologies emphasized in the project include laser-based measurement techniques and large-scale computer simulations. Considerable progress has already been achieved by project participants in modeling engine air motion, fuel sprays, and engine combustion phenomena. This milestone report covers one part of that progress, summarizing the current capabilities of multi-dimensional computer codes being developed by the project to predict the behavior of turbulent air motion in an engine environment. Computed results are compared directly with experimental data in six different areas of importance to internal combustion engines: (1) Induction-generated ring-vortex structures; (2) Piston-induced vortex roll-up; (3) Behavior of turbulence during compression; (4) Decay of swirling flow during compression; (5) Decay of swirling flow in a constant volume engine simulator; (6) Exhaust-pipe flow. The computational procedures used include vortex dynamics, rapid distortion theory, and finite difference models employing two-equation and subgrid-scale turbulence models. Although the capability does not yet exist to predict the air motion in an engine from its geometric configuration alone, the results presented show that many flowfield sub-processes can be predicted given well-specified initial and boundary conditions.

  1. Development of On-Board Fluid Analysis for the Mining Industry - Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pardini, Allan F.

    2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL: Operated by Battelle Memorial Institute for the Department of Energy) is working with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop technology for the US mining industry. PNNL was awarded a three-year program to develop automated on-board/in-line or on-site oil analysis for the mining industry.

  2. Experimental Analysis of Water Based Drilling Fluid Aging Processes at High Temperature and High Pressure Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zigmond, Brandon

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    to evaluate their validity. Experimental static and dynamic aging tests were developed for comparative analysis as well to offer a more accurate and precise method to evaluate the effects experienced by WBM when subjected to HT/HP conditions. The experimental...

  3. Notes 07. Thermal analysis of finite length journal bearings including fluid inertia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and holes), multiple pads with mechanical preloads to enhance their load capacity and stability. The analysis includes the evaluation of the film mean temperature field from an energy transport equation. The film temperature affects the viscosity... of typical cylindrical journal bearings comprised of a journal rotating with angular speed (?) and a bearing with one or more arcuate pads. A film of lubricant fills the gap between the bearing and its journal. Journal center dislacements (eX, eY) refer...

  4. Grid and basis adaptive polynomial chaos techniques for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perk, Zoltn, E-mail: Z.Perko@tudelft.nl; Gilli, Luca, E-mail: Gilli@nrg.eu; Lathouwers, Danny, E-mail: D.Lathouwers@tudelft.nl; Kloosterman, Jan Leen, E-mail: J.L.Kloosterman@tudelft.nl

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The demand for accurate and computationally affordable sensitivity and uncertainty techniques is constantly on the rise and has become especially pressing in the nuclear field with the shift to Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty methodologies in the licensing of nuclear installations. Besides traditional, already well developed methods such as first order perturbation theory or Monte Carlo sampling Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE) has been given a growing emphasis in recent years due to its simple application and good performance. This paper presents new developments of the research done at TU Delft on such Polynomial Chaos (PC) techniques. Our work is focused on the Non-Intrusive Spectral Projection (NISP) approach and adaptive methods for building the PCE of responses of interest. Recent efforts resulted in a new adaptive sparse grid algorithm designed for estimating the PC coefficients. The algorithm is based on Gerstner's procedure for calculating multi-dimensional integrals but proves to be computationally significantly cheaper, while at the same it retains a similar accuracy as the original method. More importantly the issue of basis adaptivity has been investigated and two techniques have been implemented for constructing the sparse PCE of quantities of interest. Not using the traditional full PC basis set leads to further reduction in computational time since the high order grids necessary for accurately estimating the near zero expansion coefficients of polynomial basis vectors not needed in the PCE can be excluded from the calculation. Moreover the sparse PC representation of the response is easier to handle when used for sensitivity analysis or uncertainty propagation due to the smaller number of basis vectors. The developed grid and basis adaptive methods have been implemented in Matlab as the Fully Adaptive Non-Intrusive Spectral Projection (FANISP) algorithm and were tested on four analytical problems. These show consistent good performance both in terms of the accuracy of the resulting PC representation of quantities and the computational costs associated with constructing the sparse PCE. Basis adaptivity also seems to make the employment of PC techniques possible for problems with a higher number of input parameters (1520), alleviating a well known limitation of the traditional approach. The prospect of larger scale applicability and the simplicity of implementation makes such adaptive PC algorithms particularly appealing for the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of complex systems and legacy codes.

  5. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Area (Moore, Et Al., 2001) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergyInformation AnalysisEnergy

  6. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radley, Ian (Glenmont, NY); Bievenue, Thomas J. (Delmar, NY); Burdett, John H. (Charlton, NY); Gallagher, Brian W. (Guilderland, NY); Shakshober, Stuart M. (Hudson, NY); Chen, Zewu (Schenectady, NY); Moore, Michael D. (Alplaus, NY)

    2008-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray source assembly and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode having a source spot upon which electrons impinge and a control system for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  7. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett Jr., John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray source assembly (2700) and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode (2125) having a source spot upon which electrons (2120) impinge and a control system (2715/2720) for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure (2710) notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  8. Integrating advanced materials simulation techniques into an automated data analysis workflow at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borreguero Calvo, Jose M [ORNL] [ORNL; Campbell, Stuart I [ORNL] [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL] [ORNL; Doucet, Mathieu [ORNL] [ORNL; Goswami, Monojoy [ORNL] [ORNL; Hagen, Mark E [ORNL] [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL] [ORNL; Proffen, Thomas E [ORNL] [ORNL; Ren, Shelly [ORNL] [ORNL; Savici, Andrei T [ORNL] [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation will review developments on the integration of advanced modeling and simulation techniques into the analysis step of experimental data obtained at the Spallation Neutron Source. A workflow framework for the purpose of refining molecular mechanics force-fields against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data is presented. The workflow combines software components to submit model simulations to remote high performance computers, a message broker interface for communications between the optimizer engine and the simulation production step, and tools to convolve the simulated data with the experimental resolution. A test application shows the correction to a popular fixed-charge water model in order to account polarization effects due to the presence of solvated ions. Future enhancements to the refinement workflow are discussed. This work is funded through the DOE Center for Accelerating Materials Modeling.

  9. Characterization of Porosity Development in Oxidized Graphite using Automated Image Analysis Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on initial activities at ORNL aimed at quantitative characterization of porosity development in oxidized graphite specimens using automated image analysis (AIA) techniques. A series of cylindrical shape specimens were machined from nuclear-grade graphite (type PCEA, from GrafTech International). The specimens were oxidized in air to various levels of weight loss (between 5 and 20 %) and at three oxidation temperatures (between 600 and 750 oC). The procedure used for specimen preparation and oxidation was based on ASTM D-7542-09. Oxidized specimens were sectioned, resin-mounted and polished for optical microscopy examination. Mosaic pictures of rectangular stripes (25 mm x 0.4 mm) along a diameter of sectioned specimens were recorded. A commercial software (ImagePro) was evaluated for automated analysis of images. Because oxidized zones in graphite are less reflective in visible light than the pristine, unoxidized material, the microstructural changes induced by oxidation can easily be identified and analyzed. Oxidation at low temperatures contributes to development of numerous fine pores (< 100 m2) distributed more or less uniformly over a certain depth (5-6 mm) from the surface of graphite specimens, while causing no apparent external damage to the specimens. In contrast, oxidation at high temperatures causes dimensional changes and substantial surface damage within a narrow band (< 1 mm) near the exposed graphite surface, but leaves the interior of specimens with little or no changes in the pore structure. Based on these results it appears that weakening and degradation of mechanical properties of graphite materials produced by uniform oxidation at low temperatures is related to the massive development of fine pores in the oxidized zone. It was demonstrated that optical microscopy enhanced by AIA techniques allows accurate determination of oxidant penetration depth and of distribution of porosity in oxidized graphite materials.

  10. Multiphysics Thermal-Fluid Design Analysis of a Non-Nuclear Tester for Hot-Hydrogen Materials and Component Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, T.-S.; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama, 35812 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this effort is to perform design analyses for a non-nuclear hot-hydrogen materials tester, as a first step towards developing efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber design and analysis. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, thermally radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation. The multiphysics invoked in this study include hydrogen dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics, turbulent flow, convective, and thermal radiative heat transfers. The goals of the design analyses are to maintain maximum hot-hydrogen jet impingement energy and to minimize chamber wall heating. The results of analyses on three test fixture configurations and the rationale for final selection are presented. The interrogation of physics revealed that reactions of hydrogen dissociation and recombination are highly correlated with local temperature and are necessary for accurate prediction of the hot-hydrogen jet temperature.

  11. A workshop on The application of non-and micro-destructive analysis techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zaoyang

    of the art for XRF techniques Andreas Karydas (NCSR, Demokritos) Part 2: `Strategic' utilization of XRF

  12. Dual x-ray fluorescence spectrometer and method for fluid analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Bary W.; Shepard, Chester L.

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are an X-ray fluorescence (SRF) spectrometer and method for on-site and in-line determination of contaminant elements in lubricating oils and in fuel oils on board a marine vessel. An XRF source block 13 contains two radionuclide sources 16, 17 (e.g. Cd 109 and Fe 55), each oriented 180 degrees from the other to excite separate targets. The Cd 109 source 16 excites sample lube oil flowing through a low molecular weight sample line 18. The Fe 55 source 17 excites fuel oil manually presented to the source beam inside a low molecular weight vial 26 or other container. Two separate detectors A and B are arranged to detect the fluorescent x-rays from the targets, photons from the analyte atoms in the lube oil for example, and sulfur identifying x-rays from bunker fuel oil for example. The system allows both automated in-line and manual on-site analysis using one set of signal processing and multi-channel analyzer electronics 34, 37 as well as one computer 39 and user interface 43.

  13. Applied Focused Ion Beam Techniques for Sample Preparation of Astromaterials for Integrated Nano-Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, G A; Teslich, N E; Kearsley, A T; Stadermann, F J; Stroud, R M; Dai, Z R; Ishii, H A; Hutcheon, I D; Bajt, S; Snead, C J; Weber, P K; Bradley, J P

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Sample preparation is always a critical step in study of micrometer sized astromaterials available for study in the laboratory, whether their subsequent analysis is by electron microscopy or secondary ion mass spectrometry. A focused beam of gallium ions has been used to prepare electron transparent sections from an interplanetary dust particle, as part of an integrated analysis protocol to maximize the mineralogical, elemental, isotopic and spectroscopic information extracted from one individual particle. In addition, focused ion beam techniques have been employed to extract cometary residue preserved on the rims and walls of micro-craters in 1100 series aluminum foils that were wrapped around the sample tray assembly on the Stardust cometary sample collector. Non-ideal surface geometries and inconveniently located regions of interest required creative solutions. These include support pillar construction and relocation of a significant portion of sample to access a region of interest. Serial sectioning, in a manner similar to ultramicrotomy, is a significant development and further demonstrates the unique capabilities of focused ion beam microscopy for sample preparation of astromaterials.

  14. Exploratory Nuclear Reactor Safety Analysis and Visualization via Integrated Topological and Geometric Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Valerio Pascucci; Peer-Timo Bremer; Diego Mandelli; Michael Pernice; Robert Nourgaliev

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent trend in the nuclear power engineering field is the implementation of heavily computational and time consuming algorithms and codes for both design and safety analysis. In particular, the new generation of system analysis codes aim to embrace several phenomena such as thermo-hydraulic, structural behavior, and system dynamics, as well as uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses. The use of dynamic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodologies allows a systematic approach to uncertainty quantification. Dynamic methodologies in PRA account for possible coupling between triggered or stochastic events through explicit consideration of the time element in system evolution, often through the use of dynamic system models (simulators). They are usually needed when the system has more than one failure mode, control loops, and/or hardware/process/software/human interaction. Dynamic methodologies are also capable of modeling the consequences of epistemic and aleatory uncertainties. The Monte-Carlo (MC) and the Dynamic Event Tree (DET) approaches belong to this new class of dynamic PRA methodologies. The major challenges in using MC and DET methodologies (as well as other dynamic methodologies) are the heavier computational and memory requirements compared to the classical ET analysis. This is due to the fact that each branch generated can contain time evolutions of a large number of variables (about 50,000 data channels are typically present in RELAP) and a large number of scenarios can be generated from a single initiating event (possibly on the order of hundreds or even thousands). Such large amounts of information are usually very difficult to organize in order to identify the main trends in scenario evolutions and the main risk contributors for each initiating event. This report aims to improve Dynamic PRA methodologies by tackling the two challenges mentioned above using: 1) adaptive sampling techniques to reduce computational cost of the analysis and 2) topology-based methodologies to interactively visualize multidimensional data and extract risk-informed insights. Regarding item 1) we employ learning algorithms that aim to infer/predict simulation outcome and decide the coordinate in the input space of the next sample that maximize the amount of information that can be gained from it. Such methodologies can be used to both explore and exploit the input space. The later one is especially used for safety analysis scopes to focus samples along the limit surface, i.e. the boundaries in the input space between system failure and system success. Regarding item 2) we present a software tool that is designed to analyze multi-dimensional data. We model a large-scale nuclear simulation dataset as a high-dimensional scalar function defined over a discrete sample of the domain. First, we provide structural analysis of such a function at multiple scales and provide insight into the relationship between the input parameters and the output. Second, we enable exploratory analysis for users, where we help the users to differentiate features from noise through multi-scale analysis on an interactive platform, based on domain knowledge and data characterization. Our analysis is performed by exploiting the topological and geometric properties of the domain, building statistical models based on its topological segmentations and providing interactive visual interfaces to facilitate such explorations.

  15. Comparative analysis of nonlinear dimensionality reduction techniques for breast MRI segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhbardeh, Alireza; Jacobs, Michael A. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States) and Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Visualization of anatomical structures using radiological imaging methods is an important tool in medicine to differentiate normal from pathological tissue and can generate large amounts of data for a radiologist to read. Integrating these large data sets is difficult and time-consuming. A new approach uses both supervised and unsupervised advanced machine learning techniques to visualize and segment radiological data. This study describes the application of a novel hybrid scheme, based on combining wavelet transform and nonlinear dimensionality reduction (NLDR) methods, to breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data using three well-established NLDR techniques, namely, ISOMAP, local linear embedding (LLE), and diffusion maps (DfM), to perform a comparative performance analysis. Methods: Twenty-five breast lesion subjects were scanned using a 3T scanner. MRI sequences used were T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging. The hybrid scheme consisted of two steps: preprocessing and postprocessing of the data. The preprocessing step was applied for B{sub 1} inhomogeneity correction, image registration, and wavelet-based image compression to match and denoise the data. In the postprocessing step, MRI parameters were considered data dimensions and the NLDR-based hybrid approach was applied to integrate the MRI parameters into a single image, termed the embedded image. This was achieved by mapping all pixel intensities from the higher dimension to a lower dimensional (embedded) space. For validation, the authors compared the hybrid NLDR with linear methods of principal component analysis (PCA) and multidimensional scaling (MDS) using synthetic data. For the clinical application, the authors used breast MRI data, comparison was performed using the postcontrast DCE MRI image and evaluating the congruence of the segmented lesions. Results: The NLDR-based hybrid approach was able to define and segment both synthetic and clinical data. In the synthetic data, the authors demonstrated the performance of the NLDR method compared with conventional linear DR methods. The NLDR approach enabled successful segmentation of the structures, whereas, in most cases, PCA and MDS failed. The NLDR approach was able to segment different breast tissue types with a high accuracy and the embedded image of the breast MRI data demonstrated fuzzy boundaries between the different types of breast tissue, i.e., fatty, glandular, and tissue with lesions (>86%). Conclusions: The proposed hybrid NLDR methods were able to segment clinical breast data with a high accuracy and construct an embedded image that visualized the contribution of different radiological parameters.

  16. "Trace Analysis of Speciality and Electronic Gases," Chapter 4, "Emerging Infrared Laser Absorption Spectroscopic Techniques for Gas Analysis"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lascola, R.; McWhorter, S.; Tittel, F.; Lewicki, R.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter covers Laser Absorption Spectroscopic Techniques and Applications of Semiconductor LAS Based Trace Gas Sensor Systems.

  17. RES.12-001 Topics in Fluid Dynamics: Dimensional Analysis, the Coriolis force, and Lagrangian and Eulerian Representations, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, James F.

    This collection of three essays was developed from the author's experience teaching Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean, 12.800, offered to graduate students entering the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography. The ...

  18. Analysis of hydraulic power transduction in regenerative rotary shock absorbers as function of working fluid kinematic viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avadhany, Shakeel N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation seeks to investigate the relationship of kinematic fluid viscosity to the effective power transduction seen by a hydraulic motor. Applications of this research specifically relate to energy recovery from ...

  19. A Robust Four-Fluid Transient Flow Simulator as an Analysis and Decision Making Tool for Dynamic Kill Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haghshenas, Arash

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The worst scenario of drilling operation is blowout which is uncontrolled flow of formation fluid into the wellbore. Blowouts result in environmental damage with potential risk of injuries and fatalities. Although not all ...

  20. Discussion of comments from a peer review of a technique for human event analysis (ATHEANA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forester, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ramey-Smith, A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Bley, D.C. [Buttonwood Consulting, Inc. (United States); Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Cooper, S.E. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States); Wreathall, J. [John Wreathall and Company (United States)

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May of 1998, a technical basis and implementation guidelines document for A Technique for Human Event Analysis (ATHEANA) was issued as a draft report for public comment (NUREG-1624). In conjunction with the release of the draft NUREG, a paper review of the method, its documentation, and the results of an initial test of the method was held over a two-day period in Seattle, Washington, in June of 1998. Four internationally-known and respected experts in human reliability analysis (HRA) were selected to serve as the peer reviewers and were paid for their services. In addition, approximately 20 other individuals with an interest in HRA and ATHEANA also attended the peer review meeting and were invited to provide comments. The peer review team was asked to comment on any aspect of the method or the report in which improvements could be made and to discuss its strengths and weaknesses. All of the reviewers thought the ATEANA method had made significant contributions to the field of PRA/HRA, in particular by addressing the most important open questions and issues in HRA, by attempting to develop an integrated approach, and by developing a framework capable of identifying types of unsafe actions that generally have not been considered using existing methods. The reviewers had many concerns about specific aspects of the methodology and made many recommendations for ways to improve and extend the method, and to make its application more cost effective and useful to PRA in general. Details of the reviewers` comments and the ATHEANA team`s responses to specific criticisms will be discussed.

  1. Results of a nuclear power plant Application of a new technique for human error analysis (ATHEANA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forester, J.A.; Whitehead, D.W.; Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Thompson, C.M.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method to analyze human errors has been demonstrated at a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant. This was the first application of the new method referred to as A Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA). The main goals of the demonstration were to test the ATHEANA process as described in the frame-of-reference manual and the implementation guideline, test a training package developed for the method, test the hypothesis that plant operators and trainers have significant insight into the error-forcing-contexts (EFCs) that can make unsafe actions (UAs) more likely, and to identify ways to improve the method and its documentation. A set of criteria to evaluate the {open_quotes}success{close_quotes} of the ATHEANA method as used in the demonstration was identified. A human reliability analysis (HRA) team was formed that consisted of an expert in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) with some background in HRA (not ATHEANA) and four personnel from the nuclear power plant. Personnel from the plant included two individuals from their PRA staff and two individuals from their training staff. Both individuals from training are currently licensed operators and one of them was a senior reactor operator {open_quotes}on shift{close_quotes} until a few months before the demonstration. The demonstration was conducted over a 5 month period and was observed by members of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ATHEANA development team, who also served as consultants to the HRA team when necessary. Example results of the demonstration to date, including identified human failure events (HFEs), UAs, and EFCs are discussed. Also addressed is how simulator exercises are used in the ATHEANA demonstration project.

  2. Test results of a corrosion logging technique using electromagnetic thickness and pipe analysis logging tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iliyan, I.S.; Brown, G.A.; Cotton, W.J. Jr.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent innovations in subsurface corrosion practices of the Arabian American Oil Co. (ARAMCO) have reduced logging and workover costs substantially and have permitted the detection of corrosion in the outer string of two concentric casing strings. At the request of ARAMCO, Schlumberger conducted test under both simulated and field conditions. Results showed that the data required to evaluate casing corrosion in a 7-in.X9 5/8-in. completion can be obtained during a single logging run using a 21.6-in. coil spacing electromagnetic thickness tool (ETT-A /SUP TM/ ) sonde (as opposed to two runs with 17.6-in. and 21.6-in. sondes previously used). In addition, corrosion of the outer string of 9 5/8-in. or 13 3/8-in. casing can be detected by using the results of the ETT-A logs and pipe-analysis tool (PAT) logs or caliper logs. To date, the application of this technique has been very successful in ARAMCO's operations.

  3. Evaluation and analysis of non-intrusive techniques for detecting illicit substances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Micklich, B.J.; Roche, C.T.; Fink, C.L.; Yule, T.J.; Demirgian, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Kunz, T.D.; Ulvick, S.J.; Cui, J. [Houston Advanced Research Center, The Woodlands, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) have been tasked by the Counterdrug Technology Assessment Center of the Office of National Drug Control Policy to conduct evaluations and analyses of technologies for the non-intrusive inspection of containers for illicit substances. These technologies span the range of nuclear, X-ray, and chemical techniques used in nondestructive sample analysis. ANL has performed assessments of nuclear and X-ray inspection concepts and undertaken site visits with developers to understand the capabilities and the range of applicability of candidate systems. ANL and HARC have provided support to law enforcement agencies (LEAs), including participation in numerous field studies. Both labs have provided staff to assist in the Narcotics Detection Technology Assessment (NDTA) program for evaluating drug detection systems. Also, the two labs are performing studies of drug contamination of currency. HARC has directed technical evaluations of automated ballistics imaging and identification systems under consideration by law enforcement agencies. ANL and HARC have sponsored workshops and a symposium, and are participating in a Non-Intrusive Inspection Study being led by Dynamics Technology, Incorporated.

  4. Abstract ID: WED-AM-B3 Use of ion beam analysis techniques to characterise iron corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Abstract ID: WED-AM-B3 Use of ion beam analysis techniques to characterise iron corrosion under 12 MeV proton irradiation on the corrosion behaviour of pure iron. Oxygen and hydrogen playing a crucial role during the corrosion process have been specifically investigated. Heavy desaerated water

  5. Fluid juggling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soto, Enrique

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fluid dynamics video is an entry for the Gallery of Fluid Motion for the 66th Annual Meeting of the Fluid Dynamics Division of the American Physical Society. We show the curious behaviour of a light ball interacting with a liquid jet. For certain conditions, a ball can be suspended into a slightly inclined liquid jet. We studied this phenomenon using a high speed camera. The visualizations show that the object can be `juggled' for a variety of flow conditions. A simple calculation showed that the ball remains at a stable position due to a Bernoulli-like effect. The phenomenon is very stable and easy to reproduce.

  6. Application of a new technique for human event analysis (ATHEANA) at a pressurized-water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forester, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kiper, K. [Seabrook Nuclear Station (United States); Ramey-Smith, A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past several years, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored the development of a new method for performing human reliability analyses (HRAs). A major impetus for the program was the recognized need for a method that would not only address errors of omission (EOOs), but also errors of commission (EOCs). Although several documents have been issued describing the basis and development of the new method referred to as ``A Technique for Human Event Analysis`` (ATHEANA), two documents were drafted to initially provide the necessary documentation for applying the method: the frame of reference (FOR) manual, which served as the technical basis document for the method and the implementation guideline (IG), which provided step by step guidance for applying the method. Upon the completion of the draft FOR manual and the draft IG in April 1997, along with several step-throughs of the process by the development team, the method was ready for a third-party test. The method was demonstrated at Seabrook Station in July 1997. The main goals of the demonstration were to (1) test the ATHENA process as described in the FOR manual and the IG, (2) test a training package developed for the method, (3) test the hypothesis that plant operators and trainers have significant insight into the EFCs that can make UAs more likely, and (4) identify ways to improve the method and its documentation. The results of the Seabrook demonstration are evaluated against the success criteria, and important findings and recommendations regarding ATHENA that were obtained from the demonstration are presented here.

  7. 6. Fluid mechanics: fluid statics; fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Figure Pressure (a scalar!) is defined as surface force / area, for example pb = Fb / (dw) = p @ z = z1 Picture: KJ05 Fluid volume hdw with density and mass m = hdw z = z1 In engineering forces Fn+ Fs = 0 or - pyhw + pyhw = 0 py = 0 Similarly Fw+ Fe= 0 gives px = 0, There are three

  8. Use and analysis of new optimization techniques for decision theory and data mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Centeno, Erick

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    techniques in data mining. Manuscript UC Berkeley, [40] D.Hochbaum showed that data mining problems can be viewed asstudy is a classic data mining problem. i A Dios, mi esposa,

  9. Power system fault analysis based on intelligent techniques and intelligent electronic device data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xu

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    techniques including expert systems, fuzzy logic and Petri-nets, as well as data from remote terminal units (RTUs) of supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems, and digital protective relays have been explored and utilized to fufill...

