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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Report State Clean Energy Policies NRELTP-6A2-47376 Analysis: State, Utility, and May 2010 Municipal Loan Programs Eric Lantz Technical Report State Clean Energy...

2

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal Loan  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal Loan Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal Loan Programs Jump to: navigation, search Name State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal Loan Programs Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner Eric Lantz Focus Area People and Policy, Renewable Energy Phase Evaluate Options Resource Type Guide/manual Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 5/1/2010 Website http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy10o References State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal Loan Programs[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Highlights 3 Related Tools 4 References Overview This report is a continued and collaborative effort with the Department of Energy's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE-EERE) to analyze the

3

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal Loan Programs  

SciTech Connect

High initial costs can impede the deployment of clean energy technologies. Financing can reduce these costs. And, state, municipal, and utility-sponsored loan programs have emerged to fill the gap between clean energy technology financing needs and private sector lending. In general, public loan programs are more favorable to clean energy technologies than are those offered by traditional lending institutions; however, public loan programs address only the high up-front costs of clean energy systems, and the technology installed under these loan programs rarely supports clean energy production at levels that have a notable impact on the broader energy sector. This report discusses ways to increase the impact of these loan programs and suggests related policy design considerations.

Lantz, E.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

AN ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES IN THE UNITED STATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 AN ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES IN THE UNITED STATES Stacy C. Davis Lorena F. Truett August 2000 Prepared for the Office of Transportation Technologies U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6073 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 iii An Analysis of SUV Impacts TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES ............................................................................... iv ABSTRACT.................................................................................................................... v 1 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................1

5

An Analysis of the Impact of Sport Utility Vehicles in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of the Impact of Sport Utility Vehicles in the United States Analysis of the Impact of Sport Utility Vehicles in the United States Word Count: 7,493 Stacy C. Davis Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Bldg. 3156, MS-6073 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6073 Phone: 865-574-5957 Fax: 865-574-3851 Email: davissc@ornl.gov Lorena F. Truett Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Bldg. 4500N, MS-6207 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6207 Phone: 865-574-4225 Fax: 865-574-3895 Email: truettlf@ornl.gov Stacy C. Davis and Lorena F. Truett 1 ABSTRACT During the 1990s, sport utility vehicles (SUVs) became the fastest growing segment of the auto industry. In 1999, SUV sales reached almost 19% of the total light vehicle market and the mix of SUVs on the road was about 8.7%. Some has called this popularity a passing fad, but the continued increases in SUV sales seem to indicate a more

6

Impact of state regulatory practices on electric utility: an empirical analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of state regulatory practices on investor-owned electric utilities in the context of interactions among 5 variables: allowed rate of return; cost of capital; cost of electric service; price of electricity; and realized rate of return. A recursive system of 5 equations was constructed and the ordinary least-squares estimation was adopted. Data sets comprise 77 utilities in the US for 1976 and 1980. Results are: (1) allowed rate of return is principally determined by firm specific variables rather than by commission-specific variables, and the behavior of the public utility commission is adaptive; (2) high common equity ratio and a high market to book value ratio lower the cost of external capital, as proxies for financial strength and regulatory risk; (3) long-run average cost of electric service is nearly horizontal and any inter-firm difference in the cost is predominantly explained by the difference in the price of fuel that a utility plant uses; inclusion of Construction Work in Progress adversely affects the realized rate of return, not the cost or price; (4) electricity price is mostly determined by the average cost, and inter-firm differences in the allowed rate of return have little effect on the price; and (5) regulation is effective mainly in the sense that the realized rate of return is severely affected by the allowed rate of return.

Lee, J.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

AN ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF SPORTS UTILITY VEHICLES IN THE UNITED STATES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1990s, sport utility vehicles (SUVs) became the fastest growing segment of the auto industry, especially those in the medium-size category. In 1999, SUV sales reached almost 19% of the total light vehicle market and the mix of SUVs on the road, as measured by registration data, was about 8.7%. This immense popularity has been called by some a passing fad--vehicle purchases based on the SUV ''image''. But the continued yearly increases in SUV sales seem to indicate a more permanent trend. Additional explanations for SUV popularity include the general economic well being in the United States, a perception of safety, and ''utility''. Generally larger and heavier than the typical automobile, SUVs require more fuel per mile to operate and produce greater amounts of pollutants. They are also driven further annually than are automobiles of the same vintage, a fact that exacerbates the fuel-use and emission problems. Although buyers believe that SUVs are safer than automobiles which they are in some cases, SUVs are more prone to roll-overs than are automobiles. In addition, SUVs, with their higher bumpers and greater weight, may be a threat to other vehicles on the highway, especially in side-impact crashes. With sales projected to grow to over 3 million units per year beginning in 2001, SUVs show no sign of decreasing in popularity. These vehicles are used primarily for general mobility, rather than off-road activities. An emphasis on better fuel economy and improved emissions control could address environmental and oil dependency concerns. In fact, recently, two vehicle manufacturers announced intentions of improving the fuel economy of their SUVs in the next few years. Also, tests simulating crashes involving automobiles and SUVs could provide valuable data for identifying potential safety design issues. It is clear that automobiles and SUVs will be sharing the highways for years to come.

Davis, S.C.

2000-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

8

An Analysis of the Impact of Sport Utility Vehicles in the United States  

SciTech Connect

It may be labeled sport utility vehicle, SUV, sport-ute, suburban assault vehicle, or a friend of OPEC (Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries). It has been the subject of comics, the object of high-finance marketing ploys, and the theme of Dateline. Whatever the label or the occasion, this vehicle is in great demand. The popularity of sport utility vehicles (SUVs) has increased dramatically since the late 1970s, and SUVs are currently the fastest growing segment of the motor vehicle industry. Hoping to gain market share due to the popularity of the expanding SUV market, more and more manufacturers are adding SUVs to their vehicle lineup. One purpose of this study is to analyze the world of the SUV to determine why this vehicle has seen such a rapid increase in popularity. Another purpose is to examine the impact of SUVs on energy consumption, emissions, and highway safety.

Davis, S.C.; Truett, L.F.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Modeling of utility distribution feeder in OpenDSS with steady state impact analysis of distributed generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the deregulation of the electric power industry and the advancement of new technologies, the attention of the utilities has been drawn towards adopting Distributed… (more)

Ramachandran, Vaidyanath.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

title Utility Scale Solar An Empirical Analysis of Project Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Scale Solar An Empirical Analysis of Project Cost Performance and Pricing Trends in the United States year month institution LBNL abstract p Berkeley Lab hosted a webinar...

11

Solar Desalination in the Southwest United States: A Thermoeconomic Analysis Utilizing the Sun to Desalt Water in High Irradiance Regions .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water scarcity and high irradiance overlap in the southwestern United States. This thesis explores solar energy as a method to power desalination in the Southwest.… (more)

Stroud, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Solar desalination in the southwest United States| A thermoeconomic analysis utilizing the sun to desalt water in high irradiance regions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Water scarcity and high irradiance overlap in the southwestern United States. This thesis explores solar energy as a method to power desalination in the… (more)

Stroud, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Energy utilization analysis of buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The accurate calculation of the energy requirements and heating and cooling equipment sizes for buildings is one of the most important, as well as one of the most difficult, problems facing the engineer. The fundamental principles utilized in the procedures developed by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) are explained and brief descriptions of the computer programs using these procedures are given. Such computer programs generally are capable of: simulating the thermal response of a building to all sources of heat gains and losses, accounting for all non-thermal energy requirements in the building or on the sites, translating the building operating schedules into energy demand and consumption, identifying the peak capacity requirements of heating and cooling equipment, and performing an economic analysis that would select the most economical overall owning and operating cost equipment and energy source that minimize the building's life cycle cost.

Lokmanhekim, M.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Utility Analysis of Parallel Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parallel computers are used to execute discrete-event simulations in contexts where a serial computer is unable to provide answers fast enough, and/or is unable to hold the simulation state in memory. Traditional research in parallel simulation has focused ...

David M. Nicol

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Reply Comments by the National Association of State Utility Consumer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comments by the National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates NIST Green Button Presentation AARP Reply Comments to Department of Energy Implementing the...

16

Comments by the National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

These comments are submitted on behalf of the National Association of State These comments are submitted on behalf of the National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates (NASUCA) in response to the request for information (RFI) of the Department of Energy (DOE) entitled "Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policy." See 75 Fed. Reg. 26206 (May 11, 2010).1 NASUCA is a voluntary organization comprised of offices from 40 states and the District of Columbia, charged by their respective state laws to represent utility consumers before federal and state utility regulatory commissions, before other federal and state agencies, and before federal and state courts. Many NASUCA members have extensive experience with regulatory policies governing the utility

17

CROSS DRIFT ALCOVE/NICHE UTILITIES ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to provide the design basis and general arrangement requirements of the non-potable water, waste water, compressed air and ventilation (post excavation) utilities required in support of the Cross Drift alcoves and niches.

S. Goodin

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

18

Comments by the National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comments by the National Association of State Utility Consumer Comments by the National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates Comments by the National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates The National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates ("NASUCA") hereby submits the following comments in response to the United States Department of Energy ("DOE") Request for Information ("RFI") entitled "Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers and the Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy." See 75 Fed. Reg. 26203 (May 11, 2010). The RFI requests comments and information from interested parties to assist DOE in understanding current and potential practices and policies for the states and other entities to empower consumers, and perhaps others, through access to detailed energy

19

California utilities partner with Lawrence Livermore to improve state's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2-12-04 2-12-04 For immediate release: 12/20/2012 | NR-12-12-04 California utilities partner with Lawrence Livermore to improve state's energy grid Lynda L Seaver, LLNL, (925) 423-3103, seaver1@llnl.gov Printer-friendly California utilities will use the advanced technologies and expertise of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to improve the efficiency, security and safety of the state's utility systems under an agreement approved today by the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC). The CPUC approved funding of a five-year research and development agreement between Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern California Edison Company and San Diego Gas and Electric Company, and Lawrence Livermore (LLNL) that will provide the utilities with access to LLNL technological

20

List of United States Utility Companies and Aliases | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

List of United States Utility Companies and Aliases List of United States Utility Companies and Aliases Jump to: navigation, search This is a listing of every utility company in the United States. The data includes the EIA Utility ID and is sourced from EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1]. 3 Phases Energy Services (ID # 21093) 4-County Electric Power Assn (ID # 6641) A & N Electric Coop (ID # 84) A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) (ID # 84) AEP Generating Company (ID # 343) AEP Texas Central Company (ID # 3278) AEP Texas North Company (ID # 20404) AES Eastern Energy LP (ID # 134) AGC Division of APG Inc (ID # 261) AP Holdings LLC (ID # 56571) AP Holdings LLC (New York) (ID # 56571) APN Starfirst, L.P. (ID # 50153) APN Starfirst, L.P. (Illinois) (ID # 50153) APN Starfirst, L.P. (Ohio) (ID # 50153)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

City of State Center, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa (Utility Company) Iowa (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of State Center Place Iowa Utility Id 18014 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png LGS Demand 25KW minimum Industrial Residential City Residential Residential Rural Residential Security Lights HPS 1000W Lighting Security Lights HPS 100W Lighting Security Lights HPS 150W Lighting Security Lights HPS 250W Lighting

22

Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Utilization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage December 20, 2012 - 9:44am Addthis Researchers at The Ohio State University have developed a groundbreaking new hybrid membrane that could efficiently separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from the gas that comes from burning coal at power plants. | Photo courtesy of Office of Fossil Energy. Researchers at The Ohio State University have developed a groundbreaking new hybrid membrane that could efficiently separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from the gas that comes from burning coal at power plants. | Photo courtesy of Office of Fossil Energy. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy

23

Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Utilization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage December 20, 2012 - 9:44am Addthis Researchers at The Ohio State University have developed a groundbreaking new hybrid membrane that could efficiently separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from the gas that comes from burning coal at power plants. | Photo courtesy of Office of Fossil Energy. Researchers at The Ohio State University have developed a groundbreaking new hybrid membrane that could efficiently separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from the gas that comes from burning coal at power plants. | Photo courtesy of Office of Fossil Energy. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy

24

Comments by the National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates ("NASUCA") The National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates ("NASUCA") hereby submits the following comments in response to the United States Department of Energy ("DOE") Request for Information ("RFI") entitled "Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers and the Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy." See 75 Fed. Reg. 26203 (May 11, 2010). The RFI requests comments and information from interested parties to assist DOE in understanding current and potential practices and policies for the states and other entities to empower consumers, and perhaps others, through access to detailed energy information in electronic form-including real-time information from smart meters, historical consumption data, and pricing and billing information.

25

Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources Geothermal Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description In this proposal West Virginia University (WVU) outline a project which will perform an in-depth analysis of the low-temperature geothermal resources that dominate the eastern half of the United States. Full realization of the potential of what might be considered "low-grade" geothermal resources will require the examination many more uses for the heat than traditional electricity generation. To demonstrate that geothermal energy truly has the potential to be a national energy source the project will be designing, assessing, and evaluating innovative uses for geothermal-produced water such as hybrid biomass-geothermal cogeneration of electricity and district heating and efficiency improvements to the use of cellulosic biomass in addition to utilization of geothermal in district heating for community redevelopment projects.

26

BEFORE THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#1431174 BEFORE THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA Order Instituting-Effectiveness Methodologies, Megawatt Goals and Alignment with California Independent System Operator Market Design Protocols Rulemaking 07-01-041 (January 25, 2007) JOINT COMMMENTS OF CALIFORNIA LARGE ENERGY CONSUMERS ASSOCIATION

27

BEFORE THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BEFORE THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA Order Instituting Rulemaking, 2011) SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON COMPANY (U 338-E), SAN DIEGO GAS & ELECTRIC COMPANY (U 902-M PROGRAM INVESTMENT CHARGE PROGRAM KRIS G. VYAS Attorney for SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON COMPANY 2244 Walnut

28

STATE OF IOWA BEFORE THE IOWA UTILITIES BOARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

describing the impact that coal-fired power plants (without carbon capture and storage) will haveSTATE OF IOWA BEFORE THE IOWA UTILITIES BOARD IN RE: INTERSTATE POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY DOCKET NO of heat (long wave or thermal radiation) to space. The net effect is a global warming that has become

Hansen, James E.

29

TY RPRT T1 Utility Scale Solar An Empirical Analysis of Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Scale Solar An Empirical Analysis of Project Cost Performance and Pricing Trends in the United States A1 Mark Bolinger A1 Samantha Weaver AB p Berkeley Lab hosted a webinar...

30

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

31

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

32

Preliminary analysis of the state of the art of robotics and precision engineering and evaluation of potential for improved energy utilization in the pulp, paper, and related energy-consuming processes. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to conduct a preliminary analysis of the state of the art of two technologies, robotics and precision engineering, and to evaluate their potential for improved energy utilization in the pulp, paper, and related energy consuming processes. Activity in the robotics field is growing rapidly, most activity being related to the development of smart robots rather than to systems. There is a broad base of support, both in industry and the universities, for upgrading robot machine capabilities. A large part of that support is associated with visualization and tactile sensors which facilitate assembly, placement, inspection, and tracking. Progress in this area is relatively rapid and development times are short for specifically engineered applications. The critical path in the development of robotic systems lies in the generation of reliable sensor signals. Robotic systems require a broad spectrum of sensors from which hierarchical logic systems can draw decision making information. This requirement resulted in the establishment of a program at the National Bureau of Standards which is attempting to develop a spectrum of sensor capabilities. Such sensors are applicable to robotic system automatic process control in a variety of energy-intensive industries. Precision engineering is defined as the generation or manufacture of components wherein geometry, dimension, and surface finish are controlled to within several hundred Angstroms in single point turning operations. Investigation into the state of the art of precision engineering in the United States finds that this capability exists in several national laboratories and is intended to be used exclusively for the development of weapons. There is an attempt at the present time by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to expand its capability into industry. Several corporations are now beginning to develop equipment to support the precision engineering field.

None

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities  

SciTech Connect

Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Utility Green Pricing Programs: A Statistical Analysis of Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRELTP-620-35609 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Utility Green Pricing Programs: A Statistical Analysis of Program...

35

Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

Akhil, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K. [R.K. Sen & Associates, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. Provides detailed statistics on existing generating units operated by electric utilities as of December 31, 2000, and certain summary statistics about new generators planned for operation by electric utilities during the next 5 years.

Information Center

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Federal and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale Solar Projects and the Business Models Designed to Utilize Them  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal and State Structures to Federal and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale Solar Projects and the Business Models Designed to Utilize Them Michael Mendelsohn and Claire Kreycik Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-48685 April 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Federal and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale Solar Projects and the Business Models Designed to Utilize Them Michael Mendelsohn and Claire Kreycik Prepared under Task No. CP09.2320

38

Initial Economic Analysis of Utility-scale Wind Integration in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. INITIAL ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF UTILITY-SCALE WIND INTEGRATION IN HAWAII NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored...

39

Lead Fuel Assembly Programs Analysis: Utility Perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Licensees, in association with nuclear fuel vendors, conduct lead fuel assembly (LFA) programs to test new design features prior to batch implementation. A limited number of LFAs are irradiated to obtain data and to confirm successful operation in the host reactor environment. The new LFA design features range from minor changes of dimensions and/or materials to an entirely new design from an alternate fuel vendor. LFA program elements can consist of design activities, methods development, analysis, ...

2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

40

The National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is owned by the utility. Consumers have owned and must continue to own their specific energy usage information. 4 Likewise, the Edison Electric Institute ("EEI") claims that...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner Eric Lantz Focus Area People and Policy, Renewable Energy Phase Evaluate Options Resource Type Guidemanual Availability...

42

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0095(2000) Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000 March 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric

43

Utility of Social Modeling in Assessment of a State’s Propensity for Nuclear Proliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the third and final report out of a set of three reports documenting research for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Security Administration (NASA) Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NA-22 Simulations, Algorithms, and Modeling program that investigates how social modeling can be used to improve proliferation assessment for informing nuclear security, policy, safeguards, design of nuclear systems and research decisions. Social modeling has not to have been used to any significant extent in a proliferation studies. This report focuses on the utility of social modeling as applied to the assessment of a State's propensity to develop a nuclear weapons program.

Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Whitney, Paul D.; Dalton, Angela C.; Olson, Jarrod; White, Amanda M.; Cooley, Scott K.; Youchak, Paul M.; Stafford, Samuel V.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Energy Efficiency Programs at All Utilities: An Analysis of the Factors that Lead Electric Utilities to Invest in Energy Efficiency.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??While the utilization of energy efficiency has grown in recent years, it has not been distributed evenly across the country. In some states, over 2%… (more)

Pletcher, Christopher J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A Multiattribute Utility Analysis of Sites Nominated For Characterization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Multiattribute Utility Analysis of Sites Nominated For A Multiattribute Utility Analysis of Sites Nominated For Characterization For the First Radioactive Waste Repository - A Decision Aiding Methodology A Multiattribute Utility Analysis of Sites Nominated For Characterization For the First Radioactive Waste Repository - A Decision Aiding Methodology Summary In December 1984, the Department of Energy (DOE) published draft environmental assessments (EAs) to support the proposed nomination of five sites and the recommendation of three sites for characterization for the first radioactive-waste repository. A chapter common to all the draft EAs (Chapter 7) presented rankings of the five sites against the postclosure and the preclosure technical siting guidelines. To determine which three sites appeared most favorable for recommendation for characterization,

46

Dynamic State Estimation Utilizing High Performance Computing Methods  

SciTech Connect

The state estimation tools which are currently deployed in power system control rooms are based on a quasi-steady-state assumption. As a result, the suite of operational tools that rely on state estimation results as inputs do not have dynamic information available and their accuracy is compromised. This paper presents an overview of the Kalman Filtering process and then focuses on the implementation of the predication component on multiple processors.

Schneider, Kevin P.; Huang, Zhenyu; Yang, Bo; Hauer, Matthew L.; Nieplocha, Jaroslaw

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

47

Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Storage & File Systems Data Storage & File Systems Compiling & Linking Queueing & Running Jobs Data Transfer Debugging & Profiling Performance Tools & APIs Tuning MPI on BG/Q Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) HPCToolkit HPCTW mpiP gprof Profiling Tools Darshan PAPI BG/Q Performance Counters BGPM Openspeedshop Scalasca BG/Q DGEMM Performance Software & Libraries IBM References Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) References TAU Project Site TAU Instrumentation Methods TAU Compilation Options TAU Fortran Instrumentation FAQ TAU Leap to Petascale 2009 Presentation

48

Utility green pricing programs: A statistical analysis of program effectiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Size Participation Rate (%) Utility Size (# customers) Non-Size Participation Rate (%) Utility Size (# customers)non-residential participation rates in utility green pricing

Wiser, Ryan; Olson, Scott; Bird, Lori; Swezey, Blair

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Electricity privatization : should South Korea privatize its state-owned electric utility?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The state-owned electric utility, Korea Electricity Power Cooperation (KEPCO), privatization has been a key word in South Korea since 1997, when the government received $55 billion from the International Monetary Fund in ...

Lim, Sungmin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Utility and state industrial EMS incentives programs: Experience and success factors  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of a survey of utility and state demand-side management (DSM) programs that address efficient motor systems. The paper discusses the incentive structures in place at both the state and utility levels to encourage efficient motor systems, and the market barriers associated with implementation of efficient motor equipment. The paper also assesses how the current incentives might address the market barriers to the implementation of efficient motor systems.

Roop, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state public utility commissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report on incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state public utility commissions (PUCs). Economic performance incentives established by state PUCs are applicable to the construction or operation of about 45 nuclear power reactors owned by 30 utilities in 17 states. The NRC staff monitors development of the incentives and periodically provides an updated report on all nuclear plant incentives to its regional offices. The staff maintains contact with the PUCs and the utilities responsible for implementing the incentives in order to obtain the updated information and to consider potential safety effects of the incentives. This report presents the NRC staff's concerns on potential safety effects of economic performance incentives. It also includes a plant-by-plant survey that describes the mechanics of each incentive and discusses the financial effects of the incentive on the utility-owner(s) of the plant.

Petersen, J.C.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state Public Utility Commissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic performance incentives established by state Public Utility Commissions (PUCs) currently are applicable to the construction or operation of approximately 73 nuclear power reactors owned by 27 utilities with investment greater than 10% in 18 states. The NRC staff monitors development of the incentives and periodically provides an updated report on all nuclear plant incentives to its headquarters and regional offices. The staff maintains contact with the PUCs and the utilities responsible for implementing the incentives in order to obtain the updated information and to consider potential safety effects of the incentives. This report on incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state PUCs presents the NRC staff's concerns on potential safety effects of economic performance incentives. It also includes a plant-by-plant survey that describes the mechanics of each incentive and discusses the financial effects of the incentive on the utility-owner(s) of the plant.

Martin, R.L.; Olson, J. (Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA)); Hendrickson, P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Multi-area power system state estimation utilizing boundary measurements and phasor measurement units ( PMUs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to prove the validity of a multi-area state estimator and investigate the advantages it provides over a serial state estimator. This is done utilizing the IEEE 118 Bus Test System as a sample system. This thesis investigates the benefits that stem from utilizing a multi-area state estimator instead of a serial state estimator. These benefits are largely in the form of increased accuracy and decreased processing time. First, the theory behind power system state estimation is explained for a simple serial estimator. Then the thesis shows how conventional measurements and newer, more accurate PMU measurements work within the framework of weighted least squares estimation. Next, the multi-area state estimator is examined closely and the additional measurements provided by PMUs are used to increase accuracy and computational efficiency. Finally, the multi-area state estimator is tested for accuracy, its ability to detect bad data, and computation time.

Freeman, Matthew A

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Financial Analysis of Incentive Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of a Prototypical Southwest Utility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many state regulatory commissions and policymakers want utilities to aggressively pursue energy efficiency as a strategy to mitigate demand and energy growth, diversify the resource mix, and provide an alternative to building new, costly generation. However, as the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (NAPEE 2007) points out, many utilities continue to shy away from aggressively expanding their energy efficiency efforts when their shareholder's fundamental financial interests are placed at risk by doing so. Thus, there is increased interest in developing effective ratemaking and policy approaches that address utility disincentives to pursue energy efficiency or lack of incentives for more aggressive energy efficiency efforts. New regulatory initiatives to promote increased utility energy efficiency efforts also affect the interests of consumers. Ratepayers and their advocates are concerned with issues of fairness, impacts on rates, and total consumer costs. From the perspective of energy efficiency advocates, the quid pro quo for utility shareholder incentives is the obligation to acquire all, or nearly all, achievable cost-effective energy efficiency. A key issue for state regulators and policymakers is how to maximize the cost-effective energy efficiency savings attained while achieving an equitable sharing of benefits, costs and risks among the various stakeholders. In this study, we modeled a prototypical vertically-integrated electric investor-owned utility in the southwestern US that is considering implementing several energy efficiency portfolios. We analyze the impact of these energy efficiency portfolios on utility shareholders and ratepayers as well as the incremental effect on each party when lost fixed cost recovery and/or utility shareholder incentive mechanisms are implemented. A primary goal of our quantitative modeling is to provide regulators and policymakers with an analytic framework and tools that assess the financial impacts of alternative incentive approaches on utility shareholders and customers if energy efficiency is implemented under various utility operating, cost, and supply conditions.We used and adapted a spreadsheet-based financial model (the Benefits Calculator) which was developed originally as a tool to support the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (NAPEE). The major steps in our analysis are displayed graphically in Figure ES- 1. Two main inputs are required: (1) characterization of the utility which includes its initial financial and physical market position, a forecast of the utility?s future sales, peak demand, and resource strategy to meet projected growth; and (2) characterization of the Demand-Side Resource (DSR) portfolio ? projected electricity and demand savings, costs and economic lifetime of a portfolio of energy efficiency (and/or demand response) programs that the utility is planning or considering implementing during the analysis period. The Benefits Calculator also estimates total resource costs and benefits of the DSR portfolio using a forecast of avoided capacity and energy costs. The Benefits Calculator then uses inputs provided in the Utility Characterization to produce a ?business-as usual? base case as well as alternative scenarios that include energy efficiency resources, including the corresponding utility financial budgets required in each case. If a decoupling and/or a shareholder incentive mechanism are instituted, the Benefits Calculator model readjusts the utility?s revenue requirement and retail rates accordingly. Finally, for each scenario, the Benefits Calculator produces several metrics that provides insights on how energy efficiency resources, decoupling and/or a shareholder incentive mechanism impacts utility shareholders (e.g. overall earnings, return on equity), ratepayers (e.g., average customer bills and rates) and society (e.g. net resource benefits).

Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Chait, Michele; Edgar, George; Schlegel, Jeff; Shirley, Wayne

2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

55

Reliability analysis of a utility-scale solar power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a reliability analysis for a solar central receiver power plant that employs a salt-in-tube receiver. Because reliability data for a number of critical plant components have only recently been collected, this is the first time a credible analysis can be performed. This type of power plant will be built by a consortium of western US utilities led by the Southern California Edison Company. The 10 MW plant is known as Solar Two and is scheduled to be on-line in 1994. It is a prototype which should lead to the construction of 100 MW commercial-scale plants by the year 2000. The availability calculation was performed with the UNIRAM computer code. The analysis predicted a forced outage rate of 5.4% and an overall plant availability, including scheduled outages, of 91%. The code also identified the most important contributors to plant unavailability. Control system failures were identified as the most important cause of forced outages. Receiver problems were rated second with turbine outages third. The overall plant availability of 91% exceeds the goal identified by the US utility study. This paper discuses the availability calculation and presents evidence why the 91% availability is a credible estimate. 16 refs.

Kolb, G.J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Reliability analysis of a utility-scale solar power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a reliability analysis for a solar central receiver power plant that employs a salt-in-tube receiver. Because reliability data for a number of critical plant components have only recently been collected, this is the first time a credible analysis can be performed. This type of power plant will be built by a consortium of western US utilities led by the Southern California Edison Company. The 10 MW plant is known as Solar Two and is scheduled to be on-line in 1994. It is a prototype which should lead to the construction of 100 MW commercial-scale plants by the year 2000. The availability calculation was performed with the UNIRAM computer code. The analysis predicted a forced outage rate of 5.4% and an overall plant availability, including scheduled outages, of 91%. The code also identified the most important contributors to plant unavailability. Control system failures were identified as the most important cause of forced outages. Receiver problems were rated second with turbine outages third. The overall plant availability of 91% exceeds the goal identified by the US utility study. This paper discuses the availability calculation and presents evidence why the 91% availability is a credible estimate. 16 refs.

Kolb, G.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of NewRenewable Generation in the Western United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the United States, markets for renewable generation--especially wind power--have grown substantially in recent years. This growth is typically attributed to technology improvements and resulting cost reductions, the availability of federal tax incentives, and aggressive state policy efforts. But another less widely recognized driver of new renewable generation is poised to play a major role in the coming years: utility integrated resource planning (IRP). Common in the late-1980s to mid-1990s, but relegated to lesser importance as many states took steps to restructure their electricity markets in the late-1990s, IRP has re-emerged in recent years as an important tool for utilities and regulators, particularly in regions such as the western United States, where retail competition has failed to take root. As practiced in the United States, IRP is a formal process by which utilities analyze the costs, benefits, and risks of all resources available to them--both supply- and demand-side--with the ultimate goal of identifying a portfolio of resources that meets their future needs at lowest cost and/or risk. Though the content of any specific utility IRP is unique, all are built on a common basic framework: (1) development of peak demand and load forecasts; (2) assessment of how these forecasts compare to existing and committed generation resources; (3) identification and characterization of various resource portfolios as candidates to fill a projected resource deficiency; (4) analysis of these different ''candidate'' resource portfolios under base-case and alternative future scenarios; and finally, (5) selection of a preferred portfolio, and creation of a near-term action plan to begin to move towards that portfolio. Renewable resources were once rarely considered seriously in utility IRP. In the western United States, however, the most recent resource plans call for a significant amount of new wind power capacity. These planned additions appear to be motivated by the improved economics of wind power, an emerging understanding that wind integration costs are manageable, and a growing acceptance of wind by electric utilities. Equally important, utility IRPs are increasingly recognizing the inherent risks in fossil-based generation portfolios--especially natural gas price risk and the financial risk of future carbon regulation--and the benefits of renewable energy in mitigating those risks. This article, which is based on a longer report from Berkeley Lab,i examines how twelve investor-owned utilities (IOUs) in the western United States--Avista, Idaho Power, NorthWestern Energy (NWE), Portland General Electric (PGE), Puget Sound Energy (PSE), PacifiCorp, Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo), Nevada Power, Sierra Pacific, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E)--treat renewable energy in their most recent resource plans (as of July 2005). In aggregate, these twelve utilities supply approximately half of all electricity demand in the western United States. In reviewing these plans, our purpose is twofold: (1) to highlight the growing importance of utility IRP as a current and future driver of renewable generation in the United States, and (2) to suggest possible improvements to the methods used to evaluate renewable generation as a resource option. As such, we begin by summarizing the amount and types of new renewable generation planned as a result of these twelve IRPs. We then offer observations about the IRP process, and how it might be improved to more objectively evaluate renewable resources.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

58

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Tax Incentives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a policy tool, state tax incentives can be structured to help states meet clean energy goals. Policymakers often use state tax incentives in concert with state and federal policies to support renewable energy deployment or reduce market barriers. This analysis used case studies of four states to assess the contributions of state tax incentives to the development of renewable energy markets. State tax incentives that are appropriately paired with complementary state and federal policies generally provide viable mechanisms to support renewable energy deployment. However, challenges to successful implementation of state tax incentives include serving project owners with limited state tax liability, assessing appropriate incentive levels, and differentiating levels of incentives for technologies with different costs. Additionally, state tax incentives may result in moderately higher federal tax burdens. These challenges notwithstanding, state tax incentives that consider certain policy design characteristics can support renewable energy markets and state clean energy goals.The scale of their impact though is directly related to the degree to which they support the renewable energy markets for targeted sectors and technologies. This report highlights important policy design considerations for policymakers using state tax incentives to meet clean energy goals.

