National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for analysis advanced simulation

  1. Advanced Simulation Capability for

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Advanced Simulation & Computing pro- grams as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science, Fossil Energy, and Nuclear Energy. Challenge Current groundwater and soil...

  2. Advanced Simulation and Computing

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NA-ASC-117R-09-Vol.1-Rev.0 Advanced Simulation and Computing PROGRAM PLAN FY09 October 2008 ASC Focal Point Robert Meisner, Director DOE/NNSA NA-121.2 202-586-0908 Program Plan Focal Point for NA-121.2 Njema Frazier DOE/NNSA NA-121.2 202-586-5789 A Publication of the Office of Advanced Simulation & Computing, NNSA Defense Programs i Contents Executive Summary ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 I. Introduction

  3. Advancing Internal Combustion Engine Simulations using Sensitivity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advancing Internal Combustion Engine Simulations using Sensitivity Analysis PI Name: Sibendu Som PI Email: ssom@anl.gov Institution: Argonne National Laboratory Allocation Program:...

  4. Advanced engineering analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, W.R.

    1992-11-01

    The Advanced Engineering Analysis project is being used to improve the breadth of engineering analysis types, the particular phenomena which may be simulated, and also increase the accuracy and usability of the results of both new and current types of simulations and analyses. This is an interim report covering several topics under this project. Information on two new implementations of failure criteria for metal forming, the implementation of coupled fluid flow/heat transfer analysis capabilities, the integration of experimental shock and vibration test data with analyses, a correction to a contact solution problem with a 3-D parabolic brick finite element, and the development and implementation of a file translator to link IDEAS to DYNA3D is provided in this report.

  5. Advanced Modeling & Simulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Modeling & Simulation Advanced Modeling & Simulation Advanced Modeling & Simulation ADVANCING THE STATE OF THE ART Innovation advances science. Historically, innovation resulted almost exclusively from fundamental theories combined with observation and experimentation over time. With advancements in engineering, computing power and visualization tools, scientists from all disciplines are gaining insights into physical systems in ways not possible with traditional approaches

  6. Advanced Wellbore Thermal Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-03-04

    GEOTEMP2, which is based on the earlier GEOTEMP program, is a wellbore thermal simulator designed for geothermal well drilling and production applications. The code treats natural and forced convection and conduction within the wellbore and heat conduction within the surrounding rock matrix. A variety of well operations can be modeled including injection, production, forward and reverse circulation with gas or liquid, gas or liquid drilling, and two-phase steam injection and production. Well completion with severalmore » different casing sizes and cement intervals can be modeled. The code allows variables, such as flow rate, to change with time enabling a realistic treatment of well operations. Provision is made in the flow equations to allow the flow areas of the tubing to vary with depth in the wellbore. Multiple liquids can exist in GEOTEMP2 simulations. Liquid interfaces are tracked through the tubing and annulus as one liquid displaces another. GEOTEMP2, however, does not attempt to simulate displacement of liquids with a gas or two-phase steam or vice versa. This means that it is not possible to simulate an operation where the type of drilling fluid changes, e.g. mud going to air. GEOTEMP2 was designed primarily for use in predicting the behavior of geothermal wells, but it is flexible enough to handle many typical drilling, production, and injection problems in the oil industry as well. However, GEOTEMP2 does not allow the modeling of gas-filled annuli in production or injection problems. In gas or mist drilling, no radiation losses are included in the energy balance. No attempt is made to model flow in the formation. Average execution time is 50 CP seconds on a CDC CYBER170. This edition of GEOTEMP2 is designated as Version 2.0 by the contributors.« less

  7. Consortium for Advanced Battery Simulation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Battery Simulation - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ASC Advanced Simulation and Computing Computational Systems & Software Environment Crack Modeling The Computational Systems & Software Environment program builds integrated,...

  9. Advanced ST Plasma Scenario Simulations for NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Kessel; E.J. Synakowski; D.A. Gates; R.W. Harvey; S.M. Kaye; T.K. Mau; J. Menard; C.K. Phillips; G. Taylor; R. Wilson; the NSTX Research Team

    2004-10-28

    Integrated scenario simulations are done for NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] that address four primary milestones for developing advanced ST configurations: high {beta} and high {beta}{sub N} inductive discharges to study all aspects of ST physics in the high-beta regime; non-inductively sustained discharges for flattop times greater than the skin time to study the various current-drive techniques; non-inductively sustained discharges at high {beta} for flattop times much greater than a skin time which provides the integrated advanced ST target for NSTX; and non-solenoidal start-up and plasma current ramp-up. The simulations done here use the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) and are based on a discharge 109070. TRANSP analysis of the discharge provided the thermal diffusivities for electrons and ions, the neutral-beam (NB) deposition profile, and other characteristics. CURRAY is used to calculate the High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating depositions and current drive. GENRAY/CQL3D is used to establish the heating and CD [current drive] deposition profiles for electron Bernstein waves (EBW). Analysis of the ideal-MHD stability is done with JSOLVER, BALMSC, and PEST2. The simulations indicate that the integrated advanced ST plasma is reachable, obtaining stable plasmas with {beta} {approx} 40% at {beta}{sub N}'s of 7.7-9, I{sub P} = 1.0 MA, and B{sub T} = 0.35 T. The plasma is 100% non-inductive and has a flattop of 4 skin times. The resulting global energy confinement corresponds to a multiplier of H{sub 98(y,2)} = 1.5. The simulations have demonstrated the importance of HHFW heating and CD, EBW off-axis CD, strong plasma shaping, density control, and early heating/H-mode transition for producing and optimizing these plasma configurations.

  10. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of performance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activities throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National

  11. Advanced simulation capability for environmental management ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    environmental management (ASCEM): An overview of initial results Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced simulation capability for environmental management (ASCEM): An ...

  12. Interoperable Technologies for Advanced Petascale Simulations (Technical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Interoperable Technologies for Advanced Petascale Simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interoperable Technologies for Advanced Petascale Simulations Our final report on the accomplishments of ITAPS at Stony Brook during period covered by the research award includes component service, interface service and applications. On the component service, we have designed and implemented a robust functionality for the Lagrangian tracking of

  13. COLLOQUIUM: Advanced Simulation for Technology Innovation and Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 27, 2015, 2:00pm to 3:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Advanced Simulation for Technology Innovation and Science Discovery Mr. Scott Stanton ANSYS, Inc. I will give an overview of the simulation technologies being developed by ANSYS, the largest provider of simulation software. This overview will include computational fluid dynamics, structural mechanics and computational electromagnetic field analysis. I will then discuss how these solvers

  14. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer drilling tests, as well as single impact tests, have been designed and executed. Both Berea sandstone and Mancos shale samples are used. In single impact tests, three impacts are sequentially loaded at the same rock location to investigate rock response to repetitive loadings. The crater depth and width are measured as well as the displacement and force in the rod and the force in the rock. Various pressure differences across the rock-indentor interface (i.e. bore pressure minus pore pressure) are used to investigate the pressure effect on rock penetration. For hammer drilling tests, an industrial fluid hammer is used to drill under both underbalanced and overbalanced conditions. Besides calibrating the modeling tool, the data and cuttings collected from the tests indicate several other important applications. For example, different rock penetrations during single impact tests may reveal why a fluid hammer behaves differently with diverse rock types and under various pressure conditions at the hole bottom. On the other hand, the shape of the cuttings from fluid hammer tests, comparing to those from traditional rotary drilling methods, may help to identify the dominant failure mechanism that percussion drilling relies on. If so, encouraging such a failure mechanism may improve hammer performance. The project is summarized in this report. Instead of compiling the information contained in the previous quarterly or other technical reports, this report focuses on the descriptions of tasks, findings, and conclusions, as well as the efforts on promoting percussion drilling technologies to industries including site visits, presentations, and publications. As a part of the final deliveries, the 3D numerical model for rock mechanics is also attached.

  15. EM Leads with Advanced Simulation Capability Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – Since 2010, EM’s Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation has initiated technology development programs such as the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) and the Applied Field Research Initiatives to enhance characterization and remediation technologies and create cost savings.

  16. Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Intern

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gertman, Vanessa

    2013-05-28

    Some interns just copy papers and seal envelopes. Not at INL! Check out how Vanessa Gertman, an INL intern working at the Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation, spent her summer working with some intense visualization software. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  17. Fast Analysis and Simulation Team | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACFast Analysis and Simulation Team

  18. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Engine Combustion Research Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion Research 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  19. Advanced Modeling and Simulation Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... September 9, 2013 Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements The purpose of the Nuclear Energy Advanced ...

  20. ORNL). Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) was established by the US Department of Energy in 2010 to advance modeling and simulation capabilities for nuclear reactors. CASL's...

  1. Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis. No...

  2. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (ASCEM): AN OVERVIEW OF INITIAL RESULTS Mark Williamson,* Juan Meza,† David Moulton,‡ Ian Gorton,§ Mark Freshley,§ Paul Dixon,‡ Roger Seitz,¶ Carl Steefel,† Stefan Finsterle,† Susan Hubbard,† Ming Zhu,* Kurt Gerdes,* Russ Patterson,# and Yvette T. Collazo* *U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Washington, DC, USA †Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA ‡Los Alamos National

  3. BUSINESS PLAN ADVANCED SIMULATION AND COMPUTING

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    i BUSINESS PLAN ADVANCED SIMULATION AND COMPUTING 2015 NA-ASC-104R-15-Vol.1-Rev.0 ii Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

  4. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : gap analysis for high fidelity and performance assessment code development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Joon H.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Dewers, Thomas A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Fuller, Timothy J.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wang, Yifeng

    2011-03-01

    This report describes a gap analysis performed in the process of developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with rigorous verification, validation, and software quality requirements. The gap analyses documented in this report were are performed during an initial gap analysis to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC, and during follow-on activities that delved into more detailed assessments of the various codes that were acquired, studied, and tested. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. The gap analysis indicates that significant capabilities may already exist in the existing THC codes although there is no single code able to fully account for all physical and chemical processes involved in a waste disposal system. Large gaps exist in modeling chemical processes and their couplings with other processes. The coupling of chemical processes with flow transport and mechanical deformation remains challenging. The data for extreme environments (e.g., for elevated temperature and high ionic strength media) that are needed for repository modeling are severely lacking. In addition, most of existing reactive transport codes were developed for non-radioactive contaminants, and they need to be adapted to account for radionuclide decay and in-growth. The accessibility to the source codes is generally limited. Because the problems of interest for the Waste IPSC are likely to result in relatively large computational models, a compact memory-usage footprint and a fast/robust solution procedure will be needed. A robust massively parallel processing (MPP) capability will also be required to provide reasonable turnaround times on the analyses that will be performed with the code. A performance assessment (PA) calculation for a waste disposal system generally requires a large number (hundreds to thousands) of model simulations to quantify the effect of model parameter uncertainties on the predicted repository performance. A set of codes for a PA calculation must be sufficiently robust and fast in terms of code execution. A PA system as a whole must be able to provide multiple alternative models for a specific set of physical/chemical processes, so that the users can choose various levels of modeling complexity based on their modeling needs. This requires PA codes, preferably, to be highly modularized. Most of the existing codes have difficulties meeting these requirements. Based on the gap analysis results, we have made the following recommendations for the code selection and code development for the NEAMS waste IPSC: (1) build fully coupled high-fidelity THCMBR codes using the existing SIERRA codes (e.g., ARIA and ADAGIO) and platform, (2) use DAKOTA to build an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS), and build a modular code architecture and key code modules for performance assessments. The key chemical calculation modules will be built by expanding the existing CANTERA capabilities as well as by extracting useful components from other existing codes.

  5. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Video Gallery Management of Uncertainties in Predictive Science presented by Dr. Hany Abdel-Khalik and Dr. Ralph Smith, NCSU. Surrogate Models for Uncertainty Quantification presented by Dr. Ralph Smith, NCSU. Subchannel Methods for the Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis for Nuclear Power Systems presented by Dr. Michael Doster, NCSU. Finding the Cure for CRUD: Insights from CASL presented by Dr. Mike Short, MIT. Andrew Godfrey (ORNL) describes CASL -- the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light

  6. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upcoming Training Events VERA Tutorials VERA Tutorial Download Tutorial Download Zip-file (11MB) Webinars Introduction to CASL Youtube snapshot Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors Youtube snapshot CASL Dedication Youtube snapshot Energy Secretary Chu visits ORNL Youtube snapshot CASL's VERA: What is Possible? Youtube snapshot Andrew Godfrey - Nuclear Energy Technical Webcasts - VERA Methods Youtube snapshot Subchannel methods for the Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Nuclear

  7. Software Framework for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Widmann; Sorin Munteanu; Aseem Jain; Pankaj Gupta; Mark Moales; Erik Ferguson; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Yi-dong Lang; Larry Biegler; Michael Locke; Simon Lingard; Jay Yun

    2010-08-01

    This report summarizes the work accomplished during the Phase II development effort of the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The objective of the project is to develop the tools to efficiently combine high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models with process modeling software. During the course of the project, a robust integration controller was developed that can be used in any CAPE-OPEN compliant process modeling environment. The controller mediates the exchange of information between the process modeling software and the CFD software. Several approaches to reducing the time disparity between CFD simulations and process modeling have been investigated and implemented. These include enabling the CFD models to be run on a remote cluster and enabling multiple CFD models to be run simultaneously. Furthermore, computationally fast reduced-order models (ROMs) have been developed that can be 'trained' using the results from CFD simulations and then used directly within flowsheets. Unit operation models (both CFD and ROMs) can be uploaded to a model database and shared between multiple users.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Advanced Engine Combustion Research Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion Research 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ace007_oefelein_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion Research Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Low-Temperature and Diesel Engine Combustion Research

  9. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM): Early

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site Demonstration (Conference) | SciTech Connect Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM): Early Site Demonstration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM): Early Site Demonstration The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, Technology Innovation and Development (EM-32), is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM).

  10. Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: APECS AgencyCompany Organization: National Energy Technology...

  11. Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) (Redirected from APECS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: APECS AgencyCompany Organization: National...

  12. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J.C., CASL: Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors - A DOE Energy Innovation Hub, ANS MC2015 Joint Internation Conference on Mathematics and Computation...

  13. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Virtual Environment for Scientific Collaboration Posted: April 30, 2013 The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, the Department of Energy's first...

  14. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements ...

  15. Recent Advances and Future Challenges in the Modeling and Simulations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the injection of Urea-Water-Solution for Automotive SCR Systems Recent Advances and Future Challenges in the Modeling and Simulations of the injection of ...

  16. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  17. Fast Analysis and Simulation Team | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SheetsFast Analysis and Simulation Team content top Fast Analysis and Simulation Team

  18. Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis & Evaluation Team

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis & Evaluation Team to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004.

  19. Improved Solvers for Advanced Engine Combustion Simulation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document: ace076_mcnenly_2013_o.pdfTechnology Area: Advanced Combustion; Combustion and Emissions ControlPresenter: Matthew McNenlyPresenting Organization: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ...

  20. Advanced HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Advanced HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vss089_daw_2012_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Evaluation of 2010 Urea-SCR Technology for Hybrid Vehicles using PSAT System Simulations Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Impacts of Advanced

  1. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

    2006-06-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  2. Interoperable Technologies for Advanced Petascale Simulations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    power plant fuel rods. We have implemented the fluid-structure interaction for 3D windmill and parachute simulations. We have continued our collaboration with PNNL, BNL, LANL,...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crack Modeling The Physics & Engineering Models program provides the models and databases used in simulations supporting the U.S. stockpile. These models and databases...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation Computing:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These collaborations help solve the challenges of developing computing platforms and simulation tools across a number of disciplines. Computer Science Research Institute The...

  5. Advanced simulation capability for environmental management (ASCEM): An

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    overview of initial results (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Advanced simulation capability for environmental management (ASCEM): An overview of initial results Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced simulation capability for environmental management (ASCEM): An overview of initial results No abstract prepared. Authors: Williamson, M. ; Meza, J. ; Moulton, D. ; Gorton, I. ; Feshley, M. ; Dixon, P. ; Seitz, R. ; Steefel, C. ; Finsterle, S. ; Hubbard, S. ; Zhu,

  6. Advanced Simulation Capability of Environmental Management | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Advanced Simulation Capability of Environmental Management Advanced Simulation Capability of Environmental Management The mission of ASCEM is to develop a modular and extensible open-source, high performance computing (HPC) modeling system for multiphase, multicomponent, multiscale subsurface flow and contaminant transport, and source-term degradation, enabling robust and standardized future performance and risk assessments for EM cleanup and closure activities. For more

  7. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program Plan |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Program Plan Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program Plan The NEAMS program plan includes information on the program vision, objective, scope, schedule and cost, management, development team and collaborations. PDF icon NEAMS Executive Program Plan.pdf More Documents & Publications NEAMS Quarterly Report April-June 2013 Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements

  8. Interoperable Technologies for Advanced Petascale Simulations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We have simulated a step in the reprocessing and separation of spent fuels from nuclear power plant fuel rods. We have implemented the fluid-structure interaction for 3D windmill ...

  9. Thermal Simulation of Advanced Powertrain Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the Volvo complete vehicle model was modified to include engine and exhaust system thermal outputs and cooling system to enable WHR simulations from a system perspective.

  10. Advanced Simulation and Computing Business Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rummel, E.

    2015-07-09

    To maintain a credible nuclear weapons program, the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) Office of Defense Programs (DP) needs to make certain that the capabilities, tools, and expert staff are in place and are able to deliver validated assessments. This requires a complete and robust simulation environment backed by an experimental program to test ASC Program models. This ASC Business Plan document encapsulates a complex set of elements, each of which is essential to the success of the simulation component of the Nuclear Security Enterprise. The ASC Business Plan addresses the hiring, mentoring, and retaining of programmatic technical staff responsible for building the simulation tools of the nuclear security complex. The ASC Business Plan describes how the ASC Program engages with industry partners—partners upon whom the ASC Program relies on for today’s and tomorrow’s high performance architectures. Each piece in this chain is essential to assure policymakers, who must make decisions based on the results of simulations, that they are receiving all the actionable information they need.

  11. COLLOQUIUM: CASL: Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactors, a DOE Energy Innovation Hub | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab May 29, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: CASL: Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, a DOE Energy Innovation Hub Dr. Douglas Kothe Oak Ridge National Laboratory The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is the first U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovation Hub, established in July 2010 for the modeling and simulation (M&S) of nuclear

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    located at other laboratories. These interconnects require constant observation and analysis as minor changes or error conditions can drastically alter the performance of...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and surfaces for finite element analysis. Trilinos Trilinos is an extensive open source software library that provides users with a variety of solvers for use on parallel...

  14. advanced simulation and computing | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration simulation and computing | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs

  15. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    codes (e.g,. a physics simulation) and iterative systems analysis methods such as optimization or uncertainty quantification. It includes algorithms for: optimization with...

  16. advanced-hydraulic-and-areodynamic-analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Hydraulic and Aerodynamic Analysis Using CFD March 27-28, 2013 Argonne, Illinois And Remote Locations Dr. Steve Lottes Announcement pdficon small This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Free 2 Day Training Course in Advanced Hydraulic and Aerodynamic Analysis Using CFD March 27-28 (Wednesday-Thursday) Learn and practice using STAR-CCM+ CFD software Tutorial based with a variety of hydraulic and aerodynamic problems Instructors guide

  17. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Technology Archive Energy Department Announces Five Year Renewal of Funding for First Energy Innovation Hub Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors to Receive up to $121.5 Million Over Five Years. Posted: January 29, 2015 VERA-CS Coupled Multi-physics Capability demonstrated in a Full Core Simulation In December, CASL reported on the latest results from its Watts Bar reactor progression problem modeling. Posted: August 14, 2014 Westinghouse Completes its AP1000®

  18. Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Multivariate Analysis Tools Applied to Surface Analysis. No abstract prepared. Authors: Ohlhausen, James Anthony Publication Date: 2010-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1022188 Report Number(s): SAND2010-5304C TRN: US201117%%662 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the

  19. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Media Kit CASL Acknowledgement This research was supported by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (http://www.casl.gov), an Energy Innovation Hub (http://www.energy.gov/hubs) for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors under U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. CASL Logo Files CASL Extended - CASL_word.jpg and CASL_word.png CASL without words - CASL.jpg and CASL.png CASL with words - CASL_word.jpg and CASL_word.png CASL Partners - partners.jpg

  20. General Motors Clean Combustion Engines Advanced with Predictive Simulation Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Motors Clean Combustion Engines Advanced with Predictive Simulation Tools Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been working with General Motors (GM) for over 30 years. In the last few years, this partnership has become a Strategic Alliance, which includes a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), making it easier for the partners to work together. The Alliance has broken new ground in how the national laboratories work with industry leaders. There's a dedicated SNL liaison to

  1. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Back Industry Council Chairperson: Scott Thomas, Duke Energy Executive Director: Dennis Hussey, EPRI The mission of the Industry Council (IC) is to ensure that CASL solutions are "used and useful", and that CASL provides effective leadership advancing the Modeling and Simulation state-of-the art in the nuclear industry. Specific objectives of the Industry Council are: Early, continuous, and frequent interface and engagement of end-users and technology providers Critical review of CASL

  2. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, M.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Freedman, V.; Agarwal, D.; Andre, B.; Bott, Y.; Chen, X.; Davis, J.; Faybishenko, B.; Gorton, I.; Murray, C.; Moulton, D.; Meyer, J.; Rockhold, M.; Shoshani, A.; Steefel, C.; Wainwright, H.; Waichler, S.

    2012-09-28

    In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energys Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.

  3. EGR Distribution in Engine Cylinders Using Advanced Virtual Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Xuetong

    2000-08-20

    Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) is a well-known technology for reduction of NOx in diesel engines. With the demand for extremely low engine out NOx emissions, it is important to have a consistently balanced EGR flow to individual engine cylinders. Otherwise, the variation in the cylinders' NOx contribution to the overall engine emissions will produce unacceptable variability. This presentation will demonstrate the effective use of advanced virtual simulation in the development of a balanced EGR distribution in engine cylinders. An initial design is analyzed reflecting the variance in the EGR distribution, quantitatively and visually. Iterative virtual lab tests result in an optimized system.

  4. Advancement of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Payment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lixing Gu; Don Shirey; Richard Raustad; Bereket Nigusse; Chandan Sharma; Linda Lawrie; Rich Strand; Curt Pedersen; Dan Fisher; Edwin Lee; Mike Witte; Jason Glazer; Chip Barnaby

    2011-03-31

    EnergyPlus{sup TM} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE??s Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. The 5-year project was managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and was divided into 5 budget period between 2006 and 2011. During the project period, 11 versions of EnergyPlus were released. This report summarizes work performed by an EnergyPlus development team led by the University of Central Florida??s Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC). The team members consist of DHL Consulting, C. O. Pedersen Associates, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Oklahoma State University, GARD Analytics, Inc., and WrightSoft Corporation. The project tasks involved new feature development, testing and validation, user support and training, and general EnergyPlus support. The team developed 146 new features during the 5-year period to advance the EnergyPlus capabilities. Annual contributions of new features are 7 in budget period 1, 19 in period 2, 36 in period 3, 41 in period 4, and 43 in period 5, respectively. The testing and validation task focused on running test suite and publishing report, developing new IEA test suite cases, testing and validating new source code, addressing change requests, and creating and testing installation package. The user support and training task provided support for users and interface developers, and organized and taught workshops. The general support task involved upgrading StarTeam (team sharing) software and updating existing utility software. The project met the DOE objectives and completed all tasks successfully. Although the EnergyPlus software was enhanced significantly under this project, more enhancements are needed for further improvement to ensure that EnergyPlus is able to simulate the latest technologies and perform desired HAVC system operations for the development of next generation HVAC systems. Additional development will be performed under a new 5-year project managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  5. A Virtual Engineering Framework for Simulating Advanced Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Stanislav Borodai

    2008-06-18

    In this report is described the work effort performed to provide NETL with VE-Suite based Virtual Engineering software and enhanced equipment models to support NETL's Advanced Process Engineering Co-simulation (APECS) framework for advanced power generation systems. Enhancements to the software framework facilitated an important link between APECS and the virtual engineering capabilities provided by VE-Suite (e.g., equipment and process visualization, information assimilation). Model enhancements focused on improving predictions for the performance of entrained flow coal gasifiers and important auxiliary equipment (e.g., Air Separation Units) used in coal gasification systems. In addition, a Reduced Order Model generation tool and software to provide a coupling between APECS/AspenPlus and the GE GateCycle simulation system were developed. CAPE-Open model interfaces were employed where needed. The improved simulation capability is demonstrated on selected test problems. As part of the project an Advisory Panel was formed to provide guidance on the issues on which to focus the work effort. The Advisory Panel included experts from industry and academics in gasification, CO2 capture issues, process simulation and representatives from technology developers and the electric utility industry. To optimize the benefit to NETL, REI coordinated its efforts with NETL and NETL funded projects at Iowa State University, Carnegie Mellon University and ANSYS/Fluent, Inc. The improved simulation capabilities incorporated into APECS will enable researchers and engineers to better understand the interactions of different equipment components, identify weaknesses and processes needing improvement and thereby allow more efficient, less expensive plants to be developed and brought on-line faster and in a more cost-effective manner. These enhancements to APECS represent an important step toward having a fully integrated environment for performing plant simulation and engineering. Furthermore, with little effort the modeling capabilities described in this report can be extended to support other DOE programs, such as ultra super critical boiler development, oxy-combustion boiler development or modifications to existing plants to include CO2 capture and sequestration.

  6. DOE Releases New Analysis Showing Significant Advances in Electric Vehicle

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Deployment | Department of Energy Analysis Showing Significant Advances in Electric Vehicle Deployment DOE Releases New Analysis Showing Significant Advances in Electric Vehicle Deployment February 8, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today released One Million Electric Vehicles by 2015 (pdf - 220 kb), an analysis of advances in electric vehicle deployment and progress to date in meeting President Obama's goal of putting one million electric vehicles on the

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Battery Development, System Analysis,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Testing | Department of Energy Battery Development, System Analysis, and Testing Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Battery Development, System Analysis, and Testing To develop better lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries for plug-in electric vehicles, researchers must integrate the advances made in exploratory battery materials and applied battery research into full battery systems. The Vehicle Technologies Office's (VTO) Advanced Battery Development, System Analysis, and Testing activity

  8. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles; Larson, Doug; Carr, Tom; Rath, Larry; Balash, Peter; Yih-Huei, Wan

    2008-11-28

    Growing concern over climate change is prompting new thinking about the technologies used to generate electricity. In the future, it is possible that new government policies on greenhouse gas emissions may favor electric generation technology options that release zero or low levels of carbon emissions. The Western U.S. has abundant wind and coal resources. In a world with carbon constraints, the future of coal for new electrical generation is likely to depend on the development and successful application of new clean coal technologies with near zero carbon emissions. This scoping study explores the economic and technical feasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coal generation facilities and operating them as a single generation complex in the Western US. The key questions examined are whether an advanced coal-wind hybrid (ACWH) facility provides sufficient advantages through improvements to the utilization of transmission lines and the capability to firm up variable wind generation for delivery to load centers to compete effectively with other supply-side alternatives in terms of project economics and emissions footprint. The study was conducted by an Analysis Team that consists of staff from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB). We conducted a screening level analysis of the economic competitiveness and technical feasibility of ACWH generation options located in Wyoming that would supply electricity to load centers in California, Arizona or Nevada. Figure ES-1 is a simple stylized representation of the configuration of the ACWH options. The ACWH consists of a 3,000 MW coal gasification combined cycle power plant equipped with carbon capture and sequestration (G+CC+CCS plant), a fuel production or syngas storage facility, and a 1,500 MW wind plant. The ACWH project is connected to load centers by a 3,000 MW transmission line. In the G+CC+CCS plant, coal is gasified into syngas and CO{sub 2} (which is captured). The syngas is burned in the combined cycle plant to produce electricity. The ACWH facility is operated in such a way that the transmission line is always utilized at its full capacity by backing down the combined cycle (CC) power generation units to accommodate wind generation. Operating the ACWH facility in this manner results in a constant power delivery of 3,000 MW to the load centers, in effect firming-up the wind generation at the project site.

  9. Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program- The "Hot Pot" Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program- The "Hot Pot" Project presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  10. Catalog of Data Analysis Software | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Areas of Interest Imaging Spectroscopy Scattering General Catalog of Data Analysis Software Development of software for visualization, analysis, reduction and simulation of x-ray...

  11. Advanced vehicle technology analysis and evaluation activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    FY 2007 annual progress report evaluating the technologies and performance characteristics of advanced automotive powertrain components and subsystems in an integrated vehicle systems context.

  12. CONSORTIUM FOR ADVANCED SIMULATION OF LIGHT WATER REACTORS (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    special session at NURETH-14, the premier T-H conference, with 9 papers on advanced thermal hydraulics * Recently hired former Director for CFD Technology of SIMULIA (leading...

  13. Advanced probabilistic risk analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabiti, Cristian; Alfonsi, Andrea; Mandelli, Diego; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2014-06-01

    RAVEN, under the support of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program [1], is advancing its capability to perform statistical analyses of stochastic dynamic systems. This is aligned with its mission to provide the tools needed by the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) path-lead [2] under the Department Of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability program [3]. In particular this task is focused on the synergetic development with the RELAP-7 [4] code to advance the state of the art on the safety analysis of nuclear power plants (NPP). The investigation of the probabilistic evolution of accident scenarios for a complex system such as a nuclear power plant is not a trivial challenge. The complexity of the system to be modeled leads to demanding computational requirements even to simulate one of the many possible evolutions of an accident scenario (tens of CPU/hour). At the same time, the probabilistic analysis requires thousands of runs to investigate outcomes characterized by low probability and severe consequence (tail problem). The milestone reported in June of 2013 [5] described the capability of RAVEN to implement complex control logic and provide an adequate support for the exploration of the probabilistic space using a Monte Carlo sampling strategy. Unfortunately the Monte Carlo approach is ineffective with a problem of this complexity. In the following year of development, the RAVEN code has been extended with more sophisticated sampling strategies (grids, Latin Hypercube, and adaptive sampling). This milestone report illustrates the effectiveness of those methodologies in performing the assessment of the probability of core damage following the onset of a Station Black Out (SBO) situation in a boiling water reactor (BWR). The first part of the report provides an overview of the available probabilistic analysis capabilities, ranging from the different types of distributions available, possible sampling strategies, and post processing analysis capabilities. The first part of the report provides an extensive description of two major developments introduced this year: adaptive sampling for limit surface sampling and multi variate distributions. The document concludes with a description of the demo case (BWR-SBO) and a discussion of the results obtained.

  14. Validation and Uncertainty Quantification in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Uncertainty Quantification in CASL Michael Pernice Center for Advanced Modeling and Simulation Idaho National Laboratory SAMSI Uncertainty Quantification Transition Workshop May 21-23 2012 CASL-U-2012-0108-000 What Is CASL? * Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs - An Energy Innovation Hub * Objective: predictive simulation of light water reactors - Reduce capital and operating costs * Power uprates * Lifetime extension - Reduce nuclear waste * Higher fuel burnup - Enhance operational

  15. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-10-01

    The Nuclear Energy Computational Fluid Dynamics Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-CAMS) system is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Utah State University (USU), and other interested parties with the objective of developing and implementing a comprehensive and readily accessible data and information management system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) verification and validation (V&V) in support of nuclear energy systems design and safety analysis. The two key objectives of the NE-CAMS effort are to identify, collect, assess, store and maintain high resolution and high quality experimental data and related expert knowledge (metadata) for use in CFD V&V assessments specific to the nuclear energy field and to establish a working relationship with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop a CFD V&V database, including benchmark cases, that addresses and supports the associated NRC regulations and policies on the use of CFD analysis. In particular, the NE-CAMS system will support the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program, which aims to develop and deploy advanced modeling and simulation methods and computational tools for reliable numerical simulation of nuclear reactor systems for design and safety analysis. Primary NE-CAMS Elements There are four primary elements of the NE-CAMS knowledge base designed to support computer modeling and simulation in the nuclear energy arena as listed below. Element 1. The database will contain experimental data that can be used for CFD validation that is relevant to nuclear reactor and plant processes, particularly those important to the nuclear industry and the NRC. Element 2. Qualification standards for data evaluation and classification will be incorporated and applied such that validation data sets will result in well-defined, well-characterized data. Element 3. Standards will be established for the design and operation of experiments for the generation of new validation data sets that are to be submitted to NE-CAMS that addresses the completeness and characterization of the dataset. Element 4. Standards will be developed for performing verification and validation (V&V) to establish confidence levels in CFD analyses of nuclear reactor processes; such processes will be acceptable and recognized by both CFD experts and the NRC.

  16. Advanced Numerical Methods and Software Approaches for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carey, Graham F.; Pardhanani, A. L.; Bova, S. W.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to driftdominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the driftdiffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of “upwind” and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter – Gummel approach, Petrov – Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), “entropy” variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of themore » methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. We have included numerical examples from our recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and we emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, we briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.« less

  17. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for their advancement of nuclear power; U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for safety reviews and licensing; R&D community for identification,...

  18. Advanced Stress, Strain And Geometrical Analysis In Semiconductor Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neels, Antonia; Dommann, Alex; Niedermann, Philippe; Farub, Claudiu; Kaenel, Hans von

    2010-11-24

    High stresses and defect densities increases the risk of semiconductor device failure. Reliability studies on potential failure sources have an impact on design and are essential to assure the long term functioning of the device. Related to the dramatically smaller volume of semiconductor devices and new bonding techniques on such devices, new methods in testing and qualification are needed. Reliability studies on potential failure sources have an impact on design and are essential to assure the long term functioning of the device. In this paper, the applications of advanced High Resolution X-ray Diffraction (HRXRD) methods in strain, defect and deformation analysis on semiconductor devices are discussed. HRXRD with Rocking Curves (RC's) and Reciprocal Space Maps (RSM's) is used as accurate, non-destructive experimental method to evaluate the crystalline quality, and more precisely for the given samples, the in-situ strain, defects and geometrical parameters such as tilt and bending of device. The combination with advanced FEM simulations gives the possibility to support efficiently semiconductor devices design.

  19. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Delivers next-generation thermal-hydraulic simulation tools to Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA) Thermal Hydraulics Methods...

  20. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LWRs; Develop and effectively apply modern virtual reactor technology; Engage the nuclear energy community through modeling and simulation; and Deploy new partnership and...

  1. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    modeling and simulation technology that is deployed and applied broadly throughout the nuclear energy industry to enhance safety, reliability, and economics. CASL will address,...

  2. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CASL's Latest Research CIPS Simulation Capability Implemented in VERA Posted on October 28, 2015 Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) Multi-Physics Approach & Applications using...

  3. Crashworthiness analysis using advanced material models in DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, R.W.; Burger, M.J.; McMichael, L.D.; Parkinson, R.D.

    1993-10-22

    As part of an electric vehicle consortium, LLNL and Kaiser Aluminum are conducting experimental and numerical studies on crashworthy aluminum spaceframe designs. They have jointly explored the effect of heat treat on crush behavior and duplicated the experimental behavior with finite-element simulations. The major technical contributions to the state of the art in numerical simulation arise from the development and use of advanced material model descriptions for LLNL`s DYNA3D code. Constitutive model enhancements in both flow and failure have been employed for conventional materials such as low-carbon steels, and also for lighter weight materials such as aluminum and fiber composites being considered for future vehicles. The constitutive model enhancements are developed as extensions from LLNL`s work in anisotropic flow and multiaxial failure modeling. Analysis quality as a function of level of simplification of material behavior and mesh is explored, as well as the penalty in computation cost that must be paid for using more complex models and meshes. The lightweight material modeling technology is being used at the vehicle component level to explore the safety implications of small neighborhood electric vehicles manufactured almost exclusively from these materials.