  10. Geometric parameter analysis to predetermine optimal radiosurgery technique for the treatment of arteriovenous malformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mestrovic, Ante [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) and Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: amestrovic@bccancer.bc.ca; Clark, Brenda G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a method of predicting the values of dose distribution parameters of different radiosurgery techniques for treatment of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) based on internal geometric parameters. Methods and Materials: For each of 18 previously treated AVM patients, four treatment plans were created: circular collimator arcs, dynamic conformal arcs, fixed conformal fields, and intensity-modulated radiosurgery. An algorithm was developed to characterize the target and critical structure shape complexity and the position of the critical structures with respect to the target. Multiple regression was employed to establish the correlation between the internal geometric parameters and the dose distribution for different treatment techniques. The results from the model were applied to predict the dosimetric outcomes of different radiosurgery techniques and select the optimal radiosurgery technique for a number of AVM patients. Results: Several internal geometric parameters showing statistically significant correlation (p < 0.05) with the treatment planning results for each technique were identified. The target volume and the average minimum distance between the target and the critical structures were the most effective predictors for normal tissue dose distribution. The structure overlap volume with the target and the mean distance between the target and the critical structure were the most effective predictors for critical structure dose distribution. The predicted values of dose distribution parameters of different radiosurgery techniques were in close agreement with the original data. Conclusions: A statistical model has been described that successfully predicts the values of dose distribution parameters of different radiosurgery techniques and may be used to predetermine the optimal technique on a patient-to-patient basis.

  11. Final Report, DE-FG02-92ER14261, Pore Scale Geometric and Fluid Distribution Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Brent Lindquist

    2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The elucidation of the relationship between pore scale structure and fluid flow in porous media is a fundamental problem of long standing interest. Incomplete characterization of medium properties continues to be a limiting factor in accurate field scale simulations. The accomplishments of this grant have kept us at the forefront in investigating the applicability of X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT) as a tool for contributing to the understanding of this relationship. Specific accomplishments have been achieved in four areas: - development of numerical algorithms (largely in the field of computational geometry) to provide automated recognition of and measurements on features of interest in the pore space. These algorithms have been embodied in a software package, 3DMA-Rock. - application of these algorithms to extensive studies of the pore space of sandstones. - application of these algorithms to studies of fluid (oil/water) partitioning in the pore space of Berea sandstone and polyethylene models. - technology transfer.

  12. A mathematical model of probability of conception in humans, and an analysis of the rhythm technique of birth control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordheim, Alan Walter

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of Rhythm Effectiveness . . 59 DISCUSSION 68 Proposed Rhythm Method Analysis of the Rhythm Technique of Birth Control Suggestions for Future Studies 68 68 72 CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES 75 77 VITA 80 LIST OF TABLES TABLE 1. Mean (r.... Mean (r), standard deviation (o ), coef ficient of varia- tion (v), and comparison of inverse normal (f ) and N inverse quadratic (f ) probability density functions Q against observed distributions of luteal intervals (Matsumoto et al. , 1962) 27...

  13. Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA): A Nondestructive Assay Technique for the Next Generation Safeguards Initiatives Plutonium Assay Challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Sterbentz; D. L. Chichester

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an end-of-year report for a project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241). The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) to assay plutonium in commercial light-water-reactor spent fuel. This project is part of a larger research effort within the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to evaluate methods for assaying plutonium in spent fuel, the Plutonium Assay Challenge. The first-year goals for this project were modest and included: 1) developing a zero-order MCNP model for the NRTA technique, simulating data results presented in the literature, 2) completing a preliminary set of studies investigating important design and performance characteristics for the NRTA measurement technique, and 3) documentation of this work in an end of the year report (this report). Research teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and at several universities are also working to investigate plutonium assay methods for spent-fuel safeguards. While the NRTA technique is well proven in the scientific literature for assaying individual spent fuel pins, it is a newcomer to the current NGSI efforts studying Pu assay method techniques having just started in March 2010; several analytical techniques have been under investigation within this program for two to three years or more. This report summarizes a nine month period of work.

  14. Analysis of the optics of the Final Focus Test Beam using Lie algebra based techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, G.J.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the analysis of the beam optics of the final focus test beam at the Stanford Linear Collider using Lie algebra. (LSP).

  15. Simulating Fluids Exhibiting Microstructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Simulating Fluids Exhibiting Microstructure Speaker: Noel J. Walkington, ... fluids containing elastic particles, and polymer fluids, all exhibit non-trivial...

  16. Analysis of the Sommer technique for measurement of the mobility for charges in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrotra, R.; Dahm, A.J.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique for measuring the low-frequency ac mobility of free surface charges first employed by Sommer is analyzed for arbitrary values of driving frequency, charge mobility, and effective mass. Analytical expressions for the cell admittance are given for both rectangular and circular geometries in the absence of edge corrections.

  17. MicroCT of Coronary Stents: Staining Techniques for 3-D Pathological Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darrouzet, Stephen 1987-

    2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    with post-fixation staining techniques in this study, full volumes of previously implanted stents have been analyzed in-situ in a non-destructive manner. The increased soft tissue contrast imparted by metal-containing stains allowed for a qualitative...

  18. Convergence analysis of sectional methods for solving breakage population balance equations -I. The fixed pivot technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdeburg, Universitt

    . Numerical methods fall into several categories: stochastic methods, [16, 19], finite element methods, [4 techniques become computationally very expensive in such cases. A wide variety of finite element methods, weighted residuals, the method of orthogonal collocation and Galerkin's method are also used for solving

  19. Apparatus and method for quantitative determination of materials contained in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radziemski, L.J.; Cremers, D.A.

    1982-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for near real-time in-situ monitoring of particulates and vapors contained in fluids are described. Initial filtration of a known volume of the fluid sample is combined with laser-induced dielectric breakdown spectroscopy of the filter employed to obtain qualitative and quantitative information with high sensitivity. Application of the invention to monitoring of beryllium, beryllium oxide, or other beryllium-alloy dusts is shown. Significant shortening of analysis time is achieved from the usual chemical techniques of analysis.

  20. Apparatus and method for quantitative determination of materials contained in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radziemski, Leon J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cremers, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for near real-time in-situ monitoring of particulates and vapors contained in fluids. Initial filtration of a known volume of the fluid sample is combined with laser-induced dielectric breakdown spectroscopy of the filter employed to obtain qualitative and quantitative information with high sensitivity. Application of the invention to monitoring of beryllium, beryllium oxide, or other beryllium-alloy dusts is demonstrated. Significant shortening of analysis time is achieved from those of the usual chemical techniques of analysis.

  1. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: Parallel Analysis Tools and New Visualization Techniques for Ultra-Large Climate Data Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    middleton, Don [Co-PI; Haley, Mary

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ParVis was a project funded under LAB 10-05: Earth System Modeling: Advanced Scientific Visualization of Ultra-Large Climate Data Sets. Argonne was the lead lab with partners at PNNL, SNL, NCAR and UC-Davis. This report covers progress from January 1st, 2013 through Dec 1st, 2014. Two previous reports covered the period from Summer, 2010, through September 2011 and October 2011 through December 2012, respectively. While the project was originally planned to end on April 30, 2013, personnel and priority changes allowed many of the institutions to continue work through FY14 using existing funds. A primary focus of ParVis was introducing parallelism to climate model analysis to greatly reduce the time-to-visualization for ultra-large climate data sets. Work in the first two years was conducted on two tracks with different time horizons: one track to provide immediate help to climate scientists already struggling to apply their analysis to existing large data sets and another focused on building a new data-parallel library and tool for climate analysis and visualization that will give the field a platform for performing analysis and visualization on ultra-large datasets for the foreseeable future. In the final 2 years of the project, we focused mostly on the new data-parallel library and associated tools for climate analysis and visualization.

  2. Evaluation of the Repeatability of the Delta Q Duct Leakage Testing Technique Including Investigation of Robust Analysis Techniques and Estimates of Weather Induced Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerhoff, Darryl

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques and Estimates of Weather Induced Uncertaintythe uncertainty due to changing weather during the test (the DeltaQ test are influenced by weather induced pressures.

  3. Fluid extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  4. The Benefits of Using Time-Frequency Analysis with Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, Austin P [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in detection and resolution are always desired and needed. There are various instruments available for the inspection of concrete structures that can be used with confidence for detecting different defects. However, more often than not that confidence is heavily dependent on the experience of the operator rather than the clear, objective discernibility of the output of the instrument. The challenge of objective discernment is amplified when the concrete structures contain multiple layers of reinforcement, are of significant thickness, or both, such as concrete structures in nuclear power plants. We seek to improve and extend the usefulness of results produced using the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) on data collected from thick, complex concrete structures. A secondary goal is to improve existing SAFT results, with regards to repeatedly and objectively identifying defects and/or internal structure of concrete structures. Towards these goals, we are applying the time-frequency technique of wavelet packet decomposition and reconstruction using a mother wavelet that possesses the exact reconstruction property. However, instead of analyzing the coefficients of each decomposition node, we select and reconstruct specific nodes based on the frequency band it contains to produce a frequency band specific time-series representation. SAFT is then applied to these frequency specific reconstructions allowing SAFT to be used to visualize the reflectivity of a frequency band and that band s interaction with the contents of the concrete structure. We apply our technique to data sets collected using a commercial, ultrasonic linear array (MIRA) from two 1.5m x 2m x 25cm concrete test specimens. One specimen contains multiple layers of rebar. The other contains honeycomb, crack, and rebar bonding defect analogs. This approach opens up a multitude of possibilities for improved detection, readability, and overall improved objectivity. We will focus on improved defect/reinforcement isolation in thick and multilayered reinforcement environments. Additionally, the ability to empirically explore the possibility of a frequency-band-defect-type relationship or sensitivity becomes available.

  5. Application of the embedded polariscope photoelastic technique to the stress analysis of flanged tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiken, William Byron

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the internal stresses as do the previously mentioned methods. Another method which has been successfully used to test flanged tubes is the brittle model technique in which a brittle model is loaded to failure. This method is useful for testing flanged... be used to measure stresses in flanged tubes, flanged tube models of typical and extreme dimen- sions were tested under two extreme conditions of load- ing: (1) zero internal pressure, and (2) zero seal force. In each model, a polariscope was embedded...

  6. The Preclose Technique in Percutaneous Endovascular Aortic Repair: A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaffan, Abdel Aziz A., E-mail: aajaffan@gmail.com [Emory University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology and Image-Guided Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States); Prince, Ethan A., E-mail: eprince@lifespan.org [Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Rhode Island Hospital, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (United States); Hampson, Christopher O., E-mail: christopherohampson@gmail.com [Mercy Hospital (United States); Murphy, Timothy P., E-mail: tmurphy@lifespan.org [Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Rhode Island Hospital, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (United States)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To establish the efficacy and safety of the preclose technique in total percutaneous endovascular aortic repair (PEVAR).MethodsA systematic literature search of Medline database was conducted for series on PEVAR published between January 1999 and January 2012.ResultsThirty-six articles comprising 2,257 patients and 3,606 arterial accesses were included. Anatomical criteria used to exclude patients from undergoing PEVAR were not uniform across all series. The technical success rate was 94 % per arterial access. Failure was unilateral in the majority (93 %) of the 133 failed PEVAR cases. The groin complication rate in PEVAR was 3.6 %; a minority (1.6 %) of these groin complications required open surgery. The groin complication rate in failed PEVAR cases converted to groin cutdown was 6.1 %. A significantly higher technical success rate was achieved when arterial access was performed via ultrasound guidance. Technical failure rate was significantly higher with larger sheath size ({>=}20F). Conclusion. The preclose technique in PEVAR has a high technical success rate and a low groin complication rate. Technical success tends to increase with ultrasound-guided arterial access and decrease with larger access. When failure occurs, it is unilateral in the majority of cases, and conversion to surgical cutdown does not appear to increase the operative risk.

  7. Development of one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code 'GFLOW' for groundwater flow and contaminant transport analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahatgaonkar, P. S.; Datta, D.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G. [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., R-2, Ent. Block, Nabhikiya Urja Bhavan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai - 400 094 (India)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction of groundwater movement and contaminant transport in soil is an important problem in many branches of science and engineering. This includes groundwater hydrology, environmental engineering, soil science, agricultural engineering and also nuclear engineering. Specifically, in nuclear engineering it is applicable in the design of spent fuel storage pools and waste management sites in the nuclear power plants. Ground water modeling involves the simulation of flow and contaminant transport by groundwater flow. In the context of contaminated soil and groundwater system, numerical simulations are typically used to demonstrate compliance with regulatory standard. A one-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics code GFLOW had been developed based on the Finite Difference Method for simulating groundwater flow and contaminant transport through saturated and unsaturated soil. The code is validated with the analytical model and the benchmarking cases available in the literature. (authors)

  8. VISION-BASED TECHNIQUES FOR REFRACTION ANALYSIS IN APPLICATIONS OF TERRESTRIAL GEODESY Philipp FLACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    levelling ABSTRACT: Imaging sensors are increasingly spread in geodetic instruments, because they enable the evaluation of digital image data for the determination of direction and height. Beyond this, the analysis aufzuzeigen. 1. INTRODUCTION Due to automation of tasks in terrestrial geodesy, image sensors and vision

  9. Trace-Based Analysis and Prediction of Cloud Computing User Behavior Using the Fractal Modeling Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Trace-Based Analysis and Prediction of Cloud Computing User Behavior Using the Fractal Modeling and technology. In this paper, we investigate the characteristics of the cloud computing requests received the alpha- stable distribution. Keywords- cloud computing; alpha-stable distribution; fractional order

  10. Comparative Analysis of Control Techniques for Efficiency Improvement in Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy efficient and less polluting drive-train alternative to conventional internal combustion engine, University of Biskra, Biskra, Algeria Abstract--This paper presents system analysis, modeling and simulation dynamics and system architecture. Simulation tests have been carried out on a 37-kW EV that consists

  11. An Automatic Failure Mode and Effect Analysis Technique for Processes Defined in the Little-JIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avrunin, George S.

    Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) information from processes modeled in the Little-JIL process definition language. Typically FMEA information is created manually by skilled experts, an approach this definition can then be used to create FMEA representations for a wide range of potential failures

  12. New technique for phase shift analysis: multi-energy solution of inverse scattering problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. G. Cooper; V. I. Kukulin; R. S. Mackintosh; E. V. Kuznetsova

    1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a new approach to the analysis of extensive multi-energy data. For the case of d + He-4, we produce a phase shift analysis covering for the energy range 3 to 11 MeV. The key idea is the use of iterative perturbative data-to-potential inversion which can produce potentials which reproduce the data simultaneously over a range of energies. It thus effectively regularizes the extraction of phase shifts from diverse, incomplete and possibly somewhat contradictory data sets. In doing so, it will provide guidance to experimentalists as to what further measurements should be made. This study is limited to vector spin observables and spin-orbit interactions. We discuss alternative ways in which the theory can be implemented and which provide insight into the ambiguity problems. We compare the extrapolation of these solutions to other energies. Majorana terms are presented for each potential component.

  13. Statistical techniques applied to aerial radiometric surveys (STAARS): principal components analysis user's manual. [NURE program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, C.D.; Pirkle, F.L.; Schmidt, J.S.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Principal Components Analysis (PCA) has been written to aid in the interpretation of multivariate aerial radiometric data collected by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. The variations exhibited by these data have been reduced and classified into a number of linear combinations by using the PCA program. The PCA program then generates histograms and outlier maps of the individual variates. Black and white plots can be made on a Calcomp plotter by the application of follow-up programs. All programs referred to in this guide were written for a DEC-10. From this analysis a geologist may begin to interpret the data structure. Insight into geological processes underlying the data may be obtained.

  14. The advancement of a technique using principal component analysis for the non-intrusive depth profiling of radioactive contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J. C.; Joyce, M. J. [Engineering Dept., Lancaster Univ., Lancaster. LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Mellor, M. [Createc Ltd., Derwent Mills Commercial Park, Cockermouth, Cumbria. CA13 0HT (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-intrusive technique using principal component analysis, to infer the depth of the fission fragment caesium-137, when it is buried under silica sand has been described. Using energy variances within different {gamma}-ray spectra, a complete depth model was produced for a single caesium-137 source buried under 1 mm depths ranging between 5-50 mm. This was achieved using a cadmium telluride detector and a bespoke phantom. In this paper we describe the advancement of the technique by further validating it using blind tests for applications outside of the laboratory, where not only the depth (z) but also the surface (x, y) location of {gamma}-ray emitting contamination is often poorly characterised. At present the technique has been tested at the point of maximum activity above the entrained {gamma}-ray emitting source (where the optimal x, y location is known). This is not usually practical in poorly characterized environments where the detector cannot be conveniently placed at such an optimal location to begin with and scanning at multiple points around the region of interest is often required. Using a uniform scanning time, the point of maximum intensity can be located by sampling in terms of total count rate, and converging on this optimal point of maximum intensity. (authors)

  15. A Design-Oriented Framework to Determine the Parasitic Parameters of High Frequency Magnetics in Switching Power Supplies using Finite Element Analysis Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadmand, Mohammad

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A DESIGN-ORIENTED FRAMEWORK TO DETERMINE THE PARASITIC PARAMETERS OF HIGH FREQUENCY MAGNETICS IN SWITCING POWER SUPPLIES USING FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES A Thesis by MOHAMMAD BAGHER SHADMAND Submitted to the Office... to Determine the Parasitic Parameters of High Frequency Magnetics in Switching Power Supplies using Finite Element Analysis Techniques Copyright 2012 Mohammad Bagher Shadmand A DESIGN-ORIENTED FRAMEWORK TO DETERMINE THE PARASITIC PARAMETERS OF HIGH...

  16. A Mixed Finite Element Framework for Modeling Coupled Fluid Flow ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birendra Jha

    2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    and in enhanced oil recovery techniques such as steam assisted gravity ..... When fluid flows through a porous medium there are three forces acting, per unit.

  17. HPC Usage Behavior Analysis and Performance Estimation with Machine Learning Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hao [ORNL; You, Haihang [ORNL; Hadri, Bilel [ORNL; Fahey, Mark R [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most researchers with little high performance computing (HPC) experience have difficulties productively using the supercomputing resources. To address this issue, we investigated usage behaviors of the world s fastest academic Kraken supercomputer, and built a knowledge-based recommendation system to improve user productivity. Six clustering techniques, along with three cluster validation measures, were implemented to investigate the underlying patterns of usage behaviors. Besides manually defining a category for very large job submissions, six behavior categories were identified, which cleanly separated the data intensive jobs and computational intensive jobs. Then, job statistics of each behavior category were used to develop a knowledge-based recommendation system that can provide users with instructions about choosing appropriate software packages, setting job parameter values, and estimating job queuing time and runtime. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed recommendation system, which included 127 job submissions by users from different research fields. Great feedback indicated the usefulness of the provided information. The average runtime estimation accuracy of 64.2%, with 28.9% job termination rate, was achieved in the experiments, which almost doubled the average accuracy in the Kraken dataset.

  18. New analysis techniques for estimating impacts of federal appliance efficiency standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, James E.

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacts of U.S. appliance and equipment standards have been described previously. Since 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has updated standards for clothes washers, water heaters, and residential central air conditioners and heat pumps. A revised estimate of the aggregate impacts of all the residential appliance standards in the United States shows that existing standards will reduce residential primary energy consumption and associated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by 89 percent in 2020 compared to the levels expected without any standards. Studies of possible new standards are underway for residential furnaces and boilers, as well as a number of products in the commercial (tertiary) sector, such as distribution transformers and unitary air conditioners. The analysis of standards has evolved in response to critiques and in an attempt to develop more precise estimates of costs and benefits of these regulations. The newer analysis elements include: (1) valuing energy savings by using marginal (rather than average) energy prices specific to an end-use; (2) simulating the impacts of energy efficiency increases over a sample population of consumers to quantify the proportion of households having net benefits or net costs over the life of the appliance; and (3) calculating marginal markups in distribution channels to derive the incremental change in retail prices associated with increased manufacturing costs for improving energy efficiency.

  19. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  20. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2004-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  1. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the biological object in a main magnetic field and in a radio frequency field, the main magnetic field having a static field direction; rotating the biological object at a rotational frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. According to another embodiment, the radio frequency is pulsed to provide a sequence capable of producing a spectrum that is substantially free of spinning sideband peaks.

  2. Variability of biomass chemical composition and rapid analysis using FT-NIR techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Lu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ye, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quick method for analyzing the chemical composition of renewable energy biomass feedstock was developed by using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis. The study presents the broad-based model hypothesis that a single FT-NIR predictive model can be developed to analyze multiple types of biomass feedstock. The two most important biomass feedstocks corn stover and switchgrass were evaluated for the variability in their concentrations of the following components: glucan, xylan, galactan, arabinan, mannan, lignin, and ash. A hypothesis test was developed based upon these two species. Both cross-validation and independent validation results showed that the broad-based model developed is promising for future chemical prediction of both biomass species; in addition, the results also showed the method's prediction potential for wheat straw.

  3. Analysis of techniques for predicting viscosity of heavy oil and tar sand bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khataniar, S.; Patil, S.L.; Kamath, V.A. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal recovery methods are generally employed for recovering heavy oil and tar sand bitumen. These methods rely on reduction of oil viscosity by application of heat as one of the primary mechanisms of oil recovery. Therefore, design and performance prediction of the thermal recovery methods require adequate prediction of oil viscosity as a function of temperature. In this paper, several commonly used temperature-viscosity correlations are analyzed to evaluate their ability to correctly predict heavy oil and bitumen viscosity as a function of temperature. The analysis showed that Ali and Standing`s correlations gave satisfactory results in most cases when properly applied. Guidelines are provided for their application. None of the correlations, however, performed satisfactorily with very heavy oils at low temperatures.

  4. Laboratory analysis of fluid flow and solute transport through a variably saturated fracture embedded in porous tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Y.; Haldeman, W.R.; Rasmussen, T.C.; Evans, D.D. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory techniques are developed that allow concurrent measurement of unsaturated matrix hydraulic conductivity and fracture transmissivity of fractured rock blocks. Two Apache Leap tuff blocks with natural fractures were removed from near Superior, Arizona, shaped into rectangular prisms, and instrumented in the laboratory. Porous ceramic plates provided solution to block tops at regulated pressures. Infiltration tests were performed on both test blocks. Steady flow testing of the saturated first block provided estimates of matrix hydraulic conductivity and fracture transmissivity. Fifteen centimeters of suction applied to the second block top showed that fracture flow was minimal and matrix hydraulic conductivity was an order of magnitude less than the first block saturated matrix conductivity. Coated-wire ion-selective electrodes monitored aqueous chlorided breakthrough concentrations. Minute samples of tracer solution were collected with filter paper. The techniques worked well for studying transport behavior at near-saturated flow conditions and also appear to be promising for unsaturated conditions. Breakthrough curves in the fracture and matrix, and a concentration map of chloride concentrations within the fracture, suggest preferential flows paths in the fracture and substantial diffusion into the matrix. Average travel velocity, dispersion coefficient and longitudinal dispersivity in the fracture are obtained. 67 refs., 54 figs., 23 tabs.

  5. Analysis of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System for Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frisani, Angelo

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    the VHTR performance and safety analysis, one-dimensional (1-D) system type codes, like RELAP5 or MELCOR, and multi-dimensional CFD codes can be used. The choice of 1-D over multi-dimensional codes first involves identifying the main phenomena, and from...

  6. Integration of Advanced Probabilistic Analysis Techniques with Multi-Physics Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; none,; Flanagan, George F. [ORNL] [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P. [ORNL] [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated simulation platform that couples probabilistic analysis-based tools with model-based simulation tools can provide valuable insights for reactive and proactive responses to plant operating conditions. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the benefits of a partial implementation of the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Detailed Framework Specification through the coupling of advanced PRA capabilities and accurate multi-physics plant models. Coupling a probabilistic model with a multi-physics model will aid in design, operations, and safety by providing a more accurate understanding of plant behavior. This represents the first attempt at actually integrating these two types of analyses for a control system used for operations, on a faster than real-time basis. This report documents the development of the basic communication capability to exchange data with the probabilistic model using Reliability Workbench (RWB) and the multi-physics model using Dymola. The communication pathways from injecting a fault (i.e., failing a component) to the probabilistic and multi-physics models were successfully completed. This first version was tested with prototypic models represented in both RWB and Modelica. First, a simple event tree/fault tree (ET/FT) model was created to develop the software code to implement the communication capabilities between the dynamic-link library (dll) and RWB. A program, written in C#, successfully communicates faults to the probabilistic model through the dll. A systems model of the Advanced Liquid-Metal ReactorPower Reactor Inherently Safe Module (ALMR-PRISM) design developed under another DOE project was upgraded using Dymola to include proper interfaces to allow data exchange with the control application (ConApp). A program, written in C+, successfully communicates faults to the multi-physics model. The results of the example simulation were successfully plotted.