Lantz, E.; Doris, E.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Federal, state and utility roles in reducing new building greenhouse gas emissions  

SciTech Connect

This paper will explore the role of implementation of building energy codes and standards in reducing US greenhouse gas emissions. It will discuss the role of utilities in supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency in improving the efficiency of new buildings. The paper will summarize Federal policies and programs that improve code compliance and increase overall greenhouse gas emission reductions. Finally, the paper will discuss the role of code compliance and the energy and greenhouse gas emission reductions that have been realized from various Federal, State and utility programs that enhance compliance.

Johnson, J.A.; Shankle, D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Boulin, J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Solar thermal repowering utility value analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The retrofit of solar central receiver energy supply systems to existing steam-electric generating stations (repowering) is being considered as a major programmatic thrust by DOE. The determination of a government response appropriate to the opportunities of repowering is an important policy question, and is the major reason for the analysis. The study objective is to define a government role in repowering that constitutes an efficient program investment in pursuit of viable private markets for heliostat-based energy systems. In support of that objective, the study is designed to identify the scope and nature of the repowering opportunity within the larger context of its contributions to central receiver technology development and commercialization. The Supply and Integration Tasks are documented elsewhere. This report documents the Demand Task, determining and quantifying the sources of the value of repowering and of central receiver technology in general to electric utilities. The modeling tools and assumptions used in the Demand Task are described and the results are presented and interpreted. (MCW)

Taylor, R.; Day, J.; Reed, B.; Malone, M.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NREL: Energy Analysis - State and Local Policy Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State and Local Policy Analysis State and Local Policy Analysis NREL's state and local policy analysis team examines the effects of policy on renewable energy development and deployment on a state and local level. Clean Energy Policy Analyses Project One of NREL's key state and local policy initiatives is the Clean Energy Policy Analyses (CEPA) project. Through this project, NREL analysts seek to quantify the connection between state and local policies and clean energy market development and identify the impact of state policy on decision makers. Learn more about CEPA on the NREL State & Local Activities website. Key Analyses for 2012 Cover of the Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience report State Renewable Portfolio Standards

62

Maryland - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, ... Profile AnalysisPrint State Energy Profile ... The state is backing construction of a large ...

63

NREL: Energy Analysis - Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors This chart indicates the range of recent capacity factor estimates for utility-scale renewable energy technologies. The dots indicate the average, and the vertical lines represent the range: Average +1 standard deviation and average -1 standard deviation. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update) Operations & Maintenance (September 2013 Update) Utility-Scale Capacity Factors Useful Life Land Use by System Technology LCOE Calculator Capacity factor for energy technologies. For more information, please download supporting data for energy technology costs.

64

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Cogeneration System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Cogeneration System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan June 16, 2009 Stage Two Report COGENERATION SYSTEM INTRODUCTION utility plant. COGENERATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION In its current configuration, the central utility plant

Castillo, Steven P.

65

Pathways Analysis for State Proliferators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A computational tool to assess the most likely path a state proliferator would take in making a nuclear weapon was created in a Bayesian network. The purpose of this work was to create a tool to facilitate analysts and policymakers in learning about state proliferation. In carrying out this work, a previous Bayesian network based on nuclear weapon proliferation was expanded to include dual-use export controlled technologies. The constant nodes in the network quantifying technical capability, international networking, and available infrastructure were developed to be based on pertinent characteristics that were appropriately weighted. To verify the network, nine historical cases of state proliferation were tested over time, and the enrichment and weapon pathways were graphed. The network sufficiently modeled the cases, so it was concluded that, while one can never truly being able to sufficiently validate a network of this type, sufficient verification was achieved. The tool was used to gain knowledge and insight concerning technology transfers with four countries in hypothetical cases. This exercise proved that the network can in fact be used to learn about state proliferation under different policies and conditions.

Mella, Michael

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Utility Green Pricing Programs: A Statistical Analysis of Program Effectiveness  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes actual utility green pricing program data to provide further insight into which program features might help maximize both customer participation in green pricing programs and the amount of renewable energy purchased by customers in those programs.

Wiser, R.; Olson, S.; Bird, L.; Swezey, B.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

Not Available

1981-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

68

Literature review of United States utilities computer codes for calculating actinide isotope content in irradiated fuel  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the accuracy and precision of methods used by United States electric utilities to determine the actinide isotopic and element content of irradiated fuel. After an extensive literature search, three key code suites were selected for review. Two suites of computer codes, CASMO and ARMP, are used for reactor physics calculations; the ORIGEN code is used for spent fuel calculations. They are also the most widely used codes in the nuclear industry throughout the world. Although none of these codes calculate actinide isotopics as their primary variables intended for safeguards applications, accurate calculation of actinide isotopic content is necessary to fulfill their function.

Horak, W.C.; Lu, Ming-Shih

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Utility sponsored conservation programs: an economic welfare analysis  

SciTech Connect

A major concern of public electric utilities is the proper level of energy conservation investment that households should make. Engineering cost studies indicate that the average household does not minimize its long-run total cooling and heating costs. To rectify the situation, some public utilities have attempted to induce greater energy conservation through programs that subsidize the purchase of high-efficiency air-conditioning and heating systems and ceiling insulation. A major question mark in the effectiveness of such programs is the reaction that households might have. Lower heating and cooling costs might induce more intensive appliance usage, thus counteracting the conservation of energy. Perhaps a better measure of evaluating such programs would be economic welfare. Toward this goal, a model comfort consumption is devised. The major achievement of this model is the development of a demand function with a nonlinear budget constraint. Roy's identity and Shephard's lemma are also generalized for the nonlinear case.

Scoggins, J.F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Tracking the Reliability of the U.S. Electric Power System: An Assessment of Publicly Available Information Reported to State Public Utility Commissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lists of major events for only 55 of the 123 such utilities.List of Figures and Tables Figure ES- 1. Summary of States that Provided Utility-

LaCommare, Kristina H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

State Level Analysis of Industrial Energy Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most analyses of industrial energy use have been conducted at the national level, in part because of the difficulties in dealing with state level data. Unfortunately, this provides a distorted view of the industrial sector for state and regional policymakers. ACEEE has completed analyses on eight states drawing upon data from a diverse set of sources to characterize the industries at a relatively high level of disaggregation. These analyses demonstrate how different state and regional mixes are from the national mix and the importance of a regionally specific approach to industrial energy policy. In addition, the data suggest that significant shifts are occurring in industry mix in some of these states that will have important ramifications on future industrial policies for these states. This paper will provide an overview of our analytical approach, the data sources that are available, and provide examples of the analysis results to demonstrate the regional diversity of industrial electricity use.

Elliott, R. N.; Shipley, A. M.; Brown, E.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Federal and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale Solar Projects and the Business Models Designed to Utilize Them  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-scale solar projects have grown rapidly in number and size over the last few years, driven in part by strong renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and federal incentives designed to stimulate investment in renewable energy technologies. This report provides an overview of such policies, as well as the project financial structures they enable, based on industry literature, publicly available data, and questionnaires conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

Mendelsohn, M.; Kreycik, C.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Initial cost analysis of a desalination process utilizing hydrotalcite and permutite for ion sequestration.  

SciTech Connect

An initial cost analysis of a proposed desalination process was performed. The proposed process utilizes tailored inorganic ion exchangers, hydrotalcite and permutite, to sequester anions and cations from a brackish water solution. Three different process scenarios were considered: (1) disposal of the spent exchangers as dry waste (2) conventional chemical regeneration, and (3) acid regeneration of permutite coupled with thermal (550 C) regeneration of hydrotalcite. Disposal of the resin and conventional regeneration are not viable options from an economic standpoint. Applying limited data and optimistic assumptions to the third scenario yielded an estimate of $2.34/kgal of product water. Published values for applying conventional reverse osmosis to similar water streams range from $0.70 to $2.65/kgal. Consistent with these baseline values, the Water Treatment Estimation Routine, WaTER, developed by the United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation produced a cost estimate of $1.16/kgal for brackish water reverse osmosis.

Miller, James Edward; Evans, Lindsey R.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Oregon - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Profile Analysis Print State Energy ... the electric power sector is the ... a renewable energy portfolio standard requiring the state's largest ...

75

Electric utility capacity expansion and energy production models for energy policy analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes electric utility capacity expansion and energy production models developed for energy policy analysis. The models use the same principles (life cycle cost minimization, least operating cost dispatching, and incorporation of outages and reserve margin) as comprehensive utility capacity planning tools, but are faster and simpler. The models were not designed for detailed utility capacity planning, but they can be used to accurately project trends on a regional level. Because they use the same principles as comprehensive utility capacity expansion planning tools, the models are more realistic than utility modules used in present policy analysis tools. They can be used to help forecast the effects energy policy options will have on future utility power generation capacity expansion trends and to help formulate a sound national energy strategy. The models make renewable energy source competition realistic by giving proper value to intermittent renewable and energy storage technologies, and by competing renewables against each other as well as against conventional technologies.

Aronson, E.; Edenburn, M.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Results and Analysis of EPRI Utility Survey on Experiences of Composite Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the results and analysis of a North American utility survey on the experience of polymer-based / composite products and apparatus used in transmission class (69 - 765 kV) substations. The survey addresses many topics that are of general interest to utilities such as: • Standards (internal or industry) that may have been used to purchase these apparatus. • Laboratory and field trial investigations undertaken by utilities to determine whether the apparatus was suitable for thei...

2004-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

77

Citation Analysis Method - Solid-State Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 | Headline News | Tracking Reports | Hot Technical Papers | Citation Analysis Method | Credits & Disclaimer | CITATION ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY To examine emerging science and technology knowledge domains that may someday intersect solid-state lighting, we used a citation analysis method similar to that pioneered by the Institute of Scientific Information (ISI). (For more information, see ISI's in-cites website). The analysis below was conducted in August of 2004 and will be updated periodically. First, we searched the ISI database for recent technical articles (from January 2002 on) containing key words associated with solid-state lighting. Second, we made a scatter plot of the number of citations* to these articles as a function of publication date. On that plot, we draw a curve

78

Battery Utilization in Electric Vehicles: Theoretical Analysis and an Almost Optimal Online Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Battery Utilization in Electric Vehicles: Theoretical Analysis and an Almost Optimal Online Algorithm Ron Adany Tami Tamir Abstract We consider the problem of utilizing a pack of m batteries serving among the batteries in the pack. A battery's life depends on the discharge current used for supplying

Tamir, Tami

79

A Multiattribute Utility Analysis of Alternatives for the Disposition of Surplus Weapons-Grade Plutonium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an application of multiattribute utility theory to support the selection of a technology for the disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium by the Department of Energy (DOE). This analysis evaluated 13 alternatives, examined ... Keywords: Utility/preference, applications, multiattribute

James S. Dyer; Thomas Edmunds; John C. Butler; Jianmin Jia

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis Under the utility rates scales examined, standby75 Utility Ratein New York State G.2 Utility Rate Incentives Utility rates

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The ICF, Inc. coal and electric utilities model : an analysis and evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

v.1. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is sponsoring a series of evaluations of important energy policy and electric utility industry models by the MIT Energy Model Analysis Program (EMAP). The subject of this ...

Wood, David O.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Initial Economic Analysis of Utility-Scale Wind Integration in Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes an analysis, conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in May 2010, of the economic characteristics of a particular utility-scale wind configuration project that has been referred to as the 'Big Wind' project.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Microsoft Word - state_analysis_2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State-Level Energy-Related State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2010 May 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2010 ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

84

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lists some of these potential indirect energy market impacts, and identifies whether or not utilities

Barbose, Galen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lists some of these potential indirect energy market impacts, and identifies whether or not utilities

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Non-destructive metallurgical analysis of astrolabes utilizing synchrotron radiation.  

SciTech Connect

From the experiments performed it is possible to determine a wide range of information about the metallurgy of the astrolabes studied. It was found that different brass alloys were used for components that were cast and those that were mechanically deformed. Chemical composition, forming history, and thickness measurements are all determined non-destructively, illustrating that this technique could be useful for many applications with metal artifact analysis where non-intrusive methods are required.

Newbury, B.; Stephenson, B.; Almer, J. D.; Notis, M.; Haeffner, D. R.; Slade Cargill, G., III

2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

87

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Natural Gas System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Natural Gas System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan June 16, 2009 Stage Two Report NATURAL GAS SYSTEM INTRODUCTION New Mexico State University currently uses natural gas, provided by the City of Las Cruces

Castillo, Steven P.

88

Engineering Model of Liquid Storage Utility Tank for Heat Transfer Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The utility or chemical storage tank requires special engineering attention and heat transfer analysis because the tank content is very sensitive to temperature and surrounding environment such as atmospheric or outside air, humidity, and solar radiation heat. A simplified heat transfer model was developed to calculate the liquid content temperature of utility storage tank. The content of the utility storage tanks can be water or any other chemical liquid. An engineering model of liquid storage tank for heat transfer analysis and temperature calculations are presented and discussed in the examples of Tanks No. 1 containing oxalic acid and No. 2 containing sodium tetraphenylborate solution.

Kwon, K.C.

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

89

Water use and supply concerns for utility-scale solar projects in the Southwestern United States.  

SciTech Connect

As large utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are currently being built and planned for locations in the U.S. with the greatest solar resource potential, an understanding of water use for construction and operations is needed as siting tends to target locations with low natural rainfall and where most existing freshwater is already appropriated. Using methods outlined by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine water used in designated solar energy zones (SEZs) for construction and operations&maintenance, an estimate of water used over the lifetime at the solar power plant is determined and applied to each watershed in six Southwestern states. Results indicate that that PV systems overall use little water, though construction usage is high compared to O&M water use over the lifetime of the facility. Also noted is a transition being made from wet cooled to dry cooled CSP facilities that will significantly reduce operational water use at these facilities. Using these water use factors, estimates of future water demand for current and planned solar development was made. In efforts to determine where water could be a limiting factor in solar energy development, water availability, cost, and projected future competing demands were mapped for the six Southwestern states. Ten watersheds, 9 in California, and one in New Mexico were identified as being of particular concern because of limited water availability.

Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Reno, Marissa Devan; Moreland, Barbara D.; Zemlick, Katie; Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Economic analysis of municipal wastewater utilization for thermoelectric power production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermoelectric power industry in the U.S. uses a large amount of freshwater. The large water demand is increasingly a problem, especially for new power plant development, as availability of freshwater for new uses diminishes in the United States. Reusing non-traditional water sources, such as treated municipal wastewater, provides one option to mitigate freshwater usage in the thermoelectric power industry. The amount of freshwater withdrawal that can be displaced with non-traditional water sources at a particular location requires evaluation of the water management and treatment requirements, considering the quality and abundance of the non-traditional water sources. This paper presents the development of an integrated costing model to assess the impact of degraded water treatment, as well as the implications of increased tube scaling in the main condenser. The model developed herein is used to perform case studies of various treatment, condenser cleaning and condenser configurations to provide insight into the ramifications of degraded water use in the cooling loops of thermoelectric power plants. Further, this paper lays the groundwork for the integration of relationships between degraded water quality, scaling characteristics and volatile emission within a recirculating cooling loop model.

Safari, I.; Walker, M.; Abbasian, J.; Arastoopour, H.; Hsieh, M-K.; Theregowda, R.; Dzombak, D.; Miller, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Financial Analysis of Incentive Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of a Prototypical Southwest Utility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

States Million dollars Billion dollars xiv Energy Efficiency IncentivesEnergy Efficiency Incentives Analysis Introduction Many statestate and federal government taxes). xvi Energy Efficiency Incentives

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Analysis Utilities (TAU) on BG/P Systems and Analysis Utilities (TAU) on BG/P Systems References TAU Project Site TAU Instrumentation Methods TAU Compilation Options TAU Fortran Instrumentation FAQ TAU Leap to Petascale 2009 Presentation TAU Workshop 2009 Introduction The TAU (Tuning and Analysis Utilities) Performance System is a portable profiling and tracing toolkit for performance analysis of parallel programs written in Fortran, C, C++, Java, Python. TAU gathers performance information while a program executes through instrumentation of functions, methods, basic blocks, and statements. The instrumentation consists of calls to TAU library routines which can be incorporated into a program in several ways: automatic instrumentation of the code at the source level using the Program Database Toolkit (PDT)

93

The state of energy storage in electric utility systems and its effect on renewable energy resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the state of the art of electric energy storage technologies and discusses how adding intermittent renewable energy technologies (IRETs) to a utility network affects the benefits from storage dispatch. Load leveling was the mode of storage dispatch examined in the study. However, the report recommended that other modes be examined in the future for kilowatt and kilowatt-hour optimization of storage. The motivation to install storage with IRET generation can arise from two considerations: reliability and enhancement of the value of energy. Because adding storage increases cost, reliability-related storage is attractive only if the accruing benefits exceed the cost of storage installation. The study revealed that the operation of storage should not be guided by the output of the IRET but rather by system marginal costs. Consequently, in planning studies to quantify benefits, storage should not be considered as an entity belonging to the system and not as a component of IRETS. The study also indicted that because the infusion of IRET energy tends to reduce system marginal cost, the benefits from load leveling (value of energy) would be reduced. However, if a system has storage, particularly if the storage is underutilized, its dispatch can be reoriented to enhance the benefits of IRET integration.

Rau, N.S.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis Project (SCEPA) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Industry Topics: Market analysis, Policiesdeployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website:...

95

Estimated Value of Service Reliability for Electric Utility Customers in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Information on the value of reliable electricity service can be used to assess the economic efficiency of investments in generation, transmission and distribution systems, to strategically target investments to customer segments that receive the most benefit from system improvements, and to numerically quantify the risk associated with different operating, planning and investment strategies. This paper summarizes research designed to provide estimates of the value of service reliability for electricity customers in the US. These estimates were obtained by analyzing the results from 28 customer value of service reliability studies conducted by 10 major US electric utilities over the 16 year period from 1989 to 2005. Because these studies used nearly identical interruption cost estimation or willingness-to-pay/accept methods it was possible to integrate their results into a single meta-database describing the value of electric service reliability observed in all of them. Once the datasets from the various studies were combined, a two-part regression model was used to estimate customer damage functions that can be generally applied to calculate customer interruption costs per event by season, time of day, day of week, and geographical regions within the US for industrial, commercial, and residential customers. Estimated interruption costs for different types of customers and of different duration are provided. Finally, additional research and development designed to expand the usefulness of this powerful database and analysis are suggested.

Sullivan, M.J.; Mercurio, Matthew; Schellenberg, Josh

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

especially natural gas price risk and the financial risk ofneeds. With natural gas prices expected to remain high forrisk (primarily natural gas price risk) in utility resourc e

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

portfolios – especially natural gas price risk and theutility needs. With natural gas prices expected to remainprice risk (primarily natural gas price risk) in utility

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western UtilityEmerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the WesternEnergy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Office of Planning,

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Investigation of the Utility of United States Environmental Protection Agency's Recalculation Procedure for Deriving Site-specific Criteria for Ammonia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report explores the utility of the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA’s) Recalculation Procedure for deriving site-specific criteria for ammonia in fresh water. It represents a comprehensive evaluation of the application of the deletion process for select sites geographically distributed across the conterminous United States (U.S.).BackgroundThe Agency is currently in the process of updating its National aquatic life ...

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

State environmental law and carbon emissions: Do public utility commissions use environmental statutes to fight global warming?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many states environmental statutes provide the authority for public utility commissioners to make decisions to reduce greenhouse gases from electricity generation. This article looks at six such laws and how the presence of these laws affected CO{sub 2} emissions during a nine-year period from 1997 to 2005. (author)

Sautter, John A.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the future role of energy efficiency as a resource in the Western United States and Canada, as envisioned in the most recent resource plans issued by 16 utilities, representing about 60percent of the region's load. Utility and third-party administered energy efficiency programs proposed by 15 utilities over a ten-year horizon would save almost 19,000 GWh annually, about 5.2percent of forecast load. There are clear regional trends in the aggressiveness of proposed energy savings. California's investor-owned utilities (IOUs) had the most aggressive savings targets, followed by IOUs in the Pacific Northwest, and the lowest savings were proposed by utilities in Inland West states and by two public utilities on the West coast. The adoption of multiple, aggressive policies targeting energy efficiency and climate change appear to produce sizeable energy efficiency commitments. Certain specific policies, such as mandated energy savings goals for California's IOUs and energy efficiency provisions in Nevada's Renewable Portfolio Standard had a direct impact on the level of energy savings included in the resource plans. Other policies, such as revenue decoupling and shareholder incentives, and voluntary or legislatively mandated greenhouse gas emission reduction policies, may have also impacted utilities' energy efficiency commitments, though the effects of these policies are not easily measured. Despite progress among the utilities in our sample, more aggressive energy efficiency strategies that include high-efficiency standards for additional appliances and equipment, tighter building codes for new construction and renovation, as well as more comprehensive ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs are likely to be necessary to achieve a region-wide goal of meeting 20percent of electricity demand with efficiency in 2020.

Hopper, Nichole; Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Schlegel, Jeff

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the future role of energy efficiency as a resource in the Western United States and Canada, as envisioned in the most recent resource plans issued by 16 utilities, representing about 60percent of the region's load. Utility and third-party administered energy efficiency programs proposed by 15 utilities over a ten-year horizon would save almost 19,000 GWh annually, about 5.2percent of forecast load. There are clear regional trends in the aggressiveness of proposed energy savings. California's investor-owned utilities (IOUs) had the most aggressive savings targets, followed by IOUs in the Pacific Northwest, and the lowest savings were proposed by utilities in Inland West states and by two public utilities on the West coast. The adoption of multiple, aggressive policies targeting energy efficiency and climate change appear to produce sizeable energy efficiency commitments. Certain specific policies, such as mandated energy savings goals for California's IOUs and energy efficiency provisions in Nevada's Renewable Portfolio Standard had a direct impact on the level of energy savings included in the resource plans. Other policies, such as revenue decoupling and shareholder incentives, and voluntary or legislatively mandated greenhouse gas emission reduction policies, may have also impacted utilities' energy efficiency commitments, though the effects of these policies are not easily measured. Despite progress among the utilities in our sample, more aggressive energy efficiency strategies that include high-efficiency standards for additional appliances and equipment, tighter building codes for new construction and renovation, as well as more comprehensive ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs are likely to be necessary to achieve a region-wide goal of meeting 20percent of electricity demand with efficiency in 2020.

Hopper, Nichole; Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Schlegel, Jeff

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Financial Analysis of Incentive Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of a Prototypical Southwest Utility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are placed into a utility’s rate base where the investmentis not technically part of the utility’s rate base. Energytechnically part of the utility’s rate base. D.2 Costs Most

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Improved Motors for Utility Applications, Volume 1: Industry Assessment Study: Update and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive analysis of power plant motor failures, which updates an earlier data base, relates failure rates to operating and maintenance practices, as well as application and manufacture. Using the expanded analytic methodology, utilities can analyze the data for other factors significant to improving motor reliability.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Image replica detection system utilizing R-trees and linear discriminant analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manuscript introduces a novel system for content-based identification of image replicas. The proposed approach utilizes image resemblance for deciding whether a test image has been replicated from a certain original or not. We formulate replica ... Keywords: Content-based monitoring, Copy image detection, Copyright protection, Fingerprinting, Linear discriminant analysis (LDA), Perceptual hashing, R-tree indexing, Replica detection, Robust hashing

Spiros Nikolopoulos; Stafanos Zafeiriou; Nikos Nikolaidis; Ioannis Pitas

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Adapting state and national electricity consumption forecasting methods to utility service areas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the experiences of six utilities (Florida Power and Light Co., Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia, Philadelphia Electric Co., Public Service Co. of Colorado, Sacramento Municipal Utility District, and TVA) in adapting to their service territories models that were developed for forecasting loads on a national or regional basis. The models examined were of both end-use and econometric design and included the three major customer classes: residential, commercial, and industrial.

Swift, M.A.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Analysis of potential benefits of integrated-gasifier combined cycles for a utility system  

SciTech Connect

Potential benefits of integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) units were evaluated for a reference utility system by comparing long range expansion plans using IGCC units and gas turbine peakers with a plan using only state of the art steam turbine units and gas turbine peakers. Also evaluated was the importance of the benefits of individual IGCC unit characteristics, particularly unit efficiency, unit equivalent forced outage rate, and unit size. A range of IGCC units was analyzed, including cases achievable with state of the art gas turbines and cases assuming advanced gas turbine technology. All utility system expansion plans that used IGCC units showed substantial savings compared with the base expansion plan using the steam turbine units.

Choo, Y.K.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

An assessment of the utility of GIS-based analysis to support the coordination of humanitarian assistance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This dissertation investigated if Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-based analysis can have a decisive influence upon the coordination of international humanitarian assistance. Utility was assessed… (more)

Verjee, Firoz

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Attribution and Apportionment - State-by-State Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of these documentation improvements is to assist the States in reporting their data. A flow chart showing the basic steps in the attribution process is shown on the following...

110

Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network Gateway Demonstrations Municipal Consortium About the Consortium FAQs

111

The Impact of State Clean Energy Fund Support for Utility-Scale Renewable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the U.S. have established funds to promote the development and commercialization of renewable energy of State Support for Renewable Energy May 2006 ABOUT THIS CASE STUDY SERIES A number of U.S. states have Energy States Alliance, and by the U.S. Department of Energy (the Assistant Secretary of Energy

112

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Policies International Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View...

113

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policy Act (PURPA) and US Geothermal Industry: Current controversies and trends in federal and state implementation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an analysis of the issues confronting US energy policymakers and the US geothermal industry as the result of the implementation and interpretation of the 1978 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act, commonly known as PURPA. It seeks to answer four sets of questions about PURPA: (1) What has the existence of PURPA meant to the US geothermal industry. (2) How has the interpretation of PURPA evolved over the past decade. (3) What particular portions of PURPA rule making have been most crucial to the growth and development of the geothermal industry. (4) What aspects of PURPA have been most troubling to utilities purchasing or developing geothermal energy.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The use of linear systems analysis to identify the residential/utility relationship  

SciTech Connect

There is little doubt that there will be significant changes to future residential electric loads and these changes will have a significant impact on the efficiency with which a utility meets its overall load demand. Changes to the residential load will come about, in part, due to residential growth and increased market penetration of alternate energy sources such as solar space heating. In view of these inevitable changes, it is imperative to develop analytical tools to assess their impact. To date, effective analytical tools include computer simulations and load duration analysis. Computer simulation methods are generally very powerful but require substantial computer, personnel, and financial resources which may put this method of analysis out of the reach of many utilities and systems analysts. In addition, detailed computer simulations have a tendency to obscure insight into the problem. Load duration analysis does provide good insight into the problem, but oftentimes must resort to simulation results if correlations exist between utility load curves and the modified residential curve. One analytical method which has not been exploited to its fullest potential is the use of linear systems analysis to solve this type of problem.

Baer, C.A.; Winn, C.B.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Oregon State University Development of a Bio-based Industry Utilizing Organic Waste Streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is biodiesel wastewater, or crude glycerol (CG). While the results of producing PHB, a co-polymer, from CG have goal of their research will be to implement a PHA production and composting process utilizing biodiesel the properties of the PHA co-polymers PHB and PHBV change as temperature is increased using Differential Scanning

Tullos, Desiree

116

High-Volume Fly Ash Utilization Projects in the United States and Canada: Second Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash--an increasing disposal problem for utilities operating coal-fired power plants--has considerable unrealized potential as a construction material. In a wide-ranging survey, this study documented more than 250 U.S. and Canadian construction projects employing fly ash in high volume for backfill, landfill, hydraulic fill, embankments, pavement base courses, soil amendment, subgrade stabilization, and grout.

1986-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

117

Microsoft Word - state_analysis_2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2010 12 Table 8. Carbon intensity of the economy by state (2000 - 2010)...

118

Microsoft Word - state_analysis_2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Table 2. 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel million metric tons carbon dioxide Shares State Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Total Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Al...

119

Microsoft Word - state_analysis_2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Comparison of fuel detail for the State Energy Data System and the Annual and Monthly Energy Review data systems Energy Source State Energy Data System AnnualMonthly Energy...

120

Thermodynamic analysis of solar energy utilization combined with the exploitation of the LNG physical energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The consumption of LNG (liquid natural gas) is growing and will probably increase rapidly in the near future. Consequently, (in addition to the use of the chemical exergy) the exploitation of the physical energy of LNG, due to its state in liquid phase at a temperature under that of the environment, is becoming more important. Nowadays most of LNG is regassified using the thermal energy of sea water or of warm sea water effluent from a power plant, destroying in this way its physical exergy. Several processes have been considered to utilize the physical exergy of fluids in liquid phase by vaporizing these fluids at atmospheric pressure and cryogenic temperatures. Two general alternatives may be envisaged: (a) direct utilization in cryogenic facilities (cold storage or other process uses); (b) indirect utilization in the generation of electric power. Griepentrog and Weber and others proposed a closed-cycle gas turbine with several kinds of heat sources and with liquid natural gas or hydrogen as the heat sink. In this paper a combined system utilizing a gas turbine with solar heating and LNG refrigerating is examined.

Bisio, G.; Pisoni, C. [Univ. of Genoa (Italy). Energy Engineering Dept.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Survey review of models for use in market penetration analysis: utility sector focus  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate benefits of federal expenditures in research and development for new technologies are dependent upon the degree of acceptance of these technologies. Market penetration considerations are central to the problem of quantifying the potential benefits. These benefits are inputs to the selection process of projects competing for finite R and D funds. Market penetration is the gradual acceptance of a new commodity or technology. The Office of Coal utilization is concerned with the specialized area of market penetration of new electric power generation technologies for both replacement and new capacity. The common measure of market penetration is the fraction of the market serviced by the challenging technology for each time point considered. The methodologies for estimating market penetration are divided into three generic classes: integrated energy/economy modeling systems, utility capacity expansion models, and technology substitution models. In general, the integrated energy/economy modeling systems have three advantages: they provide internally consistent macro, energy-economy scenarios, they account for the effect of prices on demand by fuel form, and they explicitly capture the effects of population growth and the level and structure of economic activity on energy demand. A variety of deficiencies appear in most energy-economy systems models. All of the methodologies may be applied at some level to questions of market penetration of new technologies in the utility sector; choice of methods for a particular analysis must be conditioned by the scope of the analysis, data availability, and the relative cost of alternative analysis.