  4. Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center Post-Doctoral Position in Advanced Combustion Simulations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Frontier Research Center (CEFRC) seeks outstanding applicants for the position of post-doctoral research associate to perform research at Cornell University and Sandia National Laboratories on advanced simulations of turbulent combustion. This position is as a Combustion Energy Research Fellow, as described at http://pcl.princeton.edu/efrc/fellow_Flyer.html . The project involves two simulation methodologies: direct numerical simulation (DNS); and large-eddy simulation (LES) using the

  5. Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center Post-Doctoral Position in Advanced Combustion Simulations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EFRC seeks outstanding applicants for the position of post-doctoral research associate to perform research at Cornell University and Sandia National Laboratories on advanced simulations of turbulent combustion. The project involves two simulation methodologies: direct numerical simulation (DNS); and large-eddy simulation (LES) using the filtered density function (FDF) approach. DNS involves minimal modeling, but is restricted (by computational capabilities) to simple geometries and a moderate

  6. Advancing Simulation Science: The Legacy of the ASC Academic Strategic Alliance Program

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    a min [Type the abstract of the document here. The abstract is typically a short summary of the contents of the document.] Advancing Simulation Science: The Legacy of the ASC Academic Strategic Alliance Program ii ON THE COVER: Hot gas flow field and propellant stress in propellant of Titan IV rocket motor. Fully coupled "fluid-structure interaction" simulation performed using CSAR Rocstar Simulation Suite." University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: Center for Simulation of

  7. Recent Advances and Future Challenges in the Modeling and Simulations of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the injection of Urea-Water-Solution for Automotive SCR Systems | Department of Energy Advances and Future Challenges in the Modeling and Simulations of the injection of Urea-Water-Solution for Automotive SCR Systems Recent Advances and Future Challenges in the Modeling and Simulations of the injection of Urea-Water-Solution for Automotive SCR Systems The role of CFD modeling to optimize UWS injection and decomposition was presented. PDF icon deer09_aburamadan.pdf More Documents &

  8. The Synergy Between Total Scattering and Advanced Simulation Techniques: Quantifying Geopolymer Gel Evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Claire; Bloomer, Breaunnah E.; Provis, John L.; Henson, Neil J.; Page, Katharine L.

    2012-05-16

    With the ever increasing demands for technologically advanced structural materials, together with emerging environmental consciousness due to climate change, geopolymer cement is fast becoming a viable alternative to traditional cements due to proven mechanical engineering characteristics and the reduction in CO2 emitted (approximately 80% less CO2 emitted compared to ordinary Portland cement). Nevertheless, much remains unknown regarding the kinetics of the molecular changes responsible for nanostructural evolution during the geopolymerization process. Here, in-situ total scattering measurements in the form of X-ray pair distribution function (PDF) analysis are used to quantify the extent of reaction of metakaolin/slag alkali-activated geopolymer binders, including the effects of various activators (alkali hydroxide/silicate) on the kinetics of the geopolymerization reaction. Restricting quantification of the kinetics to the initial ten hours of reaction does not enable elucidation of the true extent of the reaction, but using X-ray PDF data obtained after 128 days of reaction enables more accurate determination of the initial extent of reaction. The synergies between the in-situ X-ray PDF data and simulations conducted by multiscale density functional theory-based coarse-grained Monte Carlo analysis are outlined, particularly with regard to the potential for the X-ray data to provide a time scale for kinetic analysis of the extent of reaction obtained from the multiscale simulation methodology.

  9. Advanced Fingerprint Analysis Project Fingerprint Constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GM Mong; CE Petersen; TRW Clauss

    1999-10-29

    The work described in this report was focused on generating fundamental data on fingerprint components which will be used to develop advanced forensic techniques to enhance fluorescent detection, and visualization of latent fingerprints. Chemical components of sweat gland secretions are well documented in the medical literature and many chemical techniques are available to develop latent prints, but there have been no systematic forensic studies of fingerprint sweat components or of the chemical and physical changes these substances undergo over time.

  10. Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon vss041_daw_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications PHEV Engine and Aftertreatment Model Development PHEV Engine and Aftertreatment Model Development Advanced LD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling

  11. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subchannel Methods for the Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis for Nuclear Power Systems presented by Dr. Michael Doster...

  12. Advanced Simulation and Computing Co-Design Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ang, James A.; Hoang, Thuc T.; Kelly, Suzanne M.; McPherson, Allen; Neely, Rob

    2015-11-01

    This ASC Co-design Strategy lays out the full continuum and components of the co-design process, based on what we have experienced thus far and what we wish to do more in the future to meet the program’s mission of providing high performance computing (HPC) and simulation capabilities for NNSA to carry out its stockpile stewardship responsibility.

  13. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from CASL (Dr. Mike Short, MIT, October, 31, 2013) Subchannel Methods for the Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis for Nuclear Power Systems (Dr. Michael Doster, NCSU, May 28, 2013)...

  14. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An essential part of developing a closed form set of equations (closures) for prediction of two-phase flow with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is understanding how the bubbles generat- ed by boiling interact. An accurate prediction of moderator and fuel performance once boiling has begun is needed to simulate CASL Challenge Problems related to boiling water reactors (BWRs), departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) behavior in pressurized water reactors (PWRs), loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs),

  15. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management

  16. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enabling Modeling and Simulation Technology for Nuclear Power Nuclear energy is a tremendous technological success story for the United States. The first full-scale nuclear-powered electrical production plant at Pennsylvania's Shippingport Atomic Power Station was online in 1957, just 25 years after English physicist James Chadwick established the neutron's existence. However, in recent years, accelerated and translational R&D from fundamental discovery to commercialized technology has

  17. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Johnson; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01

    NE-KAMS knowledge base will assist computational analysts, physics model developers, experimentalists, nuclear reactor designers, and federal regulators by: (1) Establishing accepted standards, requirements and best practices for V&V and UQ of computational models and simulations, (2) Establishing accepted standards and procedures for qualifying and classifying experimental and numerical benchmark data, (3) Providing readily accessible databases for nuclear energy related experimental and numerical benchmark data that can be used in V&V assessments and computational methods development, (4) Providing a searchable knowledge base of information, documents and data on V&V and UQ, and (5) Providing web-enabled applications, tools and utilities for V&V and UQ activities, data assessment and processing, and information and data searches. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), the Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve computational modeling and simulation (M&S) of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs. In addition, from the outset, NE-KAMS will support the use of computational M&S in the nuclear industry by developing guidelines and recommended practices aimed at quantifying the uncertainty and assessing the applicability of existing analysis models and methods. The NE-KAMS effort will initially focus on supporting the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and thermal hydraulics (T/H) analysis for M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and will later expand to include materials, fuel system performance and other areas of M&S as time and funding allow.

  18. Steady-state Analysis Model for Advanced Fuelcycle Schemes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-05-12

    The model was developed as a part of the study, "Advanced Fuel Cycles and Waste Management", which was performed during 2003—2005 by an ad-hoc expert group under the Nuclear Development Committee in the OECD/NEA. The model was designed for an efficient conduct of nuclear fuel cycle scheme cost analyses. It is simple, transparent and offers users the capability to track down the cost analysis results. All the fuel cycle schemes considered in the model aremore » represented in a graphic format and all values related to a fuel cycle step are shown in the graphic interface, i.e., there are no hidden values embedded in the calculations. All data on the fuel cycle schemes considered in the study including mass flows, waste generation, cost data, and other data such as activities, decay heat and neutron sources of spent fuel and high—level waste along time are included in the model and can be displayed. The user can modify easily the values of mass flows and/or cost parameters and see the corresponding changes in the results. The model calculates: front—end fuel cycle mass flows such as requirements of enrichment and conversion services and natural uranium; mass of waste based on the waste generation parameters and the mass flow; and all costs. It performs Monte Carlo simulations with changing the values of all unit costs within their respective ranges (from lower to upper bounds).« less

  19. Microwave Processing of Simulated Advanced Nuclear Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.E. Clark; D.C. Folz

    2010-08-29

    Throughout the three-year project funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) and lead by Virginia Tech (VT), project tasks were modified by consensus to fit the changing needs of the DOE with respect to developing new inert matrix fuel processing techniques. The focus throughout the project was on the use of microwave energy to sinter fully stabilized zirconia pellets using microwave energy and to evaluate the effectiveness of techniques that were developed. Additionally, the research team was to propose fundamental concepts as to processing radioactive fuels based on the effectiveness of the microwave process in sintering the simulated matrix material.

  20. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    well-known thermal-hydraulic analysis codes that have found widespread use in the nuclear energy industry. This group of codes is related in that they were developed for modeling...

  1. Some Specific CASL Requirements for Advanced Multiphase Flow Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Berry

    2010-11-01

    Because of the diversity of physical phenomena occuring in boiling, flashing, and bubble collapse, and of the length and time scales of LWR systems, it is imperative that the models have the following features: • Both vapor and liquid phases (and noncondensible phases, if present) must be treated as compressible. • Models must be mathematically and numerically well-posed. • The models methodology must be multi-scale. A fundamental derivation of the multiphase governing equation system, that should be used as a basis for advanced multiphase modeling in LWR coolant systems, is given in the Appendix using the ensemble averaging method. The remainder of this work focuses specifically on the compressible, well-posed, and multi-scale requirements of advanced simulation methods for these LWR coolant systems, because without these are the most fundamental aspects, without which widespread advancement cannot be claimed. Because of the expense of developing multiple special-purpose codes and the inherent inability to couple information from the multiple, separate length- and time-scales, efforts within CASL should be focused toward development of a multi-scale approaches to solve those multiphase flow problems relevant to LWR design and safety analysis. Efforts should be aimed at developing well-designed unified physical/mathematical and high-resolution numerical models for compressible, all-speed multiphase flows spanning: (1) Well-posed general mixture level (true multiphase) models for fast transient situations and safety analysis, (2) DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation)-like models to resolve interface level phenmena like flashing and boiling flows, and critical heat flux determination (necessarily including conjugate heat transfer), and (3) Multi-scale methods to resolve both (1) and (2) automatically, depending upon specified mesh resolution, and to couple different flow models (single-phase, multiphase with several velocities and pressures, multiphase with single velocity and pressure, etc.) A unified, multi-scale approach is advocated to extend the necessary foundations and build the capability to simultaneously solve the fluid dynamic interface problems (interface resolution) as well as multiphase mixtures (homogenization).

  2. Advancing Usability Evaluation through Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman

    2005-07-01

    This paper introduces a novel augmentation to the current heuristic usability evaluation methodology. The SPAR-H human reliability analysis method was developed for categorizing human performance in nuclear power plants. Despite the specialized use of SPAR-H for safety critical scenarios, the method also holds promise for use in commercial off-the-shelf software usability evaluations. The SPAR-H method shares task analysis underpinnings with human-computer interaction, and it can be easily adapted to incorporate usability heuristics as performance shaping factors. By assigning probabilistic modifiers to heuristics, it is possible to arrive at the usability error probability (UEP). This UEP is not a literal probability of error but nonetheless provides a quantitative basis to heuristic evaluation. When combined with a consequence matrix for usability errors, this method affords ready prioritization of usability issues.

  3. Advanced Techniques for Root Cause Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-09-19

    Five items make up this package, or can be used individually. The Chronological Safety Management Template utilizes a linear adaptation of the Integrated Safety Management System laid out in the form of a template that greatly enhances the ability of the analyst to perform the first step of any investigation which is to gather all pertinent facts and identify causal factors. The Problem Analysis Tree is a simple three (3) level problem analysis tree whichmore » is easier for organizations outside of WSRC to use. Another part is the Systemic Root Cause Tree. One of the most basic and unique features of Expanded Root Cause Analysis is the Systemic Root Cause portion of the Expanded Root Cause Pyramid. The Systemic Root Causes are even more basic than the Programmatic Root Causes and represent Root Causes that cut across multiple (if not all) programs in an organization. the Systemic Root Cause portion contains 51 causes embedded at the bottom level of a three level Systemic Root Cause Tree that is divided into logical, organizationally based categorie to assist the analyst. The Computer Aided Root Cause Analysis that allows the analyst at each level of the Pyramid to a) obtain a brief description of the cause that is being considered, b) record a decision that the item is applicable, c) proceed to the next level of the Pyramid to see only those items at the next level of the tree that are relevant to the particular cause that has been chosen, and d) at the end of the process automatically print out a summary report of the incident, the causal factors as they relate to the safety management system, the probable causes, apparent causes, Programmatic Root Causes and Systemic Root Causes for each causal factor and the associated corrective action.« less

  4. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) serves as a critical pa- rameter in nuclear power plant operational and safety analysis. It occurs when a fuel rod clad surface is overheated due to the formation of a local vapor layer on the waterside surface, caus- ing a dramatic reduction in heat transfer capability. DNB is a complex phenomenon that has been experimentally and analyti- cally investigated over the past several decades. Its complexity is inherent in the multi-scale and multi-physics

  5. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Presentations 2015 back to top Gehin, J.C., CASL Program Highlights July 2015, July 30, 2015, 2015. Athe, P., and N. Dinh, A Framework for Predictive Capability Maturity Quantification, CASL Symposium, July 7, 2015, Ashville, North Carolina, 2015. Blyth, T.S., M.N. Avramova and R. Salko, CASL CFD-Informed Spacer Grid Models in CTF (Poster), CASL Symposium, July 7, 2015, Ashville, North Carolina, 2015. Brown, C.S., and I.A. Bolotnov, Analysis of the Turbulent Kinetic Energy Spectrum in Single and

  6. National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berscheid, Alan P.

    2012-07-30

    National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) mission is to: (1) Improve the understanding, preparation, and mitigation of the consequences of infrastructure disruption; (2) Provide a common, comprehensive view of U.S. infrastructure and its response to disruptions - Scale & resolution appropriate to the issues and All threats; and (3) Built an operations-tested DHS capability to respond quickly to urgent infrastructure protection issues.

  7. Methodology for Validating Building Energy Analysis Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Wortman, D.; O'Doherty, B.; Burch, J.

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this report was to develop a validation methodology for building energy analysis simulations, collect high-quality, unambiguous empirical data for validation, and apply the validation methodology to the DOE-2.1, BLAST-2MRT, BLAST-3.0, DEROB-3, DEROB-4, and SUNCAT 2.4 computer programs. This report covers background information, literature survey, validation methodology, comparative studies, analytical verification, empirical validation, comparative evaluation of codes, and conclusions.

  8. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan is to define what the NEAMS program expects in terms of V&V for the computational models that are developed under NEAMS.

  9. Advanced LD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy LD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Advanced LD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vss041_daw_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for

  10. Advanced Simulation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the programming environment. This document is intended to provide the reader with a high-level view of the ASC co-design strategy as it currently exists, and will be a living...

  11. Advanced Post-Irradiation Examination Capabilities Alternatives Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Bryan; Bill Landman; Porter Hill

    2012-12-01

    An alternatives analysis was performed for the Advanced Post-Irradiation Capabilities (APIEC) project in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets”. The Alternatives Analysis considered six major alternatives: ? No Action ? Modify Existing DOE Facilities – capabilities distributed among multiple locations ? Modify Existing DOE Facilities – capabilities consolidated at a few locations ? Construct New Facility ? Commercial Partnership ? International Partnerships Based on the alternatives analysis documented herein, it is recommended to DOE that the advanced post-irradiation examination capabilities be provided by a new facility constructed at the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory.

  12. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, R.

    2013-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership.

  13. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Digby Macdonald; Brian Marx; Balaji Soundararajan; Morgan Smith

    2005-07-28

    The different tasks that have been carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA), which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals, and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples in order to exactly predict the corrosion mechanisms; (7) Wavelet analysis of EC noise data from steel samples undergoing corrosion in an environment similar to that of the high level waste storage containers, to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data. The work has yielded a number of important findings, including an unequivocal demonstration of the role of chloride ion in passivity breakdown on nickel in terms of cation vacancy generation within the passive film, the first detection and characterization of individual micro fracture events in stress corrosion cracking, and the determination of kinetic parameters for the generation and annihilation of point defects in the passive film on iron. The existence of coupling between the internal crack environment and the external cathodic environment, as predicted by the coupled environment fracture model (CEFM), has also been indisputably established for the AISI 4340/NaOH system. It is evident from the studies that analysis of coupling current noise is a very sensitive tool for studying the crack tip processes in relation to the chemical, mechanical, electrochemical, and microstructural properties of the system. Experiments are currently being carried out to explore these crack tip processes by simultaneous measurement of the acoustic activity at the crack tip in an effort to validate the coupling current data. These latter data are now being used to deterministically predict the accumulation of general and localized corrosion damage on carbon in prototypical DOE liquid waste storage tanks. Computer simulation of the cathodic and anodic activity on the steel surfaces is also being carried out in an effort to simulate the actual corrosion process. Wavelet analysis of the coupling current data promises to be a useful tool to differentiate between the different corrosion mechanisms. Hence, wavelet analysis of the coupling current data from the DOE waste containers is also being carried out to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data which is bound to contain noise fluctuations due to any or all of the above mentioned processes.

  14. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kissel, L

    2009-04-01

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  15. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meisner, R; Hopson, J; Peery, J; McCoy, M

    2008-10-07

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2. Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3. Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  16. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-FY11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meisner, R; Peery, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2009-09-08

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  17. Advanced Simulation and Computing Fiscal Year 2011-2012 Implementation Plan, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, M; Phillips, J; Hpson, J; Meisner, R

    2010-04-22

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 - Robust Tools. Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 - Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 - Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  18. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY08-09 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusnezov, D; Bickel, T; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2007-09-13

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2--Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear-weapons performances in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3. Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  19. Advanced Simulation & Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meisner, R; Perry, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2008-04-30

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2--Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear-weapons performances in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3--Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  20. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnes, B

    2009-06-08

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

  1. Advanced Fuel Performance: Modeling and Simulation Light Water Reactor Fuel Performance:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    63 No. 8 * JOM 49 www.tms.org/jom.html Advanced Fuel Performance: Modeling and Simulation Light Water Reactor Fuel Performance: Current Status, Challenges, and Future High Fidelity Modeling K. Edsinger, C.R. Stanek, and B.D. Wirth How would you... ...describe the overall signifcance of this paper? This paper provides a concise description of the nuclear fuel used in pressurized water nuclear reactors and the most commonly observed fuel failure mechanisms. ...describe this work to a materials

  2. Simulation and Non-Simulation Based Human Reliability Analysis Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids; Shirley, Rachel Elizabeth; Joe, Jeffrey Clark; Mandelli, Diego

    2014-12-01

    Part of the U.S. Department of Energys Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway develops approaches to estimating and managing safety margins. RISMC simulations pair deterministic plant physics models with probabilistic risk models. As human interactions are an essential element of plant risk, it is necessary to integrate human actions into the RISMC risk model. In this report, we review simulation-based and non-simulation-based human reliability assessment (HRA) methods. Chapter 2 surveys non-simulation-based HRA methods. Conventional HRA methods target static Probabilistic Risk Assessments for Level 1 events. These methods would require significant modification for use in dynamic simulation of Level 2 and Level 3 events. Chapter 3 is a review of human performance models. A variety of methods and models simulate dynamic human performance; however, most of these human performance models were developed outside the risk domain and have not been used for HRA. The exception is the ADS-IDAC model, which can be thought of as a virtual operator program. This model is resource-intensive but provides a detailed model of every operator action in a given scenario, along with models of numerous factors that can influence operator performance. Finally, Chapter 4 reviews the treatment of timing of operator actions in HRA methods. This chapter is an example of one of the critical gaps between existing HRA methods and the needs of dynamic HRA. This report summarizes the foundational information needed to develop a feasible approach to modeling human interactions in the RISMC simulations.

  3. In-Service Design & Performance Prediction of Advanced Fusion Material Systems by Computational Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. R. Odette; G. E. Lucas

    2005-11-15

    This final report on "In-Service Design & Performance Prediction of Advanced Fusion Material Systems by Computational Modeling and Simulation" (DE-FG03-01ER54632) consists of a series of summaries of work that has been published, or presented at meetings, or both. It briefly describes results on the following topics: 1) A Transport and Fate Model for Helium and Helium Management; 2) Atomistic Studies of Point Defect Energetics, Dynamics and Interactions; 3) Multiscale Modeling of Fracture consisting of: 3a) A Micromechanical Model of the Master Curve (MC) Universal Fracture Toughness-Temperature Curve Relation, KJc(T - To), 3b) An Embrittlement DTo Prediction Model for the Irradiation Hardening Dominated Regime, 3c) Non-hardening Irradiation Assisted Thermal and Helium Embrittlement of 8Cr Tempered Martensitic Steels: Compilation and Analysis of Existing Data, 3d) A Model for the KJc(T) of a High Strength NFA MA957, 3e) Cracked Body Size and Geometry Effects of Measured and Effective Fracture Toughness-Model Based MC and To Evaluations of F82H and Eurofer 97, 3-f) Size and Geometry Effects on the Effective Toughness of Cracked Fusion Structures; 4) Modeling the Multiscale Mechanics of Flow Localization-Ductility Loss in Irradiation Damaged BCC Alloys; and 5) A Universal Relation Between Indentation Hardness and True Stress-Strain Constitutive Behavior. Further details can be found in the cited references or presentations that generally can be accessed on the internet, or provided upon request to the authors. Finally, it is noted that this effort was integrated with our base program in fusion materials, also funded by the DOE OFES.

  4. Technical Basis for Physical Fidelity of NRC Control Room Training Simulators for Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minsk, Brian S.; Branch, Kristi M.; Bates, Edward K.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Gore, Bryan F.; Faris, Drury K.

    2009-10-09

    The objective of this study is to determine how simulator physical fidelity influences the effectiveness of training the regulatory personnel responsible for examination and oversight of operating personnel and inspection of technical systems at nuclear power reactors. It seeks to contribute to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRCs) understanding of the physical fidelity requirements of training simulators. The goal of the study is to provide an analytic framework, data, and analyses that inform NRC decisions about the physical fidelity requirements of the simulators it will need to train its staff for assignment at advanced reactors. These staff are expected to come from increasingly diverse educational and experiential backgrounds.

  5. Quantifying the Effect of Fast Charger Deployments on Electric Vehicle Utility and Travel Patterns via Advanced Simulation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, E.; Neubauer, J.; Burton, E.

    2015-02-01

    The disparate characteristics between conventional (CVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs) in terms of driving range, refill/recharge time, and availability of refuel/recharge infrastructure inherently limit the relative utility of BEVs when benchmarked against traditional driver travel patterns. However, given a high penetration of high-power public charging combined with driver tolerance for rerouting travel to facilitate charging on long-distance trips, the difference in utility between CVs and BEVs could be marginalized. We quantify the relationships between BEV utility, the deployment of fast chargers, and driver tolerance for rerouting travel and extending travel durations by simulating BEVs operated over real-world travel patterns using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool for Vehicles (BLAST-V). With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office, BLAST-V has been developed to include algorithms for estimating the available range of BEVs prior to the start of trips, for rerouting baseline travel to utilize public charging infrastructure when necessary, and for making driver travel decisions for those trips in the presence of available public charging infrastructure, all while conducting advanced vehicle simulations that account for battery electrical, thermal, and degradation response. Results from BLAST-V simulations on vehicle utility, frequency of inserted stops, duration of charging events, and additional time and distance necessary for rerouting travel are presented to illustrate how BEV utility and travel patterns can be affected by various fast charge deployments.

  6. Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

    2007-05-03

    Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the precipitation of titanium carbonitrides during laser surface alloying provided there was sufficient amount of dissolved titanium, carbon, and nitrogen in the liquid steel. This was confirmed experimentally by using a powder mixture of 431-martensitic steel, titanium carbide powder, and nitrogen shielding, during laser deposition to produce deposits exhibiting relatively high hardness (average surface hardness of 724 HV). The same approach was extended to direct diode laser processing and similar microstructures were attained. The above analysis was extended to develop an in-situ precipitation of Ti(CN) during laser deposition. The Ti addition was achieving by mixing the 431 martensitic steel powders with ferro-titanium. The dissolution of nitrogen was achieved by using 100% nitrogen shielding gas, which was indicated by thermodynamic analysis. Demonstrations were also conducted utilizing the tools developed during the program and resulted in several viable composite coating systems being identified. This included the use of TiC and ferro-titanium in martensitic-grade stainless steel matrix material with and without the use of active N2 shielding gas, WC hard particles in a martensitic-grade stainless steel matrix material, WC and BN in a nickel-based matrix material, and WC in highly alloyed iron-based matrix. Although these demonstrations indicated the potential of forming composite coatings, in certain instances, the intended industrial applications involved unique requirements, such as coating of internal surfaces, which hindered the full development of the improved coating technology. However, it is believed that the addition of common hard particles, such as WC or TiC, to matrix material representing martensitic grades of stainless steel offer opportunities for improved performance at relatively low material cost.

  7. Advanced Wireless Power Transfer Vehicle and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.; Burton, E.; Wang, J.; Konan, A.

    2014-06-01

    This presentation discusses current research at NREL on advanced wireless power transfer vehicle and infrastructure analysis. The potential benefits of E-roadway include more electrified driving miles from battery electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, or even properly equipped hybrid electric vehicles (i.e., more electrified miles could be obtained from a given battery size, or electrified driving miles could be maintained while using smaller and less expensive batteries, thereby increasing cost competitiveness and potential market penetration). The system optimization aspect is key given the potential impact of this technology on the vehicles, the power grid and the road infrastructure.

  8. High Level Requirements for the Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Johnson; Hyung Lee; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-09-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), has been tasked with the important mission of ensuring that nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy source in the U.S. The motivations behind this mission include cost-effectively meeting the expected increases in the power needs of the country, reducing carbon emissions and reducing dependence on foreign energy sources. In the near term, to ensure that nuclear power remains a key element of U.S. energy strategy and portfolio, the DOE-NE will be working with the nuclear industry to support safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants. In the long term, to meet the increasing energy needs of the U.S., the DOE-NE will be investing in research and development (R&D) and working in concert with the nuclear industry to build and deploy new, safer and more efficient nuclear power plants. The safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants and designing, licensing and deploying new reactor designs, however, will require focused R&D programs as well as the extensive use and leveraging of advanced modeling and simulation (M&S). M&S will play a key role in ensuring safe and efficient operations of existing and new nuclear reactors. The DOE-NE has been actively developing and promoting the use of advanced M&S in reactor design and analysis through its R&D programs, e.g., the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) and Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) programs. Also, nuclear reactor vendors are already using CFD and CSM, for design, analysis, and licensing. However, these M&S tools cannot be used with confidence for nuclear reactor applications unless accompanied and supported by verification and validation (V&V) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) processes and procedures which provide quantitative measures of uncertainty for specific applications. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base that will provide technical services and resources for V&V and UQ of M&S in nuclear energy sciences and engineering. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the CASL, NEAMS, Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs.

  9. Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation for Hydrogen Transition Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory is managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy Agent Agent - - Based Modeling Based Modeling and Simulation (ABMS) and Simulation (ABMS) for Hydrogen Transition for Hydrogen Transition Analysis Analysis Marianne Mintz Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop US Department of Energy January 26, 2006 Objectives and Scope for Phase 1 2 Analyze the hydrogen infrastructure development as a complex adaptive system using an agent-based modeling and simulation (ABMS)

  10. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  11. The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Enabling Computational Technologies FY09 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diachin, L F; Garaizar, F X; Henson, V E; Pope, G

    2009-10-12

    In this document we report on the status of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) effort. In particular, we provide the context for ECT In the broader NEAMS program and describe the three pillars of the ECT effort, namely, (1) tools and libraries, (2) software quality assurance, and (3) computational facility (computers, storage, etc) needs. We report on our FY09 deliverables to determine the needs of the integrated performance and safety codes (IPSCs) in these three areas and lay out the general plan for software quality assurance to meet the requirements of DOE and the DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). We conclude with a brief description of our interactions with the Idaho National Laboratory computer center to determine what is needed to expand their role as a NEAMS user facility.

  12. Analysis of Molecular Clusters in Simulations of Lithium-Ion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Analysis of Molecular Clusters in Simulations of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrolytes. Abstract not provided. Authors: Tenney, Craig M ; Cygan, Randall T. Publication Date: ...

  13. Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) Documentation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    To address these issues, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed the Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) suite of tools. This suite of tools pairs ...

  14. Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) Documentation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) Documentation Neubauer, J. 25 ENERGY STORAGE BATTERY; LITHIUM-ION; STATIONARY ENERGY STORAGE; BLAST; BATTERY DEGRADATION;...

  15. Simulations of Failure via Three-Dimensional Cracking in Fuel Cladding for Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Hongbing; Bukkapatnam, Satish; Harimkar, Sandip; Singh, Raman; Bardenhagen, Scott

    2014-01-09

    Enhancing performance of fuel cladding and duct alloys is a key means of increasing fuel burnup. This project will address the failure of fuel cladding via three-dimensional cracking models. Researchers will develop a simulation code for the failure of the fuel cladding and validate the code through experiments. The objective is to develop an algorithm to determine the failure of fuel cladding in the form of three-dimensional cracking due to prolonged exposure under varying conditions of pressure, temperature, chemical environment, and irradiation. This project encompasses the following tasks: 1. Simulate 3D crack initiation and growth under instantaneous and/or fatigue loads using a new variant of the material point method (MPM); 2. Simulate debonding of the materials in the crack path using cohesive elements, considering normal and shear traction separation laws; 3. Determine the crack propagation path, considering damage of the materials incorporated in the cohesive elements to allow the energy release rate to be minimized; 4. Simulate the three-dimensional fatigue crack growth as a function of loading histories; 5. Verify the simulation code by comparing results to theoretical and numerical studies available in the literature; 6. Conduct experiments to observe the crack path and surface profile in unused fuel cladding and validate against simulation results; and 7. Expand the adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure parallel processing environment to allow adaptive mesh refinement at the 3D crack fronts and adaptive mesh merging in the wake of cracks. Fuel cladding is made of materials such as stainless steels and ferritic steels with added alloying elements, which increase stability and durability under irradiation. As fuel cladding is subjected to water, chemicals, fission gas, pressure, high temperatures, and irradiation while in service, understanding performance is essential. In the fast fuel used in advanced burner reactors, simulations of the nuclear fuels are critical to understand the burnup, and thus the fuel efficiency.

  16. Security Analysis of Selected AMI Failure Scenarios Using Agent Based Game Theoretic Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Schlicher, Bob G; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2014-01-01

    Information security analysis can be performed using game theory implemented in dynamic Agent Based Game Theoretic (ABGT) simulations. Such simulations can be verified with the results from game theory analysis and further used to explore larger scale, real world scenarios involving multiple attackers, defenders, and information assets. We concentrated our analysis on the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) functional domain which the National Electric Sector Cyber security Organization Resource (NESCOR) working group has currently documented 29 failure scenarios. The strategy for the game was developed by analyzing five electric sector representative failure scenarios contained in the AMI functional domain. From these five selected scenarios, we characterize them into three specific threat categories affecting confidentiality, integrity and availability (CIA). The analysis using our ABGT simulation demonstrates how to model the AMI functional domain using a set of rationalized game theoretic rules decomposed from the failure scenarios in terms of how those scenarios might impact the AMI network with respect to CIA.

  17. Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Simulation analysis of the...

  18. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V&V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V&V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V&V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M&S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V&V into subcontinuum scale M&S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

  19. Methods for simulation-based analysis of fluid-structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Payne, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Methods for analysis of fluid-structure interaction using high fidelity simulations are critically reviewed. First, a literature review of modern numerical techniques for simulation of aeroelastic phenomena is presented. The review focuses on methods contained within the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework for coupling computational fluid dynamics codes to computational structural mechanics codes. The review treats mesh movement algorithms, the role of the geometric conservation law, time advancement schemes, wetted surface interface strategies, and some representative applications. The complexity and computational expense of coupled Navier-Stokes/structural dynamics simulations points to the need for reduced order modeling to facilitate parametric analysis. The proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)/Galerkin projection approach for building a reduced order model (ROM) is presented, along with ideas for extension of the methodology to allow construction of ROMs based on data generated from ALE simulations.

  20. Systems analysis and futuristic designs of advanced biofuel factory concepts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chianelli, Russ; Leathers, James; Thoma, Steven George; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. is addicted to petroleum--a dependency that periodically shocks the economy, compromises national security, and adversely affects the environment. If liquid fuels remain the main energy source for U.S. transportation for the foreseeable future, the system solution is the production of new liquid fuels that can directly displace diesel and gasoline. This study focuses on advanced concepts for biofuel factory production, describing three design concepts: biopetroleum, biodiesel, and higher alcohols. A general schematic is illustrated for each concept with technical description and analysis for each factory design. Looking beyond current biofuel pursuits by industry, this study explores unconventional feedstocks (e.g., extremophiles), out-of-favor reaction processes (e.g., radiation-induced catalytic cracking), and production of new fuel sources traditionally deemed undesirable (e.g., fusel oils). These concepts lay the foundation and path for future basic science and applied engineering to displace petroleum as a transportation energy source for good.

  1. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Digby D. Macdonald; Brian M. Marx; Sejin Ahn; Julio de Ruiz; Balaji Soundararaja; Morgan Smith; and Wendy Coulson

    2008-01-15

    Various forms of general and localized corrosion represent principal threats to the integrity of DOE liquid waste storage tanks. These tanks, which are of a single wall or double wall design, depending upon their age, are fabricated from welded carbon steel and contain a complex waste-form comprised of NaOH and NaNO{sub 3}, along with trace amounts of phosphate, sulfate, carbonate, and chloride. Because waste leakage can have a profound environmental impact, considerable interest exists in predicting the accumulation of corrosion damage, so as to more effectively schedule maintenance and repair. The different tasks that are being carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA) which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples in order to exactly predict the corrosion mechanisms; (7) Wavelet analysis of EC noise data from steel samples undergoing corrosion in an environment similar to that of the high level waste storage containers, to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data. The Point Defect Model (PDM) is directly applied as the theoretical assessment method for describing the passive film formed on iron/steels. The PDM is used to describe general corrosion in the passive region of iron. In addition, previous work suggests that pit formation is due to the coalescence of cation vacancies at the metal/film interface which would make it possible to use the PDM parameters to predict the onset of pitting. This previous work suggests that once the critical vacancy density is reached, the film ruptures to form a pit. Based upon the kinetic parameters derived for the general corrosion case, two parameters relating to the cation vacancy formation and annihilation can be calculated. These two parameters can then be applied to predict the transition from general to pitting corrosion for iron/mild steels. If cation vacancy coalescence is shown to lead to pitting, it can have a profound effect on the direction of future studies involving the onset of pitting corrosion. The work has yielded a number of important findings, including an unequivocal demonstration of the role of chloride ion in passivity breakdown on nickel in terms of cation vacancy generation within the passive film, the first detection and characterization of individual micro fracture events in stress corrosion cracking, and the determination of kinetic parameters for the generation and annihilation of point defects in the passive film on iron. The existence of coupling between the internal crack environment and the external cathodic environment, as predicted by the coupled environment fracture model (CEFM), has also been indisputably established for the AISI 4340/NaOH system. It is evident from the studies that analysis of coupling current noise is a very sensitive tool f

  2. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 3. Battery Development, Testing, Simulation, Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3-1 3. Battery Development, Testing, Simulation, Analysis Introduction Battery systems research focuses on testing, evaluating, and developing energy storage technologies in close collaboration with developers and the automotive industry. This work is primarily accomplished through the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), a partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DaimlerChrysler, Ford, and General Motors. Working with manufacturers and the DOE national

  3. NREL: Transportation Research - Vehicle Technology Simulation and Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tools Vehicle Technology Simulation and Analysis Tools NREL's systems analysis and integration team uses the following NREL-developed modeling, simulation, and analysis tools to investigate novel vehicle technologies with the potential to achieve significant fuel savings and greenhouse gas reductions. NREL conducts technical analyses of promising technologies and explores trade-offs between component sizes and design goals (e.g., fuel economy versus performance) to find cost-competitive

  4. Advanced Simulation and Computing Fiscal Year 2016 Implementation Plan, Version 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, M.; Archer, B.; Hendrickson, B.

    2015-08-27

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is an integrated technical program for maintaining the safety, surety, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of experimental facilities and programs, and the computational capabilities to support these programs. The purpose of this IP is to outline key work requirements to be performed and to control individual work activities within the scope of work. Contractors may not deviate from this plan without a revised WA or subsequent IP.

  5. Geometric Modeling, Radiation Simulation, Rendering, Analysis Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-01-17

    RADIANCE is intended to aid lighting designers and architects by predicting the light levels and appearance of a space prior to construction. The package includes programs for modeling and translating scene geometry, luminaire data and material properties, all of which are needed as input to the simulation. The lighting simulation itself uses ray tracing techniques to compute radiance values (ie. the quantity of light passing through a specific point in a specific direction), which aremore » typically arranged to form a photographic quality image. The resulting image may be analyzed, displayed and manipulated within the package, and converted to other popular image file formats for export to other packages, facilitating the production of hard copy output.« less

  6. Systems and Controls Analysis and Testing; Harvesting More Wind Energy with Advanced Controls Technology (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-01-01

    This fact sheet outlines the systems and controls analysis and testing that takes place at the NWTC on the Controls Advanced Research Turbines.