  7. Supercritical fluid thermodynamics for coal processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, F. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Eckert, C.A. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Chemical Engineering)

    1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research is to develop an equation of state that can be used to predict solubilities and tailor supercritical fluid solvents for the extraction and processing of coal. To meet this objective we have implemented a two-sided. approach. First, we expanded the database of model coal compound solubilities in higher temperature fluids, polar fluids, and fluid mixtures systems. Second, the unique solute/solute, solute/cosolvent and solute/solvent intermolecular interactions in supercritical fluid solutions were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. These results increased our understanding of the molecular phenomena that affect solubility in supercritical fluids and were significant in the development of an equation of state that accurately reflects the true molecular makeup of the solution. (VC)

  8. Magnetic fluid flow phenomena in DC and rotating magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Scott E. (Scott Edward), 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of magnetic fluid experiments and analysis is presented in three parts: a study of magnetic field induced torques in magnetorheological fluids, a characterization and quantitative measurement of properties ...

  9. Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Turner

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

  10. Verification of the coupled fluid/solid transfer in a CASL grid-to-rod-fretting simulation : a technical brief on the analysis of convergence behavior and demonstration of software tools for verification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copps, Kevin D.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a CASL grid-to-rod fretting problem, Sandia's Percept software was used in conjunction with the Sierra Mechanics suite to analyze the convergence behavior of the data transfer from a fluid simulation to a solid mechanics simulation. An analytic function, with properties relatively close to numerically computed fluid approximations, was chosen to represent the pressure solution in the fluid domain. The analytic pressure was interpolated on a sequence of grids on the fluid domain, and transferred onto a separate sequence of grids in the solid domain. The error in the resulting pressure in the solid domain was measured with respect to the analytic pressure. The error in pressure approached zero as both the fluid and solids meshes were refined. The convergence of the transfer algorithm was limited by whether the source grid resolution was the same or finer than the target grid resolution. In addition, using a feature coverage analysis, we found gaps in the solid mechanics code verification test suite directly relevant to the prototype CASL GTRF simulations.

  11. Simulation and performance analysis of basic GAX and advanced GAX cycles with ammonia/water and ammonia/water/LiBr absorption fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, A.; Grossman, G.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) and branched GAX cycles are generally considered with NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O as their working fluid. The potential consequences of using a ternary mixture of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr (advanced fluids) in the GAX and Branched GAX (advanced cycles) are discussed in this study. A modular steady state absorption simulation model(ABSIM) was used to investigate the potential of combining the above advanced cycles with the advanced fluids. ABSIM is capable of modeling varying cycle configurations with different working fluids. Performance parameters of the cycles, including coefficient of performance (COP) and heat duties, were investigated as functions of different operating parameters in the cooling mode for both the NH {sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary and the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary mixtures. High performance potential of GAX and branched GAX cycles using the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary fluid mixture was achieved especially at the high range of firing temperatures exceeding 400{degrees}F. The cooling COP`s have been improved by approximately 21% over the COP achieved with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary mixtures. These results show the potential of using advanced cycles with advanced fluid mixtures (ternary or quaternary fluid mixtures).

  12. Laboratory tests, statistical analysis and correlations for regained permeability and breakthrough time in unconsolidated sands for improved drill-in fluid cleanup practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serrano, Gerardo Enrique

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical models for estimating the breakthrough time and regained permeability for selected nondamaging drill-in fluids (DIF's) give a clear indication of formation damage and proper cleanup treatments for reservoir conditions analyzed...

  13. Proceedings of: X Convegno Tecnologie e Sistemi Energetici Complessi, (TESEC), June 2001, Genova, Italy ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR SAFETY ANALYSIS APPLIED TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    , Italy 1 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR SAFETY ANALYSIS APPLIED TO THE GAS TURBINE CONTROL SYSTEM OF ICARO CO of complex computer based systems. Such approaches are applied to the gas turbine control system of ICARO co of the centre of ENEA CR Casaccia. The plant is based on a small gas turbine and has been specifically designed

  14. Social Network Mining, Analysis and Research Trends: Techniques and Applications Bridging the Gap between the User's Digital and Physical Worlds with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Social Network Mining, Analysis and Research Trends: Techniques and Applications 1 Bridging the Gap or sharing content with their friends in social networking websites. Social activities involve basically: (i for the manipulation of social data consists of analysing both the structure of such networks and the content

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS--I: REGULAR PAPERS, VOL. 55, NO. 8, SEPTEMBER 2008 2263 A Clock-Less Jitter Spectral Analysis Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Clock-Less Jitter Spectral Analysis Technique Chee-Kian Ong, Member, IEEE, Dongwoo Hong, Kwang-Ting (Tim computationally intensive method, based on the derivative prin- ciple, to extract only the random jitter component on simulation show that these methods can accurately estimate the sinusoidal and random jitters

  16. VERIFICATION OF A NUMERICAL SIMULATION TECHNIQUE FOR NATURAL CONVECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on advanced passive cooling techniques. Systems Analysis andand fabrica- tion techniques. Cooling Systems Research. This

  17. Application of direct-fitting, mass-integral, and multi-ratemethods to analysis of flowing fluid electric conductivity logs fromHoronobe, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, C.; Tsang, C.-F.; Hatanaka, K.; Yabuuchi, S.; Kurikami, H.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The flowing fluid electric conductivity (FFEC) loggingmethod is an efficient way to provide information on the depths,salinities, and transmissivities of individual conductive featuresintercepted by a borehole, without the use of specialized probes. Usingit in a multiple-flow-rate mode allows, in addition, an estimate of theinherent "far-field" pressure heads in each of the conductive features.The multi-rate method was successfully applied to a 500-m borehole in agranitic formation and reported recently. The present paper presents theapplication of the method to two zones within a 1000-m borehole insedimentary rock, which produced, for each zone, three sets of logs atdifferent pumping rates, each set measured over a period of about oneday. The data sets involve a number of complications, such as variablewell diameter, free water table decline in the well, and effects ofdrilling mud. To analyze data from this borehole, we apply varioustechniques that have been developed for analyzing FFEC logs:direct-fitting, mass-integral, and the multi-rate method mentioned above.In spite of complications associated with the tests, analysis of the datais able to identify 44 hydraulically conducting fractures distributedover the depth interval 150-775 meters below ground surface. Thesalinities (in FEC), and transmissivities and pressure heads (indimensionless form) of these 44 features are obtained and found to varysignificantly among one another. These results are compared with datafrom eight packer tests with packer intervals of 10-80 m, which wereconducted in this borehole over the same depth interval. They are foundto be consistent with these independent packer-test data, thusdemonstrating the robustness of the FFEC logging method under non-idealconditions.

  18. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, Rudiger

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermo-Fluid Systems, Modelica 2003 Conference, Linkping,H. Tummescheit: The Modelica Fluid and Media Library forThermo-Fluid Pipe Networks, Modelica 2006 Conference, Vi-

  19. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. XX, NO. X, MONTH 2009 1 Machine Learning Techniques for the Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, James P.

    ) technique is commonly used for non-destructive testing of oil and gas pipelines. This testing involves of installed oil and natural gas pipelines using inline magnetic flux leakage (MFL) inspection techniques that could result from a pipeline leak or catastrophic fail- ure, pipelines must be routinely evaluated

  20. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G. (Los Alamos, NM); Garcia, Anthony R. E. (Espanola, NM); Martinez, Ronald K. (Santa Cruz, NM)

    2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  1. Viscous fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly discuss the phenomenological theory of dissipative fluid. We also present some numerical results for hydrodynamic evolution of QGP fluid with dissipation due to shear viscosity only. Its effect on particle production is also studied.

  2. HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenert, Andrej

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The choice of heat transfer fluids has significant effects on the performance, cost, and reliability of solar thermal systems. In this chapter, we evaluate existing heat transfer fluids such as oils and molten salts based ...

  3. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, Rudiger

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ob- ject-Oriented Modeling of Thermo-Fluid Systems, Modelicable and Compressible Thermo-Fluid Pipe Networks, ModelicaStandardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

  4. View dependent fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barran, Brian Arthur

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    , are modified to support a nonuniform simulation grid. In addition, infinite fluid boundary conditions are introduced that allow fluid to flow freely into or out of the simulation domain to achieve the effect of large, boundary free bodies of fluid. Finally, a...

  5. Ultra-fast Imaging of Two-Phase Flow in Structured Monolith Reactors; Techniques and Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heras, Jonathan Jaime

    This thesis will address the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to probe the monolith reactor, which consists of a structured catalyst over which reactions may occur. This reactor has emerged...

  6. Spinning fluids reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  7. Fluid Dynamics Seminar Fluid Dynamics Research Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    France) 8th Nov. Future Trends in Condition Monitoring of Rotating Machines Using System Identification Simulation of the Cooling of a Simplified Brake Disc Dr. Thorsten J. Mller, (Institute for Fluid Mechanics

  8. Fluid Dynamics Seminar Fluid Dynamics Research Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Peter J.

    France) 8 th Nov. Future Trends in Condition Monitoring of Rotating Machines Using System Identification Simulation of the Cooling of a Simplified Brake Disc Dr. Thorsten J. Mller, (Institute for Fluid Mechanics

  9. Shear-induced sedimentation in yield stress fluids Guillaume Ovarlez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    if a given material will remain ho- mogeneous during a flow. Using MRI techniques, we study the time the local shear rate in the interstitial fluid. Keywords: Sedimentation; Yield stress fluid; Suspension; MRI some lift or dispersion forces to the particles. This principle is typically used in fluidization

  10. 3rd International Symposium on Advanced Fluid/Solid Science and Technology in Experimental Mechanics, 7-10 December. 2008, Tainan, Taiwan Detection of wave propagation by a nonstationary cross-spectral density technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Mechanics, 7-10 December. 2008, Tainan, Taiwan Detection of wave propagation by a nonstationary cross for the propagation time, and was applied to a shock and a detonation wave. The results show that by including prone to error than the cross-correlation technique. Key words Wave propagation, Cross-spectrum, Time

  11. Nanoscale Pore Network and Pore Fluid Characterization from Neutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Pore Network and Pore Fluid Characterization from Neutron Scattering and Modeling Techniques Jul 22 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Gernot Rother, Chemical Sciences Division...

  12. Mitigative techniques and analysis of generic site conditions for ground-water contamination associated with severe accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, J.M.; Oberlander, P.L.; Skaggs, R.L.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using ground-water contaminant mitigation techniques to control radionuclide migration following a severe commercial nuclear power reactor accident. The two types of severe commercial reactor accidents investigated are: (1) containment basemat penetration of core melt debris which slowly cools and leaches radionuclides to the subsurface environment, and (2) containment basemat penetration of sump water without full penetration of the core mass. Six generic hydrogeologic site classifications are developed from an evaluation of reported data pertaining to the hydrogeologic properties of all existing and proposed commercial reactor sites. One-dimensional radionuclide transport analyses are conducted on each of the individual reactor sites to determine the generic characteristics of a radionuclide discharge to an accessible environment. Ground-water contaminant mitigation techniques that may be suitable, depending on specific site and accident conditions, for severe power plant accidents are identified and evaluated. Feasible mitigative techniques and associated constraints on feasibility are determined for each of the six hydrogeologic site classifications. The first of three case studies is conducted on a site located on the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain. Mitigative strategies are evaluated for their impact on contaminant transport and results show that the techniques evaluated significantly increased ground-water travel times. 31 references, 118 figures, 62 tables.

  13. Analysis of the Window Side Thermal Environment Formed by Air Barrier Technique in Winter Conditions and Its Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, C.; Jia, Y.; Liu, L.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strategy of this technology. It can be found that the air barrier technique, instead of the heating-supply around outside-zone for office building, can avoid dewfall in winter and decrease the cold radiation, which has a great effect on thermal environment...

  14. Analysis of the Window Side Thermal Environment Formed by Air Barrier Technique in Winter Conditions and Its Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, C.; Jia, Y.; Liu, L.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strategy of this technology. It can be found that the air barrier technique, instead of the heating-supply around outside-zone for office building, can avoid dewfall in winter and decrease the cold radiation, which has a great effect on thermal environment...

  15. 882 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 47, NO. 6, JUNE 1999 State-Variable-Based Transient Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    , circuit transient analysis, convolution, nonlinear circuits, solitons, state variables. I. INTRODUCTION TRANSIENT analysis of distributed microwave circuits is complicated by the inability of frequency, the linear part of a microwave circuit is described in the frequency domain by network parameters, especially

  16. Disposal of drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryson, W.R.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to 1974 the disposal of drilling fluids was not considered to be much of an environmental problem. In the past, disposal of drilling fluids was accomplished in various ways such as spreading on oil field lease roads to stabilize the road surface and control dust, spreading in the base of depressions of sandy land areas to increase water retention, and leaving the fluid in the reserve pit to be covered on closure of the pit. In recent years, some states have become concerned over the indescriminate dumping of drilling fluids into pits or unauthorized locations and have developed specific regulations to alleviate the perceived deterioration of environmental and groundwater quality from uncontrolled disposal practices. The disposal of drilling fluids in Kansas is discussed along with a newer method or treatment in drilling fluid disposal.

  17. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  18. Metalworking and machining fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Sykora, Frank (Caledon, ON, CA); Dorbeck, Mark (Brighton, MI)

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved boron-based metal working and machining fluids. Boric acid and boron-based additives that, when mixed with certain carrier fluids, such as water, cellulose and/or cellulose derivatives, polyhydric alcohol, polyalkylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, dextrin, in solid and/or solvated forms result in improved metalworking and machining of metallic work pieces. Fluids manufactured with boric acid or boron-based additives effectively reduce friction, prevent galling and severe wear problems on cutting and forming tools.

  19. Adsorption Kinetics of Surfactants at Fluid-Fluid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andelman, David

    Adsorption Kinetics of Surfactants at Fluid-Fluid Interfaces Haim Diamant and David Andelman School-Fluid Interfaces, Adsorption, Adsorption Kinetics, Interfacial Tension. 1 #12;Abstract We review a new theoretical approach to the kinetics of surfactant adsorption at fluid-fluid interfaces. It yields a more complete

  20. Packing frustration in dense confined fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim Nygrd; Sten Sarman; Roland Kjellander

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Packing frustration for confined fluids, i.e., the incompatibility between the preferred packing of the fluid particles and the packing constraints imposed by the confining surfaces, is studied for a dense hard-sphere fluid confined between planar hard surfaces at short separations. The detailed mechanism for the frustration is investigated via an analysis of the anisotropic pair distributions of the confined fluid, as obtained from integral equation theory for inhomogeneous fluids at pair correlation level within the anisotropic Percus-Yevick approximation. By examining the mean forces that arise from interparticle collisions around the periphery of each particle in the slit, we calculate the principal components of the mean force for the density profile - each component being the sum of collisional forces on a particle's hemisphere facing either surface. The variations of these components with the slit width give rise to rather intricate changes in the layer structure between the surfaces, but, as shown in this paper, the basis of these variations can be easily understood qualitatively and often also semi-quantitatively. It is found that the ordering of the fluid is in essence governed locally by the packing constraints at each single solid-fluid interface. A simple superposition of forces due to the presence of each surface gives surprisingly good estimates of the density profiles, but there remain nontrivial confinement effects that cannot be explained by superposition, most notably the magnitude of the excess adsorption of particles in the slit relative to bulk.

  1. Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrdad Massoudi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian (linear) behavior for a given range of parameters or geometries; there are many empirical or semi-empirical constitutive equations suggested for these fluids. There have also been many non-linear constitutive relations which have been derived based on the techniques of continuum mechanics. The non-linearities oftentimes appear due to higher gradient terms or time derivatives. When thermal and or chemical effects are also important, the (coupled) momentum and energy equations can give rise to a variety of interesting problems, such as instability, for example the phenomenon of double-diffusive convection in a fluid layer. In Conclusion, we have studied the flow of a compressible (density gradient type) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed. It is observed that the velocity increases rapidly in the region near the inclined surface and is slower in the region near the free surface. Since R{sub 7} is a measure of the heat generation due to chemical reaction, when the reaction is frozen (R{sub 7}=0.0) the temperature distributions would depend only on R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, representing the effects of the pressure force developed in the material due to the distribution, R{sub 3} and R{sub 4} viscous dissipation, R{sub 5} the normal stress coefficient, R{sub 6} the measure of the emissivity of the particles to the thermal conductivity, etc. When the flow is not frozen (RP{sub 7} > 0) the temperature inside the flow domain is much higher than those at the inclined and free surfaces. As a result, heat is transferred away from the flow toward both the inclined surface and the free surface with a rate that increases as R{sub 7} increases. For a given temperature, an increase in {zeta} implies that the activation energy is smaller and thus, the reaction ra

  2. Fluid delivery control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  3. Benchmarking a new closed-form thermal analysis technique against a traditional lumped parameter, finite-difference method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, K. D.; Bauer, T. H. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A benchmarking effort was conducted to determine the accuracy of a new analytic generic geology thermal repository model developed at LLNL relative to a more traditional, numerical, lumped parameter technique. The fast-running analytical thermal transport model assumes uniform thermal properties throughout a homogenous storage medium. Arrays of time-dependent heat sources are included geometrically as arrays of line segments and points. The solver uses a source-based linear superposition of closed form analytical functions from each contributing point or line to arrive at an estimate of the thermal evolution of a generic geologic repository. Temperature rise throughout the storage medium is computed as a linear superposition of temperature rises. It is modeled using the MathCAD mathematical engine and is parameterized to allow myriad gridded repository geometries and geologic characteristics [4]. It was anticipated that the accuracy and utility of the temperature field calculated with the LLNL analytical model would provide an accurate 'birds-eye' view in regions that are many tunnel radii away from actual storage units; i.e., at distances where tunnels and individual storage units could realistically be approximated as physical lines or points. However, geometrically explicit storage units, waste packages, tunnel walls and close-in rock are not included in the MathCAD model. The present benchmarking effort therefore focuses on the ability of the analytical model to accurately represent the close-in temperature field. Specifically, close-in temperatures computed with the LLNL MathCAD model were benchmarked against temperatures computed using geometrically-explicit lumped-parameter, repository thermal modeling technique developed over several years at ANL using the SINDAG thermal modeling code [5]. Application of this numerical modeling technique to underground storage of heat generating nuclear waste streams within the proposed YMR Site has been widely reported [6]. New SINDAG thermal models presented here share this same basic modeling approach.

  4. Viscous dark fluid universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hipolito-Ricaldi, W. S. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Ciencias Matematicas e Naturais, CEUNES, Rodovia BR 101 Norte, km. 60, CEP 29932-540, Sao Mateus, Espirito Santo (Brazil); Velten, H. E. S.; Zimdahl, W. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Fernando Ferrari, 514, Campus de Goiabeiras, CEP 29075-910, Vitoria, Espirito Santo (Brazil)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the cosmological perturbation dynamics for a universe consisting of pressureless baryonic matter and a viscous fluid, the latter representing a unified model of the dark sector. In the homogeneous and isotropic background the total energy density of this mixture behaves as a generalized Chaplygin gas. The perturbations of this energy density are intrinsically nonadiabatic and source relative entropy perturbations. The resulting baryonic matter power spectrum is shown to be compatible with the 2dFGRS and SDSS (DR7) data. A joint statistical analysis, using also Hubble-function and supernovae Ia data, shows that, different from other studies, there exists a maximum in the probability distribution for a negative present value q{sub 0{approx_equal}}-0.53 of the deceleration parameter. Moreover, while previous descriptions on the basis of generalized Chaplygin-gas models were incompatible with the matter power-spectrum data since they required a much too large amount of pressureless matter, the unified model presented here favors a matter content that is of the order of the baryonic matter abundance suggested by big-bang nucleosynthesis.

  5. Fluid blade disablement tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos (Albuquerque, NM); Hughs, Chance G. (Albuquerque, NM); Todd, Steven N. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid blade disablement (FBD) tool that forms both a focused fluid projectile that resembles a blade, which can provide precision penetration of a barrier wall, and a broad fluid projectile that functions substantially like a hammer, which can produce general disruption of structures behind the barrier wall. Embodiments of the FBD tool comprise a container capable of holding fluid, an explosive assembly which is positioned within the container and which comprises an explosive holder and explosive, and a means for detonating. The container has a concavity on the side adjacent to the exposed surface of the explosive. The position of the concavity relative to the explosive and its construction of materials with thicknesses that facilitate inversion and/or rupture of the concavity wall enable the formation of a sharp and coherent blade of fluid advancing ahead of the detonation gases.

  6. Local entropy generation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drost, M.K.; White, M.D.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Second law analysis techniques have been widely used to evaluate the sources of irreversibility in components and systems of components but the evaluation of local sources of irreversibility in thermal processes has received little attention. While analytical procedures for evaluating local entropy generation have been developed, applications have been limited to fluid flows with analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature fields. The analysis of local entropy generation can be used to evaluate more complicated flows by including entropy generation calculations in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The research documented in this report consists of incorporating local entropy generation calculations in an existing CFD code and then using the code to evaluate the distribution of thermodynamic losses in two applications: an impinging jet and a magnetic heat pump. 22 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorie M. Dilley

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Open or recently closed fractures would be more susceptible to enhancing the permeability of the system. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will assist in fracture stimulation site selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures (Moore, Morrow et al. 1987), and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. These fluid inclusions are faithful records of pore fluid chemistry. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. This report presents the results of the project to determine fracture locations by the chemical signatures from gas analysis of fluid inclusions. With this project we hope to test our assumptions that gas chemistry can distinguish if the fractures are open and bearing production fluids or represent prior active fractures and whether there are chemical signs of open fracture systems in the wall rock above the fracture. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a method developed for the geothermal industry which applies the mass quantification of fluid inclusion gas data from drill cuttings and applying known gas ratios and compositions to determine depth profiles of fluid barriers in a modern geothermal system (Dilley, 2009; Dilley et al., 2005; Norman et al., 2005). Identifying key gas signatures associated with fractures for isolating geothermal fluid production is the latest advancement in the application of FIS to geothermal systems (Dilley and Norman, 2005; Dilley and Norman, 2007). Our hypothesis is that peaks in FIS data are related to location of fractures. Previous work (DOE Grant DE-FG36-06GO16057) has indicated differences in the chemical signature of fluid inclusions between open and closed fractures as well as differences in the chemical signature of open fractures between geothermal systems. Our hypothesis is that open fracture systems can be identified by their FIS chemical signature; that there are differences based on the mineral assemblages and geology of the system; and that there are chemical precursors in the wall rock above open, large fractures. Specific goals for this project are: (1) To build on the preliminary results which indicate that there are differences in the FIS signatures between open and closed fractures by identifying which chemical species indicate open fractures in both active geothermal systems and in hot, dry rock; (2) To evaluate the FIS signatures based on the geology of the fields; (3) To evaluate the FIS signatures based on the mineral assemblages in the fracture; and (4) To determine if there are specific chemical signatures in the wall rock above open, large fractures. This method promises to lower the cost of geothermal energy production in several ways. Knowledge of productive fractures in the boreholes will allow engineers to optimize well production. This information can aid in well testing decisions, well completion strategies, and in resource calculations. It will assist in determining the areas for future fracture enhancement. This will develop into one of the techniques in the 'tool bag' for creating and managing Enhanced Geothermal Systems.

  8. Notes 10. A thermohydrodynamic bulk-flow model for fluid film bearings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complete set of bulk-flow equations for the analysis of turbulent flow fluid film bearings. Importance of thermal effects in process fluid applications. A CFD method for solution of the bulk-flow equations....

  9. System for Dispensing a Precise Amount of Fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Dzenitis, John M. (Danville, CA); Ness, Kevin D. (Mountain View, CA)

    2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A dispensing system delivers a precise amount of fluid for biological or chemical processing and/or analysis. Dispensing means moves the fluid. The dispensing means is operated by a pneumatic force. Connection means delivers the fluid to the desired location. An actuator means provides the pneumatic force to the dispensing means. Valving means transmits the pneumatic force from the actuator means to the dispensing means.