Groncki, P.J.; Kydes, A.S.; Lamontagne, J.; Marcuse, W.; Vinjamuri, G.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

UTILITY INVESTMENT IN ON-SITE SOLAR: RISK AND RETURN ANALYSIS FOR CAPITALIZATION AND FINANCING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by any capital in the utility's rate base. incentive probleminterest equal to the utility's threshold rate of return formarket and composite utilities' index rates of return were

Kahn, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Utility load management and solar energy. Study background and preliminary market potential analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The large-scale use of electrically assisted solar heating and hot water (solar/electric HHW) systems can have a substantial effect on electric utilities. Under some conditions, peak loads may be increased causing electricity generation costs to rise. However, with appropriate control and thermal storage equipment tied to the HHW system, the timing of the delivery of electricity to the HHW system can be controlled so that it is accomplished during those times of the day when utility supply costs are lowest. In this study various load management schemes for these applications are being investigated to determine their effect on the cost of generating the back-up electric power and on the cost of the required control and storage system. Solar/electric HHW systems are compared to electric-only systems for several utilities and several HHW system designs. The issues underlying the study, the methods of investigation, and the results of the first phase of the study are described. In this phase a preliminary analysis of the maximum market potential for night-time precharge electric-only hot water systems in either utilities was conducted. This analysis indicated that if about 20 to 40 percent of the residential customers used these appliances in a load managed mode, the 10 PM--8 AM valley in the utility load curve would be filled. For combined electric heating and hot water, the corresponding fraction is 6 to 12 percent. It is estimated that in each case, roughly twice the number of residential customers could be accommodated in the valley if solar/electric systems were used instead.

Davitian, H; Bright, R N; Marcuse, W

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Biogas Potential in the United States (Fact Sheet), Energy Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Analysis Biogas Potential in the United States Biogas is the gaseous product of anaerobic digestion, a biological process in which microorganisms break down biodegradable...

125

Technology assessment and market analysis of solid state ultracapacitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report provides quantitative analysis of Solid State Ultracapacitors (SSUs) from technological and financial perspectives. SSUs are Ultracapacitors with solid electrolytes predicted to have huge application potential ...

Jiang, Zibo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Utility investment in on-site solar: risk and return analysis for capitalization and financing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A set of financial strategies designed to accelerate the penetration of on-site solar heating and cooling systems are studied. The approach of portfolio theory or the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) is used. The major features of the CAPM is summarized including a survey of those applications which are most relevant to the analysis. These include utility return on equity calculations and project evaluation techniques. How to apply empirical results is discussed based on CAPM methods. In particular, applications to the capitalization variant of the utility investment strategy and the financing variant are distinguished. Subsidization rationales are also discussed. Empirical results to date are summarized, including estimation problems for the various risk measures. The general problem of financial risk assessment for energy technologies is reviewed. (MHR)

Kahn, E.; Schutz, S.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Utilities Electric Utility Rates The Utilities Gateway houses OpenEI's free, community-editable utility rate repository. OpenEI users may browse, edit and add new electric utility rates to OpenEI's repository. EIA provides the authoritative list of utility companies in the United States, and thus OpenEI limits utility rates to companies listed by EIA. 43,031 rates have been contributed for 3,832 EIA-recognized utility companies. Browse rates by zip code Browse rates by utility name Create or edit a rate Number of Utility Companies by State Click on a state to view summaries for that state. See a list of all U.S. utility companies and aliases Utility Rate Database Description The Utility Rate Database (URDB) is a free storehouse of rate structure

128

Tracking the Reliability of the U.S. Electric Power System: An Assessment of Publicly Available Information Reported to State Public Utility Commissions  

SciTech Connect

Large blackouts, such as the August 14-15, 2003 blackout in the northeasternUnited States and Canada, focus attention on the importance of reliable electric service. As public and private efforts are undertaken to improve reliability and prevent power interruptions, it is appropriate to assess their effectiveness. Measures of reliability, such as the frequency and duration of power interruptions, have been reported by electric utilities to state public utility commissions for many years. This study examines current state and utility practices for collecting and reporting electricity reliability information and discusses challenges that arise in assessing reliability because of differences among these practices. The study is based primarily on reliability information for 2006 reported by 123 utilities to 37 state public utility commissions.

LaCommare, Kristina H.; Eto, Joseph H.

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a result, the utility’s revenues between rate cases are notspending, allowing utilities to earn a rate of return onto rate-of-return regulation, and public utilities and power

Hopper, Nichole

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

DOE OE Permitting, Siting Analysis Division: Samples of State Technical Assistance Work as of June 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE OE Permitting, Siting DOE OE Permitting, Siting Analysis Division: Samples of State Technical Assistance Work as of June 2011 December 2008 State TA: Midwest Gov Assn/NCSL/National Council on Elec Policy/NGA/NASEO December 2008 State TA: Natl Conf of State Legislatures/ Natl Council on Elec Policy/Natl Gov Assn/Natl Assn of State Energy Offices December 2008 State TA: NCSL/NGA/NASEO/ National Council on Electricity Policy December 2008 Regulatory Assistance Project Sample Products: Utility Planning December 2008 Lawrence Berkeley Nat'l Lab (LBNL) Sample Products: Smart Grid & Demand Response December 2008 LBNL Sample Products: Ratepayer- Financed Energy Efficiency December 2008 LBNL Sample Products: EE Business Models for Use by PUCs December 2008 LBNL Sample Products: EE Evaluation, Measurement & Verification (EM&V)

131

Steady State Analysis of an induction generator infinite bus system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of grid connected wind energy conver- sion systems employing induction generators, one1 Steady State Analysis of an induction generator infinite bus system Rajesh G Kavasseri Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58105 - 5285, USA (email: rajesh

Kavasseri, Rajesh

132

CUSTOMER-SITED PHOTOVOLTAICS: STATE MARKET ANALYSIS Christy Herig  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CUSTOMER-SITED PHOTOVOLTAICS: STATE MARKET ANALYSIS Christy Herig National Renewable Energy Lab the most expensive form of renewable energy, they are still the most affordable and market Information Agency has not released any new state emission data since the 1999 analysis [2]. The objectives

Perez, Richard R.

133

Damage to Utility Boilers by Cycling and Flexible Operation: Report on the State of Knowledge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this report was twofold. First, the initial concept and implementation of a boiler component and damage mechanism ranking were developed, based on the effects of cycling. This state-of-knowledge ranking can be used for determining the emphasis of future research on components most affected by cycling. Second, the groundwork for these boiler components and damage mechanisms was laid for the development in the second phase of this project of the report, The Impact of Flexible ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

134

12/22/2000 State of Art Fiber Optic 1 UTILITY APPLICATION OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gradients PD Intensity A 33 kV 60 kV/cm heavy B 25 kV 35 kV/cm medium C 19 kV 25 kV/cm light #12;12/22/2000 State of Art Fiber Optic 35 Typical Experimental Results After wetting the cable, the system by tap water, light pollution. The water formed droplets on the hydrophobic cable surface. Spark

135

Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings < Back Eligibility Institutional Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Ohio State Architect's Office In 1995 Ohio passed legislation requiring that all state agencies perform life-cycle cost analyses prior to the construction of new buildings, and energy consumption analyses prior to new leases. Both analyses are to be primary considerations in either building design or leasing decisions. The

136

"All-Inorganic, Efficient Photovoltaic Solid State Devices Utilizing Semiconducting Colloidal Nanocrystal Quantum Dots"  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We demonstrated robust colloidal quantum dot (QD) photovoltaics with high internal quantum efficiencies. In our structures, device durability is derived from use of all-inorganic atmospherically-stable semiconducting metal-oxide films together with QD photoreceptors. We have shown that both QD and metal-oxide semiconducting films and contacts are amenable to room temperature processing under minimal vacuum conditions, enabling large area processing of PV structures of high internal efficiency. We generated the state of the art devices with power conversion efficiency of more than 4%, and have shown that efficiencies as high as 9% are achievable in the near-term, and as high as 17% in the long-term.

Vladimir Bulovic and Moungi Bawendi

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

Analysis of Energy Savings in the Federal Sector through Utilities Service Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of the lack of sufficient appropriations for energy-related projects at federal sites, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Federal Energy Management Programs (FEMP) has encouraged the use of alternative financing as a method to fund energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy capital retrofit projects. One of the potential avenues for agencies to obtain alternative financing is through their servicing utility. Since the passage of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), more than 1,200 projects have been facilitated in this manner. The amount of the capital investment per project has varied markedly, depending on the need of the federal agency, number of facilities at a specific site, and nature of the retrofit technology. To help promote the use of this financing mechanism, FEMP created the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group to foster enhanced relationships between utilities and both federal agencies and their sites so projects could be identified, designed, financed, and constructed. Formation of this Working Group also allowed FEMP the opportunity to collect, on a voluntary basis, specific information regarding individual projects in order to document results, which could assist in determining the contribution to mandated energy saving goals. Accurate and complete data existed for 528 of these projects to allow an analysis of total energy savings as a function of capital cost. Projects that consisted of the category labeled controls/upgrades/ repairs yielded the largest energy savings per capital dollar of investment (~14,500 Btu per dollar). Other projects with high energy savings per capital dollar of investment included comprehensive upgrades, central plant upgrades, boiler/chiller replacement, and lighting and mechanical system upgrades. This article summarizes the findings from the analysis, provides some insight into the types of projects that yield the best savings per dollar of investment, and possible explanation for the results.

McMordie-Stoughton, Katherine L.; Solana, Amy E.; Bates, Derrick J.; Sandusky, William F.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Statistical Analysis of Geothermal Wells in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study represents the first attempt to characterize the U.S. geothermal-hydrothermal resource from well data. The report contains field test data on more than 500 geothermal wells and includes statistical analyses of key well parameters. Utilities can use the information in planning and engineering analysis.

1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

139

A Synthesis of Biomass Utilization for Bioenergy Production in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

multiple use management of the Nation’s forest resources for sustained yields of wood, water, forage, wildlife, and recreation. Through forestry research, cooperation with the States and private forest owners, and management of the National Forests and National Grasslands, it strives—as directed by Congress—to provide increasingly greater service to a growing Nation. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write

United States; Forest Service; David L. Nicholls; Robert A. Monserud; Dennis P. Dykstra; The Forest; Service U. S; Department Agriculture; Dennis P. Dykstra Is A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and the Pursuit  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and the Pursuit of Renewable Energy Manufacturing Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and the Pursuit of Renewable Energy Manufacturing Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner: NREL State Clean Energy Policies Analysis Project (SCEPA) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Industry Topics: Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy10osti/46672.pdf

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141

AN ANALYSIS OF RESIDENTIAL RADON MEASUREMENTS IN KANSAS UTILIZING GRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIs) TOOLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beginning January 1, 1987, the state of Kansas began collecting and recording data from residential radon tests. This data was collected based entirely upon voluntary home testing, performed by 1) the home owner (using a store-purchased radon test kit), 2) a professional radon testing laboratory or 3) by technicians from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) state laboratory. The majority of test results arc from tests conducted by homeowners. The radon database was analyzed using Arc Info 8.2. Three primary graphical information system (GIs) analyses were performed: 1) a comparison of the Kansas database to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)l Unites States Geographical Service (USGS) radon threat map for Kansas, 2) a data density analysis of statewide testing patterns and 3) an analysis of average radon values across clustered zip code districts in Sedgwick County, Shawnee County and the Kansas City metropolitan area (including Johnson, Wyandottc, Leavenworth and Douglas Counties). Comparison of the Kansas radon database to the EPAIUSGS threat asscssmcnt map showed similar but not identical trends. The data density analysis identified the zip code districts for which no test results had been collected and identified the areas of

Hanscn Brian

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Residential energy-consumption analysis utilizing the DOE-1 computer program  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-1 computer program is used to examine energy consumption in a typical middle-class household in Cincinnati, Ohio. The program is used to compare energy consumption under different structural and environmental conditions, including various levels of insulation in the walls and ceiling, double and single glazing of windows, and thermostat setback schedules. In addition, the DOE-1 program is used to model the house under three energy distribution systems: a unit heater, a single-zone fan system with optional subzone reheat; and a unitary heat pump. A plant equipment simulation is performed to model the heating and cooling plant currently installed in the house. A simple economic analysis of life-cycle costs for the house is done utilizing the economic simulation portion of DOE-1. Utility bills over the past six years are analyzed to gain an actual energy-use profile for the house to compare with computer results. Results indicate that a 35% savings in heating load may be obtained with addition of proper amounts of insulation as compared with the house with no insulation. The installation of double glazing on windows may save close to 6% on heating load. Thermostat setbacks may result in savings of around 25% on energy consumed for heating. Similar results are achieved with regard to cooling load. Comparison of actual energy consumed by the household (from utility bills) with the computer results shows a 4.25% difference in values between the two. This small percent difference certainly strengthens the case for future use of computer programs in comparing construction alternatives and predicting building energy consumption.

Arentsen, S K

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

An Objective Analysis of Tornado Risk in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an objective analysis of spatial tornado risk in the United States is performed, using a somewhat different dataset than in some previous tornado climatologies. We focus on significant tornadoes because their reporting frequency has ...

Timothy A. Coleman; P. Grady Dixon

144

Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

1981-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

NREL State Clean Energy Policies Analysis Project (SCEPA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL State Clean Energy Policies Analysis Project (SCEPA) NREL State Clean Energy Policies Analysis Project (SCEPA) (Redirected from State Clean Energy Policies Analysis Project (SCEPA)) Jump to: navigation, search Name NREL State Clean Energy Policies Analysis Project (SCEPA) Agency/Company /Organization NREL Website http://www.nrel.gov/applying_t References Clean Energy Policy Analysis[1] Tool Summary Name: Clean Energy Policy Analysis Project (SCEPA) Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Topics: Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Security, - Environmental and Biodiversity Website: www.nrel.gov/applying_technologies/state_local_activities/cepa.html Country: United States Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

146

Microsoft Word - state_analysis_2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 1. State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010) million metric tons carbon dioxide State 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Percent Absolute Alabama 140.4 132.0 136.7 137.2 139.7 141.5 144.0 146.1 139.2 119.8 132.7 -5.5% -7.7 Alaska 44.3 43.4 43.6 43.5 46.8 48.1 45.8 44.1 39.5 37.9 38.7 -12.6% -5.6 Arizona 86.0 88.3 87.7 89.3 96.6 96.7 100.0 102.2 103.1 94.6 95.9 11.6% 9.9 Arkansas 63.2 62.4 60.9 61.3 61.9 59.7 61.6 63.1 63.7 61.6 66.1 4.6% 2.9 California 381.3 385.8 384.9 389.5 391.5 389.0 397.5 403.7 389.8 375.9 369.8 -3.0% -11.4 Colorado 84.7 92.8 90.9 90.0 93.1 95.4 96.4 99.2 97.6 93.7 96.5 13.9% 11.8 Connecticut 42.8 41.5 39.9 42.3 44.4 43.9 40.9 40.3 38.2 36.5 36.9 -13.7% -5.8 Delaware 16.3 15.7 15.5 16.1 16.1 17.0 15.8 16.7 15.9 11.8 11.7 -27.9% -4.5 District of Columbia 4.3 4.1

147

Microsoft Word - state_analysis_2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Table 3. 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector million metric tons carbon dioxide State Commercial Electric Power Residential Industrial Transportation Total Al a ba ma 2.1 76.7 2.8 17.7 33.4 132.7 Al a s ka 2.5 3.0 1.8 16.6 14.8 38.7 Ari zona 2.4 54.4 2.3 4.8 32.1 95.9 Arka ns a s 2.6 32.3 2.3 8.6 20.3 66.1 Ca l i forni a 15.9 43.5 28.9 67.5 214.0 369.8 Col ora do 4.2 39.9 7.8 14.9 29.7 96.5 Connecti cut 3.4 7.7 7.7 1.9 16.2 36.9 Del a wa re 0.8 4.2 1.1 1.1 4.5 11.7 Di s trict of Col umbi a 1.2 0.2 0.8 0.0 1.1 3.3 Fl ori da 5.4 119.6 1.6 12.4 107.0 246.0 Georgi a 4.0 79.1 8.3 14.5 67.8 173.7 Ha wa i i 0.3 7.6 0.1 1.7 9.3 18.9 Ida ho 1.1 0.7 1.6 3.4 9.4 16.2 Il l i noi s 11.5 94.0 23.7 33.9 67.2 230.4 Indi a na 5.4 114.3 8.7 48.5 42.2 219.1 Iowa 4.1 40.6 4.5 18.0 21.6 88.7 Ka ns a s 2.0 35.4 4.5 15.1 18.0 75.0 Kentucky 2.4 94.2 3.7 18.0 32.4 150.7 Loui s i a na 1.9 42.6 2.6 128.1

148

Microsoft Word - state_analysis_2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Table 5. Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 2010) metric tons carbon dioxide per person Change 2000 to 2010 State 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Percent Absolute Al a ba ma 31.5 29.6 30.6 30.6 31.0 31.1 31.3 31.5 29.8 25.4 28.1 -11.0% -3.5 Al a s ka 70.6 68.5 67.9 67.2 70.9 72.0 67.8 64.9 57.6 54.6 54.6 -22.6% -16.0 Ari zona 16.6 16.7 16.1 16.0 16.8 16.2 16.2 16.1 15.9 14.4 14.4 -13.7% -2.3 Arka ns a s 23.6 23.2 22.5 22.5 22.6 21.5 21.9 22.2 22.2 21.3 22.7 -3.7% -0.9 Ca li fornia 11.2 11.2 11.0 11.1 11.0 10.9 11.1 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.9 -11.5% -1.3 Colora do 19.6 20.9 20.2 19.8 20.3 20.5 20.3 20.5 19.8 18.7 18.9 -3.2% -0.6 Connecticut 12.5 12.1 11.6 12.2 12.8 12.6 11.7 11.6 10.9 10.4 10.5 -16.5% -2.1 Dela wa re 20.7 19.8 19.3 19.7 19.5 20.2 18.5 19.3 18.2 13.4 13.1 -36.4% -7.5 Dis tri ct of Columbi a

149

Microsoft Word - state_analysis_2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 7. Carbon intensity of the energy supply by state (2000 - 2010) kilograms of energy-related carbon dioxide per million Btu Change 2000 to 2010 State 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Percent Absolute Al a bama 57.9 57.6 57.3 57.0 56.3 57.2 57.5 58.1 55.9 51.3 53.9 -6.9% -4.0 Al a s ka 59.7 59.0 59.4 59.4 60.3 60.2 61.3 60.9 60.6 60.1 60.4 1.1% 0.6 Ari zona 55.0 56.0 54.8 55.8 56.2 57.0 57.9 56.9 56.0 54.6 55.0 0.1% 0.1 Arka nsa s 56.8 56.3 54.4 54.6 55.1 55.4 55.2 54.8 55.6 54.3 55.5 -2.3% -1.3 Ca l i forni a 52.8 54.0 53.9 53.4 53.6 53.0 53.1 54.1 54.2 53.7 52.9 0.2% 0.1 Col ora do 69.1 68.8 69.4 68.4 68.9 68.5 68.6 67.5 66.5 65.8 66.5 -3.7% -2.6 Connecti cut 49.9 51.8 50.9 50.8 50.4 51.4 49.4 49.3 49.6 47.2 47.2 -5.5% -2.8 Del a wa re 69.6 68.3 67.5 69.1 69.4 69.9 69.5 70.0 69.1 65.2 64.0 -8.1% -5.6 Di s tri ct of Col umbi

150

Regulated utilities and solar energy: a legal-economic analysis of the major issues affecting the solar commercialization effort  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reaction of public utilities to the addition (and competitive) sources of energy supplied by solar technologies will have a significant impact on the commercialization of solar energy. Decentralized applications of solar energy need utility-produced power to back up the energy produced by solar means. The cost and availability of this power will largely determine the acceptance of solar energy. There are three legal issues surrounding the role of utilities in the solar commercialization effort: (1) the extent to which utilities may own, sell, lease, finance, or service solar devices for utility customers; (2) the degree to which solar-powered utilities may be able to compete with existing utilities; and (3) the degree to which various utility rate structures will be allowed to penalize decentralized solar users. The impact of state constitutional and statutory provisions upon these issues is examined, along with relevant federal constitutional doctrines. Finally, the statutes of the National Energy Act, many of which specifically address the above issues, are discussed.

Laitos, J.; Feuerstein, R. J.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) Project: An Analysis of Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

51 51 Revised June 2009 State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) Project: An Analysis of Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs in the United States Toby Couture E3 Analytics Karlynn Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-45551 Revised June 2009 State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) Project: An Analysis of Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs in the United States Toby Couture E3 Analytics Karlynn Cory

152

Microsoft Word - state_analysis_2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Table 6. Energy-intensity by state (2000 - 2010) thousand Btu per dollar of GDP Change 2000 to 2010 State 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Percent Absolute Al aba ma 18.3 17.1 17.4 17.2 16.9 16.4 16.3 16.2 15.9 15.3 16.0 -12.6% -2.3 Al as ka 21.7 20.6 19.8 20.2 20.3 21.1 18.7 17.8 15.9 14.1 14.2 -34.5% -7.5 Ari zona 8.7 8.5 8.4 8.0 8.3 7.6 7.2 7.3 7.6 7.5 7.6 -12.6% -1.1 Arkans a s 14.4 14.2 14.0 13.6 13.1 12.2 12.3 12.6 12.5 12.4 13.0 -9.9% -1.4 Ca l i forni a 4.9 4.9 4.8 4.7 4.5 4.3 4.3 4.2 4.0 4.0 4.0 -17.8% -0.9 Col orado 6.3 6.7 6.4 6.4 6.5 6.4 6.3 6.4 6.3 6.1 6.2 -1.8% -0.1 Connecti cut 4.6 4.3 4.3 4.5 4.5 4.3 4.1 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.7 -19.9% -0.9 Del a wa re 5.0 4.7 4.8 4.6 4.4 4.4 4.1 4.3 4.3 3.3 3.3 -34.6% -1.7 Di s tri ct of Col umbi a 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 -39.4% -0.4 Fl ori da 6.9 6.6 6.6 6.4 6.3 6.0 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.8 6.1 -11.4% -0.8

153

Analysis of Filesystem Utilization by the ?Ensemble of Models? Approach (U)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to execute Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) studies, the number of reads placed on the filesystem will increase. This document works through the file I/O for a climatology UQ study. The utilization of the filesystem for the above discussed will be similar for ICF and Stockpile Stewardship applications. The current state of the art for the quantification of uncertainty of a multi-physics simulation code is the utilization of an ensemble of models approach. As an overview of the ensemble of models approach, a set of uncertain input parameters is identified along with an identified set of observational and output parameters. The model is computed n number of times with each ensemble simulation using a unique set of parametric combinations of input parameters thereby creating an ensemble of simulations. Response surface models (also known as statistical emulator models, surrogate models, or meta models) are trained using the ensemble results. The response models are then convolved with observational data to further constrain input parameters and to create uncertainty bounds on the model outputs. Using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) specifically the atmospheric component of CCSM, the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), as the model of interest, this document provides a rough model of the demands on a filesystem that is needed to execute a UQ study on CAM. Each ensemble simulation consists of 12 simulation years and uses 384 processors on the Atlas machine. The LLNL UQ Pipeline is LLNL's standard tool to execute UQ studies. The UQ Pipeline possesses the capability to execute the ensemble simulations on LLNL's diverse set of HPC environments, produce response models, generate uncertainty bounds, and analyze the results. The process executing the LLNL UQ Pipeline is run on a different compute node from the set of concurrent, executing ensemble simulations.

Domyancic, D

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

154

Microsoft Word - state_analysis_2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Table 9. Net electricity trade index and primary electricity source for selected states (2000 - 2010) Primary Source Least CO 2 per capita New York 0.9 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 Nucl ea r Ida ho 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 Hydroel ectric Vermont 1.6 1.4 1.3 1.4 1.2 1.2 1.5 1.3 1.5 1.7 1.5 Nucl ea r Cal i fornia 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 Natural Ga s Connecticut 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.1 0.9 0.9 1.1 1.1 Nucl ea r Rhode Is l and 1.0 1.1 0.9 0.7 0.6 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.0 Natural Ga s Oregon 1.0 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 Hydroel ectric Ma s s achus etts 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 Natural Ga s Wa s hi ngton 1.0 0.9 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 Hydroel ectric Florida 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 Natural Ga s Most CO 2 per capita Okl ahoma 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.1 Natural

155

NREL State Clean Energy Policies Analysis Project (SCEPA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL State Clean Energy Policies Analysis Project (SCEPA) NREL State Clean Energy Policies Analysis Project (SCEPA) Jump to: navigation, search Name NREL State Clean Energy Policies Analysis Project (SCEPA) Agency/Company /Organization NREL Website http://www.nrel.gov/applying_t References Clean Energy Policy Analysis[1] Tool Summary Name: Clean Energy Policy Analysis Project (SCEPA) Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Topics: Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Security, - Environmental and Biodiversity Website: www.nrel.gov/applying_technologies/state_local_activities/cepa.html Country: United States Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

156

Analysis of Water Rate Escalations across the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis of Water Rate Escalations across the United States Analysis of Water Rate Escalations across the United States Elisabeth Giever Kate McMordie Stoughton Susan Loper October 2010 Executive Summary This document provides an overview of an analysis that examined changes in water rates across the country to develop a basic understanding of water rate escalations and how water rates are impacted from outside influences. The analysis investigated how water rates are influenced by the geographic region, water source, and drought tendencies. For example, one observation of the analysis found that cities located in regions of long term drought may have higher escalation rates than cities in water rich environments. Typical escalation rates were found to be between 4 and 8%. This information can be

157

YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL REVENUE ($1,000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,1,"AL",4958,"Decatur Utilities",0.148,0.124,0,0,0.272,5.55,4.65,0,0,10.2,20,2,0,0,22 2,1,"AL",4958,"Decatur Utilities",0.148,0.124,0,0,0.272,5.55,4.65,0,0,10.2,20,2,0,0,22 2012,1,"AL",6422,"City of Florence - (AL)",0.4,0,0,0,0.4,15,0,0,0,15,55,0,0,0,55 2012,1,"AL",9094,"City of Huntsville - (AL)",5.688,1.64,0,0,7.328,213.3,61.5,0,0,274.8,669,4,0,0,673 2012,1,"AL",9739,"Joe Wheeler Elec Member Corp",0.188,0,0,0,0.188,7.05,0,0,0,7.05,20,0,0,0,20 2012,1,"AR",14063,"Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co",0.488,0,0.058,0,0.546,67.739,0,8.333,0,76.072,60,0,1,0,61 2012,1,"AZ",16572,"Salt River Project",,5.372,,,5.372,,500,,,500,,6,,,6 2012,1,"AZ",19189,"Trico Electric Cooperative Inc",0.01,,,,0.01,0.25,,,,0.25,3,,,,3

158

Battery energy storage and superconducting magnetic energy storage for utility applications: A qualitative analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was prepared at the request of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management for an objective comparison of the merits of battery energy storage with superconducting magnetic energy storage technology for utility applications. Conclusions are drawn regarding the best match of each technology with these utility application requirements. Staff from the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program and the superconductivity Programs at Sandia National contributed to this effort.

Akhil, A.A.; Butler, P.; Bickel, T.C.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Parametric analysis of the electric utility market for advanced load-leveling batteries. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This task examines the market for batteries in utility load-leveling service as a function of the Battery System Cost characteristics in order to give DOE a method of assessing the results of various program alternatives. The sensitivity of the benefits (barrels of oil saved) that might be derived to the timing of the market (i.e. when it begins) is also investigated. (The real cost of fuel is to be assumed to increase 2.4% per year.) How large is the total market for a new technology; how is the relative effectiveness of Battery Storage Systems related to the cost of fuel, the capital cost of the battery, and the perception of the credits associated with batery systems; and how do these vary with time required answers in order to estimate how the market for battery systems might develop. Most of the answers were obtained by studying the data developed by MITRE/METREK for a market assessment of battery systems using lead/acid batteries. MITRE's market analysis considered a large variety of variables; since the resources and time available for the present task were limited, it was not possible to either duplicate or confirm their work in detail. The initial results of this study depend on the assumptions used by MITRE. However, where these assumptions were incomplete, the results are adjusted. The supplementary information was obtained from studies performed by Arthur D. Little, Inc. and by PSE and G.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Trends and Analysis  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A look at one of the primary tools utilities are using to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, in the context of the Energy Policy Act of 1992.

Information Center

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and the Pursuit of Renewable Energy Manufacturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 February 2010 State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and the Pursuit of Renewable Energy Manufacturing Eric Lantz, Frank Oteri, Suzanne Tegen, and Elizabeth Doris National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46672 February 2010 State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and the Pursuit of Renewable Energy Manufacturing Eric Lantz, Frank Oteri, Suzanne Tegen, and Elizabeth Doris Prepared under Task No. IGST.9000 NOTICE

162

Numerical analysis of decoy state quantum key distribution protocols  

SciTech Connect

Decoy state protocols are a useful tool for many quantum key distribution systems implemented with weak coherent pulses, allowing significantly better secret bit rates and longer maximum distances. In this paper we present a method to numerically find optimal three-level protocols, and we examine how the secret bit rate and the optimized parameters are dependent on various system properties, such as session length, transmission loss, and visibility. Additionally, we show how to modify the decoy state analysis to handle partially distinguishable decoy states as well as uncertainty in the prepared intensities.

Harrington, Jim W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rice, Patrick R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WGA CDEAC) (2006). Energy Efficiency Task Force Report.on Phase 1 Issues: Energy Efficiency Shareholder Mechanism,Schlegel, J. (2006). Energy Efficiency in Western Utility

Hopper, Nichole

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Policies for Utilities, Clean Energy Policies in States and Communities, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Brochure)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decoupling Defined Decoupling Defined Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Policies for Utilities Clean Energy Policies in States and Communities Decoupling can be a win-win strategy to both utility companies and their customers by breaking the link between electricity and gas sales and revenue. A well-designed decoupling plan helps keep utility profits steady and customers' energy costs in check-and it removes the disincentive for utilities to promote energy efficiency programs. 1 These are costs that are relatively fixed in the short-run measured on the timescale between rate cases. 2 Variable costs-those that vary directly with consumption and production such as fuel, variable operation and maintenance, and purchased power-are typically excluded from the decoupling mechanism.

165

Analysis of Hydrogen and Competing Technologies for Utility-Scale Energy Storage (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presentation about the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's analysis of hydrogen energy storage scenarios, including analysis framework, levelized cost comparison of hydrogen and competing technologies, analysis results, and conclusions drawn from the analysis.

