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1

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR) Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR) Project Summary Full Title: Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR) Project ID: 108 Principal Investigator: Matthew Thornton Brief Description: ADVISOR is used to simulate and analyze conventional, advanced, light, and heavy vehicles, including hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles. Keywords: Hybrid electric vehicles (HEV); vehicle characteristics; vehicle performance; fuel consumption Purpose ADVISOR was designed as an analysis tool to assist the DOE in developing and understanding hybrid electric vehicles through the Hybrid Vehice Propulsion Systems contracts with Ford, GM, and DaimlerChrysler. Performer Principal Investigator: Matthew Thornton Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd.

2

Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results  

SciTech Connect

Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the potential development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a liquid metal cooled reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

3

Advanced Simulation and Computing  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NA-ASC-117R-09-Vol.1-Rev.0 NA-ASC-117R-09-Vol.1-Rev.0 Advanced Simulation and Computing PROGRAM PLAN FY09 October 2008 ASC Focal Point Robert Meisner, Director DOE/NNSA NA-121.2 202-586-0908 Program Plan Focal Point for NA-121.2 Njema Frazier DOE/NNSA NA-121.2 202-586-5789 A Publication of the Office of Advanced Simulation & Computing, NNSA Defense Programs i Contents Executive Summary ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 I. Introduction -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2 Realizing the Vision ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2 The Future of the Nuclear Weapons Complex ---------------------------------------------------------------- 2

4

Advanced Simulation Capability for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Simulation Capability for Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of perfor- mance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activi- ties throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing pro- grams as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science, Fossil Energy, and Nuclear Energy. Challenge Current groundwater and soil remediation challenges that will continue to be addressed in the next decade include

5

JIFT Workshop `Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics'at NIFS, Dec.14-16 Particle Simulation AnalysisParticle Simulation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JIFT Workshop `Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics'at NIFS, Dec.14-16 Particle Simulation)Hiroaki Ohtani 1,2), Nobuaki Ohno 3), Ritoku Horiuchi 1,2) 1National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS'at NIFS, Dec.14-16 ContentsContents · Introduction ­ Virtual Realityy · Application to Magnetic

Ito, Atsushi

6

Advisor 2.0: A Second-Generation Advanced Vehicle Simulator for Systems Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has recently publicly released its second-generation advanced vehicle simulator called ADVISOR 2.0. This software program was initially developed four years ago, and after several years of in-house usage and evolution, the tool is now available to the public through a new vehicle systems analysis World Wide Web page. ADVISOR has been applied to many different systems analysis problems, such as helping to develop the SAE J1711 test procedure for hybrid vehicles and helping to evaluate new technologies as part of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) technology selection process. The model has been and will continue to be benchmarked and validated with other models and with real vehicle test data. After two months of being available on the Web, more than 100 users have downloaded ADVISOR. ADVISOR 2.0 has many new features, including an easy-to-use graphical user interface, a detailed exhaust aftertreatment thermal model, and complete browser-based documentation. Future work will include adding to the library of components available in ADVISOR, including optimization functionality, and linking with a more detailed fuel cell model.

Wipke, K.; Cuddy, M.; Bharathan, D.; Burch, S.; Johnson, V.; Markel, A.; Sprik, S.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

7

Using Process/CFD Co-Simulation for the Design and Analysis of Advanced Energy Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this presentation we describe the major features and capabilities of NETLs Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) and highlight its application to advanced energy systems, ranging from small fuel cell systems to commercial-scale power plants including the coal-fired, gasification-based electricity and hydrogen plant in the DOEs $1 billion, 10-year FutureGen demonstration project. APECS is an integrated software suite which allows the process and energy industries to optimize overall plant performance with respect to complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena by combining process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus) with high-fidelity equipment simulations based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models (e.g., FLUENT).

Zitney, S.E.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Advancing lighting and daylighting simulation: The transition from analysis to design aid tools  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores three significant software development requirements for making the transition from stand-alone lighting simulation/analysis tools to simulation-based design aid tools. These requirements include specialized lighting simulation engines, facilitated methods for creating detailed simulatable building descriptions, an automated techniques for providing lighting design guidance. Initial computer implementations meant to address each of these requirements are discussed to further elaborate these requirements and to illustrate work-in-progress.

Hitchcock, R.J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Advanced Modeling & Simulation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Modeling & Simulation Advanced Modeling & Simulation Advanced Modeling & Simulation Advanced Modeling & Simulation ADVANCING THE STATE OF THE ART Innovation advances science. Historically, innovation resulted almost exclusively from fundamental theories combined with observation and experimentation over time. With advancements in engineering, computing power and visualization tools, scientists from all disciplines are gaining insights into physical systems in ways not possible with traditional approaches alone. Modeling and simulation has a long history with researchers and scientists exploring nuclear energy technologies. In fact, the existing fleet of currently operating reactors was licensed with computational tools that were produced or initiated in the 1970s. Researchers and scientists in

10

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of performance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activities throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing programs as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science,

11

Advanced PFBC transient analysis  

SciTech Connect

Transient modeling and analysis of advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems is a research area that is currently under investigation by the US Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC). The object of the effort is to identify key operating parameters that affect plant performance and then quantify the basic response of major sub-systems to changes in operating conditions. PC-TRAX{trademark}, a commercially available dynamic software program, was chosen and applied in this modeling and analysis effort. This paper describes the development of a series of TRAX-based transient models of advanced PFBC power plants. These power plants burn coal or other suitable fuel in a PFBC, and the high temperature flue gas supports low-Btu fuel gas or natural gas combustion in a gas turbine topping combustor. When it is utilized, the low-Btu fuel gas is produced in a bubbling bed carbonizer. High temperature, high pressure combustion products exiting the topping combustor are expanded in a modified gas turbine to generate electrical power. Waste heat from the system is used to raise and superheat steam for a reheat steam turbine bottoming cycle that generates additional electrical power. Basic control/instrumentation models were developed and modeled in PC-TRAX and used to investigate off-design plant performance. System performance for various transient conditions and control philosophies was studied.

White, J.S. [Parsons Power Group, Inc., Reading, PA (United States); Bonk, D.L. [USDOE Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Advanced PFBC transient analysis  

SciTech Connect

Transient modeling and analysis of Advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems is a research area that is currently under investigative study by the United States Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The object of the effort is to identify key operating parameters affecting plant performance and then quantify the basic response of major sub-systems to changes in operating conditions. PC-TRAX, a commercially available dynamic software program, was chosen and applied in this modeling and analysis effort. This paper summarizes and describes the development of a series of TRAX-based transient models of Advanced PFBC power plants. These power plants generate a high temperature flue gas by burning coal or other suitable fuel in a PFBC. The high temperature flue gas supports low-Btu fuel gas or natural gas combustion in a gas turbine topping combustor. When utilized, low-Btu fuel gas is produced in a bubbling bed carbonizer. High temperature, high pressure combustion products exiting the topping combustor are expanded in a modified gas turbine to generate electrical power. Waste heat from the system is used to generate and superheat steam for a reheat steam turbine bottoming cycle that generates additional electrical power. Basic control/instrumentation models were developed and modeled in PC-TRAX and used to investigate off-design plant performance. System performance for various transient conditions and control philosophies was studied.

White, J.S. [Parsons Power Group, Inc., Reading, PA (United States); Bonk, D.L.; Rogers, L. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Operations Analysis - Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas of interest Experiments and analysis of APS accelerator beams Commissioning and operations software Accelerator simulation and simulation codes Design of...

14

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements The purpose of the NEAMS Software V&V Plan is to define what the NEAMS program expects in terms of V&V for the computational models that are developed under NEAMS. NEAMS Software Verification and Validation Plan Requirements Version 0.pdf More Documents & Publications NEAMS Quarterly Report for January-March 2013 Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program Plan CRAD, Assessment Criteria and Guidelines for Determining the Adequacy of Software Used in the Safety Analysis and Design of Defense Nuclear Facilities

15

Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: APECS Agency/Company /Organization: National Energy Technology Laboratory Partner: ANSYS Sector: Energy Focus Area: Industry Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/coalpower/advresearch/apecs.html APECS Screenshot References: APECS Homepage[1] Logo: APECS Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) is an innovative software tool that provides process/equipment co-simulation capabilities for model-based decision support in steady-state process design and optimization. Developed by NETL, ANSYS, and other research partners, the Advanced Process

16

Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) (Redirected from APECS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: APECS Agency/Company /Organization: National Energy Technology Laboratory Partner: ANSYS Sector: Energy Focus Area: Industry Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/coalpower/advresearch/apecs.html APECS Screenshot References: APECS Homepage[1] Logo: APECS Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) is an innovative software tool that provides process/equipment co-simulation capabilities for model-based decision support in steady-state process design and optimization. Developed by NETL, ANSYS, and other research partners, the Advanced Process

17

An advanced fuel cell simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cell power generation systems provide a clean alternative to the conventional fossil fuel based systems. Fuel cell systems have a high e?ciency and use easily available hydrocarbons like methane. Moreover, since the by-product is water, they have a very low environmental impact. The fuel cell system consists of several subsystems requiring a lot of e?ort from engineers in diverse areas. Fuel cell simulators can provide a convenient and economic alternative for testing the electrical subsystems such as converters and inverters. This thesis proposes a low-cost and an easy-to-use fuel cell simulator using a programmable DC supply along with a control module written in LabVIEW. This simulator reproduces the electrical characteristics of a 5kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack under various operating conditions. The experimental results indicate that the proposed simulator closely matches the voltage-current characteristic of the SOFC system under varying load conditions. E?ects of non-electrical parameters like hydrogen ?ow rate are also modeled and these parameters are taken as dynamic inputs from the user. The simulator is customizable through a graphical user interface and allows the user to model other types of fuel cells with the respective voltage-current data. The simulator provides an inexpensive and accurate representation of a solid oxide fuel cell under steady state and transient conditions and can replace an actual fuel cell during testing of power conditioning equipment.

Acharya, Prabha Ramchandra

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Advanced Process Engineering Co-simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 AdvAnced Process engineering co-simulAtion Description The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and its R&D collaboration partners are developing the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) as an innovative software tool that combines process simulation with high-fidelity equipment models based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Winner of a 2004 R&D 100 Award and a 2007 Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Excellence in Technology Transfer Award, this powerful co-simulation technology, for the first time, provides the necessary level of detail and accuracy essential for engineers to analyze and optimize the coupled fluid flow, heat and mass transfer, and chemical reactions that drive overall plant performance. Combined with advanced visualization and high-performance computing,

19

Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Complex Networked Systems: A Program Plan for DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many complex systems of importance to the U.S. Department of Energy consist of networks of discrete components. Examples are cyber networks, such as the internet and local area networks over which nearly all DOE scientific, technical and administrative data must travel, the electric power grid, social networks whose behavior can drive energy demand, and biological networks such as genetic regulatory networks and metabolic networks. In spite of the importance of these complex networked systems to all aspects of DOE's operations, the scientific basis for understanding these systems lags seriously behind the strong foundations that exist for the 'physically-based' systems usually associated with DOE research programs that focus on such areas as climate modeling, fusion energy, high-energy and nuclear physics, nano-science, combustion, and astrophysics. DOE has a clear opportunity to develop a similarly strong scientific basis for understanding the structure and dynamics of networked systems by supporting a strong basic research program in this area. Such knowledge will provide a broad basis for, e.g., understanding and quantifying the efficacy of new security approaches for computer networks, improving the design of computer or communication networks to be more robust against failures or attacks, detecting potential catastrophic failure on the power grid and preventing or mitigating its effects, understanding how populations will respond to the availability of new energy sources or changes in energy policy, and detecting subtle vulnerabilities in large software systems to intentional attack. This white paper outlines plans for an aggressive new research program designed to accelerate the advancement of the scientific basis for complex networked systems of importance to the DOE. It will focus principally on four research areas: (1) understanding network structure, (2) understanding network dynamics, (3) predictive modeling and simulation for complex networked systems, and (4) design, situational awareness and control of complex networks. The program elements consist of a group of Complex Networked Systems Research Institutes (CNSRI), tightly coupled to an associated individual-investigator-based Complex Networked Systems Basic Research (CNSBR) program. The CNSRI's will be principally located at the DOE National Laboratories and are responsible for identifying research priorities, developing and maintaining a networked systems modeling and simulation software infrastructure, operating summer schools, workshops and conferences and coordinating with the CNSBR individual investigators. The CNSBR individual investigator projects will focus on specific challenges for networked systems. Relevancy of CNSBR research to DOE needs will be assured through the strong coupling provided between the CNSBR grants and the CNSRI's.

Brown, D L

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors CESAR: Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors CESAR is an interdisciplinary center for developing an innovative, next-generation nuclear reactor analysis tool that both utilizes and guides the development of exascale computing platforms. Existing reactor analysis codes are highly tuned and calibrated for commercial light-water reactors, but they lack the physics fidelity to seamlessly carry over to new classes of reactors with significantly different design characteristics-as, for example, innovative concepts such as TerraPower's Traveling Wave reactor and Small Modular Reactor concepts. Without vastly improved modeling capabilities, the economic and safety characteristics of these and other novel systems will require tremendous

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facebook Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Advanced Simulation and Computing Advanced Simulation and Computing Taking on the World's Complex Challenges Advancing Science Frontiers Our research is producing new scientific insights about the world in which we live and assists in certifying the safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. Technology Provides the Tools Growth in data and the software and hardware demands needed for physics-based answers and predictive capabilities are driving technology improvements. We could not achieve the breakthroughs we're making without these important tools. Partnerships Accelerate Innovation Partnerships leverage talent and multiply the effectiveness of our research efforts. Impacting Global Issues ASC software and hardware tools solve global issues ranging from nuclear

22

Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer drilling tests, as well as single impact tests, have been designed and executed. Both Berea sandstone and Mancos shale samples are used. In single impact tests, three impacts are sequentially loaded at the same rock location to investigate rock response to repetitive loadings. The crater depth and width are measured as well as the displacement and force in the rod and the force in the rock. Various pressure differences across the rock-indentor interface (i.e. bore pressure minus pore pressure) are used to investigate the pressure effect on rock penetration. For hammer drilling tests, an industrial fluid hammer is used to drill under both underbalanced and overbalanced conditions. Besides calibrating the modeling tool, the data and cuttings collected from the tests indicate several other important applications. For example, different rock penetrations during single impact tests may reveal why a fluid hammer behaves differently with diverse rock types and under various pressure conditions at the hole bottom. On the other hand, the shape of the cuttings from fluid hammer tests, comparing to those from traditional rotary drilling methods, may help to identify the dominant failure mechanism that percussion drilling relies on. If so, encouraging such a failure mechanism may improve hammer performance. The project is summarized in this report. Instead of compiling the information contained in the previous quarterly or other technical reports, this report focuses on the descriptions of tasks, findings, and conclusions, as well as the efforts on promoting percussion drilling technologies to industries including site visits, presentations, and publications. As a part of the final deliveries, the 3D numerical model for rock mechanics is also attached.

Michael S. Bruno

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

NEAMS ToolKit: advanced computational tools for modeling & simulation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEAMS ToolKit: advanced computational tools for modeling & simulation of advanced reactor systems Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures &...

24

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Title Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2008 Authors Phadke, Amol, Charles A....

25

Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets (CSAR): Gallery of Images from Advanced Rockets Simulations  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets (CSAR) is one of five university-based Centers of Excellence founded in 1997 and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Simulation and Computing program, whose objective is to enable accurate prediction of the performance, reliability, and safety of complex physical systems through computational simulation. CSAR's mission is to achieve this goal in the specific context of solid propellant rockets, which are of vital importance to the space launch industry. A particular focus for CSAR is on the reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM) that powers the U.S. Space Shuttle.

26

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and...

27

Advanced Modeling and Simulation Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Modeling & Simulation » Advanced Modeling Advanced Modeling & Simulation » Advanced Modeling and Simulation Documents Advanced Modeling and Simulation Documents October 30, 2013 NEAMS Quarterly Report April-June 2013 The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) quarterly report includes highlights, fuel and reactor product line accomplishments, recent and upcoming milestones, news on BISON fuel benchmarks, the latest MeshKit release features, and information on numerical simulations of pebble-bed reactor cores performed by the thermal hydraulics team. September 9, 2013 Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan Requirements The purpose of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Plan is to define what the NEAMS

28

Computational Modeling and Simulation of Advanced Materials for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Computational Modeling and Simulation of Advanced Materials for Energy Applications. Sponsorship, TMS/ASM: Computational Materials Science...

29

Gasification CFD Modeling for Advanced Power Plant Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we have described recent progress on developing CFD models for two commercial-scale gasifiers, including a two-stage, coal slurry-fed, oxygen-blown, pressurized, entrained-flow gasifier and a scaled-up design of the PSDF transport gasifier. Also highlighted was NETLs Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator for coupling high-fidelity equipment models with process simulation for the design, analysis, and optimization of advanced power plants. Using APECS, we have coupled the entrained-flow gasifier CFD model into a coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant. The results for the FutureGen co-simulation illustrate how the APECS technology can help engineers better understand and optimize gasifier fluid dynamics and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance.

Zitney, S.E.; Guenther, C.P.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-1248E Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Principal Authors Amol Phadke1 , Charles;Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis ii LBNL-1248E Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. #12;#12;Advanced Coal

31

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : gap analysis for high fidelity and performance assessment code development.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a gap analysis performed in the process of developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with rigorous verification, validation, and software quality requirements. The gap analyses documented in this report were are performed during an initial gap analysis to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC, and during follow-on activities that delved into more detailed assessments of the various codes that were acquired, studied, and tested. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. The gap analysis indicates that significant capabilities may already exist in the existing THC codes although there is no single code able to fully account for all physical and chemical processes involved in a waste disposal system. Large gaps exist in modeling chemical processes and their couplings with other processes. The coupling of chemical processes with flow transport and mechanical deformation remains challenging. The data for extreme environments (e.g., for elevated temperature and high ionic strength media) that are needed for repository modeling are severely lacking. In addition, most of existing reactive transport codes were developed for non-radioactive contaminants, and they need to be adapted to account for radionuclide decay and in-growth. The accessibility to the source codes is generally limited. Because the problems of interest for the Waste IPSC are likely to result in relatively large computational models, a compact memory-usage footprint and a fast/robust solution procedure will be needed. A robust massively parallel processing (MPP) capability will also be required to provide reasonable turnaround times on the analyses that will be performed with the code. A performance assessment (PA) calculation for a waste disposal system generally requires a large number (hundreds to thousands) of model simulations to quantify the effect of model parameter uncertainties on the predicted repository performance. A set of codes for a PA calculation must be sufficiently robust and fast in terms of code execution. A PA system as a whole must be able to provide multiple alternative models for a specific set of physical/chemical processes, so that the users can choose various levels of modeling complexity based on their modeling needs. This requires PA codes, preferably, to be highly modularized. Most of the existing codes have difficulties meeting these requirements. Based on the gap analysis results, we have made the following recommendations for the code selection and code development for the NEAMS waste IPSC: (1) build fully coupled high-fidelity THCMBR codes using the existing SIERRA codes (e.g., ARIA and ADAGIO) and platform, (2) use DAKOTA to build an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS), and build a modular code architecture and key code modules for performance assessments. The key chemical calculation modules will be built by expanding the existing CANTERA capabilities as well as by extracting useful components from other existing codes.

Lee, Joon H.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Dewers, Thomas A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Fuller, Timothy J.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wang, Yifeng

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Simulation and performance analysis of basic GAX and advanced GAX cycles with ammonia/water and ammonia/water/LiBr absorption fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) and branched GAX cycles are generally considered with NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O as their working fluid. The potential consequences of using a ternary mixture of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr (advanced fluids) in the GAX and Branched GAX (advanced cycles) are discussed in this study. A modular steady state absorption simulation model(ABSIM) was used to investigate the potential of combining the above advanced cycles with the advanced fluids. ABSIM is capable of modeling varying cycle configurations with different working fluids. Performance parameters of the cycles, including coefficient of performance (COP) and heat duties, were investigated as functions of different operating parameters in the cooling mode for both the NH {sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary and the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary mixtures. High performance potential of GAX and branched GAX cycles using the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary fluid mixture was achieved especially at the high range of firing temperatures exceeding 400{degrees}F. The cooling COP`s have been improved by approximately 21% over the COP achieved with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary mixtures. These results show the potential of using advanced cycles with advanced fluid mixtures (ternary or quaternary fluid mixtures).

Zaltash, A.; Grossman, G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Software Framework for Advanced Power Plant Simulations  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work accomplished during the Phase II development effort of the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The objective of the project is to develop the tools to efficiently combine high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models with process modeling software. During the course of the project, a robust integration controller was developed that can be used in any CAPE-OPEN compliant process modeling environment. The controller mediates the exchange of information between the process modeling software and the CFD software. Several approaches to reducing the time disparity between CFD simulations and process modeling have been investigated and implemented. These include enabling the CFD models to be run on a remote cluster and enabling multiple CFD models to be run simultaneously. Furthermore, computationally fast reduced-order models (ROMs) have been developed that can be 'trained' using the results from CFD simulations and then used directly within flowsheets. Unit operation models (both CFD and ROMs) can be uploaded to a model database and shared between multiple users.

John Widmann; Sorin Munteanu; Aseem Jain; Pankaj Gupta; Mark Moales; Erik Ferguson; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Yi-dong Lang; Larry Biegler; Michael Locke; Simon Lingard; Jay Yun

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

NEAMS: The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEAMS: The Nuclear Energy Advanced NEAMS: The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Program The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program is developing a simulation tool kit using leading-edge computational methods that will accelerate the development and deployment of nuclear power technologies that employ enhanced safety and security features, produce power more cost-effectively, and utilize natural resources more efficiently. The NEAMS ToolKit

35

Chombo-Crunch: Advanced Simulation of Subsurface Flow and Reactive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chombo-Crunch: Advanced Simulation of Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport Processes Associated with Carbon Sequestration PI Name: David Trebotich Institution: Lawrence Berkeley...

36

Advanced simulations of building energy and control systems with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Development Contact Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Advanced simulations of building energy and control systems with an example of chilled water plant modeling Title...

37

Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR(tm)) Facility NETL Office of Research and Development Project...

38

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR(tm)) Facility Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTAR(tm)) Facility Project No: Adv Gas-FY131415 Task 6 Developed as a part of NETL's initiative to advance new clean coal technology, the Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research (AVESTARTM) Center is focused on training engineers and energy plant operators in the efficient, productive, and safe operation of highly efficient power generation systems that also protect the environment. Comprehensive dynamic simulator-based instruction better prepares operators and engineers to manage advanced energy plants according to economic constraints while minimizing or avoiding the impact of any potentially harmful, wasteful, or inefficient events. Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research Center - AVESTAR

39

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management  

Multi-Process High Performance Computing Simulator Modular simulation capability for barrier and waste form degradation, multiphase flow and reactive ...

40

The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Title Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-1248E Year of Publication 2008 Authors...

42

EM Leads with Advanced Simulation Capability Technology | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with Advanced Simulation Capability Technology with Advanced Simulation Capability Technology EM Leads with Advanced Simulation Capability Technology April 4, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Figure 1: Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management Thrust Areas. Figure 1: Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management Thrust Areas. Figure 2: Spatial distribution of technetium-99 after the releases from the BC cribs using VisIt software on the Hanford Central Plateau. Figure 2: Spatial distribution of technetium-99 after the releases from the BC cribs using VisIt software on the Hanford Central Plateau. Figure 3: Conceptual model of uranium attenuation processes in the Savannah River F Area Seepage Basins plume, including adsorption/desorption (1); dissolution/precipitation (2); mixing/dilution (3); aqueous reactions (4); microbial interactions (5); and abiotic organic interactions (6).

43

DOE Simulator Training to Brazil's Petrobas Advances Goal of Deploying  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Simulator Training to Brazil's Petrobas Advances Goal of DOE Simulator Training to Brazil's Petrobas Advances Goal of Deploying Clean Coal Technology at Home and Abroad DOE Simulator Training to Brazil's Petrobas Advances Goal of Deploying Clean Coal Technology at Home and Abroad September 25, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A recently-completed comprehensive Department of Energy (DOE) training initiative using an innovative high-fidelity combined-cycle dynamic simulator has provided employees of a Brazilian multi-national company the opportunity to learn to operate and control the near-zero-emission power plants critical to a cleaner energy future. The 8-day course for power plant operators from Petrobras used a simulator from the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-sponsored AVESTAR™ (Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research) Center.