  10. Fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery as a potential problem for the WIPP: Proceedings of a June 1995 workshop and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, M.K.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a facility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), designed and constructed for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) defense waste. The repository is sited in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin, at a depth of 655 meters, in the salt beds of the Salado Formation. The WIPP is surrounded by reserves and production of potash, crude oil and natural gas. In selecting a repository site, concerns about extensive oil field development eliminated the Mescalero Plains site in Chaves County and concerns about future waterflooding in nearby oil fields helped eliminate the Alternate II site in Lea County. Ultimately, the Los Medanos site in Eddy County was selected, relying in part on the conclusion that there were no oil reserves at the site. For oil field operations, the problem of water migrating from the injection zone, through other formations such as the Salado, and onto adjacent property has long been recognized. In 1980, the DOE intended to prohibit secondary recovery by waterflooding in one mile buffer surrounding the WIPP Site. However, the DOE relinquished the right to restrict waterflooding based on a natural resources report which maintained that there was a minimal amount of crude oil likely to exist at the WIPP site, hence waterflooding adjacent to the WIPP would be unlikely. This document presents the workshop presentations and analyses for the fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery utilizing fluid injection and their potential effects on the WIPP facility.

  11. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikejimba, Lynda C., E-mail: lci@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ?}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ?} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ?}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ?} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of inplane structures and improved signal difference in the lesion.

  12. High Throughput Sample Preparation and Analysis for DNA Sequencing, PCR and Combinatorial Screening of Catalysis Based on Capillary Array Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonghua Zhang

    2002-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Sample preparation has been one of the major bottlenecks for many high throughput analyses. The purpose of this research was to develop new sample preparation and integration approach for DNA sequencing, PCR based DNA analysis and combinatorial screening of homogeneous catalysis based on multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence or imaging UV absorption detection. The author first introduced a method to integrate the front-end tasks to DNA capillary-array sequencers. protocols for directly sequencing the plasmids from a single bacterial colony in fused-silica capillaries were developed. After the colony was picked, lysis was accomplished in situ in the plastic sample tube using either a thermocycler or heating block. Upon heating, the plasmids were released while chromsomal DNA and membrane proteins were denatured and precipitated to the bottom of the tube. After adding enzyme and Sanger reagents, the resulting solution was aspirated into the reaction capillaries by a syringe pump, and cycle sequencing was initiated. No deleterious effect upon the reaction efficiency, the on-line purification system, or the capillary electrophoresis separation was observed, even though the crude lysate was used as the template. Multiplexed on-line DNA sequencing data from 8 parallel channels allowed base calling up to 620 bp with an accuracy of 98%. The entire system can be automatically regenerated for repeated operation. For PCR based DNA analysis, they demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis with UV detection can be used for DNA analysis starting from clinical sample without purification. After PCR reaction using cheek cell, blood or HIV-1 gag DNA, the reaction mixtures was injected into the capillary either on-line or off-line by base stacking. The protocol was also applied to capillary array electrophoresis. The use of cheaper detection, and the elimination of purification of DNA sample before or after PCR reaction, will make this approach an attractive alternative to current methods for genetic analysis and disease diagnosis.

  13. Device and technique for in-process sampling and analysis of molten metals and other liquids presenting harsh sampling conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvarez, J.L.; Watson, L.D.

    1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for continuously analyzing liquids by creating a supersonic spray which is shaped and sized prior to delivery of the spray to a analysis apparatus. The gas and liquid is sheared into small particles which are of a size and uniformity to form a spray which can be controlled through adjustment of pressures and gas velocity. The spray is shaped by a concentric supplemental flow of gas. 5 figs.

  14. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  15. A comparison of geostatistically based inverse techniques for use in performance assessment analysis at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site: Results from Test Case No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, D.A. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gallegos, D.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The groundwater flow pathway in the Culebra Dolomite aquifer at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been identified as a potentially important pathway for radionuclide migration to the accessible environment. Consequently, uncertainties in the models used to describe flow and transport in the Culebra need to be addressed. A ``Geostatistics Test Problem`` is being developed to evaluate a number of inverse techniques that may be used for flow calculations in the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The Test Problem is actually a series of test cases, each being developed as a highly complex synthetic data set; the intent is for the ensemble of these data sets to span the range of possible conceptual models of groundwater flow at the WIPP site. The Test Problem analysis approach is to use a comparison of the probabilistic groundwater travel time (GWTT) estimates produced by each technique as the basis for the evaluation. Participants are given observations of head and transmissivity (possibly including measurement error) or other information such as drawdowns from pumping wells, and are asked to develop stochastic models of groundwater flow for the synthetic system. Cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of groundwater flow (computed via particle tracking) are constructed using the head and transmissivity data generated through the application of each technique; one semi-analytical method generates the CDFs of groundwater flow directly. This paper describes the results from Test Case No. 1.

  16. Multiphase fluid characterization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement system and method for permitting multiple independent measurements of several physical parameters of multiphase fluids flowing through pipes are described. Multiple acoustic transducers are placed in acoustic communication with or attached to the outside surface of a section of existing spool (metal pipe), typically less than 3 feet in length, for noninvasive measurements. Sound speed, sound attenuation, fluid density, fluid flow, container wall resonance characteristics, and Doppler measurements for gas volume fraction may be measured simultaneously by the system. Temperature measurements are made using a temperature sensor for oil-cut correction.

  17. Supercritical fluid extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth (Pullman, WA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  18. Techniques for Profile Binning and Analysis of Eigenvector Composite Spectra: Comparing Hbeta and MgII 2800 as Virial Estimators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulentic, Jack W; del Olmo, Ascension; Plauchu-Frayn, Ilse

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the basic techniques for extracting information about quasar structure and kinematics from the broad emission lines in quasars. We consider which lines can most effectively serve as virial estimators of black hole mass. At low redshift the Balmer lines,particularly broad H beta, are the lines of choice. For redshifts greater than 0.7 - 0.8 one can follow H beta into the IR windows or find an H beta surrogate. We explain why UV CIV 1549 is not a safe virial estimator and how MgII 2800 serves as the best virial surrogate for H beta up to the highest redshift quasar known at z ~ 7. We show how spectral binning in a parameter space context (4DE1) makes possible a more effective comparison of H beta and MgII. It also helps to derive more accurate mass estimates from appropriately binned spectra and, finally, to map the dispersion in black hole mass and Eddington ratio across the quasar population. FWHM MgII is about 20% smaller than FWHM H beta in the majority of type 1 AGN requiring correction when comp...

  19. Basic fluid system trainer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Semans, Joseph P. (Uniontown, PA); Johnson, Peter G. (Pittsburgh, PA); LeBoeuf, Jr., Robert F. (Clairton, PA); Kromka, Joseph A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goron, Ronald H. (Connellsville, PA); Hay, George D. (Venetia, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A trainer, mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

  20. Basic fluid system trainer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semans, J.P.; Johnson, P.G.; LeBoeuf, R.F. Jr.; Kromka, J.A.; Goron, R.H.; Hay, G.D.

    1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention, a trainer mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

  1. Circulating Fluid Bed Combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraley, L. D.; Do, L. N.; Hsiao, K. H.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The circulating bed combustor represents an alternative concept of burning coal in fluid bed technology, which offers distinct advantages over both the current conventional fluidized bed combustion system and the pulverized coal boilers equipped...

  2. Phoresis in fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, Howard

    This paper presents a unified theory of phoretic phenomena in single-component fluids. Simple formulas are given for the phoretic velocities of small inert force-free non-Brownian particles migrating through otherwise ...

  3. Fluid pumping apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus suitable for coupling seismic or other downhole sensors to a borehole wall in high temperature and pressure environments. In one embodiment, one or more metal bellows mounted to a sensor module are inflated to clamp the sensor module within the borehole and couple an associated seismic sensor to a borehole wall. Once the sensing operation is complete, the bellows are deflated and the sensor module is unclamped by deflation of the metal bellows. In a further embodiment, a magnetic drive pump in a pump module is used to supply fluid pressure for inflating the metal bellows using borehole fluid or fluid from a reservoir. The pump includes a magnetic drive motor configured with a rotor assembly to be exposed to borehole fluid pressure including a rotatable armature for driving an impeller and an associated coil under control of electronics isolated from borehole pressure.

  4. Ultrarelativistic fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David W. Neilsen; Matthew W. Choptuik

    1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first of two papers examining the critical collapse of spherically symmetric perfect fluids with the equation of state P = (Gamma -1)rho. Here we present the equations of motion and describe a computer code capable of simulating the extremely relativistic flows encountered in critical solutions for Gamma <= 2. The fluid equations are solved using a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme based on a linearized Riemann solver.

  5. Valve for fluid control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Hencken, Kenneth R. (Pleasanton, CA); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A valve for controlling fluid flows. This valve, which includes both an actuation device and a valve body provides: the ability to incorporate both the actuation device and valve into a unitary structure that can be placed onto a microchip, the ability to generate higher actuation pressures and thus control higher fluid pressures than conventional microvalves, and a device that draws only microwatts of power. An electrokinetic pump that converts electric potential to hydraulic force is used to operate, or actuate, the valve.

  6. CSE Master Specialization Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Annika

    CSE Master Specialization Fluid Dynamics Course Semester Fluid Dynamics II HS Quantitative Flow Energie- und Verfahrenstechnik FS Biofluiddynamics FS #12;CSE in Fluid Dynamics: Very large high in Fluid Dynamics: Physiology of the inner ear MicroCT imaging Multilayer MFS for Stokes flow simulations

  7. Selecting fines recycle methods to optimize fluid bed combustor performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickman, W.S.; Fields, D.E.; Brimhall, W.L.; Callahan, S.F.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing and analysis of a number of different fines recycle methods for fluid bed combustors has led to a generalized modeling technique. This model accounts for the effect of pertinent variables in determining overall combustion efficiencies. Computer application of this model has allowed trade-off studies to be performed that show the overall process effects of changes in individual operating parameters. Verification of the model has been accomplished in processing campaigns while combusting fuels such as graphite and bituminous coal. A 0.4 MW test unit was used for the graphite experimental work. Solid fuel was typically crushed to 5 mm maximum screen size. Bed temperatures were normally controlled at 900/sup 0/C; the combustor was an atmospheric unit with maximum in-bed pressures of 0.2 atm. Expanded bed depths ranged from 1.5 to 3 meters. Additional data was taken from recycle tests sponsored by EPRI on the B and W 6 ft x 6 ft fluid bed combustor. These tests used high sulfur coal in a 1.2 meter deep, 850/sup 0/C atmospheric fluidized bed of limestone, with low recycle rates and temperatures. Close agreement between the model and test data has been noted, with combustion efficiency predictions matching experimental results within 1%.

  8. Applying uncertainty quantification to multiphase flow computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gel, A.; Garg, R.; Tong, C.; Shahnam, M.; Guenther, C.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase computational fluid dynamics plays a major role in design and optimization of fossil fuel based reactors. There is a growing interest in accounting for the influence of uncertainties associated with physical systems to increase the reliability of computational simulation based engineering analysis. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has recently undertaken an initiative to characterize uncertainties associated with computer simulation of reacting multiphase flows encountered in energy producing systems such as a coal gasifier. The current work presents the preliminary results in applying non-intrusive parametric uncertainty quantification and propagation techniques with NETL's open-source multiphase computational fluid dynamics software MFIX. For this purpose an open-source uncertainty quantification toolkit, PSUADE developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been interfaced with MFIX software. In this study, the sources of uncertainty associated with numerical approximation and model form have been neglected, and only the model input parametric uncertainty with forward propagation has been investigated by constructing a surrogate model based on data-fitted response surface for a multiphase flow demonstration problem. Monte Carlo simulation was employed for forward propagation of the aleatory type input uncertainties. Several insights gained based on the outcome of these simulations are presented such as how inadequate characterization of uncertainties can affect the reliability of the prediction results. Also a global sensitivity study using Sobol' indices was performed to better understand the contribution of input parameters to the variability observed in response variable.

  9. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  10. On equivalence of thinning fluids used for hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linkov, Alexander

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper aims to answer the question: if and how non-Newtonian fluids may be compared in their mechanical action when used for hydraulic fracturing? By employing the modified formulation of the PKN problem we obtain its simple analytical solutions in the cases of perfectly plastic and Newtonian fluids. Since the results for shear thinning fluids are intermediate between those for these cases, the obtained equation for the fracture length suggests a criterion of the equivalence of various shear thinning fluids for the problem of hydraulic fractures. We assume fluids equivalent in their hydrofracturing action, when at a reference time they produce fractures of the same length. The equation for the fracture length translates the equivalence in terms of the hydraulic fracture length and treatment time into the equivalence in terms of the properties of a fracturing fluid (behavior and consistency indices). Analysis shows that the influence of the consistency and behavior indices on the fracture length, particle v...

  11. Mesoscale Structures at Complex Fluid-Fluid Interfaces: a Novel Lattice Boltzmann / Molecular Dynamics Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcello Sega; Mauro Sbragaglia; Sofia Sergeevna Kantorovich; Alexey Olegovich Ivanov

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex fluid-fluid interfaces featuring mesoscale structures with adsorbed particles are key components of newly designed materials which are continuously enriching the field of soft matter. Simulation tools which are able to cope with the different scales characterizing these systems are fundamental requirements for efficient theoretical investigations. In this paper we present a novel simulation method, based on the approach of Ahlrichs and D\\"unweg [Ahlrichs and D\\"unweg, Int. J. Mod. Phys. C, 1998, 9, 1429], that couples the "Shan-Chen" multicomponent Lattice Boltzmann technique to off-lattice molecular dynamics to simulate efficiently complex fluid-fluid interfaces. We demonstrate how this approach can be used to study a wide class of challenging problems. Several examples are given, with an accent on bicontinuous phases formation in polyelectrolyte solutions and ferrofluid emulsions. We also show that the introduction of solvation free energies in the particle-fluid interaction unveils the hidden, multiscale nature of the particle-fluid coupling, allowing to treat symmetrically (and interchangeably) the on-lattice and off-lattice components of the system.

  12. Fluid sphere: stability problem and dimensional constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farook Rahaman; Anirudh Pradhan; Nasr Ahmed; Saibal Ray; Bijan Saha; Mosiur Rahaman

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study different dimensional fluids inspired by noncommutative geometry which admit conformal Killing vectors. The solutions of the Einstein field equations examined specifically for five different set of spacetime. We calculate the active gravitational mass and impose stability conditions of the fluid sphere. The analysis thus carried out immediately indicates that at $4$-dimension only one can get a stable configuration for any spherically symmetric stellar system and any other dimensions, lower or higher, becomes untenable as far as the stability of a system is concerned.

  13. Computerized fluid movement mapping and 3-D visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Awami, A.A.; Poore, J.W. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Sizer, J.P.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the fieldwide fluid movement monitoring techniques under utilize available computer resources. This paper discusses an approach reservoir management engineers use to monitor fluid movement in reservoirs with a multitude of wells. This approach allows the engineer to maintain up-to-date fluid movement studies and incorporate the latest information from data acquisition programs into the day to day decision-making process. The approach uses several in-house database applications and makes extensive use of commercially available software products to generate and visualize cross-sections, maps, and 3-d models. This paper reviews the computerized procedures to create cross-sections that display the current fluid contacts overlaying the lithology. It also reviews the mapping procedures nd presents examples of water encroachment maps by layer at specific time periods. 3-D geologic modeling software greatly enhances the visualization of the reservoir. This software can also be used to interpret and model fluid movement, given the appropriate engineering constraints.

  14. Fluid driven reciprocating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, J.C.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described comprising a pair of fluid driven pump assemblies in a back-to-back configuration to yield a bi-directional pump. Each of the pump assemblies includes a piston or diaphragm which divides a chamber therein to define a power section and a pumping section. An intake-exhaust valve is connected to each of the power sections of the pump chambers, and function to direct fluid, such as compressed air, into the power section and exhaust fluid therefrom. At least one of the pistons or diaphragms is connected by a rod assembly which is constructed to define a signal valve, whereby the intake-exhaust valve of one pump assembly is controlled by the position or location of the piston or diaphragm in the other pump assembly through the operation of the rod assembly signal valve. Each of the pumping sections of the pump assemblies are provided with intake and exhaust valves to enable filling of the pumping section with fluid and discharging fluid therefrom when a desired pressure has been reached. 13 figs.

  15. Fluid driven recipricating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, John C. (Davis, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus comprising a pair of fluid driven pump assemblies in a back-to-back configuration to yield a bi-directional pump. Each of the pump assemblies includes a piston or diaphragm which divides a chamber therein to define a power section and a pumping section. An intake-exhaust valve is connected to each of the power sections of the pump chambers, and function to direct fluid, such as compressed air, into the power section and exhaust fluid therefrom. At least one of the pistons or diaphragms is connected by a rod assembly which is constructed to define a signal valve, whereby the intake-exhaust valve of one pump assembly is controlled by the position or location of the piston or diaphragm in the other pump assembly through the operation of the rod assembly signal valve. Each of the pumping sections of the pump assemblies are provided with intake and exhaust valves to enable filling of the pumping section with fluid and discharging fluid therefrom when a desired pressure has been reached.

  16. 2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonin, A. A.

    Survey of principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua. Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows. Similarity and dimensional analysis. Lubrication theory. ...

  17. Selection of fracture fluid for stimulating tight gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malpani, Rajgopal Vijaykumar

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    , surveys from fracturing experts, and statistical analysis of production data, this research provides guidelines for selection of the appropriate stimulation treatment fluid in most gas shale and tight gas reservoirs. This study takes into account various...

  18. Optimization Online - Efficient Algorithmic Techniques for Several ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mugurel Ionut Andreica

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 23, 2008 ... Efficient Algorithmic Techniques for Several Multidimensional Geometric Data Management and Analysis Problems. Mugurel Ionut...

  19. DRILL-STRING NONLINEAR DYNAMICS ACCOUNTING FOR DRILLING FLUID T. G. Ritto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DRILL-STRING NONLINEAR DYNAMICS ACCOUNTING FOR DRILLING FLUID T. G. Ritto R. Sampaio thiagoritto Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée, France Abstract. The influence of the drilling fluid (or mud) on the drill in the analysis of the nonlinear dynamics of a drill-string. The aim of this paper is to investigate how the fluid

  20. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Harold E. (Las Vegas, NV); McLaurin, Felder M. (Las Vegas, NV); Ortiz, Monico (Las Vegas, NV); Huth, William A. (Las Vegas, NV)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  1. Detecting low levels of radionuclides in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patch, Keith D. (Lexington, MA); Morgan, Dean T. (Sudbury, MA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for detecting low levels of one or more radionuclides in a fluid sample uses a substrate that includes an ion exchange resin or other sorbent material to collect the radionuclides. A collecting apparatus includes a collecting chamber that exposes the substrate to a measured amount of the fluid sample such that radionuclides in the fluid sample are collected by the ion exchange resin. A drying apparatus, which can include a drying chamber, then dries the substrate. A measuring apparatus measures emissions from radionuclides collected on the substrate. The substrate is positioned in a measuring chamber proximate to a detector, which provides a signal in response to emissions from the radionuclides. Other analysis methods can be used to detect non-radioactive analytes, which can be collected with other types of sorbent materials.

  2. Coupled optical/thermal/fluid analysis and design requirements for operation and testing of a supercritical CO2 solar receiver.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khivsara, Sagar [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalor (India)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have evaluated closed-loop supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) Brayton cycles to be a higher energy-density system in comparison to conventional superheated steam Rankine systems. At turbine inlet conditions of 923K and 25 MPa, high thermal efficiency (~50%) can be achieved. Achieving these high efficiencies will make concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies a competitive alternative to current power generation methods. To incorporate a s-CO2 Brayton power cycle in a solar power tower system, the development of a solar receiver capable of providing an outlet temperature of 923 K (at 25 MPa) is necessary. To satisfy the temperature requirements of a s-CO2 Brayton cycle with recuperation and recompression, it is required to heat s-CO2 by a temperature of ~200 K as it passes through the solar receiver. Our objective was to develop an optical-thermal-fluid model to design and evaluate a tubular receiver that will receive a heat input ~1 MWth from a heliostat field. We also undertook the documentation of design requirements for the development, testing and safe operation of a direct s-CO2 solar receiver. The main purpose of this document is to serve as a reference and guideline for design and testing requirements, as well as to address the technical challenges and provide initial parameters for the computational models that will be employed for the development of s-CO2 receivers.

  3. Fluid accumulation in thin-film fl ows driven by surface tension and gravity (I): Rigorous analysis of a drainage equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuesta, C M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a boundary layer equation describing accumulation regions within a thin-film approximation framework where gravity and surface tension balance. As part of the analysis of this problem we investigate in detail and rigorously the 'drainage' equation (phi"'+1)phi^3=1. In particular, we prove that all solutions that do not tend to 1 as the independent variable goes to infinity are oscillatory, and that they oscillate in a very specific way. This result and the method of proof will be used in the analysis of solutions of the afore mentioned boundary layer problem.

  4. The action characterization matrix: A link between HERA (Human Events Reference for ATHEANA) and ATHEANA (a technique for human error analysis)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, H.A.

    1997-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA) is a newly developed human reliability analysis (HRA) methodology that aims to facilitate better representation and integration of human performance into probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) modeling and quantification by analyzing risk-significant operating experience in the context of existing behavior science models. The fundamental premise of ATHEANA is that error-forcing contexts (EFCs), which refer to combinations of equipment/material conditions and performance shaping factors (PSFs), set up or create the conditions under which unsafe actions (UAs) can occur. ATHEANA is being developed in the context of nuclear power plant (NPP) PRAs, and much of the language used to describe the method and provide examples of its application are specific to that industry. Because ATHEANA relies heavily on the analysis of operational events that have already occurred as a mechanism for generating creative thinking about possible EFCs, a database, called the Human Events Reference for ATHEANA (HERA), has been developed to support the methodology. Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL) Human Factors Group has recently joined the ATHEANA project team; LANL is responsible for further developing the database structure and for analyzing additional exemplar operational events for entry into the database. The Action Characterization Matrix (ACM) is conceived as a bridge between the HERA database structure and ATHEANA. Specifically, the ACM allows each unsafe action or human failure event to be characterized according to its representation along each of six different dimensions: system status, initiator status, unsafe action mechanism, information processing stage, equipment/material conditions, and performance shaping factors. This report describes the development of the ACM and provides details on the structure and content of its dimensions.

  5. TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING...

  6. Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to identify fracture systems in wells using fluid inclusion gas analysis of drill chips.

  7. FINITE ELEMENT METHOD IN FLUID MECHANICS & HEAT TRANSFER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camci, Cengiz

    completed this course should be able to perform quick analysis of small problems using the finite element of Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer An Introduction to Finite Element Analysis Using "Galerkin Weak of Euler's Equation in Finite Element Analysis Generalized Form of Euler's Equation in Three Dimensional

  8. Estimation techniques for large-scale turbulent fluid systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colburn, Christopher Hughes

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. 1972 Linear Optimal Control Systems. Wiley- Intersciencetime optimal control theory applied to the linear system (time optimal control theory applied to the linear system (

  9. Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    modeling with TOUGH and eTOUGH * Stochastic and deterministic joint inversion - Use seismic to provide the architecture of the system plus wells, - Use EMresistivity,...

  10. Thermal Imaging Technique for Measuring Mixing of Fluids - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in theTheoretical Study onThermal Hydraulic

  11. MEASUREMENT OF INTERFACIAL TENSION IN FLUID-FLUID SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Watson

    MEASUREMENT OF INTERFACIAL TENSION IN FLUID-FLUID SYSTEMS J. Drelich Ch. Fang C.L. White Michigan been used to measure interfacial tensions between immisci- ble fluid phases. A recent monograph sources of information on the in- terfacial tension measurement methods include selected chapters in Refs

  12. Global Analysis Toolbox: Mellin Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    but is hidden inside complicated convolutions, summed over many subprocesses many different processes needed century math comes to help ... R.H. Mellin Finnish mathematician integral transformation: Mellin n truncated at given order satisfy DGLAP eqs. "only" in the sense of a power expansion the treatment

  13. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  14. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  15. Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial gear box lubricants typically are hydrocarbon based mineral oils with considerable amounts of additives to overcome the lack of base fluid properties like wear protection, oxidation stability, load carrying capacity, low temperature solidification and drop of viscosity at higher temperatures. For today's wind turbine gearboxes, the requirements are more severe and synthetic hydrocarbon oils are used to improve on this, but all such hydrocarbon based lubricants require significant amounts of Extreme Pressure (EP) additives to meet performance requirements. Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) fluids provide load carrying capacity as an inherent property. During the course of the project with the main tasks of 'Establish a Benchmark', 'Lubricant Evaluation', 'Full Scale Gearbox Trial' and 'Economic Evaluation', the PAO Reference oil exhibited significant changes after laboratory gear testing, in service operation in the field and full scale gearbox trial. Four hydrocarbon base oils were selected for comparison in the benchmarking exercise and showed variation with respect to meeting the requirements for the laboratory micro-pitting tests, while the PFPE fluid exceeded the requirements even with the material taken after the full scale gear box trial. This is remarkable for a lubricant without EP additives. Laboratory bearing tests performed on the PFPE fluids before and after the full scale gear box trial showed the results met requirements for the industry standard. The PFPE fluid successfully completed the full scale gear box test program which included baseline and progressive staged load testing. The evaluation of gears showed no micro-pitting or objectionable wear. By the final stage, lubricant film thickness had been reduced to just 21% of its original value, this was by design and resulted in a lambda ratio of well below 1. This test design scenario of a low lambda ratio is a very undesirable lubrication condition for real world but creates the ability to test the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by using PFPE as the gearbox lubricating fluid. It is important to note the largest portion of savings comes in Levelized Replacement Cost, which is dictated by the assumption on gearb

  16. Electrochemical Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensitive and selective detection techniques are of crucial importance for capillary electrophoresis (CE), microfluidic chips, and other microfluidic systems. Electrochemical detectors have attracted considerable interest for microfluidic systems with features that include high sensitivity, inherent miniaturization of both the detection and control instrumentation, low cost and power demands, and high compatibility with microfabrication technology. The commonly used electrochemical detectors can be classified into three general modes: conductimetry, potentiometry, and amperometry.