Steward, D.

2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

166

Analysis of Hydrogen and Competing Technologies for Utility-Scale Energy Storage (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation about the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's analysis of hydrogen energy storage scenarios, including analysis framework, levelized cost comparison of hydrogen and competing technologies, analysis results, and conclusions drawn from the analysis.

Steward, D.

2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

167

Financial Analysis of Incentive Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of a Prototypical Southwest Utility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the utility (e.g. , number of customers, annual electriccase and the current number of customers being served. Theincreases as the number of customers being served changes. A

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Analysis of novel, above-ground thermal energy storage concept utilizing low-cost, solid medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clean energy power plants cannot effectively match peak demands without utilizing energy storage technologies. Currently, several solutions address short term demand cycles, but little work has been done to address seasonal ...

Barineau, Mark Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Yard-waste compost evaluation for soil amendment utilization| Elemental, thermal, and infrared analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This research generates analytical criteria for the utilization of Northern California yard-waste composts, regardless of the sample’s feedstock, treatment facility, or final form. Several… (more)

Flock, Rebecca J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

CO? abatement by multi-fueled electric utilities: an analysis based on Japanese data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-fueled electric utilities are commonly seen as offering relatively greater opportunities for reasonably priced carbon abatement through changes in the dispatch of generating units from capacity using high emission ...

Ellerman, A. Denny.; Tsukada, Natsuki.

171

Analysis of strategies for improving uranium utilization in pressurized water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systematic procedures have been devised and applied to evaluate core design and fuel management strategies for improving uranium utilization in Pressurized Water Reactors operated on a once-through fuel cycle. A principal ...

Sefcik, Joseph A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Economic and technical analysis of distributed utility benefits for hydrogen refueling stations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the potential economic benefits of operating hydrogen refueling stations to accomplish two objectives: supply pressurized hydrogen for vehicles, and supply distributed utility generation, transmission and distribution peaking energy and capacity to the utility. The study determined under what circumstances using a hydrogen-fueled generator as a distributed utility generation source, co-located with the hydrogen refueling station components (electrolyzer and storage), would result in cost savings to the station owner, and hence lower hydrogen production costs. The systems studied include a refueling station (including such components as an electrolyzer, storage, hydrogen dispensers, and compressors) plus on-site hydrogen fueled electricity generation units (e.g., fuel cells or combustion engines). The operational strategy is to use off-peak electricity in the electrolyzer to fill hydrogen storage, and to dispatch the electricity generation about one hour per day to meet the utility`s local and system peaks. The utility was assumed to be willing to pay for such service up to its avoided generation, fuel, transmission and distribution costs.

Iannucci, J.J.; Eyer, J.M.; Horgan, S.A.; Schoenung, S.M. [Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA (United States)]|[Longitude 122 West, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Geographic analysis of childhood lead exposure in New York state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the geographic variation in the blood lead levels (BLLs) of New York State children using spatial filtering, contour mapping, and regression techniques. Data for 364,917 children tested for BLLs prior to age two were extracted from New York State’s electronic blood lead reporting system. Spatial filtering methods were used to determine which areas of the state had the highest prevalence of children with elevated BLLs (BLLs>10 µg/dL). The method used a variable filter size to allow for the simultaneous evaluation of urban and rural areas of the state. The results showed that several upstate urban areas had the highest proportion of children with elevated BLLs. Screening rates were also found to be higher in areas with a high proportion of children with elevated BLLs, indicating that areas with a high risk of lead exposure were well screened. Multiple regression analysis, using areas made up of merged zip code regions as the units of observation, was conducted to describe the relationship between the prevalence of children with elevated BLLs and community characteristics. High prevalence of elevated BLLs was predicted in areas with older housing stock, a smaller proportion of high school graduates, and a larger proportion of black births. Separate models were developed for New York City and the rest of the state, since the effect of the variables was lower in New York City.

Thomas O Talbot; Steven P For; Valerie B Haley

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A Multi-Attribute Utility Decision Analysis for Treatment Alternatives for the DOE/SR Aluminum-Based Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

A multi-attribute utility analysis is applied to the decision to select a treatment method for the management of aluminum-based spent nuclear i%el (A1-SNF) owned by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). DOE will receive, treat, and temporarily store Al- SNF, most of which is composed of highly enriched uranium, at its Savannah River Site in South Carolina. DOE intends ultimately to send the treated Al-SNJ? to a geologic repository for permanent disposal. DOE initially considered ten treatment alternatives for the management of A1-SNF, and has narrowed the choice to two of these the direct disposal and melt and dilute alternatives. The decision analysis presented in this document focuses on a decision between these two remaining alternatives.

Davis, F.; Kuzio, K.; Sorenson, K.; Weiner, R.; Wheeler, T.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

NESTLE: Few-group neutron diffusion equation solver utilizing the nodal expansion method for eigenvalue, adjoint, fixed-source steady-state and transient problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NESTLE is a FORTRAN77 code that solves the few-group neutron diffusion equation utilizing the Nodal Expansion Method (NEM). NESTLE can solve the eigenvalue (criticality); eigenvalue adjoint; external fixed-source steady-state; or external fixed-source. or eigenvalue initiated transient problems. The code name NESTLE originates from the multi-problem solution capability, abbreviating Nodal Eigenvalue, Steady-state, Transient, Le core Evaluator. The eigenvalue problem allows criticality searches to be completed, and the external fixed-source steady-state problem can search to achieve a specified power level. Transient problems model delayed neutrons via precursor groups. Several core properties can be input as time dependent. Two or four energy groups can be utilized, with all energy groups being thermal groups (i.e. upscatter exits) if desired. Core geometries modelled include Cartesian and Hexagonal. Three, two and one dimensional models can be utilized with various symmetries. The non-linear iterative strategy associated with the NEM method is employed. An advantage of the non-linear iterative strategy is that NSTLE can be utilized to solve either the nodal or Finite Difference Method representation of the few-group neutron diffusion equation.

Turinsky, P.J.; Al-Chalabi, R.M.K.; Engrand, P.; Sarsour, H.N.; Faure, F.X.; Guo, W. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Avista Utilities- Net Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net...

177

A comparative analysis of business structures suitable for farmer-owned wind power projects in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the state’s generous net metering program, the absence oftypically waived under net metering tariffs, which enablerequire utilities to offer net metering tariffs, only a few

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Financial Analysis of Incentive Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of a Prototypical Southwest Utility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incentives Analysis Supply Mix Purchased Power Natural GasIncentives Analysis Arizona Public Service Nuclear Purchased Power Nevada Power Purchased Power Nuclear Coal Renewables Renewables Natural Gas

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Visualization and data analysis-current state and exascale challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Talk about Visualization and Data Analysis Current State and Exascale challenges. The goal is to update with colleagues our current status in our research. What challenges we need to face, and what future possibilities. Our goal is to propose to approach the problems with the visualization approach operating on the supercomputing platform. This presentation is about the L2 Milestone, we intend to discuss further possibilities of enhancing our results and optimizing our solutions.

Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodgers, David [SNL; Springmeyer, Becky [LLNL

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

180

Analysis on Coalbed Methane Development Mode and Utilization Technology in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal bed methane (CBM), as a new energy, has become an important supplement to natural gas in China. Development and utilization of CBM can also reduce greenhouse gas emissions and protect of ecological environment. Very different forms of the Chinese ... Keywords: coalbed methane, virtual reservoir, low concentration CBM, ventilation air methane, energy-saving and emission reduction

Yuandong Qiao; Daping Xia; Hongyu Guo

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

An analysis of GPU utilization trends on the Keeneland initial delivery system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In late 2010, The Georgia Institute of Technology along with its partners - the Oak Ridge National Lab, the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and the National Institute for Computational Sciences, deployed the Keeneland Initial Delivery System (KIDS) ... Keywords: GPU, nvidia-smi, utilization

Tabitha K. Samuel; Stephen McNally; John Wynkoop

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A clear understanding of the monetary value that customers place on reliability and the factors that give rise to higher and lower values is an essential tool in determining investment in the grid. The recent National Transmission Grid Study recognizes the need for this information as one of growing importance for both public and private decision makers. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy has undertaken this study, as a first step toward addressing the current absence of consistent data needed to support better estimates of the economic value of electricity reliability. Twenty-four studies, conducted by eight electric utilities between 1989 and 2002 representing residential and commercial/industrial (small, medium and large) customer groups, were chosen for analysis. The studies cover virtually all of the Southeast, most of the western United States, including California, rural Washington and Oregon, and the Midwest south and east of Chicago. All variables were standardized to a consistent metric and dollar amounts were adjusted to the 2002 CPI. The data were then incorporated into a meta-database in which each outage scenario (e.g., the lost of electric service for one hour on a weekday summer afternoon) is treated as an independent case or record both to permit comparisons between outage characteristics and to increase the statistical power of analysis results. Unadjusted average outage costs and Tobit models that estimate customer damage functions are presented. The customer damage functions express customer outage costs for a given outage scenario and customer class as a function of location, time of day, consumption, and business type. One can use the damage functions to calculate outage costs for specific customer types. For example, using the customer damage functions, the cost experienced by an ''average'' customer resulting from a 1 hour summer afternoon outage is estimated to be approximately $3 for a residential customer, $1,200 for small-medium commercial and industrial customer, and $82,000 for large commercial and industrial customer. Future work to improve the quality and coverage of information on the value of electricity reliability to customers is described.

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

states/rps.cfm Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) (2007). “PG&E Energy Efficiency Shareholder Incentive

Hopper, Nichole

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Examination of utility Phase 1 compliance choices and state reactions to Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990  

SciTech Connect

Title IV (acid rain) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 is imposing new limitations on the emission of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (N{sub x}) from electric power plants. The act requires utilities to develop compliance plans to reduce these emissions, and indications are that these plans will dramatically alter traditional operating procedures. A key provision of the SO{sub 2} control program deaned in Title IV is the creation of a system of emission allowances, with utilities having the option of complying by adjusting system emissions and allowance holdings. A compilation of SO{sub 2} compliance activities by the 110 utility plants affected by Phase I is summarized in this report. These compliance plans are presented in a tabular form, correlated with age, capacity, and power pool data. A large number of the Phase I units (46%) have chosen to blend or switch to lower sulfur coals. This choice primarily is in response to (1) prices of low-sulfur coal and (2) the need to maintain SO{sub 2} control flexibility because of uncertain future environmental regulations (e.g., air toxics, carbon dioxide) and compliance prices. The report also discusses the responses of state legislatures and public utility commissions to the compliance requirements in Title IV. Most states have taken negligible action regarding the regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance activities. To protect mine employment, states producing high-sulfur coal have enacted regulations encouraging continued use of that coal, but for the most part, this response has had little effect on utility compliance choices.

Bailey, K.A.; Elliott, T.J.; Carlson, L.J.; South, D.W.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

A comparative analysis of business structures suitable forfarmer-owned wind power projects in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For years, farmers in the United States have looked with envy on their European counterparts' ability to profitably farm the wind through ownership of distributed, utility-scale wind projects. Only within the past few years, however, has farmer- or community-owned wind power development become a reality in the United States. The primary hurdle to this type of development in the United States has been devising and implementing suitable business and legal structures that enable such projects to take advantage of tax-based federal incentives for wind power. This article discusses the limitations of such incentives in supporting farmer- or community-owned wind projects, describes four ownership structures that potentially overcome such limitations, and finally conducts comparative financial analysis on those four structures, using as an example a hypothetical 1.5 MW farmer-owned project located in the state of Oregon. We find that material differences in the competitiveness of each structure do exist, but that choosing the best structure for a given project will largely depend on the conditions at hand; e.g., the ability of the farmer(s) to utilize tax credits, preference for individual versus ''cooperative'' ownership, and the state and utility service territory in which the project will be located.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

186

Benefit Analysis of Energy Storage: Case Study with Sacramento Municipal Utility District  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy storage systems may support several electric utility use cases, including grid support, outage mitigation, capital deferral, and improved services to end users. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) research in 2009 developed analytics and methods to quantify the locational value of electric energy storage options. The objectives of this project are to apply previously developed and generic energy storage dispatch models and evaluation methods to several cases and locations in the Sacramento Mu...

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI)/Home Area Network (HAN) Economic Benefits Analysis for Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops a framework for quantifying the benefits attributable to Home Area Network (HAN) technologies in the context of demand response. A HAN is a device designed to monitor energy use, distill user-consumption information (such as recent real-time energy usage), and perform appliance management functions within a home. The HAN central unit typically acts as a gateway between the in-home network (which controls appliances) and external entities such as the electric utility. Each piece of ho...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

188

DYNASTORE operating cost analysis of energy storage for a midwest utility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine the savings in utility operating costs that could be obtained by installing a Battery Energy Storage System (BESS). The target utility was Kansas City Power and Light (KCPL), a typical Midwestern utility with a mix of generating plants and many interconnections. The following applications of battery energy storage were modeled using an Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed and supported program called DYNASTORE: (1) Spinning Reserve Only (2) Load Leveling with Spinning Reserve (3) Load Leveling Only (4) Frequency Control DYNASTORE commits energy storage units along with generating units and calculates operating costs with and without energy storage, so that savings can be estimated. Typical weeks of hourly load data are used to make up a yearly load profile. For this study, the BESS power ranged from ``small`` to 300 MW (greater than the spinning reserve requirement). BESS storage time ranged from 1 to 8 hours duration (to cover the time-width of most peaks). Savings in operating costs were calculated for each of many sizes of MW capacity and duration. Graphs were plotted to enable the reader to readily see what size of BESS affords the greatest savings in operating costs.

Anderson, M.D. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Jungst, R.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

RDI's Wisdom Way Solar Village Final Report: Includes Utility Bill Analysis of Occupied Homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

7. 2-4 bedrooms, 1,100-1,700 ft2. The design heating loads in the homes were so small that each home is heated with a single, sealed-combustion, natural gas room heater. The cost savings from the simple HVAC systems made possible the tremendous investments in the homes' envelopes. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored temperatures and comfort in several homes during the winter of 2009-2010. In the Spring of 2011, CARB obtained utility bill information from 13 occupied homes. Because of efficient lights, appliances, and conscientious home occupants, the energy generated by the solar electric systems exceeded the electric energy used in most homes. Most homes, in fact, had a net credit from the electric utility over the course of a year. On the natural gas side, total gas costs averaged $377 per year (for heating, water heating, cooking, and clothes drying). Total energy costs were even less - $337 per year, including all utility fees. The highest annual energy bill for any home evaluated was $458; the lowest was $171.

Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Multi-State Load Models for Distribution System Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work in the field of distribution system analysis has shown that the traditional method of peak load analysis is not adequate for the analysis of emerging distribution system technologies. Voltage optimization, demand response, electric vehicle charging, and energy storage are examples of technologies with characteristics having daily, seasonal, and/or annual variations. In addition to the seasonal variations, emerging technologies such as demand response and plug in electric vehicle charging have the potential to send control signals to the end use loads which will affect how they consume energy. In order to support time-series analysis over different time frames and to incorporate potential control signal inputs it is necessary to develop detailed end use load models which accurately represent the load under various conditions, and not just during the peak load period. This paper will build on previous work on detail end use load modeling in order to outline the method of general multi-state load models for distribution system analysis.

Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.; Chassin, David P.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to pursue all cost-effective energy efficiency EEPS or RPSto pursue cost-effective energy efficiency The states ofall achievable cost-effective energy efficiency before

Hopper, Nichole

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

EXERGY BASED METHOD FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY UTILIZATION ANALYSIS OF A NET SHAPE MANUFACTURING SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The approach advocated in this work implements energy/exergy analysis and indirectly an irreversibility evaluation to a continuous manufacturing process involving discrete net shape production of… (more)

SANKARA, JAYASANKAR

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

RDI's Wisdom Way Solar Village Final Report: Includes Utility Bill Analysis of Occupied Homes  

SciTech Connect

In 2010, Rural Development, Inc. (RDI) completed construction of Wisdom Way Solar Village (WWSV), a community of ten duplexes (20 homes) in Greenfield, MA. RDI was committed to very low energy use from the beginning of the design process throughout construction. Key features include: 1. Careful site plan so that all homes have solar access (for active and passive); 2. Cellulose insulation providing R-40 walls, R-50 ceiling, and R-40 floors; 3. Triple-pane windows; 4. Airtight construction (~0.1 CFM50/ft2 enclosure area); 5. Solar water heating systems with tankless, gas, auxiliary heaters; 6. PV systems (2.8 or 3.4kWSTC); 7. 2-4 bedrooms, 1,100-1,700 ft2. The design heating loads in the homes were so small that each home is heated with a single, sealed-combustion, natural gas room heater. The cost savings from the simple HVAC systems made possible the tremendous investments in the homes' envelopes. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored temperatures and comfort in several homes during the winter of 2009-2010. In the Spring of 2011, CARB obtained utility bill information from 13 occupied homes. Because of efficient lights, appliances, and conscientious home occupants, the energy generated by the solar electric systems exceeded the electric energy used in most homes. Most homes, in fact, had a net credit from the electric utility over the course of a year. On the natural gas side, total gas costs averaged $377 per year (for heating, water heating, cooking, and clothes drying). Total energy costs were even less - $337 per year, including all utility fees. The highest annual energy bill for any home evaluated was $458; the lowest was $171.

Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Overview of PV balance-of-systems technology: Experience and guidelines for utility ties in the United States of America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. National Photovoltaic Program began in 1975 by supporting the development of terrestrial PV modules and hardware associated with grid-connected PV systems. Early PV-system demonstration programs were also supported and cost shared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). A wide variety of PV systems were deployed, usually with utility participation. The early demonstration projects provided, and continue to provide, valuable PV system experience to utilities, designers and suppliers. As a result of experience gained, several important milestones in codes and standards pertaining to the design, installation and operation of photovoltaic (PV) systems have been completed. These code and standard activities were conducted through collaboration of participants from all sectors of the PV industry, utilities and the US DOE National Photovoltaic Program. Codes and standards that have been proposed, written, or modified include changes and additions for the 1999 National Electric Code{reg_sign} (NEC{reg_sign}), standards for fire and personnel safety, system testing, field acceptance, component qualification, and utility interconnection. Project authorization requests with the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) have resulted in standards for component qualification and were further adapted for standards used to list PV modules and balance-of-system components. Industry collaboration with Underwriter Laboratories, Inc., with the American Society for Testing and Materials, and through critical input and review for international standards with the International Electrotechnical Commission have resulted in new and revised domestic and international standards for PV applications. Activities related to work on codes and standards through the International Energy Agency are also being supported by the PV industry and the US DOE. The paper shows relationships between activities in standards writing.

Bower, W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whitaker, C. [Endecon Engineering, San Ramon, CA (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Program on Technology Innovation: Utility-Connected Algae Systems--Analysis and Decision Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility power plants have supplies of CO2, impaired water, and low-grade heat that are useful inputs for growth of microalgae (algae), which itself can be biomass feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals. Because modern algae cultivation requires a source of CO2, growing algal biomass is thus a potential scenario for lowering net power plant CO2 emissions. At present, microalgal growth is still an unproven technology on a large scale for any purpose other than creating specialty neutr...

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Final Summary Report: Em-Powering Coastal States and Utilities through Model Offshore Wind Legislation and Outreach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final summary report summarizes the most significant findings from three project reports detailing: feed-in tariffs, model request for proposals for new generation, and model state offshore wind power legislation.

Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Experimental analysis of an energy self sufficient ocean buoy utilizing a bi-directional turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental analysis of a Venturi shrouded hydro turbine for wave energy conversion. The turbine is designed to meet the specific power requirements of a, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute offshore monitoring buoy ...

Gruber, Timothy J. (Timothy James)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Summary of Utility Studies: Smart Grid Investment Grant Consumer Behavior Study Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AUTHORS: AUTHORS: Peter Cappers, Annika Todd, Charles Goldman Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory June 2013 LBNL-6248E Summary of Utility Studies iii Acknowledgments The work described in this report was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE OE) under Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The authors would like to thank Joe Paladino (DOE OE) for his support. The authors would also like to thank the members of the LBNL Technical Advisory Group who contributed their wisdom and guidance: Peter Cappers, Annika Todd, Charles Goldman and Andy Satchwell (LBNL); Catherine Wolfram, Meredith Fowlie, and Lucas Davis (University of

199

Survey and analysis of selected jointly owned large-scale electric utility storage projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to examine and document the issues surrounding the curtailment in commercialization of large-scale electric storage projects. It was sensed that if these issues could be uncovered, then efforts might be directed toward clearing away these barriers and allowing these technologies to penetrate the market to their maximum potential. Joint-ownership of these projects was seen as a possible solution to overcoming the major barriers, particularly economic barriers, of commercializaton. Therefore, discussions with partners involved in four pumped storage projects took place to identify the difficulties and advantages of joint-ownership agreements. The four plants surveyed included Yards Creek (Public Service Electric and Gas and Jersey Central Power and Light); Seneca (Pennsylvania Electric and Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company); Ludington (Consumers Power and Detroit Edison, and Bath County (Virginia Electric Power Company and Allegheny Power System, Inc.). Also investigated were several pumped storage projects which were never completed. These included Blue Ridge (American Electric Power); Cornwall (Consolidated Edison); Davis (Allegheny Power System, Inc.) and Kttatiny Mountain (General Public Utilities). Institutional, regulatory, technical, environmental, economic, and special issues at each project were investgated, and the conclusions relative to each issue are presented. The major barriers preventing the growth of energy storage are the high cost of these systems in times of extremely high cost of capital, diminishing load growth and regulatory influences which will not allow the building of large-scale storage systems due to environmental objections or other reasons. However, the future for energy storage looks viable despite difficult economic times for the utility industry. Joint-ownership can ease some of the economic hardships for utilites which demonstrate a need for energy storage.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Energy and Utility Project Review | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Utility Project Review and Utility Project Review Energy and Utility Project Review < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Natural Resources The DNR's Office of Energy and Environmental Analysis is responsible for coordinating the review of all proposed energy and utility projects in the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Steady state modelling and analysis of flexible AC transmission systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As electric utilities move into more competitive generation supply regimes, with limited scope to expand transmission facilities, the optimisation of existing transmission corridors for power… (more)

Fuerte Esquivel, Claudio Rubén

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Nevada - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... commercial buildings ... a natural gas-fueled plant that utilizes North America’s largest air cooled condenser system and a water clarifier system that recycles ...

203

Data Envelopment Analysis Approach to Compare the Environmental Efficiency of Energy Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to increasing financial and environmental concerns, governmental rules, regulations and incentives, alternative energy sources are expected to grow at a faster pace than conventional sources of energy. However, the current body of research providing ... Keywords: Data Envelopment Analysis, Energy, Environment, Renewable Energy, Technical Efficiency

Elif A. Kongar; Kurt Rosentrater

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Home Performance with ENERGY STAR: Utility Bill Analysis on Homes Participating in Austin Energy's Program  

SciTech Connect

Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) is a jointly managed program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This program focuses on improving energy efficiency in existing homes via a whole-house approach to assessing and improving a home's energy performance, and helping to protect the environment. As one of HPwES's local sponsors, Austin Energy's HPwES program offers a complete home energy analysis and a list of recommendations for efficiency improvements, along with cost estimates. To determine the benefits of this program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collaborated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a statistical analysis using energy consumption data of HPwES homes provided by Austin Energy. This report provides preliminary estimates of average savings per home from the HPwES Loan Program for the period 1998 through 2006. The results from this preliminary analysis suggest that the HPwES program sponsored by Austin Energy had a very significant impact on reducing average cooling electricity for participating households. Overall, average savings were in the range of 25%-35%, and appear to be robust under various criteria for the number of households included in the analysis.

Belzer, D.; Mosey, G.; Plympton, P.; Dagher, L.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

The utility of accurate mass and LC elution time information in the analysis of complex proteomes  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical tryptic digests of all predicted proteins from the genomes of three organisms of varying complexity were evaluated for specificity and possible utility of combined peptide accurate mass and predicted LC normalized elution time (NET) information. The uniqueness of each peptide was evaluated using its combined mass (+/- 5 ppm and 1 ppm) and NET value (no constraint, +/- 0.05 and 0.01 on a 0-1 NET scale). The set of peptides both underestimates actual biological complexity due to the lack of specific modifications, and overestimates the expected complexity since many proteins will not be present in the sample or observable on the mass spectrometer because of dynamic range limitations. Once a peptide is identified from an LCMS/MS experiment, its mass and elution time is representative of a unique fingerprint for that peptide. The uniqueness of that fingerprint in comparison to that for the other peptides present is indicative of the ability to confidently identify that peptide based on accurate mass and NET measurements. These measurements can be made using HPLC coupled with high resolution MS in a high-throughput manner. Results show that for organisms with comparatively small proteomes, such as Deinococcus radiodurans, modest mass and elution time accuracies are generally adequate for peptide identifications. For more complex proteomes, increasingly accurate measurements are required. However, the majority of proteins should be uniquely identifiable by using LC-MS with mass accuracies within +/- 1 ppm and elution time measurements within +/- 0.01 NET.

Norbeck, Angela D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Smith, Richard D.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Multi-Reactor Transmutation Analysis Utility (MRTAU,alpha1): Verification  

SciTech Connect

Multi-Reactor Transmutation Utility (MRTAU) is a general depletion/decay algorithm under development at INL to support quick assessment of off-normal fuel cycle scenarios of similar nature to well studied reactor and fuel cycle concepts for which isotopic and cross-section data exists. MRTAU has been used in the past for scoping calculations to determine actinide composition evolution over the course of multiple recycles in Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide and Sodium cooled Fast Reactor. In these applications, various actinide partitioning scenarios of interest were considered. The code has recently been expanded to include fission product generation, depletion and isotopic evolution over multiple recycles. The capability was added to investigate potential partial separations and/or limited recycling technologies such as Melt-Refining, AIROX, DUPIC or other fuel recycle technology where the recycled fuel stream is not completely decontaminated of fission products prior to being re-irradiated in a subsequent reactor pass. This report documents the code's solution methodology and algorithm as well as its solution accuracy compared to the SCALE6.0 software suite.

Andrea Alfonsi; Samuel E. Bays; Cristian Rabiti; Steven J. Piet

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Analysis of the value of battery storage with wind and photovoltaic generation to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of an analysis to determine the economic and operational value of battery storage to wind and photovoltaic (PV) generation technologies to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) system. The analysis approach consisted of performing a benefit-cost economic assessment using established SMUD financial parameters, system expansion plans, and current system operating procedures. This report presents the results of the analysis. Section 2 describes expected wind and PV plant performance. Section 3 describes expected benefits to SMUD associated with employing battery storage. Section 4 presents preliminary benefit-cost results for battery storage added at the Solano wind plant and the Hedge PV plant. Section 5 presents conclusions and recommendations resulting from this analysis. The results of this analysis should be reviewed subject to the following caveat. The assumptions and data used in developing these results were based on reports available from and interaction with appropriate SMUD operating, planning, and design personnel in 1994 and early 1995 and are compatible with financial assumptions and system expansion plans as of that time. Assumptions and SMUD expansion plans have changed since then. In particular, SMUD did not install the additional 45 MW of wind that was planned for 1996. Current SMUD expansion plans and assumptions should be obtained from appropriate SMUD personnel.

Zaininger, H.W. [Zaininger Engineering Co., Inc., Roseville, CA (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

usage. Table A-1 lists the utility company, survey year, andRequested From Utility Participants v List of Figures and

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Deflagration analysis of the ITP facility utilizing the MELCOR/SR code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under certain accident conditions, waste tanks in the In-Tank Processing (ITP) facility may contain significant concentrations of benzene and hydrogen. Because these gases are flammable, a safety analysis was required to demonstrate that the risk posed by the possible combustion of these gases is acceptable. In support of this analysis, the MELCOR/SR computer code was modified to simulate the combustion of benzene-hydrogen mixtures. MELCOR/SR was developed originally to analyze severe accidents that may occur in the SRS production reactors but many of its modules can be used also for non-reactor applications such as combustion and aerosol and radionuclide transport. The MELCOR/SR combustion model (package) was originally configured for the deflagration analysis of hydrogen-carbon monoxide mixtures. With minor changes to the coding in the combustion package subroutines, and the addition of benzene thermodynamic and transport properties to the input decks, MELCOR/SR was modified to analyze deflagrations in benzene-hydrogen gas mixtures. A MELCOR/SR model was created consisting of two control volumes connected by flow paths. One volume represents a type III waste tank; the other, the environment. The flow paths represent vents that open during the deflagration. Choked flow and radiative heat transfer from the hot gas to the cooling coils and tank walls are phenomonalogical aspects accounted for in the model. Results from MELCOR/SR compared favorably with results from two other codes: COMPACT, a code similar to MELCOR/SR used in the preliminary ITP analysis and DPAC, a code developed specifically to analyze deflagrations in SRS waste tanks. Peak pressures predicted by MELCOR/SR (and by DPAC) for realistic waste tank conditions do not exceed the pressure required to fail the primary line of the tank. ({approximately}23 psig)

Allison, D.K.; Chow, S.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Interactive statistical-distribution-analysis program utilizing numerical and graphical methods  

SciTech Connect

The TERPED/P program is designed to facilitate the quantitative analysis of experimental data, determine the distribution function that best describes the data, and provide graphical representations of the data. This code differs from its predecessors, TEDPED and TERPED, in that a printer-plotter has been added for graphical output flexibility. The addition of the printer-plotter provides TERPED/P with a method of generating graphs that is not dependent on DISSPLA, Integrated Software Systems Corporation's confidential proprietary graphics package. This makes it possible to use TERPED/P on systems not equipped with DISSPLA. In addition, the printer plot is usually produced more rapidly than a high-resolution plot can be generated. Graphical and numerical tests are performed on the data in accordance with the user's assumption of normality or lognormality. Statistical analysis options include computation of the chi-squared statistic and its significance level and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov one-sample test confidence level for data sets of more than 80 points. Plots can be produced on a Calcomp paper plotter, a FR80 film plotter, or a graphics terminal using the high-resolution, DISSPLA-dependent plotter or on a character-type output device by the printer-plotter. The plots are of cumulative probability (abscissa) versus user-defined units (ordinate). The program was developed on a Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) PDP-10 and consists of 1500 statements. The language used is FORTRAN-10, DEC's extended version of FORTRAN-IV.