  7. NREL: Energy Storage - Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool Suite Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries used in EVs and stationary energy storage applications must be optimized to justify their high ...

  8. PDACS - A Portal for Data Analysis Services for Cosmological Simulations

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: PDACS - A Portal for Data Analysis Services for Cosmological Simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PDACS - A Portal for Data Analysis Services for Cosmological Simulations Authors: Chard, Ryan ; Madduri, Ravi ; Heimann, Katrin ; Sehrish, Saba ; Uram, Thomas D. ; Cholia, Shreyas ; Habib, Salman ; Rodriguez, Alex ; Paterno, Marc ; Kowalkowski, Jim Publication Date: 2014-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1172542 Report Number(s):

  9. Sensitivity Analysis and Parameter Optimization Using 1-D MHD Simulations

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Magnetic Drive Experiments. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Sensitivity Analysis and Parameter Optimization Using 1-D MHD Simulations of Magnetic Drive Experiments. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sensitivity Analysis and Parameter Optimization Using 1-D MHD Simulations of Magnetic Drive Experiments. Abstract not provided. Authors: Robbins, Joshua Publication Date: 2011-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1110278 Report Number(s): SAND2011-0578C 473682 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000

  10. Integration of Advanced Probabilistic Analysis Techniques with Multi-Physics Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; none,; Flanagan, George F.; Poore III, Willis P.; Muhlheim, Michael David

    2014-07-30

    An integrated simulation platform that couples probabilistic analysis-based tools with model-based simulation tools can provide valuable insights for reactive and proactive responses to plant operating conditions. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the benefits of a partial implementation of the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Detailed Framework Specification through the coupling of advanced PRA capabilities and accurate multi-physics plant models. Coupling a probabilistic model with a multi-physics model will aid in design, operations, and safety by providing a more accurate understanding of plant behavior. This represents the first attempt at actually integrating these two types of analyses for a control system used for operations, on a faster than real-time basis. This report documents the development of the basic communication capability to exchange data with the probabilistic model using Reliability Workbench (RWB) and the multi-physics model using Dymola. The communication pathways from injecting a fault (i.e., failing a component) to the probabilistic and multi-physics models were successfully completed. This first version was tested with prototypic models represented in both RWB and Modelica. First, a simple event tree/fault tree (ET/FT) model was created to develop the software code to implement the communication capabilities between the dynamic-link library (dll) and RWB. A program, written in C#, successfully communicates faults to the probabilistic model through the dll. A systems model of the Advanced Liquid-Metal ReactorPower Reactor Inherently Safe Module (ALMR-PRISM) design developed under another DOE project was upgraded using Dymola to include proper interfaces to allow data exchange with the control application (ConApp). A program, written in C+, successfully communicates faults to the multi-physics model. The results of the example simulation were successfully plotted.

  11. Advanced Multiphysics Coupling for LWR Fuel Performance Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. D. Hales; M. R. Tonks; F. N. Gleicher; B. W. Spencer; S. R. Novascone; R. L. Williamson; G. Pastore; D. M. Perez

    2015-10-01

    Even the most basic nuclear fuel analysis is a multiphysics undertaking, as a credible simulation must consider at a minimum coupled heat conduction and mechanical deformation. The need for more realistic fuel modeling under a variety of conditions invariably leads to a desire to include coupling between a more complete set of the physical phenomena influencing fuel behavior, including neutronics, thermal hydraulics, and mechanisms occurring at lower length scales. This paper covers current efforts toward coupled multiphysics LWR fuel modeling in three main areas. The first area covered in this paper concerns thermomechanical coupling. The interaction of these two physics, particularly related to the feedback effect associated with heat transfer and mechanical contact at the fuel/clad gap, provides numerous computational challenges. An outline is provided of an effective approach used to manage the nonlinearities associated with an evolving gap in BISON, a nuclear fuel performance application. A second type of multiphysics coupling described here is that of coupling neutronics with thermomechanical LWR fuel performance. DeCART, a high-fidelity core analysis program based on the method of characteristics, has been coupled to BISON. DeCART provides sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux, with resonance treatment, during a depletion or a fast transient simulation. Two-way coupling between these codes was achieved by mapping fission rate density and fast neutron flux fields from DeCART to BISON and the temperature field from BISON to DeCART while employing a Picard iterative algorithm. Finally, the need for multiscale coupling is considered. Fission gas production and evolution significantly impact fuel performance by causing swelling, a reduction in the thermal conductivity, and fission gas release. The mechanisms involved occur at the atomistic and grain scale and are therefore not the domain of a fuel performance code. However, it is possible to use lower length scale models such as those used in the mesoscale MARMOT code to compute average properties, e.g. swelling or thermal conductivity. These may then be used by an engineering-scale model. Examples of this type of multiscale, multiphysics modeling are shown.

  12. Data Collection Methods for Validation of Advanced Multi-Resolution Fast Reactor Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokuhiro, Akiro; Ruggles, Art; Pointer, David

    2015-01-22

    In pool-type Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) the regions most susceptible to thermal striping are the upper instrumentation structure (UIS) and the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). This project experimentally and computationally (CFD) investigated the thermal mixing in the region exiting the reactor core to the UIS. The thermal mixing phenomenon was simulated using two vertical jets at different velocities and temperatures as prototypic of two adjacent channels out of the core. Thermal jet mixing of anticipated flows at different temperatures and velocities were investigated. Velocity profiles are measured throughout the flow region using Ultrasonic Doppler Velocimetry (UDV), and temperatures along the geometric centerline between the jets were recorded using a thermocouple array. CFD simulations, using COMSOL, were used to initially understand the flow, then to design the experimental apparatus and finally to compare simulation results and measurements characterizing the flows. The experimental results and CFD simulations show that the flow field is characterized into three regions with respective transitions, namely, convective mixing, (flow direction) transitional, and post-mixing. Both experiments and CFD simulations support this observation. For the anticipated SFR conditions the flow is momentum dominated and thus thermal mixing is limited due to the short flow length associated from the exit of the core to the bottom of the UIS. This means that there will be thermal striping at any surface where poorly mixed streams impinge; rather unless lateral mixing is ‘actively promoted out of the core, thermal striping will prevail. Furthermore we note that CFD can be considered a ‘separate effects (computational) test’ and is recommended as part of any integral analysis. To this effect, poorly mixed streams then have potential impact on the rest of the SFR design and scaling, especially placement of internal components, such as the IHX that may see poorly mixed streams. Finally, due to lack or infrastructural support for carrying out sodium experiments, only water experiments and CFD studies were realized in, an otherwise sodium approved facility.

  13. Simulation and Analysis of HP/LP EGR for Heavy-Duty Applications |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy and Analysis of HP/LP EGR for Heavy-Duty Applications Simulation and Analysis of HP/LP EGR for Heavy-Duty Applications High- and low-pressure exhaust gas recirculation can be combined for an advanced airpath control strategy PDF icon deer09_matthews.pdf More Documents & Publications Impact of Extreme Injection Pressure and EGR on the Combustion System of a HD Single Cylinder Engine Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies Control

  14. Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems - A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced FuelVehicle Systems - A North American Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions Well-to-Wheels Analysis ...

  15. Advanced Seismic data Analysis Program (The "Hot Pot Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Share 3,985,570.00 Total Project Cost 8,199,656.00 Principal Investigator(s) Shuman Moore Targets Milestones The proposed project involves the application of advanced seismic...

  16. Advance Seismic Data Analysis Program: (The "Hot Pot Project")

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: To improve geothermal well target selection and reduce drilling risk through an innovative and advanced analytical method for interpreting seismic data to locate deep geothermal structures.

  17. Big Data Visual Analytics for Exploratory Earth System Simulation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad A.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Shipman, Galen M.; Smith, Brian E.; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Dali; Shi, Xiaoying; Williams, Dean N.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid increases in high performance computing are feeding the development of larger and more complex data sets in climate research, which sets the stage for so-called big data analysis challenges. However, conventional climate analysis techniques are inadequate in dealing with the complexities of today s data. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate a visual analytics system, called the Exploratory Data analysis ENvironment (EDEN), with specific application to the analysis of complex earth system simulation data sets. EDEN represents the type of interactive visual analysis tools that are necessary to transform data into insight, thereby improving critical comprehension of earth system processes. In addition to providing an overview of EDEN, we describe real-world studies using both point ensembles and global Community Land Model Version 4 (CLM4) simulations.

  18. Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems - A North American

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions | Department of Energy Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems - A North American Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems - A North American Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions A complete vehicle fuel-cycle analysis, commonly called a well-to-wheels (WTW)

  19. Cyber security analysis testbed : combining real, emulation, and simulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villamarin, Charles H.; Eldridge, John M.; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.; Urias, Vincent E.

    2010-07-01

    Cyber security analysis tools are necessary to evaluate the security, reliability, and resilience of networked information systems against cyber attack. It is common practice in modern cyber security analysis to separately utilize real systems of computers, routers, switches, firewalls, computer emulations (e.g., virtual machines) and simulation models to analyze the interplay between cyber threats and safeguards. In contrast, Sandia National Laboratories has developed novel methods to combine these evaluation platforms into a hybrid testbed that combines real, emulated, and simulated components. The combination of real, emulated, and simulated components enables the analysis of security features and components of a networked information system. When performing cyber security analysis on a system of interest, it is critical to realistically represent the subject security components in high fidelity. In some experiments, the security component may be the actual hardware and software with all the surrounding components represented in simulation or with surrogate devices. Sandia National Laboratories has developed a cyber testbed that combines modeling and simulation capabilities with virtual machines and real devices to represent, in varying fidelity, secure networked information system architectures and devices. Using this capability, secure networked information system architectures can be represented in our testbed on a single, unified computing platform. This provides an 'experiment-in-a-box' capability. The result is rapidly-produced, large-scale, relatively low-cost, multi-fidelity representations of networked information systems. These representations enable analysts to quickly investigate cyber threats and test protection approaches and configurations.

  20. CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMA.NRC.P5.01 CASL NRC Commissioner Technical Seminar Jess Gehin Oak Ridge National Laboratory December 22, 2012 CASL-U-2014-0076-000-a CASL-U-2012-0076-000-a 1 CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors NRC Commissioner Technical Seminar November 30, 2012 Doug Kothe (ORNL) CASL Director Doug Burns (INL) CASL Deputy Director Paul Turinsky (NCSU) CASL Chief Scientist Jess Gehin (ORNL) CASL AMA FA

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic modes analysis and control of Fusion Advanced Studies Torus high-current scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villone, F.; Mastrostefano, S.; Calabr, G.; Vlad, G.; Crisanti, F.; Fusco, V.; Marchiori, G.; Bolzonella, T.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2014-08-15

    One of the main FAST (Fusion Advanced Studies Torus) goals is to have a flexible experiment capable to test tools and scenarios for safe and reliable tokamak operation, in order to support ITER and help the final DEMO design. In particular, in this paper, we focus on operation close to a possible border of stability related to low-q operation. To this purpose, a new FAST scenario has then been designed at I{sub p}?=?10 MA, B{sub T}?=?8.5?T, q{sub 95}???2.3. Transport simulations, carried out by using the code JETTO and the first principle transport model GLF23, indicate that, under these conditions, FAST could achieve an equivalent Q???3.5. FAST will be equipped with a set of internal active coils for feedback control, which will produce magnetic perturbation with toroidal number n?=?1 or n?=?2. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mode analysis and feedback control simulations performed with the codes MARS, MARS-F, CarMa (both assuming the presence of a perfect conductive wall and using the exact 3D resistive wall structure) show the possibility of the FAST conductive structures to stabilize n?=?1 ideal modes. This leaves therefore room for active mitigation of the resistive mode (down to a characteristic time of 1?ms) for safety purposes, i.e., to avoid dangerous MHD-driven plasma disruption, when working close to the machine limits and magnetic and kinetic energy density not far from reactor values.

  2. Development of an Advanced Stimulation / Production Predictive Simulator for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritchett, John W.

    2015-04-15

    There are several well-known obstacles to the successful deployment of EGS projects on a commercial scale, of course. EGS projects are expected to be deeper, on the average, than conventional “natural” geothermal reservoirs, and drilling costs are already a formidable barrier to conventional geothermal projects. Unlike conventional resources (which frequently announce their presence with natural manifestations such as geysers, hot springs and fumaroles), EGS prospects are likely to appear fairly undistinguished from the earth surface. And, of course, the probable necessity of fabricating a subterranean fluid circulation network to mine the heat from the rock (instead of simply relying on natural, pre-existing permeable fractures) adds a significant degree of uncertainty to the prospects for success. Accordingly, the basic motivation for the work presented herein was to try to develop a new set of tools that would be more suitable for this purpose. Several years ago, the Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office recognized this need and funded a cost-shared grant to our company (then SAIC, now Leidos) to partner with Geowatt AG of Zurich, Switzerland and undertake the development of a new reservoir simulator that would be more suitable for EGS forecasting than the existing tools. That project has now been completed and a new numerical geothermal reservoir simulator has been developed. It is named “HeatEx” (for “Heat Extraction”) and is almost completely new, although its methodology owes a great deal to other previous geothermal software development efforts, including Geowatt’s “HEX-S” code, the STAR and SPFRAC simulators developed here at SAIC/Leidos, the MINC approach originally developed at LBNL, and tracer analysis software originally formulated at INEL. Furthermore, the development effort was led by engineers with many years of experience in using reservoir simulation software to make meaningful forecasts for real geothermal projects, not just software designers. It is hoped that, as a result, HeatEx will prove useful during the early stages of the development of EGS technology. The basic objective was to design a tool that could use field data that are likely to become available during the early phases of an EGS project (that is, during initial reconnaissance and fracture stimulation operations) to guide forecasts of the longer-term behavior of the system during production and heat-mining.

  3. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-02-19

    Annual Progress Report for fiscal year 2009 for the Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation (AVTAE) team activities

  4. 2008 Annual Progress Report - Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-02-24

    Annual Progress Report for fiscal year 2008 for the Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation (AVTAE) team activities

  5. Advanced Combustion/Modeling and Analysis Toward HCCI/PCCI in...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ...PCCI free-piston engine PDF icon deer09fitzgerald.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced CombustionModeling and Analysis Toward HCCIPCCI in a 60% Efficient Free-Piston ...

  6. Linking Advanced Visualization and MATLAB for the Analysis of 3D Gene

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Expression Data (Conference) | SciTech Connect Linking Advanced Visualization and MATLAB for the Analysis of 3D Gene Expression Data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Linking Advanced Visualization and MATLAB for the Analysis of 3D Gene Expression Data Three-dimensional gene expression PointCloud data generated by the Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project (BDTNP) provides quantitative information about the spatial and temporal expression of genes in early Drosophila

  7. Simulation for analysis and control of superplastic forming. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharia, T.; Aramayo, G.A.; Simunovic, S.; Ludtka, G.M.; Khaleel, M.; Johnson, K.I.; Smith, M.T.; Van Arsdale, G.L.; Lavender, C.A.

    1996-08-01

    A joint study was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy-Lightweight Materials (DOE-LWM) Program. the purpose of the study was to assess and benchmark the current modeling capabilities with respect to accuracy of predictions and simulation time. Two modeling capabilities with respect to accuracy of predictions and simulation time. Two simulation platforms were considered in this study, which included the LS-DYNA3D code installed on ORNL`s high- performance computers and the finite element code MARC used at PNL. both ORNL and PNL performed superplastic forming (SPF) analysis on a standard butter-tray geometry, which was defined by PNL, to better understand the capabilities of the respective models. The specific geometry was selected and formed at PNL, and the experimental results, such as forming time and thickness at specific locations, were provided for comparisons with numerical predictions. Furthermore, comparisons between the ORNL simulation results, using elasto-plastic analysis, and PNL`s results, using rigid-plastic flow analysis, were performed.

  8. Linking Advanced Visualization and MATLAB for the Analysis of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    To maximize the impact of novel, complex data sets, such as ... and comprehensible to developers of analysis functions. ... Language: English Subject: 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 ...

  9. SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiang, Ji; Qiang, J.; Borland, M.; Kabel, A.; Li, R.; Ryne, R.; Stern, E.; Wang, Y.; Wasserman, H.; Zhang, Y.

    2008-06-16

    In this paper, we report on progress that has been made in beam dynamics simulation, from light sources to colliders, during the first year of SciDAC-II accelerator project,"Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS)." Several parallel computational tools for beam dynamics simulation will be described. A number of applications in current and future accelerator facilities, e.g., LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC, ELIC, are presented.

  10. Visualization and analysis of eddies in a global ocean simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Sean J; Hecht, Matthew W; Petersen, Mark; Strelitz, Richard; Maltrud, Mathew E; Ahrens, James P; Hlawitschka, Mario; Hamann, Bernd

    2010-10-15

    Eddies at a scale of approximately one hundred kilometers have been shown to be surprisingly important to understanding large-scale transport of heat and nutrients in the ocean. Due to difficulties in observing the ocean directly, the behavior of eddies below the surface is not very well understood. To fill this gap, we employ a high-resolution simulation of the ocean developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Using large-scale parallel visualization and analysis tools, we produce three-dimensional images of ocean eddies, and also generate a census of eddy distribution and shape averaged over multiple simulation time steps, resulting in a world map of eddy characteristics. As expected from observational studies, our census reveals a higher concentration of eddies at the mid-latitudes than the equator. Our analysis further shows that mid-latitude eddies are thicker, within a range of 1000-2000m, while equatorial eddies are less than 100m thick.

  11. Simulation and Analysis of Converging Shock Wave Test Problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, Scott D.; Shashkov, Mikhail J.

    2012-06-21

    Results and analysis pertaining to the simulation of the Guderley converging shock wave test problem (and associated code verification hydrodynamics test problems involving converging shock waves) in the LANL ASC radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE are presented. One-dimensional (1D) spherical and two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric geometric setups are utilized and evaluated in this study, as is an instantiation of the xRAGE adaptive mesh refinement capability. For the 2D simulations, a 'Surrogate Guderley' test problem is developed and used to obviate subtleties inherent to the true Guderley solution's initialization on a square grid, while still maintaining a high degree of fidelity to the original problem, and minimally straining the general credibility of associated analysis and conclusions.

  12. Advanced HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Advanced HD Engine Systems ... Evaluation of 2010 Urea-SCR Technology for Hybrid Vehicles using PSAT System Simulations ...

  13. Simulation and Analysis of the Hybrid Operating Mode in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessel, C.E.; Budny, R.V.; Indireshkumar, K.

    2005-09-22

    The hybrid operating mode in ITER is examined with 0D systems analysis, 1.5D discharge scenario simulations using TSC and TRANSP, and the ideal MHD stability is discussed. The hybrid mode has the potential to provide very long pulses and significant neutron fluence if the physics regime can be produced in ITER. This paper reports progress in establishing the physics basis and engineering limitation for the hybrid mode in ITER.

  14. Dynamic simulation of kinematic Stirling engines: Coupled and decoupled analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, K.; Lemrani, H.; Stouffs, P.

    1995-12-31

    A coupled analysis modelling method of Stirling engines is presented. The main feature of this modelling method is the use of a software package combining the capabilities of a pre-/post-processor with a differential algebraic equations solver. As a result, modelling is merely a matter of linking appropriate objects from a model library and the outcoming tool is very flexible and powerful. Some simulation results are presented and compared with those obtained from a decoupled analysis. It clearly appears that the main imperfection of the model does not come from the modelling process itself but from their incomplete knowledge of the physics behind the Stirling engine operation.

  15. Innovative and Advanced Coupled Neutron Transport and Thermal Hydraulic Method (Tool) for the Design, Analysis and Optimization of VHTR/NGNP Prismatic Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahnema, Farzad; Garimeela, Srinivas; Ougouag, Abderrafi; Zhang, Dingkang

    2013-11-29

    This project will develop a 3D, advanced coarse mesh transport method (COMET-Hex) for steady- state and transient analyses in advanced very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). The project will lead to a coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulic (T/H) core simulation tool with fuel depletion capability. The computational tool will be developed in hexagonal geometry, based solely on transport theory without (spatial) homogenization in complicated 3D geometries. In addition to the hexagonal geometry extension, collaborators will concurrently develop three additional capabilities to increase the codes versatility as an advanced and robust core simulator for VHTRs. First, the project team will develop and implement a depletion method within the core simulator. Second, the team will develop an elementary (proof-of-concept) 1D time-dependent transport method for efficient transient analyses. The third capability will be a thermal hydraulic method coupled to the neutronics transport module for VHTRs. Current advancements in reactor core design are pushing VHTRs toward greater core and fuel heterogeneity to pursue higher burn-ups, efficiently transmute used fuel, maximize energy production, and improve plant economics and safety. As a result, an accurate and efficient neutron transport, with capabilities to treat heterogeneous burnable poison effects, is highly desirable for predicting VHTR neutronics performance. This research projects primary objective is to advance the state of the art for reactor analysis.

  16. Simulate Multi-Module Advanced Reactor with End-to-End I&C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, Richard Edward; Fugate, David L.; Cetiner, Sacit M.; Qualls, A. L.

    2015-05-01

    The Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Dynamic System Modeling Tool project is in the fourth year of development. The project is designed to support collaborative modeling and study of various advanced SMR (non-light water cooled reactor) concepts, including the use of multiple coupled reactors at a single site.

  17. Confirmation of standard error analysis techniques applied to EXAFS using simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, Corwin H; Hu, Yung-Jin

    2009-12-14

    Systematic uncertainties, such as those in calculated backscattering amplitudes, crystal glitches, etc., not only limit the ultimate accuracy of the EXAFS technique, but also affect the covariance matrix representation of real parameter errors in typical fitting routines. Despite major advances in EXAFS analysis and in understanding all potential uncertainties, these methods are not routinely applied by all EXAFS users. Consequently, reported parameter errors are not reliable in many EXAFS studies in the literature. This situation has made many EXAFS practitioners leery of conventional error analysis applied to EXAFS data. However, conventional error analysis, if properly applied, can teach us more about our data, and even about the power and limitations of the EXAFS technique. Here, we describe the proper application of conventional error analysis to r-space fitting to EXAFS data. Using simulations, we demonstrate the veracity of this analysis by, for instance, showing that the number of independent dat a points from Stern's rule is balanced by the degrees of freedom obtained from a 2 statistical analysis. By applying such analysis to real data, we determine the quantitative effect of systematic errors. In short, this study is intended to remind the EXAFS community about the role of fundamental noise distributions in interpreting our final results.

  18. Feature-Based Statistical Analysis of Combustion Simulation Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, J; Krishnamoorthy, V; Liu, S; Grout, R; Hawkes, E; Chen, J; Pascucci, V; Bremer, P T

    2011-11-18

    We present a new framework for feature-based statistical analysis of large-scale scientific data and demonstrate its effectiveness by analyzing features from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion. Turbulent flows are ubiquitous and account for transport and mixing processes in combustion, astrophysics, fusion, and climate modeling among other disciplines. They are also characterized by coherent structure or organized motion, i.e. nonlocal entities whose geometrical features can directly impact molecular mixing and reactive processes. While traditional multi-point statistics provide correlative information, they lack nonlocal structural information, and hence, fail to provide mechanistic causality information between organized fluid motion and mixing and reactive processes. Hence, it is of great interest to capture and track flow features and their statistics together with their correlation with relevant scalar quantities, e.g. temperature or species concentrations. In our approach we encode the set of all possible flow features by pre-computing merge trees augmented with attributes, such as statistical moments of various scalar fields, e.g. temperature, as well as length-scales computed via spectral analysis. The computation is performed in an efficient streaming manner in a pre-processing step and results in a collection of meta-data that is orders of magnitude smaller than the original simulation data. This meta-data is sufficient to support a fully flexible and interactive analysis of the features, allowing for arbitrary thresholds, providing per-feature statistics, and creating various global diagnostics such as Cumulative Density Functions (CDFs), histograms, or time-series. We combine the analysis with a rendering of the features in a linked-view browser that enables scientists to interactively explore, visualize, and analyze the equivalent of one terabyte of simulation data. We highlight the utility of this new framework for combustion science; however, it is applicable to many other science domains.

  19. SciDAC Advances in Beam Dynamics Simulation: From Light Sources to Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiang, J.; Borland, M.; Kabel, A.; Li, R.; Ryne, R.; Stern, E.; Wang, Y.; Wasserman, H.; Zhang, Y.; /SLAC

    2011-11-14

    In this paper, we report on progress that has been made in beam dynamics simulation, from light sources to colliders, during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project 'Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS).' Several parallel computational tools for beam dynamics simulation are described. Also presented are number of applications in current and future accelerator facilities (e.g., LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC, and ELIC). Particle accelerators are some of most important tools of scientific discovery. They are widely used in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and other basic and applied sciences to study the interaction of elementary particles, to probe the internal structure of matter, and to generate high-brightness radiation for research in materials science, chemistry, biology, and other fields. Modern accelerators are complex and expensive devices that may be several kilometers long and may consist of thousands of beamline elements. An accelerator may transport trillions of charged particles that interact electromagnetically among themselves, that interact with fields produced by the accelerator components, and that interact with beam-induced fields. Large-scale beam dynamics simulations on massively parallel computers can help provide understanding of these complex physical phenomena, help minimize design cost, and help optimize machine operation. In this paper, we report on beam dynamics simulations in a variety of accelerators ranging from next generation light sources to high-energy ring colliders that have been studied during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project.

  20. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies; (2) model biomass productivity and associated environmental impacts of annual cellulosic feedstocks; (3) simulate production of perennial biomass feedstocks grown on marginal lands; and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. We used the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) model to simulate biomass productivity and environmental impacts of annual and perennial cellulosic feedstocks across much of the USA on both croplands and marginal lands. We used data from LTER and eddy-covariance experiments within the study region to test the performance of EPIC and, when necessary, improve its parameterization. We investigated three scenarios. In the first, we simulated a historical (current) baseline scenario composed mainly of corn-, soybean-, and wheat-based rotations as grown existing croplands east of the Rocky Mountains in 30 states. In the second scenario, we simulated a modified baseline in which we harvested corn and wheat residues to supply feedstocks to potential cellulosic ethanol biorefineries distributed within the study area. In the third scenario, we simulated the productivity of perennial cropping systems such as switchgrass or perennial mixtures grown on either marginal or Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands. In all cases we evaluated the environmental impacts (e.g., soil carbon changes, soil erosion, nitrate leaching, etc.) associated with the practices. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided initial simulation results on the potential of annual and perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

  1. Nucleation Rate Analysis of Methane Hydrate from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Barnes, Brian C.; Suh, Donguk; Knott, Brandon C.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Yasuoka, Kenji; Wu, David T.; Amadeu K. Sum

    2015-01-06

    Clathrate hydrates are solid crystalline structures most commonly formed from solutions that have nucleated to form a mixed solid composed of water and gas. Understanding the mechanism of clathrate hydrate nucleation is essential to grasp the fundamental chemistry of these complex structures and their applications. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an ideal method to study nucleation at the molecular level because the size of the critical nucleus and formation rate occur on the nano scale. Moreover, various analysis methods for nucleation have been developed through MD to analyze nucleation. In particular, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP)more » methods have proven to be effective in procuring the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size for monatomic systems. This study assesses the MFPT and SP methods, previously used for monatomic systems, when applied to analyzing clathrate hydrate nucleation. Because clathrate hydrate nucleation is relatively difficult to observe in MD simulations (due to its high free energy barrier), these methods have yet to be applied to clathrate hydrate systems. In this study, we have analyzed the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size of methane hydrate using MFPT and SP methods from data generated by MD simulations at 255 K and 50 MPa. MFPT was modified for clathrate hydrate from the original version by adding the maximum likelihood estimate and growth effect term. The nucleation rates were calculated by MFPT and SP methods and are within 5%; the critical nucleus size estimated by the MFPT method was 50% higher, than values obtained through other more rigorous but computationally expensive estimates. These methods can also be extended to the analysis of other clathrate hydrates.« less

  2. A review of recent advances of numerical simulations of microscale fuel processors for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Wang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    Microscale (<5W) reformers for hydrogen production have been investigated for over a decade. These devices are intended to provide hydrogen for small fuel cells. Due to the reformers small size, numerical simulations are critical to understand heat and mass transfer phenomena occurring in the systems. This paper reviews the development of the numerical codes and details the reaction equations used. The majority of the devices utilized methanol as the fuel due to methanols low reforming temperature and high conversion, although, there are several methane fueled systems. As computational power has decreased in cost and increased in availability, the codes increased in complexity and accuracy. Initial models focused on the reformer, while more recently, the simulations began including other unit operations such as vaporizers, inlet manifolds, and combustors. These codes are critical for developing the next generation systems. The systems reviewed included, plate reactors, microchannel reactors, annulus reactors, wash-coated, packed bed systems.

  3. Development of an Advanced Stimulation/Production Predictive Simulator for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: to develop a 3-D numerical simulator to model the following aspects of stimulation and long-term operation: (1)perturbation of natural stress, pore pressure, and formation temperature distributions caused by cold water injection, (2) shear slippage and aperture increase along fracture patchesŽ and aperture change caused by changes in effective normal stress,(3) fracture patchŽ linkup to form connected permeable volume and both reversible and irreversible permeability changes.

  4. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samulyak, Roman V.; Parks, Paul

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  5. Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters

  6. training=course-in-3d-advanced-hydraulic-and-aerodynamic-analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free 2 Day Training Course in 3D Advanced Hydraulic and Aerodynamic Analysis Using CFD March 25-26, 2014 (Tuesday - Wednesday) Learn and practice using STAR-CCM+ CFD software Tutorial based with a variety of hydraulic and aerodynamic problems Instructors guide the class through problem setup, analysis, and visualization of results Participants can come to Argonne or take the course remotely over the internet Both remote and on site participants will have access to STAR-CCM+ to do the problems

  7. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : FY10 development and integration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Sassani, David Carl; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the progress in fiscal year 2010 in developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. Waste IPSC activities in fiscal year 2010 focused on specifying a challenge problem to demonstrate proof of concept, developing a verification and validation plan, and performing an initial gap analyses to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. This year-end progress report documents the FY10 status of acquisition, development, and integration of thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) code capabilities, frameworks, and enabling tools and infrastructure.

  8. Manufactured Homes Simulated Thermal Analysis and Cost Effectiveness Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baylon, David

    1990-05-17

    In 1988 and 1989, 150 manufactured homes were built to comply with Super Good Cents (SGC) specifications adapted from the existing specifications for site-built homes under the Residential Construction Demonstration Project (RCDP). Engineering calculations and computer simulations were used to estimate the effects of the SGC specifications on the thermal performance of the homes. These results were compared with consumer costs to establish the cost-effectiveness of individual measures. Heat loss U-factors for windows, walls, floors and ceilings were established using the standard ASHRAE parallel heat flow method. Adjustments resulted in higher U-factors for ceilings and floors than assumed at the time the homes were approved as meeting the SGC specifications. Except for those homes which included heat pumps, most of the homes did not meet the SGC compliance standards. Nonetheless these homes achieved substantial reductions in overall heat loss rate (UA) compared to UAs estimated for the same homes using the standard insulation packages provided by the manufacturers in the absence of the RCDP program. Homes with conventional electric furnaces showed a 35% reduction in total UA while homes with heat pumps had a 25% reduction. A regression analysis showed no significant relationship between climate zone, manufacturer and UA. A modified version of SUNDAY building simulation program which simulates duct and heat pump performance was used to model the thermal performance of each RCDP home as built and the same home as it would have been built without SGC specifications (base case). Standard assumptions were used for thermostat setpoint, thermal mass, internal gains and infiltration rates. 11 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. "Partial Panel" Operator Training: Advanced Simulator Training to Enhance Situational Awareness in Off-Normal Situations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2006-06-01

    On August 14, 2003, the largest blackout in the history of the North American electricity grid occurred. The four root causes identified by the blackout investigation team were inadequate system understanding, inadequate situational awareness, inadequate tree trimming, and inadequate reliability coordinator diagnostic support. Three of these four root causes can be attributed to deficiencies in training, communication, and the tools used by the control room operators. Using the issues revealed in the August 14, 2003 blackout, and addressing concerns associated with the security of control systems, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed a hands-on training curriculum that utilizes a dispatcher training simulator to evoke loss of situational awareness by the dispatcher. PNNL performed novel changes to the dispatcher training software in order to accomplish this training. This presentation will describe a vision for a future training environment that will incorporate hands-on training with a dispatcher training simulator in a realistic environment to train operators to recognize and respond to cyber security issues associated with their control systems.

  10. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - integrated multi-scale multi-physics hierarchical modeling and simulation framework Part III: cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tome, Carlos N; Caro, J A; Lebensohn, R A; Unal, Cetin; Arsenlis, A; Marian, J; Pasamehmetoglu, K

    2010-01-01

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Reactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems to develop predictive tools is critical. Not only are fabrication and performance models needed to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. In this paper we review the current status of the advanced modeling and simulation of nuclear reactor cladding, with emphasis on what is available and what is to be developed in each scale of the project, how we propose to pass information from one scale to the next, and what experimental information is required for benchmarking and advancing the modeling at each scale level.

  11. Challenge problem and milestones for : Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Howard, Robert; McNeish, Jerry A.; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

    2010-09-01

    This report describes the specification of a challenge problem and associated challenge milestones for the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The NEAMS challenge problems are designed to demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards IPSC goals. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. To demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards these goals and requirements, a Waste IPSC challenge problem is specified that includes coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes that describe (1) the degradation of a borosilicate glass waste form and the corresponding mobilization of radionuclides (i.e., the processes that produce the radionuclide source term), (2) the associated near-field physical and chemical environment for waste emplacement within a salt formation, and (3) radionuclide transport in the near field (i.e., through the engineered components - waste form, waste package, and backfill - and the immediately adjacent salt). The initial details of a set of challenge milestones that collectively comprise the full challenge problem are also specified.

  12. Final Technical Report: Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Bruce Hardison; Burton, Patrick D.; Hansen, Clifford; Jones, Christian Birk

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors project focuses on improving the accuracy and reducing the uncertainty of PV performance model predictions by addressing a common element of all PV performance models referred to as “derates”. Widespread use of “rules of thumb”, combined with significant uncertainty regarding appropriate values for these factors contribute to uncertainty in projected energy production.

  13. Simulation of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines and Detailed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    continuing work on exploring fuel chemistry, analysis of advanced combustion regimes, and improvements in simulation methodologies PDF icon deer12flowers.pdf More Documents & ...

  14. Implementation and Initial Testing of Advanced Processing and Analysis Algorithms for Correlated Neutron Counting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santi, Peter Angelo; Cutler, Theresa Elizabeth; Favalli, Andrea; Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth; Henzl, Vladimir; Henzlova, Daniela; Parker, Robert Francis; Croft, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the accuracy and capabilities of neutron multiplicity counting, additional quantifiable information is needed in order to address the assumptions that are present in the point model. Extracting and utilizing higher order moments (Quads and Pents) from the neutron pulse train represents the most direct way of extracting additional information from the measurement data to allow for an improved determination of the physical properties of the item of interest. The extraction of higher order moments from a neutron pulse train required the development of advanced dead time correction algorithms which could correct for dead time effects in all of the measurement moments in a self-consistent manner. In addition, advanced analysis algorithms have been developed to address specific assumptions that are made within the current analysis model, namely that all neutrons are created at a single point within the item of interest, and that all neutrons that are produced within an item are created with the same energy distribution. This report will discuss the current status of implementation and initial testing of the advanced dead time correction and analysis algorithms that have been developed in an attempt to utilize higher order moments to improve the capabilities of correlated neutron measurement techniques.