  17. Oscillating fluid power generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  18. Apparatus and method for selectively channeling a fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rightley, Michael Joseph (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for selectively channeling a high temperature fluid without chemically reacting with the fluid. The apparatus includes an inlet and a membrane positioned adjacent to the inlet, each composed of a chemically inert material. The membrane is formed by compressive preloading techniques. The apparatus further includes a seat disposed on the inlet adjacent to the membrane. The seat is composed of a heat resistant and chemically inert material. Operation of the apparatus requires that the temperature of the fluid remains below the chemical characteristic melting point of the seat. The apparatus further includes an actuator coupled to the membrane for rendering the membrane in an open and a closed position with respect to the seat. Specifically, the actuator supplies a load in the normal direction to the membrane to selectively engage the membrane in a plurality of predetermined configurations. Operatively, the apparatus receives the fluid at the inlet. The fluid is received at a high temperature and is directed from the inlet to the membrane. In the closed position, the actuator engages the membrane to prevent the fluid from flowing from the inlet between the membrane and the seat. Alternatively, in the open position, the actuator engages the membrane to permit fluid flow from the inlet between the membrane and the seat to at least one outlet provided by the apparatus. In one exemplary embodiment, the fluid may be discharged from the at least one outlet to a sensor in fluid communication with the at least one outlet. Accordingly, the sensor may measure the fluid channeled through the heat resistant and chemically inert environment provided by the apparatus.

  19. Fluid bed material transfer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinske, Jr., Edward E. (Akron, OH)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluidized bed apparatus comprising a pair of separated fluid bed enclosures, each enclosing a fluid bed carried on an air distributor plate supplied with fluidizing air from below the plate. At least one equalizing duct extending through sidewalls of both fluid bed enclosures and flexibly engaged therewith to communicate the fluid beds with each other. The equalizing duct being surrounded by insulation which is in turn encased by an outer duct having expansion means and being fixed between the sidewalls of the fluid bed enclosures.

  20. Viscous dark fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Folomeev; V. Gurovich

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The unified dark energy and dark matter model within the framework of a model of a continuous medium with bulk viscosity (dark fluid) is considered. It is supposed that the bulk viscosity coefficient is an arbitrary function of the Hubble parameter. The choice of this function is carried out under the requirement to satisfy the observational data from recombination ($z\\approx 1000$) till present time.

  1. Fluid management plan for the Project Shoal Area Offsites Subproject

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has initiated the Offsites Subproject to characterize the hazards posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at facilities other than the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A primary Subproject objective is to gather adequate data to characterize the various Subproject sites through the collection of surface and subsurface soil samples and by drilling several wells for the collection of groundwater data. The Project Shoal Area (PSA) is one of the Subproject`s Nevada sites and is subject to the requirements set forth in the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (DOE, 1996a). In accordance with the FFACO, a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed for work at the PSA (designated as Corrective Action Unit Number 416). This Fluid Management Plan (FMP) provides guidance for the management of fluids generated from wells constructed at the PSA. Long-term monitoring and future activities at the site, if required, will be set forth in additional documents as required by the FFACO. The ultimate method for disposition of fluids generated by site operations depends upon sample analysis and process knowledge in relation to fluid management criteria. Section 2 describes well site operations; Section 3 discusses fluid management criteria; Section 4 includes the fluid monitoring program; Section 5 presents the fluid management strategy; Section 6 provides for fluid management during routine well monitoring; and Section 7 contains reporting criteria.

  2. Development of an analytical model for organic-fluid fouling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.; Watkinson, A.P.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research goal of this project is to determine ways to effectively mitigate fouling in organic fluids: hydrocarbons and derived fluids. The fouling research focuses on the development of methodology for determining threshold conditions for fouling. Initially, fluid containing chemicals known to produce foulant is analyzed; subsequently, fouling of industrial fluids is investigated. The fouling model developed for determining the effects of physical parameters is the subject of this report. The fouling model is developed on the premise that the chemical reaction for generation of precursor can take place in the bulk fluid, in the thermal-boundary layer, or at the fluid/wall interface, depending upon the interactive effects of fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, and the controlling chemical reaction. In the analysis, the experimental data are examined for fouling deposition of polyperoxide produced by autoxidation of indene in kerosene. The effects of fluid and wall temperatures for two flow geometries are analyzed. The results show that the relative effects of physical parameters on the fouling rate differ for the three fouling mechanisms. Therefore, to apply the closed-flow-loop data to industrial conditions, the controlling mechanism must be identified.

  3. Classical analogous of quantum cosmological perfect fluid models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batista, A B; Gonalves, S V B; Tossa, J

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantization in the mini-superspace of a gravity system coupled to a perfect fluid, leads to a solvable model which implies singularity free solutions through the construction of a superposition of the wavefunctions. We show that such models are equivalent to a classical system where, besides the perfect fluid, a repulsive fluid with an equation of state $p_Q = \\rho_Q$ is present. This leads to speculate on the true nature of this quantization procedure. A perturbative analysis of the classical system reveals the condition for the stability of the classical system in terms of the existence of an anti-gravity phase.

  4. Pumping fluids in microfluidic systems using the elastic deformation of poly(dimethylsiloxane){

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Pumping fluids in microfluidic systems using the elastic deformation of polyth October 2007 DOI: 10.1039/b714664g This paper demonstrates a methodology for storing and pumping. Introduction This note describes a technique for storing and pumping fluids in microfluidic devices fabricated

  5. Estimating maximum sustainable injection pressure during geological sequestration of CO2 using coupled fluid flow and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valle, Martin

    coupled fluid flow and geomechanical fault-slip analysis J. Rutqvist *, J. Birkholzer, F. Cappa, C demonstrates the use of coupled fluid flow and geomechanical fault slip (fault reactivation) analysis: Geological CO2 sequestration; geomechanics; Fault slip; Stress; Caprock integrity; CO2 injection 1

  6. Long-wave models of thin film fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Roberts

    1994-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Centre manifold techniques are used to derive rationally a description of the dynamics of thin films of fluid. The derived model is based on the free-surface $\\eta(x,t)$ and the vertically averaged horizontal velocity $\\avu(x,t)$. The approach appears to converge well and has significant differences from conventional depth-averaged models.

  7. Dynamic Particle Coupling for GPU-based Fluid Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanz, Volker

    -vi j 2 W( Pi -Pj ,h). Here pj = k( j - 0) is the pressure with gas constant k and rest density 0 for modeling dynamic particle coupling solely based on individual particle contributions. This technique does and is the fluid viscosity constant. To model the surface tension, Muller et.al. [MCG03] use the so

  8. Nanoscopic Dynamics of Phospholipid in Unilamellar Vesicles: Effect of Gel to Fluid Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Veerendra K [ORNL; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Anunciado, Divina B [ORNL; O'Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamics of phospholipids in unilamellar vesicles (ULV) is of interest in biology, medical, and food sciences since these molecules are widely used as biocompatible agents and a mimic of cell membrane systems. We have investigated the nanoscopic dynamics of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) phospholipid in ULV as a function of temperature using elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The dependence of the signal on the scattering momentum transfer, which is a critical advantage of neutron scattering techniques, allows the detailed analysis of the lipid motions that cannot be carried out by other means. In agreement with a differential scanning calorimetry measurement, a sharp rise in the elastic scattering intensity below ca. 296 K indicates a phase transition from the high-temperature fluid phase to the low-temperature solid gel phase. The microscopic lipid dynamics exhibits qualitative differences between the solid gel phase (in a measurement at 280 K) and the fluid phase (in a measurement at a physiological temperature of 310 K). The data analysis invariably shows the presence of two distinct motions: the whole lipid molecule motion within a monolayer, or lateral diffusion, and the relatively faster internal motion of the DMPC molecule. The lateral diffusion of the whole lipid molecule is found to be Fickian in character, whereas the internal lipid motions are of localized character, consistent with the structure of the vesicles. The lateral motion slows down by an order of magnitude in the solid gel phase, whereas for the internal motion not only the time scale, but also the character of the motion changes upon the phase transition. In the solid gel phase, the lipids are more ordered and undergo uniaxial rotational motion. However, in the fluid phase, the hydrogen atoms of the lipid tails undergo confined translation diffusion rather than uniaxial rotational diffusion. The localized translational diffusion of the hydrogen atoms of the lipid tails is a manifestation of the flexibility of the chains acquired in the fluid phase. Because of this flexibility, both the local diffusivity and the confinement volume for the hydrogen atoms increase linearly from near the lipid s polar head group to the end of its hydrophobic tail. Our results present a quantitative and detailed picture of the effect of the gel-fluid phase transition on the nanoscopic lipid dynamics in ULV. The data analysis approach developed here has a potential for probing the dynamic response of lipids to the presence of additional cell membrane components.

  9. Needle-free interstitial fluid acquisition using a Lorentz-force actuated jet injector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Jean H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interstitial fluid (ISF) provides information on a patient's health as it contains regulatory molecules that are correlated with disease-related processes. However, current ISF acquisition techniques can be slow, resulting ...

  10. Utilizing Standing Ultrasonic Waves to Harvest Microalgae from a Fluid Suspension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loveless, Kolin, 1986-

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    timeconsuming, and centrifugation requires significant energy input and frequent repairs. Here, the ultrasonic cell separation techniques employed by Jeremy J. Hawkes and others are applied to the specific case of separating microalgae from a fluid medium...

  11. LUBRICANTS AND HYDRAULIC FLUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineer Manual Department

    Contents) Major General, USA Chief of Staff i Table of Contents Purpose ........................................................ 1-1 1-1 Applicability .................................................... 1-2 1-1 References ...................................................... 1-3 1-1 Distribution Statement ............................................. 1-4 1-1 Scope ......................................................... 1-5 1-2 Friction ........................................................ 2-1 2-1 Wear .......................................................... 2-2 2-4 Lubrication and Lubricants ......................................... 2-3 2-6 Hydrodynamic or Fluid Film Lubrication ............................... 2-4 2-6 Boundary Lubrication ............................................. 2-5 2-8 Extreme Pressure (EP) Lubrication ................................... 2-6 2-9 Elastohydrodynamic (EHD) Lubrication ................................ 2-7 2-9 Oil R

  12. A new and effective method for thermostatting confined fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Luca, Sergio; Todd, B. D., E-mail: btodd@swin.edu.au [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, and Centre for Molecular Simulation, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Hansen, J. S. [DNRF Center Glass and Time, IMFUFA, Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)] [DNRF Center Glass and Time, IMFUFA, Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Daivis, Peter J. [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia)] [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple thermostatting method suitable for nanoconfined fluid systems. Two conventional strategies involve thermostatting the fluid directly or employing a thermal wall that couples only the wall atoms with the thermostat. When only a thermal wall is implemented, the temperature control of the fluid is true to the actual experiment and the heat is transferred from the fluid to the walls. However, for large or complex systems it can often be computationally prohibitive to employ thermal walls. To overcome this limitation many researchers choose to freeze wall atoms and instead apply a synthetic thermostat to the fluid directly through the equations of motion. This, however, can have serious consequences for the mechanical, thermodynamic, and dynamical properties of the fluid by introducing unphysical behaviour into the system [Bernardi et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 244706 (2010)]. In this paper, we propose a simple scheme which enables working with both frozen walls and naturally thermostatted liquids. This is done by superimposing the walls with oscillating particles, which vibrate on the edge of the fluid control volume. These particles exchange energy with the fluid molecules, but do not interact with wall atoms or each other, thus behaving as virtual particles. Their displacements violate the Lindemann criterion for melting, in such a way that the net effect would not amount to an additional confining surface. One advantage over standard techniques is the reduced computational cost, particularly for large walls, since they can be kept rigid. Another advantage over accepted strategies is the opportunity to freeze complex charged walls such as ?-cristobalite. The method furthermore overcomes the problem with polar fluids such as water, as thermalized charged surfaces require higher spring constants to preserve structural stability, due to the effects of strong Coulomb interactions, thus inevitably degrading the thermostatting efficiency.

  13. Using the FLUENT computational fluid dynamics code to model the NACOK corrosion test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, Benjamin T

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of advancing nuclear technology, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis offers safer and lower-cost results relative to experimental work. Its use as a safety analysis tool is gaining much broader acceptance ...

  14. Ultrasonic Fluid Quality Sensor System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining the composition of a multiple-component fluid and for determining linear flow comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the multiple-component fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the multiple-component fluid. A system for determining flow uses two of the inventive circuits, one of which is set at an angle that is not perpendicular to the direction of flow.

  15. Ultrasonic fluid quality sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining the composition of a multiple-component fluid and for determining linear flow comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the multiple-component fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the multiple-component fluid. A system for determining flow uses two of the inventive circuits, one of which is set at an angle that is not perpendicular to the direction of flow.

  16. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 95, No. 3, pp. 11501169, June 2005, doi: 10.1785/0120040028 On the Spectral Analysis of Love Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzina, Bojan

    to the pore fluid. Introduction During the past two decades, the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW design of structures (Gazetas, 1991), evaluation of the soil lique- faction potential (Robertson et al., 1992; Andrus and Stokoe, 2000), and assessment of the effectiveness of ground- improvement techniques

  17. Fluid system for controlling fluid losses during hydrocarbon recovery operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.H.; Smejkal, K.D.

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid system is described for controlling fluid losses during hydrocarbon recovery operations, comprising: water; a distribution of graded calcium carbonate particle sizes; and at least one modified lignosulfonate, which is a lignosulfonate modified by polymerizing it at least to an extent effective to reduce its water solubility.

  18. An Analysis of Nuclear Fuel Burnup in the AGR 1 TRISO Fuel Experiment Using Gamma Spectrometry, Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Simulation Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Demkowicz; Phillip L. Winston; James W. Sterbentz

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methods for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1 %FIMA for the direct method and 20.0 %FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3 % FIMA to 10.7 % FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. The results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry for TRISO fuel compacts across a burnup range of approximately 10 to 20 % FIMA and also validate the approach used in the physics simulation of the AGR 1 experiment.

  19. Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving these equations varies from zero coupling to full coupling. In this paper we describe a fully coupled solution approach for well model that allows for a flexible well trajectory and screened interval within a structured hexahedral computational grid. In this scheme the nonlinear well equations have been fully integrated into the Jacobian matrix for the reservoir conservation equations, minimizing the matrix bandwidth.

  20. A one-group parametric sensitivity analysis for the graphite isotope ratio method and other related techniques using ORIGEN 2.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesson, Kristin Elaine

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Several methods have been developed previously for estimating cumulative energy production and plutonium production from graphite-moderated reactors. The Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM) is one well-known technique. This method is based...

  1. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | OpenSuperiorEnergyOpen Energy

  2. Fluid Inclusion Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs Valley Area(Sasada, 1988) | OpenOpen

  3. Fluid Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs Valley Area(Sasada, 1988) |

  4. Spin and Madelung fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Salesi

    2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from the Pauli current we obtain the decomposition of the non-relativistic local velocity in two parts: one parallel and the other orthogonal to the momentum. The former is recognized to be the ``classical'' part, that is the velocity of the center-of-mass, and the latter the ``quantum'' one, that is the velocity of the motion in the center-of-mass frame (namely, the internal ``spin motion'' or {\\em Zitterbewegung}). Inserting the complete expression of the velocity into the kinetic energy term of the classical non-relativistic (i.e., Newtonian) Lagrangian, we straightforwardly derive the so-called ``quantum potential'' associated to the Madelung fluid. In such a way, the quantum mechanical behaviour of particles appears to be strictly correlated to the existence of spin and Zitterbewegung.

  5. Fluid jet electric discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, Howard A. (Ripon, CA)

    2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid jet or filament source and a pair of coaxial high voltage electrodes, in combination, comprise an electrical discharge system to produce radiation and, in particular, EUV radiation. The fluid jet source is composed of at least two serially connected reservoirs, a first reservoir into which a fluid, that can be either a liquid or a gas, can be fed at some pressure higher than atmospheric and a second reservoir maintained at a lower pressure than the first. The fluid is allowed to expand through an aperture into a high vacuum region between a pair of coaxial electrodes. This second expansion produces a narrow well-directed fluid jet whose size is dependent on the size and configuration of the apertures and the pressure used in the reservoir. At some time during the flow of the fluid filament, a high voltage pulse is applied to the electrodes to excite the fluid to form a plasma which provides the desired radiation; the wavelength of the radiation being determined by the composition of the fluid.

  6. Reduced order modeling of fluid/structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Kalashnikova, Irina; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed from October 2007 through September 2009 under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled 'Reduced Order Modeling of Fluid/Structure Interaction.' This project addresses fundamental aspects of techniques for construction of predictive Reduced Order Models (ROMs). A ROM is defined as a model, derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations, that preserves the essential physics and predictive capability of the original simulations but at a much lower computational cost. Techniques are developed for construction of provably stable linear Galerkin projection ROMs for compressible fluid flow, including a method for enforcing boundary conditions that preserves numerical stability. A convergence proof and error estimates are given for this class of ROM, and the method is demonstrated on a series of model problems. A reduced order method, based on the method of quadratic components, for solving the von Karman nonlinear plate equations is developed and tested. This method is applied to the problem of nonlinear limit cycle oscillations encountered when the plate interacts with an adjacent supersonic flow. A stability-preserving method for coupling the linear fluid ROM with the structural dynamics model for the elastic plate is constructed and tested. Methods for constructing efficient ROMs for nonlinear fluid equations are developed and tested on a one-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction equation. These methods are combined with a symmetrization approach to construct a ROM technique for application to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  7. Supercritical fluid thermodynamics for coal processing. Final report, September 15, 1988--September 14, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, F. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Eckert, C.A. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Chemical Engineering

    1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research is to develop an equation of state that can be used to predict solubilities and tailor supercritical fluid solvents for the extraction and processing of coal. To meet this objective we have implemented a two-sided. approach. First, we expanded the database of model coal compound solubilities in higher temperature fluids, polar fluids, and fluid mixtures systems. Second, the unique solute/solute, solute/cosolvent and solute/solvent intermolecular interactions in supercritical fluid solutions were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. These results increased our understanding of the molecular phenomena that affect solubility in supercritical fluids and were significant in the development of an equation of state that accurately reflects the true molecular makeup of the solution. (VC)

  8. Finite element simulation of electrorheological fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhyou, Chanryeol, 1973-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrorheological (ER) fluids change their flow properties dramatically when an electric field is applied. These fluids are usually composed of dispersions of polarizable particles in an insulating base fluid or composed ...

  9. Analysis of the energy distribution of interface traps related to tunnel oxide degradation using charge pumping techniques for 3D NAND flash applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, Ho-Myoung; Kim, Hee-Dong; Kim, Tae Geun, E-mail: tgkim1@korea.ac.kr

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: The degradation tendency extracted by CP technique was almost the same in both the bulk-type and TFT-type cells. - Highlights: D{sub it} is directly investigated from bulk-type and TFT-type CTF memory. Charge pumping technique was employed to analyze the D{sub it} information. To apply the CP technique to monitor the reliability of the 3D NAND flash. - Abstract: The energy distribution and density of interface traps (D{sub it}) are directly investigated from bulk-type and thin-film transistor (TFT)-type charge trap flash memory cells with tunnel oxide degradation, under program/erase (P/E) cycling using a charge pumping (CP) technique, in view of application in a 3-demension stackable NAND flash memory cell. After P/E cycling in bulk-type devices, the interface trap density gradually increased from 1.55 10{sup 12} cm{sup ?2} eV{sup ?1} to 3.66 10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2} eV{sup ?1} due to tunnel oxide damage, which was consistent with the subthreshold swing and transconductance degradation after P/E cycling. Its distribution moved toward shallow energy levels with increasing cycling numbers, which coincided with the decay rate degradation with short-term retention time. The tendency extracted with the CP technique for D{sub it} of the TFT-type cells was similar to those of bulk-type cells.

  10. Calibration method and apparatus for measuring the concentration of components in a fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durham, Michael D. (Castle Rock, CO); Sagan, Francis J. (Lakewood, CO); Burkhardt, Mark R. (Denver, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A calibration method and apparatus for use in measuring the concentrations of components of a fluid is provided. The measurements are determined from the intensity of radiation over a selected range of radiation wavelengths using peak-to-trough calculations. The peak-to-trough calculations are simplified by compensating for radiation absorption by the apparatus. The invention also allows absorption characteristics of an interfering fluid component to be accurately determined and negated thereby facilitating analysis of the fluid.

  11. Calibration method and apparatus for measuring the concentration of components in a fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durham, M.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Burkhardt, M.R.

    1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A calibration method and apparatus for use in measuring the concentrations of components of a fluid is provided. The measurements are determined from the intensity of radiation over a selected range of radiation wavelengths using peak-to-trough calculations. The peak-to-trough calculations are simplified by compensating for radiation absorption by the apparatus. The invention also allows absorption characteristics of an interfering fluid component to be accurately determined and negated thereby facilitating analysis of the fluid. 7 figures.

  12. Variable flexure-based fluid filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Steve B.; Colston Jr., Billy W.; Marshall, Graham; Wolcott, Duane

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for filtering particles from a fluid comprises a fluid inlet, a fluid outlet, a variable size passage between the fluid inlet and the fluid outlet, and means for adjusting the size of the variable size passage for filtering the particles from the fluid. An inlet fluid flow stream is introduced to a fixture with a variable size passage. The size of the variable size passage is set so that the fluid passes through the variable size passage but the particles do not pass through the variable size passage.

  13. Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Fluids & Fractures - time lapse MTCSEM for fluid imaging - joint CSEM-MTseismic imaging ??? - use MEQ focal information with EM Imaging ScientificTechnical Approach...

  14. Detachment Energies of Spheroidal Particles from Fluid-Fluid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary B. Davies; Timm Krger; Peter V. Coveney; Jens Harting

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy required to detach a single particle from a fluid-fluid interface is an important parameter for designing certain soft materials, for example, emulsions stabilised by colloidal particles, colloidosomes designed for targeted drug delivery, and bio-sensors composed of magnetic particles adsorbed at interfaces. For a fixed particle volume, prolate and oblate spheroids attach more strongly to interfaces because they have larger particle-interface areas. Calculating the detachment energy of spheroids necessitates the difficult measurement of particle-liquid surface tensions, in contrast with spheres, where the contact angle suffices. We develop a simplified detachment energy model for spheroids which depends only on the particle aspect ratio and the height of the particle centre of mass above the fluid-fluid interface. We use lattice Boltzmann simulations to validate the model and provide quantitative evidence that the approach can be applied to simulate particle-stabilized emulsions, and highlight the experimental implications of this validation.

  15. Drilling fluids and reserve pit toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leuterman, A.J.J.; Jones, F.V.; Chandler, J.E. (M-I Drilling Fluids Co. (US))

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling fluids are now classified as exempt under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste laws. Since 1986, however, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been studying reserve pit contents to determine whether oilfield wastes should continue under this exemption. Concerns regarding reserve pit contents and disposal practices have resulted in state and local governmental regulations that limit traditional methods of construction, closure, and disposal of reserve pit sludge and water. A great deal of attention and study has been focused on drilling fluids that eventually reside in reserve pits. In-house studies show that waste from water-based drilling fluids plays a limited role (if any) in possible hazards associated with reserve pits. Reserve pit water samples and pit sludge was analyzed and collated. Analyses show that water-soluble heavy metals (Cr, Pb, Zn and Mn) in reserve pits are generally undetectable or, if found in the total analysis, are usually bound to clays or organics too tightly to exceed the limitations as determined by the EPA toxicity leachate test. The authors' experience is that most contamination associated with reserve pits involves high salt content from produced waters and/or salt formations, lead contamination from pipe dope, or poorly designed pits, which could allow washouts into surface waters or seepage into groundwater sources. The authors' analyses show that reserve its associated with water-based drilling fluid operations should not be classified as hazardous; however, careful attention attention should be paid to reserve pit construction and closure to help avoid any adverse environmental impact.