Glandon, S. R.; Fields, D. E.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Home Performance with ENERGY STAR: Utility Bill Analysis on Homes Participating in Austin Energy's Program  

SciTech Connect

Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) is a jointly managed program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This program focuses on improving energy efficiency in existing homes via a whole-house approach to assessing and improving a home's energy performance, and helping to protect the environment. As a local sponsor for HPwES, Austin Energy's HPwES program offers a complete home energy assessment and a list of recommendations for efficiency improvements, along with cost estimates. The owner can choose to implement only one or the complete set of energy conservation measures. Austin Energy facilitates the process by providing economic incentives to the homeowner through its HPwES Loan program and its HPwES Rebate program. In 2005, the total number of participants in both programs was approximately 1,400. Both programs are only available for improvements made by a participating HPwES contractor. The individual household billing data - encompassing more than 7,000 households - provided by Austin Energy provides a rich data set to estimate the impacts of its HPwES program. The length of the billing histories is sufficient to develop PRISM-type models of electricity use based on several years of monthly bills before and after the installation of the conservation measures. Individual household savings were estimated from a restricted version of a PRISM-type regression model where the reference temperature to define cooling (or heating degree days) was estimated along with other parameters. Because the statistical quality of the regression models varies across individual households, three separate samples were used to measure the aggregate results. The samples were distinguished on the basis of the statistical significance of the estimated (normalized) cooling consumption. A normalized measure of cooling consumption was based on average temperatures observed over the most recent nine-year period ending in 2006. This study provided a statistically rigorous approach to incorporating the variability of expected savings across the households in the sample together with the uncertainty inherent in the regression models used to estimate those savings. While the impact of the regression errors was found to be relatively small in these particular samples, this approach may be useful in future studies using individual household billing data. The median percentage savings for the largest sample of 6,000 households in the analysis was 32%, while the mean savings was 28%. Because the number of households in the sample is very large, the standard error associated with the mean percentage savings are very small, less than 1%. A conservative statement of the average savings is that is falls in the range of 25% to 30% with a high level of certainty. This preliminary analysis provides robust estimates of average program savings, but offers no insight into how savings may vary by type of conservation measure or whether savings vary by the amount of cooling electricity used prior to undertaking the measure. Follow-up researchers may want to analyze the impacts of specific ECMs. Households that use electricity for heating might also be separately analyzed. In potential future work several methodological improvements could also be explored. As mentioned in Section 2, there was no formal attempt to clean the data set of outliers and other abnormal patterns of billing data prior to the statistical analysis. The restriction of a constant reference temperature might also be relaxed. This approach may provide evidence as to whether any 'take-back' efforts are present, whereby thermostat settings are lowered during the summer months after the measures are undertaken (reflected in lower reference temperatures in the post-ECM period). A more extended analysis may also justify the investment in and use of the PRISM software package, which may provide more diagnostic measures with respect to the reference temperature. PRISM also appears to contain some built-in capability to detect outliers and other an

Belzer, D.; Mosey, G.; Dagher, L.; Plympton, P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A critical analysis of grounding practices for railroad tracks in electric utility stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A railroad spur is often routed into a large substation or generating plant to facilitate installation of large power transformers or other large pieces of equipment and to transport fuel to the plant. Because the metal rails may transfer hazardous potentials into or out of the switchyard area during ground faults, precautions must be taken to limit the hazardous voltages. This analysis looks for common trends of voltages along railroad tracks in a controlled model of a substation grounding system during a ground fault. Current practices to limit these transferred potentials are based on crude approximations and engineering judgment. Recently developed computer programs allow a much better model of the grounding system, track and the hazardous scenarios to which a person might be subject. Several cases were used to illustrate some of the most common techniques used to limit hazardous voltages, and some of these techniques were found to be quite ineffective. Except for the cases where the tracks near the substation were removed, the potential transferred along the tracks produced several scenarios with touch and/or step voltages exceeding the tolerable limits.

Garrett, D.L.; Wallace, K.A. (Southern Co. Services, Birmingham, AL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

An Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility for Underwater Sound Monitoring and Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Fishes and other marine mammals suffer a range of potential effects from intense sound sources generated by anthropogenic underwater processes such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording devices (USR) were built to monitor the acoustic sound pressure waves generated by those anthropogenic underwater activities, so the relevant processing software becomes indispensable for analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. However, existing software packages did not meet performance and flexibility requirements. In this paper, we provide a detailed description of a new software package, named Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface (AAMI), which is a Graphical User Interface (GUI) designed for underwater sound monitoring and analysis. In addition to the general functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs, the software can compute a series of acoustic metrics in physical units, monitor the sound's influence on fish hearing according to audiograms from different species of fishes and marine mammals, and batch process the sound files. The detailed applications of the software AAMI will be discussed along with several test case scenarios to illustrate its functionality.

Ren, Huiying; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Economic evaluation and market analysis for natural gas utilization. Topical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past decade, the U.S. has experienced a surplus gas supply. Future prospects are brightening because of increased estimates of the potential size of undiscovered gas reserves. At the same time, U.S. oil reserves and production have steadily declined, while oil imports have steadily increased. Reducing volume growth of crude oil imports was a key objective of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source to liquid products derived from crude oil to help meet market demand. The purpose of this study was to (1) analyze three energy markets to determine whether greater use could be made of natural gas or its derivatives and (2) determine whether those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The following three markets were targeted for possible increases in gas use: transportation fuels, power generation, and chemical feedstock. Gas-derived products that could potentially compete in these three markets were identified, and the economics of the processes for producing those products were evaluated. The processes considered covered the range from commercial to those in early stages of process development. The analysis also evaluated the use of both high-quality natural gas and lower-quality gases containing CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} levels above normal pipeline quality standards.

Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.; Rezaiyan, A.J.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: perspectives for organizational assessment. Volume 2. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect

This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. Volume 1 of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety. The six chapters of this volume discuss the major elements in our general approach to safety in the nuclear industry. The chapters include information on organizational design and safety; organizational governance; utility environment and safety related outcomes; assessments by selected federal agencies; review of data sources in the nuclear power industry; and existing safety indicators.

Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Nadel, M.V.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.; Kerwin, N.; Kennedy, J.K. Jr.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Arkansas - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Arkansas has adopted several policies to encourage renewable energy and energy efficiency including green building standards for State facilities.

217

Predicting Switchgrass Farmgate and Delivered Costs: An 11-State Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A GIS-based modeling system was developed for analyzing the geographic variation in potential switchgrass feedstock supplies and prices. The modeling system is designed for analyzing individual US states; parameters for six southern states (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Missouri, South Carolina, Tennessee) and five midwestern states (Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota). Potential switchgrass supplies are estimated for each state under two switchgrass technology adoption scenarios.

Graham, R.L.; English, B.C.; Noon, C.E.; Jager, H.I.; Daly, M.J.

1997-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

Washington - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Typically accounting for close to three-fourths of State electricity generation, hydroelectric power dominates the electricity market in Washington.

219

Assessment of human physchophysiological states based on methods for heart rate variability analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate certain parameters that characterize heart rate variability, as well as combinations of these parameters in terms of assessing their information value for regulating the current psychophysiological state of an operator during a mental ... Keywords: assessment of a person's psychophysiological state, automated ECG analysis, digital signal analysis, heart rate variability analysis

A. N. Kalinichenko; O. D. Yur'Eva

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Utility Solar Business Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many utilities are initiating business plans that enable them to play a more integral role in the solar power value chain. This report summarizes research completed to identify and track utility solar business models (USBMs) in the United States. EPRI and the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) are conducting an ongoing joint research effort to evaluate the expanding range of utility activities in acquiring solar energy, including photovoltaic (PV) asset ownership. Throughout 2011, USBMs have been ca...

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Direct utilization of geothermal resources at Warm Springs State Hospital, Warm Springs, Montana. Final report, January 31, 1979-June 30, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several decades ago the water from a natural hot spring was piped to the Warm Springs State Hospital barn and greenhouse and eventually into the domestic water supply for showers. The Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) funded a feasibility study on potential development of the geothermal resource from monies originating from coal severence taxes. The results of the feasibility study were subsequently utilized in obtaining a $721,122 award from the Department of Energy Program Opportunity Notice (PON) program to identify and develop the geothermal resource at Warm Springs. The study included environmental and legal considerations, geophysical surveys, and the subsequent development of the resource. The well produces 60 to 64 gpm of 154/sup 0/F geothermal water which is utilized in a heat exchanger to heat domestic water. The system became fully operational on January 13, 1983 and the calculated yearly energy savings represent approximately 17.6 million cubic feet of natural gas which is equivalent to $77,000, based on current prices.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Gas Utilities (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

223

Graph-Theoretic Analysis of Discrete-Phase-Space States for ...  

Graph-Theoretic Analysis of Discrete-Phase-Space States for ... Data collected from devices and human condition may be used to forewarn of critical events such as

224

A steady state analysis code for prediction of behavior in loop heat pipes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this work is to prepare an analysis raphics. code for the prediction of Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) behavior in steady-state operation. The… (more)

Hamm, Trenton Allen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Nevada - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Hydroelectric and geothermal power plants supply most of the remainder and Nevada is one of the few States that generate electricity from geothermal resources.

226

Nebraska - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The north-central and southwestern parts of the State have wind power ... and the transportation and residential sectors are ... Missouri, and South Dakota. The ...

227

Missouri - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol ... Missouri has substantial nuclear ... The residential sector accounts for nearly two-fifths of the State's ...

228

Florida - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... the state's per capita residential ... It combined a 75-megawatt concentrating solar power ... Florida has a number of small combined-heat-and-pow ...

229

Michigan - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... and the State ranks in the top ten in the use of LPG as an alternative vehicle fuel. ... two renewable energy technology manufacturers bought an abandoned ...

230

Fatal Crash Trends and Analysis in Southeastern States .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Southeastern states have about 26 percent of the nations total fatalities, and are about 24 percent above the national mean over recent years. Descriptive statistics,… (more)

Wang, Chunyan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

South Carolina - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights ... Puerto Rico US Virgin Islands: Overview; Data; State Profiles; Economy; Prices;

232

Mississippi - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The state's primary renewable resource is biomass, and the main source of biomass is Mississippi's wood products industry. Wood is used to make paper, ...

233

Arizona - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Arizona's first commercial solar photovoltaic (PV) array opened in 1997, and the state became home to the world's largest solar PV facility in 2012.

234

Minnesota - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Resources and Consumption. Minnesota has no fossil fuel resources, but the western part of the State has wind energy potential, and cornfields in the south and west ...

235

Alabama - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The State also contains one of the world’s largest solid biofuel plants, designed to produce 520,000 metric tons of wood pellets each year, ...

236

Analysis of Scope and Enforcement of State Laws and Executive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

states except Delaware, Vermont, and Washington explicitlyOregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin.Oregon (one or more), and Vermont (one or more). New Mexico,

Sears, Brad; Mallory, Christy; Hunter, Nan D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Wisconsin - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... and the State's high corn production allows Wisconsin to produce ... Wisconsin produces a substantial amount of ethanol at several ethanol plants in the southern ...

238

Indiana - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook ... Search EIA.gov. A-Z Index; ... which enter the state via three major crude oil pipelines and seven major petroleum ...

239

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Energy Sources Solar Water Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Office of Administration Several provisions of Missouri law govern energy efficiency in state facilities. In 1993 Missouri enacted legislation requiring life-cycle cost analysis for all new construction of state buildings and substantial

240

Virginia - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum prices, supply and demand information from the Energy Information Administration ... Financial market analysis and financial data for major ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Texas - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum prices, supply and demand information from the Energy Information Administration ... Financial market analysis and financial data for major ...

242

Massachusetts - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum prices, supply and demand information from the Energy Information Administration ... Financial market analysis and financial data for major ...

243

NSLS Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilities Utilities The Utilities Group, led by project engineer Ron Beauman, is responsible for providing Utilities Engineering and Technical services to NSLS, Users, and SDL including cooling water at controlled flow rates, pressures, and temperatures, compressed air and other gases. In addition, they provide HVAC engineering, technical, and electrical services as needed. Utilities systems include cooling and process water, gas, and compressed air systems. These systems are essential to NSLS operations. Working behind the scenes, the Utilities group continuously performs preventative maintenance to ensure that the NSLS has minimal downtime. This is quite a feat, considering that the Utilities group has to maintain seven very large and independent systems that extent throughout NSLS. Part of the group's

244

Steady State Analysis of Mobile Station State Transition for General Packet Radio Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) is a system for efficient data packet radio transmission services which is used in conjunction with the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) system. The three mobile station (MS) states idle, ready, and standby are defined for efficient management of radio resources and signaling networks. The MS state transition behavior is modeled and the steady state probability of the MS states is derived using a semi-Markov process approach. The effect of various input parameters on the steady state probability is investigated. These results can be used in analyzing the effect of the input parameters on the tradeoff between location update and paging signaling, and thus, providing guidelines for proper selection of GPRS system parameters.

Yun Won Chung; Dan Keun Sung; A. Hamid Aghvami

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic, risk reduction, and environmental effects. This article synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 31 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost-impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 20 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the projected costs of state RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, evaluate the reasonableness of key input assumptions, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analyses. We conclude that while there is considerable uncertainty in the study results, the majority of the studies project modest cost impacts. Seventy percent of the state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of no greater than one percent. Nonetheless, there is considerable room for improving the analytic methods, and therefore accuracy, of these estimates.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

Production and analysis of a Southern Ocean state estimate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A modern general circulation model of the Southern Ocean with one-sixth of a degree resolution is optimized to the observed ocean in a weighted least squares sense. Convergence toward the state estimate solution is carried ...

Mazloff, Matthew R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED STATES: Agricultural Economics #12;AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ANALYSIS ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MITIGATION IN THE UNITED on Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation in the United States. (December 2000) Uwe Schneider, M.Ag., Humboldt

McCarl, Bruce A.

248

Intensity and mosaic spread analysis from PISEMA tensors in solid-state NMR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intensity and mosaic spread analysis from PISEMA tensors in solid-state NMR J.R. Quine a,b,*, S 2005 Available online 18 January 2006 Abstract The solid-state NMR experiment PISEMA, is a technique: PISEMA tensors; Solid-state NMR; Powder pattern intensity; Mosaic spread; Lineshapes 1. Introduction

Aluffi, Paolo

249

Design and analysis of modern three-phase AC/AC power converters for AC drives and utility interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Significant advances in modern ac/ac power converter technologies and demands of industries have reached beyond standard ac/ac power converters with voltage-source inverters fed from diode rectifiers. Power electronics converters have been matured to stages toward compact realization, increased high-power handling capability, and improving utility interface. Modern ac/ac power converter topologies with various control strategies have been introduced for the further improvements, such as matrix converters, current-fed converters, PWM rectifiers, and active power filters. In this dissertation, several new converter topologies are proposed in conjunction with developed control schemes based on the modern ac/ac converters which enhance performance and solve the drawbacks of conventional converters. In this study, a new fault-tolerant PWM strategy is first proposed for matrix converters. The added fault-tolerant scheme would strengthen the matrix converter technology for aerospace and military applications. A modulation strategy is developed to reshape output currents for continuous operation, against fault occurrence in matrix converter drives. This study designs a hybrid, high-performance ac/ac power converter for high power applications, based on a high-power load commutated inverter and a mediumpower voltage source inverter. Natural commutation of the load commutated inverter is actively controlled by the voltage source inverter. In addition, the developed hybrid system ensures sinusoidal output current/voltage waveforms and fast dynamic response in high power areas. A new topology and control scheme for a six-step current source inverter is proposed. The proposed topology utilizes a small voltage source inverter, to turn off main thyristor switches, transfer reactive load energy, and limit peak voltages across loads. The proposed topology maximizes benefits of the constituent converters: highpower handling capability of large thyristor-based current source inverters as well as fast and easy control of small voltage source inverters. This study analyzes, compares, and evaluates two topologies for unity power factor and multiple ac/ac power conversions. Theoretical analyses and comparisons of the two topologies, grounded on mathematical approaches, are presented from the standpoint of converter kVA ratings, dc-link voltage requirements, switch ratings, semiconductor losses, and reactive component sizes. Analysis, simulation, and experimental results are detailed for each proposed topology.

Kwak, Sangshin

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Integration of Distributed Resources in Electric Utility Distribution Systems: Distribution System Behavior Analysis for Urban and R ural Feeders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need for improved practices for integrating them with electric utility distribution systems. Analytical models of DR were developed for use in existing utility system simulation tools, and case studies on a rural and an urban distribution feeder were performed to assess the impacts of DR in various scenarios for those feeders.

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

251

Integration of Distributed Resources in the Electric Utility Distribution Systems: Distribution System Behavior Analysis for Suburba n Feeder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need to improve practices for integrating them with electric utility distribution systems. Analytical models of DR were developed for use in existing utility system simulation tools, and initial case studies on a suburban distribution feeder were performed to assess the impacts of DR in various scenarios for that feeder.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Policies for Utilities; Clean Energy Policies in States and Communities, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses the policy of decoupling in utilities and how it can be used to encourage energy efficiency.

Not Available

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Producers and Production Capacity by State, September 2013 Biodiesel Producers and Production Capacity by State, September 2013 State Number of Producers Annual Production Capacity (million gallons per year) Alabama 3 47 Alaska - - Arizona 1 2 Arkansas 3 85 California

254

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and the Pursuit of Renewable Energy Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

Future manufacturing of renewable energy equipment in the United States provides economic development opportunities for state and local communities. However, demand for the equipment is finite, and opportunities are limited. U.S. demand is estimated to drive total annual investments in renewable energy equipment to $14-$20 billion by 2030. Evidence from leading states in renewable energy manufacturing suggests that economic development strategies that target renewable energy sector needs by adapting existing policies attract renewable energy manufacturing more than strategies that create new policies. Literature suggests that the states that are most able to attract direct investment and promote sustained economic development can leverage diverse sets of durable assets--like human capital and modern infrastructure--as well as low barriers to market entry. State marketing strategies for acquiring renewable energy manufacturers are likely best served by an approach that: (1) is multi-faceted and long-term, (2) fits within existing broad-based economic development strategies, (3) includes specific components such as support for renewable energy markets and low barriers to renewable energy deployment, and (4) involves increased differentiation by leveraging existing assets when applicable.

Lantz, E.; Oteri, F.; Tegen, S.; Doris, E.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & ApplicationChapter 7 Recent Advances in Silver-Ion HPLC Utilizing Acetonitrile in Hexane as Solvent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application Chapter 7 Recent Advances in Silver-Ion HPLC Utilizing Acetonitrile in Hexane as Solvent Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books F98F563E606CED1FD3744F0D6362BAB2

256

state  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST. state. (definition). Definition: The condition of a finite state machine or Turing machine at a certain time. Informally, the content of memory. ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

257

Infodynamics: Analogical analysis of states of matter and information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper expands and consolidates the use of analogies in thermodynamics to explore concepts in the characterization of information systems. The analogy spans the range of information systems to include databases, knowledge bases and model bases. It ... Keywords: Database, Expressiveness, Infodynamics, Information integration, Knowledge base, Metrics, Model base, States of matter, Thermodynamics, Tractability

Marion G. Ceruti; Stuart H. Rubin

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A Semidefinite Optimization Approach to the Steady-State Analysis ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

show the potential of this approach in queueing analysis. Structure ...... were run by a PC with a Intel Pentium 4 - M 1.72GHz CPX, 256 MB of RAM and Microsoft.

259

Steady state thermal hydraulic analysis of hydride fueled BWRs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) Since the results obtained in the main body of the analysis account only for thermal-hydraulic constraints, an estimate of the power reduction due to the application of neutronic constraints is also performed. This ...

Ferroni, Paolo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in the United States. Preliminary background report  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United States and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. This report describes laws and regulatory programs in the United States. Subsequent reports will (1) describe public utility rate regulatory procedures and practices as they might affect an ICES, (2) analyze each of the aforementioned regulatory programs to identify impediments to the development of ICES, and (3) recommend potential changes in legislation and regulatory practices and procedures to overcome such impediments.

Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States Title Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Barbose, Galen L., Ryan H. Wiser, Amol Phadke, and Charles A. Goldman Pagination 28 Date Published 03/2009 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords carbon emissions, electric utilities, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, power system planning Abstract Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demandside resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers

262

Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in the study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Revised final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in this study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Subjectivity and sentiment analysis: An overview of the current state of the area and envisaged developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this introduction, we present an overview of the current state of research in the Natural Language Processing tasks of subjectivity and sentiment analysis, as well as their application domains and closely-related research field of emotion detection. ... Keywords: Emotion detection, Opinion mining, Sentiment analysis, Social media mining, Social network mining, Subjectivity analysis, Text mining

AndréS Montoyo; Patricio MartíNez-Barco; Alexandra Balahur

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

UTILITY_ID","UTILNAME","STATE_CODE","YEAR","MONTH","RES_REV (Thousand $)","RES_S  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OTH_REV (Thousand $)","OTH_SALES (MWh)","OTH_CONS","TOT_REV (Thousand $)","TOT_SALES (MWh)","TOT_CONS" OTH_REV (Thousand $)","OTH_SALES (MWh)","OTH_CONS","TOT_REV (Thousand $)","TOT_SALES (MWh)","TOT_CONS" 0,"State Level Adjustment","AK","2007R",1,5766,24179,0,7398,30009,0,1385.504,7829.663,0,,,0,14549.504,62017.663,0 213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK","2007R",1,1479,14609,13602,981,11953,2118,390.496,5260.337,99,0,0,0,2850.496,31822.337,15819 219,"Alaska Power Co","AK","2007R",1,605,2282,4456,803,3397,2000,0,0,0,0,0,0,1408,5679,6456 599,"Anchorage Municipal Light and Power","AK","2007R",1,1488,16596,23880,5545,87869,6182,0,0,0,0,0,0,7033,104465,30062 1651,"Bethel Utilities Corp","AK","2007R",1,489,1180,1563,1171,2979,1121,0,0,0,0,0,0,1660,4159,2684

266

State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State NIST. Weights and Measures. Laboratories. Program Handbook. NIST Handbook 143. March 2003. Preface. The National ...

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

State space modelling and data analysis exercises in LISA Pathfinder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LISA Pathfinder is a mission planned by the European Space Agency to test the key technologies that will allow the detection of gravitational waves in space. The instrument on-board, the LISA Technology package, will undergo an exhaustive campaign of calibrations and noise characterisation campaigns in order to fully describe the noise model. Data analysis plays an important role in the mission and for that reason the data analysis team has been developing a toolbox which contains all the functionalities required during operations. In this contribution we give an overview of recent activities, focusing on the improvements in the modelling of the instrument and in the data analysis campaigns performed both with real and simulated data.

M Nofrarias; F Antonucci; M Armano; H Audley; G Auger; M Benedetti; P Binetruy; J Bogenstahl; D Bortoluzzi; N Brandt; M Caleno; A Cavalleri; G Congedo; M Cruise; K Danzmann; F De Marchi; M Diaz-Aguilo; I Diepholz; G Dixon; R Dolesi; N Dunbar; J Fauste; L Ferraioli; V Ferroni W Fichter; E Fitzsimons; M Freschi; C García Marirrodriga; R Gerndt; L Gesa; F Gibert; D Giardini; C Grimani; A Grynagier; F Guzmán; I Harrison; G Heinzel; M Hewitson; D Hollington; D Hoyland; M Hueller; J Huesler; O Jennrich; P Jetzer; B Johlander; N Karnesis; N Korsakova; C Killow; X Llamas; I Lloro; A Lobo; R Maarschalkerweerd; S Madden; D Mance; I Mateos; P W McNamara; J Mendes; E Mitchell; D Nicolini; D Nicolodi; M Perreur-Lloyd; E Plagnol; P Prat; J Ramos-Castro; J Reiche; J A Romera Perez; D Robertson; H Rozemeijer; G Russano; A Schleicher; D Shaul; CF Sopuerta; T J Sumner; A Taylor; D Texier; C Trenkel; H-B Tu; S Vitale; G Wanner; H Ward; S Waschke; P Wass; D Wealthy; S Wen; W J Weber; T Ziegler; P Zweifel

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

268

NREL: Wind Research - Utility Grid Integration Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Grid Integration Assessment Utility Grid Integration Assessment Photo of large power transmission towers set against a sunset. The national need for transmission improvements will have a direct impact on the effective use of renewable energy sources such as wind. For wind energy to play a larger role in supplying the nation's energy needs, integrating wind energy into the power grid of the United States is an important challenge to address. NREL's transmission grid integration staff collaborates with utility industry partners and provides data, analysis, and techniques to increase utility understanding of integration issues and confidence in the reliability of new wind turbines. For more information, contact Brian Parsons at 303-384-6958. Printable Version Wind Research Home Capabilities

269

Innovative Utility Pricing for Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry represents only one source of power available to industry. Although the monopolistic structure of the electric utility industry may convey a perception that an electric utility is unaffected by competition, this is an erroneous perception with regard to industry. Electric utilities face increased competition, both from other utilities and from industrial self-generation. The paper discusses competition for industrial customers and innovative pricing trends that have evolved nationally to meet the growing competition for industrial sales. Cogeneration activities and the emerging concepts of wheeling power are also discussed. Specifics of industry evaluation and reaction to utility pricing are presented. Also enumerated are examples of the response various utilities throughout the United States have made to the needs of their industrial customers through innovative rate design. Industry/utility cooperation can result in benefits to industry, to the electric utility and to all other ratepayers. This discussion includes examples of successful cooperation between industry and utilities.

Ross, J. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards:A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

SciTech Connect

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. Collectively, these policies now apply to roughly 40% of U.S. electricity load, and may have substantial impacts on electricity markets, ratepayers, and local economies. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on projecting cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic and environmental effects. This report synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 28 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 18 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the costs and benefits of RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, assess the attributes of different modeling approaches, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analysis.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Utility Solar Business Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) are conducting an ongoing joint research effort, initiated in 2011, to define, track, and evaluate the expanding range of regulated utility solar energy acquisition activities. This report provides a high-level overview of the conceptual framework by which EPRI-SEPA are classifying regulated utility solar business models (USBMs) in the United States. It then provides five case studies detailing existing ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Final design of OSCAR steady state flowsheeting system. Technical report. [OTEC Steady-state and Control System Analysis Routines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineer using the OSCAR steady state simulation program will be able to link together in an arbitrary configuration the pieces of equipment needed to simulate an OTEC plant. Each one of these pieces of equipment (condenser, mixer, splitter, pump, etc.) is called a unit. Within a unit there are three types of substructures. A group of variables associated with a unit is called a variable pack. A unit can utilize more than one variable pack, and several units can utilize the same variable pack. The variables associated with a stream (flow rate, temperature, and pressure) form a variable pack. These variables are used by the unit producing the stream and by the unit receiving the stream. Another example of a variable pack would be the variables associated with a condenser. This type of variable pack would contain such variables as condenser area, log mean temperature difference, and heat duty. Other variable packs would contain physical properties of the pure components of a stream. A physical property variable pack of a particular component would be available to any unit where the component appeared.

Westerberg, A.W.; Chao, N.H.; Kuru, S.; Locke, M.H.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

National Utility Rate Database: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Climate Zones of the Conterminous United States Defined Using Cluster Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regionalization of the conterminous United States is accomplished using hierarchical cluster analysis on temperature and precipitation data. The “best” combination of clustering method and data preprocessing strategy yields a set of candidate ...

Robert G. Fovell; Mei-Ying C. Fovell

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Using Relative Humidity as a State Variable in Climate Feedback Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach to climate change feedback analysis is described in which tropospheric relative humidity replaces specific humidity as the state variable that, along with the temperature structure, surface albedos, and clouds, controls the magnitude ...

Isaac M. Held; Karen M. Shell

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Satellite-Based Summer Convective Cloud Frequency Analysis over the Southeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A convective cloud (CC) analysis is performed over the southeastern United States (SEUS) during June, July, and August 2006 and 2007, using data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) visible and infrared sensors as ...

Laci D. Gambill; John R. Mecikalski

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Strategic Sequencing for State Distributed PV Policies: A Quantitative Analysis of Policy Impacts and Interactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

State and local policymakers show increasing interest in spurring the development of customer-sited distributed generation (DG), in particular solar photovoltaic (PV) markets. Prompted by that interest, this analysis examines the use of state policy as a tool to support the development of a robust private investment market. This analysis builds on previous studies that focus on government subsidies to reduce installation costs of individual projects and provides an evaluation of the impacts of policies on stimulating private market development.

Doris, E.; Krasko, V.A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Residential, Commercial, and Utility-Scale Photovoltaic (PV) System Prices in the United States: Current Drivers and Cost-Reduction Opportunities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The price of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States (i.e., the cost to the system owner) has dropped precipitously in recent years, led by substantial reductions in global PV module prices. However, system cost reductions are not necessarily realized or realized in a timely manner by many customers. Many reasons exist for the apparent disconnects between installation costs, component prices, and system prices; most notable is the impact of fair market value considerations on system prices. To guide policy and research and development strategy decisions, it is necessary to develop a granular perspective on the factors that underlie PV system prices and to eliminate subjective pricing parameters. This report's analysis of the overnight capital costs (cash purchase) paid for PV systems attempts to establish an objective methodology that most closely approximates the book value of PV system assets.

Goodrich, A.; James, T.; Woodhouse, M.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Analysis of the impact of decentralized solar technology on electric utilities: comparison and synthesis of models. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The validation of the physical submodels of three solar-electric utility interface models is described. The validation problem is divided into two components, the accuracy of the submodels themselves and the accuracy of the data typically used to run these models. The data set required to study these problems with respect to utility requirements is discussed and its collection in the Philadelphia Metropolitan area described. The instrumentation employed in the gathering of the data is covered. Error statistics of data and submodel accuracy are presented and the current status of the study is presented.

Feldman, S.; Blair, P.

1980-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

280

Nuclear New Build in the United States 1990-2010: A Three State Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

 conducting their analysis. For example,  Jasper (1990) too  conducted a similar study to this research with over 100 stakeholder interviews  in examining nuclear energy policy. However, his  focus was on  three countries  (the US, France, and Sweden) from the point of the 1970s oil...  net savings for Texas consumers or businesses; can be  achieved without  financial cost  to  consumers or businesses; or help businesses  in  Texas maintain global  competitiveness”(p.1,  Senate Bill  184). However,  support  for nuclear energy capable of reducing GHGs through the aims of Senate Bill 184  has...

Heffron, Raphael J.

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Savings Analysis of Utility Bills for Unmonitored Sites, Volume I: Procedures, Results, and Discussion, Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas LoanSTAR program is an eight year, $98 million revolving loan program, funded by oil overcharge dollars, for energy conservation retrofits in Texas state, local government and school buildings. The program began in 1988. Public sector institutions participating in the program must repay the loans according to estimated energy savings from an energy audit. As part of this program, a statewide energy Monitoring and Analysis Program (MAP) has been established. The major objectives of the LoanSTAR MAP are to: (1) verify energy and dollar savings of the retrofits; (2) reduce energy costs by identifying operational and maintenance improvements; (3) improve retrofit selection in future rounds of the LoanSTAR program; (4) initiate a data base of energy use in institutional and commercial buildings in Texas.

Wei, G.; Eggebrecht, J.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Utility rate structures and distributed thermal energy storage: a cost/benefit analysis. Basic research report, October 1978-February 1979  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines three alternative methods by which electric utilities might take advantage of distributed thermal energy storage to smooth out their load profiles. These three methods are: time-specific rates, time-invariant rates with subsidized storage, and direct load controls. The optimal form of each of these policies is determined, and formulas indicating the relative desirability of each policy are developed.