  15. 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION ACTIVITIES AND HEAVY VEHICLE SYSTEMS OPTIMIZATION PROGRAM annual progress report 2008 V e h i c l e T e c h n o l o g i e s P r o g r a m U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Program 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2008 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Submitted to: U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and

  16. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vss043_gonder_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis Battery Pack Requirements and Targets Validation FY 2009 DOE Vehicle

  17. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spentzouris, P.; /Fermilab; Cary, J.; /Tech-X, Boulder; McInnes, L.C.; /Argonne; Mori, W.; /UCLA; Ng, C.; /SLAC; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization for software development and applications accounts for the natural domain areas (beam dynamics, electromagnetics, and advanced acceleration), and all areas depend on the enabling technologies activities, such as solvers and component technology, to deliver the desired performance and integrated simulation environment. The ComPASS applications focus on computationally challenging problems important for design or performance optimization to all major HEP, NP, and BES accelerator facilities. With the cost and complexity of particle accelerators rising, the use of computation to optimize their designs and find improved operating regimes becomes essential, potentially leading to significant cost savings with modest investment.

  18. Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.

    2014-12-01

    The deployment and use of lithium-ion batteries in automotive and stationary energy storage applications must be optimized to justify their high up-front costs. Given that batteries degrade with use and storage, such optimizations must evaluate many years of operation. As the degradation mechanisms are sensitive to temperature, state-of-charge histories, current levels, and cycle depth and frequency, it is important to model both the battery and the application to a high level of detail to ensure battery response is accurately predicted. To address these issues, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed the Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) suite of tools. This suite of tools pairs NREL's high-fidelity battery degradation model with a battery electrical and thermal performance model, application-specific electrical and thermal performance models of the larger system (e.g., an electric vehicle), application-specific system use data (e.g., vehicle travel patterns and driving data), and historic climate data from cities across the United States. This provides highly realistic, long-term predictions of battery response and thereby enables quantitative comparisons of varied battery use strategies.

  19. Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, Steve

    2013-09-11

    Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: 2016 CAF standards. Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industrys future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

  20. Work Domain Analysis Methodology for Development of Operational Concepts for Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugo, Jacques

    2015-05-01

    This report describes a methodology to conduct a Work Domain Analysis in preparation for the development of operational concepts for new plants. This method has been adapted from the classical method described in the literature in order to better deal with the uncertainty and incomplete information typical of first-of-a-kind designs. The report outlines the strategy for undertaking a Work Domain Analysis of a new nuclear power plant and the methods to be used in the development of the various phases of the analysis. Basic principles are described to the extent necessary to explain why and how the classical method was adapted to make it suitable as a tool for the preparation of operational concepts for a new nuclear power plant. Practical examples are provided of the systematic application of the method and the various presentation formats in the operational analysis of advanced reactors.

  1. ADVANCED INTEGRATION OF MULTI-SCALE MECHANICS AND WELDING PROCESS SIMULATION IN WELD INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkowski, Gery M.; Rudland, David L.; Shim, Do-Jun; Brust, Frederick W.; Babu, Sundarsanam

    2008-06-30

    The potential to save trillions of BTUs in energy usage and billions of dollars in cost on an annual basis based on use of higher strength steel in major oil and gas transmission pipeline construction is a compelling opportunity recognized by both the US Department of Energy (DOE). The use of high-strength steels (X100) is expected to result in energy savings across the spectrum, from manufacturing the pipe to transportation and fabrication, including welding of line pipe. Elementary examples of energy savings include more the 25 trillion BTUs saved annually based on lower energy costs to produce the thinner-walled high-strength steel pipe, with the potential for the US part of the Alaskan pipeline alone saving more than 7 trillion BTU in production and much more in transportation and assembling. Annual production, maintenance and installation of just US domestic transmission pipeline is likely to save 5 to 10 times this amount based on current planned and anticipated expansions of oil and gas lines in North America. Among the most important conclusions from these studies were: While computational weld models to predict residual stress and distortions are well-established and accurate, related microstructure models need improvement. Fracture Initiation Transition Temperature (FITT) Master Curve properly predicts surface-cracked pipe brittle-to-ductile initiation temperature. It has value in developing Codes and Standards to better correlate full-scale behavior from either CTOD or Charpy test results with the proper temperature shifts from the FITT master curve method. For stress-based flaw evaluation criteria, the new circumferentially cracked pipe limit-load solution in the 2007 API 1104 Appendix A approach is overly conservative by a factor of 4/?, which has additional implications. . For strain-based design of girth weld defects, the hoop stress effect is the most significant parameter impacting CTOD-driving force and can increase the crack-driving force by a factor of 2 depending on strain-hardening, pressure level as a % of SMYS, and flaw size. From years of experience in circumferential fracture analyses and experimentation, there has not been sufficient integration of work performed for other industries into analogous problems facing the oil and gas pipeline markets. Some very basic concepts and problems solved previously in these fields could have circumvented inconsistencies seen in the stress-based and strain-based analysis efforts. For example, in nuclear utility piping work, more detailed elastic-plastic fracture analyses were always validated in their ability to predict loads and displacements (stresses and strains). The eventual implementation of these methodologies will result in acceleration of the industry adoption of higher-strength line-pipe steels.

  2. Using Micro-Synchrophasor Data for Advanced Distribution Grid Planning and Operations Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Emma; Kiliccote, Sila; McParland, Charles; Roberts, Ciaran

    2014-07-01

    This report reviews the potential for distribution-grid phase-angle data that will be available from new micro-synchrophasors (µPMUs) to be utilized in existing distribution-grid planning and operations analysis. This data could augment the current diagnostic capabilities of grid analysis software, used in both planning and operations for applications such as fault location, and provide data for more accurate modeling of the distribution system. µPMUs are new distribution-grid sensors that will advance measurement and diagnostic capabilities and provide improved visibility of the distribution grid, enabling analysis of the grid’s increasingly complex loads that include features such as large volumes of distributed generation. Large volumes of DG leads to concerns on continued reliable operation of the grid, due to changing power flow characteristics and active generation, with its own protection and control capabilities. Using µPMU data on change in voltage phase angle between two points in conjunction with new and existing distribution-grid planning and operational tools is expected to enable model validation, state estimation, fault location, and renewable resource/load characterization. Our findings include: data measurement is outstripping the processing capabilities of planning and operational tools; not every tool can visualize a voltage phase-angle measurement to the degree of accuracy measured by advanced sensors, and the degree of accuracy in measurement required for the distribution grid is not defined; solving methods cannot handle the high volumes of data generated by modern sensors, so new models and solving methods (such as graph trace analysis) are needed; standardization of sensor-data communications platforms in planning and applications tools would allow integration of different vendors’ sensors and advanced measurement devices. In addition, data from advanced sources such as µPMUs could be used to validate models to improve/ensure accuracy, providing information on normally estimated values such as underground conductor impedance, and characterization of complex loads. Although the input of high-fidelity data to existing tools will be challenging, µPMU data on phase angle (as well as other data from advanced sensors) will be useful for basic operational decisions that are based on a trend of changing data.

  3. Sandia Energy - Advanced Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Imaging Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Reacting Flow Experiments Advanced Imaging Advanced ImagingAshley Otero2015-10-30T01:47:37+00:00...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

  5. Comparison of a Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment Approach with Advanced Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis L; Mandelli, Diego; Zhegang Ma

    2014-11-01

    As part of the Light Water Sustainability Program (LWRS) [1], the purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) [2] Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic and probabilistic approaches are combined in order to estimate a safety margin. We use the scenario of a station blackout (SBO) wherein offsite power and onsite power is lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and contrast this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario. We also describe our approach we are using to represent advanced flooding analysis.

  6. advanced simulation and computing

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NIF, in particular the first Pu experiment on NIF, the return to operations of the TA-55 gas gun, a successful series of plutonium experiments on Joint Actinide Shock Physics...

  7. Advanced Simulation Capability

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the investment need, EM funded a number of initiatives in 1 National Research Council. 2009. Advice on the Department of Energy's Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges....

  8. Advanced Simulation Capability

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    courtesy of Daniel Scott, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. L-Lake is a 1,000-acre, man-made lake, created to disperse and cool water in L-Reactor when it was operating....

  9. advanced simulation and computing

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Each successive generation of computing system has provided greater computing power and energy efficiency.

    CTS-1 clusters will support NNSA's Life Extension Program and...

  10. Advanced Simulation Capability

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    grids, radioactive decay and progeny ingrowth, consideration of changing material prop- erties as a function of time, and collaboration with CBP on a joint demonstration....

  11. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of advanced reactor concepts: The Gas Core Nuclear Rocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banjac, V.; Heger, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    The Gas Core Nuclear Rocket (GCNR), a design first proposed in the 1960s for fast round-trip missions to Mars and the outer planets, is generally considered to be the most advanced, and therefore the most complex, iteration of the fission reactor concept. The GCNR technology involves the extraction of fission energy, by means of thermal radiation, from a high-temperature plasma core to a working fluid. A specific derivative of GCNR technology is the nuclear fight bulb (NLB) rocket engine, first proposed by the then United Aircraft Research Laboratories (UARL) in the early 1960s. The potential operating parameters provided the motivation for a detailed thermal hydraulics analysis.

  12. An analysis of cost effective incentives for initial commercial deployment of advanced clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, D.F.

    1997-12-31

    This analysis evaluates the incentives necessary to introduce commercial scale Advanced Clean Coal Technologies, specifically Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (ICGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) powerplants. The incentives required to support the initial introduction of these systems are based on competitive busbar electricity costs with natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, in baseload service. A federal government price guarantee program for up to 10 Advanced Clean Coal Technology powerplants, 5 each ICGCC and PFBC systems is recommended in order to establish the commercial viability of these systems by 2010. By utilizing a decreasing incentives approach as the technologies mature (plants 1--5 of each type), and considering the additional federal government benefits of these plants versus natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, federal government net financial exposure is minimized. Annual net incentive outlays of approximately 150 million annually over a 20 year period could be necessary. Based on increased demand for Advanced Clean Coal Technologies beyond 2010, the federal government would be revenue neutral within 10 years of the incentives program completion.

  13. Analysis and Simulation of Electrochemical Energy Systems | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 10 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es083_newman_2010_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Interfacial Processes … Diagnostics Progress in Electrolyte Component R&D within the ABR Program, 2009 thru 2013 Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives

  14. Technical analysis of advanced wastewater-treatment systems for coal-gasification plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-31

    This analysis of advanced wastewater treatment systems for coal gasification plants highlights the three coal gasification demonstration plants proposed by the US Department of Energy: The Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant, the Illinois Coal Gasification Group Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant, and the CONOCO Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant. Technical risks exist for coal gasification wastewater treatment systems, in general, and for the three DOE demonstration plants (as designed), in particular, because of key data gaps. The quantities and compositions of coal gasification wastewaters are not well known; the treatability of coal gasification wastewaters by various technologies has not been adequately studied; the dynamic interactions of sequential wastewater treatment processes and upstream wastewater sources has not been tested at demonstration scale. This report identifies key data gaps and recommends that demonstration-size and commercial-size plants be used for coal gasification wastewater treatment data base development. While certain advanced treatment technologies can benefit from additional bench-scale studies, bench-scale and pilot plant scale operations are not representative of commercial-size facility operation. It is recommended that coal gasification demonstration plants, and other commercial-size facilities that generate similar wastewaters, be used to test advanced wastewater treatment technologies during operation by using sidestreams or collected wastewater samples in addition to the plant's own primary treatment system. Advanced wastewater treatment processes are needed to degrade refractory organics and to concentrate and remove dissolved solids to allow for wastewater reuse. Further study of reverse osmosis, evaporation, electrodialysis, ozonation, activated carbon, and ultrafiltration should take place at bench-scale.

  15. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities forin situandin operandoGISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in themore » soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed.« less

  16. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Mller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities forin situandin operandoGISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in the soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed.

  17. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  18. RISMC advanced safety analysis working plan: FY2015 - FY2019. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H; Smith, Curtis L

    2014-09-01

    In this report, the Advanced Safety Analysis Program (ASAP) objectives and value proposition is described. ASAP focuses on modernization of nuclear power safety analysis (tools, methods and data); implementing state-of-the-art modeling techniques (which include, for example, enabling incorporation of more detailed physics as they become available); taking advantage of modern computing hardware; and combining probabilistic and mechanistic analyses to enable a risk informed safety analysis process. The modernized tools will maintain the current high level of safety in our nuclear power plant fleet, while providing an improved understanding of safety margins and the critical parameters that affect them. Thus, the set of tools will provide information to inform decisions on plant modifications, refurbishments, and surveillance programs, while improving economics. The set of tools will also benefit the design of new reactors, enhancing safety per unit cost of a nuclear plant. As part of the discussion, we have identified three sets of stakeholders, the nuclear industry, the Department of Energy (DOE), and associated oversight organizations. These three groups would benefit from ASAP in different ways. For example, within the DOE complex, the possible applications that are seen include the safety of experimental reactors, facility life extension, safety-by-design in future generation advanced reactors, and managing security for the storage of nuclear material. This report provides information in five areas: (1) A value proposition (why is this important?) that will make the case for stakeholders use of the ASAP research and development (R&D) products; (2) An identification of likely end users and pathway to adoption of enhanced tools by the end-users; (3) A proposed set of practical and achievable use case demonstrations; (4) A proposed plan to address ASAP verification and validation (V&V) needs; and (5) A proposed schedule for the multi-year ASAP.

  19. SOARCA Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Long-Term Station Blackout Uncertainty Analysis: Knowledge Advancement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Mattie, Patrick D.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Ross, Kyle; Cardoni, Jeffrey N; Kalinich, Donald A.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Ghosh, S. Tina

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes the knowledge advancements from the uncertainty analysis for the State-of- the-Art Reactor Consequence Analyses (SOARCA) unmitigated long-term station blackout accident scenario at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. This work assessed key MELCOR and MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2) modeling uncertainties in an integrated fashion to quantify the relative importance of each uncertain input on potential accident progression, radiological releases, and off-site consequences. This quantitative uncertainty analysis provides measures of the effects on consequences, of each of the selected uncertain parameters both individually and in interaction with other parameters. The results measure the model response (e.g., variance in the output) to uncertainty in the selected input. Investigation into the important uncertain parameters in turn yields insights into important phenomena for accident progression and off-site consequences. This uncertainty analysis confirmed the known importance of some parameters, such as failure rate of the Safety Relief Valve in accident progression modeling and the dry deposition velocity in off-site consequence modeling. The analysis also revealed some new insights, such as dependent effect of cesium chemical form for different accident progressions. (auth)

  20. Analysis of Aurora's Performance Simulation Engine for Three Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Janine; Simon, Joseph

    2015-07-07

    Aurora Solar Inc. is building a cloud-based optimization platform to automate the design, engineering, and permit generation process of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations. They requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) validate the performance of the PV system performance simulation engine of Aurora Solar’s solar design platform, Aurora. In previous work, NREL performed a validation of multiple other PV modeling tools 1, so this study builds upon that work by examining all of the same fixed-tilt systems with available module datasheets that NREL selected and used in the aforementioned study. Aurora Solar set up these three operating PV systems in their modeling platform using NREL-provided system specifications and concurrent weather data. NREL then verified the setup of these systems, ran the simulations, and compared the Aurora-predicted performance data to measured performance data for those three systems, as well as to performance data predicted by other PV modeling tools.

  1. Regional price targets appropriate for advanced coal extraction. [Forecasting to 1985 and 2000; USA; Regional analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terasawa, K.L.; Whipple, D.W.

    1980-12-01

    The object of the study is to provide a methodology for predicting coal prices in regional markets for the target time frames 1985 and 2000 that could subsequently be used to guide the development of an advanced coal extraction system. The model constructed for the study is a supply and demand model that focuses on underground mining, since the advanced technology is expected to be developed for these reserves by the target years. The supply side of the model is based on coal reserve data generated by Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. (EEA). Given this data and the cost of operating a mine (data from US Department of Energy and Bureau of Mines), the Minimum Acceptable Selling Price (MASP) is obtained. The MASP is defined as the smallest price that would induce the producer to bring the mine into production, and is sensitive to the current technology and to assumptions concerning miner productivity. Based on this information, market supply curves can then be generated. On the demand side of the model, demand by region is calculated based on an EEA methodology that emphasizes demand by electric utilities and demand by industry. The demand and supply curves are then used to obtain the price targets. This last step is accomplished by allocating the demands among the suppliers so that the combined cost of producing and transporting coal is minimized.

  2. Analysis and Simulation of a Blue Energy Cycle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sharma, Ms. Ketki; Kim, Yong-Ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Gabitto, Jorge; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Mayes, Richard T.; Dai, Sheng; Tsouris, Costas

    2016-01-30

    The mixing process of fresh water and seawater releases a significant amount of energy and is a potential source of renewable energy. The so called ‘blue energy’ or salinity-gradient energy can be harvested by a device consisting of carbon electrodes immersed in an electrolyte solution, based on the principle of capacitive double layer expansion (CDLE). In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of energy production based on the CDLE principle. Experiments and computer simulations were used to study the process. Mesoporous carbon materials, synthesized at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, were used as electrode materials in the experiments. Neutronmore » imaging of the blue energy cycle was conducted with cylindrical mesoporous carbon electrodes and 0.5 M lithium chloride as the electrolyte solution. For experiments conducted at 0.6 V and 0.9 V applied potential, a voltage increase of 0.061 V and 0.054 V was observed, respectively. From sequences of neutron images obtained for each step of the blue energy cycle, information on the direction and magnitude of lithium ion transport was obtained. A computer code was developed to simulate the process. Experimental data and computer simulations allowed us to predict energy production.« less

  3. Loads Analysis of a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Using Fully Coupled Simulation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J. M.; Buhl, M. L., Jr.

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents the use of fully coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulation tools to perform a loads analysis of a 5-MW offshore wind turbine supported by a barge with moorings, one of many promising floating platform concepts.

  4. Analysis of Molecular Clusters in Simulations of Lithium-Ion Battery

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrolytes. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Analysis of Molecular Clusters in Simulations of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrolytes. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Analysis of Molecular Clusters in Simulations of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrolytes. Abstract not provided. Authors: Tenney, Craig M ; Cygan, Randall T. Publication Date: 2013-05-01 OSTI Identifier: 1079143 Report Number(s): SAND2013-3865J 452727 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Journal

  5. Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) Code Verification and Validation Data Standards and Requirements: Fluid Dynamics Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Weirs; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01

    V&V and UQ are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of M&S and, hence, to establish confidence in M&S. Though other industries are establishing standards and requirements for the performance of V&V and UQ, at present, the nuclear industry has not established such standards or requirements. However, the nuclear industry is beginning to recognize that such standards are needed and that the resources needed to support V&V and UQ will be very significant. In fact, no single organization has sufficient resources or expertise required to organize, conduct and maintain a comprehensive V&V and UQ program. What is needed is a systematic and standardized approach to establish and provide V&V and UQ resources at a national or even international level, with a consortium of partners from government, academia and industry. Specifically, what is needed is a structured and cost-effective knowledge base that collects, evaluates and stores verification and validation data, and shows how it can be used to perform V&V and UQ, leveraging collaboration and sharing of resources to support existing engineering and licensing procedures as well as science-based V&V and UQ processes. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base to provide V&V and UQ resources for M&S for nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear power. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors.

  6. Analysis of the effectiveness of gas centrifuge enrichment plants advanced safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Brian David; Erpenbeck, Heather H; Miller, Karen A; Swinjoe, Martyn T; Ianakiev, Kiril D; Marlow, Johnna B

    2010-01-01

    Current safeguards approaches used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low-enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect highly enriched uranium (HEU) production with adequate detection probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and 235U enrichment of declared UF6 containers used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive assay (DA) of samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements. These improvements could reduce the difference between the operator's and inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We also explore how a few advanced safeguards systems could be assembled for unattended operation. The analysis will focus on how unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections (IDS) can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear materials when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems.

  7. A survey of Existing V&V, UQ and M&S Data and Knowledge Bases in Support of the Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyung Lee; Rich Johnson, Ph.D.; Kimberlyn C. Moussesau

    2011-12-01

    The Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Utah State University and others. The objective of this consortium is to establish a comprehensive knowledge base to provide Verification and Validation (V&V) and Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and other resources for advanced modeling and simulation (M&S) in nuclear reactor design and analysis. NE-KAMS will become a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, the national laboratories, the U.S. NRC and the public to help ensure the safe operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. A survey and evaluation of the state-of-the-art of existing V&V and M&S databases, including the Department of Energy and commercial databases, has been performed to ensure that the NE-KAMS effort will not be duplicating existing resources and capabilities and to assess the scope of the effort required to develop and implement NE-KAMS. The survey and evaluation have indeed highlighted the unique set of value-added functionality and services that NE-KAMS will provide to its users. Additionally, the survey has helped develop a better understanding of the architecture and functionality of these data and knowledge bases that can be used to leverage the development of NE-KAMS.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Wireless Power Transfer and Infrastructure Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1: ASC software quality engineering practices, Version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  10. Conceptual design of the HTTR-IS hydrogen production system - dynamic simulation code development for advanced process heat exchanger in the HTTR-IS system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Kubo, Shinji; Sakaba, Nariaki; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sano, Naoki; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study is to confirm the availability of proposed mitigation methodology against thermal load increase events initiated by the thermochemical water splitting IS process hydrogen production system (IS process) coupling with the High temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been performing the development of dynamic simulation code which can evaluate complex phenomena in the HTTR-IS system all at one once to achieve the requirement. The notable feature of the developed code is the Advanced Process Heat Exchanger (APHX) module which enables to estimate the IS process thermal load variation considering phase change and chemical reaction behavior assumed in the APHX. In this paper, two cases of dynamic calculation for the thermal load increase events were performed using the newly developed APHX module. The results of the analytical studies clearly show the availability of the developed model for dynamic simulation of the HTTR-IS system and the thermal load increase mitigation methodology. (authors)

  11. Development of an Advanced Simulator to Model Mobility Control and Geomechanics during CO{sub 2} Floods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delshad, Mojdeh; Wheeler, Mary; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; Pope, Gary

    2013-12-31

    The simulator is an isothermal, three-dimensional, four-phase, compositional, equation-of state (EOS) simulator. We have named the simulator UTDOE-CO2 capable of simulating various recovery processes (i.e., primary, secondary waterflooding, and miscible and immiscible gas flooding). We include both the Peng-Robinson EOS and the Redlich-Kwong EOS models. A Gibbs stability test is also included in the model to perform a phase identification test to consistently label each phase for subsequent property calculations such as relative permeability, viscosity, density, interfacial tension, and capillary pressure. Our time step strategy is based on an IMPEC-type method (implicit pressure and explicit concentration). The gridblock pressure is solved first using the explicit dating of saturation-dependent terms. Subsequently, the material balance equations are solved explicitly for the total concentration of each component. The physical dispersion term is also included in the governing equations. The simulator includes (1) several foam model(s) for gas mobility control, (2) compositional relative permeability models with the hysteresis option, (3) corner point grid and several efficient solvers, (4) geomechanics module to compute stress field as the result of CO{sub 2} injection/production, (5) the format of commercial visualization software, S3graf from Science-soft Ltd., was implemented for user friendly visualization of the simulation results. All tasks are completed and the simulator was fully tested and delivered to the DOE office including a users guide and several input files and the executable for Windows Pcs. We have published several SPE papers, presented several posters, and one MS thesis is completed (V. Pudugramam, 2013) resulting from this DOE funded project.

  12. Simulation-Length Requirements in the Loads Analysis of Offshore Floating Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haid, L.; Stewart, G.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Lackner, M.; Matha, D.

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine the appropriate length of a floating offshore wind turbine (FOWT) simulation - a fundamental question that needs to be answered to develop design requirements. To examine this issue, a loads analysis of an example FOWT was performed in FAST with varying simulation lengths. The offshore wind system used was the OC3-Hywind spar buoy, which was developed for use in the International Energy Agency Code Comparison Collaborative Project and supports NREL's offshore 5-megawatt baseline turbine. Realistic metocean data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and repeated periodic wind files were used to excite the structure. The results of the analysis clearly show that loads do not increase for longer simulations. In regards to fatigue, a sensitivity analysis shows that the procedure used for counting half cycles is more important than the simulation length itself. Based on these results, neither the simulation length nor the periodic wind files affect response statistics and loads for FOWTs (at least for the spar studied here); a result in contrast to the offshore oil and gas industry, where running simulations of at least 3 hours in length is common practice.

  13. A microcomputer-based control and simulation of an advanced IPM (interior permanent magnet) synchronous machine drive system for electric vehicle propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bose, B.K.; Szczesny, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced digital control and computer-aided control system design techniques are playing key roles in the complex drive system design and control implementation. The paper describes a high performance microcomputer-based control and digital simulation of an inverter-fed interior permanent magnet (IPM) synchronous machine which uses Neodymium-Iron-Boron magnet. The fully operational four-quadrant drive system includes constant-torque region with zero speed operation and high speed field-weakening constant-power region. The control uses vector or field-oriented technique in constant-torque region with the direct axis aligned to the stator flux, whereas the constant-power region control is based on torque angle orientation of the impressed square-wave voltage. All the key feedback signals for the control are estimated with precision. The drive system is basically designed with an outer torque control loop for electric vehicle appliation, but speed and position control loops can be added for other industrial applications. The distributed microcomputer-based control system is based on Intel-8096 microcontroller and Texas Instruments TMS32010 type digital signal processor. The complete drive system has been simulated using the VAX-based simulation language SIMMON to verify the feasibility of the control laws and to study the performances of the drive system. The simulation results are found to have excellent correlation with the laboratory breadboard tests. 19 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Simulation Analysis for HB-Line Dissolver Mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S

    2006-03-22

    In support of the HB-Line Engineering agitator mixing project, flow pattern calculations have been made for a 90{sup o} apart and helical pitch agitator submerged in a flat tank containing dissolver baskets. The work is intended to determine maximum agitator speed to keep the dissolver baskets from contacting the agitator for the nominal tank liquid level. The analysis model was based on one dissolver basket located on the bottom surface of the flat tank for a conservative estimate. The modeling results will help determine acceptable agitator speeds and tank liquid levels to ensure that the dissolver basket is kept from contacting the agitator blade during HB-Line dissolver tank operations. The numerical modeling and calculations have been performed using a computational fluid dynamics approach. Three-dimensional steady-state momentum and continuity equations were used as the basic equations to estimate fluid motion driven by an agitator with four 90{sup o} pitched blades or three flat blades. Hydraulic conditions were fully turbulent (Reynolds number about 1 x 10{sup 5}). A standard two-equation turbulence model ({kappa},{var_epsilon}), was used to capture turbulent eddy motion. The commercial finite volume code, Fluent [5], was used to create a prototypic geometry file with a non-orthogonal mesh. Hybrid meshing was used to fill the computational region between the round-edged tank bottom and agitator regions. The nominal calculations and a series of sensitivity runs were made to investigate the impact of flow patterns on the lifting behavior of the dissolver basket. At high rotational speeds and low tank levels, local turbulent flow reaches the critical condition for the dissolver basket to be picked up from the tank floor and to touch the agitator blades during the tank mixing operations. This is not desirable in terms of mixing performance. The modeling results demonstrate that the flow patterns driven by the agitators considered here are not strong enough to lift up the dissolver basket for the agitator speeds up to 2500 rpm. The results also show that local velocity magnitudes for the three-blade flat plate agitator are at maximum three times smaller than the helical fourblade one. Table 5 and Table 6 summarize the results.

  15. DOE Simulator Training to Brazil's Petrobas Advances Goal of Deploying Clean Coal Technology at Home and Abroad

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A recently-completed comprehensive Department of Energy training initiative using an innovative high-fidelity combined-cycle dynamic simulator has provided employees of a Brazilian multi-national company the opportunity to learn to operate and control the near-zero-emission power plants critical to a cleaner energy future.

  16. Systems Analysis of an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Based on a Modified UREX+3c Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. R. Johnson; R. E. Best

    2009-12-28

    The research described in this report was performed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe and compare the merits of two advanced alternative nuclear fuel cycles -- named by this study as the UREX+3c fuel cycle and the Alternative Fuel Cycle (AFC). Both fuel cycles were assumed to support 100 1,000 MWe light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants operating over the period 2020 through 2100, and the fast reactors (FRs) necessary to burn the plutonium and minor actinides generated by the LWRs. Reprocessing in both fuel cycles is assumed to be based on the UREX+3c process reported in earlier work by the DOE. Conceptually, the UREX+3c process provides nearly complete separation of the various components of spent nuclear fuel in order to enable recycle of reusable nuclear materials, and the storage, conversion, transmutation and/or disposal of other recovered components. Output of the process contains substantially all of the plutonium, which is recovered as a 5:1 uranium/plutonium mixture, in order to discourage plutonium diversion. Mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for recycle in LWRs is made using this 5:1 U/Pu mixture plus appropriate makeup uranium. A second process output contains all of the recovered uranium except the uranium in the 5:1 U/Pu mixture. The several other process outputs are various waste streams, including a stream of minor actinides that are stored until they are consumed in future FRs. For this study, the UREX+3c fuel cycle is assumed to recycle only the 5:1 U/Pu mixture to be used in LWR MOX fuel and to use depleted uranium (tails) for the makeup uranium. This fuel cycle is assumed not to use the recovered uranium output stream but to discard it instead. On the other hand, the AFC is assumed to recycle both the 5:1 U/Pu mixture and all of the recovered uranium. In this case, the recovered uranium is reenriched with the level of enrichment being determined by the amount of recovered plutonium and the combined amount of the resulting MOX. The study considered two sub-cases within each of the two fuel cycles in which the uranium and plutonium from the first generation of MOX spent fuel (i) would not be recycled to produce a second generation of MOX for use in LWRs or (ii) would be recycled to produce a second generation of MOX fuel for use in LWRs. The study also investigated the effects of recycling MOX spent fuel multiple times in LWRs. The study assumed that both fuel cycles would store and then reprocess spent MOX fuel that is not recycled to produce a next generation of LWR MOX fuel and would use the recovered products to produce FR fuel. The study further assumed that FRs would begin to be brought on-line in 2043, eleven years after recycle begins in LWRs, when products from 5-year cooled spent MOX fuel would be available. Fuel for the FRs would be made using the uranium, plutonium, and minor actinides recovered from MOX. For the cases where LWR fuel was assumed to be recycled one time, the 1st generation of MOX spent fuel was used to provide nuclear materials for production of FR fuel. For the cases where the LWR fuel was assumed to be recycled two times, the 2nd generation of MOX spent fuel was used to provide nuclear materials for production of FR fuel. The number of FRs in operation was assumed to increase in successive years until the rate that actinides were recovered from permanently discharged spent MOX fuel equaled the rate the actinides were consumed by the operating fleet of FRs. To compare the two fuel cycles, the study analyzed recycle of nuclear fuel in LWRs and FRs and determined the radiological characteristics of irradiated nuclear fuel, nuclear waste products, and recycle nuclear fuels. It also developed a model to simulate the flows of nuclear materials that could occur in the two advanced nuclear fuel cycles over 81 years beginning in 2020 and ending in 2100. Simulations projected the flows of uranium, plutonium, and minor actinides as these nuclear fuel materials were produced and consumed in a fleet of 100 1,000 MWe LWRs and in FRs. The model als

  17. Development and Analysis of Advanced High-Temperature Technology for Nuclear Heat Transport and Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Per F. Peterson

    2010-03-01

    This project by the Thermal Hydraulics Research Laboratory at U.C. Berkeley Studied advanced high-temperature heat transport and power conversion technology, in support of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative and Generation IV.

  18. Using EnergyPlus to Simulate the Dynamic Response of a Residential Building to Advanced Cooling Strategies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booten, C.; Tabares-Velasco, P. C.

    2012-08-01

    This study demonstrates the ability of EnergyPlus to accurately model complex cooling strategies in a real home with a goal of shifting energy use off peak and realizing energy savings. The house was retrofitted through the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) deep energy retrofit demonstration program; field tests were operated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The experimental data were collected as part of a larger study and are used here to validate simulation predictions.

  19. An analysis of markets for small-scale, advanced coal-combustion technology in Spain, Italy, and Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    This report describes the results of an in-depth analysis of markets for US-developed, advanced coal-combustion technology (ACT) in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors of three countries -- Spain, Italy, and Turkey. These countries were chosen in a previous study, in which member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) were rated on eight factors influencing their propensity to use small-scale, US-developed ACT. 76 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs.

  20. Analysis of DOE s Roof Savings Calculator with Comparison to other Simulation Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan; Huang, Yu; Levinson, Ronnen; Mellot, Joe; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Childs, Kenneth W

    2014-01-01

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs the latest web technologies and usability design to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned based on national averages and can provide estimated annual energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than building location. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool can simulate multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance surfaces, HVAC duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple layers of building materials, ceiling and deck insulation levels, and other parameters. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to generate an energy/cost savings estimate between two buildings. The RSC tool was benchmarked against field data for demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, CA. However, RSC gives different energy savings estimates than previous cool roof simulation tools so more thorough software and empirical validation proved necessary. This report consolidates much of the preliminary analysis for comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to that from other simulation engines.

  1. An overview of 3-D graphical analysis using DOE-2 hourly simulation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haberl, J.S.; MacDonald, M.; Eden, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of a 3-D graphical approach for improving the potential of building energy analyses using the DOE-2 computer program. The approach produces 3-D annual profiles from hourly data generated by DOE-2 simulations using a statistical plotting package for specific quantities of interest. The annual profiles of hourly data provide a useful graphical check of voluminous data in a condensed form, allowing several different types of data to be plotted over a year. These profiles provide the user with the opportunity to check simulation results, check for potential problems with user input, provide graphs to customers who may want a simpler presentation, visualize interactions in simulations, and understand where inappropriate modeling conditions may exist in simulations. Future analysis, using such profiles, may allow methods to be developed to check consistency between simulations, check for potential hidden errors in modeling buildings, and better understand how simulations compare with data from real buildings. 22 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Analysis of Petroleum Technology Advances Through Applied Research by Independent Oil Producers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brashear, Jerry P.; North, Walter B.; Thomas Charles P.; Becker, Alan B.; Faulder, David D.

    2000-01-12

    Petroleum Technology Advances Through Applied Research by Independent Oil Producers is a program of the National Oil Research Program, U.S. Department of Energy. Between 1995 and 1998, the program competitively selected and cost-shared twenty-two projects with small producers. The purpose was to involve small independent producers in testing technologies of interest to them that would advance (directly or indirectly) one or more of four national program objectives: (1) Extend the productive life of reservoirs; (2) Increase production and/or reserves; (3) Improve environmental performance; and (4) Broaden the exchange of technology information.

  3. Reframing Accelerator Simulations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations Mori-1.png Key Challenges: Use advanced simulation tools to study the feasibility of plasma-based linear colliders and to optimize conceptual designs. Much of the...

  4. Analysis of Wind Turbine Simulation Models: Assessment of Simplified versus Complete Methodologies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honrubia-Escribano, A.; Jimenez-Buendia, F.; Molina-Garcia, A.; Fuentes-Moreno, J. A.; Muljadi, Eduard; Gomez-Lazaro, E.

    2015-09-14

    This paper presents the current status of simplified wind turbine models used for power system stability analysis. This work is based on the ongoing work being developed in IEC 61400-27. This international standard, for which a technical committee was convened in October 2009, is focused on defining generic (also known as simplified) simulation models for both wind turbines and wind power plants. The results of the paper provide an improved understanding of the usability of generic models to conduct power system simulations.

  5. Simulation of the passive condensation cooling tank of the PASCAL test facility using the component thermal-hydraulic analysis code CUPID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, H. K.; Lee, S. J.; Kang, K. H.; Yoon, H. Y.

    2012-07-01

    For the analysis of transient two-phase flows in nuclear reactor components, a three-dimensional thermal hydraulics code, named CUPID, has been being developed. In the present study, the CUPID code was applied for the simulation of the PASCAL (PAFS Condensing Heat Removal Assessment Loop) test facility constructed with an aim of validating the cooling and operational performance of the PAFS (Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System). The PAFS is one of the advanced safety features adopted in the APR+ (Advanced Power Reactor +), which is intended to completely replace the conventional active auxiliary feedwater system. This paper presents the preliminary simulation results of the PASCAL facility performed with the CUPID code in order to verify its applicability to the thermal-hydraulic phenomena inside the system. A standalone calculation for the passive condensation cooling tank was performed by imposing a heat source boundary condition and the transient thermal-hydraulic behaviors inside the system, such as the water level, temperature and velocity, were qualitatively investigated. The simulation results verified that the natural circulation and boiling phenomena in the water pool can be well reproduced by the CUPID code. (authors)

  6. Analysis of the flamelet concept in the numerical simulation of laminar partially premixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Consul, R.; Oliva, A.; Perez-Segarra, C.D.; Carbonell, D.; de Goey, L.P.H.