44

Risk Analysis and Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis and Simulation Analysis and Simulation for Geologic Storage of CO 2 BEST PRACTICES for: 2013 Revised Edition Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The

45

Applied, Advanced X-ray Tracing Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, O. Advanced Neutron and Synchrotron Studies of Materials .... Status of China Spallation Neutron Source and Perspectives of Neutron Research in...

46

Advanced Characterization, Testing, and Simulation Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our Mission: The science and engineering of advanced methods for ... and modeling of mechanical properties, and development of computational tools for...

47

Co-Simulation for Advanced Process Design and Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meeting the increasing demand for clean, affordable, and secure energy is arguably the most important challenge facing the world today. Fossil fuels can play a central role in a portfolio of carbon-neutral energy options provided CO{sub 2} emissions can be dramatically reduced by capturing CO{sub 2} and storing it safely and effectively. Fossil energy industry faces the challenge of meeting aggressive design goals for next-generation power plants with CCS. Process designs will involve large, highly-integrated, and multipurpose systems with advanced equipment items with complex geometries and multiphysics. APECS is enabling software to facilitate effective integration, solution, and analysis of high-fidelity process/equipment (CFD) co-simulations. APECS helps to optimize fluid flow and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance. APECS offers many advanced capabilities including ROMs, design optimization, parallel execution, stochastic analysis, and virtual plant co-simulations. NETL and its collaborative R&D partners are using APECS to reduce the time, cost, and technical risk of developing high-efficiency, zero-emission power plants with CCS.

Stephen E. Zitney

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis & Evaluation Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Analysis and Evaluation Team Lee Slezak Manager, AVTAET Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems Analysis Workshop July 28-29, 2004 Washington, D.C. 2 Charter * AVTAET's mission is to develop and apply the tools and skills necessary to: - Identify technology development needs and requirements to support OFCVT goals and - Collect, analyze, and disseminate unbiased information on advanced transportation technology components, systems, and vehicles that potentially support OFCVT goals. * Goal of analytical groups at ANL, NREL and ORNL - Develop and apply modeling and simulation tools to help DOE, manufacturers and suppliers design and develop clean, energy efficient components and systems for

49

Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Advanced reservoir simulation using soft computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reservoir simulation is a challenging problem for the oil and gas industry. A correctly calibrated reservoir simulator provides an effective tool for reservoir evaluation that can be used to obtain essential reservoir information. A long-standing problem ... Keywords: fuzzy control, history matching, parallel processing, reservoir simulation

G. Janoski; F.-S. Li; M. Pietrzyk; A. H. Sung; S.-H. Chang; R. B. Grigg

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Integrating advanced materials simulation techniques into an ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extension to this work, allowing the co-refinement of x-ray scattering data from the Advanced Photon Source (APS) with data from the SNS, will also be briefly...

52

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation and Computing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tools for innovative product engineering. Engineering Physics Integrated Codes Sierra Mechanics Sierra is Sandia's engineering mechanics simulation code suite. This suite includes...

53

Advances in NLTE Modeling for Integrated Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last few years have seen significant progress in constructing the atomic models required for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) simulations. Along with this has come an increased understanding of the requirements for accurately modeling the ionization balance, energy content and radiative properties of different elements for a wide range of densities and temperatures. Much of this progress is the result of a series of workshops dedicated to comparing the results from different codes and computational approaches applied to a series of test problems. The results of these workshops emphasized the importance of atomic model completeness, especially in doubly excited states and autoionization transitions, to calculating ionization balance, and the importance of accurate, detailed atomic data to producing reliable spectra. We describe a simple screened-hydrogenic model that calculates NLTE ionization balance with surprising accuracy, at a low enough computational cost for routine use in radiation-hydrodynamics codes. The model incorporates term splitting, {Delta}n = 0 transitions, and approximate UTA widths for spectral calculations, with results comparable to those of much more detailed codes. Simulations done with this model have been increasingly successful at matching experimental data for laser-driven systems and hohlraums. Accurate and efficient atomic models are just one requirement for integrated NLTE simulations. Coupling the atomic kinetics to hydrodynamics and radiation transport constrains both discretizations and algorithms to retain energy conservation, accuracy and stability. In particular, the strong coupling between radiation and populations can require either very short timesteps or significantly modified radiation transport algorithms to account for NLTE material response. Considerations such as these continue to provide challenges for NLTE simulations.

Scott, H A; Hansen, S B

2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

54

GEOTEMP2. Advanced Wellbore Thermal Simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GEOTEMP2, which is based on the earlier GEOTEMP program, is a wellbore thermal simulator designed for geothermal well drilling and production applications. The code treats natural and forced convection and conduction within the wellbore and heat conduction within the surrounding rock matrix. A variety of well operations can be modeled including injection, production, forward and reverse circulation with gas or liquid, gas or liquid drilling, and two-phase steam injection and production. Well completion with several different casing sizes and cement intervals can be modeled. The code allows variables, such as flow rate, to change with time enabling a realistic treatment of well operations. Provision is made in the flow equations to allow the flow areas of the tubing to vary with depth in the wellbore. Multiple liquids can exist in GEOTEMP2 simulations. Liquid interfaces are tracked through the tubing and annulus as one liquid displaces another. GEOTEMP2, however, does not attempt to simulate displacement of liquids with a gas or two-phase steam or vice versa. This means that it is not possible to simulate an operation where the type of drilling fluid changes, e.g. mud going to air. GEOTEMP2 was designed primarily for use in predicting the behavior of geothermal wells, but it is flexible enough to handle many typical drilling, production, and injection problems in the oil industry as well. However, GEOTEMP2 does not allow the modeling of gas-filled annuli in production or injection problems. In gas or mist drilling, no radiation losses are included in the energy balance. No attempt is made to model flow in the formation. Average execution time is 50 CP seconds on a CDC CYBER170. This edition of GEOTEMP2 is designated as Version 2.0 by the contributors.

Mitchell, R.F. [Enertech Engineering and Research Co., Houston, TX (United States); Monday, L.A.; Duda, L.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Set ­ Models · Conventional, hybrid and electric vehicles · Fuel consumption and performanceAdvanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Team Lee Slezak Manager, AVTAET Office · Supports HIL/RCP · Fuel cell models ­ Net power vs. fuel consumption ­ Engineering · ADvanced Vehicle

56

Operations Analysis - Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

401-B2205 9700 S. Cass Avenue FAX number: 5703 Argonne, IL 60439 Email Internet: xiaoam@aps.anl.gov Areas of interest Design and simulation of damping rings for linear colliders....

57

Advanced materials: Information and analysis needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of a study to identify the types of information and analysis that are needed for advanced materials. The project was sponsored by the US Bureau of Mines (BOM). It includes a conceptual description of information needs for advanced materials and the development and implementation of a questionnaire on the same subject. This report identifies twelve fundamental differences between advanced and traditional materials and discusses the implications of these differences for data and analysis needs. Advanced and traditional materials differ significantly in terms of physical and chemical properties. Advanced material properties can be customized more easily. The production of advanced materials may differ from traditional materials in terms of inputs, the importance of by-products, the importance of different processing steps (especially fabrication), and scale economies. The potential for change in advanced materials characteristics and markets is greater and is derived from the marriage of radically different materials and processes. In addition to the conceptual study, a questionnaire was developed and implemented to assess the opinions of people who are likely users of BOM information on advanced materials. The results of the questionnaire, which was sent to about 1000 people, generally confirm the propositions set forth in the conceptual part of the study. The results also provide data on the categories of advanced materials and the types of information that are of greatest interest to potential users. 32 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

Curlee, T.R.; Das, S.; Lee, R.; Trumble, D.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Time parallelization of advanced operation scenario simulations of ITER plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work demonstrates that simulations of advanced burning plasma operation scenarios can be successfully parallelized in time using the parareal algorithm. CORSICA - an advanced operation scenario code for tokamak plasmas is used as a test case. This is a unique application since the parareal algorithm has so far been applied to relatively much simpler systems except for the case of turbulence. In the present application, a computational gain of an order of magnitude has been achieved which is extremely promising. A successful implementation of the Parareal algorithm to codes like CORSICA ushers in the possibility of time efficient simulations of ITER plasmas.

Samaddar, D. [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Casper, T. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Kim, S. H. [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Berry, Lee A [ORNL; Elwasif, Wael R [ORNL; Batchelor, Donald B [ORNL; Houlberg, Wayne A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit (ACTS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Distinctively, a number of these are important scientific problems ranging in scale from the atomic to the cosmic. For example, ionization is a phenomenon as ubiquitous in modern society as the glow of fluorescent lights and the etching on silicon computer chips; but it was not until 1999 that researchers finally achieved a complete numerical solution to the simplest example of ionization, the collision of a hydrogen atom with an electron. On the opposite scale, cosmologists have long wondered whether the expansion of the Universe, which began with the Big Bang, would ever reverse itself, ending the Universe in a Big Crunch. In 2000, analysis of new measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation showed that the geometry of the Universe is flat, and thus the Universe will continue expanding forever. Both of these discoveries depended on high performance computer simulations that utilized computational tools included in the Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit. The ACTS Toolkit is an umbrella project that brought together a number of general purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools, which have been developed independently, mainly at DOE laboratories, make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS Toolkit Project enables the use of these tools by a much wider community of computational scientists, and promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts, and tool maturity. This paper presents a brief introduction to the functionality available in ACTS.

Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

60

Applying advanced simulation in early stage unconventional ship design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed description of the first, or global, optimization stage of two-stage hydrodynamic optimization framework for high-speed vessels is presented. A key feature of the framework is the application of advanced simulation in the early phases of design ... Keywords: early-stage design, high-speed vessel, optimization, ship design, surrogate model

Matthew Collette; Woei-Min Lin; Jun Li

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

TRANSIMS: Transportation analysis and simulation system  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the TRansportation ANalysis and SIMulation System (TRANSIMS) Project, the system`s major modules, and the project`s near-term plans. TRANSIMS will employ advanced computational and analytical techniques to create an integrated regional transportation systems analysis environment. The simulation environment will include a regional population of individual travelers and freight loads with travel activities and plans, whose individual interactions will be simulated on the transportation system, and whose environmental impact will be determined. We will develop an interim operational capability (IOC) for each major TRANSIMS module during the five-year program. When the IOC is ready, we will complete a specific case study to confirm the IOC features, applicability, and readiness.

Smith, L.; Beckman, R.; Baggerly, K. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

FY 2006 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AdvAnced vehicle Technology AdvAnced vehicle Technology AnAlysis And evAluATion AcTiviTies U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2006 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities Submitted to: U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Lee Slezak, Technology Manager Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities FY 2006 Annual Report CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................................ 1 II. MODELING AND SIMULATION ................................................................................................ 9

63

Simulation aids cogeneration system analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cogeneration systems using gas turbines and heat-recovery steam generators (HRSGs) are widely used in chemical process industries (CPI) plants. Because these plants are quite expensive and the HRSG is an important part of the system, it is prudent to analyze the heat-recovery system or simulate its performance well in advance of finalizing plant specifications. Simulation is a method of predicting the performance of the HRSG under different operating modes and gas and steam conditions without physically designing the equipment. Such a study will provide the engineer with valuable information about the HRSG and its performance capabilities. The simulation results could influence the choice of steam system parameters and the selection of the steam or gas turbine. In addition, one may also obtain information about the performance of the HRSG and the cogeneration system. This article explains what HRSG simulation is and the basic methodology. Its applications are then illustrated through several examples.

Ganapathy, V.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Flow instabilities in the core and the coolant circuit of advances low-boiling light water reacto: classification of causes and development of simulator for the future analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coolant flow instability, apparent in the coolant mass flow fluctuations in the separate parallel heating channels and also in a closed loop of the primary circuit under some operating conditions, is observed in the core fuel assemblies of light water reactors. In some ways this phenomenon is identical with the fluctuations in the once-through steam generators pipes, and changes of the coolant mass flows and length of flow patterns are initiating this phenomenon. The parameters at the core output and the secondary circuit parameters have influence on each other. These parameter changes have significant influences on the operating processes, operating and control algorithms, operating and control system design, and reliability of the operating power plant's machines and equipment. Changes of heating surface temperatures, displacement borders of the flow patterns, and critical heat flux entail changes of the coolant flow parameters, finally causing changes of the initial primary system parameters due to closed loop system feedback. In turn, these cause over-circuit instability in the reactor. Core power generation changes are carried out by means of influencing the nuclear fission process through changing the multiplication factor. Additionally, these local side-to-side power irregularities in sub-zones may appear due to the influence of various hydrodynamic instabilities. The local side-to-side power in these sub-zones may differ significantly from each other. The aforesaid arguments are correct for the both light water reactor types. But, as is shown by our investigations and operational practice of low-boiling reactors, behavior of the core-circuit hydrodynamic system is significantly different from its behavior in the boiling or pressurized reactors with pumping circulation. The coolant flow regimes in typical reactors are defined through pump operating regimes and are not adjustable inside a certain power range. The objective of this thesis is to understand more precisely the influence and the nature of these phenomena. After analyzing the problem from different points of view and showing the necessity of its comprehensive understanding, we present recommendations for engineering solutions and plans for further investigations. We will try to determine limits of their reliable practical application with modern low-to-medium power reactor design and investigate this dynamic system behavior. Finally, it is necessary to take into consideration not separate phenomena, but their complex influence on the whole primary system (i.e. a kind of macro-system is examined without being separated into its individual elements). But, the analysis of every phenomenon is fulfilled separately and a process of formation of a block-scheme, consisting of several sub-systems, is given in this thesis. The final block-scheme is presented as a simulator model, taking into consideration design components chosen for the analysis of system dynamics as the first step of model development.

Rezvyi, Aleksey

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Lessons Learned From Dynamic Simulations of Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect

Years of performing dynamic simulations of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options provide insights into how they could work and how one might transition from the current once-through fuel cycle. This paper summarizes those insights from the context of the 2005 objectives and goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Our intent is not to compare options, assess options versus those objectives and goals, nor recommend changes to those objectives and goals. Rather, we organize what we have learned from dynamic simulations in the context of the AFCI objectives for waste management, proliferation resistance, uranium utilization, and economics. Thus, we do not merely describe lessons learned from dynamic simulations but attempt to answer the so what question by using this context. The analyses have been performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics (VISION). We observe that the 2005 objectives and goals do not address many of the inherently dynamic discriminators among advanced fuel cycle options and transitions thereof.

Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (heavy) simulation. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer program to simulate hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (HEAVY) is described. It is intended for use early in the design process: concept evaluation, alternative comparison, preliminary design, control and management strategy development, component sizing, and sensitivity studies. It allows the designer to quickly, conveniently, and economically predict the performance of a proposed drive train. The user defines the system to be simulated using a library of predefined component models that may be connected to represent a wide variety of propulsion systems. The development of three models are discussed as examples.

Hammond, R.A.; McGehee, R.K.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Advanced Analysis Software Key to New, Energy-Efficient ...  

Advanced Analysis Software Key to New, Energy-Efficient Technologies Leveraging Scientific and Engineering Know-How to Advance Sources of Renewable En ...

69

Advanced Analysis Software Key to New, Energy-Efficient ...  

Advanced Analysis Software Key to New, Energy-Efficient Technologies Leveraging Scientific and Engineering Know-How to Advance Sources of Renewable Energy

70

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coalfeasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation Computing: Verification &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Verification & Validation Verification & Validation high-fidelity simulations The Verification and Validation (V&V) program conducts two major activities at Sandia. The first is to perform assessments and studies that quantify confidence in Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) calculation results. The second activity develops and improves V&V and uncertainty quantification methods, metrics, and standards. Assessments This project area conducts studies and assessments for Sandia's engineering simulation focus areas (outlined below). These assessments quantify the prediction uncertainty of the engineering codes as they apply to applications in the four focus areas. Safety and Security This area focuses on engineering codes as they apply to nuclear weapon. External load prediction capability includes mechanical (impact, pressure,)

72

Advanced simulation capability for environmental management (ASCEM): An overview of initial results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security Adminis- tration (NNSA), Advanced Simulation andASCEM that were developed by NNSA-, EM-, and Basic Energy

Williamson, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energys Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.?

Freshley, M.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Freedman, V.; Agarwal, D.; Andre, B.; Bott, Y.; Chen, X.; Davis, J.; Faybishenko, B.; Gorton, I.; Murray, C.; Moulton, D.; Meyer, J.; Rockhold, M.; Shoshani, A.; Steefel, C.; Wainwright, H.; Waichler, S.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

74

EGR Distribution in Engine Cylinders Using Advanced Virtual Simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) is a well-known technology for reduction of NOx in diesel engines. With the demand for extremely low engine out NOx emissions, it is important to have a consistently balanced EGR flow to individual engine cylinders. Otherwise, the variation in the cylinders' NOx contribution to the overall engine emissions will produce unacceptable variability. This presentation will demonstrate the effective use of advanced virtual simulation in the development of a balanced EGR distribution in engine cylinders. An initial design is analyzed reflecting the variance in the EGR distribution, quantitatively and visually. Iterative virtual lab tests result in an optimized system.

Fan, Xuetong

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Sensitivity Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuel cycle economic analysis was performed on four fuel cycles to provide a baseline for initial cost comparison using the Gen IV Economic Modeling Work Group G4 ECON spreadsheet model, Decision Programming Language software, the 2006 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis report, industry cost data, international papers, the nuclear power related cost study from MIT, Harvard, and the University of Chicago. The analysis developed and compared the fuel cycle cost component of the total cost of energy for a wide range of fuel cycles including: once through, thermal with fast recycle, continuous fast recycle, and thermal recycle.

David Shropshire; Kent Williams; J.D. Smith; Brent Boore

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Advancement of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Payment  

SciTech Connect

EnergyPlus{sup TM} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE??s Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. The 5-year project was managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and was divided into 5 budget period between 2006 and 2011. During the project period, 11 versions of EnergyPlus were released. This report summarizes work performed by an EnergyPlus development team led by the University of Central Florida??s Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC). The team members consist of DHL Consulting, C. O. Pedersen Associates, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Oklahoma State University, GARD Analytics, Inc., and WrightSoft Corporation. The project tasks involved new feature development, testing and validation, user support and training, and general EnergyPlus support. The team developed 146 new features during the 5-year period to advance the EnergyPlus capabilities. Annual contributions of new features are 7 in budget period 1, 19 in period 2, 36 in period 3, 41 in period 4, and 43 in period 5, respectively. The testing and validation task focused on running test suite and publishing report, developing new IEA test suite cases, testing and validating new source code, addressing change requests, and creating and testing installation package. The user support and training task provided support for users and interface developers, and organized and taught workshops. The general support task involved upgrading StarTeam (team sharing) software and updating existing utility software. The project met the DOE objectives and completed all tasks successfully. Although the EnergyPlus software was enhanced significantly under this project, more enhancements are needed for further improvement to ensure that EnergyPlus is able to simulate the latest technologies and perform desired HAVC system operations for the development of next generation HVAC systems. Additional development will be performed under a new 5-year project managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Lixing Gu; Don Shirey; Richard Raustad; Bereket Nigusse; Chandan Sharma; Linda Lawrie; Rich Strand; Curt Pedersen; Dan Fisher; Edwin Lee; Mike Witte; Jason Glazer; Chip Barnaby

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

A Virtual Engineering Framework for Simulating Advanced Power System  

SciTech Connect

In this report is described the work effort performed to provide NETL with VE-Suite based Virtual Engineering software and enhanced equipment models to support NETL's Advanced Process Engineering Co-simulation (APECS) framework for advanced power generation systems. Enhancements to the software framework facilitated an important link between APECS and the virtual engineering capabilities provided by VE-Suite (e.g., equipment and process visualization, information assimilation). Model enhancements focused on improving predictions for the performance of entrained flow coal gasifiers and important auxiliary equipment (e.g., Air Separation Units) used in coal gasification systems. In addition, a Reduced Order Model generation tool and software to provide a coupling between APECS/AspenPlus and the GE GateCycle simulation system were developed. CAPE-Open model interfaces were employed where needed. The improved simulation capability is demonstrated on selected test problems. As part of the project an Advisory Panel was formed to provide guidance on the issues on which to focus the work effort. The Advisory Panel included experts from industry and academics in gasification, CO2 capture issues, process simulation and representatives from technology developers and the electric utility industry. To optimize the benefit to NETL, REI coordinated its efforts with NETL and NETL funded projects at Iowa State University, Carnegie Mellon University and ANSYS/Fluent, Inc. The improved simulation capabilities incorporated into APECS will enable researchers and engineers to better understand the interactions of different equipment components, identify weaknesses and processes needing improvement and thereby allow more efficient, less expensive plants to be developed and brought on-line faster and in a more cost-effective manner. These enhancements to APECS represent an important step toward having a fully integrated environment for performing plant simulation and engineering. Furthermore, with little effort the modeling capabilities described in this report can be extended to support other DOE programs, such as ultra super critical boiler development, oxy-combustion boiler development or modifications to existing plants to include CO2 capture and sequestration.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Stanislav Borodai

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

78

Engineering design and analysis of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies  

SciTech Connect

This project is sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for the Engineering Design and Analysis of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies. The major goal is to provide the simulation tools for modeling both conventional and advanced coal cleaning technologies. This DOE project is part of a major research initiative by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) aimed at advancing three advanced coal cleaning technologies-heavy-liquid cylconing, selective agglomeration, and advanced froth flotation through the proof-of-concept (POC) level.

1992-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

Advanced modeling and simulation to design and manufacture high performance and reliable advanced microelectronics and microsystems.  

SciTech Connect

An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers having broad expertise in materials processing and properties, materials characterization, and computational mechanics was assembled to develop science-based modeling/simulation technology to design and reproducibly manufacture high performance and reliable, complex microelectronics and microsystems. The team's efforts focused on defining and developing a science-based infrastructure to enable predictive compaction, sintering, stress, and thermomechanical modeling in ''real systems'', including: (1) developing techniques to and determining materials properties and constitutive behavior required for modeling; (2) developing new, improved/updated models and modeling capabilities, (3) ensuring that models are representative of the physical phenomena being simulated; and (4) assessing existing modeling capabilities to identify advances necessary to facilitate the practical application of Sandia's predictive modeling technology.

Nettleship, Ian (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Hinklin, Thomas; Holcomb, David Joseph; Tandon, Rajan; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr. (,; .); Dempsey, James Franklin; Ewsuk, Kevin Gregory; Neilsen, Michael K.; Lanagan, Michael (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

PRATHAM: Parallel Thermal Hydraulics Simulations using Advanced Mesoscopic Methods  

SciTech Connect

At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, efforts are under way to develop a 3D, parallel LBM code called PRATHAM (PaRAllel Thermal Hydraulic simulations using Advanced Mesoscopic Methods) to demonstrate the accuracy and scalability of LBM for turbulent flow simulations in nuclear applications. The code has been developed using FORTRAN-90, and parallelized using the message passing interface MPI library. Silo library is used to compact and write the data files, and VisIt visualization software is used to post-process the simulation data in parallel. Both the single relaxation time (SRT) and multi relaxation time (MRT) LBM schemes have been implemented in PRATHAM. To capture turbulence without prohibitively increasing the grid resolution requirements, an LES approach [5] is adopted allowing large scale eddies to be numerically resolved while modeling the smaller (subgrid) eddies. In this work, a Smagorinsky model has been used, which modifies the fluid viscosity by an additional eddy viscosity depending on the magnitude of the rate-of-strain tensor. In LBM, this is achieved by locally varying the relaxation time of the fluid.