  16. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.; Spangler, B.S. Jr.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device are described comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips. 7 figures.

  17. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKay, Mark D. (1426 Socastee Dr., North Augusta, SC 29841); Sweeney, Chad E. (3600 Westhampton Dr., Martinez, GA 30907-3036); Spangler, Jr., B. Samuel (2715 Margate Dr., Augusta, GA 30909)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

  18. Computational fluid dynamic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.-L.; Lottes, S. A.; Zhou, C. Q.

    2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid advancement of computational capability including speed and memory size has prompted the wide use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to simulate complex flow systems. CFD simulations are used to study the operating problems encountered in system, to evaluate the impacts of operation/design parameters on the performance of a system, and to investigate novel design concepts. CFD codes are generally developed based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy that govern the characteristics of a flow. The governing equations are simplified and discretized for a selected computational grid system. Numerical methods are selected to simplify and calculate approximate flow properties. For turbulent, reacting, and multiphase flow systems the complex processes relating to these aspects of the flow, i.e., turbulent diffusion, combustion kinetics, interfacial drag and heat and mass transfer, etc., are described in mathematical models, based on a combination of fundamental physics and empirical data, that are incorporated into the code. CFD simulation has been applied to a large variety of practical and industrial scale flow systems.

  19. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

  20. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

  1. Tracing Geothermal Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael C. Adams; Greg Nash

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive analytic methods that are economically feasible. The amount and concentration pattern of the tracer revealed by this monitoring can be used to evaluate how effective the injection strategy is. However, the tracers must have properties that suite the environment that they will be used in. This requires careful consideration and testing of the tracer properties. In previous and parallel investigations we have developed tracers that are suitable from tracing liquid water. In this investigation, we developed tracers that can be used for steam and mixed water/steam environments. This work will improve the efficiency of injection management in geothermal fields, lowering the cost of energy production and increasing the power output of these systems.

  2. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franke, Rudiger; Casella, Francesco; Sielemann, Michael; Proelss, Katrin; Otter, Martin; Wetter, Michael

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

  3. Insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Daniel O. (Glenville, NV)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid flow passage bridgepiece for insertion into an open-face fluid flow channel of a fluid flow plate is provided. The bridgepiece provides a sealed passage from a columnar fluid flow manifold to the flow channel, thereby preventing undesirable leakage into and out of the columnar fluid flow manifold. When deployed in the various fluid flow plates that are used in a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, bridgepieces of this invention prevent mixing of reactant gases, leakage of coolant or humidification water, and occlusion of the fluid flow channel by gasket material. The invention also provides a fluid flow plate assembly including an insertable bridgepiece, a fluid flow plate adapted for use with an insertable bridgepiece, and a method of manufacturing a fluid flow plate with an insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece.

  4. Fluid Mixing from Viscous Fingering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jha, Birendra

    Mixing efficiency at low Reynolds numbers can be enhanced by exploiting hydrodynamic instabilities that induce heterogeneity and disorder in the flow. The unstable displacement of fluids with different viscosities, or ...

  5. Bio-inspired fluid locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Brian, 1980-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed several novel methods of locomotion at low Reynolds number, for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids: Robosnails 1 and 2, which operate on a lubrication layer, and the three-link swimmer which moves ...

  6. Rip Cosmology via Inhomogeneous Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Obukhov; A. V. Timoshkin; E. V Savushkin

    2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The conditions for the appearance of the Little Rip, Pseudo Rip and Quasi Rip universes in the terms of the parameters in the equation of state of some dark fluid are investigated. Several examples of the Rip cosmologies are investigated.

  7. Graduate Studies Environmental Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Laurence J.

    and bridge scour Wastewater dispersion in coastal waters Cohesive sediment resuspension Flood, and modeling research; and develop new technologies and tools that benefit engineering practice in fluid Atmospheric, surface, and subsurface models Flood/drought forecasting and management Decision support

  8. Interface instabilities during displacements of two miscible fluids in a vertical pipe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lajeunesse, Eric

    superposed layers of fluids of different viscosities between two horizontal plates. He showed that the flow analysis of steady concentric flow of two fluids in a vertical circular tube. He considered both asymmetric for diffusive effects to be negligible. For certain viscosity ratios and flow rates, the interface between

  9. Fluid computation of the performanceenergy trade-off in large scale Markov models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imperial College, London

    Fluid computation of the performance­energy trade-off in large scale Markov models Anton Stefanek energy consumption while maintaining multiple service level agreements. 2. VIRTUALISED EXECUTION MODEL optimisation. We show how the fluid analysis naturally leads to a constrained global optimisation prob- lem

  10. Elimination of Adverse Leakage Flow in a Miniature Pediatric Centrifugal Blood Pump by Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paden, Brad

    levitated centrifugal blood pump intended to deliver 0.31.5 l/min of support to neo- nates and infants computational fluid dy- namics (CFD) analysis of impeller refinements, we found that sec- ondary blades located by exten- sive in vitro model testing. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been widely used

  11. Scaling fluid content-pressure relations of different fluid systems in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenhard, R.J.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-fluid-phase relations among fluid saturations (S) and pressures (P) have historically been used to predict S-P relations for three-fluid-phase systems consisting of a gas, nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL), and water, because measurements of three-phase S-P relations are complex. Two-phase S-P relations of air-NAPL systems are generally used to predict the behavior between total-liquid saturations of three-phase systems and air-NAPL capillary pressures. Two-phase S-P relations of NAPL-water systems are generally used to predict the behavior between water saturations of three-phase systems and NAPL-water capillary pressures. Because S-P measurements are very time-consuming, investigators have attempted to scale S-P relations so that fewer measurements would be required. A S-P scaling technique is discussed in this paper, and methods to predict the scaling factors are evaluated.

  12. LMP-MIT-TGG-03-12-09-2004 (12 December 2004) 1 WORKING DRAFT LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF CONVENTIONAL MANUFACTURING TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutowski, Timothy

    casting uses significant quantities of energy, as well as materials like oil-based lubricants and cooling effects of equipment manufacture can then be amortized over the many years of service. This analysis

  13. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore, K.

    2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. This is the first annual progress report submitted to the DOE. It reports on the work completed during the reporting period even if it may have started before this period. This project is a partnership between Professor George J. Hirasaki at Rice University and Professor Kishore Mohanty at University of Houston. In addition to the DOE, this project is supported by a consortium of oil companies and service companies. The fluid properties characterization has emphasized the departure of live oils from correlations based on dead oils. Also, asphaltic components can result in a difference between the T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions as well as reduce the hydrogen index. The fluid rock characterizations that are reported here are the effects of wettability and internal magnetic field gradients. A pore reconstruction method ha s been developed to recreate three-dimensional porous media from two-dimensional images that reproduce some of their key statistical properties. A Monte Carlo simulation technique has been developed to calculate the magnetization decay in fluid saturated porous media given their pore structure.

  14. FLUID MECHANICS AND HEAT TRANSFER OF ELECTRON FLOW IN SEMICONDUCTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Mihir

    = heat, f = LO-mode, g = LO, h = LA-mode, i = negligible, j = remote heat sink 7/ 70 #12;Heat conductionFLUID MECHANICS AND HEAT TRANSFER OF ELECTRON FLOW IN SEMICONDUCTORS Mihir Sen Department · Shallow water analogy · Vorticity dynamics · Linear stability analysis · Numerical simulations of heat

  15. Fluid Mechanics IB Lecturer: Dr Natalia Berloff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : hydroelectric power, chemical processing, jet-driven cutting tools our fluid environment: ozone loss, climate

  16. Pitch-catch only ultrasonic fluid densitometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA); Harris, Robert V. (Pasco, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge and pitch-catch only ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface.

  17. Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    cake solids mass/m2, w 3. Ruth equation using dw = (1-)solid dx fluidL p Ku solidK )1( 1 resistance, , with cake porosity : velocity, u layer thickness, L pressure drop, p dynamic viscosity, fluid Finland februari 2014 Unit w: kg/m2 Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010 Fluid&ParticulateSystems A424514

  18. QUALITATIVE REASONING ABOUT FLUIDS AND MECHANICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    which include both me- chanical mechanisms and fluids, such as internal combustion engines and hydraulic

  19. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of coal gasification in a pressurized spout-fluid bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhongyi Deng; Rui Xiao; Baosheng Jin; He Huang; Laihong Shen; Qilei Song; Qianjun Li [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, which has recently proven to be an effective means of analysis and optimization of energy-conversion processes, has been extended to coal gasification in this paper. A 3D mathematical model has been developed to simulate the coal gasification process in a pressurized spout-fluid bed. This CFD model is composed of gas-solid hydrodynamics, coal pyrolysis, char gasification, and gas phase reaction submodels. The rates of heterogeneous reactions are determined by combining Arrhenius rate and diffusion rate. The homogeneous reactions of gas phase can be treated as secondary reactions. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data shows that most gasification performance parameters can be predicted accurately. This good agreement indicates that CFD modeling can be used for complex fluidized beds coal gasification processes. 37 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. SUBMITTED TO THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FLOW CONTROL, REVISED VERSION 1 Fluid Flow Control: a Vision-Based Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    SUBMITTED TO THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FLOW CONTROL, REVISED VERSION 1 Fluid Flow Control, by visualizing a fluid flow, dense flow velocity maps can be computed via optical flow techniques by diminishing the fuel consumption of their aircrafts through drag reduction [1]. In contrast, in other

  1. Determining effects of turbine blades on fluid motion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linn, Rodman Ray (Los Alamos, NM); Koo, Eunmo (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a technique for simulating wind interaction with wind turbines. A turbine blade is divided into radial sections. The effect that each of these radial sections has on the velocities in Eulerian computational cells they overlap is determined. The effect is determined using Lagrangian techniques such that the calculations need not include wind components in the radial direction. A force on each radial section of turbine blade is determined. This force depends on the axial and azimuthal components of the fluid flow in the computational cell and the geometric properties of the turbine blade. The force on the turbine blade is fed back to effect the fluid flow in the computational cell for the next time step.

  2. Determining effects of turbine blades on fluid motion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linn, Rodman Ray (Los Alamos, NM); Koo, Eunmo (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a technique for simulating wind interaction with wind turbines. A turbine blade is divided into radial sections. The effect that each of these radial sections has on the velocities in Eulerian computational cells they overlap is determined. The effect is determined using Lagrangian techniques such that the calculations need not include wind components in the radial direction. A force on each radial section of turbine blade is determined. This force depends on the axial and azimuthal components of the fluid flow in the computational cell and the geometric properties of the turbine blade. The force on the turbine blade is fed back to effect the fluid flow in the computational cell for the next time step.

  3. Nonlinear Analysis 91 (2013) 119 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yorke, James

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    challenges. Fluidparticle interaction is of great significance in sedimentation analysis of disperse a c t This article deals with a fluidparticle interaction model for the evolution of particles dispersed in a fluid. The fluid flow is governed by the NavierStokes equations for a compressible fluid

  4. Geothermal fluid genesis in the Great Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.K.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early theories concerning geothermal recharge in the Great Basin implied recharge was by recent precipitation. Physical, chemical, and isotopic differences between thermal and non-thermal fluids and global paleoclimatic indicators suggest that recharge occurred during the late Pleistocene. Polar region isotopic studies demonstrate that a depletion in stable light-isotopes of precipitation existed during the late Pleistocene due to the colder, wetter climate. Isotopic analysis of calcite veins and packrat midden megafossils confirm the depletion event occurred in the Great Basin. Isotopic analysis of non-thermal springs is utilized as a proxy for local recent precipitation. Contoured plots of deuterium concentrations from non-thermal and thermal water show a regional, systematic variation. Subtracting contoured plots of non-thermal water from plots of thermal water reveals that thermal waters on a regional scale are generally isotopically more depleted. Isolated areas where thermal water is more enriched than non-thermal water correspond to locations of pluvial Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, suggesting isotopically enriched lake water contributed to fluid recharge. These anomalous waters also contain high concentrations of sodium chloride, boron, and other dissolved species suggestive of evaporative enrichment. Carbon-age date and isotopic data from Great Basin thermal waters correlate with the polar paleoclimate studies. Recharge occurred along range bounding faults. 151 refs., 62 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

  6. ASTROPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS VIA DIRECT STATISTICAL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobias, S. M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Dagon, K.; Marston, J. B., E-mail: smt@maths.leeds.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912-1843 (United States)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we introduce the concept of direct statistical simulation for astrophysical flows. This technique may be appropriate for problems in astrophysical fluids where the instantaneous dynamics of the flows are of secondary importance to their statistical properties. We give examples of such problems including mixing and transport in planets, stars, and disks. The method is described for a general set of evolution equations, before we consider the specific case of a spectral method optimized for problems on a spherical surface. The method is illustrated for the simplest non-trivial example of hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics on a rotating spherical surface. We then discuss possible extensions of the method both in terms of computational methods and the range of astrophysical problems that are of interest.

  7. Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    fluidr L wDdrag vbL Lv dxbFF 331 0 . Picture: BMH99 PTG #12;Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010 Fluid/2010 Fluid&ParticulateSystems A424514/2014 Basic concept wFAw A F VpVpP losscs cs loss losspumppump carlosscar wFP 212121 ,0, ppwwzz F w wFP #12;Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010 Fluid

  8. Extraction and analysis of pollutant organics from contaminated solids using off-line supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and on-line SFE-infrared spectroscopy. Task 2. Semiannual report, November 1995--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, S.B.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes activities in the following tasks associated with a project on environmental management technology decontamination and commercialization: A commercialized version of a field-portable instrument for performing supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with on-line Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) detection;pyrolysis of plastic wastes associated with mixtures of radioactive wastes;management and reporting activities; centrifugal membrane filtration with application to tank waste remediation; technology development integration activities associated with remedial action and waste management.

  9. Thioulouse, J., J. Devillers, D. Chessel, and Y. Auda. 1991. Graphical techniques for multidimensional data analysis. Pages 153-205 in J. Devillers and W. Karcher, editors. Applied Multivariate Analysis in SAR and Environmental Studies. Kluwer Academic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thioulouse, Jean

    Analysis in SAR and Environmental Studies. Kluwer Academic Publishers. http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/R/articles Analysis in SAR and Environmental Studies. Kluwer Academic Publishers. http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/R/articles Analysis in SAR and Environmental Studies. Kluwer Academic Publishers. http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/R/articles

  10. Cognitive environment simulation: An artificial intelligence system for human performance assessment: Cognitive reliability analysis technique: (Technical report, May 1986-June 1987)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, D.D.; Roth, E.M.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of Phase II of a three phase research program to develop and validate improved methods to model the cognitive behavior of nuclear power plant (NPP) personnel. In Phase II a dynamic simulation capability for modeling how people form intentions to act in NPP emergency situations was developed based on techniques from artificial intelligence. This modeling tool, Cognitive Environment Simulation or CES, simulates the cognitive processes that determine situation assessment and intention formation. It can be used to investigate analytically what situations and factors lead to intention failures, what actions follow from intention failures (e.g., errors of omission, errors of commission, common mode errors), the ability to recover from errors or additional machine failures, and the effects of changes in the NPP person-machine system. The Cognitive Reliability Assessment Technique (or CREATE) was also developed in Phase II to specify how CES can be used to enhance the measurement of the human contribution to risk in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) studies. 34 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Fluid observers and tilting cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Coley; S. Hervik; W. C. Lim

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study perfect fluid cosmological models with a constant equation of state parameter $\\gamma$ in which there are two naturally defined time-like congruences, a geometrically defined geodesic congruence and a non-geodesic fluid congruence. We establish an appropriate set of boost formulae relating the physical variables, and consequently the observed quantities, in the two frames. We study expanding spatially homogeneous tilted perfect fluid models, with an emphasis on future evolution with extreme tilt. We show that for ultra-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma>4/3$), generically the tilt becomes extreme at late times and the fluid observers will reach infinite expansion within a finite proper time and experience a singularity similar to that of the big rip. In addition, we show that for sub-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma < 4/3$), the tilt can become extreme at late times and give rise to an effective quintessential equation of state. To establish the connection with phantom cosmology and quintessence, we calculate the effective equation of state in the models under consideration and we determine the future asymptotic behaviour of the tilting models in the fluid frame variables using the boost formulae. We also discuss spatially inhomogeneous models and tilting spatially homogeneous models with a cosmological constant.

  12. Investigation into the discrepancies between computational fluid dynamics lift predictions and experimental results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairman, Randall S. (Randall Scott), 1967-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of current computational fluid dynamics capabilities in predicting mean lift forces for two dimensional foils is conducted. It is shown that both integral boundary layer theory and Reynolds Averaged Navier ...

  13. A biomedical device business plan for Medicraften Devices Inc. to develop a fluid medication dispenser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louison, Charles Davidson

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis surrounds an analysis to understand what it would take for a company to successfully launch a prescription fluid dispensing device. This device would in theory be able to dispense medication at any time daily ...

  14. Numerical and analytical modeling of heat transfer between fluid and fractured rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling of heat transfer between fluid and fractured rocks is of particular importance for energy extraction analysis in EGS, and therefore represents a critical component of EGS design and performance evaluation. In ...

  15. Critical elements in the design of piping systems for toxic fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Getz, R.C. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While releases of hazardous/toxic fluids from pressurized pipelines are infrequent, the potential for a catastrophic event resulting from such a release warrants extraordinary care of the hazardous/toxic piping systems containing these fluids, during the entire plant life cycle. System identification, segregation, material and component selection, construction techniques, and preventative maintenance programs all contribute to improved system reliability, and are discussed herein. Methods to mitigate damages in the event of a failure are also discussed.

  16. Direct Measurements of Pore Fluid Density by Vibrating Tube Densimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Wallacher, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of a vibrating tube method. Isotherms of total adsorption capacity were measured directly making the method complementary to the conventional gravimetric or volumetric/piezometric adsorption techniques, which yield the excess adsorption (the Gibbsian surface excess). A custom-made high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter (VTD) was used to measure the densities of subcritical and supercritical propane (between 35 C and 97 C) and supercritical carbon dioxide (between 32 C and 50 C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm3, 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, excess adsorption isotherms for supercritical CO2 and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically-coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum at a subcritical density of the bulk fluid, and then decreased towards zero or negative values at supercritical densities. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk liquid at the same temperature was observed at subcritical temperatures. The features of the isotherms of confined fluid density are interpreted to elucidate the observed behavior of excess adsorption. The maxima of excess adsorption were found to occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the conditions corresponding to the beginning of the plateau of total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquid-like pore phase. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. No measurable effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical point was found. Quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined from VTD total adsorption results and those measured gravimetrically at the same temperature, confirming the validity of the vibrating tube measurements. Vibrating tube densimetry was demonstrated as a novel experimental approach capable of providing the average density of pore-confined fluids.

  17. Maxwell's fluid model of magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Brady; Ross Anderson

    2015-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1861, Maxwell derived two of his equations of electromagnetism by modelling a magnetic line of force as a `molecular vortex' in a fluid-like medium. Later, in 1980, Berry and colleagues conducted experiments on a `phase vortex', a wave geometry in a fluid which is analogous to a magnetic line of force and also exhibits behaviour corresponding to the quantisation of magnetic flux. Here we unify these approaches by writing down a solution to the equations of motion for a compressible fluid which behaves in the same way as a magnetic line of force. We then revisit Maxwell's historical inspiration, namely Faraday's 1846 model of light as disturbances in lines of force. Using our unified model, we show that such disturbances resemble photons: they are polarised, absorbed discretely, obey Maxwell's full equations of electromagnetism to first order, and quantitatively reproduce the correlation that is observed in the Bell tests.

  18. Technique for information retrieval using enhanced latent semantic analysis generating rank approximation matrix by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chew, Peter A; Bader, Brett W

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for information retrieval includes parsing a corpus to identify a number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. A weighted morpheme-by-document matrix is generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus and based at least in part on a weighting function. The weighted morpheme-by-document matrix separately enumerates instances of stems and affixes. Additionally or alternatively, a term-by-term alignment matrix may be generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. At least one lower rank approximation matrix is generated by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix and/or the term-by-term alignment matrix.

  19. Radiation induces turbulence in particle-laden fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamansky, Rmi [Centre for Turbulence Research, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-3035 (United States); Coletti, Filippo [Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, California 94305-3035 (United States); Massot, Marc [Centre for Turbulence Research, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-3035 (United States); Ecole Centrale Paris, Laboratoire EM2C - UPR CNRS 288 et Fdration de Mathmatiques - FR CNRS 3487, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Mani, Ali [Centre for Turbulence Research, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-3035 (United States); Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, California 94305-3035 (United States)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    When a transparent fluid laden with solid particles is subject to radiative heating, non-uniformities in particle distribution result in local fluid temperature fluctuations. Under the influence of gravity, buoyancy induces vortical fluid motion which can lead to strong preferential concentration, enhancing the local heating and more non-uniformities in particle distribution. By employing direct numerical simulations this study shows that the described feedback loop can create and sustain turbulence. The velocity and length scale of the resulting turbulence is not known a priori, and is set by balance between viscous forces and buoyancy effects. When the particle response time is comparable to a viscous time scale, introduced in our analysis, the system exhibits intense fluctuations of turbulent kinetic energy and strong preferential concentration of particles.

  20. Multiscale Simulation and Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Richards' Equation in Heterogeneous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Seul Ki

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, we develop multiscale finite element methods and uncertainty quantification technique for Richards' equation, a mathematical model to describe fluid flow in unsaturated porous media. Both coarse-level and fine-level numerical...

  1. Non-Newtonian fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osinski, Charles Anthony

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    zero and unity. The Ostwald- de Waele Equation (4), commonly known as the power law, is sometimes used to describe fluid behavior of this type. The rheological equation is (4) where the parameters "k" and "n" are constant for a particular fluid... be extended to include Reynolds numbers and the type of flow determined to be laminar and/or turbulent. It is assumed that the transition from laminar to turbulent flow occurs at a Reynolds number of 2100, the numeric distribution of Reynolds numbers...

  2. Viscosity of a nucleonic fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aram Z. Mekjian

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The viscosity of nucleonic matter is studied both classically and in a quantum mechanical description. The collisions between particles are modeled as hard sphere scattering as a baseline for comparison and as scattering from an attractive square well potential. Properties associated with the unitary limit are developed which are shown to be approximately realized for a system of neutrons. The issue of near perfect fluid behavior of neutron matter is remarked on. Using some results from hard sphere molecular dynamics studies near perfect fluid behavior is discussed further.

  3. DECOUPLED TIME STEPPING METHODS FOR FLUID-FLUID INTERACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    -fluid interaction, atmosphere-ocean, implicit-explicit method. 1. Introduction. The dynamic core in atmosphere-ocean to the coupled system using only (uncoupled) atmosphere and ocean solves, (see e.g. [4, 6, 17, 18, 19 their shared interface I by a rigid-lid coupling condition, i.e. no penetration and a slip with friction

  4. Local structure and dynamics in colloidal fluids and gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takehiro Ohtsuka; C. Patrick Royall; Hajime Tanaka

    2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Gels in soft-matter systems are an important nonergodic state of matter. We study a colloid-polymer mixture which is quenched by increasing the polymer concentration, from a fluid to a gel. Using confocal microscopy, we study both the static structure and dynamics in three dimensions (3D). Between the dynamically arrested gel and ergodic fluid comprised of isolated particles we find an intermediate 'cluster fluid' state, where the 'bonds' between the colloidal particles have a finite lifetime. The local dynamics are reminiscent of a fluid, while the local structure is almost identical to that of the gel. Simultaneous real-time local structural analysis and particle tracking in 3D at the single-particle level yields the following interesting information. Particles in the clusters move in a highly correlated manner, but, at the same time, exhibit significant dynamical heterogeneity, reflecting the enhanced mobility near the free surface. Deeper quenching eventually leads to a gel state where the 'bond' lifetime exceeds that of the experiment, although the local structure is almost identical to that of the 'cluster fluid'.

  5. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  6. Hybrid opto-electric techniques for molecular diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haque, Aeraj Ul [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid optoelectric techniques reflect a new paradigm in microfluidics. In essence, these are microfluidic techniques that employ a synergistic combination of optical and electrical forces to enable noninvasive manipulation of fluids and/or particle-type entities at the micro/nano-scale [1]. Synergy between optical and electrical forces bestows these techniques with several unique features that are promising to bring new opportunities in molecular diagnostics. Within the scope of molecular diagnostics, several aspects of optoelectric techniques promise to play a relevant role. These include, but are not limited to, sample preparation, sorting, purification, amplification and detection.