    2008-04-15

    The aim of this work is to analyze the application of flamelet models based on the mixture fraction variable and its dissipation rate to the numerical simulation of partially premixed flames. Although the main application of these models is the computation of turbulent flames, this work focuses on the performance of flamelet concept in laminar flame simulations removing, in this way, turbulence closure interactions. A well-known coflow methane/air laminar flame is selected. Five levels of premixing are taken into account from an equivalence ratio {phi}={infinity} (nonpremixed) to {phi}=2.464. Results obtained using the flamelet approaches are compared to data obtained from the detailed solution of the complete transport equations using primitive variables. Numerical simulations of a counterflow flame are also presented to support the discussion of the results. Special emphasis is given to the analysis of the scalar dissipation rate modeling. (author)

  7. Comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for advanced nuclear reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bartel, N.; Chen, M.; Utgikar, V. P.; Sun, X.; Kim, I. -H.; Christensen, R.; Sabharwall, P.

    2015-04-04

    A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in advanced nuclear reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal advanced nuclear reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimummore » combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well.« less

  8. Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines Research Diesel Fuels: Analysis of Physical and Chemical Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallant, Tom; Franz, Jim; Alnajjar, Mikhail; Storey, John Morse; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Sluder, Scott; Cannella, William C; Fairbridge, Craig; Hager, Darcy; Dettman, Heather; Luecke, Jon; Ratcliff, Matthew A.; Zigler, Brad

    2009-01-01

    The CRC Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines working group has worked to identify a matrix of research diesel fuels for use in advanced combustion research applications. Nine fuels were specified and formulated to investigate the effects of cetane number aromatic content and 90% distillation fraction. Standard ASTM analyses were performed on the fuels as well as GC/MS and /u1H//u1/u3C NMR analyses and thermodynamic characterizations. Details of the actual results of the fuel formulations compared with the design values are presented, as well as results from standard analyses, such as heating value, viscosity and density. Cetane number characterizations were accomplished by using both the engine method and the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT/sT) apparatus.

  9. Analysis of Advanced Fuel Assemblies and Core Designs for the Current and Next Generations of LWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragusa, Jean; Vierow, Karen

    2011-09-01

    The objective of the project is to design and analyze advanced fuel assemblies for use in current and future light water reactors and to assess their ability to reduce the inventory of transuranic elements, while preserving operational safety. The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel can delay or avoid the need for a second geological repository in the US. Current light water reactor fuel assembly designs under investigation could reduce the plutonium inventory of reprocessed fuel. Nevertheless, these designs are not effective in stabilizing or reducing the inventory of minor actinides. In the course of this project, we developed and analyzed advanced fuel assembly designs with improved thermal transmutation capability regarding transuranic elements and especially minor actinides. These designs will be intended for use in thermal spectrum (e.g., current and future fleet of light water reactors in the US). We investigated various fuel types, namely high burn-up advanced mixed oxides and inert matrix fuels, in various geometrical designs that are compliant with the core internals of current and future light water reactors. Neutronic/thermal hydraulic effects were included. Transmutation efficiency and safety parameters were used to rank and down-select the various designs.

  10. Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems - A North American Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems - A North American Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions May 2005 Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems - A North American Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions Norman Brinkman, General Motors Corporation Michael Wang, Argonne National Laboratory Trudy Weber, General Motors Corporation Thomas Darlington, Air Improvement Resource, Inc. May

  11. Automating Embedded Analysis Capabilities and Managing Software Complexity in Multiphysics Simulation, Part I: Template-Based Generic Programming

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pawlowski, Roger P.; Phipps, Eric T.; Salinger, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    An approach for incorporating embedded simulation and analysis capabilities in complex simulation codes through template-based generic programming is presented. This approach relies on templating and operator overloading within the C++ language to transform a given calculation into one that can compute a variety of additional quantities that are necessary for many state-of-the-art simulation and analysis algorithms. An approach for incorporating these ideas into complex simulation codes through general graph-based assembly is also presented. These ideas have been implemented within a set of packages in the Trilinos framework and are demonstrated on a simple problem from chemical engineering.

  12. Designing and Operating Through Compromise: Architectural Analysis of CKMS for the Advanced Metering Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duren, Mike; Aldridge, Hal; Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2013-01-01

    Compromises attributable to the Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) highlight the necessity for constant vigilance. The APT provides a new perspective on security metrics (e.g., statistics based cyber security) and quantitative risk assessments. We consider design principals and models/tools that provide high assurance for energy delivery systems (EDS) operations regardless of the state of compromise. Cryptographic keys must be securely exchanged, then held and protected on either end of a communications link. This is challenging for a utility with numerous substations that must secure the intelligent electronic devices (IEDs) that may comprise complex control system of systems. For example, distribution and management of keys among the millions of intelligent meters within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) is being implemented as part of the National Smart Grid initiative. Without a means for a secure cryptographic key management system (CKMS) no cryptographic solution can be widely deployed to protect the EDS infrastructure from cyber-attack. We consider 1) how security modeling is applied to key management and cyber security concerns on a continuous basis from design through operation, 2) how trusted models and key management architectures greatly impact failure scenarios, and 3) how hardware-enabled trust is a critical element to detecting, surviving, and recovering from attack.

  13. Grand Challenges in Modeling, Simulation and Analysis: Extraction and Visualization of Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Steven J; Omitaomu, Olufemi A

    2010-01-01

    Threats to the national electric power grid often require the coupling of real-time state data with look-ahead or forecasting models to provide timely disruption warnings. However, successful accomplishment of this capability presents a grand challenge in modeling, simulation, and analysis. Analysis of inter-area oscillatory modes may provide a new path to anticipate power system stability and address this grand challenge. An algorithm is presented for the identification and analysis of such modes from high resolution phasor measurement data that might indicate a pathway to meet this grand challenge. The process outlined includes data collection, conditioning, extraction of the primary oscillatory frequency, and determination of participating areas of the system.

  14. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) verification and validation plan. version 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Urbina, Angel; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); McCornack, Marjorie Turner

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. To meet this objective, NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities will be applied to challenging spatial domains, temporal domains, multiphysics couplings, and multiscale couplings. A strategic verification and validation (V&V) goal is to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities. Because it is economically impractical to apply the maximum V&V rigor to each and every M&S capability, M&S capabilities will be ranked for their impact on the performance assessments of various components of the repository systems. Those M&S capabilities with greater impact will require a greater level of confidence and a correspondingly greater investment in V&V. This report includes five major components: (1) a background summary of the NEAMS Waste IPSC to emphasize M&S challenges; (2) the conceptual foundation for verification, validation, and confidence assessment of NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities; (3) specifications for the planned verification, validation, and confidence-assessment practices; (4) specifications for the planned evidence information management system; and (5) a path forward for the incremental implementation of this V&V plan.

  15. Using the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite to Enable Comparative Analysis Between Energy Simulation Engines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Maguire, J.; Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.

    2014-09-01

    Verification and validation are crucial software quality control procedures when developing and implementing models. This is particularly important as a variety of stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from building simulation programs. This study uses the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite (BARTS) to facilitate comparison of two energy simulation engines across various building components and includes models that isolate the impacts of specific building components on annual energy consumption. As a case study, BARTS has been used to identify important discrepancies between the engines for several components of the building models; these discrepancies are caused by differences in the models used by the engines or coding errors.

  16. Using the Beopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite to Enable Comparative Analysis Between Energy Simulation Engines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares-Velasco, Paulo Cesar; Maguire, Jeff; Horowitz, Scott; Christensen, Craig

    2014-09-01

    Verification and validation are crucial software quality control procedures to follow when developing and implementing models. This is particularly important because a variety of stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from building simulation programs. This study uses the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite (BARTS) to facilitate comparison of two energy simulation engines across various building components and includes building models that isolate the impacts of specific components on annual energy consumption. As a case study, BARTS has been used to identify important discrepancies between the engines for several components of the building models. These discrepancies are caused by differences in the algorithms used by the engines or coding errors.

  17. Application of a Tractive Energy Analysis to Quantify the Benefits of Advanced Efficiency Technologies Using Characteristic Drive Cycle Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaClair, Tim J

    2012-01-01

    Accurately predicting the fuel savings that can be achieved with the implementation of various technologies developed for fuel efficiency can be very challenging, particularly when considering combinations of technologies. Differences in the usage of highway vehicles can strongly influence the benefits realized with any given technology, which makes generalizations about fuel savings inappropriate for different vehicle applications. A model has been developed to estimate the potential for reducing fuel consumption when advanced efficiency technologies, or combinations of these technologies, are employed on highway vehicles, particularly medium- and heavy-duty trucks. The approach is based on a tractive energy analysis applied to drive cycles representative of the vehicle usage, and the analysis specifically accounts for individual energy loss factors that characterize the technologies of interest. This tractive energy evaluation is demonstrated by analyzing measured drive cycles from a long-haul trucking fleet and the results of an assessment of the fuel savings potential for combinations of technologies are presented. The results of this research will enable more reliable estimates of the fuel savings benefits that can be realized with particular technologies and technology combinations for individual trucking applications so that decision makers can make informed investment decisions for the implementation of advanced efficiency technologies.

  18. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Smith, James A.; Jewell, James Keith

    2015-02-01

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  19. Development and Utilization of mathematical Optimization in Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turinsky, Paul; Hays, Ross

    2011-09-02

    Over the past sixty years, a wide variety of nuclear power technologies have been theorized, investigated and tested to various degrees. These technologies, if properly applied, could provide a stable, long-term, economical source of CO2-free electric power. However, the recycling of nuclear fuel introduces a degree of coupling between reactor systems which must be accounted for when making long term strategic plans. This work investigates the use of a simulated annealing optimization algorithm coupled together with the VISION fuel cycle simulation model in order to identify attractive strategies from economic, evironmental, non-proliferation and waste-disposal perspectives, which each have associated an objective function. The simulated annealing optimization algorithm works by perturbing the fraction of new reactor capacity allocated to each available reactor type (using a set of heuristic rules) then evaluating the resulting deployment scenario outcomes using the VISION model and the chosen objective functions. These new scenarios, which are either accepted or rejected according the the Metropolis Criterion, are then used as the basis for further perturbations. By repeating this process several thousand times, a family of near-optimal solutions are obtained. Preliminary results from this work using a two-step, Once-through LWR to Full-recycle/FRburner deployment scenario with exponentially increasing electric demand indicate that the algorithm is capable of #12;nding reactor deployment pro#12;les that reduce the long-term-heat waste disposal burden relative to an initial reference scenario. Further work is under way to re#12;ne the current results and to extend them to include the other objective functions and to examine the optimization trade-o#11;s that exist between these di#11;erent objectives.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

  1. Analysis of the applicability and probable cost effectiveness of advancing longwall-mining systems in the United States. Final technical report. [Advance vs retreat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, F.E.; Peake, C.V.; Sharkey, A.

    1981-07-01

    In the first phase of this study it was concluded that there are a number of advancing longwall systems that might well be applicable in the United States and, furthermore, meet the health and safety requirements of MSHA, state inspectors, operating management, and unions. Comparative analyses showed that only two of the advancing-type systems evaluated in the Phase I report failed to approach or better, economically, the typical retreating method in at least some conditions; the others appeared to warrant further attention. And if the mining plan could be worked out to allow for a switch from advancing to retreating after the early years of mining, then almost any combination of advancing and retreating would provide a better return on investment, or in our terms, have a higher net present value than would a typical retreating system. The reason for this lies in the higher initial production rates of the advancing systems and in the lower operating cost and higher ultimate productivity of a retreating system once it is established. After analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of the various advancing longwall systems for a trial program it became apparent that the modified Z System offered the best combination of economic potential and lack of conflict with US mining laws. The major attraction of the modified Z system is that it provides separate roadways to the face for intake air, exhaust air and a beltway. Thus regulatory approval of the ventilation system should not be a major obstacle. The Kaiser Steel Corporation agreed to cooperate with the development of a specification for a trial of the system at its Sunnyside Mine in Utah. The specification was developed for one longwall face to mine a series of panels at Sunnyside.

  2. Preliminary Feasibility, Design, and Hazard Analysis of a Boiling Water Test Loop Within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas M. Gerstner

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A Boiling Water Test Loop (BWTL) is being designed for one of the irradiation test positions within the. The objective of the new loop will be to simulate boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions to support clad corrosion and related reactor material testing. Further it will accommodate power ramping tests of candidate high burn-up fuels and fuel pins/rods for the commercial BWR utilities. The BWTL will be much like the pressurized water loops already in service in 5 of the 9 flux traps (region of enhanced neutron flux) in the ATR. The loop coolant will be isolated from the primary coolant system so that the loops temperature, pressure, flow rate, and water chemistry can be independently controlled. This paper presents the proposed general design of the in-core and auxiliary BWTL systems; the preliminary results of the neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses; and the preliminary hazard analysis for safe normal and transient BWTL and ATR operation.

  3. Advanced Simulation and Computing Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The SSP mission is to analyze and predict the performance, safety, and reliability of nuclear weapons and certify their functionality. ASC works in partnership with computer ...

  4. Science-Based Simulation Model of Human Performance for Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana L. Kelly; Ronald L. Boring; Ali Mosleh; Carol Smidts

    2011-10-01

    Human reliability analysis (HRA), a component of an integrated probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), is the means by which the human contribution to risk is assessed, both qualitatively and quantitatively. However, among the literally dozens of HRA methods that have been developed, most cannot fully model and quantify the types of errors that occurred at Three Mile Island. Furthermore, all of the methods lack a solid empirical basis, relying heavily on expert judgment or empirical results derived in non-reactor domains. Finally, all of the methods are essentially static, and are thus unable to capture the dynamics of an accident in progress. The objective of this work is to begin exploring a dynamic simulation approach to HRA, one whose models have a basis in psychological theories of human performance, and whose quantitative estimates have an empirical basis. This paper highlights a plan to formalize collaboration among the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the University of Maryland, and The Ohio State University (OSU) to continue development of a simulation model initially formulated at the University of Maryland. Initial work will focus on enhancing the underlying human performance models with the most recent psychological research, and on planning follow-on studies to establish an empirical basis for the model, based on simulator experiments to be carried out at the INL and at the OSU.

  5. A bottom collider vertex detector design, Monte-Carlo simulation and analysis package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebrun, P.

    1990-10-01

    A detailed simulation of the BCD vertex detector is underway. Specifications and global design issues are briefly reviewed. The BCD design based on double sided strip detector is described in more detail. The GEANT3-based Monte-Carlo program and the analysis package used to estimate detector performance are discussed in detail. The current status of the expected resolution and signal to noise ratio for the golden'' CP violating mode B{sub d} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} is presented. These calculations have been done at FNAL energy ({radical}s = 2.0 TeV). Emphasis is placed on design issues, analysis techniques and related software rather than physics potentials. 20 refs., 46 figs.

  6. Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants with Advanced Technology

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    This analysis responds to a request of Senators James M. Jeffords and Joseph I. Lieberman. This report describes the impacts of technology improvements and other market-based opportunities on the costs of emissions reductions from electricity generators, including nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, mercury, and carbon dioxide.

  7. Hypopharyngeal Dose Is Associated With Severe Late Toxicity in Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: An RTOG Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machtay, Mitchell; Moughan, Jennifer; Farach, Andrew; University of Texas Health Science Center Martin-O'Meara, Elizabeth; Galvin, James; Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Garden, Adam S.; Weber, Randal S.; Cooper, Jay S.; Forastiere, Arlene; Ang, K. Kian

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) increases local tumor control but at the expense of increased toxicity. We recently showed that several clinical/pretreatment factors were associated with the occurrence of severe late toxicity. This study evaluated the potential relationship between radiation dose delivered to the pharyngeal wall and toxicity. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of long-term survivors from 3 previously reported Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials of CCRT for locally advanced SCCHN (RTOG trials 91-11, 97-03, and 99-14). Severe late toxicity was defined in this secondary analysis as chronic grade 3-4 pharyngeal/laryngeal toxicity and/or requirement for a feeding tube {>=}2 years after registration and/or potential treatment-related death (eg, pneumonia) within 3 years. Radiation dosimetry (2-dimensional) analysis was performed centrally at RTOG headquarters to estimate doses to 4 regions of interest along the pharyngeal wall (superior oropharynx, inferior oropharynx, superior hypopharynx, and inferior hypopharynx). Case-control analysis was performed with a multivariate logistic regression model that included pretreatment and treatment potential factors. Results: A total of 154 patients were evaluable for this analysis, 71 cases (patients with severe late toxicities) and 83 controls; thus, 46% of evaluable patients had a severe late toxicity. On multivariate analysis, significant variables correlated with the development of severe late toxicity, including older age (odds ratio, 1.062 per year; P=.0021) and radiation dose received by the inferior hypopharynx (odds ratio, 1.023 per Gy; P=.016). The subgroup of patients receiving {<=}60 Gy to the inferior hypopharynx had a 40% rate of severe late toxicity compared with 56% for patients receiving >60 Gy. Oropharyngeal dose was not associated with this outcome. Conclusions: Severe late toxicity following CCRT is common in long-term survivors. Age is the most significant factor, but hypopharyngeal dose also was associated.

  8. As-Run Physics Analysis for the UCSB-1 Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Joseph Wayne

    2015-09-01

    The University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) -1 experiment was irradiated in the A-10 position of the ATR. The experiment was irradiated during cycles 145A, 145B, 146A, and 146B. Capsule 6A was removed from the test train following Cycle 145A and replaced with Capsule 6B. This report documents the as-run physics analysis in support of Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the test. This report documents the as-run fluence and displacements per atom (DPA) for each capsule of the experiment based on as-run operating history of the ATR. Average as-run heating rates for each capsule are also presented in this report to support the thermal analysis.

  9. Coupled Hybrid Monte Carlo: Deterministic Analysis of VHTR Configurations with Advanced Actinide Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsvetkov, Pavel V.; Ames II, David E.; Alajo, Ayodeji B.; Pritchard, Megan L.

    2006-07-01

    Partitioning and transmutation of minor actinides are expected to have a positive impact on the future of nuclear technology. Their deployment would lead to incineration of hazardous nuclides and could potentially provide additional fuel supply. The U.S. DOE NERI Project assesses the possibility, advantages and limitations of involving minor actinides as a fuel component. The analysis takes into consideration and compares capabilities of actinide-fueled VHTRs with pebble-bed and prismatic cores to approach a reactor lifetime long operation without intermediate refueling. A hybrid Monte Carlo-deterministic methodology has been adopted for coupled neutronics-thermal hydraulics design studies of VHTRs. Within the computational scheme, the key technical issues are being addressed and resolved by implementing efficient automated modeling procedures and sequences, combining Monte Carlo and deterministic approaches, developing and applying realistic 3D coupled neutronics-thermal-hydraulics models with multi-heterogeneity treatments, developing and performing experimental/computational benchmarks for model verification and validation, analyzing uncertainty effects and error propagation. This paper introduces the suggested modeling approach, discusses benchmark results and the preliminary analysis of actinide-fueled VHTRs. The presented up-to-date results are in agreement with the available experimental data. Studies of VHTRs with minor actinides suggest promising performance. (authors)

  10. Simulation analysis of within-day flow fluctuation effects on trout below flaming Gorge Dam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Railsback, S. F.; Hayse, J. W.; LaGory, K. E.; Environmental Science Division; EPRI

    2006-01-01

    In addition to being renewable, hydropower has the advantage of allowing rapid load-following, in that the generation rate can easily be varied within a day to match the demand for power. However, the flow fluctuations that result from load-following can be controversial, in part because they may affect downstream fish populations. At Flaming Gorge Dam, located on the Green River in northeastern Utah, concern has been raised about whether flow fluctuations caused by the dam disrupt feeding at a tailwater trout fishery, as fish move in response to flow changes and as the flow changes alter the amount or timing of the invertebrate drift that trout feed on. Western Area Power Administration (Western), which controls power production on submonthly time scales, has made several operational changes to address concerns about flow fluctuation effects on fisheries. These changes include reducing the number of daily flow peaks from two to one and operating within a restricted range of flows. These changes significantly reduce the value of the power produced at Flaming Gorge Dam and put higher load-following pressure on other power plants. Consequently, Western has great interest in understanding what benefits these restrictions provide to the fishery and whether adjusting the restrictions could provide a better tradeoff between power and non-power concerns. Directly evaluating the effects of flow fluctuations on fish populations is unfortunately difficult. Effects are expected to be relatively small, so tightly controlled experiments with large sample sizes and long study durations would be needed to evaluate them. Such experiments would be extremely expensive and would be subject to the confounding effects of uncontrollable variations in factors such as runoff and weather. Computer simulation using individual-based models (IBMs) is an alternative study approach for ecological problems that are not amenable to analysis using field studies alone. An IBM simulates how a population responds to environmental changes by representing how the population's individuals interact with their environment and each other. IBMs represent key characteristics of both individual organisms (trout, in this case) and the environment, thus allowing controlled simulation experiments to analyze the effects of changes in the key variables. For the flow fluctuation problem at Flaming Gorge Dam, the key environmental variables are flow rates and invertebrate drift concentrations, and the most important processes involve how trout adapt to changes (over space and time) in growth potential and mortality risk. This report documents simulation analyses of flow fluctuation effects on trout populations. The analyses were conducted in a highly controlled fashion: an IBM was used to predict production (survival and growth) of trout populations under a variety of scenarios that differ only in the level or type of flow fluctuation.

  11. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

  12. Software Requirements Specification Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Shropshire; W. H. West

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this Software Requirements Specification (SRS) is to define the top-level requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). This simulation model is intended to serve a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies.

  13. FINAL Report on Analysis and direct numerical simulation of RF heating processes and advanced computational methods for fusion application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, John R

    2015-02-23

    This completes the description of the work done under the above referenced grant. In brief, we have discovered many nonlinear effects, frequency doubling, nonlinear decays, that can prevent effective use of EBWs for plasma heating.

  14. Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saffer, Shelley I.

    2014-12-01

    This is a final report of the DOE award DE-SC0001132, Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation. This document describes the achievements of the goals, and resulting research made possible by this award.

  15. A Study of the Role of Adjoint-Equipped CFD in VUQ Analysis of Channel Boiling Simulations -Slides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study of the Role of Adjoint- Equipped CFD in VUQ Analysis of Channel Boiling Simulations Krzysztof Fidkowski University of Michigan Milestone L3:THM.CFD.P7.08 November 21, 2013 CASL-U-2013-0192-000-b L3-THM-CFD-P7-08 A Study of the Role of Adjoint-Equipped CFD in VUQ Analysis of Channel Boiling Simulations Milestone owner: Krzysztof Fidkowski, U. Michigan Additional personnel: Isaac Asher, U. Michigan 2 CASL-U-2013-0192-000-b Milestone Execution Responsibility & Personnel * Contact:

  16. Severe Accident Sequence Analysis Program: Anticipated transient without scram simulations for Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallman, R J; Gottula, R C; Holcomb, E E; Jouse, W C; Wagoner, S R; Wheatley, P D

    1987-05-01

    An analysis of five anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The five detailed deterministic simulations of postulated ATWS sequences were initiated from a main steamline isolation valve (MSIV) closure. The subject of the analysis was the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1, a boiling water reactor (BWR) of the BWR/4 product line with a Mark I containment. The simulations yielded insights to the possible consequences resulting from a MSIV closure ATWS. An evaluation of the effects of plant safety systems and operator actions on accident progression and mitigation is presented.

  17. Analysis of advanced biofuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dec, John E.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Welz, Oliver; Yang, Yi

    2010-09-01

    Long chain alcohols possess major advantages over ethanol as bio-components for gasoline, including higher energy content, better engine compatibility, and less water solubility. Rapid developments in biofuel technology have made it possible to produce C{sub 4}-C{sub 5} alcohols efficiently. These higher alcohols could significantly expand the biofuel content and potentially replace ethanol in future gasoline mixtures. This study characterizes some fundamental properties of a C{sub 5} alcohol, isopentanol, as a fuel for homogeneous-charge compression-ignition (HCCI) engines. Wide ranges of engine speed, intake temperature, intake pressure, and equivalence ratio are investigated. The elementary autoignition reactions of isopentanol is investigated by analyzing product formation from laser-photolytic Cl-initiated isopentanol oxidation. Carbon-carbon bond-scission reactions in the low-temperature oxidation chemistry may provide an explanation for the intermediate-temperature heat release observed in the engine experiments. Overall, the results indicate that isopentanol has a good potential as a HCCI fuel, either in neat form or in blend with gasoline.

  18. Advanced CSP Systems Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and tested a prototype solid particle receiver. Tests were performed with concentrated solar power ranging from approximately 1.5 -2.6 MW. Computational fluid dynamics models were...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Large Eddy Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion Research Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine...

  20. A method of orbital analysis for large-scale first-principles simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohwaki, Tsukuru; Otani, Minoru; Ozaki, Taisuke

    2014-06-28

    An efficient method of calculating the natural bond orbitals (NBOs) based on a truncation of the entire density matrix of a whole system is presented for large-scale density functional theory calculations. The method recovers an orbital picture for O(N) electronic structure methods which directly evaluate the density matrix without using Kohn-Sham orbitals, thus enabling quantitative analysis of chemical reactions in large-scale systems in the language of localized Lewis-type chemical bonds. With the density matrix calculated by either an exact diagonalization or O(N) method, the computational cost is O(1) for the calculation of NBOs associated with a local region where a chemical reaction takes place. As an illustration of the method, we demonstrate how an electronic structure in a local region of interest can be analyzed by NBOs in a large-scale first-principles molecular dynamics simulation for a liquid electrolyte bulk model (propylene carbonate + LiBF{sub 4})

  1. A Report on Simulation-Driven Reliability and Failure Analysis of Large-Scale Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Lipeng; Wang, Feiyi; Oral, H. Sarp; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S.; Cao, Qing

    2014-11-01

    High-performance computing (HPC) storage systems provide data availability and reliability using various hardware and software fault tolerance techniques. Usually, reliability and availability are calculated at the subsystem or component level using limited metrics such as, mean time to failure (MTTF) or mean time to data loss (MTTDL). This often means settling on simple and disconnected failure models (such as exponential failure rate) to achieve tractable and close-formed solutions. However, such models have been shown to be insufficient in assessing end-to-end storage system reliability and availability. We propose a generic simulation framework aimed at analyzing the reliability and availability of storage systems at scale, and investigating what-if scenarios. The framework is designed for an end-to-end storage system, accommodating the various components and subsystems, their interconnections, failure patterns and propagation, and performs dependency analysis to capture a wide-range of failure cases. We evaluate the framework against a large-scale storage system that is in production and analyze its failure projections toward and beyond the end of lifecycle. We also examine the potential operational impact by studying how different types of components affect the overall system reliability and availability, and present the preliminary results

  2. Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Advanced Scientific Computing Research Discovering, developing, and deploying computational and networking capabilities to analyze, model, simulate, and predict complex phenomena important to the Department of Energy. Get Expertise Pieter Swart (505) 665 9437 Email Pat McCormick (505) 665-0201 Email Dave Higdon (505) 667-2091 Email Fulfilling the potential of emerging computing systems and architectures beyond today's tools and techniques to deliver

  3. Addendum to the Building America House Simulation Protocols | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Addendum to the Building America House Simulation Protocols Addendum to the Building America House Simulation Protocols The House Simulation Protocols (HSP) provide guidance to program partners and managers so that energy savings for new construction and retrofit projects can be compared alongside each other. The HSP provides the program with analysis methods that are proven to be effective and reliable in investigating the energy use of advanced energy systems and of entire houses.

  4. System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on Emissions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on Emissions System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on Emissions Comparative simulations of hybrid electric vehicles with gasoline and diesel engines will be conducted with focus on emissions control. PDF icon deer10_gao.pdf More Documents & Publications PHEV Engine and Aftertreatment Model Development Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis PHEV Engine and

  5. Practical application of large eddy simulation to film cooling flow analysis on gas turbine airfoils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takata, T.; Takeishi, K.; Kawata, Y.; Tsuge, A.

    1999-07-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) using body-fitted coordinates is applied to solve film cooling flow on turbine blades. The turbulent model was tuned using the experimental flow field and adiabatic film cooling effectiveness measurements for a single row of holes on a flat plate surface. The results show the interaction between the main stream boundary layer and injected film cooling air generates kidney and horseshoe shaped vortices. Comparison of the temperature distribution between experimental results and present analysis has been conducted. The non-dimensional temperature distribution at x/d = 1 is dome style and quantitatively agrees with experimental results. LES was also applied to solve film cooling on a turbine airfoil. If LES was applied to solve whole flow field domain large CPU time would make the solution impractical. LES, using body-fitted coordinates, is applied to solve the non-isotropic film cooling flow near the turbine blade. The cascade flow domain, with a pitch equal to one film cooling hole spacing, is solved using {kappa}-{epsilon} model. By using such a hybrid numerical method, CPU time is reduced and numerical accuracy is insured. The analytical results show the interaction between the flow blowing through film cooling holes and mainstream on the suction and pressure surfaces of the turbine airfoil. They also show the fundamental structure of the film cooling air flow is governed by arch internal secondary flow and horseshoe vortices which have a similar structure to film cooling air flow blowing through a cooling hole on a flat plate. In the flow field, the effect of turbulent structure on curvature (relaminarization) and flow pattern, involving the interaction between main flow and the cooling jet, are clearly shown. Film cooling effectiveness on the blade surface is predicted from the results of the thermal field calculation and is compared with the test result.

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    20098 Annual Progress Report describing accomplishments in: modeling and simulation; integration and validation; laboratory testing and benchmarking; operational and fleet testing; thermal management; friction and wear; and aerodynamics.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 annual progress report describing accomplishments in: modeling and simulation; integration and validation; laboratory testing and benchmarking; operational and fleet testing; thermal management; friction and wear; and aerodynamics.

  8. Advanced robot locomotion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neely, Jason C.; Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Feddema, John Todd; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Rose, Scott E.; Novick, David Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Buerger, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    This report contains the results of a research effort on advanced robot locomotion. The majority of this work focuses on walking robots. Walking robot applications include delivery of special payloads to unique locations that require human locomotion to exo-skeleton human assistance applications. A walking robot could step over obstacles and move through narrow openings that a wheeled or tracked vehicle could not overcome. It could pick up and manipulate objects in ways that a standard robot gripper could not. Most importantly, a walking robot would be able to rapidly perform these tasks through an intuitive user interface that mimics natural human motion. The largest obstacle arises in emulating stability and balance control naturally present in humans but needed for bipedal locomotion in a robot. A tracked robot is bulky and limited, but a wide wheel base assures passive stability. Human bipedal motion is so common that it is taken for granted, but bipedal motion requires active balance and stability control for which the analysis is non-trivial. This report contains an extensive literature study on the state-of-the-art of legged robotics, and it additionally provides the analysis, simulation, and hardware verification of two variants of a proto-type leg design.

  9. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SIMULATED HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASSES TO SUPPORT SULFATE SOLUBILITY MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2014-08-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms both within the DOE complex and to some extent at U.K. sites. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerated cleanup missions. Much of the previous work on improving sulfate retention in waste glasses has been done on an empirical basis, making it difficult to apply the findings to future waste compositions despite the large number of glass systems studied. A more fundamental, rather than empirical, model of sulfate solubility in glass, under development at Sheffield Hallam University (SHU), could provide a solution to the issues of sulfate solubility. The model uses the normalized cation field strength index as a function of glass composition to predict sulfate capacity, and has shown early success for some glass systems. The objective of the current scope is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DOE waste vitrification efforts, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the current model. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for simulated waste glasses fabricated SHU in support of sulfate solubility model development. A review of the measured compositions revealed that there are issues with the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations missing their targeted values by a significant amount for several of the study glasses. SHU is reviewing the fabrication of these glasses and the chemicals used in batching them to identify the source of these issues. The measured sulfate concentrations were all below their targeted values. This is expected, as the targeted concentrations likely exceeded the solubility limit for sulfate in these glass compositions. Some volatilization of sulfate may also have occurred during fabrication of the glasses. Measurements of the other oxides in the study glasses were reasonably close to their targeted values

  10. Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis Home/Analysis - Structures of the zwitterionic coatings synthesized for this study. Permalink Gallery Investigations on Anti-biofouling Zwitterionic Coatings for MHK Is Now in Press Analysis, Capabilities, Energy, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Water Power Investigations on Anti-biofouling Zwitterionic Coatings for MHK Is Now in Press Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Advanced Materials program has a new publication on the antifouling efficacy

  11. An Analysis of Nuclear Fuel Burnup in the AGR 1 TRISO Fuel Experiment Using Gamma Spectrometry, Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Simulation Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Demkowicz; Phillip L. Winston; James W. Sterbentz

    2014-10-01

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methods for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1 %FIMA for the direct method and 20.0 %FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3 % FIMA to 10.7 % FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. The results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry for TRISO fuel compacts across a burnup range of approximately 10 to 20 % FIMA and also validate the approach used in the physics simulation of the AGR 1 experiment.

  12. Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our Programs Defense Programs Future Science & Technology Programs Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D...

  13. NREL: News - Advisor 2002-A Powerful Vehicle Simulation Tool Gets Better

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advisor 2002-A Powerful Vehicle Simulation Tool Gets Better Golden, Colo., June 11, 2002 A powerful tool for the analysis of advanced and conventional vehicles just got better with the release of ADVISOR 2002. ADVISOR (ADvanced VehIcle SimulatOR) was created by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems. It's a flexible modeling tool that rapidly assesses the performance and fuel economy of conventional,

  14. Advanced Gasificatioin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Gasification Research Team Members Key Contacts Advanced Gasification Carbon feedstock gasification is a promising pathway for high-efficiency, low-pollutant power generation and chemical production. The inability, however, to meet a number of operational goals could create roadblocks to widespread acceptance and commercialization of advanced gasification technologies. We must, for example, achieve gasifier online availability of 85-95 percent in utility applications, and 95 percent for

  15. Chemical composition analysis of simulated waste glass T10-G-16A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K. M.

    2015-08-01

    In this report, SRNL provides chemical composition analyses of a simulated LAW glass designated T10-G-16A.The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component. No issues were identified in reviewing the analytical data.

  16. Advanced Combustion/Modeling and Analysis Toward HCCI/PCCI in a 60% Efficient Free-Piston Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation covers analysis and prediction of attainable combustion ratios in an HCCI/PCCI free-piston engine

  17. Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franconi, E.

    1998-05-01

    Substantial commercial building energy savings have been achieved by improving the performance of the HV AC distribution system. The energy savings result from distribution system design improvements, advanced control capabilities, and use of variable-speed motors. Yet, much of the commercial building stock remains equipped with inefficient systems. Contributing to this is the absence of a definition for distribution system efficiency as well as the analysis methods for quantifying performance. This research investigates the application of performance indices to assess design advancements in commercial building thermal distribution systems. The index definitions are based on a first and second law of thermodynamics analysis of the system. The second law or availability analysis enables the determination of the true efficiency of the system. Availability analysis is a convenient way to make system efficiency comparisons since performance is evaluated relative to an ideal process. A TRNSYS simulation model is developed to analyze the performance of two distribution system types, a constant air volume system and a variable air volume system, that serve one floor of a large office building. Performance indices are calculated using the simulation results to compare the performance of the two systems types in several locations. Changes in index values are compared to changes in plant energy, costs, and carbon emissions to explore the ability of the indices to estimate these quantities.

  18. Analysis of a double-ended cold-leg break simulation: THTF Test 3. 05. 5B. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craddick, W.G.; Pevey, R.E.

    1982-09-01

    On July 3, 1980, an experiment was performed in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility that simulated a double-ended cold-leg break pressurized-water reactor (PWR) accident. Analysis of the experiment revealed that nuclear fuel rods exposed to the same hydrodynamic environment as that which existed in the experiment would have departed from nucleate boiling both earlier and later than the fuel rod simulator (FRS), depending on the size of the gap between the nuclear fuel pellets and cladding and on the initial power of the nuclear fuel rod. Comparison of the results of the current experiment, which used an FRS bundle with geometry similar to 17 x 17 PWR fuel assemblies, to the results of earlier experiments, which used an FRS bundle with geometry similar to 15 x 15 PWR fuel assemblies, revealed no differences that can be attributed to the difference in geometries.