Joshi, Abhijit S [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Mudrich, Jaime A [ORNL; Popov, Emilian L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Figures Figure ES-1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Basicviii Figure 1. Advanced-Coal Wind Hybrid: Basic29 Figure 9. Sensitivity to Coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Figures Figure ES-1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Basicviii Figure 1. Advanced-Coal Wind Hybrid: Basic21 Figure 6. Comparison of ACWH and CCGT-Wind

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Pursuing Energy Efficiency From Building Simulation to Portfolio Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pursuing Energy Efficiency From Building Simulation to Portfolio Analysis Pursuing Energy Efficiency From Building Simulation to Portfolio Analysis Speaker(s): Paul Mathew Date: January 4, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Stephen Wiel Dr. Mathew's presentation will describe two aspects of energy efficiency and sustainable design, viewed from the perspective of market transformation: 1. Building Simulation: case study on the use of detailed energy simulation for evaluating advanced building systems and building integrated energy systems, using DOE-2 and a CAD-integrated, heat-balance-based energy simulation tool developed by Dr. Mathew at CMU. 2. Energy Portfolio Analysis: a "curve-based" actuarial approach for modeling and valuing large portfolios of energy efficiency projects and tools that were developed at Enron to support this business strategy

84

Advanced coal gasifier designs using large-scale simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Porting of the legacy code MFIX to a high performance computer (HPC) and the use of high resolution simulations for the design of a coal gasifier are described here. MFIX is based on a continuum multiphase flow model that considers gas and solids to form interpenetrating continua. Low resolution simulations of a commercial scale gasifier with a validated MFIX model revealed interesting physical phenomena with implications on the gasifier design, which prompted the study reported here. To be predictive, the simulations need to model the spatiotemporal variations in gas and solids volume fractions, velocities, temperatures with any associated phase change and chemical reactions. These processes occur at various time- and length-scales requiring very high spatial resolution and large number of iterations with small time-steps. We were able to perform perhaps the largest known simulations of gas-solids reacting flows, providing detailed information about the gas-solids flow structure and the pressure, temperature and species distribution in the gasifier. One key finding is the new features of the coal jet trajectory revealed with the high spatial resolution, which provides information on the accuracy of the lower resolution simulations. Methodologies for effectively combining high and low resolution simulations for design studies must be developed. From a computational science perspective, we found that global communication has to be reduced to achieve scalability to 1000s of cores, hybrid parallelization is required to effectively utilize the multicore chips, and the wait time in the batch queue significantly increases the actual time-to-solution. From our experience, development is required in the following areas: efficient solvers for heterogeneous, massively parallel systems; data analysis tools to extract information from large data sets; and programming environments for easily porting legacy codes to HPC.

Syamlal, M [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Guenther, Chris [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Gel, Aytekin [Aeolus Research Inc.; Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high-fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation, a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet tranformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

Heinz Pitsch

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Development of a GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager Solar Channel Radiance Simulator for Ice Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of an ice cloud radiance simulator for the anticipated Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R (GOES-R) Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) solar channels. The simulator is based on the discrete ...

Shouguo Ding; Ping Yang; Bryan A. Baum; Andrew Heidinger; Thomas Greenwald

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore); and (3) accurate approaches to account for the effects of reservoir heterogeneity and for the optimization of nonconventional well deployment. An overview of our progress in each of these main areas is as follows. A general purpose object-oriented research simulator (GPRS) was developed under this project. The GPRS code is managed using modern software management techniques and has been deployed to many companies and research institutions. The simulator includes general black-oil and compositional modeling modules. The formulation is general in that it allows for the selection of a wide variety of primary and secondary variables and accommodates varying degrees of solution implicitness. Specifically, we developed and implemented an IMPSAT procedure (implicit in pressure and saturation, explicit in all other variables) for compositional modeling as well as an adaptive implicit procedure. Both of these capabilities allow for efficiency gains through selective implicitness. The code treats cell connections through a general connection list, which allows it to accommodate both structured and unstructured grids. The GPRS code was written to be easily extendable so new modeling techniques can be readily incorporated. Along these lines, we developed a new dual porosity module compatible with the GPRS framework, as well as a new discrete fracture model applicable for fractured or faulted reservoirs. Both of these methods display substantial advantages over previous implementations. Further, we assessed the performance of different preconditioners in an attempt to improve the efficiency of the linear solver. As a result of this investigation, substantial improvements in solver performance were achieved.

Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

2004-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

88

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008. Annual Report on US Wind Power Installation, Cost,Feed Sequestration Site Wind Power Figure ES-1. AdvancedFeed Sequestration Site Wind Power Figure 1. Advanced-Coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Advanced Vehicle Introduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keywords: Vehicle characteristics; market penetration; advanced technology vehicles; hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) Purpose Vehicle Choice Model - Estimate market penetration...

90

Climate Change Mitigation: An Analysis of Advanced Technology Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a scenario analysis that explores three advanced technology pathways toward climate stabilization using the MiniCAM model.

Clarke, Leon E.; Wise, Marshall A.; Placet, Marylynn; Izaurralde, R Cesar; Lurz, Joshua P.; Kim, Son H.; Smith, Steven J.; Thomson, Allison M.

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

91

Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants ANL-AFCI-168 of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants ANL-AFCI-168 by G. Palmiotti, J. Cahalan, P. Pfeiffer, T;2 ANL-AFCI-168 Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants G

Anitescu, Mihai

92

Advanced concepts in large-scale network simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This tutorial paper reviews existing concepts and future directions in selected areas related to simulation of large-scale networks. It covers specifically topics in traffic modeling, simulation of routing, network emulation, and real-time simulation.

David M. Nicol; Michael Liljenstam; Jason Liu

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Advanced wellbore thermal simulator GEOTEMP2 research report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of the GEOTEMP2 wellbore thermal simulator is described. The major technical features include a general purpose air and mist drilling simulator and a two-phase steam flow simulator that can model either injection or production.

Mitchell, R.F.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Growing concern over climate change is prompting new thinking about the technologies used to generate electricity. In the future, it is possible that new government policies on greenhouse gas emissions may favor electric generation technology options that release zero or low levels of carbon emissions. The Western U.S. has abundant wind and coal resources. In a world with carbon constraints, the future of coal for new electrical generation is likely to depend on the development and successful application of new clean coal technologies with near zero carbon emissions. This scoping study explores the economic and technical feasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coal generation facilities and operating them as a single generation complex in the Western US. The key questions examined are whether an advanced coal-wind hybrid (ACWH) facility provides sufficient advantages through improvements to the utilization of transmission lines and the capability to firm up variable wind generation for delivery to load centers to compete effectively with other supply-side alternatives in terms of project economics and emissions footprint. The study was conducted by an Analysis Team that consists of staff from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB). We conducted a screening level analysis of the economic competitiveness and technical feasibility of ACWH generation options located in Wyoming that would supply electricity to load centers in California, Arizona or Nevada. Figure ES-1 is a simple stylized representation of the configuration of the ACWH options. The ACWH consists of a 3,000 MW coal gasification combined cycle power plant equipped with carbon capture and sequestration (G+CC+CCS plant), a fuel production or syngas storage facility, and a 1,500 MW wind plant. The ACWH project is connected to load centers by a 3,000 MW transmission line. In the G+CC+CCS plant, coal is gasified into syngas and CO{sub 2} (which is captured). The syngas is burned in the combined cycle plant to produce electricity. The ACWH facility is operated in such a way that the transmission line is always utilized at its full capacity by backing down the combined cycle (CC) power generation units to accommodate wind generation. Operating the ACWH facility in this manner results in a constant power delivery of 3,000 MW to the load centers, in effect firming-up the wind generation at the project site.

Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles; Larson, Doug; Carr, Tom; Rath, Larry; Balash, Peter; Yih-Huei, Wan

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

95

ADVISOR (ADvanced VehIcle SimulatOR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ADVISOR (ADvanced VehIcle SimulatOR) ADVISOR (ADvanced VehIcle SimulatOR) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: ADVISOR (ADvanced VehIcle SimulatOR) Focus Area: Fuel Economy Topics: System & Application Design Website: sourceforge.net/projects/adv-vehicle-sim/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/advisor-advanced-vehicle-simulator Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Fuel Efficiency Standards This tool, originally developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), allows users to simulate and analyze conventional, advanced, light, and heavy vehicles, including hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles. The tool allows users to assess the effect of changes in vehicle components (such as motors, batteries, catalytic converters, climate control systems,

96

Utility Analysis of Parallel Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parallel computers are used to execute discrete-event simulations in contexts where a serial computer is unable to provide answers fast enough, and/or is unable to hold the simulation state in memory. Traditional research in parallel simulation has focused ...

David M. Nicol

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IGCC PC advanced coal-wind hybrid combined cycle power plantnatural gas combined cycle gas turbine power plant carboncrude gasification combined cycle power plant with carbon

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Virtual cityscapes: recent advances in crowd modeling and traffic simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We survey our recent work on interactive modeling, generation, and control of large-scale crowds and traffic for simulating digital cities. These include multi-agent navigation, simulating large crowds with emerging behaviors as well as interactive simulation ... Keywords: continuum traffic, crowd modeling, digital cities, multi-agent simulation

Ming C. Lin; Dinesh Manocha

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Energy Computational Fluid Dynamics Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-CAMS) system is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Utah State University (USU), and other interested parties with the objective of developing and implementing a comprehensive and readily accessible data and information management system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) verification and validation (V&V) in support of nuclear energy systems design and safety analysis. The two key objectives of the NE-CAMS effort are to identify, collect, assess, store and maintain high resolution and high quality experimental data and related expert knowledge (metadata) for use in CFD V&V assessments specific to the nuclear energy field and to establish a working relationship with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop a CFD V&V database, including benchmark cases, that addresses and supports the associated NRC regulations and policies on the use of CFD analysis. In particular, the NE-CAMS system will support the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program, which aims to develop and deploy advanced modeling and simulation methods and computational tools for reliable numerical simulation of nuclear reactor systems for design and safety analysis. Primary NE-CAMS Elements There are four primary elements of the NE-CAMS knowledge base designed to support computer modeling and simulation in the nuclear energy arena as listed below. Element 1. The database will contain experimental data that can be used for CFD validation that is relevant to nuclear reactor and plant processes, particularly those important to the nuclear industry and the NRC. Element 2. Qualification standards for data evaluation and classification will be incorporated and applied such that validation data sets will result in well-defined, well-characterized data. Element 3. Standards will be established for the design and operation of experiments for the generation of new validation data sets that are to be submitted to NE-CAMS that addresses the completeness and characterization of the dataset. Element 4. Standards will be developed for performing verification and validation (V&V) to establish confidence levels in CFD analyses of nuclear reactor processes; such processes will be acceptable and recognized by both CFD experts and the NRC.

Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application Center for Transportation Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies T he Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) TAMS application is a web-based tool that supports

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G+CC+CCS IGCC+CCS FT HVAC HVDC IGCC PC advanced coal-windthan the Base Case (HVDC Only Transmission) Sensitivity toused in the FEAST model. HVDC transmission lines have lower

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Coal-Wind Non-Hybrid SNG IGCC+CCS PC CCGT Windor a synthetic natural gas (SNG) production facility) and anwithout Fuel With with SNG Production or Syncrude Production

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Advances in Adaptive Data Analysis Vol. 3, No. 4 (2011) 417445  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. ANSYS software in the paper simulates displacement influence line at middle span under loading testAdvances in Adaptive Data Analysis Vol. 3, No. 4 (2011) 417­445 c World Scientific Publishing Company DOI: 10.1142/S1793536911000908 DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF BEAM BY A QUASI-STATIC MOVING VEHICULAR LOAD

104

Developing a Comprehensive Software Suite for Advanced Reactor Performance and Safety Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an introduction to the reactor analysis capabilities of the nuclear power reactor simulation tools that are being developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy s Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Toolkit. The NEAMS Toolkit is an integrated suite of multi-physics simulation tools that leverage high-performance computing to reduce uncertainty in the prediction of performance and safety of advanced reactor and fuel designs. The Toolkit effort is comprised of two major components, the Fuels Product Line (FPL), which provides tools for fuel performance analysis, and the Reactor Product Line (RPL), which provides tools for reactor performance and safety analysis. This paper provides an overview of the NEAMS RPL development effort.

Pointer, William David [ORNL; Bradley, Keith S [ORNL; Fischer, Paul F [ORNL; Smith, Micheal A [ORNL; Tautges, Timothy J [ORNL; Ferencz, Robert M [ORNL; Martineau, Richard C [ORNL; Jain, Rajeev [ORNL; Obabko, Aleksandr [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Billings, Jay Jay [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Crashworthiness analysis using advanced material models in DYNA3D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of an electric vehicle consortium, LLNL and Kaiser Aluminum are conducting experimental and numerical studies on crashworthy aluminum spaceframe designs. They have jointly explored the effect of heat treat on crush behavior and duplicated the experimental behavior with finite-element simulations. The major technical contributions to the state of the art in numerical simulation arise from the development and use of advanced material model descriptions for LLNL`s DYNA3D code. Constitutive model enhancements in both flow and failure have been employed for conventional materials such as low-carbon steels, and also for lighter weight materials such as aluminum and fiber composites being considered for future vehicles. The constitutive model enhancements are developed as extensions from LLNL`s work in anisotropic flow and multiaxial failure modeling. Analysis quality as a function of level of simplification of material behavior and mesh is explored, as well as the penalty in computation cost that must be paid for using more complex models and meshes. The lightweight material modeling technology is being used at the vehicle component level to explore the safety implications of small neighborhood electric vehicles manufactured almost exclusively from these materials.

Logan, R.W.; Burger, M.J.; McMichael, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Parkinson, R.D. [Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States). Center for Technology

1993-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

106

B61: Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, ASC: LANL Inside  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL ASC Science Underpins Stockpile Modernization Before the end of underground nuclear weapons testing, our nation relied on theory, experiment (testing), and simulation to...

107

Advancing Simulation Science: The Legacy of the ASC Academic Strategic Alliance Program  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

a a min [Type the abstract of the document here. The abstract is typically a short summary of the contents of the document.] Advancing Simulation Science: The Legacy of the ASC Academic Strategic Alliance Program ii ON THE COVER: Hot gas flow field and propellant stress in propellant of Titan IV rocket motor. Fully coupled "fluid-structure interaction" simulation performed using CSAR Rocstar Simulation Suite." University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets (CSAR) NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United

108

DOE Releases New Analysis Showing Significant Advances in Electric Vehicle  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Analysis Showing Significant Advances in Electric New Analysis Showing Significant Advances in Electric Vehicle Deployment DOE Releases New Analysis Showing Significant Advances in Electric Vehicle Deployment February 8, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today released One Million Electric Vehicles by 2015 (pdf - 220 kb), an analysis of advances in electric vehicle deployment and progress to date in meeting President Obama's goal of putting one million electric vehicles on the road by 2015. The analysis shows that while the goal is ambitious, it is also achievable based on steps already taken as part of the Recovery Act and additional policy initiatives proposed by President Obama -- including improvements to existing consumer tax credits, programs to help cities prepare for the growing demand for electric vehicles, and strong support

109

Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog ASC Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and ...

110

Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Approaches Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Background The United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) develops affordable and clean energy from coal and other fossil fuels to secure a sustainable energy economy. To further this mission, NETL funds research and development of advanced control technologies, including chemical looping (CL)

111

The Synergy Between Total Scattering and Advanced Simulation Techniques: Quantifying Geopolymer Gel Evolution  

SciTech Connect

With the ever increasing demands for technologically advanced structural materials, together with emerging environmental consciousness due to climate change, geopolymer cement is fast becoming a viable alternative to traditional cements due to proven mechanical engineering characteristics and the reduction in CO2 emitted (approximately 80% less CO2 emitted compared to ordinary Portland cement). Nevertheless, much remains unknown regarding the kinetics of the molecular changes responsible for nanostructural evolution during the geopolymerization process. Here, in-situ total scattering measurements in the form of X-ray pair distribution function (PDF) analysis are used to quantify the extent of reaction of metakaolin/slag alkali-activated geopolymer binders, including the effects of various activators (alkali hydroxide/silicate) on the kinetics of the geopolymerization reaction. Restricting quantification of the kinetics to the initial ten hours of reaction does not enable elucidation of the true extent of the reaction, but using X-ray PDF data obtained after 128 days of reaction enables more accurate determination of the initial extent of reaction. The synergies between the in-situ X-ray PDF data and simulations conducted by multiscale density functional theory-based coarse-grained Monte Carlo analysis are outlined, particularly with regard to the potential for the X-ray data to provide a time scale for kinetic analysis of the extent of reaction obtained from the multiscale simulation methodology.

White, Claire [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bloomer, Breaunnah E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Provis, John L. [The University of Melbourne; Henson, Neil J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Page, Katharine L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

112

DOE Releases New Analysis Showing Significant Advances in Electric...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today released One Million Electric Vehicles by 2015 (pdf - 220 kb), an analysis of advances in electric vehicle...

113

Definition: Software - Advanced Analysis/Visualization | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Software - Advanced Analysis/Visualization Software - Advanced Analysis/Visualization Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Software - Advanced Analysis/Visualization Systems installed to analyze grid information or help human operators.[1] Related Terms System References ↑ [www.smartgrid.gov/sites/default/files/pdfs/description_of_assets.pdf SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Assets'] An Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Software_-_Advanced_Analysis/Visualization&oldid=480431" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services

114

Advanced Fingerprint Analysis Project Fingerprint Constituents  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report was focused on generating fundamental data on fingerprint components which will be used to develop advanced forensic techniques to enhance fluorescent detection, and visualization of latent fingerprints. Chemical components of sweat gland secretions are well documented in the medical literature and many chemical techniques are available to develop latent prints, but there have been no systematic forensic studies of fingerprint sweat components or of the chemical and physical changes these substances undergo over time.

GM Mong; CE Petersen; TRW Clauss

1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

115

Advanced beam-dynamics simulation tools for RIA.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are developing multi-particle beam-dynamics simulation codes for RIA driver-linac simulations extending from the low-energy beam transport (LEBT) line to the end of the linac. These codes run on the NERSC parallel supercomputing platforms at LBNL, which allow us to run simulations with large numbers of macroparticles. The codes have the physics capabilities needed for RIA, including transport and acceleration of multiple-charge-state beams, beam-line elements such as high-voltage platforms within the linac, interdigital accelerating structures, charge-stripper foils, and capabilities for handling the effects of machine errors and other off-normal conditions. This year will mark the end of our project. In this paper we present the status of the work, describe some recent additions to the codes, and show some preliminary simulation results.

Garnett, R. W.; Wangler, T. P.; Billen, J. H.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; Crandall, K. R.; Ostroumov, P.; York, R.; Zhao, Q.; Physics; LANL; LBNL; Tech Source; Michigan State Univ.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Advanced nuclear reactor safety analysis: the simulation of a small break loss of coolant accident in the simplified boiling water reactor using RELAP5/MOD3.1.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal hydraulic simulation code RELAP5/MOD3.1.1 was utilized to model General Electric's Simplified Boiling Water Reactor plant. The model of the plant was subjected to a small break loss of coolant accident occurring from a guillotine shear of the vessel's 2 inch bottom drain line while operating at full power. The accident was compounded by disabling the plant's isolation condenser system and as an initial condition, the loss of site power. The ability of the plant's passive safety systems to respond to this type of accident, and the code's ability to accurately predict the accidents phenomena was investigated. The overall conclusion was that the modeled plant maintained all relevant safety parameters within specifications supplied by General Electric (GE) in their Standard Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the term of investigation (I 5,500 real time seconds). While no safety related parameters were exceeded, certain trends appearing near the end of the calculation suggest the need for further investigation. Both containment temperature and pressure were increasing when the transient was terminated. The RELAP5 code was able to simulate a representative model of the plant. Calculated steady state parameters for power, flow rates, recirculation ratio, and mass balance were within I% of those specified in the SAR. However the ability of the code to accurately model low flow, condensation heat transfer, in the presence of noncondensable gases should be verified. It is concluded that the simulation's results seem to pass an intuitive engineering inspection. That is to say, flow and heat transfer data calculated by the RELAP5 code reflect expected values and relational interactions are maintained, but that no quantitative significance could be justified. The uniqueness of the plant's design and the interactive nature of the transient, suggest Additional experimental data from test facilities is needed to validate the calculations.

Faust, Christophor Randall

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)  

SciTech Connect

NE-KAMS knowledge base will assist computational analysts, physics model developers, experimentalists, nuclear reactor designers, and federal regulators by: (1) Establishing accepted standards, requirements and best practices for V&V and UQ of computational models and simulations, (2) Establishing accepted standards and procedures for qualifying and classifying experimental and numerical benchmark data, (3) Providing readily accessible databases for nuclear energy related experimental and numerical benchmark data that can be used in V&V assessments and computational methods development, (4) Providing a searchable knowledge base of information, documents and data on V&V and UQ, and (5) Providing web-enabled applications, tools and utilities for V&V and UQ activities, data assessment and processing, and information and data searches. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), the Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve computational modeling and simulation (M&S) of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs. In addition, from the outset, NE-KAMS will support the use of computational M&S in the nuclear industry by developing guidelines and recommended practices aimed at quantifying the uncertainty and assessing the applicability of existing analysis models and methods. The NE-KAMS effort will initially focus on supporting the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and thermal hydraulics (T/H) analysis for M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and will later expand to include materials, fuel system performance and other areas of M&S as time and funding allow.

Rich Johnson; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau; Hyung Lee

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Simulation Problem Analysis and Research Kernel | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simulation Problem Analysis and Research Kernel Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Simulation Problem Analysis and Research Kernel AgencyCompany Organization:...

119

Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Simulation analysis of...

120

Applying advanced user models and input technologies to augment military simulation-based training  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the current state of requirement specification for an initiative based tactics virtual training environment. The methodology for collecting requirements followed three concurrent processes of task analysis, simulated firearms specification, ... Keywords: agent-based combat modeling, exercises, military operations, requirements, simulation and modeling for acquisition, simulation/exercise integration, simulations in training, training, training (SMART), virtual training environment

Bruno Emond; Hlne Fournier; Jean-Franois Lapointe

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE, 2007. 20 Percent Wind by 2030. Supporting Analysis,price forecast during 2012-2030. This approach assumes thatfutures prices during 2012-2030 will be the same as that

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal prices have been far less volatile than natural gas prices.Coal Prices Figure 9 is similar to Figure 8 except the natural gas pricesCoal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis interested in natural gas prices

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

given current technology. Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)CSP produces most of its power during the day hence isHence, we do not consider CSP in this analysis. 39 Unlike a

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Simulating Deep Earthquakes in the Laboratory | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A "Sponge" Path to Better Catalysts and Energy Materials A "Sponge" Path to Better Catalysts and Energy Materials Metal Model Mimics Metalloenzymes New Physics in a Copper-Iridium Compound A Key Target for Diabetes Drugs Molten Metal Solidifies into a New Kind of Glass Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Simulating Deep Earthquakes in the Laboratory September 26, 2013 Bookmark and Share Olivine crystal of a sample used to simulate deep earthquakes. The olivine contains small crystals of pyroxene within it that have been cut by "nanofaults." The numbers each show the parts of a pyroxene crystal that has been cut and displaced along a "nanofault." Image courtesy of

125

AVESTAR® - Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Avestar Video Avestar Video AVESTAR Center for Operational Excellence of Clean Energy Systems The AVESTAR Center is dedicated to accelerating progress toward achieving operational excellence for the nation's energy systems, from smart power plants to smart grid. Attaining operational excellence requires maximizing the efficiency and profitability from operations through excellent automation and control, all while reducing negative environmental impact and improving safety. Driving people excellence via the development, training, and empowerment of a highly-skilled engineering and operations workforce is another critical component of operational excellence. The AVESTAR Center is addressing all of these challenges by bringing together dynamic simulation, control, and 3D virtual reality technologies, state-of-the-art training simulators and facilities, and leading industry experts to focus on the optimal operation of clean energy systems in the smart grid era.

126

Advanced wellbore thermal simulator: GEOTEMP2 user manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOTEMP2 is a wellbore thermal simulator designed for geothermal well drilling and production problems. GEOTEMP2 includes the following features: fully transient heat conduction, wellbore fluid flow options, well completion options, and drilling-production histories. The data input format is given, along with input examples and comments on special features of the input. Ten examples that illustrate all of the flowing options and input options in GEOTEMP2 are included.

Mitchell, R.F.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Numerical Simulation Of Utility Boilers With Advanced Combustion Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents calculations of a pulverized coal flame and a coal-fired utility boiler with advanced combustion technologies. A combustion model based on an extended Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) combined with finite rate chemistry is described and some applications are shown. This model can be regarded as an extension of the previously used Eddy Breakup model (EBU) where infinite fast chemistry is assumed. It is part of a 3D-prediction code for quasi-stationary turbulent reacting flows which is based on a conservative finite-volume solution procedure. Equations are solved for the conservation of mass, momentum and scalar quantities. A domain decomposition method is used to introduce locally refined grids. Validation and comparison of both combustion models are made by comparison with measurement data of a swirled flame with air staging in a semi-industrial pulverized coal combustion facility. The application to three-dimensional combustion systems is demonstrated by the simulati...