Koening, E.F.; Cambel, A.B.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Engineering and economic analysis for the utilization of geothermal fluids in a cane sugar processing plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of geothermal resource utilization at the Puna Sugar Company cane sugar processing plant, located in Keaau, Hawaii. A proposed well site area was selected based on data from surface exploratory surveys. The liquid dominated well flow enters a binary thermal arrangement, which results in an acceptable quality steam for process use. Hydrogen sulfide in the well gases is incinerated, leaving sulfur dioxide in the waste gases. The sulfur dioxide in turn is recovered and used in the cane juice processing at the sugar factory. The clean geothermal steam from the binary system can be used directly for process requirements. It replaces steam generated by the firing of the waste fibrous product from cane sugar processing. The waste product, called bagasse, has a number of alternative uses, but an evaluation clearly indicated it should continue to be employed for steam generation. This steam, no longer required for process demands, can be directed to increased electric power generation. Revenues gained by the sale of this power to the utility, in addition to other savings developed through the utilization of geothermal energy, can offset the costs associated with hydrothermal utilization.

Humme, J.T.; Tanaka, M.T.; Yokota, M.H.; Furumoto, A.S.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) Analysis of Crankcase Oils and Oil Residues From the Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If used crankcase oils and oil residues from electric utilities were listed as hazardous waste by EPA, disposal would be costly and recycling options would be limited. The toxicity characteristic test results from this study reveal that such used oils and oil residues are generally nonhazardous and therefore do not warrant classification as hazardous wastes.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Integrated Analysis of Fuel, Technology and Emission Allowance Markets: Electric Utility Responses to the Clean Air Act Amendments o f 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed analysis of the strategic responses of the electric utility industry to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The study analyzes the competitive interactions between fuel switching, scrubbing, and emission trading options and provides information on future regional coal demands and prices, the adoption of SO2 control technologies, compliance costs, and the character of SO2 emission allowance markets.

1993-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

Econometric analysis of the demand for gasoline at the state level  

SciTech Connect

An investigation into factors influencing levels of highway gasoline use per household and per vehicle at the state level shows use per vehicle ranged from 588.7 gal in Pennsylvania to 900.0 gal in Arkansas in 1975. Household use in the same year was lowest in New York (864.5 gal) and highest in Wyoming (2222.0 gal). Determinants of the demand for highway gasoline were identified based on economic theory of the demand for travel. Exploratory theoretical analyses led to the conclusion that important state-specific influences were not being adequately accounted for by the available time series (1966 to 1975) of cross-sectional (state) variables. These state effects appeared to be strongly correlated with income. Two time-series cross-sectional (TSCS) regression techniques were employed, producing reasonable and consistent models. Elasticity estimates were slightly higher than estimates using earlier data. In order to analyze the determinants of differences in state gasoline use rates, a two-phase modeling approach was used which first estimates a demand equation utilizing key socio-economic variables. The TSCS technique used to estimate the equation produces quantitative estimates of state-specific deviations from predicted consumption levels. In the second stage these state-specific effects are regressed against a set of explanatory variables describing such state characteristics as spatial structure, climate, and employment in agriculture. State household gasoline-use rates were found to be negatively related to population density, percent of population living in metropolitan areas, agricultural employment, severe winter weather, and small car share of the vehicle fleet. They were positively related to the percentage of the population of working age and to the level of tourist activity. A companion report (ORNL-5391, ''An Investigation of the Variability of Gasoline Consumption among States,'' D. L. Greene) summarizes the major findings of this study.

Greene, D.L.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Utility Baghouse Survey 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI conducted comprehensive surveys of utility baghouse installations in 1981, 1991, and 2005 to summarize the state of the technology. The current survey focuses on nine selected pulse-jet baghouses to provide a better understanding of the design, performance, and operation of recent installations.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

288

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.aceee.org/research-report/u111 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carrots-utilities-providing-financial Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Cost Recovery/Allocation This report examines state experiences with shareholder financial incentives that encourage investor-owned utilities to provide energy

289

Waste Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 3, 2011 ... In 2009 NC State University characterized fibers recovered from initial ... The results showed that the biomass residues generated the highest ...

290

District Level Analysis of Urbanization from Rural-to-Urban Migration in the Rajasthan State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Migration has various dimensions; urbanization due to migration is one of them. In Rajasthan State, district level analysis of urbanization due to migrants shows trend invariably for all districts of the state, though the contribution in urbanization by migrants varies from district to district. In some districts the share of migrants moving to urban areas is very impressive, in others it is not that much high. The migrants' contribution is on the raising over the decades. In this paper, the district level migration in the Rajasthan State is examined in relation to total urbanization and urbanization due to migration.

Jayant Singh; Hansraj Yadav; Florentin Smarandache

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

291

Public Utilities (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilities (Florida) Utilities (Florida) Public Utilities (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Florida Public Service Commission Chapter 366 of the Florida Statutes governs the operation of public utilities, and includes a section pertaining to cogeneration and small power production (366.051). This section establishes the state's support for incorporating cogenerators and small power producers into the grid, and directs the Public Service Commission to establish regulations and

292

Benefit/Cost Analysis of Geothermal Technology R&D. Volume III: Energy Extraction and Utilization Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the benefit/cost relationship for 44 research and development (R and D) projects being funded by the Utilization Technology Branch (UTB) of the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE), Department of Energy (DOE) as a part of its Energy Extraction and Conversion Technology program. The benefits were computed in terms of the savings resulting from the reduction in the cost of electricity projected to be generated at 27 hydrothermal prospects in the US between 1978 and 2000, due to technological improvements brought about by successful R and D. The costs of various projects were estimated by referring to the actual expenditures already incurred and the projected future budgets for these projects. In certain cases, the expected future expenditures had to be estimated on the basis of the work which would need to be done to carry a project to the commercialization stage.

Dhillon, Harpal S.; Nguyen, Van Thanh; Pfundstein, Richard T.; Entingh, Daniel J.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission The Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act constitutes the main legislation in Virginia that pertains to the regulation of the state's electric utilities. The Act directs the State Corporation Commission to construct regulations for electric utilities, and contains information on

294

Utility Easements (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Easements (Indiana) Utility Easements (Indiana) Utility Easements (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Indiana Department of Natural Resources A permit is required from the Indiana Department of Natural Resources for the construction of a utility upon a state park, a state forest, a state game preserve, land acquired by the state and set aside as a scenic or historic place, or the portion of a public highway passing through one of the aforementioned types of places

295

Energy sensitivity and variability analysis of Populus hybrid short-rotation plantations in northeastern United States. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Production of biomass by corn-like plantations has been demonstrated by a number of researchers. These forest analogs of agronomic cropping systems have the potential to yield substantially more biomass per unit area than traditional forests. Care is needed in choosing the appropriate sites, species, spacing, and harvesting strategies. Opportunities for increased yields have been suggested for fertilization and irrigation. Utilization of the biomass from these dense plantations for energy was the focus of this study. Although the amount of energy potential of the biomass is important, the energy output must be greater than the energy input for biomass to have a positive benefit to society. Further, in order to completely evaluate the net energy of the system it is necessary to examine the energy out-to-in ratios on the basis of usable energy (for example, usable heat, process steam and electricity), as well as all of the energies expended in producing, harvesting, transporting and processing the biomass. The objective of this study is to establish and analyze the energy inputs for selected management strategies in order to evaluate the sensitivity and variability of the energy inputs in the net energy analysis, and based on the net energy analysis to recommend a management strategy that minimizes energy inputs while maximizing biomass yield for short-rotation systems of Populus spp. in the northeastern United States.

Bowersox, T.W.; Blankenhorn, P.R.

1979-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

296

Gas Utility Pipeline Tax (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All gas utilities, including any entity that owns, manages, operates, leases, or controls a pipeline for the purpose of transporting natural gas in the state for sale or compensation, as well as...

297

Research on electric utility regulatory and policy matters relating to state and federal jurisdiction. Final report for period September 1, 1994 - February 28, 2001  

SciTech Connect

The projects funded by the above referenced grant, are based on the October 1992 proposal to the FERC, which outlined the need for closer dialogue between Federal and State energy officials. The project is designed to assist State commissioners in responding to outreach initiatives that were already forthcoming from the FERC and to further develop and refine proposals that were still outstanding.

Spahn, Andrew; Dwyer, Alix

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Steady State Performance Analysis of a VSC-Based HVDC Converter Stations Using PSCAD/EMTDC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a steady state performance analysis carried out to study the behavior of a two VSC-based operating as a single-input single output HVDC link. The digital model of the HVDC link has been implemented and evaluated using PSCAD/EMTDC©. ... Keywords: Voltage source converter, HVDC Stations, pulse width modulation, harmonic spectra

Eduardo Vásquez-Mortera; Edgar L. Moreno-Goytia

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Statistical Analysis of Steady State Leakage Currents in Nano-CMOS Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical Analysis of Steady State Leakage Currents in Nano-CMOS Devices Jawar Singh, Jimson, UK. Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, USA. jawar also propose a statistical model to characterize nano-scale CMOS device characteristics such as dynamic

Mohanty, Saraju P.

300

Tracking the Reliability of the U.S. Electric Power System: An Assessment of Publicly Available Information Reported to State Public Utility Commissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis Working Group District of Columbia U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Institute of Electrical and

LaCommare, Kristina H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A Review of Battery Life-Cycle Analysis: State of Knowledge and Critical Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Life-Cycle Analysis: Battery Life-Cycle Analysis: State of Knowledge and Critical Needs ANL/ESD/10-7 Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone (865) 576-8401 fax (865) 576-5728 reports@adonis.osti.gov Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express

302

Strategic Sequencing for State Distributed PV Policies: A Quantitative Analysis of Policy Impacts and Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategic Sequencing for State Strategic Sequencing for State Distributed PV Policies: A Quantitative Analysis of Policy Impacts and Interactions V.A. Krasko and E. Doris National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-7A30-56428 October 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Strategic Sequencing for State Distributed PV Policies: A Quantitative Analysis of Policy Impacts and Interactions V.A. Krasko and E. Doris National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. SM12.1070

303

Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board Cities may establish utilities to acquire existing electric generating facilities or distribution systems. Acquisition, in this statute, is defined as city involvement, and includes purchase, lease, construction, reconstruction, extension, remodeling, improvement, repair, and equipping of the facility. This chapter does not limit the powers or authority of

304

Mississippi Public Utility Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mississippi Public Utility Act Mississippi Public Utility Act Mississippi Public Utility Act < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer General Public/Consumer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Siting and Permitting Provider Public Service Commission The Mississippi Public Utility Act is relevant to any project that plans to generate energy. It requires that a utility must first obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN) from the Mississippi Public Service Commission (PSC) before commencing construction of a new electric

305

A Duration Analysis of Food Safety Recall Events in the United States: January, 2000 to October, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The safety of the food supply in the United States has become an issue of prominence in the minds of ordinary Americans. Several government agencies, including the United States Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration, are charged with the responsibility of preserving the safety of the food supply. Food is withdrawn from the market in a product recall when tainted or mislabeled and has the potential to harm the consumer in some manner. This research examines recall events issued by firms over the period of January, 2000 through October, 2009 in the United States. Utilizing economic and management theory to establish predictions, this study employs the Cox proportional hazard regression model to analyze the effects of firm size and branding on the risk of recall recurrence. The size of the firm was measured in both billions of dollars of sales and in thousands of employees. Branding by the firm was measured as a binary variable that expressed if a firm had a brand and as a count of the number of brands within a firm. This study also provides a descriptive statistical analysis and several findings based on the recall data specifically relating to annual occurrences, geographical locations of the firms involved, types of products recalled, and reasons for recall. We hypothesized that the increasing firm size would be associated with increased relative risk of a recall event while branding and an increasing portfolio of brands would be associated with decreased relative risk of a recall event. However, it was found that increased firm size and branding by the firm are associated with an increased risk of recall occurrence. The results of this research can have implications on food safety standards in both the public and private sectors.

Joy, Nathaniel Allen

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Utility Companies | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Companies Utility Companies Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 17 May, 2013 - 11:14 Utility Rates API Version 2 is Live! API developer OpenEI update utility Utility Companies utility rate Utility Rates version 1 version 2 version 3 web service Smart meter After several months of development and testing, the next generation web service for the utility rate database is finally here! I encourage you to check out the V2 Utility Rates API at http://en.openei.org/services/doc/rest/util_rates Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 29 October, 2012 - 14:46 East Coast Utilities prepare for Hurricane Sandy East Coast Hurricane Sandy OpenEI outages storm United States Utility Companies As Hurricane Sandy continues to track towards the coast of the Eastern

307

SUPERENERGY-2: a multiassembly, steady-state computer code for LMFBR core thermal-hydraulic analysis  

SciTech Connect

Core thermal-hydraulic design and performance analyses for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) require repeated detailed multiassembly calculations to determine radial temperature profiles and subchannel outlet temperatures for various core configurations and subassembly structural analyses. At steady-state, detailed core-wide temperature profiles are required for core restraint calculations and subassembly structural analysis. In addition, sodium outlet temperatures are routinely needed for each reactor operating cycle. The SUPERENERGY-2 thermal-hydraulic code was designed specifically to meet these designer needs. It is applicable only to steady-state, forced-convection flow in LMFBR core geometries.

Basehore, K.L.; Todreas, N.E.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimates that electricity rates in the state could increasethe state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rateelectricity rate impacts in percentage and ¢/kWh terms, for each individual state

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Requirements for Defining Utility Drive Cycles: An Exploratory Analysis of Grid Frequency Regulation Data for Establishing Battery Performance Testing Standards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Battery testing procedures are important for understanding battery performance, including degradation over the life of the battery. Standards are important to provide clear rules and uniformity to an industry. The work described in this report addresses the need for standard battery testing procedures that reflect real-world applications of energy storage systems to provide regulation services to grid operators. This work was motivated by the need to develop Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) testing procedures, or V2G drive cycles. Likewise, the stationary energy storage community is equally interested in standardized testing protocols that reflect real-world grid applications for providing regulation services. As the first of several steps toward standardizing battery testing cycles, this work focused on a statistical analysis of frequency regulation signals from the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland Interconnect with the goal to identify patterns in the regulation signal that would be representative of the entire signal as a typical regulation data set. Results from an extensive time-series analysis are discussed, and the results are explained from both the statistical and the battery-testing perspectives. The results then are interpreted in the context of defining a small set of V2G drive cycles for standardization, offering some recommendations for the next steps toward standardizing testing protocols.

Hafen, Ryan P.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

310

Utility Regulation (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation (Indiana) Regulation (Indiana) Utility Regulation (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission enforces regulations in this legislation that apply to all individuals, corporations, companies, and partnerships that may own, operate, manage, or control any equipment for the production, transmission, delivery, or furnishing of heat, light,

311

Using Solid State Disk Array as a Cache for LHC ATLAS Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

User data analysis in high energy physics presents a challenge to spinning-disk based storage systems. The analysis is data intense, yet reads are small, sparse and cover a large volume of data files. It is also unpredictable due to users' response to storage performance. We describe here a system with an array of Solid State Disk as a non-conventional, standalone file level cache in front of the spinning disk storage to help improve the performance of LHC ATLAS user analysis at SLAC. The system uses a long period of data access records to make caching decisions. It can also use information from other sources such as a work-flow management system. We evaluate the performance of the system both in terms of caching and its impact on user analysis jobs. The system currently uses Xrootd technology, but the technique can be applied to any storage system.

Yang, W; The ATLAS collaboration; Mount, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Liberty Utilities (Electric) – Commercial New Construction Rebate Program (New Hampshire)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

'''Liberty Utilities has assumed National Grid's customers base in the state of New Hampshire. Customers should contact Liberty Utilities for questions regarding incentive availability.'''

313

Thermopolis hydrothermal system, with an analysis of Hot Springs State Park. Preliminary report No. 20  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermopolis is the site of Hot Springs State Park, where numerous hot springs produce nearly 3000 gallons per minute (gpm) of 130/sup 0/F (54/sup 0/C) water. The University of Wyoming Geothermal Resource Assessment Group has studied a 1700-square-mile area centered roughly on the State Park. Available literature, bottom-hole temperatures from over 400 oil well logs, 62 oil field drill stem tests, the Wyoming State Engineer's water well files, 60 formation water analyses, thermal logs of 19 holes, and field investigations of geology and hydrology form the basis of this report. Analysis of thermal data reveals that temperatures of up to 161/sup 0/F (72/sup 0/C) occur along the crest of the Thermopolis Anticline within 500 feet of the surface. The hydrology and heat flow of these geothermal anomalies was studied.

Hinckley, B.S.; Heasler, H.P.; King, J.K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Correspondence: Comments on "Dissipative analysis and control of state-space symmetric systems" [Automatica 45 (2009) 1574-1579  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that some results presented by Meisami-Azad, Mohammadpour, and Grigoriadis [Meisami-Azad, M., Mohammadpour, J. & Grigoriadis, K. M. (2009). Dissipative analysis and control of state-space symmetric systems. Automatica, 45, 1574-1579] are erroneous. ... Keywords: Dissipativity analysis, Linear systems, State-space symmetric systems

Gabriela Iuliana Bara

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell: a model of a central utility plant.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This central utilities plant model details the major elements of a central utilities plant for several classes of users. The model enables the analyst to select optional, cost effective, plant features that are appropriate to a fuel cell application. These features permit the future plant owner to exploit all of the energy produced by the fuel cell, thereby reducing the total cost of ownership. The model further affords the analyst an opportunity to identify avoided costs of the fuel cell-based power plant. This definition establishes the performance and capacity information, appropriate to the class of user, to support the capital cost model and the feasibility analysis. It is detailed only to the depth required to identify the major elements of a fuel cell-based system. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

3/30/11 Update 2011 Facts and analysis about the well being of our state's families and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; that inform key audiences such as professionals, state agency heads, legislators and funders; and that expand and data inform practice and policy. Many different state agencies may impact outcomes, and no singleTHE STATE OF FLORIDA'S CHILD 3/30/11 Update 2011 Facts and analysis about the well being of our

Weston, Ken

317

Public Utility Regulation (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Regulation (Iowa) Utility Regulation (Iowa) Public Utility Regulation (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board This section applies to any person, partnership, business association, or corporation that owns or operates any facilities for furnishing gas by piped distribution system, electricity, communications services, or water to the public for compensation. Regulations pertaining to these facilities can be found in this section. Some exemptions apply

318

Electricity prices in a competitive environment: Marginal cost pricing of generation services and financial status of electric utilities. A preliminary analysis through 2015  

SciTech Connect

The emergence of competitive markets for electricity generation services is changing the way that electricity is and will be priced in the United States. This report presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated {open_quotes}cost-of-service{close_quotes} pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers? This study is not intended to be a cost-benefit analysis of wholesale or retail competition, nor does this report include an analysis of the macroeconomic impacts of competitive electricity prices.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Statistical Analysis of Historical State-Level Residential Energy Consumption Trends  

SciTech Connect

Developing an accurate picture of the major trends in energy consumption in the nation’s stock of residential buildings can serve a variety of national and regional program planning and policy needs related to energy use. This paper employs regression analysis and uses the PRISM (Princeton Scorekeeping Method) approach with historical data to provide some insight into overall changes in the thermal integrity of the residential building stock by state. Although national energy use intensity estimates exist in aggregate, these numbers shed little light on what drives building consumption, as opposing influences are hidden within the measurement (e.g., more appliances that increase energy use while shell improvements reduce it). This study addresses this issue by estimating changes in the reference temperatures that best characterize the existing residential building stock on a state basis. Improvements in building thermal integrity are reflected by declines in the heating reference temperature, holding other factors constant. Heating and cooling-day estimates to various reference temperatures were computed from monthly average temperature data for approximately 350 climatic divisions in the U.S. A simple cross-sectional analysis is employed to try to explain the differential impacts across states. Among other factors, this analysis considers the impact that the relative growth in the number of residential buildings and the stringency of building energy codes has had on residential building energy use. This paper describes the methodology used, presents results, and suggests directions for future research.

Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Preliminary study of the oil shales of the Green River formation in the tri-state area of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming to investigate their utility for disposal of radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of a preliminary study of the oil shales of the Green River formation in the tri-state area of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming to investigate their utility for possible disposal of radioactive waste material. The objective of this study was to make a preliminary investigation and to obtain a broad overview of the physical and economic factors which would have an effect on the suitability of the oil shale formations for possible disposal of radioactive waste material. These physical and economic factors are discussed in sections on magnitude of the oil shales, waste disposal relations with oil mining, cavities requirements, hydrological aspects, and study requirements. (JRD)

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Orlando Utilities Commission - Residential Solar Water Heater...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program (Florida) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate 1,000 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility...

322

Orange and Rockland Utilities (Electric) - Residential Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate...

323

Avista Utilities - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Avista Utilities - Net Metering Avista Utilities - Net Metering Avista Utilities - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Idaho Program Type Net Metering Provider Avista Utilities Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net-metering tariff that has been approved by the Idaho Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The framework of the utilities' net-metering programs is similar, in that each utility: (1) offers net metering to customers that generate electricity using solar,

324

Assessing State Nuclear Weapons Proliferation: Using Bayesian Network Analysis of Social Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Bayesian network (BN) model of social factors can support proliferation assessments by estimating the likelihood that a state will pursue a nuclear weapon. Social factors including political, economic, nuclear capability, security, and national identity and psychology factors may play as important a role in whether a State pursues nuclear weapons as more physical factors. This paper will show how using Bayesian reasoning on a generic case of a would-be proliferator State can be used to combine evidence that supports proliferation assessment. Theories and analysis by political scientists can be leveraged in a quantitative and transparent way to indicate proliferation risk. BN models facilitate diagnosis and inference in a probabilistic environment by using a network of nodes and acyclic directed arcs between the nodes whose connections, or absence of, indicate probabilistic relevance, or independence. We propose a BN model that would use information from both traditional safeguards and the strengthened safeguards associated with the Additional Protocol to indicate countries with a high risk of proliferating nuclear weapons. This model could be used in a variety of applications such a prioritization tool and as a component of state safeguards evaluations. This paper will discuss the benefits of BN reasoning, the development of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) BN state proliferation model and how it could be employed as an analytical tool.

Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Olson, Jarrod; Whitney, Paul D.

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

325

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

state retail electricity rates, state sales and property taxWind Systems state electricity rates, which increase thethe average state retail electricity rate, meaning that

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State Incentives for Renewable Energy, individual incentiveDatabase of State Incentives for Renewable Energy. http://Energy States Alliance (Cooperman, 2004). Most state incentive

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

UTILITY_ID","UTILNAME","STATE_CODE","YEAR","MONTH","RES_REV (Thousand $)","RES_S  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10,1,6539.248,26227.516,0,8095.266,30902.977,0,1420.819,7702.417,0,0,0,0,16055.333,64832.91,0 10,1,6539.248,26227.516,0,8095.266,30902.977,0,1420.819,7702.417,0,0,0,0,16055.333,64832.91,0 213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK",2010,1,1535.941,15011.6,13783,980.665,11721.382,2156,987.54,11255.996,91,0,0,0,3504.146,37988.978,16030 219,"Alaska Power Co","AK",2010,1,668.02,2319.376,4592,921.903,3261.675,2099,0,0,0,0,0,0,1589.923,5581.051,6691 599,"Anchorage Municipal Light and Power","AK",2010,1,1759.777,15111.366,24014,7807.31,87008.534,6284,0,0,0,0,0,0,9567.087,102119.9,30298 1651,"Bethel Utilities Corp","AK",2010,1,468,1127,1643,1135,2893,1060,0,0,0,0,0,0,1603,4020,2703 3522,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc","AK",2010,1,7333,57329,69482,5576,52475,8979,311,3086,5,0,0,0,13220,112890,78466

328

UTILITY_ID","UTILNAME","STATE_CODE","YEAR","MONTH","RES_REV (Thousand $)","RES_S  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,1,6253.499,25151.849,0,8208.937,31991.364,0,1543.228,7550.664,0,,,0,16005.664,64693.877,0 8,1,6253.499,25151.849,0,8208.937,31991.364,0,1543.228,7550.664,0,,,0,16005.664,64693.877,0 213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK",2008,1,2015.937,14801.591,13678,1251.812,10568.181,2133,586.169,5267.906,104,0,0,0,3853.918,30637.678,15915 219,"Alaska Power Co","AK",2008,1,671,2365,4469,920,3569,2025,0,0,0,0,0,0,1591,5934,6494 599,"Anchorage Municipal Light and Power","AK",2008,1,1651.456,16935.599,23989,6541.271,93233.067,6236,0,0,0,0,0,0,8192.727,110168.666,30225 1651,"Bethel Utilities Corp","AK",2008,1,487,1211,1569,1098,2861,1141,0,0,0,0,0,0,1585,4072,2710 3522,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc","AK",2008,1,7922,60443,69877,5884,54753,8839,290,3241,6,0,0,0,14096,118437,78722

329

UTILITY_ID","UTILNAME","STATE_CODE","YEAR","MONTH","RES_REV (Thousand $)","RES_S  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9,1,6604.695,26567.861,0,8336.99,32882.18,0,1345.301,7416.849,0,0,0,0,16286.986,66865.89,0 9,1,6604.695,26567.861,0,8336.99,32882.18,0,1345.301,7416.849,0,0,0,0,16286.986,66865.89,0 213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK",2009,1,3587,16219,13713,2198,10943,2143,1053,5362,91,0,0,0,6838,32524,15947 219,"Alaska Power Co","AK",2009,1,676.033,2544.992,4478,879.743,3565.976,2065,0,0,0,0,0,0,1555.776,6110.968,6543 599,"Anchorage Municipal Light and Power","AK",2009,1,1829.997,17165.04,23948,7297.496,90566.855,6262,0,0,0,0,0,0,9127.493,107731.895,30210 1651,"Bethel Utilities Corp","AK",2009,1,597,1111,1622,1377,2655,1074,0,0,0,0,0,0,1974,3766,2696 3522,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc","AK",2009,1,9619,63056,69308,7256,55227,8987,340,2916,6,0,0,0,17215,121199,78301

330

Utility Proportional Fair Bandwidth Allocation: An Optimization Oriented Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In this paper, we present a novel approach to the congestion control and resource allocation problem of elastic and real-time traffic in telecommunication networks. With the concept of utility functions, where each source uses a utility function to evaluate the benefit from achieving a transmission rate, we interpret the resource allocation problem as a global optimization problem. The solution to this problem is characterized by a new fairness criterion, utility proportional fairness. We argue that it is an application level performance measure, i.e. the utility that should be shared fairly among users. As a result of our analysis, we obtain congestion control laws at links and sources that are globally stable and provide a utility proportional fair resource allocation in equilibrium. We show that a utility proportional fair resource allocation also ensures utility max-min fairness for all users sharing a single path in the network. As a special case of our framework, we incorporate utility maxmin fairness for the entire network. To implement our approach, neither per-flow state at the routers nor explicit feedback beside ECN (Explicit Congestion Notification) from the routers to the end-systems is required. 1

Tobias Harks

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Utilities Group Aids in Restructuring Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Utilities Group Aids in Restructuring Process Researchers at the Energy Analysis Program's (EAP) Utility Planning and Policy (UPP) Group are helping ensure that energy efficiency, renewable energy, and a host of other important issues are not overlooked as California and the nation restructure the electric power industry. The UPP staff is analyzing the potential impact of restructuring on efficiency and renewables, modeling a variety of potential restructuring policies, and assisting federal customers seeking to better understand emerging electricity markets. UPP Group Leader Chuck Goldman is participating in discussions on how to distribute surcharge funds set aside for energy efficiency in California, and Acting EAP Head Stephen Wiel is assisting state lawmakers and regulators by overseeing the National Council on

332

Validation of the National Energy Audit (NEAT) with data from a gas utility low-income residential weatherization program in New York State  

SciTech Connect

This study uses two approaches to the validation of the National Energy Audit (NEAT). The first consists of comparisons of audit-predicted savings to savings observed in a pre- and post-retrofit analysis of metered gas consumption. Here, realization rates, which are the ratio of measured savings to audit-predicted savings, are examined for 49 houses to determine how accurately NEAT predicts savings in a field setting. The second approach involves assessing the accuracy of NEAT`s internal algorithms by comparing its results to those obtained with another engineering model, DOE-2.1E, which is an industry standard. In this analysis, both engineering models are applied to two houses, using the same building description data, and measure-specific estimates of savings are compared. 12 figs., 11 tabs.

Gettings, M.B.; Berry, L.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Beyer, M.A.; Maxwell, J.B. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

NET PRED UTILITY  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002602IBMPC00 Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility  http://omics.pnl.gov/software/NETPredictionUtility.php 

334

An R&D Project Management and Selection System for the Utilization Technology Branch, Division of Geothermal Energy, Volume III - Project Selection Procedure and Benefit/Cost Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report in three volumes describes an R and D project management and selection system developed for the Utilization Technology Branch of the Division of Geothermal Energy, Department of Energy. The proposed project management system (PMS) consists of a project data system (PDS) and a project selection procedure (PSP). The project data system consists of a series of project data forms and project status logs, and descriptions of information pathways. The PDS emphasizes timely monitoring of the technical and financial progress of projects, maintenance of the history of the project and rapid access to project information to facilitate responsive reporting to DGE and DOE Upper Management. The project selection procedure emphasizes a R and D product-oriented approach to benefit/cost analysis of individual projects. The report includes: (a) a description of the system, and recommendations for its implementation, (b) the PDS forms and explanation of their use, (c) a glossary of terms for use on the forms, (d) a description of the benefit/cost approach, (e) a data base for estimating R and D benefits, and (f) examples of test applications of the system to nine current DGE projects. This volume describes a proposed procedure for R and D project selection. The benefit/cost analysis part of the procedure estimates financial savings expected to result from the commercial use of hardware or process products of R and D. Savings are estimated with respect to the geothermal power plants expected to come on line between 1978 and 2000.

Dhillon, Harpal S.; Entingh, Daniel J.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Energy Analysis and Energy Conservation Options for the Supreme Court and Attorney General Buildings Final Report, Prepared for the Energy Efficiency Division, Texas Public Utility Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy use of the Supreme Court and Attorney General buildings in Austin, Texas was analyzed using the D0E-2.1B building energy simulation program. An analysis was made for each building as specified in the building plans and the specifications provided by the State Purchasing and General Services Commission. The proposed construction of the Supreme Court and Attorney General buildings reflect improvements in energy use over buildings built several years ago. The energy consumption of these buildings were compared with the energy consumption of the buildings modified to comply with the ASHRAE standards. The net reduction of 44% in energy use was obtained using the ASHRAE standards.