  19. Advanced Materials Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Advanced Materials Laboratory Home/Tag:Advanced Materials Laboratory - Structures of the zwitterionic coatings synthesized for this study. Permalink Gallery Investigations on Anti-biofouling Zwitterionic Coatings for MHK Is Now in Press Analysis, Capabilities, Energy, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Water Power Investigations on Anti-biofouling Zwitterionic Coatings for MHK Is Now in Press Sandia's Marine

  20. Simulation and performance analysis of a 4-effect lithium bromide-water absorption chiller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossman, G.; Zaltash, A.; DeVault, R.C.

    1995-02-01

    Performance simulation has been conducted for a 4-effect lithium bromide-water chiller, capable of substantial performance improvement over state-of-the-art double-effect cycles. The system investigated includes four condensers and four desorbers coupled together, forming an extension of the conventional double-effect cycle; based on prior analytical studies, a parallel flow system was preferred over series flow, and double-condenser coupling was employed, to further improve performance. A modular computer code for simulation of absorption systems (ABSIM) was used to investigate the performances of the cycle. The simulation was carried out to investigate the influence of some major design parameters. A coefficient of performance around 2.0 (cooling) was calculated at the design point, with a heat supply temperature of 600{degrees}F (315{degrees}C) at the solution outlet from the high temperature desorber. With some optimization of the weak (pumped) solution flowrate and of the solution split among the four desorbers, this COP may be raised above 2.2.

  1. Dynamic simulations of geologic materials using combined FEM/DEM/SPH analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, J P; Johnson, S M

    2008-03-26

    An overview of the Lawrence Discrete Element Code (LDEC) is presented, and results from a study investigating the effect of explosive and impact loading on geologic materials using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC) are detailed. LDEC was initially developed to simulate tunnels and other structures in jointed rock masses using large numbers of polyhedral blocks. Many geophysical applications, such as projectile penetration into rock, concrete targets, and boulder fields, require a combination of continuum and discrete methods in order to predict the formation and interaction of the fragments produced. In an effort to model this class of problems, LDEC now includes implementations of Cosserat point theory and cohesive elements. This approach directly simulates the transition from continuum to discontinuum behavior, thereby allowing for dynamic fracture within a combined finite element/discrete element framework. In addition, there are many application involving geologic materials where fluid-structure interaction is important. To facilitate solution of this class of problems a Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) capability has been incorporated into LDEC to simulate fully coupled systems involving geologic materials and a saturating fluid. We will present results from a study of a broad range of geomechanical problems that exercise the various components of LDEC in isolation and in tandem.

  2. Identification of Potential Efficiency Opportunities in Internal Combustion Engines Using a Detailed Thermodynamic Analysis of Engine Simulation Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Kevin Dean; Wagner, Robert M; Graves, Ronald L

    2008-01-01

    Current political and environmental concerns are driving renewed efforts to develop techniques for improving the efficiency of internal combustion engines. A detailed thermodynamic analysis of an engine and its components from a 1st and 2nd law perspective is necessary to characterize system losses and to identify efficiency opportunities. We have developed a method for performing this analysis using engine-simulation results obtained from WAVE , a commercial engine-modeling software package available from Ricardo, Inc. Results from the engine simulation are post-processed to compute thermodynamic properties such as internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, and availability (or exergy), which are required to perform energy and availability balances of the system. This analysis is performed for all major components (turbocharger, intercooler, EGR cooler, etc.) of the engine as a function of crank angle degree for the entire engine cycle. With this information, we are able to identify potential efficiency opportunities as well as guide engine experiments for exploring new technologies for recovering system losses.

  3. Technical Readiness and Gaps Analysis of Commercial Optical Materials and Measurement Systems for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Qiao, Hong; Andersen, Eric S.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bliss, Mary; Cannon, Bret D.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Mendoza, Albert; Sheen, David M.

    2013-08-06

    This report intends to support Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap and industry stakeholders by evaluating optical-based instrumentation and control (I&C) concepts for advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) applications. These advanced designs will require innovative thinking in terms of engineering approaches, materials integration, and I&C concepts to realize their eventual viability and deployability. The primary goals of this report include: 1. Establish preliminary I&C needs, performance requirements, and possible gaps for AdvSMR designs based on best available published design data. 2. Document commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) optical sensors, components, and materials in terms of their technical readiness to support essential AdvSMR in-vessel I&C systems. 3. Identify technology gaps by comparing the in-vessel monitoring requirements and environmental constraints to COTS optical sensor and materials performance specifications. 4. Outline a future research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program plan that addresses these gaps and develops optical-based I&C systems that enhance the viability of future AdvSMR designs. The development of clean, affordable, safe, and proliferation-resistant nuclear power is a key goal that is documented in the Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. This roadmap outlines RD&D activities intended to overcome technical, economic, and other barriers, which currently limit advances in nuclear energy. These activities will ensure that nuclear energy remains a viable component to this nation’s energy security.

  4. A Multi-layer, Data-driven Advanced Reasoning Tool for Intelligent Data Mining and Analysis for Smart Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Du, Pengwei; Greitzer, Frank L.; Guo, Xinxin; Hohimer, Ryan E.; Pomiak, Yekaterina G.

    2012-12-31

    This paper presents the multi-layer, data-driven advanced reasoning tool (M-DART), a proof-of-principle decision support tool for improved power system operation. M-DART will cross-correlate and examine different data sources to assess anomalies, infer root causes, and anneal data into actionable information. By performing higher-level reasoning “triage” of diverse data sources, M-DART focuses on early detection of emerging power system events and identifies highest priority actions for the human decision maker. M-DART represents a significant advancement over today’s grid monitoring technologies that apply offline analyses to derive model-based guidelines for online real-time operations and use isolated data processing mechanisms focusing on individual data domains. The development of the M-DART will bridge these gaps by reasoning about results obtained from multiple data sources that are enabled by the smart grid infrastructure. This hybrid approach integrates a knowledge base that is trained offline but tuned online to capture model-based relationships while revealing complex causal relationships among data from different domains.

  5. Preliminary process simulation and analysis of GMODS: Processing of plutonium surplus materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrada, J.J.; Nehls, J.W. Jr.; Welch, T.D.; Giardina, J.L.; Forsberg, C.W.; Maliyekkel, A.T.

    1996-01-02

    To address growing concerns in the areas of arms control, control of fissile materials, waste management, and environment and health, the US Department of Energy is studying and evaluating various options for the control and disposal of surplus fissile materials (SFMs). One of the options under consideration is the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) which directly converts plutonium-bearing materials such as metals, ceramics, and organics into a durable-high-quality glass for long-term storage or a waste form for disposal. This study undertook the development of a computer simulation of the GMODS process using FLOW. That computer simulation was used to perform an assessment of how GMODS would handle the treatment of plutonium, rich scrap (RS) and lead scrap (LS), and identify critical process parameters. Among the key process parameters affecting the glass formation were processing temperatures, additives, and the effects of varying them on the final product. This assessment looked at the quantity of glass produced, the quality of the final glass form, and the effect of blending different groups of the feed streams on the glass produced. The model also provided a way to study the current process assumptions and determine in which areas more experimental studies are required. The simulation showed that the glass chemistry postulated in the models is workable. It is expected that the glass chemistry assumed during the modeling process can be verified by the results of the laboratory experiments that are currently being conducted relating to the GMODS process.Further waste characterization, especially of the SFM waste streams not studied in this report, will provide more nearly accurate results and give a more detailed evaluation of the GMODS process.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Analysis of Interfacial Water at Selected Sulfide Mineral Surfaces under Anaerobic Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2014-04-10

    In this paper, we report on a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) study of the behavior of interfacial water at selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions. The study revealed the interfacial water structure and wetting characteristics of the pyrite (100) surface, galena (100) surface, chalcopyrite (012) surface, sphalerite (110) surface, and molybdenite surfaces (i.e., the face, armchair-edge, and zigzag-edge surfaces), including simulated contact angles, relative number density profiles, water dipole orientations, hydrogen-bonding, and residence times. For force fields of the metal and sulfur atoms in selected sulfide minerals used in the MDS, we used the universal force field (UFF) and another set of force fields optimized by quantum chemical calculations for interactions with interfacial water molecules at selected sulfide mineral surfaces. Simulation results for the structural and dynamic properties of interfacial water molecules indicate the natural hydrophobic character for the selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions as well as the relatively weak hydrophobicity for the sphalerite (110) surface and two molybdenite edge surfaces. Part of the financial support for this study was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Basic Science Grant No. DE-FG-03-93ER14315. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE, funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES. The authors are grateful to Professor Tsun-Mei Chang for valuable discussions.

  7. Uncertainty Analysis of Runoff Simulations and Parameter Identifiability in the Community Land Model Evidence from MOPEX Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Maoyi; Hou, Zhangshuan; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ke, Yinghai; Liu, Ying; Fang, Zhufeng; Sun, Yu

    2013-12-01

    With the emergence of earth system models as important tools for understanding and predicting climate change and implications to mitigation and adaptation, it has become increasingly important to assess the fidelity of the land component within earth system models to capture realistic hydrological processes and their response to the changing climate and quantify the associated uncertainties. This study investigates the sensitivity of runoff simulations to major hydrologic parameters in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4) by integrating CLM4 with a stochastic exploratory sensitivity analysis framework at 20 selected watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions. We found that for runoff simulations, the most significant parameters are those related to the subsurface runoff parameterizations. Soil texture related parameters and surface runoff parameters are of secondary significance. Moreover, climate and soil conditions play important roles in the parameter sensitivity. In general, site conditions within water-limited hydrologic regimes and with finer soil texture result in stronger sensitivity of output variables, such as runoff and its surface and subsurface components, to the input parameters in CLM4. This study demonstrated the feasibility of parameter inversion for CLM4 using streamflow observations to improve runoff simulations. By ranking the significance of the input parameters, we showed that the parameter set dimensionality could be reduced for CLM4 parameter calibration under different hydrologic and climatic regimes so that the inverse problem is less ill posed.

  8. Automating Embedded Analysis Capabilities and Managing Software Complexity in Multiphysics Simulation, Part II: Application to Partial Differential Equations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pawlowski, Roger P.; Phipps, Eric T.; Salinger, Andrew G.; Owen, Steven J.; Siefert, Christopher M.; Staten, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    A template-based generic programming approach was presented in Part I of this series of papers [Sci. Program. 20 (2012), 197–219] that separates the development effort of programming a physical model from that of computing additional quantities, such as derivatives, needed for embedded analysis algorithms. In this paper, we describe the implementation details for using the template-based generic programming approach for simulation and analysis of partial differential equations (PDEs). We detail several of the hurdles that we have encountered, and some of the software infrastructure developed to overcome them. We end with a demonstration where we present shape optimization and uncertaintymore » quantification results for a 3D PDE application.« less

  9. An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

    2014-03-01

    Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

  10. Heavy Duty Vehicle Modeling & Simulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Simulation Heavy Duty Vehicle Modeling & Simulation 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon vssp_15_rousseau.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report AVTA: Quantifying the Effects of Idle Stop Systems on Fuel

  11. In-Depth Analysis of Simulation Engine Codes for Comparison with DOE s Roof Savings Calculator and Measured Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan; Levinson, Ronnen; Huang, Yu; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Miller, William A.; Mellot, Joe; Childs, Kenneth W.; Kriner, Scott

    2014-06-01

    The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) was developed through collaborations among Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), White Box Technologies, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the Environmental Protection Agency in the context of a California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research project to make cool-color roofing materials a market reality. The RSC website and a simulation engine validated against demonstration homes were developed to replace the liberal DOE Cool Roof Calculator and the conservative EPA Energy Star Roofing Calculator, which reported different roof savings estimates. A preliminary analysis arrived at a tentative explanation for why RSC results differed from previous LBNL studies and provided guidance for future analysis in the comparison of four simulation programs (doe2attic, DOE-2.1E, EnergyPlus, and MicroPas), including heat exchange between the attic surfaces (principally the roof and ceiling) and the resulting heat flows through the ceiling to the building below. The results were consolidated in an ORNL technical report, ORNL/TM-2013/501. This report is an in-depth inter-comparison of four programs with detailed measured data from an experimental facility operated by ORNL in South Carolina in which different segments of the attic had different roof and attic systems.

  12. Advanced Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Combustion Fact Sheet Key Contacts Advanced Combustion Background Conventional coal-fired power plants utilize steam turbines to generate electricity, which operate at efficiencies of 35-37 percent. Operation at higher temperatures and pressures can lead to higher efficiencies. Oxy-combustion comes with an efficiency loss, so it will actually increase the amount of CO2 to be captured. But without so much N2 in the flue gas, it will be easier and perhaps more efficient to capture,

  13. NREL: Energy Analysis - Models and Tools Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are no longer active. See current models and tools here. ADVISOR (ADvanced VehIcle SimulatOR) Simulate and analyze conventional, advanced, light, and heavy vehicles, including...

  14. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 ; Katsoulakis, Markos A.

    2014-03-28

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-coupled- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the BortzKalosLebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary MATLAB source code.

  15. Simulation and analysis of the plutonium shipping container subject to 30-foot drops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, C.; Gupta, N.K.; Gromada, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    The shipping container 5320 is a shipping package for radioactive materials. In order to maintain the component in this packaging within the sub-critical state when subjected to any kind of Hypothetical Accident conditions (HAC), this Type B packaging is designed with various impact limiters. The present study is to examine the energy absorbing capacity of the impact limiter design of this container subjected to a 30-foot drop onto a flat unyielding horizontal surface in each of the three critical dropping orientations. This paper presents the results of a three dimensional nonlinear dynamic impact analysis. This analysis shows the deformed configuration of the container caused by the impact and also determines the effects of different stress wave paths in three distinct drops on the stress states in the critical component. The solution to the problem was obtained using the ABAQUS (explicit) finite element computer code. The nonlinearity of this analysis involves large structural deformation, elasto-plastic materials with strain hardening as well as multiple contact interfaces. Three drop orientations were studied, namely, top down impact, bottom down impact and side impact. Results will be compared against actual drop test data.

  16. An analysis of markets for small-scale, advanced coal-combustion technology in Spain, Italy, and Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Placet, M.; Gerry, P.A.; Kenski, D.M.; Kern, D.M.; Nehring, J.L.; Szpunar, C.B.

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses the examination of potential overseas markets for using small-scale, US-developed, advanced coal-combustion technologies (ACTs). In previous work, member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) were rated on their potential for using ACTs through a comprehensive screening methodology. The three most promising OECD markets were found to be Spain, Italy, and Turkey. This report provides in-depth analyses of these three selected countries. First, it addresses changes in the European Community with particular reference to the 1992 restructuring and its potential effect on the energy situation in Europe, specifically in the three subject countries. It presents individual country studies that examine demographics, economics, building infrastructures, and energy-related factors. Potential niches for ACTs are explored for each country through regional analyses. Marketing channels, strategies, and the trading environments in each country are also discussed. The information gathered indicates that Turkey is a most promising market, Spain is a fairly promising market, and Italy appears to be a somewhat limited market for US ACTs. 76 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs.

  17. Interpretation of solar irradiance monitor measurements through analysis of 3D MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criscuoli, S.; Uitenbroek, H.

    2014-06-20

    Measurements from the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) on board the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment mission indicate that solar spectral irradiance at visible and IR wavelengths varies in counter phase with the solar activity cycle. The sign of these variations is not reproduced by most of the irradiance reconstruction techniques based on variations of surface magnetism employed so far, and it is not yet clear whether SIM calibration procedures need to be improved or if instead new physical mechanisms must be invoked to explain such variations. We employ three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar photosphere to investigate the dependence of solar radiance in SIM visible and IR spectral ranges on variations of the filling factor of surface magnetic fields. We find that the contribution of magnetic features to solar radiance is strongly dependent on the location on the disk of the features, which are negative close to disk center and positive toward the limb. If features are homogeneously distributed over a region around the equator (activity belt), then their contribution to irradiance is positive with respect to the contribution of HD snapshots, but decreases with the increase of their magnetic flux for average magnetic flux larger than 50 G in at least two of the visible and IR spectral bands monitored by SIM. Under the assumption that the 50 G snapshots are representative of quiet-Sun regions, we thus find that the Spectral Irradiance can be in counter-phase with the solar magnetic activity cycle.

  18. Time cycle analysis and simulation of material flow in MOX process layout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, S.; Saraswat, A.; Danny, K.M.; Somayajulu, P.S.; Kumar, A.

    2013-07-01

    The (U,Pu)O{sub 2} MOX fuel is the driver fuel for the upcoming PFBR (Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor). The fuel has around 30% PuO{sub 2}. The presence of high percentages of reprocessed PuO{sub 2} necessitates the design of optimized fuel fabrication process line which will address both production need as well as meet regulatory norms regarding radiological safety criteria. The powder pellet route has highly unbalanced time cycle. This difficulty can be overcome by optimizing process layout in terms of equipment redundancy and scheduling of input powder batches. Different schemes are tested before implementing in the process line with the help of a software. This software simulates the material movement through the optimized process layout. The different material processing schemes have been devised and validity of the schemes are tested with the software. Schemes in which production batches are meeting at any glove box location are considered invalid. A valid scheme ensures adequate spacing between the production batches and at the same time it meets the production target. This software can be further improved by accurately calculating material movement time through glove box train. One important factor is considering material handling time with automation systems in place.

  19. New developments and prospects on COSI, the simulation software for fuel cycle analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eschbach, R.; Meyer, M.; Coquelet-Pascal, C.; Tiphine, M.; Krivtchik, G.; Cany, C.

    2013-07-01

    COSI, software developed by the Nuclear Energy Direction of the CEA, is a code simulating a pool of nuclear power plants with its associated fuel cycle facilities. This code has been designed to study various short, medium and long term options for the introduction of various types of nuclear reactors and for the use of associated nuclear materials. In the frame of the French Act for waste management, scenario studies are carried out with COSI, to compare different options of evolution of the French reactor fleet and options of partitioning and transmutation of plutonium and minor actinides. Those studies aim in particular at evaluating the sustainability of Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) deployment and the possibility to transmute minor actinides. The COSI6 version is a completely renewed software released in 2006. COSI6 is now coupled with the last version of CESAR (CESAR5.3 based on JEFF3.1.1 nuclear data) allowing the calculations on irradiated fuel with 200 fission products and 100 heavy nuclides. A new release is planned in 2013, including in particular the coupling with a recommended database of reactors. An exercise of validation of COSI6, carried out on the French PWR historic nuclear fleet, has been performed. During this exercise quantities like cumulative natural uranium consumption, or cumulative depleted uranium, or UOX/MOX spent fuel storage, or stocks of reprocessed uranium, or plutonium content in fresh MOX fuel, or the annual production of high level waste, have been computed by COSI6 and compared to industrial data. The results have allowed us to validate the essential phases of the fuel cycle computation, and reinforces the credibility of the results provided by the code.

  20. Structural analysis of three global land models on carbon cycle simulations using a traceability framework

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rafique, R.; Xia, J.; Hararuk, O.; Luo, Y.

    2014-06-27

    Modeled carbon (C) storage capacity is largely determined by the C residence time and net primary productivity (NPP). Extensive research has been done on NPP dynamics but the residence time and their relationships with C storage are much less studied. In this study, we implemented a traceability analysis to understand the modeled C storage and residence time in three land surface models: CSIRO's Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) with 9 C pools, Community Land Model (version 3.5) combined with Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CLM3.5-CASA) with 12 C pools and Community Land Model (version 4) (CLM4) with 26 C pools. The globally averagedmoreC storage and residence time was computed at both individual pool and total ecosystem levels. The spatial distribution of total ecosystem C storage and residence time differ greatly among the three models. The CABLE model showed a closer agreement with measured C storage and residence time in plant and soil pools than CLM3.5-CASA and CLM4. However, CLM3.5-CASA and CLM4 were close to each other in modeled C storage but not with measured data. CABLE stores more C in root whereas CLM3.5-CASA and CLM4 store more C in woody pools, partly due to differential NPP allocation in respective pools. The C residence time in individual C pools is greatly different among models, largely because of different transfer coefficient values among pools. CABLE had higher bulk residence time for soil C pools than the other two models. Overall, the traceability analysis used in this study can help fully characterizes the behavior of complex land models.less

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Heavy-Duty Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Heavy-Duty Engine Systems and Emissions ...

  2. Advanced Microturbine System: Market Assessment, May 2003 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Microturbine System: Market Assessment, May 2003 The objective of this report is to provide an integrated analysis of the economics and market potential for the advanced ...

  3. Simulating cyanobacterial phenotypes by integrating flux balance analysis, kinetics, and a light distribution function

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Lian; Wu, Stephen G.; Wan, Ni; Reding, Adrienne C.; Tang, Yinjie J.

    2015-12-24

    In this study, genome-scale models (GSMs) are widely used to predict cyanobacterial phenotypes in photobioreactors (PBRs). However, stoichiometric GSMs mainly focus on fluxome that result in maximal yields. Cyanobacterial metabolism is controlled by both intracellular enzymes and photobioreactor conditions. To connect both intracellular and extracellular information and achieve a better understanding of PBRs productivities, this study integrates a genome-scale metabolic model of Synechocystis 6803 with growth kinetics, cell movements, and a light distribution function. The hybrid platform not only maps flux dynamics in cells of sub-populations but also predicts overall production titer and rate in PBRs. Analysis of the integratedmore » GSM demonstrates several results. First, cyanobacteria are capable of reaching high biomass concentration (>20 g/L in 21 days) in PBRs without light and CO2 mass transfer limitations. Second, fluxome in a single cyanobacterium may show stochastic changes due to random cell movements in PBRs. Third, insufficient light due to cell self-shading can activate the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway in subpopulation cells. Fourth, the model indicates that the removal of glycogen synthesis pathway may not improve cyanobacterial bio-production in large-size PBRs, because glycogen can support cell growth in the dark zones. Based on experimental data, the integrated GSM estimates that Synechocystis 6803 in shake flask conditions has a photosynthesis efficiency of ~2.7 %. Conclusions: The multiple-scale integrated GSM, which examines both intracellular and extracellular domains, can be used to predict production yield/rate/titer in large-size PBRs. More importantly, genetic engineering strategies predicted by a traditional GSM may work well only in optimal growth conditions. In contrast, the integrated GSM may reveal mutant physiologies in diverse bioreactor conditions, leading to the design of robust strains with high chances of success in industrial settings.« less

  4. COLLOQUIUM: Advanced Simulation for Technology Innovation and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at PPPL, adult visitors must show a government-issued photo I.D. - for example, a passport or a driver's license. Non-U.S. citizens must show a government-issued photo I.D.,...

  5. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 12 ...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    these models are then incorporated into integrated design codes. Verification and Validation develops and improves methods, metrics, and standards to assess code and model...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bahendr@sandia.gov Program Manager David Womble dewombl@sandia.gov Integrated Codes Lead Scott Hutchinson sahutch@sandia.gov Physics & Engineering Modeling Lead Jim Redmond...

  8. ADVANCED WAVEFORM SIMULATION FOR SEISMIC MONITORING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helmberger, Donald V.; Tromp, Jeroen; Rodgers, Arthur J.

    2008-10-17

    This quarter, we have focused on several tasks: (1) Building a high-quality catalog of earthquake source parameters for the Middle East and East Asia. In East Asia, we computed source parameters using the CAP method for a set of events studied by Herrman et al., (MRR, 2006) using a complete waveform technique. Results indicated excellent agreement with the moment magnitudes in the range 3.5 -5.5. Below magnitude 3.5 the scatter increases. For events with more than 2-3 observations at different azimuths, we found good agreement of focal mechanisms. Depths were generally consistent, although differences of up to 10 km were found. These results suggest that CAP modeling provides estimates of source parameters at least as reliable as complete waveform modeling techniques. However, East Asia and the Yellow Sea Korean Paraplatform (YSKP) region studied are relatively laterally homogeneous and may not benefit from the CAP methods flexibility to shift waveform segments to account for path-dependent model errors. A more challenging region to study is the Middle East where strong variations in sedimentary basin, crustal thickness and crustal and mantle seismic velocities greatly impact regional wave propagation. We applied the CAP method to a set of events in and around Iran and found good agreement between estimated focal mechanisms and those reported by the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) catalog. We found a possible bias in the moment magnitudes that may be due to the thick low-velocity crust in the Iranian Plateau. (2) Testing Methods on a Lifetime Regional Data Set. In particular, the recent 2/21/08 Nevada Event and Aftershock Sequence occurred in the middle of USArray, producing over a thousand records per event. The tectonic setting is quite similar to Central Iran and thus provides an excellent testbed for CAP+ at ranges out to 10, including extensive observations of crustal thinning and thickening and various Pnl complexities. Broadband modeling in 1D, 2D, and 3D will be presented. (3) Shallow Crustal Structure and Sparse Network Source Inversions for Southern California. We conducted a detailed test of a recently developed technique, CAPloc, in recovering source parameters including location and depth based on tomographic maps. We tested two-station solutions against 160 well determined events which worked well except for paths crossing deep basins and along mountain ridges.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation Computing:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System response prediction capability includes mechanical (large deformation, contact, fracture), thermal (conduction, surface radiation), and lightning (arc). Radiation...

  10. Improved Solvers for Advanced Engine Combustion Simulation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  11. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  12. Advanced Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  13. Advanced Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  14. Advanced Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  15. Analysis of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh/Taylor unstable flow using direct numerical simulation data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schilling, Oleg; Mueschke, Nicholas J.

    2010-10-18

    Data from a 1152X760X1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a transitional Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer modeled after a small Atwood number water channel experiment is used to comprehensively investigate the structure of mean and turbulent transport and mixing. The simulation had physical parameters and initial conditions approximating those in the experiment. The budgets of the mean vertical momentum, heavy-fluid mass fraction, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, heavy-fluid mass fraction variance, and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance dissipation rate equations are constructed using Reynolds averaging applied to the DNS data. The relative importance of mean and turbulent production, turbulent dissipationmoreand destruction, and turbulent transport are investigated as a function of Reynolds number and across the mixing layer to provide insight into the flow dynamics not presently available from experiments. The analysis of the budgets supports the assumption for small Atwood number, Rayleigh/Taylor driven flows that the principal transport mechanisms are buoyancy production, turbulent production, turbulent dissipation, and turbulent diffusion (shear and mean field production are negligible). As the Reynolds number increases, the turbulent production in the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation becomes the dominant production term, while the buoyancy production plateaus. Distinctions between momentum and scalar transport are also noted, where the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate both grow in time and are peaked near the center plane of the mixing layer, while the heavy-fluid mass fraction variance and its dissipation rate initially grow and then begin to decrease as mixing progresses and reduces density fluctuations. All terms in the transport equations generally grow or decay, with no qualitative change in their profile, except for the pressure flux contribution to the total turbulent kinetic energy flux, which changes sign early in time (a countergradient effect). The production-to-dissipation ratios corresponding to the turbulent kinetic energy and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance are large and vary strongly at small evolution times, decrease with time, and nearly asymptote as the flow enters a self-similar regime. The late-time turbulent kinetic energy production-to-dissipation ratio is larger than observed in shear-driven turbulent flows. The order of magnitude estimates of the terms in the transport equations are shown to be consistent with the DNS at late-time, and also confirms both the dominant terms and their evolutionary behavior. These results are useful for identifying the dynamically important terms requiring closure, and assessing the accuracy of the predictions of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation models of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh-Taylor instability-generated flow.less

  16. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analyses Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.S. Samuelsen; A.D. Rao

    2006-02-06

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include ''Zero Emission'' power plants and the ''FutureGen'' H{sub 2} co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the ''Vision 21'' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  17. Energy Systems Integration: NREL + Advanced Energy (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    This fact sheet describes the collaboration between NREL and Advanced Energy Industries at the ESIF to test its advanced photovoltaic inverter technology with the ESIF's power hardware-in-the-loop system and megawatt-scale grid simulators.

  18. 2014 Building America House Simulation Protocols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, E.; Engebrecht-Metzger, C.; Horowitz, S.; Hendron, R.

    2014-03-01

    As BA has grown to include a large and diverse cross-section of the home building and retrofit industries, it has become more important to develop accurate, consistent analysis techniques to measure progress towards the program's goals. The House Simulation Protocol (HSP) document provides guidance to program partners and managers so they can compare energy savings for new construction and retrofit projects. The HSP provides the program with analysis methods that are proven to be effective and reliable in investigating the energy use of advanced energy systems and of entire houses.

  19. 2014 Building America House Simulation Protocols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, E.; Engebrecht, C. Metzger; Horowitz, S.; Hendron, R.

    2014-03-01

    As Building America has grown to include a large and diverse cross-section of the home building and retrofit industries, it has become more important to develop accurate, consistent analysis techniques to measure progress towards the program's goals. The House Simulation Protocol (HSP) document provides guidance to program partners and managers so they can compare energy savings for new construction and retrofit projects. The HSP provides the program with analysis methods that are proven to be effective and reliable in investigating the energy use of advanced energy systems and of entire houses.

  20. Albany/FELIX: A parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tezaur, I. K.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; Tuminaro, R. S.; Price, S. F.

    2015-04-27

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, along with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.

  1. TRAC-PF1/MOD1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1986-07-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light-water reactors. The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic test facilities. The code features either a one- or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals, a two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field and solute tracking, flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment, optional reflood tracking capability for bottom-flood and falling-film quench fronts, and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. The stability-enhancing two-step (SETS) numerical algorithm is used in the one-dimensional hydrodynamics and permits this portion of the fluid dynamics to violate the material Courant condition. This technique permits large time steps and, hence, reduced running time for slow transients.

  2. Albany/FELIX: A parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tezaur, I. K.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; Tuminaro, R. S.; Price, S. F.

    2015-04-27

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, alongmore » with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.« less

  3. 2012 Advanced Applications Research & Development Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sauer, U Illinois PDF icon 2012 Advanced Applications R&D Peer Review - Reliability Standards Analysis and Assessment - Gil Tam, EPG More Documents & Publications 2013 ...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle ...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle ...

  6. NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Advanced Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Energy Photo of a large gray inverter connected to numerous power cords. 500-kilowatt Advanced Energy inverter at the ESIF PSIL. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL As the first industry partner to use the ESIF, Advanced Energy Industries is using the ESIF's Power Systems Integration Laboratory (PSIL) to test its new solar photovoltaic (PV) inverter technology with the facility's hardware-in-the-loop system and megawatt-scale grid simulators. Solar inverters are responsible for a number of

  7. Analysis of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh–Taylor unstable flow using direct numerical simulation data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schilling, Oleg; Mueschke, Nicholas J.

    2010-10-18

    Data from a 1152X760X1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a transitional Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer modeled after a small Atwood number water channel experiment is used to comprehensively investigate the structure of mean and turbulent transport and mixing. The simulation had physical parameters and initial conditions approximating those in the experiment. The budgets of the mean vertical momentum, heavy-fluid mass fraction, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, heavy-fluid mass fraction variance, and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance dissipation rate equations are constructed using Reynolds averaging applied to the DNS data. The relative importance of mean and turbulent production, turbulent dissipationmore » and destruction, and turbulent transport are investigated as a function of Reynolds number and across the mixing layer to provide insight into the flow dynamics not presently available from experiments. The analysis of the budgets supports the assumption for small Atwood number, Rayleigh/Taylor driven flows that the principal transport mechanisms are buoyancy production, turbulent production, turbulent dissipation, and turbulent diffusion (shear and mean field production are negligible). As the Reynolds number increases, the turbulent production in the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation becomes the dominant production term, while the buoyancy production plateaus. Distinctions between momentum and scalar transport are also noted, where the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate both grow in time and are peaked near the center plane of the mixing layer, while the heavy-fluid mass fraction variance and its dissipation rate initially grow and then begin to decrease as mixing progresses and reduces density fluctuations. All terms in the transport equations generally grow or decay, with no qualitative change in their profile, except for the pressure flux contribution to the total turbulent kinetic energy flux, which changes sign early in time (a countergradient effect). The production-to-dissipation ratios corresponding to the turbulent kinetic energy and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance are large and vary strongly at small evolution times, decrease with time, and nearly asymptote as the flow enters a self-similar regime. The late-time turbulent kinetic energy production-to-dissipation ratio is larger than observed in shear-driven turbulent flows. The order of magnitude estimates of the terms in the transport equations are shown to be consistent with the DNS at late-time, and also confirms both the dominant terms and their evolutionary behavior. Thus, these results are useful for identifying the dynamically important terms requiring closure, and assessing the accuracy of the predictions of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation models of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh-Taylor instability-generated flow.« less

  8. Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Advanced Scientific Computing Research Discovering, developing, and deploying computational and networking capabilities to analyze, model,...

  9. SIMULATION MODEL ANALYSIS OF THE MOST PROMISING GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION FORMATION CANDIDATES IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION, USA, WITH FOCUS ON UNCERTAINTY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Si-Yong; Zaluski, Wade; Will, Robert; Eisinger, Chris; Matthews, Vince; McPherson, Brian

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to report results of reservoir model simulation analyses for forecasting subsurface CO2 storage capacity estimation for the most promising formations in the Rocky Mountain region of the USA. A particular emphasis of this project was to assess uncertainty of the simulation-based forecasts. Results illustrate how local-scale data, including well information, number of wells, and location of wells, affect storage capacity estimates and what degree of well density (number of wells over a fixed area) may be required to estimate capacity within a specified degree of confidence. A major outcome of this work was development of a new workflow of simulation analysis, accommodating the addition of random pseudo wells to represent virtual characterization wells.

  10. Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

    2013-07-31

    The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

  11. Suitability of Synthetic Driving Profiles from Traffic Micro-Simulation for Real-World Energy Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Yunfei; Wood, Eric; Burton, Evan; Gonder, Jeffrey

    2015-10-14

    A shift towards increased levels of driving automation is generally expected to result in improved safety and traffic congestion outcomes. However, little empirical data exists to estimate the impact that automated driving could have on energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. In the absence of empirical data on differences between drive cycles from present day vehicles (primarily operated by humans) and future vehicles (partially or fully operated by computers) one approach is to model both situations over identical traffic conditions. Such an exercise requires traffic micro-simulation to not only accurately model vehicle operation under high levels of automation, but also (and potentially more challenging) vehicle operation under present day human drivers. This work seeks to quantify the ability of a commercial traffic micro-simulation program to accurately model real-world drive cycles in vehicles operated primarily by humans in terms of driving speed, acceleration, and simulated fuel economy. Synthetic profiles from models of freeway and arterial facilities near Atlanta, Georgia, are compared to empirical data collected from real-world drivers on the same facilities. Empirical and synthetic drive cycles are then simulated in a powertrain efficiency model to enable comparison on the basis of fuel economy. Synthetic profiles from traffic micro-simulation were found to exhibit low levels of transient behavior relative to the empirical data. Even with these differences, the synthetic and empirical data in this study agree well in terms of driving speed and simulated fuel economy. The differences in transient behavior between simulated and empirical data suggest that larger stochastic contributions in traffic micro-simulation (relative to those present in the traffic micro-simulation tool used in this study) are required to fully capture the arbitrary elements of human driving. Interestingly, the lack of stochastic contributions from models of human drivers in this study did not result in a significant discrepancy between fuel economy simulations based on synthetic and empirical data; a finding with implications on the potential energy efficiency gains of automated vehicle technology.