H. C. Magel; R. Schneider; B. Risio; U. Schnell; K. R. G. Hein

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Modelling, Simulation, Testing, and Optimization of Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Powertrains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FCV: fuel cell vehicle FEA: finite element analysis GA: Genetic Algorithms GCM: Global Circulation of a power-split architecture with two modes (or configurations) introduced by General Motors Corporation.2 General Motors Designs

Victoria, University of

129

Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation Computing: Research &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research & Collaboration Research & Collaboration Partnerships among the national laboratories, industry, and academia leverage a broad spectrum of talent and multiply the effectiveness of our research efforts. These collaborations help solve the challenges of developing computing platforms and simulation tools across a number of disciplines. Computer Science Research Institute The Computer Science Research Institute brings university faculty and students to Sandia for focused collaborative research on DOE computer and computational science problems. Organized under the DOE Stockpile Computing Program, participants conduct leading-edge research, interact with scientists and engineers at the Laboratories, and help transfer the results of their research to programs at the Labs.

130

Progress in Advanced Spectral Analysis of Radioxenon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvements to a Java based software package developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for display and analysis of radioxenon spectra acquired by the International Monitoring System (IMS) are described here. The current version of the Radioxenon JavaViewer implements the region of interest (ROI) method for analysis of beta-gamma coincidence data. Upgrades to the Radioxenon JavaViewer will include routines to analyze high-purity germanium detector (HPGe) data, Standard Spectrum Method to analyze beta-gamma coincidence data and calibration routines to characterize beta-gamma coincidence detectors. These upgrades are currently under development; the status and initial results will be presented. Implementation of these routines into the JavaViewer and subsequent release is planned for FY 2011-2012.

Haas, Derek A.; Schrom, Brian T.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Ely, James H.; Flory, Adam E.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Saunders, Danielle L.; Suckow, Thomas J.

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

131

LLNL Scientists Use NERSC to Advance Global Aerosol Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While ''greenhouse gases'' have been the focus of climate change research for a number of years, DOE's ''Aerosol Initiative'' is now examining how aerosols (small particles of approximately micron size) affect the climate on both a global and regional scale. Scientists in the Atmospheric Science Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are using NERSC's IBM supercomputer and LLNL's IMPACT (atmospheric chemistry) model to perform simulations showing the historic effects of sulfur aerosols at a finer spatial resolution than ever done before. Simulations were carried out for five decades, from the 1950s through the 1990s. The results clearly show the effects of the changing global pattern of sulfur emissions. Whereas in 1950 the United States emitted 41 percent of the world's sulfur aerosols, this figure had dropped to 15 percent by 1990, due to conservation and anti-pollution policies. By contrast, the fraction of total sulfur emissions of European origin has only dropped by a factor of 2 and the Asian emission fraction jumped six fold during the same time, from 7 percent in 1950 to 44 percent in 1990. Under a special allocation of computing time provided by the Office of Science INCITE (Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment) program, Dan Bergmann, working with a team of LLNL scientists including Cathy Chuang, Philip Cameron-Smith, and Bala Govindasamy, was able to carry out a large number of calculations during the past month, making the aerosol project one of the largest users of NERSC resources. The applications ran on 128 and 256 processors. The objective was to assess the effects of anthropogenic (man-made) sulfate aerosols. The IMPACT model calculates the rate at which SO{sub 2} (a gas emitted by industrial activity) is oxidized and forms particles known as sulfate aerosols. These particles have a short lifespan in the atmosphere, often washing out in about a week. This means that their effects on climate tend to be more regional, occurring near the area where the SO{sub 2} is emitted. To accurately study these regional effects, Bergmann needed to run the simulations at a finer horizontal resolution, as the coarser resolution (typically 300km by 300km) of other climate models are insufficient for studying changes on a regional scale. Livermore's use of CAM3, the Community Atmospheric Model which is a high-resolution climate model developed at NCAR (with collaboration from DOE), allows a 100km by 100km grid to be applied. NERSC's terascale computing capability provided the needed computational horsepower to run the application at the finer level.

Bergmann, D J; Chuang, C; Rotman, D

2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

132

A numerical sensitivity analysis of streamline simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nowadays, field development strategy has become increasingly dependent on the results of reservoir simulation models. Reservoir studies demand fast and efficient results to make investment decisions that require a reasonable trade off between accuracy and simulation time. One of the suitable options to fulfill this requirement is streamline reservoir simulation technology, which has become very popular in the last few years. Streamline (SL) simulation provides an attractive alternative to conventional reservoir simulation because SL offers high computational efficiency and minimizes numerical diffusion and grid orientation effects. However, streamline methods have weaknesses incorporating complex physical processes and can also suffer numerical accuracy problems. The main objective of this research is to evaluate the numerical accuracy of the latest SL technology, and examine the influence of different factors that may impact the solution of SL simulation models. An extensive number of numerical experiments based on sensitivity analysis were performed to determine the effects of various influential elements on the stability and results of the solution. Those experiments were applied to various models to identify the impact of factors such as mobility ratios, mapping of saturation methods, number of streamlines, time step sizes, and gravity effects. This study provides a detailed investigation of some fundamental issues that are currently unresolved in streamline simulation.

Chaban Habib, Fady Ruben

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Complex Fluid Analysis with the Advanced Distillation Curve Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the flask. Heaters are controlled by a model predictive proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllerComplex Fluid Analysis with the Advanced Distillation Curve Approach Thomas J. Bruno, Lisa S. Ott of petroleomics, as asserted by Marshall and Rodgers, include quantitation of species, modeling, and informatics

134

Advanced Computer Methods for Grounding Analysis Ignasi Colominas1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of grounding grids of large electrical substations in practical cases present some difficulties mainly dueAdvanced Computer Methods for Grounding Analysis Ignasi Colominas1 , Jos´e Par´is1 , Xes present the foundations of a nu- merical formulation based on the Boundary Element Method for grounding

Colominas, Ignasi

135

Advanced Post-Irradiation Examination Capabilities Alternatives Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect

An alternatives analysis was performed for the Advanced Post-Irradiation Capabilities (APIEC) project in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. The Alternatives Analysis considered six major alternatives: ? No Action ? Modify Existing DOE Facilities capabilities distributed among multiple locations ? Modify Existing DOE Facilities capabilities consolidated at a few locations ? Construct New Facility ? Commercial Partnership ? International Partnerships Based on the alternatives analysis documented herein, it is recommended to DOE that the advanced post-irradiation examination capabilities be provided by a new facility constructed at the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory.

Jeff Bryan; Bill Landman; Porter Hill

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership.

Seitz, R.

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

137

ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership.

Seitz, Roger; Freshley, Mark D.; Dixon, Paul; Hubbard, Susan S.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Flach, Gregory P.; Faybishenko, Boris; Gorton, Ian; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Moulton, John D.; Steefel, Carl I.; Marble, Justin

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

138

National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) mission is to: (1) Improve the understanding, preparation, and mitigation of the consequences of infrastructure disruption; (2) Provide a common, comprehensive view of U.S. infrastructure and its response to disruptions - Scale & resolution appropriate to the issues and All threats; and (3) Built an operations-tested DHS capability to respond quickly to urgent infrastructure protection issues.

Berscheid, Alan P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Methodology for Validating Building Energy Analysis Simulations  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report was to develop a validation methodology for building energy analysis simulations, collect high-quality, unambiguous empirical data for validation, and apply the validation methodology to the DOE-2.1, BLAST-2MRT, BLAST-3.0, DEROB-3, DEROB-4, and SUNCAT 2.4 computer programs. This report covers background information, literature survey, validation methodology, comparative studies, analytical verification, empirical validation, comparative evaluation of codes, and conclusions.

Judkoff, R.; Wortman, D.; O'Doherty, B.; Burch, J.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Analysis of multi-domain complex simulation studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complex simulations are increasingly important in systems analysis and design. In some cases simulations can be exhaustively validated against experiment and taken to be implicitly accurate. However, in domains where only limited validation of the simulations ...

James R. Gattiker; Earl Lawrence; David Higdon

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CAPE-OPEN Integration for Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulation  

SciTech Connect

This paper highlights the use of the CAPE-OPEN (CO) standard interfaces in the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) developed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The APECS system uses the CO unit operation, thermodynamic, and reaction interfaces to provide its plug-and-play co-simulation capabilities, including the integration of process simulation with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. APECS also relies heavily on the use of a CO COM/CORBA bridge for running process/CFD co-simulations on multiple operating systems. For process optimization in the face of multiple and some time conflicting objectives, APECS offers stochastic modeling and multi-objective optimization capabilities developed to comply with the CO software standard. At NETL, system analysts are applying APECS to a wide variety of advanced power generation systems, ranging from small fuel cell systems to commercial-scale power plants including the coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant.

Zitney, S.E.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-FY11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0.5  

SciTech Connect

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Peery, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

143

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY08-09 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2--Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear-weapons performances in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3. Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Kusnezov, D; Bickel, T; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

144

Advanced Simulation and Computing Fiscal Year 2011-2012 Implementation Plan, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 - Robust Tools. Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 - Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 - Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

McCoy, M; Phillips, J; Hpson, J; Meisner, R

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

145

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Carnes, B

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

146

Advanced Simulation & Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2--Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear-weapons performances in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3--Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Perry, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2. Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3. Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Hopson, J; Peery, J; McCoy, M

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Kissel, L

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Reducing Parallel Program Simulation Complexity by Static Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a novel approach, based on the integration of static program analysis and simulation techniques, for the performance prediction of message passing programs. PS, a simulator of PVM applications developed in the last years by our ... Keywords: parallel program analysis, performance analysis, simulation, software reengineering

Rocco Aversa; Beniamino Di Martino; Nicola Mazzocca; Umberto Villano

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

On some recent advances in multimodal surgery simulation: A hybrid approach to surgical cutting and the use of video images for enhanced realism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present some recent advances in realistic surgery simulation including novel algorithms for simulating surgical cutting and techniques of improving visual realism of the simulated scenarios using images. Simulation of surgical cutting ...

Yi-Je Lim; Wei Jin; Suvranu De

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Advanced beam-dynamics simulation tools for the RIA driver linac,Part I: Low energy beam transport and radiofrequency quadrupole  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Beam-Dynamics Simulation Tools for the RIA Driver Linac; Low Energy Beam Transport and Radiofrequency Quadrupole.

Wangler, Thomas P.; Crandall, Kenneth R.; Garnett, Robert W.; Gorelov, Dmitry; Ostroumov, Petr; Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert; York, Richard

2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

152

Advanced process engineering co-simulation using CFD-based reduced order models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process and energy industries face the challenge of designing the next generation of plants to operate with unprecedented efficiency and near-zero emissions, while performing profitably amid fluctuations in costs for raw materials, finished products, and energy. To achieve these targets, the designers of future plants are increasingly relying upon modeling and simulation to create virtual plants that allow them to evaluate design concepts without the expense of pilot-scale and demonstration facilities. Two of the more commonly used simulation tools include process simulators for describing the entire plant as a network of simplified equipment models and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) packages for modeling an isolated equipment item in great detail by accounting for complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena. The Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been developed to combine process simulation software with CFD-based equipment simulation software so that design engineers can analyze and optimize the coupled fluid flow, heat and mass transfer, and chemical reactions that drive overall plant performance (Zitney et al., 2006). The process/CFD software integration was accomplished using the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN interfaces.

Lang, Y.-D.; Biegler, L.T.; Munteanu, S.; Madsen, J.I.; Zitney, S.E.

2007-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

153

High Level Requirements for the Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), has been tasked with the important mission of ensuring that nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy source in the U.S. The motivations behind this mission include cost-effectively meeting the expected increases in the power needs of the country, reducing carbon emissions and reducing dependence on foreign energy sources. In the near term, to ensure that nuclear power remains a key element of U.S. energy strategy and portfolio, the DOE-NE will be working with the nuclear industry to support safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants. In the long term, to meet the increasing energy needs of the U.S., the DOE-NE will be investing in research and development (R&D) and working in concert with the nuclear industry to build and deploy new, safer and more efficient nuclear power plants. The safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants and designing, licensing and deploying new reactor designs, however, will require focused R&D programs as well as the extensive use and leveraging of advanced modeling and simulation (M&S). M&S will play a key role in ensuring safe and efficient operations of existing and new nuclear reactors. The DOE-NE has been actively developing and promoting the use of advanced M&S in reactor design and analysis through its R&D programs, e.g., the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) and Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) programs. Also, nuclear reactor vendors are already using CFD and CSM, for design, analysis, and licensing. However, these M&S tools cannot be used with confidence for nuclear reactor applications unless accompanied and supported by verification and validation (V&V) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) processes and procedures which provide quantitative measures of uncertainty for specific applications. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base that will provide technical services and resources for V&V and UQ of M&S in nuclear energy sciences and engineering. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the CASL, NEAMS, Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs.

Rich Johnson; Hyung Lee; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Advanced virtual energy simulation training and research: IGCC with CO2 capture power plant  

SciTech Connect

In this presentation, we highlight the deployment of a real-time dynamic simulator of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM) Center. The Center was established as part of the DOE's accelerating initiative to advance new clean coal technology for power generation. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option, generating low-cost electricity by converting coal and/or other fuels into a clean synthesis gas mixture in a process that is efficient and environmentally superior to conventional power plants. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Fueled with coal, petroleum coke, and/or biomass, the gasification island of the simulated IGCC plant consists of two oxygen-blown, downward-fired, entrained-flow, slagging gasifiers with radiant syngas coolers and two-stage sour shift reactors, followed by a dual-stage acid gas removal process for CO{sub 2} capture. The combined cycle island consists of two F-class gas turbines, steam turbine, and a heat recovery steam generator with three-pressure levels. The dynamic simulator can be used for normal base-load operation, as well as plant start-up and shut down. The real-time dynamic simulator also responds satisfactorily to process disturbances, feedstock blending and switchovers, fluctuations in ambient conditions, and power demand load shedding. In addition, the full-scope simulator handles a wide range of abnormal situations, including equipment malfunctions and failures, together with changes initiated through actions from plant field operators. By providing a comprehensive IGCC operator training system, the AVESTAR Center is poised to develop a workforce well-prepared to operate and control commercial-scale gasification-based power plants capable of 90% pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture and compression, as well as low sulfur, mercury, and NOx emissions. With additional support from the NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA), the Center will educate and train engineering students and researchers by providing hands-on 'learning by operating' experience The AVESTAR Center also offers unique collaborative R&D opportunities in high-fidelity dynamic modeling, advanced process control, real-time optimization, and virtual plant simulation. Objectives and goals are aimed at safe and effective management of power generation systems for optimal efficiency, while protecting the environment. To add another dimension of realism to the AVESTAR experience, NETL will introduce an immersive training system with innovative three-dimensional virtual reality technology. Wearing a stereoscopic headset or eyewear, trainees will enter an interactive virtual environment that will allow them to move freely throughout the simulated 3-D facility to study and learn various aspects of IGCC plant operation, control, and safety. Such combined operator and immersive training systems go beyond traditional simulation and include more realistic scenarios, improved communication, and collaboration among co-workers.

Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Provost, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the precipitation of titanium carbonitrides during laser surface alloying provided there was sufficient amount of dissolved titanium, carbon, and nitrogen in the liquid steel. This was confirmed experimentally by using a powder mixture of 431-martensitic steel, titanium carbide powder, and nitrogen shielding, during laser deposition to produce deposits exhibiting relatively high hardness (average surface hardness of 724 HV). The same approach was extended to direct diode laser processing and similar microstructures were attained. The above analysis was extended to develop an in-situ precipitation of Ti(CN) during laser deposition. The Ti addition was achieving by mixing the 431 martensitic steel powders with ferro-titanium. The dissolution of nitrogen was achieved by using 100% nitrogen shielding gas, which was indicated by thermodynamic analysis. Demonstrations were also conducted utilizing the tools developed during the program and resulted in several viable composite coating systems being identified. This included the use of TiC and ferro-titanium in martensitic-grade stainless steel matrix material with and without the use of active N2 shielding gas, WC hard particles in a martensitic-grade stainless steel matrix material, WC and BN in a nickel-based matrix material, and WC in highly alloyed iron-based matrix. Although these demonstrations indicated the potential of forming composite coatings, in certain instances, the intended industrial applications involved unique requirements, such as coating of internal surfaces, which hindered the full development of the improved coating technology. However, it is believed that the addition of common hard particles, such as WC or TiC, to matrix material representing martensitic grades of stainless steel offer opportunities for improved performance at relatively low material cost.

R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

156

Thermal analysis of simulated Pantex pit storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report investigates potential pit storage configurations that could be used at the Mason and Hanger Pantex Plant. The study utilizes data from a thermal test series performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that simulated these storage configurations. The heat output values used in the LLNL test series do not represent actual pits but are rounded numbers that were chosen for convenience to allow parameter excursions. Specifically in this project, we are modeling the heat transfer and air flow around cylindrical storage containers in Pantex magazines in order to predict container temperatures. This difficult problem in thermal- fluid mechanics involves transient, three-dimensional (3-D) natural convection and thermal radiation around interacting containers with various heat generation rates. Our approach is to link together two computational methods in order to synthesize a modeling procedure for a large array of pit storage containers. The approach employs a finite element analysis of a few containers, followed by a lumped- parameter model of an array of containers. The modeling procedure we developed was applied in the simulation of a recent experiment where temperatures of pit storage containers were monitored in a steady- state, controlled environment. Our calculated pit container temperatures are comparable with data from that experiment. We found it absolutely necessary to include thermal radiation between containers in order to predict temperatures accurately, although the assumption of black-body radiation appears to be sufficient. When radiation is neglected the calculated temperatures are 4 to 6 {degrees}C higher than temperature data from the experiment. We also investigated our model`s sensitivity to variations in the natural convection heat transfer coefficient and found that with a 50% drop in the coefficient, calculated temperatures are approximately I {degree}C higher. Finally, with a modified lumped-parameter model, we demonstrate how an entire Pantex magazine can be simulated.

Aceves, S.M., Kornblum, B.T.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Enabling Computational Technologies FY09 Report  

SciTech Connect

In this document we report on the status of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) effort. In particular, we provide the context for ECT In the broader NEAMS program and describe the three pillars of the ECT effort, namely, (1) tools and libraries, (2) software quality assurance, and (3) computational facility (computers, storage, etc) needs. We report on our FY09 deliverables to determine the needs of the integrated performance and safety codes (IPSCs) in these three areas and lay out the general plan for software quality assurance to meet the requirements of DOE and the DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). We conclude with a brief description of our interactions with the Idaho National Laboratory computer center to determine what is needed to expand their role as a NEAMS user facility.

Diachin, L F; Garaizar, F X; Henson, V E; Pope, G

2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

158

NUCLEAR DATA RESOURCES FOR ADVANCED ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION.  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) includes collection, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear physics data for basic nuclear research and applied nuclear technologies. In 2004, to answer the needs of nuclear data users, NNDC completed a project to modernize storage and management of its databases and began offering new nuclear data Web services. Examples of nuclear reaction, nuclear structure and decay database applications along with a number of nuclear science codes are also presented.

PRITYCHENKO, B.

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

159

Analysis of advanced compressed air energy storage concepts. [Adiabatic concept  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis is presented of a class of Advanced Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) concepts, which are designed to minimize or eliminate the dependence on oil for firing the turbines. The analysis is based on a ''Hybrid'' CAES system that incorporates thermal storage and varying turbine inlet conditions. The extreme case of the hybrid is the adiabatic CAES concept where the sole source of energy to the cycle is the electrical power input to the compressors. The thermodynamic characteristics of these cycles are studied parametrically. In addition, the economics of the hybrid cycle, including the adiabatic cycle, are studied parametrically for the case where thermal storage in an aquifer is used. The results of the analysis conclude that the adiabatic CAES concept is technically feasible and that the storage efficiency would be comparable to or better than pumped hydro. However, the economic analysis concludes that heat storage in an aquifer is of questionable economic value since a recuperator can accomplish much the same effects at lower cost. The adiabatic concept using heat storage in an aquifer does not appear economic for foreseeable conditions.

Kreid, D.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V&V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V&V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V&V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M&S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V&V into subcontinuum scale M&S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

Schultz, Peter Andrew

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

ME EET Seminar: MODELING, SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF INTEGRATED...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts ME EET Seminar: MODELING, SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF INTEGRATED BUILDING ENERGY AND CONTROL SYSTEMS Speaker(s): Michael Wetter Date: October 21, 2009 -...

162

Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Integrated Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Integrated Building Energy and Control Systems Speaker(s): Michael Wetter Date: August 10, 2009 -...

163

Information Security Analysis Using Game Theory and Simulation  

analysis can be performed using game theory implemented in dynamic simulations of Agent -Based Models ... previous limitations of current stochastic game models.

164

Systems analysis and futuristic designs of advanced biofuel factory concepts.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. is addicted to petroleum--a dependency that periodically shocks the economy, compromises national security, and adversely affects the environment. If liquid fuels remain the main energy source for U.S. transportation for the foreseeable future, the system solution is the production of new liquid fuels that can directly displace diesel and gasoline. This study focuses on advanced concepts for biofuel factory production, describing three design concepts: biopetroleum, biodiesel, and higher alcohols. A general schematic is illustrated for each concept with technical description and analysis for each factory design. Looking beyond current biofuel pursuits by industry, this study explores unconventional feedstocks (e.g., extremophiles), out-of-favor reaction processes (e.g., radiation-induced catalytic cracking), and production of new fuel sources traditionally deemed undesirable (e.g., fusel oils). These concepts lay the foundation and path for future basic science and applied engineering to displace petroleum as a transportation energy source for good.

Chianelli, Russ; Leathers, James; Thoma, Steven George; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Gupta, Vipin P.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

SALT-ANL. Systems Analysis Process Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SALT (Systems Analysis Language Translator), a systems- analysis and process-simulation program for steady-state and dynamic systems, can also be used for optimization and sensitivity studies. SALT employs state-of-the-art numerical techniques including a hybrid steepest-descent/quasi-Newtonian multidimensional nonlinear equation solver, sequential quadratic programming methods for optimization, and multistep integration methods for both stiff and nonstiff systems of differential equations. Based on a preprocessor concept where a `new` system driver can be written for each application, SALT-ANL contains precompiled component models, several flow types, and a number of thermodynamic and transport property routines, including a gas chemical-equilibrium code. It has been applied to the study of open-cycle and liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic systems, fuel cells, ocean thermal energy conversion, municipal solid-waste processing, fusion, breeder reactors, and geothermal and solar-energy systems. Models available include: combustor, compressor, deaerator, gas-diffuser, fuel-dryer, feedwater-heater, flash-tank, gas-turbine, heater, heat-exchanger, flow-initiator, fuel-flow-initiator, molten-carbonate fuel-cell, liquid-metal diffuser, magnetohydrodynamic-generator, liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic-generator, liquid-metal nozzle, liquid-metal pipe, flow-mixer, gas-nozzle, phosphoric acid fuel-cell, pump, pipe-calculator, steam-condenser, steam-drum, liquid-gas separator, stack, solid-oxide fuel-cell, flow-splitter, steam-turbine, two-phase diffuser, two-phase mixer, and two-phase nozzle. Input data to the SALT program describe the system configuration for the specific problem to be analyzed and provide instructions defining system constraints, objective functions, parameter sweeps, etc. to generate a PL/I program representing the system problem and performing the various analytic tasks.