Farzad, M.; O'Neal, D. L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Survey of Western U.S. electric utility resource plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Survey Survey of Western U.S. electric utility resource plans Jordan Wilkerson a,n , Peter Larsen a,b , Galen Barbose b a Management Science and Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United States b Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 90-4000, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States H I G H L I G H T S  Anticipated power plant retirements are split between coal and natural gas.  By 2030, natural gas-fired generation represents 60% of new capacity followed by wind (15%), solar (7%) and hydropower (7%).  Utilities anticipate most new solar capacity to come online before 2020 with significant growth in wind capacity after 2020.  Utilities focus their uncertainty analyses on future demand, fuel prices,

337

Final Report for DE-FG36-08GO18007 "All-Inorganic, Efficient Photovoltaic Solid State Devices Utilizing Semiconducting Colloidal Nanocrystal Quantum Dots"  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrated robust colloidal quantum dot (QD) photovoltaics with high internal quantum efficiencies. In our structures, device durability is derived from use of all-inorganic atmospherically-stable semiconducting metal-oxide films together with QD photoreceptors. We have shown that both QD and metal-oxide semiconducting films and contacts are amenable to room temperature processing under minimal vacuum conditions, enabling large area processing of PV structures of high internal efficiency. We generated the state of the art devices with power conversion efficiency of more than 4%, and have shown that efficiencies as high as 9% are achievable in the near-term, and as high as 17% in the long-term.

Vladimir Bulovic and Moungi Bawendi

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Improved Off-State Stress Critical Voltage on AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors Utilizing Pt/Ti/Au Based Gate Metallization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The critical voltage for degradation of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) employed with the Pt/Ti/Au gate metallization instead of the commonly used Ni/Au was significantly increased during the off-state stress. The typical critical voltage for HEMTs with Ni/Au gate metallization was around -60V. By sharp contrast, no critical voltage was observed for the HEMTs with Pt/Ti/Au gate metallization, even up to -100V, which was the instrumental limitation in this experiment. Both Schottky forward and reverse gate characteristics of the Ni/Au degraded once the gate voltage passed the critical voltage of around -60V. There was no degradation exhibited for the HEMTs with Pt-gated HEMTs.

Lo, C. F. [University of Florida; Liu, L. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Kang, Tsung Sheng [University of Florida, Gainesville; Davies, Ryan [University of Florida; Gila, Brent P. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Pearton, S. J. [University of Florida; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Laboutin, O. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Cao, Yu [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Johnson, Wayne J. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Ren, F. [University of Florida

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

DEMEC Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities) DEMEC Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial...

340

Texas State Building Energy Code: Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Commercial Lighting Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The State Energy Conservation Office of Texas has asked the U.S. Department of Energy to analyze the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in the 2003 IECC as they consider adoption of this energy code. The new provisions of interest in the lighting section of IECC 2003 include new lighting power densities (LPD) and requirements for automatic lighting shutoff controls. The potential effect of the new LPD values is analyzed as a comparison with previous values in the nationally available IECC codes and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1. The basis for the analysis is a set of lighting models developed as part of the ASHRAE/IES code process, which is the basis for IECC 2003 LPD values. The use of the models allows for an effective comparison of values for various building types of interest to Texas state. Potential effects from control requirements are discussed, and available case study analysis results are provided but no comprehensive numerical evaluation is provided in this limited analysis effort.

Richman, Eric E.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Institutional Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider South Dakota Public Utilities Commission This legislation contains provisions for gas and electric utilities. As part of these regulations, electric utilities are required to file with the

342

Public Utilities Act (Illinois) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Utilities Act (Illinois) Public Utilities Act (Illinois) Public Utilities Act (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State Illinois Program Type Environmental Regulations Generating Facility Rate-Making Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Illinois Commerce Commission This act aims to make energy services in the state reliable and efficient, while preserving the quality if the environment. It states the duties of public utilities in terms of accounts and reports. Every public utility shall furnish to the Commission all information required by it to carry into effect the provisions of this Act, and shall make specific answers to

343

Gas Utilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Utilities (Maine) Gas Utilities (Maine) Gas Utilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Public Utilities Commission Rules regarding the production, sale, and transfer of manufactured gas will also apply to natural gas. This section regulates natural gas utilities that serve ten or more customers, more than one customer when any portion

344

UTILITY_ID","UTILNAME","STATE_CODE","YEAR","MONTH","RES_REV (Thousand $)","RES_S  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MwH)","RES_CONS ","COM_REV (Thousand $)","COM_SALES (MwH)","COM_CONS","IND_REV (Thousand $)","IND_SALES (MwH)","IND_CONS","OTH_REV (Thousand $)","OTH_SALES (MwH)","OTH_CONS","TOT_REV (Thousand $)","TOT_SALES (MwH)","TOT_CONS" MwH)","RES_CONS ","COM_REV (Thousand $)","COM_SALES (MwH)","COM_CONS","IND_REV (Thousand $)","IND_SALES (MwH)","IND_CONS","OTH_REV (Thousand $)","OTH_SALES (MwH)","OTH_CONS","TOT_REV (Thousand $)","TOT_SALES (MwH)","TOT_CONS" 0,"State Level Adjustment","AK",2006,1,4505,21935,0,6801,28853,0,1284,11667,0,,,0,12590,62454,0 213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK",2006,1,1424,13941,13422,961,11573,2086,349,4532,98,0,0,0,2734,30046,15606 219,"Alaska Power Co","AK",2006,1,603,2288,4345,823,3487,1956,0,0,0,0,0,0,1426,5775,6301 599,"Anchorage Municipal Light and Power","AK",2006,1,1643,16217,23865,6649,90110,6112,0,0,0,0,0,0,8292,106327,29977

345

Steam Generator Management Program: Dynamic Analysis of a Steam Generator--Part 1: Method Development, Steady-State Verification, an d Steady-State Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the first of a two-part set that details the development and application of a new software model for steam generator dynamic analysis. This report contains the background and development of the steam generator dynamic analysis model and the steady-state verification and validation results. The second report (to be published in early 2013) is expected to contain results from simulations that illustrate the effect of tube support plate clogging levels on the onset of water level instability ...

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

346

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The market for small wind systems in the United States, often defined as systems less than or equal to 100 kW that produce power on the customer side of the meter, is small but growing steadily. The installed capacity of domestic small wind systems in 2002 was reportedly 15-18 MW, though the market is estimated to be growing by as much as 40 percent annually (AWEA, 2002). This growth is driven in part by recent technology advancements and cost improvements and, perhaps more importantly, by favorable policy incentives targeted at small wind systems that are offered in several states. Currently, over half of all states have incentive policies for which residential small wind installations are eligible. These incentives range from low-interest loan programs and various forms of tax advantages to cash rebates that cover as much as 60 percent of the total system cost for turbines 10 kW or smaller installed in residential applications. Most of these incentives were developed to support a ran ge of emerging renewable technologies (most notably photovoltaic systems), and were therefore not specifically designed with small wind systems in mind. As such, the question remains as to which incentive types provide the greatest benefit to small wind systems, and how states might appropriately set the level and type of incentives in the future. Furthermore, given differences in incentive types and levels across states, as well as variations in retail electricity rates and other relevant factors, it is not immediately obvious which states offer the most promising markets for small wind turbine manufacturers and installers, as well as potential residential system owners. This paper presents results from a Berkeley Lab analysis of the impact of existing and proposed state and federal incentives on the economics of grid-connected, residential small wind systems. Berkeley Lab has designed the Small Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT) to compare system economics under current incentive structures a cross all 50 states. SWAT reports three metrics to characterize residential wind economics in each state and wind resource class: (1) Break-Even Turnkey Cost (BTC): The BTC is defined as the aggregate installed system cost that would balance total customer payments and revenue over the life of the system, allowing the customer to ''break-even'' while earning a specified rate of return on the small wind ''investment.'' (2) Simple Payback (SP): The SP is the number of years it takes a customer to recoup a cash payment for a wind system and all associated costs, assuming zero discount on future revenue and payments (i.e., ignoring the time value of money). (3) Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE): The LCOE is the levelized cost of generating a kWh of electricity over the lifetime of the system, and is calculated assuming a cash purchase for the small wind system and a 5.5 percent real discount rate. This paper presents SWAT results for a 10 kW wind turbine and turbine power production is based on a Bergey Excel system. These results are not directly applicable to turbines with different power curves and rated outputs, especially given the fact that many state incentives are set as a fixed dollar amount, and the dollar per Watt amount will vary based on the total rated turbine capacity.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Summary of Utility Studies: Smart Grid Investment Grant Consumer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary of Utility Studies: Smart Grid Investment Grant Consumer Behavior Study Analysis Title Summary of Utility Studies: Smart Grid Investment Grant Consumer Behavior Study...

348

Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935: 1935--1992  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an economic and legislative history and analysis of the Public Utilities Holding Company Act (PUHCA) of 1935. This Act was substantially amended for the first time in 1992 by passage of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT). The report also includes a discussion of the issues which led to the amendment of PUHCA and projections of the impact of these changes on the electric industry. The report should be of use to Federal and State regulators, trade associations, electric utilities, independent power producers, as well as decision-makers in Congress and the Administration.

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inclusion of its state renewable energy grant program, but aDatabase of State Incentives for Renewable Energy. http://of State Incentives for Renewable Energy, individual

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in Summit County, Utah  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in Summit County, Utah David J. Ratliff, Captain United States Air Force Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 DOE/GO-102009-2918 October 2009 The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. The authors thank Marshall Goldberg and Elise Brown for assistance with data collection and analysis and Sandra Reategui and Sara Baldwin for the helpful comments on an earlier draft of

351

Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in San Juan County, Utah  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in San Juan County, Utah David J. Ratliff, Captain United States Air Force Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 DOE/GO-102010-3005 March 2010 The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. The authors thank Marshall Goldberg and Elise Brown for assistance with data collection and analysis and Sandra Reategui, Suzanne Tegen, and Sara Baldwin for the helpful comments on

352

An Analysis of Freezing Rain, Freezing Drizzle, and Ice Pellets across the United States and Canada: 1976–90  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive analysis of freezing rain, freezing drizzle, and ice pellets was conducted using data from surface observations across the United States and Canada. This study complements other studies of freezing precipitation in the United ...

John V. Cortinas Jr.Ben C. Bernstein; Christopher C. Robbins; J. Walter Strapp

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Study Report II. Albany, New York: New York DepartmentOrder Cost Analysis. Albany, New York: New York Public

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Public Utility Public Utility Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Public Utility Definition An entity that owns, controls, operates, or manages a facility that supplies electricity to the public exclusively to charge battery electric

355

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Public Utility Public Utility Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Public Utility Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Public Utility Definition A corporation or individual that owns, controls, operates, or manages a facility that supplies electricity to the public exclusively to charge

356

Process analysis and economics of biophotolysis of water. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a preliminary cost analysis of the biophotolysis of water and was prepared as part of the work of Annex 10 of the IEA Hydrogen agreement. Biophotolysis is the conversion of water and solar energy to hydrogen and oxygen using microalgae. In laboratory experiments at low light intensities, algal photosynthesis and some biophotolysis reactions exhibit highlight conversion efficiencies that could be extrapolated to about 10% solar efficiencies if photosynthesis were to saturate at full sunlight intensities. The most promising approach to achieving the critical goal of high conversion efficiencies at full sunlight intensities, one that appears within the capabilities of modern biotechnology, is to genetically control the pigment content of algal cells such that the photosynthetic apparatus does not capture more photons than it can utilize. A two-stage indirect biophotolysis system was conceptualized and general design parameters extrapolated. The process comprises open ponds for the CO{sub 2}fixation stage, an algal concentration step, a dark adaptation and fermentation stage, and a closed tubular photobioreactor in which hydrogen production would take place. A preliminary cost analysis for a 200 hectare (ha) system, including 140 ha of open algal ponds and 14 ha of photobioreactors was carried out. The cost analysis was based on prior studies for algal mass cultures for fuels production and a conceptual analysis of a hypothetical photochemical processes, as well as the assumption that the photobioreactors would cost about $100/m(sup 2). Assuming a very favorable location, with 21 megajoules (MJ)/m{sup 2} total insolation, and a solar conversion efficiency of 10% based on CO{sub 2} fixation in the large algal ponds, an overall cost of $10/gigajoule (GJ) is projected. Of this, almost half is due to the photobioreactors, one fourth to the open pond system, and the remainder to the H{sub 2} handling and general support systems. It must be cautioned that these are highly preliminary, incomplete, and optimistic estimates. Biophotolysis processes, indirect or direct, clearly require considerable basic and applied R and D before a more detailed evaluation of their potential and plausible economics can be carried out. For example, it is not yet clear which type of algae, green algae, or cyanobacteria, would be preferred in biophotolysis. If lower-cost photobioreactors can be developed, then small-scale (<1 ha) single-stage biophotolysis processes may become economically feasible. A major basic and applied R and D effort will be required to develop such biophotolysis processes.

Benemann, J.R.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Trends in Utility Scale Renewable Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov Trends in Utility Scale Renewable Electricity for ReTech 2012

358

Solar energy: some variables influencing increased utilization  

SciTech Connect

The mid 1970s energy crisis encouraged the growth of alternative fuels. Through the late 1970s and 1980s, solar energy was the primary alternative fuel. Federal and state programs encouraged the growth of residential solar installations through the use of tax credits. This dissertation used data from the eleven western states to assess tax credits' influence on residential solar installations. A Spearman's r was used to evaluate the role of tax credits on the percent increase in solar systems from 1980 to 1984. The r/sub s/ was .93. The second portion of the analysis used contingency tables to see if variables other than tax credits influence solar installations; the results showed tax credits + solar radiation and fuel mix are the significant variables. The final chapter looks at municipal solar utilities, tax on excessive energy use, a public/private solar research lab, and building rating system as means to supplement solar energy tax credits.

Born, B.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Natural Gas Pipeline Utilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Pipeline Utilities (Maine) Natural Gas Pipeline Utilities (Maine) Natural Gas Pipeline Utilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Public Utilities Commission These regulations apply to entities seeking to develop and operate natural gas pipelines and provide construction requirements for such pipelines. The regulations describe the authority of the Public Utilities Commission with

360

Administrative Code Title 83, Public Utilities (Illinois) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administrative Code Title 83, Public Utilities (Illinois) Administrative Code Title 83, Public Utilities (Illinois) Administrative Code Title 83, Public Utilities (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Commercial Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Illinois Program Type Environmental Regulations Generating Facility Rate-Making Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Safety and Operational Guidelines Training/Technical Assistance Provider Illinois Commerce Commission In addition to general rules for utilities, this article states regulations for the protection of underground utilities, promotional practices of electric and gas public utilities construction of electric power and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Performance-based ratemaking for electric utilities: Review of plans and analysis of economic and resource-planning issues. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) is a form of utility regulation that strengthens the financial incentives to lower rates, lower costs, or improve nonprice performance relative traditional regulation, which the authors call cost-of-service, rate-of-return (COS/ROR) regulation. Although the electric utility industry has considerable experience with incentive mechanisms that target specific areas of performance, implementation of mechanisms that cover a comprehensive set of utility costs or services is relatively rare. In recent years, interest in PBR has increased as a result of growing dissatisfaction with COS/ROR and as a result of economic and technological trends that are leading to more competition in certain segments of the electricity industry. In addition, incentive regulation has been used with some success in other public utility industries, most notably telecommunications in the US and telecommunications, energy, and water in the United Kingdom. In this report, the authors analyze comprehensive PBR mechanisms for electric utilities in four ways: (1) they describe different types of PBR mechanisms, (2) they review a sample of actual PBR plans, (3) they consider the interaction of PBR and utility-funded energy efficiency programs, and (4) they examine how PBR interacts with electric utility resource planning and industry restructuring. The report should be of interest to technical staff of utilities and regulatory commissions that are actively considering or designing PBR mechanisms. 16 figs., 17 tabs.

Comnes, G.A.; Stoft, S.; Greene, N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Hill, L.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Energy Div.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Renewable energy and utility regulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a joint project on renewable energy of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and the US DOE. NARUC`S Task Force on Renewable Energy conducted a review of the current state of renewable energy technologies to evaluate their potential and extract key policy lessons from experience already gained in deployment of these technologies in numerous states. The main focus of this effort has been to clarify how utility regulators affect the development of renewable energy resources. The goal of the project was twofold: (1) identify the factors that have led to success or failure or renewable energy technologies in various energy markets, and (2) to develop an agenda on renewable energy and utility regulation for NARUC and the DOE. This report consists of three sections: renewable energy contributions, costs and potential; factors affecting development of renewable energy resources; and a renewable energy agenda for NARUC.

Not Available

1991-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

Renewable energy and utility regulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a joint project on renewable energy of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and the US DOE. NARUC'S Task Force on Renewable Energy conducted a review of the current state of renewable energy technologies to evaluate their potential and extract key policy lessons from experience already gained in deployment of these technologies in numerous states. The main focus of this effort has been to clarify how utility regulators affect the development of renewable energy resources. The goal of the project was twofold: (1) identify the factors that have led to success or failure or renewable energy technologies in various energy markets, and (2) to develop an agenda on renewable energy and utility regulation for NARUC and the DOE. This report consists of three sections: renewable energy contributions, costs and potential; factors affecting development of renewable energy resources; and a renewable energy agenda for NARUC.

Not Available

1991-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

364

Utility Conservation Programs: Opportunities and Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the use of conservation programs to achieve utility goals in an electric industry environment subject to change. First, the importance of articulating clear goals for the mission of a utility is discussed. Second, a strategic framework for analysis of utility promotion of conservation investment is presented. Third, the rationale, design and marketing of basic conservation strategies based on differences in utility capacity and cost situations are examined. Particular attention is given to evaluating the establishment of a subsidiary by a utility to offer energy management services -- a relatively new concept that: may present great opportunities for many utilities.

Norland, D. L.; Wolf, J. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada Title Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2008 Authors Hopper, Nicole C., Galen L. Barbose, Charles A. Goldman, and Jeff Schlegel Journal Energy Efficiency Journal Volume Volume 2, Number 1 Pagination 24 Date Published 09/2008 Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract This article examines the future role of energy efficiency as a resource in the Western US and Canada, as envisioned in the most recent resource plans issued by 16 utilities, representing about 60% of the region's load. Utility and third-party-administered energy-efficiency programs proposed by 15 utilities over a 10-year horizon would save almost 19,000 GWh annually, about 5.2% of forecast load. There are clear regional trends in the aggressiveness of proposed energy savings. California's investor-owned utilities (IOUs) had the most aggressive savings targets, followed by IOUs in the Pacific Northwest, and the lowest savings were proposed by utilities in Inland West states and by two public utilities on the West Coast. The adoption of multiple, aggressive policies targeting energy efficiency and climate change appears to produce sizeable energy-efficiency commitments. Certain specific policies, such as mandated energy savings goals for California's IOUs and energy-efficiency provisions in Nevada's Renewable Portfolio Standard, had a direct impact on the level of energy savings included in the resource plans. Other policies, such as revenue decoupling and shareholder incentives and voluntary or legislatively mandated greenhouse gas emission reduction policies, may have also impacted utilities' energy-efficiency commitments, though the effects of these policies are not easily measured. Despite progress among the utilities in our sample, more aggressive energy-efficiency strategies that include high-efficiency standards for additional appliances and equipment, tighter building codes for new construction and renovation, as well as more comprehensive ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs are likely to be necessary to achieve a region-wide goal of meeting 20% of electricity demand with efficiency in 2020.

366

Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribe’s tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon West Power Project construction of the power infrastructure at Grand Canyon West. Develop the maintenance and operations capacity necessary to support utility operations. Develop rates for customers on the Grand Canyon West “mini-grid” sufficient for the tribal utility to be self-sustaining. Establish an implementation strategy for tribal utility service at Grand Canyon West Objective 2 - Develop a strategy for tribal utility takeover of electric service on the Reservation. Perform a cost analysis of Reservation electrical service. Develop an implementation strategy for tribal takeover of Reservation electrical service. Examine options and costs associated with integration of the Tribe’s wind resources.

Hualapai Tribal Nation

2008-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

367

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) Project: An Analysis of Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs in the United States (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes renewable energy feed-in tariff (FIT) policies and explores the different FIT policies currently implemented in the United States. It also discusses of a few proposed policies, the best practices in FIT policy design, and examines how FITs can be used to target state policy goals. The report covers current and potential future interactions between FITs and other state and federal energy policies while also providing an overview of the impacts FIT policies have in terms of renewable energy deployment, job creation, and economic development.

Couture, T.; Cory, K.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Other Construction Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Custom Projects: $100,000 (existing facilities); $250,000 (new construction) Energy Efficiency Engineering Study: $10,000 Steam Traps: $2500 Programmable Thermostats: up to five units Boiler Reset Controls: up to two units Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount

369

Analysis of source spectra, attenuation, and site effects from central and eastern United States earthquakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results from three studies of source spectra, attenuation, and site effects of central and eastern United States earthquakes. In the first study source parameter estimates taken from 27 previous studies were combined to test the assumption that the earthquake stress drop is roughly a constant, independent of earthquake size. 200 estimates of stress drop and seismic moment from eastern North American earthquakes were combined. It was found that the estimated stress drop from the 27 studies increases approximately as the square-root of the seismic moment, from about 3 bars at 10{sup 20} dyne-cm to 690 bars at 10{sup 25} dyne-cm. These results do not support the assumption of a constant stress drop when estimating ground motion parameters from eastern North American earthquakes. In the second study, broadband seismograms recorded by the United States National Seismograph Network and cooperating stations have been analysed to determine Q{sub Lg} as a function of frequency in five regions: the northeastern US, southeastern US, central US, northern Basin and Range, and California and western Nevada. In the third study, using spectral analysis, estimates have been made for the anelastic attenuation of four regional phases, and estimates have been made for the source parameters of 27 earthquakes, including the M{sub b} 5.6, 14 April, 1995, West Texas earthquake.

Lindley, G.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

EM Utility Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12 12 EM UTILITY CONTRACT Site State Supplier Executed Contract Type DOE Contract # East Tennessee Technology Park TN Tennessee Valley Authority 4/27/2007 Energy supply contract (retail) DE-AC05-07OR23242 Hanford WA Bonneville Power Administration 10/1/2001 Transmission Service Agreement Hanford WA Bonneville Power Administration 10/1/2011 Power Sales Agreement (retail) Moab UT Paducah KY Electric Energy, Inc. (EEI as agent for DOE) Original Power Contract Portsmouth OH Pike Natural Gas 2/28/2007 Negotiated contract Portsmouth OH Ohio Valley Electric Corporation (OVEC) 9/10/2008 Letter Agreement DE-AC05-03OR22988 Savannah River Site SC South Carolina Electric & Gas

371

Utility Contract Competition | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competition Competition Utility Contract Competition October 7, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Opening utility energy service contracts to competing franchised utility companies ensures Federal agencies get the best value for their projects. Federal agencies are not legally required to compete for utility incentive services provided by the "established source" utility in the utility's franchised service territory. If services are available, the Energy Policy Act of 1992 states that there should be no restriction on Federal facilities directly benefiting from the services the same as any other customer. The exception is if there is more than one serving utility offering utility energy services (e.g., a gas company and an electric company). In this case, the Federal Acquisition Regulations and good fiscal management

372

Wind Farm Power Fluctuations, Ancillary Services, and System Operating Impact Analysis Activities in the United States: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

With ever increasing penetration of wind capacity and growing interest in wind power by electric utilities and other power providers, questions about the impacts and costs associated with maintaining a stable grid is receiving lots of attention. These issues are important, both in competitive and regulated monopoly markets.To evaluate the range of ancillary service impact of wind power plants, wind power plant output fluctuations on the order of seconds to minutes must be known. However, the data required for a credible analysis has not been widely available. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), through its own efforts, and in conjunction with a wide group of stakeholders including other national labs, consultants, developers, utilities, and the non-profit Utility Wind Interest Group, has initiated measurement and analysis activities. The efforts are ongoing. While final system-cost results are not available, this paper will describe the progress to date and present typical results and statistical analysis. In addition, methods will be explained with the aim of soliciting feedback from others looking at similar issues worldwide.

Parsons, B. K. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Wan, Y. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Kirby, B. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (Georgia) Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (Georgia) Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Utilities Protection Center of Georgia The Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (GUFPA) was established to protect the underground utility infrastructure of Georgia. GUFPA mandates that, before starting any mechanized digging or excavation work, you must

374

Solar Valuation in Utility Planning Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Valuation in Utility Planning Studies Solar Valuation in Utility Planning Studies Title Solar Valuation in Utility Planning Studies Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2013 Authors Mills, Andrew D., and Ryan H. Wiser Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, renewable energy: policy Abstract This webinar was presented by the Clean Energy States Alliance and featured Andrew Mills of Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) discussing new research on solar valuation that he and his colleague, Ryan Wiser, have recently published. As renewable technologies mature, recognizing and evaluating their economic value will become increasingly important for justifying their expanded use. In their report, Mills and Wiser used a unique investment and dispatch model to evaluate the changes in the long-run value of variable renewables with increasing penetration levels, based on a case study of California. They found that the value of solar is high at low penetration levels owing to the capacity and energy value of solar, even accounting for an increased need for ancillary services and imperfect forecastability. At higher penetration levels, the marginal value of additional PV and concentrating solar power (CSP) without thermal storage declines, largely due to a decrease in capacity value. The value of CSP with thermal storage remains higher for similar penetration levels owing to the ability to continue to produce energy for hours after the sun goes down. By way of comparison, in California the value of wind at low penetrations is less than the value of solar at low penetrations, but its value is less sensitive to penetration levels. In addition to discussing these findings, Mills reviewed a recent sample of utility planning studies and procurement processes to identify how current practices reflect these drivers of solar's economic value. The LBNL report found that many of the utilities have a framework to capture and evaluate solar's value, but approaches vary widely: only a few studies appear to complement the framework with detailed analysis of key factors such as capacity credits, integration costs, and tradeoffs between distributed and utility-scale photovoltaics. In particular Mills and Wiser found that studies account for the capacity value of solar, though capacity credit estimates with increasing penetration can be improved. Similarly, few planning studies currently reflect the full range of potential benefits from adding thermal storage and/or natural gas augmentation to concentrating solar power plants.

375

Cogeneration - A Utility Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration has become an extremely popular subject when discussing conservation and energy saving techniques. One of the key factors which effect conservation is the utility viewpoint on PURPA and cogeneration rule making. These topics are discussed from a utility perspective as how they influence utility participation in future projects. The avoided cost methodology is examined, and these payments for sale of energy to the utility are compared with utility industrial rates. In addition to utilities and industry, third party owner/operation is also a viable option to cogeneration. These options are also discussed as to their impact on the utility and the potential of these ownership arrangements.

Williams, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group - Utility Interconnection Panel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WORKING GROUP - Utility Interconnection Panel M. Renee Jewell, Program/Energy Manager, & Contracting Officer, Forest Service (reneejewell@fs.fed.us) SCENARIO: Fed Agencies had Solar PV Projects To Connect with Utility in California * United States (US) Forest Service (FS) - 1 small Solar Photovoltaic (PV) project; and - 1 small Renewable project (Solar PV) exporting energy to grid. * U.S. National Park Service (NPS) - 24 Small Solar Photovoltaic projects. * U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs (VA) - 6 Renewable generation projects of different sizes. FS Region 5 (California) - Solar Photovoltaic Installations Solar PV Project @ Mono Lake Visitor Center (Inyo NF) Solar PV Project (net exporter) @ San Dimas Technology and Development Center SITUATION - Utility Wanted Feds to Sign Its

378

Utility Rebate Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Rebate Program Utility Rebate Program Jump to: navigation, search States, local governments and utilities offer rebates to promote the installation of renewable energy systems and energy efficiency measures. The majority of rebate programs that support renewable energy are administered by states, municipal utilities and electric cooperatives; these programs commonly provide funding for solar water heating and/or photovoltaic (PV) systems. Most rebate programs that support energy efficiency are administered by utilities. Rebate amounts vary widely based on technology and program administrator. [1] Utility Rebate Program Incentives CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-1000) CSV (rows 1001-1500) CSV (rows 1501-1718) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active

379

The Economic Effects of Electricity Deregulation: An Empricial Analysis of Indian States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; adjusted for inflation at constant (1993-94) prices Rupees per unit PLF Plant Load Factor of grid-connected thermal power stations in a state Percentage TDL Transmission & distribution losses in a state Percentage GRGEN Gross Generation... of thermal power plants in a state Million Kilowatt Hours INPRICE Average industrial price of electricity in a state; adjusted for inflation at constant (1993-94) prices Rupees per unit PRICE Average price of electricity in a state; adjusted...

Sen, A; Jamasb, Tooraj

380

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Requirements for Utilities | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Energy Efficiency and Conservation Requirements for Utilities Energy Efficiency and Conservation Requirements for Utilities < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Savings Category Other Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Energy Efficiency Resource Standard Provider Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission In October 2008 Pennsylvania adopted Act 129, creating energy efficiency and conservation requirements for the state's investor owned utilities with at least 100,000 customers. With this limitation on applicability, the standards apply only to the following utilities: PECO Energy, PPL Electric Utilities, West Penn Power, Pennsylvania Electric (Penelec), Metropolitan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Utilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilities Utilities Utilities Below are resources for Tribes about utilities. The Economics of Electric System Municipalization Looks at the economic environment in California to determine whether municipalization would be a beneficial option for many California cities. Source: Bay Area Economic Forum. Establishing a Tribal Utility Authority Handbook Provides an introduction to electric utility operation and general guidance for the steps required to form a tribal utility authority. Funded by an economic development grant awarded by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development to the Ak-Chin Indian Community and its tribal utility authority, Ak-Chin Energy Services. Source: Leonard S. Gold, Utility Strategies Consulting Group,

382

Utility Solar Generation Valuation Methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tucson Electric Power (TEP) developed, tested and verified the results of a new and appropriate method for accurately evaluating the capacity credit of time variant solar generating sources and reviewed new methods to appropriately and fairly evaluate the value of solar generation to electric utilities. The project also reviewed general integrated approaches for adequately compensating owners of solar generation for their benefits to utilities. However, given the limited funding support and time duration of this project combined with the significant differences between utilities regarding rate structures, solar resource availability and coincidence of solar generation with peak load periods, it is well beyond the scope of this project to develop specific rate, rebate, and interconnection approaches to capture utility benefits for all possible utilities. The project developed computer software based evaluation method models to compare solar generation production data measured in very short term time increments called Sample Intervals over a typical utility Dispatch Cycle during an Evaluation Period against utility system load data. Ten second resolution generation production data from the SGSSS and actual one minute resolution TEP system load data for 2006 and 2007, along with data from the Pennington Street Garage 60 kW DC capacity solar unit installed in downtown Tucson will be applied to the model for testing and verification of the evaluation method. Data was provided by other utilities, but critical time periods of data were missing making results derived from that data inaccurate. The algorithms are based on previous analysis and review of specific 2005 and 2006 SGSSS production data. The model was built, tested and verified by in house TEP personnel. For this phase of the project, TEP communicated with, shared solar production data with and collaborated on the development of solar generation valuation tools with other utilities, including Arizona Public Service, Salt River Project, Xcel and Nevada Power Company as well as the Arizona electric cooperatives. In the second phase of the project, three years of 10 second power output data of the SGSSS was used to evaluate the effectiveness of frequency domain analysis, normal statistical distribution analysis and finally maximum/minimum differential output analysis to test the applicability of these mathematic methods in accurately modeling the output variations produced by clouds passing over the SGSSS array.