  12. Simulation of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines and Detailed

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms Development | Department of Energy continuing work on exploring fuel chemistry, analysis of advanced combustion regimes, and improvements in simulation methodologies PDF icon deer12_flowers.pdf More Documents & Publications Computationally Efficient Modeling of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines Computationally Efficient Modeling of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines Computationally Efficient Modeling of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Large Eddy Simulation (LES)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion Research | Department of Energy Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion Research Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion Research Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Large Eddy Simulation applied to advanced engine

  14. Does Response to Induction Chemotherapy Predict Survival for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer? Secondary Analysis of RTOG 8804/8808

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAleer, Mary Frances; Moughan, Jennifer M.S.; Byhardt, Roger W.; Cox, James D.; Sause, William T.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Induction chemotherapy (ICT) improves survival compared with radiotherapy (RT) alone in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LANSCLC) patients with good prognostic factors. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is superior to ICT followed by RT. The question arises whether ICT response predicts the outcome of patients subsequently treated with CCRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 1992, 194 LANSCLC patients were treated prospectively with ICT (two cycles of vinblastine and cisplatin) and then CCRT (cisplatin plus 63 Gy for 7 weeks) in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 8804 trial (n = 30) or ICT and then RT (60 Gy/6 wk) on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 8808 trial (n = 164). Of the 194 patients, 183 were evaluable and 141 had undergone a postinduction assessment. The overall survival (OS) of those with complete remission (CR) or partial remission (PR) was compared with that of patients with stable disease (SD) or progressive disease (PD) after ICT. Results: Of the 141 patients, 6, 30, 99, and 6 had CR, PR, SD, and PD, respectively. The log-rank test showed a significant difference (p <0.0001) in OS when the response groups were compared (CR/PR vs. SD/PD). On univariate and multivariate analyses, a trend was seen toward a response to ICT with OS (p = 0.097 and p = 0.06, respectively). A squamous histologic type was associated with worse OS on univariate and multivariate analyses (p = 0.031 and p = 0.018, respectively). SD/PD plus a squamous histologic type had a hazard ratio of 2.25 vs. CR/PR plus a nonsquamous histologic type (p = 0.007) on covariate analysis. Conclusion: The response to ICT was associated with a significant survival difference when the response groups were compared. A response to ICT showed a trend toward, but was not predictive of, improved OS in LANSCLC patients. Patients with SD/PD after ICT and a squamous histologic type had the poorest OS. These data suggest that patients with squamous LANSCLC might benefit from immediate RT or CCRT.

  15. Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program,...

  16. A computer simulation of an induction heating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egan, L.R. ); Furlani, E.P. )

    1991-09-01

    In this paper a method is presented for the design and analysis of induction heating systems. The method entails the simulation of system performance using an equivalent circuit approach. Equivalent circuit models are obtained for the three pats of an induction heating system: the power source, the impedance matching circuit, and the load. These model are combined in a system model which is analyzed using the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL). This approach is applied to an existing system, and the predicted performance is in close agreement with measured data.

  17. Advanced Application Development Program Information | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Application Development Program Information Advanced Application Development Program Information Summary of the Tranmission Reliability program's Advanced Applications Research and Development activity area. This program develops and demonstrates tools to monitor and control the grid with advanced analysis, visualization, and situational awareness tools. PDF icon Advanced Applications Development Program Factsheet.pdf More Documents & Publications EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding

  18. Sandia Energy - Advanced Research & Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Research & Development Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Advanced Research & Development Advanced Research & DevelopmentCoryne...

  19. Multi-Physics Demonstration Problem with the SHARP Reactor Simulation Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merzari, E.; Shemon, E. R.; Yu, Y. Q.; Thomas, J. W.; Obabko, A.; Jain, Rajeev; Mahadevan, Vijay; Tautges, Timothy; Solberg, Jerome; Ferencz, Robert Mark; Whitesides, R.

    2015-12-21

    This report describes to employ SHARP to perform a first-of-a-kind analysis of the core radial expansion phenomenon in an SFR. This effort required significant advances in the framework Multi-Physics Demonstration Problem with the SHARP Reactor Simulation Toolkit used to drive the coupled simulations, manipulate the mesh in response to the deformation of the geometry, and generate the necessary modified mesh files. Furthermore, the model geometry is fairly complex, and consistent mesh generation for the three physics modules required significant effort. Fully-integrated simulations of a 7-assembly mini-core test problem have been performed, and the results are presented here. Physics models of a full-core model of the Advanced Burner Test Reactor have also been developed for each of the three physics modules. Standalone results of each of the three physics modules for the ABTR are presented here, which provides a demonstration of the feasibility of the fully-integrated simulation.

  20. Hydra: a service oriented architecture for scientific simulation integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, Russell; Djidjev, Tatiana; Hayes, Birch P; Holland, Joe V; Khalsa, Hari S; Linger, Steve P; Mathis, Mark M; Mniszewski, Sue M; Bush, Brian

    2008-01-01

    One of the current major challenges in scientific modeling and simulation, in particular in the infrastructure-analysis community, is the development of techniques for efficiently and automatically coupling disparate tools that exist in separate locations on different platforms, implemented in a variety of languages and designed to be standalone. Recent advances in web-based platforms for integrating systems such as SOA provide an opportunity to address these challenges in a systematic fashion. This paper describes Hydra, an integrating architecture for infrastructure modeling and simulation that defines geography-based schemas that, when used to wrap existing tools as web services, allow for seamless plug-and-play composability. Existing users of these tools can enhance the value of their analysis by assessing how the simulations of one tool impact the behavior of another tool and can automate existing ad hoc processes and work flows for integrating tools together.

  1. Advanced Manufacturing Office News

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-08-08

    News stories about advanced manufacturing, events, and office accomplishments. Subscribe to receive updates.

  2. Simulating neural systems with Xyce.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Mei, Ting; Warrender, Christina E.; Aimone, James Bradley; Teeter, Corinne; Duda, Alex M.

    2012-12-01

    Sandia's parallel circuit simulator, Xyce, can address large scale neuron simulations in a new way extending the range within which one can perform high-fidelity, multi-compartment neuron simulations. This report documents the implementation of neuron devices in Xyce, their use in simulation and analysis of neuron systems.

  3. Hybrid Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-10-15

    HybSim (short for Hybrid Simulator) is a flexible, easy to use screening tool that allows the user to quanti the technical and economic benefits of installing a village hybrid generating system and simulates systems with any combination of —Diesel generator sets —Photovoltaic arrays -Wind Turbines and -Battery energy storage systems Most village systems (or small population sites such as villages, remote military bases, small communities, independent or isolated buildings or centers) depend on diesel generationmore » systems for their source of energy. HybSim allows the user to determine other "sources" of energy that can greatly reduce the dollar to kilo-watt hour ratio. Supported by the DOE, Energy Storage Program, HybSim was initially developed to help analyze the benefits of energy storage systems in Alaskan villages. Soon after its development, other sources of energy were added providing the user with a greater range of analysis opportunities and providing the village with potentially added savings. In addition to village systems, HybSim has generated interest for use from military institutions in energy provisions and USAID for international village analysis.« less

  4. Advanced Manufacturing Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Workshop: Microwave (MW) and Radio Frequency (RF) as Enabling Technologies for Advanced Manufacturing Venue: The 2nd Global Congress on Microwave Energy Applications (2GCMEA) July 25, 2012 Long Beach Hilton Long Beach, CA Advanced Manufacturing Office U.S. Department of Energy Rob Ivester Acting Deputy Program Manager, Advanced Manufacturing Office Advanced Manufacturing Office Advanced Manufacturing Office Agenda Time Activity 2:00-2:30 PM Opening Session - AMO o Presentation of Industry

  5. Iron Fertilization of the Southern Ocean: Regional Simulation and Analysis of C-Sequestration in the Ross Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Arrigo

    2012-03-13

    A modified version of the dynamic 3-dimensional mesoscale Coupled Ice, Atmosphere, and Ocean model (CIAO) of the Ross Sea ecosystem has been used to simulate the impact of environmental perturbations upon primary production and biogenic CO2 uptake. The Ross Sea supports two taxonomically, and spatially distinct phytoplankton populations; the haptophyte Phaeocystis antarctica and diatoms. Nutrient utilization ratios predict that P. antarctica and diatoms will be driven to nitrate and phosphate limitation, respectively. Model and field data have confirmed that the Ross Sea is iron limited with only two-thirds of the macronutrients consumed by the phytoplankton by the end of the growing season. In this study, the CIAO model was improved to simulate a third macronutrient (phosphate), dissolved organic carbon, air-sea gas exchange, and the carbonate system. This enabled us to effectively model pCO2 and subsequently oceanic CO2 uptake via gas exchange, allowing investigations into the affect of alleviating iron limitation on both pCO2 and nutrient drawdown.

  6. The prospects for magnetohydrodynamic stability in advanced tokamak regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manickam, J.; Chance, M.S.; Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.; Monticello, D.; Pomphrey, N.; Reiman, A.; Wang, C.; Zakharov, L.E. )

    1994-05-01

    Stability analysis of advanced regime tokamaks is presented. Here advanced regimes are defined to include configurations where the ratio of the bootstrap current, [ital I][sub BS], to the total plasma current, [ital I][sub [ital p

  7. Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.D. Rao; D.J. Francuz; J.D. Maclay; J. Brouwer; A. Verma; M. Li; G.S. Samuelsen

    2008-09-30

    The main objective is to identify and assess advanced improvements to the Brayton Cycle (such as but not limited to firing temperature, pressure ratio, combustion techniques, intercooling, fuel or combustion air augmentation, enhanced blade cooling schemes) that will lead to significant performance improvements in coal based power systems. This assessment is conducted in the context of conceptual design studies (systems studies) that advance state-of-art Brayton cycles and result in coal based efficiencies equivalent to 65% + on natural gas basis (LHV), or approximately an 8% reduction in heat rate of an IGCC plant utilizing the H class steam cooled gas turbine. H class gas turbines are commercially offered by General Electric and Mitsubishi for natural gas based combined cycle applications with 60% efficiency (LHV) and it is expected that such machine will be offered for syngas applications within the next 10 years. The studies are being sufficiently detailed so that third parties will be able to validate portions or all of the studies. The designs and system studies are based on plants for near zero emissions (including CO{sub 2}). Also included in this program is the performance evaluation of other advanced technologies such as advanced compression concepts and the fuel cell based combined cycle. The objective of the fuel cell based combined cycle task is to identify the desired performance characteristics and design basis for a gas turbine that will be integrated with an SOFC in Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) applications. The goal is the conceptualization of near zero emission (including CO{sub 2} capture) integrated gasification power plants producing electricity as the principle product. The capability of such plants to coproduce H{sub 2} is qualitatively addressed. Since a total systems solution is critical to establishing a plant configuration worthy of a comprehensive market interest, a baseline IGCC plant scheme is developed and used to study how alternative process schemes and power cycles might be used and integrated to achieve higher systems efficiency. To achieve these design results, the total systems approach is taken requiring creative integration of the various process units within the plant. Advanced gas turbine based cycles for Integrated gasification Combined cycle (IGCC) applications are identified by a screening analysis and the more promising cycles recommended for detailed systems analysis. In the case of the IGFC task, the main objective is met by developing a steady-state simulation of the entire plant and then using dynamic simulations of the hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)/Gas Turbine sub-system to investigate the turbo-machinery performance. From these investigations the desired performance characteristics and a basis for design of turbo-machinery for use in a fuel cell gas turbine power block is developed.

  8. Modeling & Simulation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling & Simulation Modeling & Simulation Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise David Harradine Physical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy Email Josh Smith Chemistry Communications Email The inherent knowledge of transformation has beguiled sorcerers and scientists alike. Data Analysis and Modeling & Simulation for the Chemical Sciences Project Description Almos every

  9. Fundamentals of plasma simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forslund, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    With the increasing size and speed of modern computers, the incredibly complex nonlinear properties of plasmas in the laboratory and in space are being successfully explored in increasing depth. Of particular importance have been numerical simulation techniques involving finite size particles on a discrete mesh. After discussing the importance of this means of understanding a variety of nonlinear plasma phenomena, we describe the basic elements of particle-in-cell simulation and their limitations and advantages. The differencing techniques, stability and accuracy issues, data management and optimization issues are discussed by means of a simple example of a particle-in-cell code. Recent advances in simulation methods allowing large space and time scales to be treated with minimal sacrifice in physics are reviewed. Various examples of nonlinear processes successfully studied by plasma simulation will be given.

  10. Addendum to the Building America House Simulation Protocols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engebrecht, C. Metzger; Wilson, E.; Horowitz, S.

    2012-12-01

    As DOE's Building America program has grown to include a large and diverse cross-section of the home building and retrofit industries, it has become more important to develop accurate, consistent analysis techniques to measure progress towards the programs goals. The House Simulation Protocols (HSP) provide guidance to program partners and managers so that energy savings for new construction and retrofit projects can be compared alongside each other. The HSP provides the program with analysis methods that are proven to be effective and reliable in investigating the energy use of advanced energy systems and of entire houses.

  11. Addendum to the Building America House Simulation Protocols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engebrecht-Metzger, C.; Wilson, E.; Horowitz, S.

    2012-12-01

    As Building America (BA) has grown to include a large and diverse cross-section of the home building and retrofit industries, it has become more important to develop accurate, consistent analysis techniques to measure progress towards the program's goals. The House Simulation Protocols (HSP) provides guidance to program partners and managers so that energy savings for new construction and retrofit projects can be compared alongside each other. The HSP provides the program with analysis methods that are proven to be effective and reliable in investigating the energy use of advanced energy systems and of entire houses.

  12. lightsource_data_challenge-analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Source Data Analysis & Simulation: The Data Challenge Alexander Hexemer (ALS), Xiaoye Li (CRD), Stefano Marchesini (ALS), Dilworth Parkinson (ALS), Nobumichi Tamura (ALS), Craig E. Tull (CRD) Advanced Light Source, LBNL; Computing Research Division, LBNL BES facilities (Light Sources and Neutron Sources) serve ~10,000 researchers per year. Recent improvements in detector speed and light source luminosity are yielding unprecedented data rates which exceed the capabilities of most data

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Variability and Uncertainty in Environmental Data and Models. Volume 1. Theory and Methodology Based Upon Bootstrap Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, H. Christopher; Rhodes, David S.

    1999-04-30

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume set of reports describing work conducted at North Carolina State University sponsored by Grant Number DE-FG05-95ER30250 by the U.S. Department of Energy. The title of the project is Quantitative Analysis of Variability and Uncertainty in Acid Rain Assessments. The work conducted under sponsorship of this grant pertains primarily to two main topics: (1) development of new methods for quantitative analysis of variability and uncertainty applicable to any type of model; and (2) analysis of variability and uncertainty in the performance, emissions, and cost of electric power plant combustion-based NOx control technologies. These two main topics are reported separately in Volumes 1 and 2.

  14. Validation Methodology to Allow Simulated Peak Reduction and Energy Performance Analysis of Residential Building Envelope with Phase Change Materials: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Christensen, C.; Bianchi, M.

    2012-08-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) represent a potential technology to reduce peak loads and HVAC energy consumption in residential buildings. This paper summarizes NREL efforts to obtain accurate energy simulations when PCMs are modeled in residential buildings: the overall methodology to verify and validate Conduction Finite Difference (CondFD) and PCM algorithms in EnergyPlus is presented in this study. It also shows preliminary results of three residential building enclosure technologies containing PCM: PCM-enhanced insulation, PCM impregnated drywall and thin PCM layers. The results are compared based on predicted peak reduction and energy savings using two algorithms in EnergyPlus: the PCM and Conduction Finite Difference (CondFD) algorithms.

  15. Comparison of physical properties of quiet and active regions through the analysis of magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar photosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criscuoli, S.

    2013-11-20

    Recent observations have shown that the photometric and dynamic properties of granulation and small-scale magnetic features depend on the amount of magnetic flux of the region they are embedded in. We analyze results from numerical hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations characterized by different amounts of average magnetic flux and find qualitatively the same differences as those reported from observations. We show that these different physical properties result from the inhibition of convection induced by the presence of the magnetic field, which changes the temperature stratification of both quiet and magnetic regions. Our results are relevant for solar irradiance variations studies, as such differences are still not properly taken into account in irradiance reconstruction models.

  16. MPSalsa 3D Simulations of Chemically Reacting Flows

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Many important scientific and engineering applications require a detailed analysis of complex systems with coupled fluid flow, thermal energy transfer, mass transfer and nonequilibrium chemical reactions. Currently, computer simulations of these complex reacting flow problems are limited to idealized systems in one or two spatial dimensions when coupled with a detailed, fundamental chemistry model. The goal of our research is to develop, analyze and implement advanced MP numerical algorithms that will allow high resolution 3D simulations with an equal emphasis on fluid flow and chemical kinetics modeling. In our research, we focus on the development of new, fully coupled, implicit solution strategies that are based on robust MP iterative solution methods (copied from http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/). These simulations are needed for scientific and technical areas such as: combustion research for transportation, atmospheric chemistry modeling for pollution studies, chemically reacting flow models for analysis and control of manufacturing processes, surface catalytic reactors for methane to methanol conversion and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process modeling for production of advanced semiconductor materials (http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/).

    This project website provides six QuickTime videos of these simulations, along with a small image gallery and slideshow animations. A list of related publications and conference presentations is also made available.

  17. Intrinsic alignments of galaxies in the MassiveBlack-II simulation: Analysis of two-point statistics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tenneti, Ananth; Singh, Sukhdeep; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Matteo, Tiziana Di; Feng, Yu; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2015-03-11

    The intrinsic alignment of galaxies with the large-scale density field in an important astrophysical contaminant in upcoming weak lensing surveys. We present detailed measurements of the galaxy intrinsic alignments and associated ellipticity-direction (ED) and projected shape (wg₊) correlation functions for galaxies in the cosmological hydrodynamic MassiveBlack-II (MB-II) simulation. We carefully assess the effects on galaxy shapes, misalignment of the stellar component with the dark matter shape and two-point statistics of iterative weighted (by mass and luminosity) definitions of the (reduced and unreduced) inertia tensor. We find that iterative procedures must be adopted for a reliable measurement of the reduced tensormore » but that luminosity versus mass weighting has only negligible effects. Both ED and wg₊ correlations increase in amplitude with subhalo mass (in the range of 10¹⁰ – 6.0 X 10¹⁴h⁻¹ M⊙), with a weak redshift dependence (from z = 1 to z = 0.06) at fixed mass. At z ~ 0.3, we predict a wg₊ that is in reasonable agreement with SDSS LRG measurements and that decreases in amplitude by a factor of ~ 5–18 for galaxies in the LSST survey. We also compared the intrinsic alignment of centrals and satellites, with clear detection of satellite radial alignments within the host halos. Finally, we show that wg₊ (using subhalos as tracers of density and wδ (using dark matter density) predictions from the simulations agree with that of non-linear alignment models (NLA) at scales where the 2-halo term dominates in the correlations (and tabulate associated NLA fitting parameters). The 1-halo term induces a scale dependent bias at small scales which is not modeled in the NLA model.« less

  18. Intrinsic alignments of galaxies in the MassiveBlack-II simulation: Analysis of two-point statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tenneti, Ananth; Singh, Sukhdeep; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Matteo, Tiziana Di; Feng, Yu; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2015-03-11

    The intrinsic alignment of galaxies with the large-scale density field in an important astrophysical contaminant in upcoming weak lensing surveys. We present detailed measurements of the galaxy intrinsic alignments and associated ellipticity-direction (ED) and projected shape (wg?) correlation functions for galaxies in the cosmological hydrodynamic MassiveBlack-II (MB-II) simulation. We carefully assess the effects on galaxy shapes, misalignment of the stellar component with the dark matter shape and two-point statistics of iterative weighted (by mass and luminosity) definitions of the (reduced and unreduced) inertia tensor. We find that iterative procedures must be adopted for a reliable measurement of the reduced tensor but that luminosity versus mass weighting has only negligible effects. Both ED and wg? correlations increase in amplitude with subhalo mass (in the range of 10? 6.0 X 10?h? M?), with a weak redshift dependence (from z = 1 to z = 0.06) at fixed mass. At z ~ 0.3, we predict a wg? that is in reasonable agreement with SDSS LRG measurements and that decreases in amplitude by a factor of ~ 518 for galaxies in the LSST survey. We also compared the intrinsic alignment of centrals and satellites, with clear detection of satellite radial alignments within the host halos. Finally, we show that wg? (using subhalos as tracers of density and w? (using dark matter density) predictions from the simulations agree with that of non-linear alignment models (NLA) at scales where the 2-halo term dominates in the correlations (and tabulate associated NLA fitting parameters). The 1-halo term induces a scale dependent bias at small scales which is not modeled in the NLA model.

  19. Advances and Challenges in Computational Plasma Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.M. Tang; V.S. Chan

    2005-01-03

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically-confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper with illustrative examples chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and other topics. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology.

  20. Advance Liquid Metal Reactor Discrete Dynamic Event Tree/Bayesian Network Analysis and Incident Management Guidelines (Risk Management for Sodium Fast Reactors)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Groth, Katrina M.; Cardoni, Jeffrey N.; Wheeler, Timothy A.

    2015-04-01

    Accident management is an important component to maintaining risk at acceptable levels for all complex systems, such as nuclear power plants. With the introduction of self-correcting, or inherently safe, reactor designs the focus has shifted from management by operators to allowing the system's design to manage the accident. Inherently and passively safe designs are laudable, but nonetheless extreme boundary conditions can interfere with the design attributes which facilitate inherent safety, thus resulting in unanticipated and undesirable end states. This report examines an inherently safe and small sodium fast reactor experiencing a beyond design basis seismic event with the intend of exploring two issues : (1) can human intervention either improve or worsen the potential end states and (2) can a Bayesian Network be constructed to infer the state of the reactor to inform (1). ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to acknowledge the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy for funding this research through Work Package SR-14SN100303 under the Advanced Reactor Concepts program. The authors also acknowledge the PRA teams at Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Idaho National Laboratory for their continue d contributions to the advanced reactor PRA mission area.

  1. Direct Numerical Simulation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Numerical Simulation - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  2. Advanced Bio-based Jet Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biochemical Conversion Processes Advanced Bio-based Jet fuel Cost of Production Workshop Mary Biddy (NREL) November 27, 2012 Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 * Techno-Economic Analysis Approach * Biochemical conversion to Ethanol * Biochemical conversion to Advanced Hydrocarbons Overview Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 3 Techno-Economic Analysis Approach * Collaborate with engineering & construction firm to enhance credibility, quality *

  3. Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems: A North American Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, Norman; Wang, Michael; Weber, Trudy; Darlington, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    An accurate assessment of future fuel/propulsion system options requires a complete vehicle fuel-cycle analysis, commonly called a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis. This WTW study analyzes energy use and emissions associated with fuel production (or well-to-tank [WTT]) activities and energy use and emissions associated with vehicle operation (or tank-to-wheels [TTW]) activities.

  4. UTILITY OF MECHANISTIC MODELS FOR DIRECTING ADVANCED SEPARATIONS RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES: Electrochemically Modulated Separation Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwantes, Jon M.

    2009-06-01

    The objective for this work was to demonstrate the utility of mechanistic computer models designed to simulate actinide behavior for use in efficiently and effectively directing advanced laboratory R&D activities associated with developing advanced separations methods.

  5. Laboratory measurement verification of laser hazard analysis for miles weapon simulators used in force on force exercises.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2006-08-01

    Due to the change in the batteries used with the Small Arm Laser Transmitters (SALT) from 3-volts dc to 3.6-volts dc and changes to SNL MILES operating conditions, the associated laser hazards of these units required re-evaluation to ensure that the hazard classification of the laser emitters had not changed as well. The output laser emissions of the SNL MILES, weapon simulators and empire guns, used in Force-On-Force (FOF) training exercises, was measured in accordance to the ANSI Standard Z136.4-2005, ''Recommended Practice for Laser Safety Measurements for Hazard Evaluation''. The laser hazard class was evaluated in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, ''Safe Use of Lasers'', using ''worst'' case conditions associated with these MILES units. Laser safety assessment was conducted in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2005, ''Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors''. The laser hazard evaluation of these MILES laser emitters was compared to and supersedes SAND Report SAND2002-0246, ''Laser Safety Evaluation of the MILES and Mini MILES Laser Emitting Components'', which used ''actual'' operating conditions of the laser emitters at the time of its issuance.

  6. Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and Credentialing - 2014 BTO Peer Review Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and...

  7. Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors Utility Requirements Document Small Modular Reactors Inclusion Summary Advanced Nuclear Technology: Advanced Light Water Reactors ...

  8. Guest Editorial Introduction to the Special Issue on 'Advanced Signal Processing Techniques and Telecommunications Network Infrastructures for Smart Grid Analysis, Monitoring, and Management'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracale, Antonio; Barros, Julio; Cacciapuoti, Angela Sara; Chang, Gary; Dall'Anese, Emiliano

    2015-06-10

    Electrical power systems are undergoing a radical change in structure, components, and operational paradigms, and are progressively approaching the new concept of smart grids (SGs). Future power distribution systems will be characterized by the simultaneous presence of various distributed resources, such as renewable energy systems (i.e., photovoltaic power plant and wind farms), storage systems, and controllable/non-controllable loads. Control and optimization architectures will enable network-wide coordination of these grid components in order to improve system efficiency and reliability and to limit greenhouse gas emissions. In this context, the energy flows will be bidirectional from large power plants to end users and vice versa; producers and consumers will continuously interact at different voltage levels to determine in advance the requests of loads and to adapt the production and demand for electricity flexibly and efficiently also taking into account the presence of storage systems.

  9. Guest Editorial Introduction to the Special Issue on 'Advanced Signal Processing Techniques and Telecommunications Network Infrastructures for Smart Grid Analysis, Monitoring, and Management'

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bracale, Antonio; Barros, Julio; Cacciapuoti, Angela Sara; Chang, Gary; Dall'Anese, Emiliano

    2015-06-10

    Electrical power systems are undergoing a radical change in structure, components, and operational paradigms, and are progressively approaching the new concept of smart grids (SGs). Future power distribution systems will be characterized by the simultaneous presence of various distributed resources, such as renewable energy systems (i.e., photovoltaic power plant and wind farms), storage systems, and controllable/non-controllable loads. Control and optimization architectures will enable network-wide coordination of these grid components in order to improve system efficiency and reliability and to limit greenhouse gas emissions. In this context, the energy flows will be bidirectional from large power plants to end users andmore » vice versa; producers and consumers will continuously interact at different voltage levels to determine in advance the requests of loads and to adapt the production and demand for electricity flexibly and efficiently also taking into account the presence of storage systems.« less

  10. Center For Advanced Energy Studies Overview

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Blackman, Harold

    2013-05-28

    A collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory, Boise State University, Idaho State University and the University of Idaho. Conducts research in nuclear energy, advanced materials, carbon management, bioenergy, energy policy, modeling and simulation, and energy efficiency. Educates next generation of energy workforce. Visit us at www.caesenergy.org.

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Analysis of Film Formation Chemistry on Silicon Anodes by Advanced in-situ and operando Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by UC Berkeley at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the analysis of film formation...

  12. Advanced Pressure Boundary Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, Michael L; Shingledecker, John P

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the operating temperatures of fossil power plants is fundamental to improving thermal efficiencies and reducing undesirable emissions such as CO{sub 2}. One group of alloys with the potential to satisfy the conditions required of higher operating temperatures is the advanced ferritic steels such as ASTM Grade 91, 9Cr-2W, and 12Cr-2W. These are Cr-Mo steels containing 9-12 wt% Cr that have martensitic microstructures. Research aimed at increasing the operating temperature limits of the 9-12 wt% Cr steels and optimizing them for specific power plant applications has been actively pursued since the 1970's. As with all of the high strength martensitic steels, specifying upper temperature limits for tempering the alloys and heat treating weldments is a critical issue. To support this aspect of development, thermodynamic analysis was used to estimate how this critical temperature, the A{sub 1} in steel terminology, varies with alloy composition. The results from the thermodynamic analysis were presented to the Strength of Weldments subgroup of the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code and are being considered in establishing maximum postweld heat treatment temperatures. Experiments are also being planned to verify predictions. This is part of a CRADA project being done with Alstom Power, Inc.

  13. Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of thermal storage and advanced heat transfer fluids: measuring thermophysical properties, measuring fluid flow and heat transfer, and simulating flow of thermal energy and fluid.

  14. PROJECT PROFILE: Rapid QSTS Simulations for High-Resolution Comprehensive Assessment of Distributed PV Impacts (SuNLaMP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project, led by Sandia National Laboratory and supported by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, will accelerate Quasi Static Time Series (QSTS) simulation capabilities through the use of new and innovative methods for advanced time-series analysis. Currently, QSTS analysis is not commonly performed in photovoltaic (PV) interconnection studies because of the data requirements and computational burden. This project will address both of these issues by developing advanced QSTS methods that greatly reduce the required computational time and by developing high-proxy data sets.

  15. Energy and cost analysis of a solar-hydrogen combined heat and power system for remote power supply using a computer simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shabani, Bahman; Andrews, John; Watkins, Simon

    2010-01-15

    A simulation program, based on Visual Pascal, for sizing and techno-economic analysis of the performance of solar-hydrogen combined heat and power systems for remote applications is described. The accuracy of the submodels is checked by comparing the real performances of the system's components obtained from experimental measurements with model outputs. The use of the heat generated by the PEM fuel cell, and any unused excess hydrogen, is investigated for hot water production or space heating while the solar-hydrogen system is supplying electricity. A 5 kWh daily demand profile and the solar radiation profile of Melbourne have been used in a case study to investigate the typical techno-economic characteristics of the system to supply a remote household. The simulation shows that by harnessing both thermal load and excess hydrogen it is possible to increase the average yearly energy efficiency of the fuel cell in the solar-hydrogen system from just below 40% up to about 80% in both heat and power generation (based on the high heating value of hydrogen). The fuel cell in the system is conventionally sized to meet the peak of the demand profile. However, an economic optimisation analysis illustrates that installing a larger fuel cell could lead to up to a 15% reduction in the unit cost of the electricity to an average of just below 90 c/kWh over the assessment period of 30 years. Further, for an economically optimal size of the fuel cell, nearly a half the yearly energy demand for hot water of the remote household could be supplied by heat recovery from the fuel cell and utilising unused hydrogen in the exit stream. Such a system could then complement a conventional solar water heating system by providing the boosting energy (usually in the order of 40% of the total) normally obtained from gas or electricity. (author)

  16. ANALYSIS OF THE LEACHING EFFICIENCY OF INHIBITED WATER AND TANK SIMULANT IN REMOVING RESIDUES ON THERMOWELL PIPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; White, T.; Oji, L.; Martino, C.; Wilmarth, B.

    2011-10-20

    A key component for the accelerated implementation and operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is the recovery of Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a type IIIA tank with a maximum capacity of 1.3 million gallons. Video inspection of the tank showed that a film of solid material adhered to the tank internal walls and structures between 69 inch and 150 inch levels. From the video inspection, the solid film thickness was estimated to be 1mm, which corresponds to {approx}33 kg of TPB salts (as 20 wt% insoluble solids) (1). This film material is expected to be easily removed by single-rinse, slurry pump operation during Tank 48H TPB disposition via aggregation processing. A similar success was achieved for Tank 49H TPB dispositioning, with slurry pumps operating almost continuously for approximately 6 months, after which time the tank was inspected and the film was found to be removed. The major components of the Tank 49H film were soluble solids - Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} (Hydrated Sodium Carbonate, aka: Trona), Al(OH){sub 3} (Aluminum Hydroxide, aka: Gibbsite), NaTPB (Sodium Tetraphenylborate), NaNO{sub 3} (Sodium Nitrate) and NaNO{sub 2} (Sodium Nitrite) (2). Although the Tank 48H film is expected to be primarily soluble solids, it may not behave the same as the Tank 49H film. There is a risk that material on the internal surfaces of Tank 48H could not be easily removed. As a risk mitigation activity, the chemical composition and leachability of the Tank 48H film are being evaluated prior to initiating tank aggregation. This task investigated the dissolution characteristics of Tank 48H solid film deposits in inhibited water and DWPF recycle. To this end, SRNL received four separate 23-inch long thermowell-conductivity pipe samples which were removed from the tank 48H D2 risers in order to determine: (1) the thickness of the solid film deposit, (2) the chemical composition of the film deposits, and (3) the leaching behavior of the solid film deposit in inhibited water (IW) and in DWPF recycle simulant (3).

  17. Neutron Emission Characteristics of Two Mixed-Oxide Fuels: Simulations and Initial Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; J. L. Dolan; M. Flaska; J. T. Johnson; E. H. Seabury; E. M. Gantz

    2009-07-01

    Simulations and experiments have been carried out to investigate the neutron emission characteristics of two mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These activities are part of a project studying advanced instrumentation techniques in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Research and Development program and it's Materials Protection, Accounting, and Control for Transmutation (MPACT) campaign. This analysis used the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo simulation tool to determine the relative strength and energy spectra of the different neutron source terms within these fuels, and then used this data to simulate the detection and measurement of these emissions using an array of liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers. These calculations accounted for neutrons generated from the spontaneous fission of the actinides in the MOX fuel as well as neutrons created via (alpha,n) reactions with oxygen in the MOX fuel. The analysis was carried out to allow for characterization of both neutron energy as well as neutron coincidences between multiple detectors. Coincidences between prompt gamma rays and neutrons were also analyzed. Experiments were performed at INL with the same materials used in the simulations to benchmark and begin validation tests of the simulations. Data was collected in these experiments using an array of four liquid scintillators and a high-speed waveform digitizer. Advanced digital pulse-shape discrimination algorithms were developed and used to collect this data. Results of the simulation and modeling studies are presented together with preliminary results from the experimental campaign.

  18. Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon vss029_karner_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing R&D Annual Progress Report

  19. AdvAnced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AdvAnced test reActor At the InL advanced Unlike large, commercial power reactors, ATR is a low- temperature, low-pressure reactor. A nuclear reactor is basically an elaborate tool to produce power. reactors work by splitting atoms, the basic building blocks of matter, to release large amounts of energy. In commercial power reactors, that energy heats water, which creates steam. the steam turns turbines, generating electricity. What makes the Advanced test reactor, located at the Idaho national

  20. Institute for Advanced Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Video Collaboration » Education Opportunities » Institute for Advanced Studies Institute for Advanced Studies NMC leverages the strengths of three research universities to build joint programs, develop strategic partnerships, provide common organization and facilities. Contact Leader TBD LANL Program Administrator Pam Hundley (505) 663-5453 Email Building regional partnerships in education, leveraging strengths of three research universities The Institute for Advanced Studies (IAS) works with

  1. Thermoacoustic engine simulations with lattice Boltzmann CFD. Tasks 3, 4 and 5 progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-06

    Advanced Projects Research Incorporated has completed tasks number 3, 4 and 5 of the specified tasks in the LANL subcontract. Task 3 required measurement of the acoustic attenuation for various thermoacoustic conditions and Task 4 involved the analysis of the energy transfer mechanisms for the geometries of Task 3. Finally, Task 5 specified that simulations of thermoacoustic engine configurations used at LANL were to be performed. Discussion of all 3 task results is presented.

  2. Advanced Combustion FAQs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oxygen production technology, an air separation unit operating a cryogenic distillation process. For further information, see: - Oxy-Combustion - Advanced Combustion...

  3. Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) program is designed to promote separate but parallel engine development between the major stationary, gaseous fueled engine manufacturers in the...

  4. Advanced Conversion Roadmap Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Deliverable: Roadmap for public dissemination which will guide Biomass program out-year R&D directions Workshop Objective Advanced Conversion Technology Roadmap Energy ...

  5. Overview | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APS Overview: Introduction APS Systems Map LINAC Booster Synchrotron Storage Ring Insertion Devices Experiment Hall LOMs & Beamlines Overview of the APS The Advanced Photon Source...

  6. Advanced Studies Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this professional development experience to help aspiring young researchers advance and excel in the next stage of their careers in academia or at a national laboratory. For...

  7. Beamlines | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamlines Beamlines Home Beamlines Directory Research Techniques Sectors Directory Status and Schedule Safety and Training Beamlines The Advanced Photon Source consists of 34...

  8. Advanced Rooftop Unit Control

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced-Rooftop-Unit-Control Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Policy & Reporting Expand Policy & Reporting EE Sectors Expand EE Sectors...

  9. Nuclear fuel cycle system simulation tool based on high-fidelity component modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, David E.

    2014-02-01

    The DOE is currently directing extensive research into developing fuel cycle technologies that will enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy. The task is formidable considering the numerous fuel cycle options, the large dynamic systems that each represent, and the necessity to accurately predict their behavior. The path to successfully develop and implement an advanced fuel cycle is highly dependent on the modeling capabilities and simulation tools available for performing useful relevant analysis to assist stakeholders in decision making. Therefore a high-fidelity fuel cycle simulation tool that performs system analysis, including uncertainty quantification and optimization was developed. The resulting simulator also includes the capability to calculate environmental impact measures for individual components and the system. An integrated system method and analysis approach that provides consistent and comprehensive evaluations of advanced fuel cycles was developed. A general approach was utilized allowing for the system to be modified in order to provide analysis for other systems with similar attributes. By utilizing this approach, the framework for simulating many different fuel cycle options is provided. Two example fuel cycle configurations were developed to take advantage of used fuel recycling and transmutation capabilities in waste management scenarios leading to minimized waste inventories.