Berry, G.F.; Geyer, H.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

166

Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste  

SciTech Connect

Various forms of general and localized corrosion represent principal threats to the integrity of DOE liquid waste storage tanks. These tanks, which are of a single wall or double wall design, depending upon their age, are fabricated from welded carbon steel and contain a complex waste-form comprised of NaOH and NaNO{sub 3}, along with trace amounts of phosphate, sulfate, carbonate, and chloride. Because waste leakage can have a profound environmental impact, considerable interest exists in predicting the accumulation of corrosion damage, so as to more effectively schedule maintenance and repair. The different tasks that are being carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA) which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples in order to exactly predict the corrosion mechanisms; (7) Wavelet analysis of EC noise data from steel samples undergoing corrosion in an environment similar to that of the high level waste storage containers, to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data. The Point Defect Model (PDM) is directly applied as the theoretical assessment method for describing the passive film formed on iron/steels. The PDM is used to describe general corrosion in the passive region of iron. In addition, previous work suggests that pit formation is due to the coalescence of cation vacancies at the metal/film interface which would make it possible to use the PDM parameters to predict the onset of pitting. This previous work suggests that once the critical vacancy density is reached, the film ruptures to form a pit. Based upon the kinetic parameters derived for the general corrosion case, two parameters relating to the cation vacancy formation and annihilation can be calculated. These two parameters can then be applied to predict the transition from general to pitting corrosion for iron/mild steels. If cation vacancy coalescence is shown to lead to pitting, it can have a profound effect on the direction of future studies involving the onset of pitting corrosion. The work has yielded a number of important findings, including an unequivocal demonstration of the role of chloride ion in passivity breakdown on nickel in terms of cation vacancy generation within the passive film, the first detection and characterization of individual micro fracture events in stress corrosion cracking, and the determination of kinetic parameters for the generation and annihilation of point defects in the passive film on iron. The existence of coupling between the internal crack environment and the external cathodic environment, as predicted by the coupled environment fracture model (CEFM), has also been indisputably established for the AISI 4340/NaOH system. It is evident from the studies that analysis of coupling current noise is a very sensitive tool f

Digby D. Macdonald; Brian M. Marx; Sejin Ahn; Julio de Ruiz; Balaji Soundararaja; Morgan Smith; and Wendy Coulson

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Advanced High Temperature Reactor Systems and Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a large-output [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR's large thermal output enables direct comparison of its performance and requirements with other high output reactor concepts. As high-temperature plants, FHRs can support either high-efficiency electricity generation or industrial process heat production. The AHTR analysis presented in this report is limited to the electricity generation mission. FHRs, in principle, have the potential to be low-cost electricity producers while maintaining full passive safety. However, no FHR has been built, and no FHR design has reached the stage of maturity where realistic economic analysis can be performed. The system design effort described in this report represents early steps along the design path toward being able to predict the cost and performance characteristics of the AHTR as well as toward being able to identify the technology developments necessary to build an FHR power plant. While FHRs represent a distinct reactor class, they inherit desirable attributes from other thermal power plants whose characteristics can be studied to provide general guidance on plant configuration, anticipated performance, and costs. Molten salt reactors provide experience on the materials, procedures, and components necessary to use liquid fluoride salts. Liquid metal reactors provide design experience on using low-pressure liquid coolants, passive decay heat removal, and hot refueling. High temperature gas-cooled reactors provide experience with coated particle fuel and graphite components. Light water reactors (LWRs) show the potentials of transparent, high-heat capacity coolants with low chemical reactivity. Modern coal-fired power plants provide design experience with advanced supercritical-water power cycles. The current design activities build upon a series of small-scale efforts over the past decade to evaluate and describe the features and technology variants of FHRs. Key prior concept evaluation reports include the SmAHTR preconceptual design report,1 the PB-AHTR preconceptual design, and the series of early phase AHTR evaluations performed from 2004 to 2006. This report provides a power plant-focused description of the current state of the AHTR. The report includes descriptions and sizes of the major heat transport and power generation components. Component configuration and sizing are based upon early phase AHTR plant thermal hydraulic models. The report also provides a top-down AHTR comparative economic analysis. A commercially available advanced supercritical water-based power cycle was selected as the baseline AHTR power generation cycle both due to its superior performance and to enable more realistic economic analysis. The AHTR system design, however, has several remaining gaps, and the plant cost estimates consequently have substantial remaining uncertainty. For example, the enriched lithium required for the primary coolant cannot currently be produced on the required scale at reasonable cost, and the necessary core structural ceramics do not currently exist in a nuclear power qualified form. The report begins with an overview of the current, early phase, design of the AHTR plant. Only a limited amount of information is included about the core and vessel as the core design and refueling options are the subject of a companion report. The general layout of an AHTR system and site showing the relationship of the major facilities is then provided. Next is a comparative evaluation of the AHTR anticipated performance and costs. Finally, the major system design efforts necessary to bring the AHTR design to a pre-conceptual level are then presented.

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Analysis and comparison of active solar desiccant and absorption cooling systems. Part 2; Annual simulation results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative analysis has been performed to compare the cooling and dehumidification performance of future ventilation mode desiccant systems, proposed advanced absorption systems, and conventional vapor compression systems. A common framework has been developed for direct comparison of these different cooling technologies; this method is described in a companion paper. This paper presents the application of this method to annual simulations of cooling system performance in five cities.

Warren, M.L. (ASI Controls, San Ramon, CA (US)); Wahlig, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Applied Science Div.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Systems and Controls Analysis and Testing; Harvesting More Wind Energy with Advanced Controls Technology (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet outlines the systems and controls analysis and testing that takes place at the NWTC on the Controls Advanced Research Turbines.

Not Available

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Adaptive Multiple Super Fast Simulated Annealing for Stochastic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrating Advanced Materials Simulation Techniques into an Automated Data Analysis Workflow at the Spallation Neutron Source Intersecting Slip for...

171

Simulation analysis of marine terminal investments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A common problem in the oil industry is the optimization of terminal facilities to minimize delays in servicing incoming tankers. In Exxon Corporation, simulation has been successfully applied to marine terminal studies since the early nineteen sixties. ...

David W. Graff

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Simulation and Analysis of SNRs in LAT Data Challenge 2  

SciTech Connect

In 2006 the GLAST LAT collaboration organized a detailed simulation of 55 days of the gamma-ray sky and particle background in orbit to test the simulation and analysis tools of the collaboration. For this simulation, designated Data Challenge 2 (DC2), empirical models for SNRs as gamma-ray sources in the energy range of the LAT were developed, in most cases informed by X-ray or gamma-ray observations. The development of these models and an example of analysis of one of the simulated SNRs are described here.

Tibolla, O.; Busetto, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica - Universita di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Digel, S. [Stanford University, SLAC and KIPAC Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Longo, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica - Universita di Trieste, Via F. Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); INFN Trieste, Via F. Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

173

Simulation And Analysis of SNRs in LAT Data Challenge 2  

SciTech Connect

In 2006 the GLAST LAT collaboration organized a detailed simulation of 55 days of the gamma-ray sky and particle background in orbit to test the simulation and analysis tools of the collaboration. For this simulation, designated Data Challenge 2 (DC2), empirical models for SNRs as gamma-ray sources in the energy range of the LAT were developed, in most cases informed by X-ray or gamma-ray observations. The development of these models and an example of analysis of one of the simulated SNRs are described here.

Tibolla, O.; Busetto, G.; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua; Digel, S.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Longo, F.; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

174

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system: Hot End Simulation Rig  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Hot End Simulation Rig (HESR) was an integral part of the overall Solar/METC program chartered to prove the technical, economic, an environmental feasibility of a coal-fueled gas turbine, for cogeneration applications. The program was to culminate in a test of a Solar Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal slurry fuel throughput the engine design operating range. This particular activity was designed to verify the performance of the Centaur Type H engine hot section materials in a coal-fired environment varying the amounts of alkali, ash, and sulfur in the coal to assess the material corrosion. Success in the program was dependent upon the satisfactory resolution of several key issues. Included was the control of hot end corrosion and erosion, necessary to ensure adequate operating life. The Hot End Simulation Rig addressed this important issue by exposing currently used hot section turbine alloys, alternate alloys, and commercially available advanced protective coating systems to a representative coal-fueled environment at turbine inlet temperatures typical of Solar`s Centaur Type H. Turbine hot end components which would experience material degradation include the transition duct from the combustor outlet to the turbine inlet, the shroud, nozzles, and blades. A ceramic candle filter vessel was included in the system as the particulate removal device for the HESR. In addition to turbine material testing, the candle material was exposed and evaluated. Long-term testing was intended to sufficiently characterize the performance of these materials for the turbine.

Galica, M.A.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Computer science principles: analysis of a proposed advanced placement course  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze the CS Principles project, a proposed Advanced Placement course, by focusing on the second pilot that took place in 2011-2012. In a previous publication the first pilot of the course was explained, but not in a context related ... Keywords: advanced placement, national pilot, portfolio assessment

Andrea Arpaci-Dusseau; Owen Astrachan; Dwight Barnett; Matthew Bauer; Marilyn Carrell; Rebecca Dovi; Baker Franke; Christina Gardner; Jeff Gray; Jean Griffin; Richard Kick; Andy Kuemmel; Ralph Morelli; Deepa Muralidhar; R Brook Osborne; Chinma Uche

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect

The current posture of the used nuclear fuel management program in the U.S. following termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, is to pursue research and development (R&D) of generic (i.e., non-site specific) technologies for storage, transportation and disposal. Disposal R&D is directed toward understanding and demonstrating the performance of reference geologic disposal concepts selected to represent the current state-of-the-art in geologic disposal. One of the principal constraints on waste packaging and emplacement in a geologic repository is management of the waste-generated heat. This paper describes the selection of reference disposal concepts, and thermal management strategies for waste from advanced fuel cycles. A geologic disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or high-level waste (HLW) consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. A set of reference geologic disposal concepts has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign, for crystalline rock, clay/shale, bedded salt, and deep borehole (crystalline basement) geologic settings. We performed thermal analysis of these concepts using waste inventory cases representing a range of advanced fuel cycles. Concepts of operation consisting of emplacement mode, repository layout, and engineered barrier descriptions, were selected based on international progress and previous experience in the U.S. repository program. All of the disposal concepts selected for this study use enclosed emplacement modes, whereby waste packages are in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. The encapsulating materials (typically clay-based or rock salt) have low intrinsic permeability and plastic rheology that closes voids so that low permeability is maintained. Uniformly low permeability also contributes to chemically reducing conditions common in soft clay, shale, and salt formations. Enclosed modes are associated with temperature constraints that limit changes to the encapsulating materials, and they generally have less capacity to dissipate heat from the waste package and its immediate surroundings than open modes such as that proposed for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Open emplacement modes can be ventilated for many years prior to permanent closure of the repository, limiting peak temperatures both before and after closure, and combining storage and disposal functions in the same facility. Open emplacement modes may be practically limited to unsaturated host formations, unless emplacement tunnels are effectively sealed everywhere prior to repository closure. Thermal analysis of disposal concepts and waste inventory cases has identified important relationships between waste package size and capacity, and the duration of surface decay storage needed to meet temperature constraints. For example, the choice of salt as the host medium expedites the schedule for geologic disposal by approximately 50 yr (other factors held constant) thereby reducing future reliance on surface decay storage. Rock salt has greater thermal conductivity and stability at higher temperatures than other media considered. Alternatively, the choice of salt permits the use of significantly larger waste packages for SNF. The following sections describe the selection of reference waste inventories, geologic settings, and concepts of operation, and summarize the results from the thermal analysis.

Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Blink, James [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Carter, Joe [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Massimiliano, Fratoni [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Greenberg, Harris [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Howard, Rob L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Seasonally Stratified Analysis of Simulated ENSO Thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using outputs from the SINTEX-F1 coupled GCM, the thermodynamics of ENSO events and its relation with the seasonal cycle are investigated. Simulated El Nio events are first classified into four groups depending on during which season the Nio-...

Tomoki Tozuka; Jing-Jia Luo; Sebastien Masson; Toshio Yamagata

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Systems integration and analysis of advanced life support technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extended missions to space have long been a goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Accomplishment of NASA's goal requires the development of systems and tools for sustaining human life for periods of several months to several years. This is the primary objective of NASA's Advanced Life Support (ALS) program. This work contributes directly to NASA efforts for ALS, particularly food production. The objective of this work is to develop a systematic methodology for analyzing and improving or modifying ALS technologies to increase their acceptability for implementation in long-duration space missions. By focusing primarily on the food production systems, it is an aim of this work to refine the procedure for developing and analyzing the ALS technologies. As a result of these efforts, researchers will have at their disposal, a powerful tool for establishing protocols for each technology as well as for modifying each technology to meet the standards for practical applications. To automate the developed methodology and associated calculations, a computer-aided tool has been developed. The following systematic procedures are interrelated and automatically integrated into the computer-aided tool: Process configuration, with particular emphasis given to food production (e.g., syrup and flour from sweet potato, starch from sweet potato, breakfast cereal from sweet potato); Modeling and analysis for mass and energy tracking and budgeting; Mass and energy integration Metrics evaluation (e.g., Equivalent System Mass (ESM)). Modeling and analysis is achieved by developing material- and energy-budgeting models. Various forms of mass and energy are tracked through fundamental as well as semiempirical models. Various system alternatives are synthesized and screened using ESM and other metrics. The results of mass, energy and ESM analyses collectively revealed the major consumers of time, equivalent mass, and energy, namely evaporation, condensation, dehydration, drying and extrusion. The targeted processes were subsequently targeted for modifications. In conclusion, this work provides a systematic methodology for transforming non-conventional problems into traditional engineering design problems, a significant contribution to ALS studies.

Nworie, Grace A.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

FY2003 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities Bringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable and affordable 2003 Annual Progress Report freedomCAR & vehicle technologies program Less dependence on foreign oil, and eventual transition to an emissions-free, petroleum-free vehicle U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2003 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities Submitted to: U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Lee Slezak, Technology Manager Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities

180

PROTEUS - Simulation Toolset for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation Toolset for Simulation Toolset for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis PROTEUS Faster and more accurate neutronics calculations enable optimum reactor design... Argonne National Laboratory's powerful reactor physics toolset, PROTEUS, empowers users to create optimal reactor designs quickly, reliably and accurately. ...Reducing costs for designers of fast spectrum reactors. PROTEUS' long history of validation provides confidence in predictive simulations Argonne's simulation tools have more than 30 years of validation history against numerous experiments and measurements. The tools within PROTEUS work together, using the same interface files for easier integration of calculations. Multi-group Fast Reactor Cross Section Processing: MC 2 -3 No other fast spectrum multigroup generation tool

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

An expanded framework for the advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit is a set of computational tools developed primarily at DOE laboratories and is aimed at simplifying the solution of common and important computational problems. The use of the tools reduces the development time for new codes and the tools provide functionality that might not otherwise be available. This document outlines an agenda for expanding the scope of the ACTS Project based on lessons learned from current activities. Highlights of this agenda include peer-reviewed certification of new tools; finding tools to solve problems that are not currently addressed by the Toolkit; working in collaboration with other software initiatives and DOE computer facilities; expanding outreach efforts; promoting interoperability, further development of the tools; and improving functionality of the ACTS Information Center, among other tasks. The ultimate goal is to make the ACTS tools more widely used and more effective in solving DOE's and the nation's scientific problems through the creation of a reliable software infrastructure for scientific computing.

Marques, Osni A.; Drummond, Leroy A.

2003-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

182

Review of wind simulation methods for horizontal-axis wind turbine analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews three reports on simulation of winds for use in wind turbine fatigue analysis. The three reports are presumed to represent the state of the art. The Purdue and Sandia methods simulate correlated wind data at two points rotating as on the rotor of a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The PNL method at present simulates only one point, which rotates either as on a horizontal-axis wind turbine blade or as on a vertical-axis wind turbine blade. The spectra of simulated data are presented from the Sandia and PNL models under comparable input conditions, and the energy calculated in the rotational spikes in the spectra by the two models is compared. Although agreement between the two methods is not impressive at this time, improvement of the Sandia and PNL methods is recommended as the best way to advance the state of the art. Physical deficiencies of the models are cited in the report and technical recommendations are made for improvement. The report also reviews two general methods for simulating single-point data, called the harmonic method and the white noise method. The harmonic method, which is the basis of all three specific methods reviewed, is recommended over the white noise method in simulating winds for wind turbine analysis.

Powell, D.C.; Connell, J.R.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation for Hydrogen Transition Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agent Agent Agent - - Based Modeling Based Modeling and Simulation (ABMS) and Simulation (ABMS) for Hydrogen Transition for Hydrogen Transition Analysis Analysis Marianne Mintz Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop US Department of Energy January 26, 2006 Objectives and Scope for Phase 1 2 Analyze the hydrogen infrastructure development as a complex adaptive system using an agent-based modeling and simulation (ABMS) approach Develop an ABMS model to simulate the evolution of that system, spanning the entire H2 supply chain from production to consumption Identify key factors that either promote or inhibit the growth of H2 infrastructure Apply ABMS to get new insights into transition, particularly early transition phase - Dynamic interplay between supply and demand

184

Task parallel sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation of groundwater simulations through the SALSSA framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Support Architecture for Large-Scale Subsurface Analysis (SALSSA) provides an extensible framework, sophisticated graphical user interface, and underlying data management system that simplifies the process of running subsurface models, tracking provenance information, and analyzing the model results. Initially, SALSSA supported two styles of job control: user directed execution and monitoring of individual jobs, and load balancing of jobs across multiple machines taking advantage of many available workstations. Recent efforts in subsurface modelling have been directed at advancing simulators to take advantage of leadership class supercomputers. We describe two approaches, current progress, and plans toward enabling efficient application of the subsurface simulator codes via the SALSSA framework: automating sensitivity analysis problems through task parallelism, and task parallel parameter estimation using the PEST framework.

Schuchardt, Karen L.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Chase, Jared M.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Elsethagen, Todd O.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Chin, George; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Advanced computational simulation for design and manufacturing of lightweight material components for automotive applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computational vehicle models for the analysis of lightweight material performance in automobiles have been developed through collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, and George Washington University. The vehicle models have been verified against experimental data obtained from vehicle collisions. The crashed vehicles were analyzed, and the main impact energy dissipation mechanisms were identified and characterized. Important structural parts were extracted and digitized and directly compared with simulation results. High-performance computing played a key role in the model development because it allowed for rapid computational simulations and model modifications. The deformation of the computational model shows a very good agreement with the experiments. This report documents the modifications made to the computational model and relates them to the observations and findings on the test vehicle. Procedural guidelines are also provided that the authors believe need to be followed to create realistic models of passenger vehicles that could be used to evaluate the performance of lightweight materials in automotive structural components.

Simunovic, S.; Aramayo, G.A.; Zacharia, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Toridis, T.G. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Bandak, F.; Ragland, C.L. [Dept. of Transportation, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

O1: Advanced Neutron Monte-Carlo Ray-Tracing Simulations Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, O. Advanced Neutron and Synchrotron Studies of Materials .... Status of China Spallation Neutron Source and Perspectives of Neutron Research in...

187

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: MOVES (Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MOVES (Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator) MOVES (Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator) Project Summary Full Title: MOVES (Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator) Previous Title(s): New Generation Mobile Source Emissions Model (NGM) Project ID: 179 Principal Investigator: Margo Oge Brief Description: Estimates emissions for on-road and nonroad sources, multiple pollutants, fine-scale analysis to national inventory estimation. Keywords: Vehicle; transportation; emissions Purpose Estimate emissions for on-road and nonroad sources, cover a broad range of pollutants, and allow multiple scale analysis, from fine-scale analysis to national inventory estimation. When fully implemented MOVES will serve as the replacement for MOBILE. Performer Principal Investigator: Margo Oge Organization: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

188

Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This study covers about 1000 mi2 (2600 km2) of the southern Raft River drainage basin in south-central Idaho and northwest Utah. The main area of interest, approximately 200 mi2 (520 km2) of semiarid agricultural and rangeland in the southern Raft River Valley that includes the known Geothermal Resource Area near Bridge, Idaho, was modelled numerically to evaluate the hydrodynamics of the unconfined aquifer. Computed and estimated transmissivity values range from 1200 feet squared per day (110

189

Big Data Visual Analytics for Exploratory Earth System Simulation Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Rapid increases in high performance computing are feeding the development of larger and more complex data sets in climate research, which sets the stage for so-called big data analysis challenges. However, conventional climate analysis techniques are inadequate in dealing with the complexities of today s data. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate a visual analytics system, called the Exploratory Data analysis ENvironment (EDEN), with specific application to the analysis of complex earth system simulation data sets. EDEN represents the type of interactive visual analysis tools that are necessary to transform data into insight, thereby improving critical comprehension of earth system processes. In addition to providing an overview of EDEN, we describe real-world studies using both point ensembles and global Community Land Model Version 4 (CLM4) simulations.

Steed, Chad A [ORNL; Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Smith, Brian E [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

In-situ sampling of a large-scale particle simulation for interactive visualization and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a simulation-time random sampling of a large-scale particle simulation, the RoadRunner Universe MC3 cosmological simulation, for interactive post-analysis and visualization. Simulation data generation rates will continue to be ...

J. Woodring; J. Ahrens; J. Figg; J. Wendelberger; S. Habib; K. Heitmann

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Recent advances in 2+1-dimensional simulations of the pattern-forming Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an overview of recent advances in numerical simulations of the 2+1-dimensional Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, describing the flame-front deformation in a combustion experiment. Algorithmic development includes a second-order unconditionally ... Keywords: 02.60.Cb, 02.70.-c, 05.45.-a, 05.70.Ln, 47.11.+j, 47.54.+r, Cellular flames, Distributed approximating functionals, Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, Mode decomposition, Spatio-temporal pattern formation

Peter Blomgren; Antonio Palacios; Scott Gasner

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Analysis of advanced solar hybrid desiccant cooling systems for buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes an assessment of the energy savings possible from developing hybrid desiccant/vapor-compression air conditioning systems. Recent advances in dehumidifier design for solar desiccant cooling systems have resulted in a dehumidifier with a low pressure drop and high efficiency in heat and mass transfer. A recent study on hybrid desiccant/vapor compression systems showed a 30%-80% savings in resource energy when compared with the best conventional systems with vapor compression. A system consisting of a dehumidifier with vapor compression subsystems in series was found to be the simplest and best overall performer.

Schlepp, D.; Schultz, K.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

An Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action InstitutionDegradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings with Syngas Combustion: Testing by Hyperbaric Advanced Development Environmental Simulator and Characterization by Advanced Electron Microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Please accept my apology in delayed delivery. Enclosed is the final technical report entitled Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings with Syngas Combustion: Testing by Hyperbaric Advanced Development Environmental Simulator and Characterization by Advanced Electron Microscopy, by Sohn. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at 407-882-1181 or ysohn@mail.ucf.edu.

Dr. Richard Wenglarz; Yongho Sohn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Modeling, simulation, sensitivity analysis, and optimization of hybrid systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid (discrete/continuous) systems exhibit both discrete state and continuous state dynamics which interact to such a significant extent that they cannot be decoupled and must be analyzed simultaneously. We present an overview of the work that has ... Keywords: Hybrid automata, combined discrete/continuous simulation, consistent reinitialization, discontinuities, sensitivity analysis, state events, transitions

Paul I. Barton; Cha Kun Lee

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Advancing clinical gait analysis through technology and policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantitatively analyzing human gait biomechanics will improve our ability to diagnose and treat disability and to measure the effectiveness of assistive devices. Gait analysis is one technology used to analyze walking, but ...

Tan, Junjay

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Advances in the identification of transfer function models using Prony analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper further advances the usefulness and understanding of Prony analysis as a tool for identification of models. The presented results allow more generality in the assumed model formulation. In addition, a comparison is made between Prony analysis and autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) modeling. Special attention is given to system conditions often encountered with power system electromechanical dynamics.

Trudnowski, D.J.; Donnelly, M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US); Hauer, J.F. [Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Innovative and Advanced Coupled Neutron Transport and Thermal Hydraulic Method (Tool) for the Design, Analysis and Optimization of VHTR/NGNP Prismatic Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This project will develop a 3D, advanced coarse mesh transport method (COMET-Hex) for steady- state and transient analyses in advanced very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). The project will lead to a coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulic (T/H) core simulation tool with fuel depletion capability. The computational tool will be developed in hexagonal geometry, based solely on transport theory without (spatial) homogenization in complicated 3D geometries. In addition to the hexagonal geometry extension, collaborators will concurrently develop three additional capabilities to increase the codes versatility as an advanced and robust core simulator for VHTRs. First, the project team will develop and implement a depletion method within the core simulator. Second, the team will develop an elementary (proof-of-concept) 1D time-dependent transport method for efficient transient analyses. The third capability will be a thermal hydraulic method coupled to the neutronics transport module for VHTRs. Current advancements in reactor core design are pushing VHTRs toward greater core and fuel heterogeneity to pursue higher burn-ups, efficiently transmute used fuel, maximize energy production, and improve plant economics and safety. As a result, an accurate and efficient neutron transport, with capabilities to treat heterogeneous burnable poison effects, is highly desirable for predicting VHTR neutronics performance. This research projects primary objective is to advance the state of the art for reactor analysis.