Hansen, Thomas N.; Dion, Phillip J.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

FEMP Utility Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Services Utility Services Karen Thomas & Deb Beattie  SPONSORED BY THE FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM  Overview  UESC Project Support  Agency / Utility Partnerships  Renewable Project Support  Design Assistance  Agency Energy Implementation Plans * * * * * * UESC Project Support Education UESC Workshops Agency Briefings Utility Briefings On-site team training Communications Web site Enabling documents * Case studies UESC Project Support Direct Project Assistance Project facilitation Advise & Consult In depth Contract development Technical Proposal review Performance Verification Agency / Utility Partnerships Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Strategic Partnering Meeting Renewable Projects  Resource Screening: - PV - Solar Hot Water

384

EIA'S Natural Gas Residential Programs by State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Marketer List: Marketer Summary Table: ... State Public Utility Commission Web Sites. Status of State Electric Industry Restructuring Activity.

385

Utility Rates | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Rates Utility Rates Home Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 6 September, 2013 - 14:00 The utility rate database version 1 API is now deprecated API Utility Rates There comes a time in every API version's lifecycle when it needs to be deprecated. OpenEI's utility rate database version 1 API has been in use since the inception of the database in 2010. As Illinois State University has taken a commanding lead of the project and its data curation, we have updated the schema and API to version 2 to present a richer spectrum of utility rate data. Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 11 June, 2013 - 09:33 Tip for working with approvals on OpenEI EZFeed Utility Rates The "ApprovedRevs" extension is the feature on OpenEI that allows

386

Microsoft Word - January 2012 Utility Incentives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incentives and Rebates for Energy-Efficient Windows Incentives and Rebates for Energy-Efficient Windows offered through utility and state programs Presented by the Efficient Windows Collaborative, January 2012  Do you intend to equip your home with high-performance, energy-efficient windows?  Do you plan to improve your home in a way that lowers energy costs and provides for a comfortable interior?  Are you looking for utility programs within your state that can help you finance such an investment in efficient windows? The following pages give an overview of utility and state programs to help finance improvements in window energy efficiency. Programs are listed by state and by the specific utility companies that administer the programs. For detailed information about each program, please refer to the web links in the list.

387

Analysis of Intracellular State Based on Controlled 3D Nanostructures Mediated Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful technique for analyzing the chemical composition within a single living cell at unprecedented resolution. However, current SERS methods employing uncontrollable colloidal metal particles or non-uniformly distributed metal particles on a substrate as SERS-active sites show relatively low reliability and reproducibility. Here, we report a highly-ordered SERS-active surface that is provided by a gold nano-dots array based on thermal evaporation of gold onto an ITO surface through a nanoporous alumina mask. This new combined technique showed a broader distribution of hot spots and a higher signal-to-noise ratio than current SERS techniques due to the highly reproducible and uniform geometrical structures over a large area. This SERS-active surface was applied as cell culture system to study living cells in situ within their culture environment without any external preparation processes. We applied this newly developed method to cell-based research to differentiate cell lines, cells at different cell cycle stages, and live/dead cells. The enhanced Raman signals achieved from each cell, which represent the changes in biochemical compositions, enabled differentiation of each state and the conditions of the cells. This SERS technique employing a tightly controlled nanostructure array can potentially be applied to single cell analysis, early cancer diagnosis and cell physiology research.

Waleed Ahmed El-said; Tae-hyung Kim; Hyuncheol Kim; Jeong-woo Choi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Analysis and Interpretation of Dual-Polarized Radar Measurements at +45° and ?45° Linear Polarization States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equations are derived for transforming radar data obtained with ±45° linear polarization states to conventional radar parameters measured at horizontal and vertical polarization states. The derivation is based on the covariance matrix and assumes ...

V. Chandrasekar; J. Hubbert; V. N. Bringi; P. F. Meischner

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

State-Aware Performance Analysis with eXtended Stochastic Probes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We define a mechanism for specifying performance queries which combine instantaneous observations of model states and finite sequences of observations of model activities. We realise these queries by composing the state-aware observers (called eXtended ...

Allan Clark; Stephen Gilmore

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Utility Brownfields Resource Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established a program designed to assist utilities wishing to participate in local Brownfields redevelopment projects. EPRI developed this Brownfields guide to educate utility economic and real estate development personnel in identifying, screening, and supporting Brownfields projects.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Future of Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Future of Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs in the The Future of Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs in the United States: Projected Spending and Savings to 2025 Title The Future of Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs in the United States: Projected Spending and Savings to 2025 Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2013 Authors Barbose, Galen L., Charles A. Goldman, Ian M. Hoffman, and Megan A. Billingsley Date Published 01/2013 Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, renewable energy: policy Abstract We develop projections of future spending on, and savings from, energy efficiency programs funded by electric and gas utility customers in the United States, under three scenarios through 2025. Our analysis, which updates a previous LBNL study, relies on detailed bottom-up modeling of current state energy efficiency policies, regulatory decisions, and demand-side management and utility resource plans. The three scenarios are intended to represent a range of potential outcomes under the current policy environment (i.e., without considering possible major new policy developments).

392

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for rapid identification of buried utilities, blended coal ash, and non-spec./off-spec. aggregates and fly

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

393

Army Solid State Laser Program: Design, Operation, and Mission Analysis for a Heat-Capacity Laser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid-state lasers have held great promise for the generation of high-average-power, high-quality output beams for a number of decades. However, the inherent difficulty of scaling the active solid-state gain media while continuing to provide efficient cooling has limited demonstrated powers to <5kW. Even at the maximum demonstrated average powers, the output is most often delivered as continuous wave (CW) or as small energy pulses at high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and the beam divergence is typically >10X the diffraction limit. Challenges posed by optical distortions and depolarization arising from internal temperature gradients in the gain medium of a continuously cooled system are only increased for laser designs that would attempt to deliver the high average power in the form of high energy pulses (>25J) from a single coherent optical aperture. Although demonstrated phase-locking of multiple laser apertures may hold significant promise for the future scaling of solid-state laser systems,1 the continuing need for additional technical development and innovation coupled with the anticipated complexity of these systems effectively limits this approach for near-term multi-kW laser operation outside of a laboratory setting. We have developed and demonstrated a new operational mode for solid-state laser systems in which the cooling of the gain medium is separated in time from the lasing cycle. In ''heat-capacity'' operation, no cooling takes place during lasing. The gain medium is pumped very uniformly and the waste heat from the excitation process is stored in the solid-state gain medium. By depositing the heat on time scales that are short compared to thermal diffusion across the optical aperture, very high average power operation is possible while maintaining low optical distortions. After a lasing cycle, aggressive cooling can then take place in the absence of lasing, limited only by the fracture limit of the solid-state medium. This mode of operation is ideally suited for applications that require 1-30s engagements at very high average power. If necessary, multiple laser apertures can provide continuous operation. Land Combat mission analysis of a stressing air defense scenario including a dense attack of rockets, mortars, and artillery has indicated that multiple HEL weapon systems, based on the solid state, heat capacity laser concept, can provide significantly improved protection of high value battlefield assets. We will present EADSIM results for two government-supplied scenarios, one with temporally high threat density over a fairly large defended area, and one with fewer threats concentrating on a single defended asset. Implications for weapon system requirements will be presented. In order to demonstrate the operation of a high average power heat-capacity laser system, we have developed a flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass laser with output energies in the range of 500-1000J/pulse in a 10 x 10cm{sup 2} beam. With a repetition frequency of 20Hz, an average power of 13kW has been demonstrated for operational periods of up to 10s using a stable optical resonator (see enclosed figure). Using an M=1.4 unstable resonator, a beam divergence of 5X diffraction-limited has been measured with no active wavefront correction. An adaptively corrected unstable resonator that incorporates an intracavity deformable mirror controlled by feedback from an external wavefront sensor will provide <2X diffraction-limited output integrated over an entire 10s run at an average power of 10kW. A very similar laser architecture in which the Nd:glass is replaced by Nd:GGG and the flashlamps are replaced by large diode-laser arrays will enable the scaling of the output average power from the demonstrated 10kW to 100kW (500J/pulse at 200Hz). Risk reduction experiments for diode-pumped Nd:GGG, the fabrication of large Nd:GGG amplifier slabs, as well as the progress toward a sub-scale amplifier testbed pumped by diode arrays with total of 1MW peak power will also be presented.

Dane, C B; Flath, L; Rotter, M; Fochs, S; Brase, J; Bretney, K

2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

394

NRRI summary of Texas Utility Commission staff analysis of the incentive regulation plan established in Docket No. 8585: The first three years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Texas Public Utility Commission Staff review of Southwestern Bell Telephone Company of Texas` (SWBT of Texas) incentive regulation plan (the Plan) yielded mixed results. The evaluation of the Plan found that it provided benefits to Texas ratepayers, yet, as with any experiment, there have been both successes and failures in different aspects of the Plan.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Least-cost utility planning consumer participation manual. [Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is designed to provide guidance to state consumer advocates and other state consumer groups interested in either initiating and/or participating in an Least-Cost Utility Planning (LCUP) process in their state. Least cost utility planning examined primarily as a regulatory framework to be implemented by an appropriate state authority -- usually the public utility commission -- for the benefit of the state`s citizens and electric utility customers. LCUP is also a planning process to be used by investor owned and public utilities to select, support and justify future expenditures in resource additions. This manual is designed as a ``How-To`` manual for implementing and participating in a statewide LCUP process. Its goal is to guide the reader through the LCUP maze so that meaningful, forward-looking, and cost minimizing electric utility planning can be initiated and sustained in your state.

Mitchell, C.; Wellinghoff, J.; Goldberg, F.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Michigan State Code Adoption Analysis: Cost-Effectiveness of Lighting Requirements - ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004  

SciTech Connect

This report documents PNNL's analysis of the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 if this energy code is adopted in the state of Michigan, instead of the current standard.

Richman, Eric E.

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

397

Parallel implementation of a steady state thermal and hydraulic analysis of pipe networks in OpenMP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The considerable computation time of a practical application of sequential algorithms for simulating thermal and flow distribution in pipe networks is the motivating factor to study their parallel implementation. The mathematical model formulated and ... Keywords: OpenMP, flow and thermal analysis, parallel implementation, pipe networks, steady state

Mykhaylo Fedorov

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Statistical Analysis of Precipitation Chemistry Measurements over the Eastern United States. Part II: Kriging Analysis of Regional Patterns and Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The regional patterns and time trends of free acidity and inorganic chemical constituents in precipitation were investigated using a new archive of daily precipitation chemistry measurements for the eastern United States. This archive contains ...

Barrett P. Eynon

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment - Preliminary Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Preliminary Assessment draft report will present the results of a literature search and preliminary assessment of the body of research, analysis methods, models and data deemed to be relevant to the Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment research. This report will provide: 1) a description of the problem space and the kinds of information pertinent to the problem space, 2) a discussion of key relevant or representative literature, 3) a discussion of models and modeling approaches judged to be potentially useful to the research, and 4) the next steps of this research that will be pursued based on this preliminary assessment. This draft report represents a technical deliverable for the NA-22 Simulations, Algorithms, and Modeling (SAM) program. Specifically this draft report is the Task 1 deliverable for project PL09-UtilSocial-PD06, Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment. This project investigates non-traditional use of social and cultural information to improve nuclear proliferation assessment, including nonproliferation assessment, proliferation resistance assessments, safeguards assessments and other related studies. These assessments often use and create technical information about the State’s posture towards proliferation, the vulnerability of a nuclear energy system to an undesired event, and the effectiveness of safeguards. This project will find and fuse social and technical information by explicitly considering the role of cultural, social and behavioral factors relevant to proliferation. The aim of this research is to describe and demonstrate if and how social science modeling has utility in proliferation assessment.

Coles, Garill A.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Brothers, Alan J.; Thompson, Sandra E.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Analysis of International Commodity Shipping Data and the Shipment of NORM to the United States  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Spreader Bar Radiation Detector project, PNNL analyzed US import data shipped through US ports collected over the 12 months of 2006 (over 4.5 million containers). Using these data, we extracted a variety of distributions that are of interest to modelers and developers of active and passive detection systems used to 'scan' IMCCs for potential contraband. This report expands on some of the analysis presented in an earlier report from LLNL, by investigation the foreign port distribution of commodities shipped to the US. The majority of containers shipped to the United States are 40 ft containers ({approx}70%); about 25% are 20 ft; and about 3.6% are 45 ft containers. A small fraction (<1%) of containers are of other more specialized sizes, and very few ports actually ship these unique size containers (a full distribution for all foreign ports is shown in Appendix A below). The primary foreign ports that ship the largest fraction of each container are shown in the table below. Given that 45 ft containers comprise 1 of out every 27 containers shipped to the US, and given the foreign ports from which they are shipped, they should not be ignored in screening; further testing and analysis of radiation measurements for national security with this size container is warranted. While a large amount of NORM is shipped in IMCCs, only a few specific commodities are shipped with enough frequency to present potential issues in screening IMCCs at ports. The majority of containers with NORM will contain fertilizers (5,700 containers), granite (59,000 containers), or ceramic (225,000 containers) materials. Fertilizers were generally shipping in either 20- or 40 ft containers with equal frequency. While granite is mostly shipped in 20 ft containers, ceramic materials can be shipped in either 20- or 40 ft containers. The size of container depended on the specific use of the ceramic or porcelain material. General construction ceramics (such as floor and roofing tiles) tend to be shipped in 20 ft containers. Consumer products made from ceramic materials (e.g., tableware, sinks, and toilets) are generally shipped in 40 ft containers. This distinct discrepancy is due in large part to the packaging of the commodity. Consumer products are generally shipped packed in a box loaded with Styrofoam or other packing material to protect the product from breakage. Construction ceramic materials are generally shipped in less packing material, many times consisting of only a cardboard or wooden box. Granite is almost always shipped in a 20 ft container, given its very high density.

Baciak, James E.; Ely, James H.; Schweppe, John E.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Robinson, Sean M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate 500 Program Info Expiration Date program offered until expiration of funding State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Natural Gas Furnaces: $150-$250, depending on efficiency Natural Gas Furnace Tune-up: $25 ECM Motor: $75 Natural Gas Boilers: $200 Central Air Conditioners: $250 Central Air Conditioner Tune-up: $25 Tankless Gas Water Heaters: $150 Storage Gas Water Heaters: $50 Air Source Heat Pumps: $75/ton

402

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Home Performance with ENERGY STAR®: $4000 Program Info Funding Source NH Saves State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Performance with ENERGY STAR®: up to $4,000 for improvements ENERGY STAR® Homes Qualification: custom incentives and technical support

403

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Custom Incentives: amount that buys down the cost of the project to a 1 year simple payback Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Retrofits and Engineering Studies: 50% of project cost Fluorescent Lighting: $10-$50 High Bay: $70 or $100 (retrofit) Metal Halide: $50 or $70 LED Exit Signs: $12 LED Traffic Signals: $50

404

Future State of Outsourcing Supply Chain Information Systems: An Analysis of Survey Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to acquire knowledge that will help clarify outsourcing trends in general and an information systems utilization perspective in particular. The authors review recent studies on outsourcing and conduct a nationwide survey. ... Keywords: Information Systems, Literature Review, Outsourcing, Supply Chain Management, Survey

Seong-Jong Joo; Ik-Whan G. Kwon; Chang Won Lee

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

406

Managing the transition: an analysis of renewable energy policies in resource-rich Arab states with a comparative focus on the United Arab Emirates and Algeria.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study analyses renewable energy policy in hydrocarbons-wealthy Arab states. Integrating elements of energy policy analysis, Middle Eastern studies and sociotechnical governance theory, the thesis… (more)

Kumetat, Dennis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

State and National Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis Systems for underground injection control. Summary annual report, April 1992--April 1993  

SciTech Connect

ICF Resources` project, entitled {open_quotes}State and National Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis Systems for Underground Injection Control{close_quotes} includes two primary tasks (development of state and national systems respectively) and a technology transfer element. The state system was designed to assist states with data management related to underground injection control (UIC). However, during the current period, external changes (primarily pending regulatory changes at the federal level) have made the risk assessment protocol aspect of the state system of increased importance relative to data management. This protocol would assess the relative risk of groundwater contamination due to UIC activities in various areas of the state. The risk assessment system could be used to assist states in allocating scarce resources and potentially could form the analytical basis of a state variance program to respond to pending federal regulatory changes. Consequently, a substantial portion of the effort to date has been focused on this aspect of the project, The national energy and environmental risk analysis system (EERAS) is designed to enhance DOE`s analytical capabilities. This concept will be demonstrated using UIC data. The initial system design for EERAS has been completed but may be revised based on input from DOE and on the pending UIC regulatory changes. Data have been collected and organized and can be input once the file structure is finalized. The further development options for EERAS defined as part of this project will allow for the full development of the system beyond the current prototype phase which will enhance DOE`s analytical capabilities for responding to regulatory initiatives and for evaluating the benefits of risk-based regulatory approaches.

Haas, M.R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Conserving the Connections: A Nationwide Inventory of State-Based Habitat Connectivity Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Transportation. Montpelier, VT. Personal Communicationin Vermont. Montpelier, VT. http://repositories.cdlib.org/Transportation, Montpelier, VT. http://www.aot.state.vt.us/

Feinberg, Jesse

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Sensitivity analysis, ocean state estimation and diagnostics in the California current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source water . . 2.5.2 Offshore upwelling source water . .states shows stronger offshore transport during the Aprilof interest: inshore and offshore of the Point Sur region of

Song, Hajoon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Sensitivity analysis, ocean state estimation and diagnostics in the California current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.3 Physical Ocean Model Simulations . . . . . . . . . . .3 xv the California Estimating ocean states for Aprilusing the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) data

Song, Hajoon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Quantum Chemical Analysis of the Excited State Dynamics of Hydrated Electrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum calculations are performed for an anion water cluster representing the first hydration shell of the solvated electron in solution. The absorption spectra from the ground state, the instant excited states and the relaxed excited states are calculated including CI-SD interactions. Analytic expressions for the nonadiabatic relaxation are presented. It is shown that the 50fs dynamics recently observed after s->p excitation is best accounted for if it is identified with the internal conversion, preceded by an adiabatic relaxation within the excited p state. In addition, transient absorptions found in the infrared are qualitatively reproduced by these calculations .

P. O. J. Scherer; Sighart F. Fischer

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and statewide average residential electricity rates below $Average statewide residential electricity rates were takenFor Residential Wind Systems state electricity rates, which

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The "Great Experiment" and the Michigan State Normal School: An Institutional History Analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the historic development of teacher training in the western world and the United States, focusing on the establishment and institutionalization of teacher… (more)

Flowers, Ronald D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington WestDakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington Westare states For example, Vermont had subscribed all of its

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Customers"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Customers" Customers" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Number of Customers" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",1,".",1 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",1,".",1 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1 "RV CSU Power II LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1

416

Springfield Utility Board - Energy Smart Lighting Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Springfield Utility Board - Energy Smart Lighting Program Springfield Utility Board - Energy Smart Lighting Program Springfield Utility Board - Energy Smart Lighting Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Commercial Lighting Replacement: $1,500 Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Incentives are based upon three programs offered by SUB: New Construction Lighting: $10 - $50/light fixture Commercial Lighting Replacement: $3 - $100 Commercial Lighting Implementation: not specified Energy Smart Design Office: $0.50 per square foot Provider Springfield Utility Board The Springfield Utility Board (SUB) works with their commercial customers

417

Cedarburg Light and Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cedarburg Light and Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Cedarburg Light and Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cedarburg Light and Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Unspecified ($250,000 per bid cycle) Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by measure Provider Cedarburg Light and Water Utility Cedarburg Light and Water Utility provides incentives for commercial,

418

Norwich Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Norwich Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Norwich Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Norwich Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Variable Frequency Drives: Contact NPU Lighting: Contact NPU HVAC: Contact NPU Natural Gas Conversions: Contact NPU Provider Norwich Public Utilities Norwich Public Utilities (NPU) provides rebates to its commercial, industrial, institutional, and agricultural customers for high-efficiency

419

Rochester Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rochester Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Rochester Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Rochester Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Construction Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Electric Measures: $100,000 per customer location, per technology, per year Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by technology Provider Rochester Public Utilities Rochester Public Utilities (RPU) offers incentives to commercial and

420

Least-cost utility planning consumer participation manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is designed to provide guidance to state consumer advocates and other state consumer groups interested in either initiating and/or participating in an Least-Cost Utility Planning (LCUP) process in their state. Least cost utility planning examined primarily as a regulatory framework to be implemented by an appropriate state authority -- usually the public utility commission -- for the benefit of the state's citizens and electric utility customers. LCUP is also a planning process to be used by investor owned and public utilities to select, support and justify future expenditures in resource additions. This manual is designed as a How-To'' manual for implementing and participating in a statewide LCUP process. Its goal is to guide the reader through the LCUP maze so that meaningful, forward-looking, and cost minimizing electric utility planning can be initiated and sustained in your state.

Mitchell, C.; Wellinghoff, J.; Goldberg, F.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Dublin Municipal Electric Util | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dublin Municipal Electric Util Dublin Municipal Electric Util Jump to: navigation, search Name Dublin Municipal Electric Util Place Indiana Utility Id 5392 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial General Power Rate OL: Outdoor Lighting (Security Lights) Lighting Rate SL: Street Lighting, All Public Street Lighting Lighting Rate SL: Street Lighting, State Highway Stoplight Lighting Residential Residential Residential: Space Heating and/or Air Conditioning Service Residential

422

Solving the problems facing the electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

The dimensions of the current problems of attracting capital for utilities investment, of achieving more efficient utilization of capacity, of siting and construction of new power plants, and of utilities receiving a return on their investment large enough to enable them to continue their service to American consumers are examined. Federal actions that are being taken to help get the utilities out of their current state of malaise are described. The author concludes that positive electric power load management, through a system of cost-based pricing incentives and load controls, can achieve a balanced future both for total electricity usage and for peak demand. This would minimize the consumption of scarce fossil fuels in electricity generation, moderate the future need for construction of new capacity, improve utility revenues, and eventually reduce the need for rate increases to maintain utility viability. The FEA feels that is a reasonable, attainable objective for substantial electrification of the economy beyond 1985. (MCW)

Hill, J.A.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Is it Worth it? A Comparative Analysis of Cost-Benefit Projections for State Renewables Portfolio Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Economics Wind Utility Consulting (WUC) UCS Rutgers CEEEP Center for Clean Air Policy (Policy Consulting (PPC) UCS GDS Associates (GDS) Wind Utility Consulting ( WUC) Sustainable Energy

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory...

425

OpenEI Community - Utility+Utility Access Map  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finding Utility Finding Utility Companies Under a Given Utility ID http://en.openei.org/community/blog/finding-utility-companies-under-given-utility-id  Here's a quick way to find all the utility company pages under a given utility id.  From the Special Ask page, in the query box enter the following: [[Category:Utility Companies]][[EiaUtilityId::15248]] substituting your utility id of interest for 15248, and click "Find results". http://en.openei.org/community/blog/finding-utility-companies-under-given-utility-id#comments

426

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Name Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns...

427

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Empowering Consumers and the ) Request for Information Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party ) Use and Privacy ) COMMENTS BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STATE UTILITY CONSUMER...

428

Utilities weather the storm  

SciTech Connect

Utilities must restore power to storm-damaged transmission and distribution systems, even if it means going out in ice storms or during lightning and hurricane conditions. Weather forecasting helps utilities plan for possible damage as well as alerting them to long-term trends. Storm planning includes having trained repair personnel available and adjusting the system so that less power imports are needed. Storm damage response requires teamwork and cooperation between utilities. Utilities can strengthen equipment in storm-prone or vulnerable areas, but good data are necessary to document the incidence of lighning strikes, hurricanes, etc. 2 references, 8 figures.

Lihach, N.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Tribal Utility Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

• Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems – These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

Municipal Utility Districts (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Municipal Utility Districts, regulated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, may be created for the following purposes: (1) the control, storage, preservation, and distribution of its...

431

Electric utility system master plan  

SciTech Connect

This publication contains the electric utility system plan and guidelines for providing adequate electric power to the various facilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in support of the mission of the Laboratory. The topics of the publication include general information on the current systems and their operation, a planning analysis for current and future growth in energy demand, proposed improvements and expansions required to meet long range site development and the site`s five-year plan.

Erickson, O.M.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

State energy price and expenditure report 1993  

SciTech Connect

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 states and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the US. The five economic sectors used in SEPER correspond to those used in SEDR and are residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility. Documentation in appendices describe how the price estimates are developed, provide conversion factors for measures used in the energy analysis, and include a glossary. 65 tabs.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Public Utility Regulatory Act, Alternative Energy Providers (Texas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulatory Act, Alternative Energy Providers (Texas) Regulatory Act, Alternative Energy Providers (Texas) Public Utility Regulatory Act, Alternative Energy Providers (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Public Utility Commission of Texas Chapter 35 of the Public Utility Regulatory Act specifically addresses alternative energy providers, and contains provisions designed to aid such providers in selling power in Texas's competitive utility market. The

434

Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation authorizes the Public Service Commission to promulgate regulations related to investor owned utilities in South Carolina, and addresses service areas, rates and charges, and operating procedures for

435

Thermopolis hydrothermal system with an analysis of Hot Springs State Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermopolis is the site of Hot Springs State Park, where numerous hot springs produce nearly 3000 gallons per minute (gpm) of 130/sup 0/F (54/sup 0/C) water. The University of Wyoming Geothermal Resource Assessment Group has studied a 1700-square-mile area centered roughly on the State Park. Available literature, bottom-hole temperatures from over 400 oil well logs, 62 oil field drill stem tests, the Wyoming State Engineer's water well files, 60 formation water analyses, thermal logs of 19 holes, and field investigations of geology and hydrology form the basis of this report.

Hinckley, B.S.; Heasler, H.P.; King, J.K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Aligning Utility Incentives with Investment in Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aligning Utility Incentives with Investment in Energy Efficiency: A Resource of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (United States) Jump to: navigation, search Name...

437

Anaheim Public Utilities- Low-Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Anaheim Public Utilities offers low-cost financing for energy efficiency measures through State Assistance Fund for Enterprise, Business and Industrial Development Corporation ([http://www.safe...

438

Decoupling treatment of electric and gas utilities can differ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Many States institute decoupled rates for both electric and gas utilities ... Virginia and North Carolina have both decoupled gas rates but not electric rates.

439

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs New Hampshire...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing NationalGrid (formerly Granite State Electric) Information for Businesses Public Service of New Hampshire (PSNH...

440

Utilizing Nanoscale Interfacial Films to Tailor Battery and Other Ionic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Such nanoscale intergranular and surficial films can be utilized to engineer lithium-ion battery cathode and anode materials, as well as solid-state ionic ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

Information Center

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure in the United States. This report updates a previously published report on copper wire theft. The combined efforts of electric utilities, lawmakers, scrap metal...

443

Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Power Burst Facility (PER-620) Final End State and PBF Vessel Disposal  

SciTech Connect

Preparation of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, (DOE and EPA 1995) which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental, Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time critical removal action process as an approach for decommissioning. The scope of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is to evaluate alternatives and recommend a preferred alternative for the final end state of the PBF and the final disposal location for the PBF vessel.

B. C. Culp

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

An Analysis of Precipitation Variability, Persistence, and Observational Data Uncertainty in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an intercomparison of precipitation observations for the western United States. Using nine datasets, the authors provide a comparative climatology and season- and location-specific evaluations of precipitation uncertainty for ...

Kristen J. Guirguis; Roni Avissar

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Tornado Fatalities in the United States: 1880–2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dataset of killer tornadoes is compiled and analyzed spatially in order to assess region-specific vulnerabilities in the United States from 1880 to 2005. Results reveal that most tornado fatalities occur in the lower–Arkansas, Tennessee, and ...

Walker S. Ashley

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Corporate bodies and chemical bonds : an STS analysis of natural gas development in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas extraction in the United States in the early 21st century has transformed social, physical, legal and biological landscapes. The technique of hydraulic fracturing, which entails the high-pressure injection into ...

Wylie, Sara Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Prospects for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in the United States : a general equilibrium analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) could significantly contribute to reductions in carbon dioxide emissions from personal vehicle transportation in the United States over the next century, depending on the ...

Karplus, Valerie Jean

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO{sub 2} take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry`s response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO[sub 2] take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry's response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Water Energy Sources Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Maine Public Utilities Commission Legislation enacted in 2009 directed the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to develop a program offering green power as an option to residential and small commercial customers in the state. The PUC issued rules in October 2010 and issued an RFP. The PUC selected a company, 3 Degrees, to manage the statewide green power program for Maine's transmission and distribution territories. The program includes community-based renewable

451

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Jump to: navigation, search Several states require certain electric utilities to offer customers the option of buying electricity generated from renewable resources, commonly known as “green power.” Typically, utilities offer green power generated using renewable resources that the utilities own (or for which they contract), or they buy renewable energy credits (RECs) from a renewable energy provider certified by a state public utilities commission [1] Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 17) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active DEMEC - Green Power Program (Delaware) Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Delaware Municipal Utility Solar Water Heat

452

Utility+Utility Access Map | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the utility company pages under a given utility id. From the Special Ask page, in the query box enter the following: Category:Utility CompaniesEiaUtilityId::15248...

453

Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Western Interstate Energy Board Legislation authorizes states' entrance into the Western Interstate Nuclear Compact, which aims to undertake the cooperation of participating states in

454

Southern States Energy Compact (Multiple States) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southern States Energy Compact (Multiple States) Southern States Energy Compact (Multiple States) Southern States Energy Compact (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Southern States Energy Board

455

Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage...

456

Analysis of system wide distortion in an integrated power system utilizing a high voltage DC bus and silicon carbide power devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigates the distortion on the electrical distribution system for a high voltage DC Integrated Power System (IPS). The analysis was concentrated on the power supplied to a propulsion motor driven by an ...

Fallier, William F. (William Frederick)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

None

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Multi actor multi criteria analysis (MAMCA) as a tool to support sustainable decisions: State of use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this contribution, the multi actor multi criteria analysis (MAMCA) to evaluate transport projects is presented. This evaluation methodology specifically focuses on the inclusion of the different actors that are involved in a project, the so-called ... Keywords: Multi actor multi criteria analysis, Stakeholders, Transport project appraisal

Cathy Macharis; Laurence Turcksin; Kenneth Lebeau

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis state utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Analysis of mass transfer processes in geothermal power cycles utilizing direct contact heat exchange. Report of work, September 21, 1978 to September 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer program was developed which calculates the isobutane content of the spent brine and the liquid-vapor distribution of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide throughout the components of a geothermal power plant using direct contact heat exchange. The program model assumes separate boiler and preheater vessels, with the preheater being a spray tower. The condenser model is a horizontal tube surface condenser with condensation on the outside. The program was written in Fortran language. The Fortran source deck consists of 976 cards. The program utilizes 320K for compilation and 72K for execution on an IBM 370/3031. Samp