  10. Advancing the surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish: a gap analysis and research agenda based on a review of trends in intracoelomic tagging effects studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Woodley, Christa M.; Eppard, M. B.; Brown, Richard S.; Nielsen, Jennifer L.

    2011-03-08

    Early approaches to surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish were often through trial and error, however, in recent years there has been an interest in using scientific research to identify techniques and procedures that improve the outcome of surgical procedures and determine the effects of tagging on individuals. Here we summarize the trends in 108 peer-reviewed electronic tagging effect studies focused on intracoleomic implantation to determine opportunities for future research. To date, almost all of the studies have been conducted in freshwater, typically in laboratory environments, and have focused on biotelemetry devices. The majority of studies have focused on salmonids, cyprinids, ictalurids and centrarchids, with a regional bias towards North America, Europe and Australia. Most studies have focused on determining whether there is a negative effect of tagging relative to control fish, with proportionally fewer that have contrasted different aspects of the surgical procedure (e.g., methods of sterilization, incision location, wound closure material) that could advance the discipline. Many of these studies included routine endpoints such as mortality, growth, healing and tag retention, with fewer addressing sublethal measures such as swimming ability, predator avoidance, physiological costs, or fitness. Continued research is needed to further elevate the practice of electronic tag implantation in fish in order to ensure that the data generated are relevant to untagged conspecifics (i.e., no long-term behavioural or physiological consequences) and the surgical procedure does not impair the health and welfare status of the tagged fish. To that end, we advocate for i) rigorous controlled manipulations based on statistical designs that have adequate power, account for inter-individual variation, and include controls and shams, ii) studies that transcend the laboratory and the field with more studies in marine waters, iii) incorporation of knowledge and techniques emerging from the medical and veterinary disciplines, iv) addressing all components of the surgical event, v) comparative studies that evaluate the same surgical techniques on multiple species and in different environments, vi) consideration of how biotic factors (e.g., sex, age, size) influence tagging outcomes, and vii) studies that cover a range of endpoints over ecologically-relevant time periods.

  11. Terascale Simulation Tolls and Technologies

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-11-01

    The Terascale Simulation Tools and Technologies (TSTT) center is a collaboration between several universities and DOE laboratories, and is funded by the DOE Scientific Discovery for Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program. The primary objective of the (TSTT) center is to develop technologies taht enable application scientists to easily use multiple mesh and discretization strageties within a single simulation on terascale computeres. This is accomplished through the development of common functional interfaces to geometry, mesh, and othermore » simulation data. This package is Sandia's implementation of these interfaces.« less

  12. Advanced Electric Submersible Pump Design Tool for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xuele Qi; Norman Turnquist; Farshad Ghasripoor

    2012-05-31

    Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESPs) present higher efficiency, larger production rate, and can be operated in deeper wells than the other geothermal artificial lifting systems. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) applications recommend lifting 300 C geothermal water at 80kg/s flow rate in a maximum 10-5/8-inch diameter wellbore to improve the cost-effectiveness. In this paper, an advanced ESP design tool comprising a 1D theoretical model and a 3D CFD analysis has been developed to design ESPs for geothermal applications. Design of Experiments was also performed to optimize the geometry and performance. The designed mixed-flow type centrifugal impeller and diffuser exhibit high efficiency and head rise under simulated EGS conditions. The design tool has been validated by comparing the prediction to experimental data of an existing ESP product.

  13. A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior

    2004-12-22

    In this report is described the work effort to develop and demonstrate a software framework to support advanced process simulations to evaluate the performance of advanced power systems. Integrated into the framework are a broad range of models, analysis tools, and visualization methods that can be used for the plant evaluation. The framework provides a tightly integrated problem-solving environment, with plug-and-play functionality, and includes a hierarchy of models, ranging from fast running process models to detailed reacting CFD models. The framework places no inherent limitations on the type of physics that can be modeled, numerical techniques, or programming languages used to implement the equipment models, or the type or amount of data that can be exchanged between models. Tools are provided to analyze simulation results at multiple levels of detail, ranging from simple tabular outputs to advanced solution visualization methods. All models and tools communicate in a seamless manner. The framework can be coupled to other software frameworks that provide different modeling capabilities. Three software frameworks were developed during the course of the project. The first framework focused on simulating the performance of the DOE Low Emissions Boiler System Proof of Concept facility, an advanced pulverized-coal combustion-based power plant. The second framework targeted simulating the performance of an Integrated coal Gasification Combined Cycle - Fuel Cell Turbine (IGCC-FCT) plant configuration. The coal gasifier models included both CFD and process models for the commercially dominant systems. Interfacing models to the framework was performed using VES-Open, and tests were performed to demonstrate interfacing CAPE-Open compliant models to the framework. The IGCC-FCT framework was subsequently extended to support Virtual Engineering concepts in which plant configurations can be constructed and interrogated in a three-dimensional, user-centered, interactive, immersive environment. The Virtual Engineering Framework (VEF), in effect a prototype framework, was developed through close collaboration with NETL supported research teams from Iowa State University Virtual Reality Applications Center (ISU-VRAC) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). The VEF is open source, compatible across systems ranging from inexpensive desktop PCs to large-scale, immersive facilities and provides support for heterogeneous distributed computing of plant simulations. The ability to compute plant economics through an interface that coupled the CMU IECM tool to the VEF was demonstrated, and the ability to couple the VEF to Aspen Plus, a commercial flowsheet modeling tool, was demonstrated. Models were interfaced to the framework using VES-Open. Tests were performed for interfacing CAPE-Open-compliant models to the framework. Where available, the developed models and plant simulations have been benchmarked against data from the open literature. The VEF has been installed at NETL. The VEF provides simulation capabilities not available in commercial simulation tools. It provides DOE engineers, scientists, and decision makers with a flexible and extensible simulation system that can be used to reduce the time, technical risk, and cost to develop the next generation of advanced, coal-fired power systems that will have low emissions and high efficiency. Furthermore, the VEF provides a common simulation system that NETL can use to help manage Advanced Power Systems Research projects, including both combustion- and gasification-based technologies.

  14. Engineering and Economic Analysis of an Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant with and without Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Task 7. Design and Economic Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booras, George; Powers, J.; Riley, C.; Hendrix, H.

    2015-09-01

    This report evaluates the economics and performance of two A-USC PC power plants; Case 1 is a conventionally configured A-USC PC power plant with superior emission controls, but without CO2 removal; and Case 2 adds a post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) system to the plant from Case 1, using the design and heat integration strategies from EPRI’s 2015 report, “Best Integrated Coal Plant.” The capture design basis for this case is “partial,” to meet EPA’s proposed New Source Performance Standard, which was initially proposed as 500 kg-CO2/MWh (gross) or 1100 lb-CO2/MWh (gross), but modified in August 2015 to 635 kg-CO2/MWh (gross) or 1400 lb-CO2/MWh (gross). This report draws upon the collective experience of consortium members, with EPRI and General Electric leading the study. General Electric provided the steam cycle analysis as well as v the steam turbine design and cost estimating. EPRI performed integrated plant performance analysis using EPRI’s PC Cost model.

  15. Advanced uranium enrichment technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merriman, R.

    1983-03-10

    The Advanced Gas Centrifuge and Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation methods are described. The status and potential of the technologies are summarized, the programs outlined, and the economic incentives are noted. How the advanced technologies, once demonstrated, might be deployed so that SWV costs in the 1990s can be significantly reduced is described.

  16. Vehicle Energy Consumption and Performance Analysis | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Consumption and Performance Analysis Vehicle Energy Consumption and Performance Analysis Argonne researchers have applied their expertise in modeling, simulation and control to develop new control theories and designs for advanced vehicles. Working with government organizations (such as the U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Department of Transportation) and leading car and truck manufacturers as well as suppliers, the System Modeling and Control group has extensive research

  17. Advanced Methods for Manufacturing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scientists Computational Resources and Multi- Physics Modeling & Simulation Knowledge & ... Manufacturing Methods R&D Test Bed ... loops, process development...

  18. VISION: Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Abdellatif M. Yacout; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; David E. Shropshire

    2009-04-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle is a very complex system that includes considerable dynamic complexity as well as detail complexity. In the nuclear power realm, there are experts and considerable research and development in nuclear fuel development, separations technology, reactor physics and waste management. What is lacking is an overall understanding of the entire nuclear fuel cycle and how the deployment of new fuel cycle technologies affects the overall performance of the fuel cycle. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiatives systems analysis group is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing and delays in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works and can transition as technologies are changed. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model and some examples of how to use VISION.

  19. Animations/simulations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Numeric data Data plots and fgures Genome/genetics data Interactive data maps Animations/simulations Still images and photos Find scientific research data resulting from DOE-funded research. u u u u u u Find www.osti.gov/dataexplorer Search DOE Data Explorer for Energy and Science Data + Advanced Search DOE/OSTI--C205 01/15 Explore DOE Data Explorer View the most recently added datasets or collections. Browse by titles or subjects. Discover the organizations sponsoring the data. Check out

  20. Animations/simulations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Numeric data Data plots and fgures Genome/genetics data Interactive data maps Animations/simulations Still images and photos Find scientifc research data resulting from DOE-funded research. u u u u u u Find www.osti.gov/dataexplorer Search DOE Data Explorer for Energy and Science Data + Advanced Search DOE/OSTI--C205 02/16 Explore DOE Data Explorer View the most recently added datasets or collections. Browse by titles or subjects. Discover the organizations sponsoring the data. Check out

  1. Multiphysics Simulations for LWR Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Steven P [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Evans, Thomas M [ORNL; Lefebvre, Robert A [ORNL; Sampath, Rahul S [ORNL; Davidson, Gregory G [ORNL; Hansel, J [Texas A& M University; Ragusa, J [Texas A& M University; Josey, Colin [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque

    2013-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the neutron and temperature distributions within an operating nuclear reactor requires the solution of multiple coupled physics equations. In a light water reactor (LWR), there is a very strong coupling between the power distribution (governed by the radiation transport equation) and the temperature and density distributions (governed by a thermal diusion equation in combination with a fluid flow model). This study aims to begin to quantify the impact of such feedback mechanisms as well as identify numerical diculties associated with such multiphysics problems. A description of the multiphysics model and current solution strategy within the Exnihilo code package will be presented, along with numerical results for a representative 3 3 PWR mini-assembly.

  2. Multiphysics simulations for LWR analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, S.; Clarno, K.; Berrill, M.; Evans, T.; Davidson, G.; Lefebvre, R.; Sampath, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hansel, J.; Ragusa, J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University (United States); Josey, C. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Accurate prediction of the neutron and temperature distributions within an operating nuclear reactor requires the solution of multiple coupled physics equations. In a light water reactor (LWR), there is a very strong coupling between the power distribution (described by the radiation transport equation) and the temperature and density distributions (described by a thermal diffusion equation in combination with a fluid flow model). This study aims to begin to quantify the impact of such feedback mechanisms as well as identify numerical difficulties associated with such multiphysics problems. A description of the multiphysics model and current solution strategy within the Exnihilo code package for coupling between 3-D radiation transport and 3-D heat transfer is given. Numerical results detailing the effects of varying the nature of the coupling and the impact of mesh refinement for a representative 3x3 pressurized water reactor (PWR) 'mini-assembly' are presented. (authors)

  3. Detailed Photovoltaic Analysis Simulation Spreadsheet

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-12-31

    The software calculates photovoltaic system energy and financial performance via the utilization of very detailed parameters.

  4. Data, exergy, and energy analysis of a vertical-bore, ground-source heat pump to for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D; Baxter, Van D; Gehl, Anthony C

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is provided to support the view that greater than two-thirds of energy required to produce domestic hot water may be extracted from the ground which serves as renewable energy resource. The case refers to a 345 m2 research house located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 36.01 N 84.26 W in a mixed-humid climate with HDD of 2218 C-days (3993 F-days) and CDD of 723 C-days (1301 F-days). The house is operated under simulated occupancy conditions in which the hot water use protocol is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which captures the water consumption lifestyles of the average family in the United States. The 5.275 (1.5-ton) water-to-water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) shared the same vertical bore with a 7.56 KW water-to-air ground source heat pump for space conditioning the same house. Energy and exergy analysis of data collected continuously over a twelve month period provide performance metrics and sources of inherent systemic inefficiencies. Data and analyses are vital to better understand how WW-GSHPs may be further improved to enable the ground to be used as a renewable energy resource.

  5. Advanced System for Process Engineering

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-01

    ASPEN (Advanced System for Process Engineering) is a state of the art process simulator and economic evaluation package which was designed for use in engineering fossil energy conversion processes. ASPEN can represent multiphase streams including solids, and handle complex substances such as coal. The system can perform steady state material and energy balances, determine equipment size and cost, and carry out preliminary economic evaluations. It is supported by a comprehensive physical property system for computationmore » of major properties such as enthalpy, entropy, free energy, molar volume, equilibrium ratio, fugacity coefficient, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion coefficient for specified phase conditions; vapor, liquid, or solid. The properties may be computed for pure components, mixtures, or components in a mixture, as appropriate. The ASPEN Input Language is oriented towards process engineers.« less

  6. Development of Mechanistic Modeling Capabilities for Local Neutronically-Coupled Flow-Induced Instabilities in Advanced Water-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Podowski

    2009-11-30

    The major research objectives of this project included the formulation of flow and heat transfer modeling framework for the analysis of flow-induced instabilities in advanced light water nuclear reactors such as boiling water reactors. General multifield model of two-phase flow, including the necessary closure laws. Development of neurton kinetics models compatible with the proposed models of heated channel dynamics. Formulation and encoding of complete coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models for the analysis of spatially-dependent local core instabilities. Computer simulations aimed at testing and validating the new models of reactor dynamics.

  7. Advanced solar panel designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ralph, E.L.; Linder, E.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes solar cell panel designs that utilize new high efficiency solar cells along with lightweight rigid panel technology. The resulting designs push the W/kg and W/sq m parameters to new high levels. These new designs are well suited to meet the demand for higher performance small satellites. This paper reports on progress made on two SBIR Phase 1 contracts. One panel design involved the use of large area (5.5 cm x 6.5 cm) GaAs/Ge solar cells of 19% efficiency combined with a lightweight rigid graphite fiber epoxy isogrid substrate configuration. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power level of 60 W/kg with a potential of reaching 80 W/kg. The second panel design involved the use of newly developed high efficiency (22%) dual junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells combined with an advanced lightweight rigid substrate using aluminum honeycomb core with high strength graphite fiber mesh facesheets. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power of 105 W/kg and 230 W/sq m. This paper will address the construction details of the panels and an analysis of the component weights. A strawman array design suitable for a typical small-sat mission is described for each of the two panel design technologies being studied. Benefits in respect to weight reduction, area reduction, and system cost reduction are analyzed and compared to conventional arrays.

  8. Experimental Characterization of a Grid-Loss Event on a 2.5-MW Dynamometer Using Advanced Operational Modal Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helsen, J.; Weijtjens, W.; Guo, Y.; Keller, J.; McNiff, B.; Devriendt, C.; Guillaume, P.

    2015-02-01

    This paper experimentally investigates a worst case grid loss event conducted on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) drivetrain mounted on the 2.5MW NREL dynamic nacelle test-rig. The GRC drivetrain has a directly grid-coupled, fixed speed asynchronous generator. The main goal is the assessment of the dynamic content driving this particular assess the dynamic content of the high-speed stage of the GRC gearbox. In addition to external accelerometers, high frequency sampled measurements of strain gauges were used to assess torque fluctuations and bending moments both at the nacelle main shaft and gearbox high-speed shaft (HSS) through the entire duration of the event. Modal analysis was conducted using a polyreference Least Squares Complex Frequency-domain (pLSCF) modal identification estimator. The event driving the torsional resonance was identified. Moreover, the pLSCF estimator identified main drivetrain resonances based on a combination of acceleration and strain measurements. Without external action during the grid-loss event, a mode shape characterized by counter phase rotation of the rotor and generator rotor determined by the drivetrain flexibility and rotor inertias was the main driver of the event. This behavior resulted in significant torque oscillations with large amplitude negative torque periods. Based on tooth strain measurements of the HSS pinion, this work showed that at each zero-crossing, the teeth lost contact and came into contact with the backside flank. In addition, dynamic nontorque loads between the gearbox and generator at the HSS played an important role, as indicated by strain gauge-measurements.

  9. Advanced Vehicles Manufacturing Projects | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Vehicles Manufacturing Projects Advanced Vehicles Manufacturing Projects Advanced Vehicles Manufacturing Projects Advanced Vehicles Manufacturing Projects Advanced Vehicles Manufacturing Projects Advanced Vehicles Manufacturing Projects Advanced Vehicles Manufacturing Projects Advanced Vehicles Manufacturing Projects Advanced Vehicles Manufacturing Projects Advanced Vehicles Manufacturing Projects DOE-LPO_ATVM-Economic-Growth_Thumbnail.png DRIVING ECONOMIC GROWTH: ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES

  10. Advanced engineering environment pilot project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwegel, Jill; Pomplun, Alan R.; Abernathy, Rusty

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a concurrent engineering concept that enables real-time process tooling design and analysis, collaborative process flow development, automated document creation, and full process traceability throughout a product's life cycle. The AEE will enable NNSA's Design and Production Agencies to collaborate through a singular integrated process. Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) are working together on a prototype AEE pilot project to evaluate PTC's product collaboration tools relative to the needs of the NWC. The primary deliverable for the project is a set of validated criteria for defining a complete commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) solution to deploy the AEE across the NWC.

  11. Advanced Target Effects Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Target Effects Modeling for Ion Accelerators and other High-Energy-Density Experiments Alice Koniges 1,a , Wangyi Liu 1 , Steven Lidia 1 , Thomas Schenkel 1 , John Barnard...

  12. Advanced Combustion Turbines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that will accelerate turbine performance and efficiency beyond current state-of-the-art and reduce the risk to market for novel and advanced turbine-based power cycles....

  13. Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  14. Advanced Ultraviolet Spectroradiometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Ultraviolet Spectroradiometer A specialized instrument used to measure a portion of the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum was recently installed at the SGP central facility. The instrument, called an advanced UV spectroradiometer, was developed by Dr. Lee Harrison of the State University of New York at Albany and is funded by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The sun emits a vast amount of energy in the form of electro- magnetic radiation. We see some of this energy as visible

  15. Advanced Studies Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute » Advanced Studies Institute Science of Signatures Advanced Studies Institute Developing innovative solution strategies for problems that support the forward deployment theme of the Science of Signatures Pillar, and building skills needed for succesful research program development. Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran

  16. Advances in Performance Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories originated an innovative approach to determining the safety of geologic repositories for radioactive waste disposal called "performance assessment", PA. The discipline of PA continues to advance within the Defense Waste Management Programs as computing capabilities advance and as the discipline is used in an expanding portfolio of applications both nationally and internationally. Do Radioactive Waste Disposal Options Assure Safety for

  17. Advanced Optical Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Optical Technologies The Advanced Optical Components and Technologies program develops, creates and provides critical optical components for laser-based missions at LLNL. Past projects focused on kinoform phase plates for LLNL's Nova laser and on large-area, submicron-pitch holographic diffraction gratings for LLNL's Petawatt (1015 watt) ultrashort-pulse laser. Today, the optical team designs and fabricates a variety of custom diffractive optics for researchers worldwide. Included are

  18. Wind Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-12-31

    The Software consists of a spreadsheet written in Microsoft Excel that provides an hourly simulation of a wind energy system, which includes a calculation of wind turbine output as a power-curve fit of wind speed.

  19. Simulation and Risk Assessment for Carbon Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Capture and Storage » Simulation and Risk Assessment for Carbon Storage Simulation and Risk Assessment for Carbon Storage Research in simulation and risk assessment is focused on development of advanced simulation models of the subsurface and integration of the results into a risk assessment that includes both technical and programmatic risks. Simulation models are critical for predicting the flow of the CO2 in the target formations, chemical changes that may occur in the reservoir, and

  20. Advanced reactor safety program. Stakeholder interaction and feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H.; Smith, Curtis L.

    2014-08-01

    In the Spring of 2013, we began discussions with our industry stakeholders on how to upgrade our safety analysis capabilities. The focus of these improvements would primarily be on advanced safety analysis capabilities that could help the nuclear industry analyze, understand, and better predict complex safety problems. The current environment in the DOE complex is such that recent successes in high performance computer modeling could lead the nuclear industry to benefit from these advances, as long as an effort to translate these advances into realistic applications is made. Upgrading the nuclear industry modeling analysis capabilities is a significant effort that would require substantial participation and coordination from all industry segments: research, engineering, vendors, and operations. We focus here on interactions with industry stakeholders to develop sound advanced safety analysis applications propositions that could have a positive impact on industry long term operation, hence advancing the state of nuclear safety.

  1. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Carbohydrates...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Conversion Roadmap Workshop Workshop on Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Carbohydrates Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Carbohydrates...

  2. Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV) Vehicle Technology Advancement and Demonstration Activity Advanced Vehicle...

  3. Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Advancement Partnership (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership (October 2012) The Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership ...

  4. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  5. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  6. Advanced Distillation Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena Fanelli; Ravi Arora; Annalee Tonkovich; Jennifer Marco; Ed Rode

    2010-03-24

    The Advanced Distillation project was concluded on December 31, 2009. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded project was completed successfully and within budget during a timeline approved by DOE project managers, which included a one year extension to the initial ending date. The subject technology, Microchannel Process Technology (MPT) distillation, was expected to provide both capital and operating cost savings compared to conventional distillation technology. With efforts from Velocys and its project partners, MPT distillation was successfully demonstrated at a laboratory scale and its energy savings potential was calculated. While many objectives established at the beginning of the project were met, the project was only partially successful. At the conclusion, it appears that MPT distillation is not a good fit for the targeted separation of ethane and ethylene in large-scale ethylene production facilities, as greater advantages were seen for smaller scale distillations. Early in the project, work involved flowsheet analyses to discern the economic viability of ethane-ethylene MPT distillation and develop strategies for maximizing its impact on the economics of the process. This study confirmed that through modification to standard operating processes, MPT can enable net energy savings in excess of 20%. This advantage was used by ABB Lumus to determine the potential impact of MPT distillation on the ethane-ethylene market. The study indicated that a substantial market exists if the energy saving could be realized and if installed capital cost of MPT distillation was on par or less than conventional technology. Unfortunately, it was determined that the large number of MPT distillation units needed to perform ethane-ethylene separation for world-scale ethylene facilities, makes the targeted separation a poor fit for the technology in this application at the current state of manufacturing costs. Over the course of the project, distillation experiments were performed with the targeted mixture, ethane-ethylene, as well as with analogous low relative volatility systems: cyclohexane-hexane and cyclopentane-pentane. Devices and test stands were specifically designed for these efforts. Development progressed from experiments and models considering sections of a full scale device to the design, fabrication, and operation of a single-channel distillation unit with integrated heat transfer. Throughout the project, analytical and numerical models and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were validated with experiments in the process of developing this platform technology. Experimental trials demonstrated steady and controllable distillation for a variety of process conditions. Values of Height-to-an-Equivalent Theoretical Plate (HETP) ranging from less than 0.5 inch to a few inches were experimentally proven, demonstrating a ten-fold performance enhancement relative to conventional distillation. This improvement, while substantial, is not sufficient for MPT distillation to displace very large scale distillation trains. Fortunately, parallel efforts in the area of business development have yielded other applications for MPT distillation, including smaller scale separations that benefit from the flowsheet flexibility offered by the technology. Talks with multiple potential partners are underway. Their outcome will also help determine the path ahead for MPT distillation.

  7. Energy Systems Integration: NREL + Advanced Energy (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ADVANCED ENERGY Solar inverter manufacturer Advanced Energy Industries is using the ESIF's Power Systems Integration Laboratory (PSIL) to test its advanced photovoltaic (PV) inverter technology with the ESIF's power hardware-in-the-loop system and megawatt- scale grid simulators. Solar inverters are responsible for a number of critical functions within a solar PV system, including converting the direct current output into alternating current for the grid. Advanced Energy's inverter will help

  8. Development of 3rd Generation Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) with an

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated Experimental and Simulation Approach | Department of Energy 3rd Generation Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) with an Integrated Experimental and Simulation Approach Development of 3rd Generation Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) with an Integrated Experimental and Simulation Approach 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon lm082_sun_2013_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle

  9. Large-scale computations in analysis of structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, D.B.; Goudreau, G.L.

    1993-09-01

    Computer hardware and numerical analysis algorithms have progressed to a point where many engineering organizations and universities can perform nonlinear analyses on a routine basis. Through much remains to be done in terms of advancement of nonlinear analysis techniques and characterization on nonlinear material constitutive behavior, the technology exists today to perform useful nonlinear analysis for many structural systems. In the current paper, a survey on nonlinear analysis technologies developed and employed for many years on programmatic defense work at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is provided, and ongoing nonlinear numerical simulation projects relevant to the civil engineering field are described.

  10. Library Analog Semiconductor Devices SPICE Simulators

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-07-23

    SPICE-SANDIA.LIB is a library of parameter sets and macromodels of semiconductor devices. They are used with Spice-based (SPICE is a program for electronic circuit analysis) simulators to simulate electronic circuits.

  11. Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Analysis Home/Tag:Analysis - Electricity use by water service sector and county. Shown are electricity use by (a) large-scale conveyance, (b) groundwater irrigation pumping, (c) surface water irrigation pumping, (d) drinking water, and (e) wastewater. Aggregate electricity use across these sectors (f) is also mapped. Permalink Gallery Sandians Recognized in Environmental Science & Technology's Best Paper Competition Analysis, Capabilities,

  12. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  13. Advanced servomanipulator development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuban, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Servomanipulator (ASM) System consists of three major components: the ASM slave, the dual arm master controller (DAMC) or master, and the control system. The ASM is remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. This new manipulator addresses requirements of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing with emphasis on force reflection, remote maintainability, reliability, radiation tolerance, and corrosion resistance. The advanced servomanipulator is uniquely subdivided into remotely replaceable modules which will permit in situ manipulator repair by spare module replacement. Manipulator modularization and increased reliability are accomplished through a force transmission system that uses gears and torque tubes. Digital control algorithms and mechanical precision are used to offset the increased backlash, friction, and inertia resulting from the gear drives. This results in the first remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator in the world.

  14. Recent advances in picosecond and hybrid femtosecond/picosecond CARS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    techniques for gas phase analysis. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Recent advances in picosecond and hybrid femtosecond/picosecond CARS techniques for gas phase analysis. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recent advances in picosecond and hybrid femtosecond/picosecond CARS techniques for gas phase analysis. Abstract not provided. Authors: Kliewer, Christopher Jesse Publication Date: 2014-05-01 OSTI Identifier: 1143147 Report Number(s): SAND2014-3942C 517657 DOE Contract Number:

  15. Advanced Tower Analysis and Design System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enhanced metafile, and both 2D and 3D International Graphics Standard for import into CAD systems. Help is available through the Windows help system as well as through a...

  16. PROTON RADIOGRAPHY FOR AN ADVANCED HYDROTEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. MORRIS

    2000-11-01

    Analysis of data from BNL experiment 933 is presented. Results demonstrate that proton radiography can meet many of the requirements for an Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF). Results for background, position resolution, metrology, quantitative radiography, material identification, and edge resolution are presented.

  17. Advanced Materials Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Marketing Summaries Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Marketing Summaries (345) Success Stories (3) Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Browse

  18. Advanced Containment System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kawamura, Hideki (Tokyo, JP); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Noda, Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

    2005-02-08

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. The advanced containment system comprises a plurality of casing sections with each casing section interlocked to an adjacent casing section. Each casing section includes a complementary interlocking structure that interlocks with the complementary interlocking structure on an adjacent casing section. A barrier filler substantially fills the casing sections and may substantially fill the spaces of the complementary interlocking structure to form a substantially impermeable barrier. Some of the casing sections may include sensors so that the casing sections and the zone of interest may be remotely monitored after the casing sections are emplaced in the ground.

  19. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The toolkit also provides run-time parallel domain decomposition with data-migration for both static and dynamic load-balancing. Linear algebra is handled through an...

  20. CONSORTIUM FOR ADVANCED SIMULATION OF LIGHT WATER REACTORS (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Problem Integration Virtual Reactor Integration (VRI) Bridging the gap between research and engineering. Chemistry Mesh Motion Quality Improvement Multi- resolution...

  1. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Monte Carlo transport applications. Exnihilo is based on a package architecture model such that each package provides well-defined capabilities. Exnihilo currently...

  2. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory PV Regional ... Facility Geomechanics and Drilling Labs National ... Health Monitoring Offshore Wind High-Resolution ...

  3. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that have included management of CERCLA and RCRA remediation projects at the INL, Rocky Flats, and Mound laboratories, management of special nuclear materials at the INL, and...

  4. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reactor physical phenomena using coupled multiphysics models. VERA also includes the software development environment and computational infrastructure needed for these...

  5. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to achieve challenge problem solutions A strong VERA infrastructure supporting software development, testing, and releases. Requirements Drivers Modeling of reactors...

  6. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to develop the world's first nuclear fuel cycle and today is DOE's largest science and energy laboratory. ORNL has world-leading capabilities in computing and computational...

  7. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plan to set up eight innovation hubs to solve the eight biggest energy problems in the world. CUNY Energy Institute The CUNY Energy Institute is proudly training the next...

  8. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Map Home About CASL Vision Mission Goals Strategy Integration Performance Metrics Partners Founding Partners Electric Power Research Institute Idaho National Laboratory Los...

  9. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model and numerical algorithm requirements of VERA. THM collaborates closely with Materials Performance and Optimization (MPO) for sub-grid material and chemistry models,...

  10. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    integration (VRI) for integration and development of VERA. Materials Performance and Optimization (MPO) - Develops improved materials performance models for fuels, cladding,...

  11. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Transport Methods (RTM) Delivers next-generation radiation transport tools to the virtual Reactor RTM Vision Statement Objectives and Strategies Next generation,...

  12. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    capabilities to meet future CASL needs. DTK has been given an open source BSD 3-clause license. The primary code development repository is publicly-hosted under the GitHub group...

  13. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    models are being developed based on higher fidelity CFD methods, and may also include adhesionstrength models16 for the crud's surface layer as well as other "release"...

  14. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for TVA Watts Bar plant * First-of-a-kind three-dimensional (3D) assessment of fuel pellet-to- cladding interaction * VERA 1.0 established with infrastructure and basic industry...

  15. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of plant operation and fuel rod design on the thermo-mechanical behavior, including Pellet-Cladding Interaction (PCI) failures in PWRs. The multi-physics, multi-dimensional...

  16. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to deliver materials insight in the areas of CRUD, Grid-to-Rod-Fretting (GTRF), pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), reactivity insertion accident (RIA) and loss of cooling...

  17. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  18. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering and Design, Volume Online, Issue CASL-U-2015-0301-000, August 28, 2015. Smith, T.M., M.A. Christon, E. Baglietto and H. Luo, "Assessment of Models for Near Wall...

  19. An Advanced simulation Code for Modeling Inductive Output Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thuc Bui; R. Lawrence Ives

    2012-04-27

    During the Phase I program, CCR completed several major building blocks for a 3D large signal, inductive output tube (IOT) code using modern computer language and programming techniques. These included a 3D, Helmholtz, time-harmonic, field solver with a fully functional graphical user interface (GUI), automeshing and adaptivity. Other building blocks included the improved electrostatic Poisson solver with temporal boundary conditions to provide temporal fields for the time-stepping particle pusher as well as the self electric field caused by time-varying space charge. The magnetostatic field solver was also updated to solve for the self magnetic field caused by time changing current density in the output cavity gap. The goal function to optimize an IOT cavity was also formulated, and the optimization methodologies were investigated.

  20. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Drekar, CASL Technical Report: CASL-U-2012-0080-000, June 30, 2012. Bakosi, J., N. Barnett, M.A. Christon, M.M. Francois, R.B. Lowrie and R. Sankaran, Integration of Hydra-TH...

  1. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CASL Partners Electric Power Research Institute Idaho National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology North Carolina State University Oak...

  2. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plant power uprates, life extension, and higher burnup fuels Provide the primary bridge between the scientific and computational capabilities developed by CASL and external...

  3. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Back Board of Directors The CASL Board of Directors (BOD) serves as both an advisory and oversight body for the ORNL Laboratory Director and the CASL Senior Leadership Team (SLT) on issues related to management, performance, strategic direction, and institutional interfaces within CASL. The CASL Director reports to the BOD on all matters related to CASL strategic program plans and decisions. The BOD works to ensure the execution of CASL operational and R&D plans provide maximum benefit to

  4. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organization The CASL organizational structure (see chart) has proven to accommodate necessary program priority changes and risk management actions during CASL's lifetime, yet possesses a primary structure that is stable and functional. Major features include: Central, integrated management working predominately from a single location at ORNL: Director with full line authority and accountability for all aspects of CASL; Deputy Direct to drive program planning, performance and assessment; Chief

  5. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Us Address Oak Ridge National Laboratory PO Box 2008, MS6003 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6003 Email Information Support ORNL Campus

  6. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Map Home CASL Partners Research Science & Technology Archive Journal & Conference Papers Technical Reports Presentations VERA Software & Support VERA 3.3 VERA.edu How To Request VERA Support & Resources Tutorials & Webcasts Upcoming Training Events Tutorials Webinars About CASL Image Gallery Video Gallery Media Kit Organization Board of Directors Industry Council Science Council Contact Us

  7. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VERA VERA.edu Software availability U.S. Citizens and most LPRs as limited by U.S. export control regulations Students, Faculty MOC radiation transport included included Sn and SPn radiation transport included Not included Monte Carlo radiation transport included included Integrated cross-section library included Limited functionality Integrated depletion library included Limited functionality Subchannel thermal-hydraulics included included Fuel performance included included Coolant chemistry

  8. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reliable predictions of grid to rod gap, turbulent flow excitation, and resulting rod vibration and wear at any location in core. PCI Pellet-Clad Interaction. Cladding...

  9. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of technology. Management Performance reflects CASL's ability to meet its virtual one-roof plan (collocation), maintain consortium cohesion and chemistry, and deliver its...

  10. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    issues. The Science Council advises the following CASL Focus Areas (FAs): Radiation Transport Methods (RTM), Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM), Materials Performance and...

  11. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA) CASL's Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA) prediction of the reactor coolant enthalpy distribution in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) at hot full power (left, 3D quarter-core; right, the plane at the exit of the core). Read More An example of data transfer on a shared interface between two different spacer grid meshes using DTK An example of data transfer on a shared interface between two different spacer grid meshes using

  12. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Smith, T.M., M.A. Christon, E. Baglietto and H. Luo, "Assessment of Models for Near Wall ... Romano, P., N. Horelik, B.R. Herman, A.G. Nelson, B. Forget and K. Smith, "OpenMC: A ...

  13. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Report: CASL-2013-0215-000, October 24, 2013. O'Brien, C., Z. Rak and D. Brenner, Free Energies of (Co, Fe, Ni, Zn) Fe2O4 Spinels and Oxides in Water at High...

  14. COLLOQUIUM: CASL: Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Reactor Applications (VERA), incorporates science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and...

  15. Sandia Energy - Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light-Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    industry. VERA incorpor-ates coupled physics and science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, and modern computational architecture. It is being validated with...

  16. CONSORTIUM FOR ADVANCED SIMULATION OF LIGHT WATER REACTORS (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... - provide CASL papers , reports, and presentations CASL: ... 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2010 ... GSE SYSTEMS, INC. O&G Refinery Fossil - Coal Nuclear ...

  17. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on issues related to management, performance, strategic direction, and institutional interfaces within CASL. The CASL Director reports to the BOD on all matters related to CASL...

  18. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT )

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

  19. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 5. Advanced Power Electronics |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 5. Advanced Power Electronics 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 5. Advanced Power Electronics DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review PDF icon 2008_merit_review_5.pdf More Documents & Publications 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 14. Vehicle Systems and Simulation 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 13. Health Impacts 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 10. Fuels Technologies

  20. Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ape_06_lai.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses Electro-thermal-mechanical Simulation and Reliability for