Rahnema, Farzad; Garimeela, Srinivas; Ougouag, Abderrafi; Zhang, Dingkang

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

198

Dynamic Systems Analysis and Simulation Dynamic Systems Analysis and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring and Diagnostics Electrical Signature Analysis In ESA, a motor (or generator) of the system under system. ESA applications have included motor-operated valves, pumps, compressors, and generators used in a large variety of applications and industries. PRIME MOVER GENERATOR ELECTRICAL LOAD ESA SYSTEM ELECTRIC

199

Community petascale project for accelerator science and simulation: Advancing computational science for future accelerators and accelerator technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research. Theand Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research. The

Spentzouris, Panagiotis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Simulation and analysis of high efficiency absorption systems for solar cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A flexible modular computer code was developed for simulation of absorption systems. The code is capable to investigate, on a comparable basis, various cycles configurations with a variety of working fluids. In Phase 1 of the program, two open cycle absorption systems for solar energy were successfully simulated. Modifications which were applied to the code in Phase 2, allowed the analysis of systems with volatile absorbents, as used in advanced, high COP, absorption systems such as the GAX cycle. Ammonia-water database was developed into equation form and introduced to the code. That eliminated discontinuities in evaluating differentials used in the solver. Properties calculated with these equations fit well the tabulated data. This and other modifications allowed to model absorption cycles using ammonia-water. Single effect cycles converged in most ranges. Direct analysis of the code to advanced cycles, such as GAX, still encountered some convergence problems. It was, however, possible to analyze the GAX cycle in groups. The results show that high COP's are obtainable and are compatible with those reached by LBL. The properties of two additional pairs, that were developed in BG Univ., are reported. 27 refs., 13 figs., 13 tabs.

Shavit, A.; Haim, I. (Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering); Borde, I.; Jelinek, M. (Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel). Applied Research Inst.)

1989-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Recent advances in differential evolution: a survey and experimental analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential Evolution (DE) is a simple and efficient optimizer, especially for continuous optimization. For these reasons DE has often been employed for solving various engineering problems. On the other hand, the DE structure has some limitations in ... Keywords: Comparative Analysis, Continuous Optimization, Differential Evolution, Self-Adaptation, Survey

Ferrante Neri; Ville Tirronen

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Immersive VR decision training: telling interactive stories featuring advanced virtual human simulation technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the premise of a synergy between the interactive storytelling and VR training simulation this paper treats the main issues involved in practical realization of an immersive VR decision training system supporting possibly broad spectrum of scenarios ... Keywords: decision training, immersive VR, interactive storytelling, virtual human simulation

Michal Ponder; Bruno Herbelin; Tom Molet; Sebastien Schertenlieb; Branislav Ulicny; George Papagiannakis; Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann; Daniel Thalmann

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Wavelet Analysis of Simulated Tropical Convective Cloud Systems. Part I: Basic Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wavelet analysis of a three-dimensional 7-day explicit simulation of the tropical cloud systems in the Global Atmosphere Research Programme (GARP) Atlantic Tropical Experiment Phase III is performed. Three physically distinct regimes (squall ...

Jun-Ichi Yano; Mitchell W. Moncrieff; Xiaoqing Wu; Michio Yamada

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Advances in the identification of electrochemical transfer function models using Prony analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper further advances the usefulness and understanding of Prony analysis as a tool for identification of power system electromechanical oscillation models. These linear models are developed by analyzing power system ring-down data. The presented results allow more generality in the assumed model formulation. In addition, a comparison is made between Prony analysis and autoregressive moving-average (KARMA) modeling, which has also been proposed for analysis of system oscillations. Under the conditions investigated, the Prony algorithm performed more accurate identification.

Trudnowski, D.J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Donnelly, M.K. (Control Tech., Inc., Bozeman, MT (United States)); Hauer, J.F. (USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Information Security Analysis Using Game Theory and Simulation  

SciTech Connect

Information security analysis can be performed using game theory implemented in dynamic simulations of Agent Based Models (ABMs). Such simulations can be verified with the results from game theory analysis and further used to explore larger scale, real world scenarios involving multiple attackers, defenders, and information assets. Our approach addresses imperfect information and scalability that allows us to also address previous limitations of current stochastic game models. Such models only consider perfect information assuming that the defender is always able to detect attacks; assuming that the state transition probabilities are fixed before the game assuming that the players actions are always synchronous; and that most models are not scalable with the size and complexity of systems under consideration. Our use of ABMs yields results of selected experiments that demonstrate our proposed approach and provides a quantitative measure for realistic information systems and their related security scenarios.

Schlicher, Bob G [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Visualization and analysis of eddies in a global ocean simulation  

SciTech Connect

Eddies at a scale of approximately one hundred kilometers have been shown to be surprisingly important to understanding large-scale transport of heat and nutrients in the ocean. Due to difficulties in observing the ocean directly, the behavior of eddies below the surface is not very well understood. To fill this gap, we employ a high-resolution simulation of the ocean developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Using large-scale parallel visualization and analysis tools, we produce three-dimensional images of ocean eddies, and also generate a census of eddy distribution and shape averaged over multiple simulation time steps, resulting in a world map of eddy characteristics. As expected from observational studies, our census reveals a higher concentration of eddies at the mid-latitudes than the equator. Our analysis further shows that mid-latitude eddies are thicker, within a range of 1000-2000m, while equatorial eddies are less than 100m thick.

Williams, Sean J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hecht, Matthew W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Petersen, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Strelitz, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maltrud, Mathew E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hlawitschka, Mario [UC DAVIS; Hamann, Bernd [UC DAVIS

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Simulation and Analysis of Converging Shock Wave Test Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results and analysis pertaining to the simulation of the Guderley converging shock wave test problem (and associated code verification hydrodynamics test problems involving converging shock waves) in the LANL ASC radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE are presented. One-dimensional (1D) spherical and two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric geometric setups are utilized and evaluated in this study, as is an instantiation of the xRAGE adaptive mesh refinement capability. For the 2D simulations, a 'Surrogate Guderley' test problem is developed and used to obviate subtleties inherent to the true Guderley solution's initialization on a square grid, while still maintaining a high degree of fidelity to the original problem, and minimally straining the general credibility of associated analysis and conclusions.

Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

208

Neutronic Analysis of an Advanced Fuel Design Concept for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the neutronic analysis of an advanced fuel design concept for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that could significantly extend the current fuel cycle length under the existing design and safety criteria. A key advantage of the fuel design herein proposed is that it would not require structural changes to the present HFIR core, in other words, maintaining the same rated power and fuel geometry (i.e., fuel plate thickness and coolant channel dimensions). Of particular practical importance, as well, is the fact that the proposed change could be justified within the bounds of the existing nuclear safety basis. The simulations herein reported employed transport theory-based and exposure-dependent eigenvalue characterization to help improve the prediction of key fuel cycle parameters. These parameters were estimated by coupling a benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP5 model of the HFIR core to the depletion code ORIGEN via the MONTEBURNS interface. The design of an advanced HFIR core with an improved fuel loading is an idea that evolved from early studies by R. D. Cheverton, formerly of ORNL. This study contrasts a modified and increased core loading of 12 kg of 235U against the current core loading of 9.4 kg. The simulations performed predict a cycle length of 39 days for the proposed fuel design, which represents a 50% increase in the cycle length in response to a 25% increase in fissile loading, with an average fuel burnup increase of {approx}23%. The results suggest that the excess reactivity can be controlled with the present design and arrangement of control elements throughout the core's life. Also, the new power distribution is comparable or even improved relative to the current power distribution, displaying lower peak to average fission rate densities across the inner fuel element's centerline and bottom cells. In fact, the fission rate density in the outer fuel element also decreased at these key locations for the proposed design. Overall, it is estimated that the advanced core design could increase the availability of the HFIR facility by {approx}50% and generate {approx}33% more neutrons annually, which is expected to yield sizeable savings during the remaining life of HFIR, currently expected to operate through 2014. This study emphasizes the neutronics evaluation of a new fuel design. Although a number of other performance parameters of the proposed design check favorably against the current design, and most of the core design features remain identical to the reference, it is acknowledged that additional evaluations would be required to fully justify the thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical performance of a new fuel design, including checks for cladding corrosion performance as well as for industrial and economic feasibility.

Xoubi, Ned [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations of next generation light sources and of high-RF linac for a next generation FEL light source at LBNL. Ain light sources The next generation of accelerator based

Qiang, Ji

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations of next generation light sources and of high-RF linac for a next generation FEL light source at LBNL. Ain light sources The next generation of accelerator based

Qiang, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Parallel I/O, analysis, and visualization of a trillion particle simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petascale plasma physics simulations have recently entered the regime of simulating trillions of particles. These unprecedented simulations generate massive amounts of data, posing significant challenges in storage, analysis, and visualization. In this ...

Surendra Byna; Jerry Chou; Oliver Rbel; Prabhat; Homa Karimabadi; William S. Daughton; Vadim Roytershteyn; E. Wes Bethel; Mark Howison; Ke-Jou Hsu; Kuan-Wu Lin; Arie Shoshani; Andrew Uselton; Kesheng Wu

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Simulation Model of the F/A-18 High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle Utilized for the Design of Advanced Control Laws  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The f18harv six degree-of-freedom nonlinear batch simulation used to support research in advanced control laws and flight dynamics issues as part of NASA''s High Alpha Technology Program is described in this report. This simulation models an F/A-18 airplane ...

Messina M. D.; Strickland M. E.; Hoffler K. D.; Carzoo S. W.; Bundick W. T.; Yeager J. C.; Jr F. L. Beissner

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

COUPLING STATE-OF-THE-SCIENCE SUBSURFACE SIMULATION WITH ADVANCED USER INTERFACE AND PARALLEL VISUALIZATION: SBIR Phase I Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a Phase I report on a project to significantly enhance existing subsurface simulation software using leadership-class computing resources, allowing researchers to solve problems with greater speed and accuracy. Subsurface computer simulation is used for monitoring the behavior of contaminants around nuclear waste disposal and storage areas, groundwater flow, environmental remediation, carbon sequestration, methane hydrate production, and geothermal energy reservoir analysis. The Phase I project was a collaborative effort between Thunderhead Engineering (project lead and developers of a commercial pre- and post-processor for the TOUGH2 simulator) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (developers of the TOUGH2 simulator for subsurface flow). The Phase I project successfully identified the technical approaches to be implemented in Phase II.

Hardeman, B.; Swenson, D.; Finsterle, S.; Zhou, Q.

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Test data will be used to validate advanced turbine design and analysis tools.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test data will be used to validate advanced turbine design and analysis tools. NREL signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with Alstom in 2010 to conduct certification testing certification testing in 2011. Tests to be conducted by NREL include a power quality test to finalize

215

Feature-Based Statistical Analysis of Combustion Simulation Data  

SciTech Connect

We present a new framework for feature-based statistical analysis of large-scale scientific data and demonstrate its effectiveness by analyzing features from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion. Turbulent flows are ubiquitous and account for transport and mixing processes in combustion, astrophysics, fusion, and climate modeling among other disciplines. They are also characterized by coherent structure or organized motion, i.e. nonlocal entities whose geometrical features can directly impact molecular mixing and reactive processes. While traditional multi-point statistics provide correlative information, they lack nonlocal structural information, and hence, fail to provide mechanistic causality information between organized fluid motion and mixing and reactive processes. Hence, it is of great interest to capture and track flow features and their statistics together with their correlation with relevant scalar quantities, e.g. temperature or species concentrations. In our approach we encode the set of all possible flow features by pre-computing merge trees augmented with attributes, such as statistical moments of various scalar fields, e.g. temperature, as well as length-scales computed via spectral analysis. The computation is performed in an efficient streaming manner in a pre-processing step and results in a collection of meta-data that is orders of magnitude smaller than the original simulation data. This meta-data is sufficient to support a fully flexible and interactive analysis of the features, allowing for arbitrary thresholds, providing per-feature statistics, and creating various global diagnostics such as Cumulative Density Functions (CDFs), histograms, or time-series. We combine the analysis with a rendering of the features in a linked-view browser that enables scientists to interactively explore, visualize, and analyze the equivalent of one terabyte of simulation data. We highlight the utility of this new framework for combustion science; however, it is applicable to many other science domains.

Bennett, J; Krishnamoorthy, V; Liu, S; Grout, R; Hawkes, E; Chen, J; Pascucci, V; Bremer, P T

2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

216

Advances in the TOUGH2 family of general-purpose reservoir simulators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

TOUGH2 is a general-purpose fluid and heat flow simulators, with applications in geothermal reservoir engineering, nuclear waste disposal, and environmental contamination problems. This report summarizes recent developments which enhance the usability of the code, and provide a more accurate and comprehensive description of reservoir processes.

Pruess, K.; Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.; Oldenburg, C.; Antunez, E.; Wu, Y.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Preliminary analysis of the dynamic heliosphere by MHD simulations  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary analysis of the dynamic heliosphere to estimate the termination shock (TS) distance from the sun around the time when Voyager 1 passed the termination shock at December 16, 2004 is performed by using MHD simulations. For input to this simulation, we use the Voyager 2 solar-wind data. We first find a stationary solution of the 3-D outer heliosphere by assigning a set of LISM parameters as our outer boundary conditions and then the dynamical analysis is performed. The model TS crossing is within 6 months of the observed date. The TS is pushed outward every time a high ram-pressure solar wind pulse arrives. After the end of the high ram-pressure wind, the TS shock shrinks inward. When the last Halloween event passed through the TS at DOY 250, 2004, the TS began to shrink inward very quickly and the TS crossed V1. The highest inward speed of the TS is over 400 km/s. The high ram-pressure solar wind transmitted through the TS becomes a high thermal-pressure plasma in the heliosheath, acting to push the TS inward. This suggests that the position of the TS is determined not only by the steady-state pressure balance condition between the solar wind ram-pressure and the LISM pressure, but by the dynamical ram pressure too. The period when the high ram-pressure solar wind arrives at the TS shock seems to correspond to the period of the TS particle event (Stone et al, 2005, Decker et al., 2005). The TS crossing date will be revised in future simulations using a more appropriate set of parameters for the LISM. This will enable us to undertake a detailed comparison of the simulation results with the TS particle events.

Washimi, H.; Zank, G. P. [Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP), University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Tanaka, T. [Faculty of Science, Kyushu University, Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

218

Benchmark analysis for the design of piping systems in advanced reactors  

SciTech Connect

To satisfy the need for the verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for an advanced boding water reactor standard design, three piping benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the advanced reactor standard design. It will be required that the combined license holders demonstrate that their solutions to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set. A summary description of each problem and some sample results are included.

Bezler, P.; DeGrassi, G.; Braverman, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Shounien Hou (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Benchmark analysis for the design of piping systems in advanced reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To satisfy the need for the verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for an advanced boding water reactor standard design, three piping benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the advanced reactor standard design. It will be required that the combined license holders demonstrate that their solutions to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set. A summary description of each problem and some sample results are included.

Bezler, P.; DeGrassi, G.; Braverman, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Shounien Hou [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : FY10 development and integration.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the progress in fiscal year 2010 in developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. Waste IPSC activities in fiscal year 2010 focused on specifying a challenge problem to demonstrate proof of concept, developing a verification and validation plan, and performing an initial gap analyses to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. This year-end progress report documents the FY10 status of acquisition, development, and integration of thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) code capabilities, frameworks, and enabling tools and infrastructure.

Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Sassani, David Carl; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies; (2) model biomass productivity and associated environmental impacts of annual cellulosic feedstocks; (3) simulate production of perennial biomass feedstocks grown on marginal lands; and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. We used the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) model to simulate biomass productivity and environmental impacts of annual and perennial cellulosic feedstocks across much of the USA on both croplands and marginal lands. We used data from LTER and eddy-covariance experiments within the study region to test the performance of EPIC and, when necessary, improve its parameterization. We investigated three scenarios. In the first, we simulated a historical (current) baseline scenario composed mainly of corn-, soybean-, and wheat-based rotations as grown existing croplands east of the Rocky Mountains in 30 states. In the second scenario, we simulated a modified baseline in which we harvested corn and wheat residues to supply feedstocks to potential cellulosic ethanol biorefineries distributed within the study area. In the third scenario, we simulated the productivity of perennial cropping systems such as switchgrass or perennial mixtures grown on either marginal or Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands. In all cases we evaluated the environmental impacts (e.g., soil carbon changes, soil erosion, nitrate leaching, etc.) associated with the practices. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided initial simulation results on the potential of annual and perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF A PROPOSED TRANSPORT CASK FOR THREE ADVANCED BURNER REACTOR USED FUEL ASSEMBLIES  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary studies of used fuel generated in the US Department of Energys Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative have indicated that current used fuel transport casks may be insufficient for the transportation of said fuel. This work considers transport of three 5-year-cooled oxide Advanced Burner Reactor used fuel assemblies with a burn-up of 160 MWD/kg. A transport cask designed to carry these assemblies is proposed. This design employs a 7-cm-thick lead gamma shield and a 20-cm-thick NS-4-FR composite neutron shield. The temperature profile within the cask, from its center to its exterior surface, is determined by two dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations of conduction, convection, and radiation within the cask. Simulations are performed for a cask with a smooth external surface and various neutron shield thicknesses. Separate simulations are performed for a cask with a corrugated external surface and a neutron shield thickness that satisfies shielding constraints. Resulting temperature profiles indicate that a three-assembly cask with a smooth external surface will meet fuel cladding temperature requirements but will cause outer surface temperatures to exceed the regulatory limit. A cask with a corrugated external surface will not exceed the limits for both the fuel cladding and outer surface temperatures.

T. Bullard; M. Greiner; M. Dennis; S. Bays; R. Weiner

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

NISAC | National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center | NISAC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Logo Logo National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Search Btn search this site... Overview Fact Sheets Capabilities Chemical Supply Chain Analysis Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASoS) National Transportation Fuels Model Network Optimization Models (RNAS and ATOM) NISAC Agent-Based Laboratory for Economics (N-ABLE(tm)) Publications Contacts Home Featured Previous National Transportatio... National Transportation Fuels Model This model informs analyses of the availability of transportation fuel in the event the fuel supply chain is disrupted. The portion of the fuel supply system represented by the network model (see figure) spans from oil fields to fuel distribution terminals. Different components of this system (e.g., crude oil import terminals, refineries,... Read More

224

simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part 1 of this two-part paper describes the analysis and 2D finite element (FE) simulations for a capacitive incremental position sensor for nanopositioning of microactuator systems with a displacement range of 100 m or more. Two related concepts for a capacitive incremental position sensor are presented. In an incremental capacitance measurement mode (ICMM), the periodic change in capacitance is measured to determine the relative displacement between two periodic geometries S1 and S2 with a gap distance of ?1 m. In a constant capacitance measurement mode (CCMM), the distance between S1 and S2 is controlled to keep the capacitance between S1 and S2 constant. Analysis and 2D finite element simulations show that the signal-to-noise ratio for CCMM can be>300 over ICMM and with less nonlinearity of the position sensor signal. This means that CCMM will perform better in accurate quadrature incremental position detection. A comparison with measurements shows that the 2D finite element simulation method is a useful tool that realistically predicts the capacitance versus displacement for different combinations of periodic geometries. (Some figures in this article are in colour only in the electronic version) 1.

A A Kuijpers; G J M Krijnen; R J Wiegerink; T S J Lammerink; M Elwenspoek

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - integrated multi-scale multi-physics hierarchical modeling and simulation framework Part III: cladding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Reactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems to develop predictive tools is critical. Not only are fabrication and performance models needed to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. In this paper we review the current status of the advanced modeling and simulation of nuclear reactor cladding, with emphasis on what is available and what is to be developed in each scale of the project, how we propose to pass information from one scale to the next, and what experimental information is required for benchmarking and advancing the modeling at each scale level.

Tome, Carlos N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, J A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lebensohn, R A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arsenlis, A [LLNL; Marian, J [LLNL; Pasamehmetoglu, K [INL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fracture of AISI 4340 steel in concentrated sodium hydroxide solution has been monitored by measuring the coupling current that flows between the crack and the external surfaces. The results clearly demonstrate that positive current flows from the crack to the external cathodes (through the solution) during crack growth of AISI 4340 steel in concentrated (6 to12 M) sodium hydroxide solution at 70 C. The (electron) coupling current contains periodic noise that is attributed to fracture events occurring at the crack front, with the amplitude of the noise and the mean current increasing with crack growth rate. The characteristic shape of the individual transients in the noise at lower SCC crack growth rate is a rapid drop followed by slow recovery. The form of the noise in the coupling current during SCC at high NaOH concentration (8 M and 12 M) is attributed to overlap of many cracks propagating simultaneously through micro fracture events along grain boundaries. The discrete events, which have a dimension of about 49 {micro}m, are postulated to be hydrogen induced, and the mechanism of caustic cracking of AISI 4340 steel is considered to be hydrogen embrittlement along grain boundaries. Measurement of the electrochemical noise is shown to be capable of detecting and distinguishing between uniform corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in the steel/NaOH system. The coupling current data are consistent with a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism for crack advance.

Macdonald, Digby D.; Liu, Sue; Sikora, Elizbieta; Liu, Jun

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Second law analysis of premixed compression ignition combustion in a diesel engine using a thermodynamic engine cycle simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A second law analysis of compression ignition engine was completed using a thermodynamic engine cycle simulation. The major components of availability destruction and transfer for an entire engine cycle were identified and the influence of mode of combustion, injection timing and EGR on availability balance was evaluated. The simulation pressure data was matched with the available experimental pressure data gathered from the tests on the Isuzu 1.7 L direct injection diesel engine. Various input parameters of the simulation were changed to represent actual engine conditions. Availability destruction due to combustion decreases with advanced injection timing and under premixed compression ignition (PCI) modes; but it is found to be insensitive to the level of EGR. Similarly, trends (or lack of trends) in the other components of availability balance were identified for variation in injection timing, EGR level and mode of combustion. Optimum strategy for efficient combustion processes was proposed based on the observed trends.

Oak, Sushil Shreekant

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Testing and Analysis to Advance R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing and Analysis to Advance R&D Testing and Analysis to Advance R&D Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. Text Alternative NREL has capabilities and experts in measurements, characterization, reliability, engineering, scientific computing, and theory to support photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) across a range of conversion technologies and scales. Conversion technologies include the primary areas of silicon, polycrystalline thin films (cadmium telluride [CdTe], copper indium gallium diselenide [CIGS]), III-V-based multijunctions, and organic PV. And scales of interest range from materials, to cells, modules, and systems. Measurements and Characterization Photo of a hand holding tweezers pinching a square wafer that is striped gold and black. We provide a huge range of techniques for measuring and characterizing PV

229

Preliminary analysis for adopting high pressure treatment: a simulation-based approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present in this paper a preliminary analysis of the simulation results in introducing high pressure treatment (HPT) into a meat production line. In particular, we first give a brief introduction to HPT and its applications. Next, we present a thorough ... Keywords: business process simulation, perishable products, production management, simulation analysis

Vassiliou Vassos; Menicou Michalis; Chartosia Niki; Christofi Stavros; Charalambides Marios

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Challenge problem and milestones for : Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the specification of a challenge problem and associated challenge milestones for the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The NEAMS challenge problems are designed to demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards IPSC goals. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. To demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards these goals and requirements, a Waste IPSC challenge problem is specified that includes coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes that describe (1) the degradation of a borosilicate glass waste form and the corresponding mobilization of radionuclides (i.e., the processes that produce the radionuclide source term), (2) the associated near-field physical and chemical environment for waste emplacement within a salt formation, and (3) radionuclide transport in the near field (i.e., through the engineered components - waste form, waste package, and backfill - and the immediately adjacent salt). The initial details of a set of challenge milestones that collectively comprise the full challenge problem are also specified.

Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Howard, Robert; McNeish, Jerry A.; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Surface detection, meshing and analysis during large molecular dynamics simulations  

SciTech Connect

New techniques are presented for the detection and analysis of surfaces and interfaces in atomistic simulations of solids. Atomistic and other particle-based simulations have no inherent notion of a surface, only atomic positions and interactions. The algorithms we introduce here provide an unambiguous means to determine which atoms constitute the surface, and the list of surface atoms and a tessellation (meshing) of the surface are determined simultaneously. The algorithms have been implemented and demonstrated to run automatically (on the fly) in a large-scale parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code on a supercomputer. We demonstrate the validity of the method in three applications in which the surfaces and interfaces evolve: void surfaces in ductile fracture, the surface morphology due to significant plastic deformation of a nanoscale metal plate, and the interfaces (grain boundaries) and void surfaces in a nanoscale polycrystalline system undergoing ductile failure. The technique is found to be quite robust, even when the topology of the surfaces changes as in the case of void coalescence where two surfaces merge into one. It is found to add negligible computational overhead to an MD code, and is much less expensive than other techniques such as the solvent-accessible surface.