  7. Review of uranium bioassay techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogard, J.S.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of analytical techniques is available for evaluating uranium in excreta and tissues at levels appropriate for occupational exposure control and evaluation. A few (fluorometry, kinetic phosphorescence analysis, {alpha}-particle spectrometry, neutron irradiation techniques, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry) have also been demonstrated as capable of determining uranium in these materials at levels comparable to those which occur naturally. Sample preparation requirements and isotopic sensitivities vary widely among these techniques and should be considered carefully when choosing a method. This report discusses analytical techniques used for evaluating uranium in biological matrices (primarily urine) and limits of detection reported in the literature. No cost comparison is attempted, although references are cited which address cost. Techniques discussed include: {alpha}-particle spectrometry; liquid scintillation spectrometry, fluorometry, phosphorometry, neutron activation analysis, fission-track counting, UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A summary table of reported limits of detection and of the more important experimental conditions associated with these reported limits is also provided.

  8. Meso-scale turbulence in living fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henricus H. Wensink; Jrn Dunkel; Sebastian Heidenreich; Knut Drescher; Raymond E. Goldstein; Hartmut Lwen; Julia M. Yeomans

    2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulence is ubiquitous, from oceanic currents to small-scale biological and quantum systems. Self-sustained turbulent motion in microbial suspensions presents an intriguing example of collective dynamical behavior amongst the simplest forms of life, and is important for fluid mixing and molecular transport on the microscale. The mathematical characterization of turbulence phenomena in active non-equilibrium fluids proves even more difficult than for conventional liquids or gases. It is not known which features of turbulent phases in living matter are universal or system-specific, or which generalizations of the Navier-Stokes equations are able to describe them adequately. Here, we combine experiments, particle simulations, and continuum theory to identify the statistical properties of self-sustained meso-scale turbulence in active systems. To study how dimensionality and boundary conditions affect collective bacterial dynamics, we measured energy spectra and structure functions in dense Bacillus subtilis suspensions in quasi-2D and 3D geometries. Our experimental results for the bacterial flow statistics agree well with predictions from a minimal model for self-propelled rods, suggesting that at high concentrations the collective motion of the bacteria is dominated by short-range interactions. To provide a basis for future theoretical studies, we propose a minimal continuum model for incompressible bacterial flow. A detailed numerical analysis of the 2D case shows that this theory can reproduce many of the experimentally observed features of self-sustained active turbulence.

  9. Visually simulating realistic fluid motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naithani, Priyanka

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's second law of motion and Conservation of Mass, which leads to the continuity equation. Newton's second law states that the total force F, acting on an element equals mass m times the element's acceleration a. In the case of fluids we do not consider...

  10. Directed flow fluid rinse trough

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kempka, S.N.; Walters, R.N.

    1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The tanks are suitable for one or more essentially planar items having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs also require less rinse fluid to accomplish a thorough rinse than prior art troughs. 9 figs.

  11. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  12. Quantifying the stimuli of photorheological fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Sarah Woodring

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a model to predict the dynamics of photorheological fluids and, more generally, photoresponsive fluids for monochromatic and polychromatic light sources. Derived from first principles, the model relates the ...

  13. Fluid Flow Simulation in Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Sudipta

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to analyze fluid flow in fractured reservoirs. In most petroleum reservoirs, particularly carbonate reservoirs and some tight sands, natural fractures play a critical role in controlling fluid ...

  14. Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    size distribution (CSD) and quality #12;Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010 Fluid solution Selective distribution of impurities between a liquid phase and a solid phase uniformity, purity

  15. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Alper, Naum I. (Monroeville, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump.

  16. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

  17. Radiological and Clinical Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy: A Matched Analysis of Three-Dimensional Conformal and Volumetric-modulated Arc Therapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palma, David A., E-mail: d.palma@vumc.n [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vincent, Andrew [Department of Biometrics, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lagerwaard, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Lung fibrosis is common after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors, but the influence of treatment technique on rates of clinical and radiological pneumonitis is not well described. After implementing volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) for SBRT, we scored the early pulmonary changes seen with arc and conventional three-dimensional SBRT (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-five SBRT patients treated with RA were matched 1:2 with 50 SBRT patients treated with 3D-CRT. Dose fractionations were based on a risk-adapted strategy. Clinical pneumonitis was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Acute radiological changes 3 months posttreatment were scored by three blinded observers. Relationships among treatment type, baseline factors, and outcomes were assessed using Spearman's correlation, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests, and logistic regression. Results: The RA and 3D-CRT groups were well matched. Forty-three patients (57%) had radiological pneumonitis 3 months after treatment. Twenty-eight patients (37%) had computed tomography (CT) findings of patchy or diffuse consolidation, and 15 patients (20%) had ground-glass opacities only. Clinical pneumonitis was uncommon, and no differences were seen between 3D-CRT vs. RA patients in rates of grade 2/3 clinical pneumonitis (6% vs. 4%, respectively; p = 0.99), moderate/severe radiological changes (24% vs. 36%, respectively, p = 0.28), or patterns of CT changes (p = 0.47). Radiological severity scores were associated with larger planning target volumes (p = 0.09) and extended fractionation (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Radiological changes after lung SBRT are common with both approaches, but no differences in early clinical or radiological findings were observed after RA. Longer follow-up will be required to exclude late changes.

  18. Analysis of ancient-river systems by 3D seismic time-slice technique: A case study in northeast Malay Basin, offshore Terengganu, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulaiman, Noorzamzarina; Hamzah, Umar; Samsudin, Abdul Rahim [Geology Programme, School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluvial sandstones constitute one of the major clastic petroleum reservoir types in many sedimentary basins around the world. This study is based on the analysis of high-resolution, shallow (seabed to 500 m depth) 3D seismic data which generated three-dimensional (3D) time slices that provide exceptional imaging of the geometry, dimension and temporal and spatial distribution of fluvial channels. The study area is in the northeast of Malay Basin about 280 km to the east of Terengganu offshore. The Malay Basin comprises a thick (> 8 km), rift to post-rift Oligo-Miocene to Pliocene basin-fill. The youngest (Miocene to Pliocene), post-rift succession is dominated by a thick (15 km), cyclic succession of coastal plain and coastal deposits, which accumulated in a humid-tropical climatic setting. This study focuses on the Pleistocene to Recent (500 m thick) succession, which comprises a range of seismic facies analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) seismic sections, mainly reflecting changes in fluvial channel style and river architecture. The succession has been divided into four seismic units (Unit S1-S4), bounded by basin-wide strata surfaces. Two types of boundaries have been identified: 1) a boundary that is defined by a regionally-extensive erosion surface at the base of a prominent incised valley (S3 and S4); 2) a sequence boundary that is defined by more weakly-incised, straight and low-sinuosity channels which is interpreted as low-stand alluvial bypass channel systems (S1 and S2). Each unit displays a predictable vertical change of the channel pattern and scale, with wide low-sinuosity channels at the base passing gradationally upwards into narrow high-sinuosity channels at the top. The wide variation in channel style and size is interpreted to be controlled mainly by the sea-level fluctuations on the widely flat Sunda land Platform.

  19. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 94, No. 5, pp. 18171830, October 2004 Faulting Induced by Forced Fluid Injection and Fluid Flow Forced by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is a technique used to image the volume of rock stimulated by hydraulic fracturing (Al- bright and Pearson, 1982. The method has been applied in devel- oping hot dry rock reservoirs (e.g., Pine and Batchelor, 1984; House al., 2003). Beyond mapping gross structure and fluid-flow paths, rela- tive source location

  20. Ultrasonic fluid densitometer for process control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses at least one pair of transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within a material wedge. A temperature sensor is provided to monitor the temperature of the wedge material. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface and comparing a transducer voltage and wedge material temperature to a tabulation as a function of density.

  1. Fluid Construction Grammar on Real Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steels, Luc

    Chapter 10 Fluid Construction Grammar on Real Robots Luc Steels1,2, Joachim De Beule3, and Pieter and P. Wellens (2012). Fluid Construction Grammar on Real Robots. In Luc Steels and Manfred Hild (Eds game experiments reported in this book. This framework is called Fluid Construction Grammar (FCG

  2. Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    .zevenhoven@abo.fi 2Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010 Fluid&ParticulateSystems A424514/2014 2.1 Flow tube sections / Turku Finland RoNz 3 Fluid Flow in Tube Systems loss 2 2 1 pump 2 2 1 ppwzgppwzg outoutoutoutininininloss,311 ' 3 ppzgp 2loss,322 ' 3 ppzgp 210 VVV For a fully developed turbulent flow (horizontal

  3. Harmonic Fluids Changxi Zheng Doug L. James

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Harmonic Fluids Changxi Zheng Doug L. James Cornell University Abstract Fluid sounds- ing. Furthermore, while offline applications can rely on talented foley artists to "cook up" plausible for vortex-based fluid sounds [Dobashi et al. 2003] and solid bodies [O'Brien et al. 2001; James et al. 2006

  4. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW J. E. Santos1, G. B. Savioli2, J. M. Carcione3, D´e, Argentina SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. I Storage of CO2). SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. II CO2 is separated from natural

  5. Wavelet Domain Based Techniques for Video Coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kutil, Rade

    Wavelet Domain Based Techniques for Video Coding Dissertation zur Erlangung des Doktorgrades an der . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2.4.3 Error Resilience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 3 Wavelet Transform 18 3.1 Wavelet Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.1.1 Fourier Transform (FT

  6. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 -rz Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 - rz Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics (iCFD) 424512.0 E, 5 sp / 3 sw 1. Introduction; Fluid dynamics (lecture 1 of 5) Ron Zevenhoven ?bo to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 - rz april 2013 ?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering

  7. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 2011; 00:123

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

    , magma chambers, fluidfuel interactions, crude oil recovery, spray cans, sediment transport in riversINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 2011; 00 for the treatment of discontinuous pressures in multifluid flows Roberto F. Ausas1 , Gustavo C. Buscaglia1

  8. Optical on line techniques for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doizi, D. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div. DEN, DANS/DPC/SECR/LSRM (France); Pailloux, A.; Maury, C.; Sirven, J. B.; Dauvois, V.; Roujou, J. L.; Rosset, C. D. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div. DEN, DANS/DPC (France); Hartmann, J. M. [CNRS., UMR 7583, LISA, Creteil (France)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical on line techniques enable non intrusive physical measurements in harsh environments (high temperature, high pressure, radioactivity, ...). Optical absorption spectrometries such as UV-Visible, FTIR, CRDS have been successfully used to study gas phase speciation in different nuclear applications. LIBS which relies on laser matter interactions is a on line optical technique for solids and liquids elementary analysis. (authors)

  9. The effect of condensate dropout on pressure transient analysis of a high-pressure gas condensate well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briens, Frederic Jean-Louis

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of drawdown or buildup tests, the formation permeability can be estimated. Although these conventional techniques have been successfully applied to 'dry' gas well analysis, they have not been extended to high-pressure gas condensate wells. The application... Condensate Reser voir Data. . 43 Elf Aquitaine Gas Condensate Reservoir Fluid Composition Elf Aquitaine Gas Condensate Well Production Test Data. Drawdown Test F1 of Elf Aquitaine Gas Condensate Mell 45 46 Drawdown Test F2 of Elf Aquitaine Gas...

  10. Organic fluids in a supercritical Rankine cycle for low temperature power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vidhi, Rachana [University of South Florida, Tampa; Kuravi, Sarada [University of South Florida, Tampa; Goswami, Yogi D. [University of South Florida, Tampa; Stefanakos, Elias [University of South Florida, Tampa; Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a performance analysis of a supercritical organic Rankine cycle (SORC) with various working fluids with thermal energy provided from a geothermal energy source. In the present study, a number of pure fluids (R23, R32, R125, R143a, R134a, R218, and R170) are analyzed to identify the most suitable fluids for different operating conditions. The source temperature is varied between 125 C and 200 C, to study its effect on the efficiency of the cycle for fixed and variable pressure ratios. The energy and exergy efficiencies for each working fluid are obtained and the optimum fluid is selected. It is found that thermal efficiencies as high as 21% can be obtained with 200 C source temperature and 10 C cooling water temperature considered in this study. For medium source temperatures (125 150 C), thermal efficiencies higher than 12% are obtained.

  11. Applying one-dimensional fluid thermal elements into a 3D CLIC accelerating strucutre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raatikainen, Riku; sterberg, Kenneth; Riddone, Germana; Samoshkin, Alexander; Gudkov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A finite element modeling method to simplify the analysis of coupled thermal-structural model for the CLIC accelerating structure is presented. In addition, the results of thermal and structural analyses for the accelerating structure are presented. Instead of using a standard 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method for solving problems involving fluid dynamics and heat transfer in 3D environment, one-dimensional fluid thermal elements are used. In one-dimensional flow, the governing equations of fluid dynamics are considerably simplified. Thus, it is expected that the computational time for more complex simulations becomes shorter. The method was first applied to several test models, which demonstrated the suitability of the one-dimensional flow modeling. The results show that one-dimensional fluid flow reduces the computation time considerably allowing the modeling for the future larger assemblies with sufficient accuracy.

  12. Development of SRC-I product analysis. Volume 2. Evaluation of analytical techniques for SRC-I characterization, recycle solvent studies, and product fractionation studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweighardt, F.K.; Kingsley, I.S.; Cooper, F.E.; Kamzelski, A.Z.; Parees, D.M.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A data analysis was performed to determine the relationship between the Wilsonville Solvent Quality test result and SRC liquefaction process parameters. The data base studied covers the years 1979 to 1982, Wilsonville runs 133 to 234. Only process-defined material balance data sets were included to best represent steady-state operation. Each material balance period provided 48 variables from which common process conditions were selected by imposing a range of acceptable deviations from a norm, e.g., a reactor hydrogen pressure of 2000 +- 100 psi. Data for all variables vs. solvent quality were plotted, and in some cases variables were compared with each other to determine common trends, e.g. gas production vs. hydrogen consumption. The plotted data produced no discernible trends. Separating the data by coal type (mine location) and identifying common process conditions with coal types still provided no absolute correlations with solvent quality. However, the effect of the weight percent pyrite present in the feed coal produced a consistent trend. A coal containing more than 1.2% pyrite and less than 0.1% sulfate sulfur yielded results in which any one correlation would cluster about a central point. It was observed that, on average, Kentucky Fies and Pyro mine coal and Indiana V coal clustered together, while Kentucky Lafayette and Dotiki mine coals clustered together. These data point clusters for the variables tested were nearly independent of reactor pressure, space rate, and temperature. One unusual observation of all the data points, independent of process conditions, was that at each change of feed coal, the sum of hydrocarbon and heteroatom gas production was greatest for the first 30 days, after which gas production reached a steady state dependent on process conditions, primarily temperature.

  13. Mechanics of layered anisotropic poroelastic media with applications to effective stress for fluid permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanics of vertically layered porous media has some similarities to and some differences from the more typical layered analysis for purely elastic media. Assuming welded solid contact at the solid-solid interfaces implies the usual continuity conditions, which are continuity of the vertical (layering direction) stress components and the horizontal strain components. These conditions are valid for both elastic and poroelastic media. Differences arise through the conditions for the pore pressure and the increment of fluid content in the context of fluid-saturated porous media. The two distinct conditions most often considered between any pair of contiguous layers are: (1) an undrained fluid condition at the interface, meaning that the increment of fluid content is zero (i.e., {delta}{zeta} = 0), or (2) fluid pressure continuity at the interface, implying that the change in fluid pressure is zero across the interface (i.e., {delta}p{sub f} = 0). Depending on the types of measurements being made on the system and the pertinent boundary conditions for these measurements, either (or neither) of these two conditions might be directly pertinent. But these conditions are sufficient nevertheless to be used as thought experiments to determine the expected values of all the poroelastic coefficients. For quasi-static mechanical changes over long time periods, we expect drained conditions to hold, so the pressure must then be continuous. For high frequency wave propagation, the pore-fluid typically acts as if it were undrained (or very nearly so), with vanishing of the fluid increment at the boundaries being appropriate. Poroelastic analysis of both these end-member cases is discussed, and the general equations for a variety of applications to heterogeneous porous media are developed. In particular, effective stress for the fluid permeability of such poroelastic systems is considered; fluid permeabilities characteristic of granular media or tubular pore shapes are treated in some detail, as are permeabilities of some of the simpler types of fractured materials.

  14. GEOPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS-I OC512/AS509 2011 P.Rhines 19-21 Jan 2011 LECTUREs 7-8: Dynamics of a single-layer fluid: waves, inertial oscillations, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -water' balance in a homogeneous fluid. The MASS conservation equation for a constant density fluid implies.1-7.6 (began last week), 10.4 (Kelvin waves) (similar material in Vallis §§ 2.8, 3.1, 3.6-3.8 Bretherton than a fraction of a wavelength. This is implicit in a scale analysis of the governing equation

  15. Fluid dynamics on sieve trays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hag, M.A.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of fluid properties on the hydrodynamics of sieve tray columns. The study showed that changes in liquid viscosity influenced froth height, while changes in liquid surface tension and density influenced total pressure drop across the trays. Liquid holdup was independent of these solution properties. The liquid systems used for the study were: water/glycerol for viscosity, water/ethanol for surface tension and methanol/chloroform for density.

  16. Estimating the Impact (Energy, Emissions and Economics) of the US Fluid Power Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Lonnie J [ORNL

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to estimate the impact (energy, emissions and economics) of United Fluid power (hydraulic and pneumatic actuation) is the generation, control, and application of pumped or compressed fluids when this power is used to provide force and motion to mechanisms. This form of mechanical power is an integral part of United States (U.S.) manufacturing and transportation. In 2008, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, sales of fluid power components exceeded $17.7B, sales of systems using fluid power exceeded $226B. As large as the industry is, it has had little fundamental research that could lead to improved efficiency since the late 1960s (prior to the 1970 energy crisis). While there have been some attempts to replace fluid powered components with electric systems, its performance and rugged operating condition limit the impact of simple part replacement. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) collaborated with 31 industrial partners to collect and consolidate energy specific measurements (consumption, emissions, efficiency) of deployed fluid power systems. The objective of this study was to establish a rudimentary order of magnitude estimate of the energy consumed by fluid powered systems. The analysis conducted in this study shows that fluid powered systems consumed between 2.0 and 2.9 Quadrillion (1015) Btus (Quads) of energy per year; producing between 310 and 380 million metric tons (MMT) of Carbon Dioxide (CO2). In terms of efficiency, the study indicates that, across all industries, fluid power system efficiencies range from less than 9% to as high as 60% (depending upon the application), with an average efficiency of 22%. A review of case studies shows that there are many opportunities to impact energy savings in both the manufacturing and transportation sectors by the development and deployment of energy efficient fluid power components and systems.

  17. Assessor Training Assessment Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills and Conducting an Assessment listener Knowledgeable Assessor Training 2009: Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills & Conducting, truthful, sincere, discrete Diplomatic Decisive Selfreliant Assessor Training 2009: Assessment

  18. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Rigby, ID)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  19. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, J.R.

    1982-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion. 3 figs.

  20. Locomotion in complex fluids: Integral theorems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Lauga

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The biological fluids encountered by self-propelled cells display complex microstructures and rheology. We consider here the general problem of low-Reynolds number locomotion in a complex fluid. {Building on classical work on the transport of particles in viscoelastic fluids,} we demonstrate how to mathematically derive three integral theorems relating the arbitrary motion of an isolated organism to its swimming kinematics {in a non-Newtonian fluid}. These theorems correspond to three situations of interest, namely (1) squirming motion in a linear viscoelastic fluid, (2) arbitrary surface deformation in a weakly non-Newtonian fluid, and (3) small-amplitude deformation in an arbitrarily non-Newtonian fluid. Our final results, valid for a wide-class of {swimmer geometry,} surface kinematics and constitutive models, at most require mathematical knowledge of a series of Newtonian flow problems, and will be useful to quantity the locomotion of biological and synthetic swimmers in complex environments.

  1. Two-level Stochastic Fluid Tandem Queuing Model for Burst Impact Yong Huang, Yong Liu, Weibo Gong, Don Towsley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    , Weibo Gong, Don Towsley Abstract-- Queuing analysis is important in providing guid- ing principles are modeled as continuous fluid. The continuous nature of fluid makes Yong Huang and Weibo Gong, gong@ecs.umass.edu. Yong Liu is with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Polytechnic

  2. Transient Analysis of Large-scale Stochastic Service Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Young Myoung

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    technique called uniform acceleration, utilizing the theory of strong approximations. We first investigate and discuss the possible inaccuracy of limit processes obtained from employing the technique. As a solution, we propose adjusted fluid and diffusion...

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic pump with a system for promoting flow of fluid in one direction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemoff, Asuncion V. (Union City, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Irvine, CA)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetohydrodynamic pump for pumping a fluid. The pump includes a microfluidic channel for channeling the fluid, a MHD electrode/magnet system operatively connected to the microfluidic channel, and a system for promoting flow of the fluid in one direction in the microfluidic channel. The pump has uses in the medical and biotechnology industries for blood-cell-separation equipment, biochemical assays, chemical synthesis, genetic analysis, drug screening, an array of antigen-antibody reactions, combinatorial chemistry, drug testing, medical and biological diagnostics, and combinatorial chemistry. The pump also has uses in electrochromatography, surface micromachining, laser ablation, inkjet printers, and mechanical micromilling.

  4. Multiple source/multiple target fluid transfer apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid transfer apparatus includes: a) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid sources; b) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid targets; c) a set of fluid source conduits and fluid target conduits associated with the orifices; d) a pump fluidically interposed between the source and target conduits to transfer fluid therebetween; e) a purge gas conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass a purge gas under pressure; f) a solvent conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass solvent, the solvent conduit including a solvent valve; g) pump control means for controlling operation of the pump; h) purge gas valve control means for controlling operation of the purge gas valve to selectively impart flow of purge gas to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; i) solvent valve control means for controlling operation of the solvent valve to selectively impart flow of solvent to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; and j) source and target valve control means for controlling operation of the fluid source conduit valves and the fluid target conduit valves to selectively impart passage of fluid between a selected one of the fluid source conduits and a selected one of the fluid target conduits through the pump and to enable passage of solvent or purge gas through selected fluid source conduits and selected fluid target conduits.

  5. Adaptive Finite element approximation of steady flows of incompressible fluids with implicit power-law-like rheology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Kreuzer; Endre Sli

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop the a posteriori error analysis of finite element approximations of implicit power-law-like models for viscous incompressible fluids. The Cauchy stress and the symmetric part of the velocity gradient in the class of models under consideration are related by a, possibly multi--valued, maximal monotone $r$-graph, with $\\frac{2d}{d+1}finite element residual, as well as the local stability of the error bound. We then consider an adaptive finite element approximation of the problem, and, under suitable assumptions, we show the weak convergence of the adaptive algorithm to a weak solution of the boundary-value problem. The argument is based on a variety of weak compactness techniques, including Chacon's biting lemma and a finite element counterpart of the Acerbi--Fusco Lipschitz truncation of Sobolev functions, introduced by L. Diening, C. Kreuzer and E. S\\"uli [Finite element approximation of steady flows of incompressible fluids with implicit power-law-like rheology. SIAM J. Numer. Anal., 51(2), 984--1015].

  6. Category:Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual Model Add.png Add aTechniques page?asFluid

  7. Because microscopic quantities of liquids do not behave as bulk fluids do, basic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuter, Martin

    --transporting, mixing, filtering--for microfluids pose new and unique challenges. Researchers at Lincoln Laboratory are working on an innovative technique to solve the problem of moving fluids through microfluidic devices. Currently, the most widely used approach to controlling the flow of liq- uids in microfluidic systems

  8. Effect of fluid rheology on enhanced oil recovery in a microfluidic sandstone device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    recovery with that secondary fluid alone. These results clearly demonstrate that the microfluidic sandstone oil in the field will have been recov- ered [1]. The secondary stage of oil recovery is characterized of the oil being recovered [1]. After primary and secondary oil recovery techniques have been exhausted

  9. Investigation of novel geophysical techniques for monitoring CO2 movement during sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, G. Michael; Gasperikova, Erika

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost effective monitoring of reservoir fluid movement during CO{sub 2} sequestration is a necessary part of a practical geologic sequestration strategy. Current petroleum industry seismic techniques are well developed for monitoring production in petroleum reservoirs. The cost of time-lapse seismic monitoring can be born because the cost to benefit ratio is small in the production of profit making hydrocarbon. However, the cost of seismic monitoring techniques is more difficult to justify in an environment of sequestration where the process produces no direct profit. For this reasons other geophysical techniques, which might provide sufficient monitoring resolution at a significantly lower cost, need to be considered. In order to evaluate alternative geophysical monitoring techniques we have undertaken a series of numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} sequestration scenarios. These scenarios have included existing projects (Sleipner in the North Sea), future planned projects (GeoSeq Liberty test in South Texas and Schrader Bluff in Alaska) as well as hypothetical models based on generic geologic settings potentially attractive for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In addition, we have done considerable work on geophysical monitoring of CO{sub 2} injection into existing oil and gas fields, including a model study of the Weyburn CO{sub 2} project in Canada and the Chevron Lost Hills CO{sub 2} pilot in Southern California (Hoversten et al. 2003). Although we are specifically interested in considering ''novel'' geophysical techniques for monitoring we have chosen to include more traditional seismic techniques as a bench mark so that any quantitative results derived for non-seismic techniques can be directly compared to the industry standard seismic results. This approach will put all of our finding for ''novel'' techniques in the context of the seismic method and allow a quantitative analysis of the cost/benefit ratios of the newly considered methods compared to the traditional, more expensive, seismic technique. The Schrader Bluff model was chosen as a numerical test bed for quantitative comparison of the spatial resolution of various geophysical techniques being considered for CO{sub 2} sequestration monitoring. We began with a three dimensional flow simulation model provided by BP Alaska of the reservoir and developed a detailed rock-properties model from log data that provides the link between the reservoir parameters (porosity, pressure, saturations, etc.) and the geophysical parameters (velocity, density, electrical resistivity). The rock properties model was used to produce geophysical models from the flow simulations.