Dupuy, L M; Rudd, R E

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Metrics for Availability Analysis Using a Discrete Event Simulation Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The system performance metric 'availability' is a central concept with respect to the concerns of a plant's operators and owners, yet it can be abstract enough to resist explanation at system levels. Hence, there is a need for a system-level metric more closely aligned with a plant's (or, more generally, a system's) raison d'etre. Historically, availability of repairable systems - intrinsic, operational, or otherwise - has been defined as a ratio of times. This paper introduces a new concept of availability, called endogenous availability, defined in terms of a ratio of quantities of product yield. Endogenous availability can be evaluated using a discrete event simulation analysis methodology. A simulation example shows that endogenous availability reduces to conventional availability in a simple series system with different processing rates and without intermediate storage capacity, but diverges from conventional availability when storage capacity is progressively increased. It is shown that conventional availability tends to be conservative when a design includes features, such as in - process storage, that partially decouple the components of a larger system.

Schryver, Jack C [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL; Haire, Marvin Jonathan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Advanced Seismic data Analysis Program (The "Hot Pot Project")  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data Analysis Program (The "Hot Pot Project") data Analysis Program (The "Hot Pot Project") Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Advanced Seismic data Analysis Program (The "Hot Pot Project") Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The proposed exploration surveys, drilling programs, data analysis and report generation will require 18 months to complete. It is anticipated that the resource confirmation drilling program will be successful in intersecting structural targets predicted by the 2.5-D advanced seismic analysis and model construction, effectively validating use of this innovative technology as a means to reduce drilling risk through improved well targeting. Oski expects that temporary field jobs will be created during the drilling stage and that long-term direct and indirect jobs would be created once this geothermal resource is proven and a geothermal plant is designed, financed and built.

234

Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization for software development and applications accounts for the natural domain areas (beam dynamics, electromagnetics, and advanced acceleration), and all areas depend on the enabling technologies activities, such as solvers and component technology, to deliver the desired performance and integrated simulation environment. The ComPASS applications focus on computationally challenging problems important for design or performance optimization to all major HEP, NP, and BES accelerator facilities. With the cost and complexity of particle accelerators rising, the use of computation to optimize their designs and find improved operating regimes becomes essential, potentially leading to significant cost savings with modest investment.

Spentzouris, P.; /Fermilab; Cary, J.; /Tech-X, Boulder; McInnes, L.C.; /Argonne; Mori, W.; /UCLA; Ng, C.; /SLAC; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

235

Numerical Simulation and Experimental Analysis of Notched Failure ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in numerical methods, such as extended and augmented finite element modelling (X-FEM and A-FEM respectively) provide significant...

236

Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers  

SciTech Connect

Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: 2016 CAF standards. Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industrys future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

Hale, Steve

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

237

Performance demonstration program plan for analysis of simulated headspace gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for analysis of headspace gases will consist of regular distribution and analyses of test standards to evaluate the capability for analyzing VOCs, hydrogen, and methane in the headspace of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles will provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for TRU waste characterization. Laboratory performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste drum headspace gases according to the criteria set within the text of this Program Plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAPP QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization gas samples. Analyses which are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories which have demonstrated acceptable performance in the PDP.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

ADVANCED INTEGRATION OF MULTI-SCALE MECHANICS AND WELDING PROCESS SIMULATION IN WELD INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential to save trillions of BTUs in energy usage and billions of dollars in cost on an annual basis based on use of higher strength steel in major oil and gas transmission pipeline construction is a compelling opportunity recognized by both the US Department of Energy (DOE). The use of high-strength steels (X100) is expected to result in energy savings across the spectrum, from manufacturing the pipe to transportation and fabrication, including welding of line pipe. Elementary examples of energy savings include more the 25 trillion BTUs saved annually based on lower energy costs to produce the thinner-walled high-strength steel pipe, with the potential for the US part of the Alaskan pipeline alone saving more than 7 trillion BTU in production and much more in transportation and assembling. Annual production, maintenance and installation of just US domestic transmission pipeline is likely to save 5 to 10 times this amount based on current planned and anticipated expansions of oil and gas lines in North America. Among the most important conclusions from these studies were: While computational weld models to predict residual stress and distortions are well-established and accurate, related microstructure models need improvement. Fracture Initiation Transition Temperature (FITT) Master Curve properly predicts surface-cracked pipe brittle-to-ductile initiation temperature. It has value in developing Codes and Standards to better correlate full-scale behavior from either CTOD or Charpy test results with the proper temperature shifts from the FITT master curve method. For stress-based flaw evaluation criteria, the new circumferentially cracked pipe limit-load solution in the 2007 API 1104 Appendix A approach is overly conservative by a factor of 4/?, which has additional implications. . For strain-based design of girth weld defects, the hoop stress effect is the most significant parameter impacting CTOD-driving force and can increase the crack-driving force by a factor of 2 depending on strain-hardening, pressure level as a % of SMYS, and flaw size. From years of experience in circumferential fracture analyses and experimentation, there has not been sufficient integration of work performed for other industries into analogous problems facing the oil and gas pipeline markets. Some very basic concepts and problems solved previously in these fields could have circumvented inconsistencies seen in the stress-based and strain-based analysis efforts. For example, in nuclear utility piping work, more detailed elastic-plastic fracture analyses were always validated in their ability to predict loads and displacements (stresses and strains). The eventual implementation of these methodologies will result in acceleration of the industry adoption of higher-strength line-pipe steels.

Wilkowski, Gery M.; Rudland, David L.; Shim, Do-Jun; Brust, Frederick W.; Babu, Sundarsanam

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facilitys compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement facilities must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for routine waste characterization analyses of WIPP samples.

Carlsbad Field Office

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

240

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases  

SciTech Connect

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes sample gases of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for analysis. Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facilitys compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement facilities must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for routine waste characterization analyses of WIPP samples.

Carlsbad Field Office

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases  

SciTech Connect

The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facilitys compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement facilities must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for routine waste characterization analyses of WIPP samples.

Carlsbad Field Office

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

242

Analysis of model parameters for a polymer filtration simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine a simulation model for polymer extrusion filters and determine its sensitivity to filter parameters. The simulator is a three-dimensional, time-dependent discretization of a coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations used to ...

N. Brackett-Rozinsky; S. Mondal; K. R. Fowler; E. W. Jenkins

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Linking Advanced Visualization and MATLAB for the Analysis of 3D Gene Expression Data  

SciTech Connect

Three-dimensional gene expression PointCloud data generated by the Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project (BDTNP) provides quantitative information about the spatial and temporal expression of genes in early Drosophila embryos at cellular resolution. The BDTNP team visualizes and analyzes Point-Cloud data using the software application PointCloudXplore (PCX). To maximize the impact of novel, complex data sets, such as PointClouds, the data needs to be accessible to biologists and comprehensible to developers of analysis functions. We address this challenge by linking PCX and Matlab via a dedicated interface, thereby providing biologists seamless access to advanced data analysis functions and giving bioinformatics researchers the opportunity to integrate their analysis directly into the visualization application. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, we computationally model parts of the expression pattern of the gene even skipped using a genetic algorithm implemented in Matlab and integrated into PCX via our Matlab interface.

Ruebel, Oliver; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Biggin, Mark; Knowles, David W.; Weber, Gunther H.; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

Stochastic algorithms for the analysis of numerical flame simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent progress in simulation methodologies and high-performance parallel computers have made it is possible to perform detailed simulations of multidimensional reacting flow phenomena using comprehensive kinetics mechanisms. As simulations become larger ... Keywords: computational diagnostics, particle tracking, reacting flows, stochastic

J. B. Bell; M. S. Day; J. F. Grcar; M. J. Lijewski

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

FY 1977 Progress report, Compressed air energy storage advanced systems analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Advanced Systems Analysis task is to accelerate the development of new technologies that will reduce the consumption of natural gas and oil. The immediate overall objectives of this program are to: (1) provide a screening cost assessment for thermal energy storage (TES) systems that are suitable for CAES applications; (2) establish the potential fuel savings of hybrid CAES cycles that incorporate TES for recovery of the heat of compression and estimate the economic incentive for using TES in CAES systems; and (3) investigate modified CAES cycles that eliminate the use of gas and oil by the use of alternative fuels.

Kreid, D.K.; McKinnon, M.A.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Advanced Mixed-Oxide Fuel Assemblies with VIPRE-01  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two new fuel assembly designs for light water reactors using advanced mixed-oxide fuels have been proposed to reduce the radiotoxicity of used nuclear fuel discharged from nuclear power plants. The research efforts of this thesis are the first to consider the effects of burnup on advanced mixed-oxide fuel assembly performance and thermal safety margin over an assembly?s expected operational burnup lifetime. In order to accomplish this, a new burnup-dependent thermal-hydraulic analysis methodology has been developed. The new methodology models many of the effects of burnup on an assembly design by including burnup-dependent variations in fuel pin relative power from neutronic calculations, assembly power reductions due to fissile content depletion and core reshuffling, and fuel material thermal-physical properties. Additionally, a text-based coupling method is developed to facilitate the exchange of information between the neutronic code DRAGON and thermal-hydraulic code VIPRE-01. The new methodology effectively covers the entire assembly burnup lifetime and evaluates the thermal-hydraulic performance against ANS Condition I, II, and III events with respect to the minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio, peak cladding temperatures, and fuel centerline temperatures. A comprehensive literature survey on the thermal conductivity of posed fuel materials with burnup-dependence has been carried out to model the advanced materials in the thermal-hydraulic code VIPRE-01. Where documented conductivity values are not available, a simplified method for estimating the thermal conductivity has been developed. The new thermal conductivity models are based on established FRAPCON-3 fuel property models used in the nuclear industry, with small adjustments having been made to account for actinide additions. Steady-state and transient thermal-hydraulic analyses are performed with VIPRE- 01 for a reference UO2 assembly design, and two advanced mixed-oxide fuel assembly designs using the new burnup-dependent thermal-hydraulic analysis methodology. All three designs maintain a sufficiently large thermal margin with respect to the minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio, and maximum cladding and fuel temperatures during partial and complete loss-of-flow accident scenarios. The presence of a thin (Am,Zr)O2 outer layer on the fuel pellet in the two advanced mixed-oxide fuel assembly designs increases maximum fuel temperatures during transient conditions, but does not otherwise greatly compromise the thermal margin of the new designs.

Bingham, Adam R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

An 128Innovative Vehicular Traffic Combined Simulation Tool: From a Detailed Analysis to Comprehensive Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a technologically advanced analysis method to study the urban traffic problem. The integrated approach described here may also provide interesting results for studying particularly extensive and complex situations, while guaranteeing ...

Agostino G. Bruzzone; D. Rivarolo

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Presented by Collaboration for Advanced Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented by Collaboration for Advanced Nuclear Simulation: Predictive Reactor Simulation for GNEP Kevin Clarno Reactor Analysis, NST Nuclear Science and Technology Division #12;2 Clarno_GNEP_SC07 Many operating nuclear reactors worldwide 2 Clarno_GNEP_SC07 Immediate response to global warming Designs static

250

Multi-Agent-Based simulation for analysis of transport policy and infrastructure measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we elaborate on the usage of multi-agent-based simulation (MABS) for quantitative impact assessment of transport policy and infrastructure measures. We provide a general discussion on how to use MABS for freight transport analysis, focusing ... Keywords: MABS, freight transportation, multi-agent systems, multi-agent-based simulation, supply chain simulation, transport policy assessment

Johan Holmgren; Linda Ramstedt; Paul Davidsson; Jan A. Persson

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Analysis of Advanced Liquid Waste Minimization Techniques at a PWR: Advanced Media, Pleated Filters, and Ecomomic Evaluation Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities may employ a number of options for processing radioactive liquids or improving processing system O&M. This report summarizes low level waste minimization studies for the Diablo Canyon Power Plant. These studies involved the performance of selective ion media, optimization of the chemical volume control system (CVCS) demineralizers, performance assessment of the application of advanced minimum precoat elements for processing condensate demineralizer system rinse water, and evaluation of the econ...

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

A Transfer Function Analysis of Numerical Schemes Used to Simulate Geostrophic Adjustment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional analysis of finite-difference and finite-element schemes used in numerical weather prediction has concentrated almost exclusively on an analysis of the accuracy with which the scheme simulates the phase speeds involved. In this paper ...

Arthur L. Schoenstadt

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Modeling and Analysis using SAINT: A combined discrete/continuous network simulation language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SAINT, Systems Analysis of Integrated Networks of Tasks, is a network modeling and simulation technique developed to assist in the design and analysis of complex man-machine systems.* SAINT provides the concepts necessary to model systems that consist ...

David B. Wortman; Steven D. Duket; Deborah J. Seifert

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Chemistry & Physics at Interfaces | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Atoms to Systems Materials Characterization Materials Theory and Simulation Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced...

255

A flammability and combustion model for integrated accident analysis. [Advanced light water reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A model for flammability characteristics and combustion of hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixtures is presented for application to severe accident analysis of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR's). Flammability of general mixtures for thermodynamic conditions anticipated during a severe accident is quantified with a new correlation technique applied to data for several fuel and inertant mixtures and using accepted methods for combining these data. Combustion behavior is quantified by a mechanistic model consisting of a continuity and momentum balance for the burned gases, and considering an uncertainty parameter to match the idealized process to experiment. Benchmarks against experiment demonstrate the validity of this approach for a single recommended value of the flame flux multiplier parameter. The models presented here are equally applicable to analysis of current LWR's. 21 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

Plys, M.G.; Astleford, R.D.; Epstein, M. (Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Computerized Games and Simulations in Computer-Assisted Language Learning: A Meta-Analysis of Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article explores research on the use of computerized games and simulations in language education. The author examined the psycholinguistic and sociocultural constructs proposed as a basis for the use of games and simulations in computer-assisted ... Keywords: CALL, MMORPG, MOO, computer-assisted language learning, computerized game, computerized simulation, effective language learning, gaming, meta-analysis, psycholinguistic construct, research, second language acquisition, simulation, sociocultural construct, theories of language acquisition, virtual world

Mark Peterson

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Programs understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear powers cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Symposium article: Simulation-based L2 writing instruction: Enhancement through genre analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers have highlighted various benefits of the simulation-based approach to second language (L2) writing instruction. In this article, the author argues, with specific pedagogical scenarios, that an explicit focus on genre and genre analysis in ... Keywords: EAP, ESP, L2 writing, genre analysis, genre studies, processing of content materials, simulations, textual practices, writing accuracy, writing instruction

An Cheng

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Physically based facial expression synthesizer with performance analysis and GPU-aided simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance analysis of a physically-based facial expression synthesizer with a novel algorithm for designing parametric muscle model is described. The facial expression synthesizer is partitioned into four general activities: construction of volumetric ... Keywords: GPU based simulation, facial animation, performance analysis, physically based simulation

C. Chen; E. C. Prakash

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Joule-Thomson inversion curves of mixtures by molecular simulation in comparison to advanced equations of state: natural gas as an example  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular modelling and simulation as well as four equations of state (EOS) are applied to natural gas mixtures regarding Joule-Thomson (JT) inversion. JT inversion curves are determined by molecular simulation for six different natural gas mixtures consisting of methane, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and ethane. These components are also regarded as pure fluids, leading to a total of ten studied systems. The results are compared to four advanced mixture EOS: DDMIX, SUPERTRAPP, BACKONE and the recent GERG-2004 Wide-Range Reference EOS. It is found that molecular simulation is competitive with state-of-the-art EOS in predicting JT inversion curves. The molecular based approaches (simulation and BACKONE) are superior to DDMIX and SUERTRAPP.

Vrabec, J; Hasse, H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Analysis of Wind Generation System by Real-Time Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the demand of green energy, the number of wind turbines installed has been increased drastically worldwide. Comparing with the traditional utility generation systems, the dynamic characteristic and response of wind farms are totally different. ... Keywords: Doubly-fed induction generator, real-time simulation, PC cluster-based real-time simulator, wind farm

H. C. Su; G. W. Chang; H. M. Huang; K. K. Jen; G. C. Chung; G. Z. Wu

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Visual Analysis of Particle Behaviors to Understand Combustion Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of turbulent flames have used particles to capture the dynamic behavior of combustion in next-generation engines. Each particle includes a history of its movement positions and changing thermochemical states. Analyzing such a set of many ... Keywords: visualization, simulation, modeling, machine learning, artificial intelligence, computer graphics, graphics and multimedia

Jishang Wei; Hongfeng Yu; Ray Grout; Jacqueline Chen; Kwan-Liu Ma

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Design of an Enterprise Dynamic Performance Simulation and Analysis System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many problems in enterprise running faced by managers can be resolved by simulation of the corresponding system dynamics model. It is often desirable to forecasting enterprise running in the next period. And managers hope to find the reason quickly if ... Keywords: dynamic performance, simulation, sensitivity, diagnose, performance optimization

Zheng Li; Yueting Chai; Yi Liu

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Virtually simulating the next generation of clean energy technologies: NETL's AVESTAR Center is dedicated to the safe, reliable and efficient operation of advanced energy plants with carbon capture  

SciTech Connect

Imagine using a real-time virtual simulator to learn to fly a space shuttle or rebuild your car's transmission without touching a piece of equipment or getting your hands dirty. Now, apply this concept to learning how to operate and control a state-of-the-art, electricity-producing power plant capable of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture. That's what the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR) Center (www.netl.doe.gov/avestar) is designed to do. Established as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative to advance new clean energy technology for power generation, the AVESTAR Center focuses primarily on providing simulation-based training for process engineers and energy plant operators, starting with the deployment of a first-of-a-kind operator training simulator for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Based on Invensys Operations Management's SimSci-Esscor DYNSIM software, the high-fidelity dynamic simulator provides realistic training on IGCC plant operations, including normal and faulted operations, as well as plant start-up, shutdown and power demand load changes. The highly flexible simulator also allows for testing of different types of fuel sources, such as petcoke and biomass, as well as co-firing fuel mixtures. The IGCC dynamic simulator is available at AVESTAR's two locations, NETL (Figure 1) and West Virginia University's National Research Center for Coal and Energy (www.nrcce.wvu.edu), both in Morgantown, W.Va. By offering a comprehensive IGCC training program, AVESTAR aims to develop a workforce well prepared to operate, control and manage commercial-scale gasification-based power plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The facility and simulator at West Virginia University promotes NETL's outreach mission by offering hands-on simulator training and education to researchers and university students.

Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Vibration Monitoring and Analysis: Durability Surveillance at Potomac Electric Power Company's Stat ion H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analyses performed by EPRI's Vibration Monitoring and Analysis System (VMAS) represent an important source of steady- state and transient operational data. These advanced gas turbine guidelines discuss state-of-the art vibration analysis methods, monitoring systems, and sensors as well as troubleshooting approaches for engine-related problems.

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

266

An Analysis of Energy Savings Possible Through Advances in Automotive Tooling Technology  

SciTech Connect

The use of lightweight and highly formable advanced materials in automobile and truck manufacturing has the potential to save fuel. Advances in tooling technology would promote the use of these materials. This report describes an energy savings analysis performed to approximate the potential fuel savings and consequential carbon-emission reductions that would be possible because of advances in tooling in the manufacturing of, in particular, non-powertrain components of passenger cars and heavy trucks. Separate energy analyses are performed for cars and heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are considered to be Class 7 and 8 trucks (trucks rated over 26,000 lbs gross vehicle weight). A critical input to the analysis is a set of estimates of the percentage reductions in weight and drag that could be achieved by the implementation of advanced materials, as a consequence of improved tooling technology, which were obtained by surveying tooling industry experts who attended a DOE Workshop, Tooling Technology for Low-Volume Vehicle Production, held in Seattle and Detroit in October and November 2003. The analysis is also based on 2001 fuel consumption totals and on energy-audit component proportions of fuel use due to drag, rolling resistance, and braking. The consumption proportions are assumed constant over time, but an allowance is made for fleet growth. The savings for a particular component is then the product of total fuel consumption, the percentage reduction of the component, and the energy audit component proportion. Fuel savings estimates for trucks also account for weight-limited versus volume-limited operations. Energy savings are assumed to be of two types: (1) direct energy savings incurred through reduced forces that must be overcome to move the vehicle or to slow it down in braking. and (2) indirect energy savings through reductions in the required engine power, the production and transmission of which incur thermodynamic losses, internal friction, and other inefficiencies. Total savings for an energy use component are estimated by scaling up the direct savings with an approximate total-to-direct savings ratio. Market penetration for new technology vehicles is estimated from projections about scrappage. Retrofit savings are assumed negligible, but savings are also assumed to accrue with increases in the fleet size, based on economic growth forecasts. It is assumed that as vehicles in the current fleet are scrapped, they are replaced with advanced-technology vehicles. Saving estimates are based on proportions of new vehicles, rather than new-vehicle mileages. In practice, of course, scrapped vehicles are often replaced with used vehicles, and used vehicles are replaced with new vehicles. Because new vehicles are typically driven more than old, savings estimates based on count rather than mileage proportions tend to be biased down (i.e., conservative). Savings are expressed in terms of gallons of fuel saved, metric tons of CO2 emissions reductions, and percentages relative to 2001 levels of fuel and CO2. The sensitivity of the savings projections to inputs such as energy-audit proportions of fuel consumed for rolling resistance, drag, braking, etc. is assessed by considering different scenarios. Though based on many approximations, the estimates approximate the potential energy savings possible because of improvements in tooling. For heavy trucks, annual diesel savings of 2.4-6.8 percent, and cumulative savings on the order of 54-154 percent, of 2001 consumption could accrue by 2050. By 2050, annual gasoline savings of 2.8-12 percent, and cumulative savings on the order of 83-350 percent of 2001 consumption could accrue for cars.

Rick Schmoyer, RLS

2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

267

FY2005 - Annual Progress Report for Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AdvAnced vehicle AdvAnced vehicle Technology AnAlysis And evAluATion AcTiviTies Less dependence on foreign oil, and eventual transition to an emissions-free, petroleum-free vehicle F r e e d o m C A r A n d V e h i C l e T e C h n o l o g i e s P r o g r A m Acknowledgement We would like to express our sincere appreciation to QSS Group, Inc., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory for their technical and artistic contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all the participants for their contributions to the pro- grams and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. This document highlights work sponsored by agencies of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any

268

Defect Analysis by Casting Simulation Software in Rolling Roll ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct Numerical Simulation of Inclusion Turbulent Deposition at Liquid ... and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on Macrosegregation of Investment Cast -TiAl Alloys ... of the Interaction between a Foreign Particle an Solidifying Crystalline Interface.

269

Simulation and analysis of district-heating and -cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer simulation model, GEOCITY, was developed to study the design and economics of district heating and cooling systems. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating based on climate, population, energy source, and financing conditions. The principal input variables are minimum temperature, heating degree-days, population size and density, energy supply temperature and distance from load center, and the interest rate. For district cooling, maximum temperature and cooling degree-hours are required. From this input data the model designs the fluid transport and district heating systems. From this design, GEOCITY calculates the capital and operating costs for the entire system. GEOCITY was originally developed to simulate geothermal district heating systems and thus, in addition to the fluid transport and distribution models, it includes a reservoir model to simulate the production of geothermal energy from geothermal reservoirs. The reservoir model can be adapted to simulate the supply of hot water from any other energy source. GEOCITY has been used extensively and has been validated against other design and cost studies. GEOCITY designs the fluid transport and distribution facilities and then calculates the capital and operating costs for the entire system. GEOCITY can simulate nearly any financial and tax structure through varying the rates of return on equity and debt, the debt-equity ratios, and tax rates. Both private and municipal utility systems can be simulated.