  10. Immersible solar heater for fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An immersible solar heater comprising a light-absorbing panel attached to a frame for absorbing heat energy from the light and transferring the absorbed heat energy directly to the fluid in which the heater is immersed. The heater can be used to heat a swimming pool, for example, and is held in position and at a preselected angle by a system of floats, weights and tethers so that the panel can operate efficiently. A skid can be used in one embodiment to prevent lateral movement of the heater along the bottom of the pool. Alternative embodiments include different arrangements of the weights, floats and tethers and methods for making the heater.

  11. Fluid cooled vehicle drive module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric vehicle drive includes a support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EM/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  12. Fluid Imaging | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs Valley Area (DOEARRA Funded Projects for Fluid

  13. array processing techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    telescope arrays MIT - DSpace Summary: Measurement and analysis of redshifted 21cm hydrogen emissions is a developing technique for studying the early universe. The primary time...

  14. System and method for filling a plurality of isolated vehicle fluid circuits through a common fluid fill port

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Scott C; Fansler, Douglas

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A vehicle having multiple isolated fluid circuits configured to be filled through a common fill port includes a first fluid circuit disposed within the vehicle, the first fluid circuit having a first fill port, a second fluid circuit disposed within the vehicle, and a conduit defining a fluid passageway between the first fluid circuit and second fluid circuit, the conduit including a valve. The valve is configured such that the first and second fluid circuits are fluidly coupled via the passageway when the valve is open, and are fluidly isolated when the valve is closed.

  15. Maximally Random Jamming of Two-Dimensional One-Component and Binary Hard Disc Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xinliang Xu; Stuart A. Rice

    2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report calculations of the density of maximally random jamming (aka random close packing) of one-component and binary hard disc fluids. The theoretical structure used provides a common framework for description of the hard disc liquid to hexatic, the liquid to hexagonal crystal and the liquid-to-maximally random jammed state transitions. Our analysis is based on locating a particular bifurcation of the solutions of the integral equation for the inhomogeneous single particle density at the transition between different spatial structures. The bifurcation of solutions we study is initiated from the dense metastable fluid, and we associate it with the limit of stability of the fluid, which we identify with the transition from the metastable fluid to a maximally random jammed state. For the one-component hard disc fluid the predicted packing fraction at which the metastable fluid to maximally random jammed state transition occurs is 0.84, in excellent agreement with the experimental value 0.84 \\pm 0.02. The corresponding analysis of the limit of stability of a binary hard disc fluid with specified disc diameter ratio and disc composition requires extra approximations in the representations of the direct correlation function, the equation of state, and the number of order parameters accounted for. Keeping only the order parameter identified with the largest peak in the structure factor of the highest density regular lattice with the same disc diameter ratio and disc composition as the binary fluid, the predicted density of maximally random jamming is found to be 0.84 to 0.87, depending on the equation of state used, and very weakly dependent on the ratio of disc diameters and the fluid composition, in agreement with both experimental data and computer simulation data.

  16. On the equivalence of nonadiabatic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Barreto

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we show how an anisotropic fluid in the diffusion limit can be equivalent to an isotropic fluid in the streaming out limit, in spherical symmetry. For a particular equation of state this equivalence is total, from one fluid we can obtain the other and vice versa. A numerical master model is presented, based on a generic equation of state, in which only quantitative differences are displayed between both nonadiabatic fluids. From a deeper view, other difference between fluids is shown as an asymmetry that can be overcome if we consider the appropriate initial-boundary conditions. Equivalence in this context can be considered as a first order method of approximation to study dissipative fluids.

  17. Split driveshaft pump for hazardous fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, II, Thomas P. (Aiken, SC); Purohit, Jwalit J. (Evans, GA); Fazio, John M. (Orchard Park, NY)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump having a split driveshaft for use in pumping hazardous fluids wherein only one driveshaft becomes contaminated by the fluid while the second remains isolated from the fluid. The pump has a first portion and a second portion. The first portion contains a pump motor, the first driveshaft, a support pedestal, and vapor barriers and seals. The second portion contains a second, self-lubricating driveshaft and an impeller. The first and second driveshafts are connected together by a releasable coupling. A shield and a slinger deployed below the coupling prevent fluid from the second portion from reaching the first portion. In operation, only the second assembly comes into contact with the fluid being pumped, so the risk of contamination of the first portion by the hazardous fluid is reduced. The first assembly can be removed for repairs or routine maintenance by decoupling the first and second driveshafts and disconnecting the motor from the casing.

  18. Drill-in fluids control formation damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halliday, W.S. (Baker Hughes Inteq, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several factors led to development, oil company interest in, and use of payzone drilling fluids, including operator concern about maximizing well production, increasing acceptance of horizontal drilling and openhole completion popularity. This article discusses water-base drill-in'' fluid systems and applications. Payzone damage, including fine solids migration, clay swelling and solids invasion, reduces effective formation permeability, which results in lower production rates. Formation damage is often caused by invasion of normal drilling fluids that contain barite or bentonite. Drill-in systems are designed with special bridging agents to minimize invasion. Several bridging materials designed to form effective filter cake for instantaneous leak-off control can be used. Bridging materials are also designed to minimize stages and time required to clean up wells before production. Fluids with easy-to-remove bridging agents reduce completion costs. Drill-in fluid bridging particles can often be removed more thoroughly than those in standard fluids.

  19. Method for automatically evaluating a transition from a batch manufacturing technique to a lean manufacturing technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivezic, Nenad; Potok, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for automatically evaluating a manufacturing technique comprises the steps of: receiving from a user manufacturing process step parameters characterizing a manufacturing process; accepting from the user a selection for an analysis of a particular lean manufacturing technique; automatically compiling process step data for each process step in the manufacturing process; automatically calculating process metrics from a summation of the compiled process step data for each process step; and, presenting the automatically calculated process metrics to the user. A method for evaluating a transition from a batch manufacturing technique to a lean manufacturing technique can comprise the steps of: collecting manufacturing process step characterization parameters; selecting a lean manufacturing technique for analysis; communicating the selected lean manufacturing technique and the manufacturing process step characterization parameters to an automatic manufacturing technique evaluation engine having a mathematical model for generating manufacturing technique evaluation data; and, using the lean manufacturing technique evaluation data to determine whether to transition from an existing manufacturing technique to the selected lean manufacturing technique.

  20. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, J.R.

    1980-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  1. LDPC codes : structural analysis and decoding techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaojie

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Low-Density Parity-Check Codes 2.1 Representation of LDPC4.2 Error Floors of LDPC Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .LP Decoding of LDPC Codes with Alternating Direction Method

  2. Graph Layout Techniques and Multidimensional Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan de Leeuw; George Michailides

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Society, 13: [57] E.J. Wegman. Hyperdimensional dataInselburg and Dimsdale [33], Wegman [57]. In these plots, we

  3. Analysis of Link Graph Compression Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannah, D.; Macdonald, C.; Ounis, I.

    Hannah,D. Macdonald,C. Ounis,I. In Proceedings of the 30th European Conference on Information Retrieval (ECIR 2008), Glasgow, 30th March - 3rd April 2008. LNCS, Springer

  4. NASA/TM--2001210880 Photographic Analysis Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    Access Help Desk NASA Center for AeroSpace Information 7121 Standard Drive Hanover, MD 210761320 (301 Port Royal Road Hanover, MD 210761320 Springfield, VA 22161 (301) 6210390 (703) 487

  5. SDLC Gap Analysis and Remediation Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    , tools and training ­ Case Study: Sony Corporation ­ Pointers to helpful resources (free and commercial, tools and training ­ Case Study: Sony Corporation ­ Pointers to helpful resources (free and commercial

  6. Towards Intelligent Analysis Techniques for Object Pretenuring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Jeremy

    for generational garbage collection systems, which are standard in most high performance Java virtual machines in a common framework. A study of garbage collection traces from four standard Java benchmark programs shows.4 [Programming Languages]: Processors--Memory management (garbage collection) General Terms Measurement Keywords

  7. Incident Data Analysis Using Data Mining Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veltman, Lisa M.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and findings that are currently available will greatly aid in this effort. 7 3. HSEES DATA The Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) data includes information on events where: ? There was an uncontrolled/illegal release... = Equipment failure, 3 = Operator Error, 8 = Other, G = Intentional, H = Bad weather condition, S = Illegal act SEC_FACT Secondary factor contributing to incident 1=Improper mixing, 2=Equipment failure, 3=Human error, 4=Improper filling, loading, or packing...

  8. Lab Analysis Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groups < LEDSGP‎LEEPuente,Salle,LaMoure County,Lab

  9. Metaphoric optical computing of fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, M; Tsang, Mankei; Psaltis, Demetri

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present theoretical and numerical evidence to show that self-defocusing nonlinear optical propagation can be used to compute Euler fluid dynamics and possibly Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics. In particular, the formation of twin vortices and the K\\'arm\\'an vortex street behind an obstacle, two well-known viscous fluid phenomena, is numerically demonstrated using the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation.

  10. Development of models for the two-dimensional, two-fluid code for sodium boiling NATOF-2D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zielinski, R. G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several features were incorporated into NATOF-2D, a twodimensional, two fluid code developed at M.I.T. for the purpose of analysis of sodium boiling transients under LMFBR conditions. They include improved interfacial mass, ...

  11. Development of a three-dimensional two-fluid code with transient neutronic feedback for LWR applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griggs, D. P.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a three-dimensional coupled neutronics/thermalhydraulics code for LWR safety analysis has been initiated. The transient neutronics code QUANDRY has been joined to the two-fluid thermal-hydraulics code ...

  12. Analytical Models for Flowing-Fluid Temperature Distribution in Single-Phase Oil Reservoirs Accounting for Joule-Thomson Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chevarunotai, Natasha

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    calculation. Findings from the sensitivity analysis allow us to make a decision whether or not to acquire more data or to perform additional tests for a more reasonable outcome- the flowing-fluid temperature in the reservoir. Bottomhole flowing...

  13. Improved fluid bed combustor efficiencies through fines recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickman, W.S.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon burnup efficiencies of 99.9% and higher have been attained on a 0.4-MW(t) atmospheric fluid bed combustor with fines recycle. A cyclone and sintered metal filter system separated the fines from the off-gas stream, returning them at 600/sup 0/C (1150/sup 0/F) to the fluid bed. The fines were metered through a unique rotary valve that also served as a pressure boundary between the fluid bed and the fines recycle hopper. Combustor operation was fully automated with a 100-channel process controller and supervisory computer. This high combustion efficiency is especially significant, since the fuel was graphite sized to less than 5 mm (1.3 in.) maximum size. More than 30% of the feed was fine enough to be quickly entrained, placing a substantial burden on the fines recycle system. Detailed modeling techniques were successfully developed to allow prediction of recycle rates and temperatures needed to maintain high combustion efficiency. This model has now been used to analyze coal combustion tests sponsored by Electric Power Research Institute. Surface reaction rate constants were first determined using combustor data taken during cold, low-flow fines recycle tests. These were then used to predict the effect of higher rates of recycle at various temperatures.

  14. FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 1st Edition FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES November 1979O. INTRODUCTION 1. COt1PILER OPTIMIZATIONS 2. SOURCE CODEcode. Most of these optimizations decrease central processor

  15. Critical phenomena in perfect fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David W. Neilsen; Matthew W. Choptuik

    1999-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric, perfect fluid with equation of state P = (Gamma -1)rho. We restrict attention to the ultrarelativistic (``kinetic-energy-dominated'', ``scale-free'') limit where black hole formation is anticipated to turn on at infinitesimal black hole mass (Type II behavior). Critical solutions (those which sit at the threshold of black hole formation in parametrized families of collapse) are found by solving the system of ODEs which result from a self-similar ansatz, and by solving the full Einstein/fluid PDEs in spherical symmetry. These latter PDE solutions (``simulations'') extend the pioneering work of Evans and Coleman (Gamma = 4/3) and verify that the continuously self-similar solutions previously found by Maison and Hara et al for $1.05 Gamma_dn are nodal points rather than focal points as previously reported. We also find a critical solution for Gamma = 2, and present evidence that it is continuously self-similar and Type II. Mass-scaling exponents for all of the critical solutions are calculated by evolving near-critical initial data, with results which confirm and extend previous calculations based on linear perturbation theory. Finally, we comment on critical solutions generated with an ideal-gas equation of state.

  16. Process for retarding fluid flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandford, B.B.; Zillmer, R.C.

    1989-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for retarding the flow of fluid in a subterranean formation, comprising: (a) introducing an effective amount of a gel-forming composition into a subterranean formation, the gel-forming composition being operable when gelled in the formation for retarding the flow of fluid therein. The gel-forming composition consists of: i. a first substance dissolved in water to form an aqueous solution, the first substance being selected from the group consisting of polyvivyl alcohols, and mixtures thereof, wherein the gel-forming composition contains an amount of the first substance of from about 0.5 to about 5 weight percent of the gel-forming composition, and ii. an effective amount of glutaraldehyde which is operable for forming a weakly acidic condition having a pH from about 5.5 to less than 7 in the gel-forming composition and also operable for promoting crosslinking of the first substance and glutaraldehyde and for forming a gel from the gel-forming composition under the weakly acidic condition within a period of time no greater than about 5 days without adding an acidic catalyst to the gel-forming composition to lower the pH of the gel-forming composition below about 5.5.

  17. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF. CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW. J. E. Santos. 1. , G. B. Savioli. 2. , J. M. Carcione. 3. , D. Gei. 3. 1. CONICET, IGPUBA, Fac.

  18. Solution generating theorems for perfect fluid spheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petarpa Boonserm; Matt Visser; Silke Weinfurtner

    2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The first static spherically symmetric perfect fluid solution with constant density was found by Schwarzschild in 1918. Generically, perfect fluid spheres are interesting because they are first approximations to any attempt at building a realistic model for a general relativistic star. Over the past 90 years a confusing tangle of specific perfect fluid spheres has been discovered, with most of these examples seemingly independent from each other. To bring some order to this collection, we develop several new transformation theorems that map perfect fluid spheres into perfect fluid spheres. These transformation theorems sometimes lead to unexpected connections between previously known perfect fluid spheres, sometimes lead to new previously unknown perfect fluid spheres, and in general can be used to develop a systematic way of classifying the set of all perfect fluid spheres. In addition, we develop new ``solution generating'' theorems for the TOV, whereby any given solution can be ``deformed'' to a new solution. Because these TOV-based theorems work directly in terms of the pressure profile and density profile it is relatively easy to impose regularity conditions at the centre of the fluid sphere.

  19. Coupled atomistic-continuum methods for fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I will discuss the coupling scheme, its application to polymer fluids, and the major difficulties in implementations. In the second part of the talk, I will discuss the...

  20. DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ANALYSES ON MUDLOG GRAPHS Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY...

  1. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Surveys Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy Creation of an Engineered Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation...

  2. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grubelich, Mark C; Yonas, Gerold

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  3. Fourier's Law for a Granular Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James W. Dufty

    2007-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Newton' viscosity law for the momentum flux and Fourier's law for the heat flux define Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics for a simple, one component fluid. There is ample evidence that a hydrodynamic description applies as well to a mesoscopic granular fluid with the same form for Newton's viscosity law. However, theory predicts a qualitative difference for Fourier's law with an additional contribution from density gradients even at uniform temperature. The reasons for the absence of such terms for normal fluids are indicated, and a related microscopic explanation for their existence in granular fluids is presented.

  4. Spinning Fluids: A Group Theoretical Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dario Capasso; Debajyoti Sarkar

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the Lagrangian formulation of relativistic non-abelian fluids in group theory language. We propose a Mathisson-Papapetrou equation for spinning fluids in terms of the reduction limit of de Sitter group. The equation we find correctly boils down to the one for non-spinning fluids. We study the application of our results for an FRW cosmological background for fluids with no vorticity and for dusts in the vicinity of a Kerr black hole. We also explore two alternative approaches based on a group theoretical formulation of particles dynamics.

  5. Graph partitioning advance clustering technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhulatha, T Soni

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clustering is a common technique for statistical data analysis, Clustering is the process of grouping the data into classes or clusters so that objects within a cluster have high similarity in comparison to one another, but are very dissimilar to objects in other clusters. Dissimilarities are assessed based on the attribute values describing the objects. Often, distance measures are used. Clustering is an unsupervised learning technique, where interesting patterns and structures can be found directly from very large data sets with little or none of the background knowledge. This paper also considers the partitioning of m-dimensional lattice graphs using Fiedler's approach, which requires the determination of the eigenvector belonging to the second smallest Eigenvalue of the Laplacian with K-means partitioning algorithm.

  6. TOPAZ: a computer code for modeling heat transfer and fluid flow in arbitrary networks of pipes, flow branches, and vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winters, W.S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the computer code TOPAZ (Transient-One-Dimensional Pipe Flow Analyzer) is presented. TOPAZ models the flow of compressible and incompressible fluids through complex and arbitrary arrangements of pipes, valves, flow branches and vessels. Heat transfer to and from the fluid containment structures (i.e. vessel and pipe walls) can also be modeled. This document includes discussions of the fluid flow equations and containment heat conduction equations. The modeling philosophy, numerical integration technique, code architecture, and methods for generating the computational mesh are also discussed.

  7. Dynamical instabilities of two-fluid interfaces in a porous medium: A three-dimensional video imaging study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prerna Sharma; P. Aswathi; Anit Sane; Shankar Ghosh; S. Bhattacharya

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-fluid interfaces in porous media, an example of driven disordered systems, were studied by a real time three-dimensional imaging technique with pore scale resolution for a less viscous fluid displacing a more viscous one. With increasing flow rate the interface transforms from flat to fingers and thence to droplets for both drainage and imbibition. The results compare and contrast the effects of randomness, both physical (geometry of the pore space) and chemical (wettability of the fluids), on the dynamical instability and identify the origin of the pore-scale processes that govern them.

  8. 414 Solutions Manual x Fluid Mechanics, Fifth Edition Solution: Given 'p fcn(U, V, d/D), then by dimensional analysis 'p/(UV2) fcn(d/D). For

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    /D), then by dimensional analysis 'p/(UV2) fcn(d/D). For water at 20qC, take U 998 kg/m3. For gasoline at 20qC, take U 680 are negligible, estimate the terminal fall velocity at 5000-ft standard altitude of a parachutist using

  9. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Hydroelastic waves on fluid sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parau, Emilian I.

    ). In particular our work may find application in flat plate-type fuel assemblies found in nuclear reactor coolingUnder consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Hydroelastic waves on fluid sheets M. G. B 6BT, UK (Received 26 March 2012) Nonlinear travelling waves on a two-dimensional inviscid fluid

  10. Laser microfluidics : fluid actuation by light Laser microfluidics: fluid actuation by light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Laser microfluidics : fluid actuation by light Laser microfluidics: fluid actuation by light Jean.delville@cpmoh.u-bordeaux1.fr Abstract: The development of microfluidic devices is still hindered by the lack of robust to extend this concept to microfluidic two-phase flows. First, we investigate the destabilization of fluid

  11. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  12. Immersible solar heater for fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An immersible solar heater is described comprising a light-absorbing panel attached to a frame for absorbing heat energy from the light and transferring the absorbed heat energy directly to the fluid in which the heater is immersed. The heater can be used to heat a swimming pool, for example, and is held in position and at a preselected angle by a system of floats, weights and tethers so that the panel can operate efficiently. A skid can be used in one embodiment to prevent lateral movement of the heater along the bottom of the pool. Alternative embodiments include different arrangements of the weights, floats and tethers and methods for making the heater. 11 figs.

  13. Immersible solar heater for fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An immersible solar heater is described comprising a light-absorbing panel attached to a frame for absorbing heat energy from the light and transferring the absorbed heat energy directly to the fluid in which the heater is immersed. The heater can be used to heat a swimming pool, for example, and is held in position and at a preselected angle by a system of floats, weights and tethers so that the panel can operate efficiently. A skid can be used in one embodiment to prevent lateral movement of the heater along the bottom of the pool. Alternative embodiments include different arrangements of the weights, floats and tethers and methods for making the heater.

  14. Foam vessel for cryogenic fluid storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, Jonathan D (San Francisco, CA)

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Cryogenic storage and separator vessels made of polyolefin foams are disclosed, as are methods of storing and separating cryogenic fluids and fluid mixtures using these vessels. In one embodiment, the polyolefin foams may be cross-linked, closed-cell polyethylene foams with a density of from about 2 pounds per cubic foot to a density of about 4 pounds per cubic foot.

  15. Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-"R- 68 Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption and Composition Michael J, California #12;GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR EVALUATION CONSIDERING FLUID ADSORPTION AND COMPOSITION A DISSERTATIONFtion phenomena is described. Then, t h e implications of adsorption on material balance calculations and on vel1

  16. Mechanical Engineering ME 3720 FLUID MECHANICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panchagnula, Mahesh

    . Fundamentals of fluid flow; fluid statics; systems, and control volumes; continuity, momentum and energy physical model results to prototype 10. Use Moody chart to calculate friction losses in pipe flows 11 equations; dynamic similitude; One-dimensional compressible flow. The objective(s) of this course is (are

  17. Method and apparatus for measuring the mass flow rate of a fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Robert P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilkins, S. Curtis (Idaho Falls, ID); Goodrich, Lorenzo D. (Shelley, ID); Blotter, Jonathan D. (Pocatello, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non invasive method and apparatus is provided to measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid. An accelerometer is attached to a pipe carrying a multi-phase fluid. Flow related measurements in pipes are sensitive to random velocity fluctuations whose magnitude is proportional to the mean mass flow rate. An analysis of the signal produced by the accelerometer shows a relationship between the mass flow of a fluid and the noise component of the signal of an accelerometer. The noise signal, as defined by the standard deviation of the accelerometer signal allows the method and apparatus of the present invention to non-intrusively measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid.

  18. Fluid permeability measurement system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis (Knoxville, TN); Renner, Michael John (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring the permeance of a material. The permeability of the material may also be derived. The system provides a liquid or high concentration fluid bath on one side of a material test sample, and a gas flow across the opposing side of the material test sample. The mass flow rate of permeated fluid as a fraction of the combined mass flow rate of gas and permeated fluid is used to calculate the permeance of the material. The material test sample may be a sheet, a tube, or a solid shape. Operational test conditions may be varied, including concentration of the fluid, temperature of the fluid, strain profile of the material test sample, and differential pressure across the material test sample.

  19. Theory of locomotion through complex fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gwynn Elfring; Eric Lauga

    2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Microorganisms such as bacteria often swim in fluid environments that cannot be classified as Newtonian. Many biological fluids contain polymers or other heterogeneities which may yield complex rheology. For a given set of boundary conditions on a moving organism, flows can be substantially different in complex fluids, while non-Newtonian stresses can alter the gait of the microorganisms themselves. Heterogeneities in the fluid may also be characterized by length scales on the order of the organism itself leading to additional dynamic complexity. In this chapter we present a theoretical overview of small-scale locomotion in complex fluids with a focus on recent efforts quantifying the impact of non-Newtonian rheology on swimming microorganisms.

  20. Pumping viscoelastic two-fluid media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirofumi Wada

    2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a two-fluid model for viscoelastic polymer solutions, we study analytically fluid transport driven by a transverse, small amplitude traveling wave propagation. The pumping flow far from the waving boundary is shown to be strongly wave number and viscosity dependent, in contrast to a viscous Newtonian fluid. We find the two qualitatively different regimes: In one regime relevant to small wave numbers, the fluidic transport is almost the same as the Newtonian case, and uniform viscoelastic constitutive equations provide a good approximation. In the other regime, the pumping is substantially decreased because of the gel-like character. The boundary separating these two regimes is clarified. Our results suggest possible needs of two-fluid descriptions for the transport and locomotion in biological fluids with cilia and flagella.