Bloomster, C.H.; Fassbender, L.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Analysis of core-concrete interaction event with flooding for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses salient aspects of the methodology, assumptions, and modeling of various features related to estimation of source terms from an accident involving a molten core-concrete interaction event (with and without flooding) in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various containment configurations are considered for this postulated severe accident. Several design features (such as rupture disks) are examined to study containment response during this severe accident. Also, thermal-hydraulic response of the containment and radionuclide transport and retention in the containment are studied. The results are described as transient variations of source terms, which are then used for studying off-site radiological consequences and health effects for the support of the Conceptual Safety Analysis Report for ANS. The results are also to be used to examine the effectiveness of subpile room flooding during this type of severe accident.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Navarro-Valenti, S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Advanced Turbine Systems Program, Conceptual Design and Product Development. Task 6, System definition and analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The strategy of the ATS program is to develop a new baseline for industrial gas turbine systems for the 21st century, meeting the buying criteria of industrial gas turbine end users, and having growth potential. These criteria guided the Solar ATS Team in selecting the system definition described in this Topical Report. The key to selecting the ATS system definition was meeting or exceeding each technical goal without negatively impacting other commercial goals. Among the most crucial goals are the buying criteria of the industrial gas turbine market. Solar started by preliminarily considering several cycles with the potential to meet ATS program goals. These candidates were initially narrowed based on a qualitative assessment of several factors such as the potential for meeting program goals and for future growth; the probability of successful demonstration within the program`s schedule and expected level of funding; and the appropriateness of the cycle in light of end users` buying criteria. A first level Quality Function Deployment (QFD) analysis then translated customer needs into functional requirements, and ensured favorable interaction between concept features. Based on this analysis, Solar selected a recuperated cycle as the best approach to fulfilling both D.O.E. and Solar marketing goals. This report details the design and analysis of the selected engine concept, and explains how advanced features of system components achieve program goals. Estimates of cost, performance, emissions and RAMD (reliability, availability, maintainability, durability) are also documented in this report.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Combination of job oriented simulation with ecological material flow analysis as integrated analysis tool for business production processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines the application of a special Environmental Management Information System (EMIS) as combination of discrete event simulation with ecological material flow analysis for a selected production process. The software tool serves as decision ...

Philip Joschko; Bernd Page; Volker Wohlgemuth

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Analysis of Idealized Tropical Cyclone Simulations Using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model: Sensitivity to Turbulence Parameterization and Grid Spacing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting Advanced Research Model (WRF-ARW) was used to perform idealized tropical cyclone (TC) simulations, with domains of 36-, 12-, and 4-km horizontal grid spacing. Tests were conducted to determine the sensitivity ...

Kevin A. Hill; Gary M. Lackmann

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Solar box-cooker: Part II-analysis and simulation  

SciTech Connect

Based on the model proposed in the companion paper (Part I), a method is outlined simulation of the solar box-cookers loaded with one, two, or four vessels. The relative importance of various heat-exchange rates in the cooker were examined. The effect of parameters such as the thickness and size of the absorber plate, emissivity of the vessel, insulation thickness, and cooking time were studied. Cookers of three sizes were simulated to assess their adequacy in cooking. The studies indicate that the black paint on the vessels could be avoided if weathered stainless steel or aluminum vessels are used. The cooker with inner dimensions of 0.6 x 0.6 x 0.1 m[sup 3] was found to be adequate to cook lunch and dinner on a clear day even in the winter months. Experimental studies carried out to obtain the heat-transfer coefficients, required for simulation, are presented.

Thulasi Das, T.C. (Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)); Karmakar, S. (Univ. of Akron, OH (United States)); Rao, D.P. (Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) Code Verification and Validation Data Standards and Requirements: Fluid Dynamics Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

V&V and UQ are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of M&S and, hence, to establish confidence in M&S. Though other industries are establishing standards and requirements for the performance of V&V and UQ, at present, the nuclear industry has not established such standards or requirements. However, the nuclear industry is beginning to recognize that such standards are needed and that the resources needed to support V&V and UQ will be very significant. In fact, no single organization has sufficient resources or expertise required to organize, conduct and maintain a comprehensive V&V and UQ program. What is needed is a systematic and standardized approach to establish and provide V&V and UQ resources at a national or even international level, with a consortium of partners from government, academia and industry. Specifically, what is needed is a structured and cost-effective knowledge base that collects, evaluates and stores verification and validation data, and shows how it can be used to perform V&V and UQ, leveraging collaboration and sharing of resources to support existing engineering and licensing procedures as well as science-based V&V and UQ processes. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base to provide V&V and UQ resources for M&S for nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear power. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors.

Greg Weirs; Hyung Lee

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Big data visual analytics for exploratory earth system simulation analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid increases in high performance computing are feeding the development of larger and more complex data sets in climate research, which sets the stage for so-called ''big data'' analysis challenges. However, conventional climate analysis techniques ... Keywords: Big data, Climate, Data intensive computing, Data mining, Multivariate, Parallel coordinates, Sensitivity analysis, Statistical visualization, Visualization

Chad A. Steed, Daniel M. Ricciuto, Galen Shipman, Brian Smith, Peter E. Thornton, Dali Wang, Xiaoying Shi, Dean N. Williams

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Propensity score analysis in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 simulated data set on independent individuals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workshop 17 simulated data set on independent individuals.Workshop 17 simulated data set on independent individualspower in this small data set by limiting the genomic

Lin, Chen; Sathirapongsasuti, Fah J; Kerner, Berit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Frequency Monitoring and Simulation Analysis for Historical Structures Being Retrofitted  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many historical structures now need to be retrofitted to meet the requirements of fast developing cities. To ensure the safety of a historical masonry building during its retrofitting, natural frequency of the structure was measured through ambient vibrating ... Keywords: Historical masonry building, Retrofit, Monitoring, Simulation

Chao Wang, Bin Peng, Peng Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Analysis of the effectiveness of gas centrifuge enrichment plants advanced safeguards  

SciTech Connect

Current safeguards approaches used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low-enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect highly enriched uranium (HEU) production with adequate detection probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and 235U enrichment of declared UF6 containers used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive assay (DA) of samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements. These improvements could reduce the difference between the operator's and inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We also explore how a few advanced safeguards systems could be assembled for unattended operation. The analysis will focus on how unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections (IDS) can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear materials when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinjoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Co-simulation for performance prediction of integrated building and HVAC systems -An analysis of solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Co-simulation for performance prediction of integrated building and HVAC systems - An analysis performance simulation of buildings and heating, ventilation and air- conditioning (HVAC) systems can help, heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are responsible for 10%-60% of the total building

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A survey of Existing V&V, UQ and M&S Data and Knowledge Bases in Support of the Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Utah State University and others. The objective of this consortium is to establish a comprehensive knowledge base to provide Verification and Validation (V&V) and Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and other resources for advanced modeling and simulation (M&S) in nuclear reactor design and analysis. NE-KAMS will become a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, the national laboratories, the U.S. NRC and the public to help ensure the safe operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. A survey and evaluation of the state-of-the-art of existing V&V and M&S databases, including the Department of Energy and commercial databases, has been performed to ensure that the NE-KAMS effort will not be duplicating existing resources and capabilities and to assess the scope of the effort required to develop and implement NE-KAMS. The survey and evaluation have indeed highlighted the unique set of value-added functionality and services that NE-KAMS will provide to its users. Additionally, the survey has helped develop a better understanding of the architecture and functionality of these data and knowledge bases that can be used to leverage the development of NE-KAMS.

Hyung Lee; Rich Johnson, Ph.D.; Kimberlyn C. Moussesau

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Simulations of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Using Advanced Lithium Batteries and Ultracapacitors on Various Driving Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Batteries for Hybrid Vehicle Applications, 23 rdSimulations of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles using Advancedultracapacitors in plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs) with high

Burke, Andy; Zhao, Hengbing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Loads Analysis of a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Using Fully Coupled Simulation: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the use of fully coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulation tools to perform a loads analysis of a 5-MW offshore wind turbine supported by a barge with moorings, one of many promising floating platform concepts.

Jonkman, J. M.; Buhl, M. L., Jr.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Anisotropic mesoscopic traffic simulation approach to support large-scale traffic and logistic modeling and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale traffic and transportation logistics analysis requires a realistic depiction of network traffic condition in a dynamic manner. In the past decades, vehicular traffic simulation approaches have been increasingly developed and applied to describe ...

Ye Tian; Yi-Chang Chiu

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

A discrete, stochastic simulation model for the analysis and design of solar energy heating systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a stochastic simulation approach to the generalized solar energy space heating performance analysis and design problem. Specifically, Markov chain models are developed to represent ambient temperature, insolation, hot water load and ...

Gerard F. Lameiro; Robert A. Rademacher

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

NETL: Advanced Research - Computation Energy Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Energy Sciences > APECS Computational Energy Sciences > APECS Advanced Research Computational Energy Sciences APECS APECS Virtual Plant APECS (Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator) is the first simulation software to combine the disciplines of process simulation and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This unique combination makes it possible for engineers to create "virtual plants" and to follow complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena from unit to unit across the plant. Advanced visualization software tools aid in analysis and optimization of the entire plant's performance. This tool can significantly reduce the cost of power plant design and optimization with an emphasis on multiphase flows critical to advanced power cycles. A government-industry-university collaboration (including DOE, NETL, Ansys/

287

Materials Characterization | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization Nuclear Forensics Scanning Probes Related Research Materials Theory and Simulation Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials Home | Science &...

288

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2Chapter 1 Analysis of Conjugated Linoleic Acid: An Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Chapter 1 Analysis of Conjugated Linoleic Acid: An Overview Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry FC2183A22B667A6B95F8EF1636CB912D AOCS Press

289

Simulation and Analysis Chain for Acoustic Ultra-high Energy Neutrino Detectors in Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acousticneutrinodetectionisapromisingapproachforlarge-scaleultra-highenergyneutrinodetectorsinwater.In this article, a Monte Carlo simulation chain for acoustic neutrino detection devices in water will be presented. The simulation chain covers the generation of the acoustic pulse produced by a neutrino interaction and its propagation to the sensors within the detector. Currently, ambient and transient noise models for the Mediterranean Sea and simulations of the data acquisition hardware, equivalent to the one used in ANTARES/AMADEUS, are implemented. A pre-selection scheme for neutrino-like signals based on matched filtering is employed, as it is used for on-line filtering. To simulate the whole processing chain for experimental data, signal classification and acoustic source reconstruction algorithms are integrated in an analysis chain. An overview of design and capabilities of the simulation and analysis chain will be presented and preliminary studies will be discussed.

Neff, M; Enzenhfer, A; Graf, K; Hl, J; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Sieger, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Neutronics analysis of a modified Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this research is to, based on the original design for the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR), develop an MCNPX model (more)

Abejon Orzaez, Jorge

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan. Part 2, Mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices. Version 1.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, 'ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines'. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

Ellis, Molly A.; Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan part 2 mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices, version 2.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR001.3.2 and CPR001.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ''ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines''. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1: ASC software quality engineering practices, Version 2.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Multifractal Analysis and Simulation of the Global Meteorological Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taking the example of the meteorological measuring network, it is shown how the density of stations can be characterized by multifractal measures. A series of multifractal analysis techniques are applied (including new ones designed to take into ...

Y. Tessier; S. Lovejoy; D. Schertzer

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Simulations of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Using Advanced Lithium Batteries and Ultracapacitors on Various Driving Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

weight, volume, and the cost of the battery unit. It is alsoweight, volume, and the cost of the battery unit. It is alsoCost-Effective Combinations of Ultracapacitors and Batteries for Vehicle Applications, Proceedings of the Second International Advanced Battery

Burke, Andy; Zhao, Hengbing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Technology gap analysis on sodium-cooled reactor fuel handling system supporting advanced burner reactor development.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand in an environmentally sustainable manner, to address nuclear waste management issues without making separated plutonium, and to address nonproliferation concerns. The advanced burner reactor (ABR) is a fast reactor concept which supports the GNEP fuel cycle system. Since the integral fast reactor (IFR) and advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) projects were terminated in 1994, there has been no major development on sodium-cooled fast reactors in the United States. Therefore, in support of the GNEP fast reactor program, the history of sodium-cooled reactor development was reviewed to support the initiation of this technology within the United States and to gain an understanding of the technology gaps that may still remain for sodium fast reactor technology. The fuel-handling system is a key element of any fast reactor design. The major functions of this system are to receive, test, store, and then load fresh fuel into the core; unload from the core; then clean, test, store, and ship spent fuel. Major requirements are that the system must be reliable and relatively easy to maintain. In addition, the system should be designed so that it does not adversely impact plant economics from the viewpoints of capital investment or plant operations. In this gap analysis, information on fuel-handling operating experiences in the following reactor plants was carefully reviewed: EBR-I, SRE, HNPF, Fermi, SEFOR, FFTF, CRBR, EBR-II, DFR, PFR, Rapsodie, Phenix, Superphenix, KNK, SNR-300, Joyo, and Monju. The results of this evaluation indicate that a standardized fuel-handling system for a commercial fast reactor is yet to be established. However, in the past sodium-cooled reactor plants, most major fuel-handling components-such as the rotatable plug, in-vessel fuel-handling machine, ex-vessel fuel transportation cask, ex-vessel sodium-cooled storage, and cleaning stations-have accumulated satisfactory construction and operation experiences. In addition, two special issues for future development are described in this report: large capacity interim storage and transuranic-bearing fuel handling.

Chikazawa, Y.; Farmer, M.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Express Licensing Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And Membrane Express Licensing Analysis Of Macromolecule, Liggands And Macromolecule-Lingand Complexes Express Licensing Carbon Microtubes Express Licensing Chemical Synthesis Of Chiral Conducting Polymers Express Licensing Forming Adherent Coatings Using Plasma Processing Express Licensing Hydrogen Scavengers Express Licensing Laser Welding Of Fused Quartz Express Licensing Multiple Feed Powder Splitter Negotiable Licensing Boron-10 Neutron Detectors for Helium-3 Replacement Negotiable Licensing Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Negotiable Licensing Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) Express Licensing Method of Synthesis of Proton Conducting Materials

298

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System Simulations  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System Simulations Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System Simulations Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.gwec.net/index.php?id=131 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/spain-installed-wind-capacity-website Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Feed-in Tariffs This website presents an overview of total installed wind energy capacity in Spain per year from 2000 to 2010. The page also presents the main market developments from 2010; a policy summary; a discussion of the revision in feed-in tariffs in 2010; and a future market outlook. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cost-Benefit_Analysis_of_Smart_Grid_Technologies_Through_System_Simulations&oldid=514355"

299

PHYSICAL FIDELITY CONSIDERATIONS FOR NRC ADVANCED REACTOR CONTROL ROOM TRAINING SIMULATORS USED FOR INSPECTOR/EXAMINER TRAINING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes research into the physical fidelity requirements of control room simulators to train U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff for their duties as inspectors and license examiners for next-generation nuclear power plants. The control rooms of these power plants are expected to utilize digital instrumentation and controls to a much greater extent than do current plants. The NRC is assessing training facility needs, particularly for control room simulators, which play a central role in NRC training. Simulator fidelity affects both training effectiveness and cost. Research has shown high simulation fidelity sometimes positively affects transfer to the operational environment but sometimes makes no significant difference or actually impedes learning. The conditions in which these different effects occur are often unclear, especially for regulators (as opposed to operators) about whom research is particularly sparse. This project developed an inventory of the tasks and knowledges, skills, and abilities that NRC regulators need to fulfill job duties and used expert panels to characterize the inventory items by type and level of cognitive/behavioral capability needed, difficulty to perform, importance to safety, frequency of performance, and the importance of simulator training for learning these capabilities. A survey of current NRC staff provides information about the physical fidelity of the simulator on which the student trained to the control room to which the student was assigned and the effect lack of fidelity had on learning and job performance. The study concludes that a high level of physical fidelity is not required for effective training of NRC staff.

Branch, Kristi M.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Miller, Mark; Cochrum, Steven

2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

300

Molecular simulation analysis and X-ray absorption measurement of Ca2+, K+, and Cl- ions in solution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent advances in the use of molecular simulations and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to understand solvated ions in aqueous solutions are described. We report and discuss the results of the EXAFS spectra, Debye-Waller factors and the related properties governing solvation processes of different ions in water, as well as in different solvents (methanol). Molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories are coupled to electron scattering simulations to generate the EXAFS spectra, which are found to be in very good agreement with the corresponding experimental measurements. From these spectra, both the ion-oxygen and the ion-hydrogen distances for the first hydration shell are predicted to be within 0.1-0.2 . The ionic species studied range from monovalent to divalent, positive and negative: K+, Ca2+ and Cl-. This work demonstrates that the combination of MD-EXAFS and the corresponding experiment measurement provides a powerful tool in the analysis of the solvation structure of aqueous ionic solutions. We also investigate the value of electronic structure analysis of small aqueous clusters as a benchmark to the empirical potentials. In a novel computational approach, we compute the Debye-Waller factors combining a harmonic analysis of data obtained from electronic structure calculations on finite ionwater clusters, and we present a direct comparison with results from a harmonic classical statistical mechanical analysis of an empirical potential. Work was supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

Dang, Liem X.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Glezakou, Vanda A.; Fulton, John L.

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Analysis of the Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been receiving specific attention for Generation IV possibilities due to desired characteristics such as relatively low cost, short construction period, and inherent safety. Attractive inherent characteristics include an inert, single phase helium coolant, refractory coated fuel with high temperature capability and low fission product release, and graphite moderator with high temperature stability and long response times. The passively safe design has a relatively low power density, annular core, large negative temperature coefficient, and passive decay heat removal system. The objective of the U.S. DOE NERI Project is to assess the possibility, advantages and limitations of achieving ultra-long life VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) configurations by utilizing minor actinides as a fuel component. The present analysis takes into consideration and compares capabilities of pebble-bed core designs with various core and reflector configuration to allow spectrum shifting for advanced actinide fuels. Whole-core 3D models for pebble-bed design with multi-heterogeneity treatments in SCALE 5.0 are developed to compare computational results with experiments. Obtained results are in agreement with the available HTR-10 data. By altering the moderator to fuel ratio, a shift in the spectrum is observed. The use of minor actinides as fuel components relies on spectrum shifting capabilities. Actinide fueled VHTR configurations reveal promising performance. With an optimized pebble-bed model, the spectrum shifting abilities are apparent and effects of altered moderator to fuel ratio, and Dancoff factor are investigated. This will lead to a facilitated development of new fuel cycles in support of future operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems.

Pritchard, Megan; Tsvetkov, Pavel

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

Analysis of Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been receiving specific attention for Generation IV possibilities due to desired characteristics such as relatively low cost, short construction period, and inherent safety. Attractive inherent characteristics include an inert, single phase helium coolant, refractory coated fuel with high temperature capability and low fission product release, and graphite moderator with high temperature stability and long response times. The passively safe design has a relatively low power density, annular core, large negative temperature coefficient, and passive decay heat removal system. The objective of the U.S. DOE NERI Project is to assess the possibility, advantages and limitations of achieving ultra-long life VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) configurations by utilizing minor actinides as a fuel component. The present analysis takes into consideration and compares capabilities of pebble-bed core designs with various core and reflector configuration to allow spectrum shifting for advanced actinide fuels. Whole-core 3D models for pebble-bed design with multi-heterogeneity treatments in SCALE 5.0 are developed to compare computational results with experiments. Obtained results are in agreement with the available HTR-10 data. By altering the moderator to fuel ratio, a shift in the spectrum is observed. The use of minor actinides as fuel components relies on spectrum shifting capabilities. Actinide fueled VHTR configurations reveal promising performance. With an optimized pebble-bed model, the spectrum shifting abilities are apparent and effects of altered moderator to fuel ratio, and Dancoff factor are investigated. This will lead to a facilitated development of new fuel cycles in support of future operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems.

Pritchard, Megan

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

303

Molecular simulation analysis of structural variations in lipoplexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a coarse-grained molecular model to study the self-assembly process of complexes of cationic and neutral lipids with DNA molecules ("lipoplexes") - a promising nonviral carrier of DNA for gene therapy. We identify the resulting structures through direct visualization of the molecular arrangements and through calculations of the corresponding scattering plots. The latter approach provides a means for comparison with published data from X-ray scattering experiments. Consistent with experimental results, we find that upon increasing the stiffness of the lipid material, the system tends to form lamellar structures. Two characteristic distances can be extracted from the scattering plots of lamellar complexes - the lamellar (interlayer) spacing and the DNA-spacing within each layer. We find a remarkable agreement between the computed values of these two quantities and the experimental data [J. O. R\\"{a}dler, I. Koltover, T. Salditt and C. R. Safinya, Science Vol. 275, 810 (1997)] over the entire range of mole fractions of charged lipids (CLs) studied experimentally. A visual inspection of the simulated systems reveals that, for very high fractions of CLs, disordered structures consisting of DNA molecules bound to small membrane fragments are spontaneously formed. The diffraction plots of these non-lamellar disordered complexes appear very similar to that of the lamellar structure, which makes the interpretation of the X-ray data ambiguous. The loss of lamellar order may be the origin of the observed increase in the efficiency of lipoplexes as gene delivery vectors at high charge densities.

Oded Farago; Niels Grnbech-Jensen

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

304

Survey and Analysis of Weather Data for Building Energy Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, calibrated energy modeling of residential and commercial buildings has gained importance in a retrofit-dominated market. Accurate weather data plays an important role in this calibration process and projected energy savings. It would be ideal to measure weather data at the building location to capture relevant microclimate variation but this is generally considered cost-prohibitive. There are data sources publicly available with high temporal sampling rates but at relatively poor geospatial sampling locations. To overcome this limitation, there are a growing number of service providers that claim to provide real time and historical weather data for 20-35 km2 grid across the globe. Unfortunately, there is limited documentation from 3rd-party sources attesting to the accuracy of this data. This paper compares provided weather characteristics with data collected from a weather station inaccessible to the service providers. Monthly average dry bulb temperature; relative humidity; direct, diffuse and horizontal solar radiation; and wind speed are statistically compared. Moreover, we ascertain the relative contributions of each weather variable and its impact on building loads. Annual simulations are calculated for three different building types, including a closely monitored and automated energy efficient research building. The comparison shows that the difference for an individual variable can be as high as 90%. In addition, annual building energy consumption can vary by 7% while monthly building loads can vary by 40% as a function of the provided location s weather data.

Bhandari, Mahabir S [ORNL; Shrestha, Som S [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Systems Analysis of an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Based on a Modified UREX+3c Process  

SciTech Connect

The research described in this report was performed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe and compare the merits of two advanced alternative nuclear fuel cycles -- named by this study as the UREX+3c fuel cycle and the Alternative Fuel Cycle (AFC). Both fuel cycles were assumed to support 100 1,000 MWe light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants operating over the period 2020 through 2100, and the fast reactors (FRs) necessary to burn the plutonium and minor actinides generated by the LWRs. Reprocessing in both fuel cycles is assumed to be based on the UREX+3c process reported in earlier work by the DOE. Conceptually, the UREX+3c process provides nearly complete separation of the various components of spent nuclear fuel in order to enable recycle of reusable nuclear materials, and the storage, conversion, transmutation and/or disposal of other recovered components. Output of the process contains substantially all of the plutonium, which is recovered as a 5:1 uranium/plutonium mixture, in order to discourage plutonium diversion. Mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for recycle in LWRs is made using this 5:1 U/Pu mixture plus appropriate makeup uranium. A second process output contains all of the recovered uranium except the uranium in the 5:1 U/Pu mixture. The several other process outputs are various waste streams, including a stream of minor actinides that are stored until they are consumed in future FRs. For this study, the UREX+3c fuel cycle is assumed to recycle only the 5:1 U/Pu mixture to be used in LWR MOX fuel and to use depleted uranium (tails) for the makeup uranium. This fuel cycle is assumed not to use the recovered uranium output stream but to discard it instead. On the other hand, the AFC is assumed to recycle both the 5:1 U/Pu mixture and all of the recovered uranium. In this case, the recovered uranium is reenriched with the level of enrichment being determined by the amount of recovered plutonium and the combined amount of the resulting MOX. The study considered two sub-cases within each of the two fuel cycles in which the uranium and plutonium from the first generation of MOX spent fuel (i) would not be recycled to produce a second generation of MOX for use in LWRs or (ii) would be recycled to produce a second generation of MOX fuel for use in LWRs. The study also investigated the effects of recycling MOX spent fuel multiple times in LWRs. The study assumed that both fuel cycles would store and then reprocess spent MOX fuel that is not recycled to produce a next generation of LWR MOX fuel and would use the recovered products to produce FR fuel. The study further assumed that FRs would begin to be brought on-line in 2043, eleven years after recycle begins in LWRs, when products from 5-year cooled spent MOX fuel would be available. Fuel for the FRs would be made using the uranium, plutonium, and minor actinides recovered from MOX. For the cases where LWR fuel was assumed to be recycled one time, the 1st generation of MOX spent fuel was used to provide nuclear materials for production of FR fuel. For the cases where the LWR fuel was assumed to be recycled two times, the 2nd generation of MOX spent fuel was used to provide nuclear materials for production of FR fuel. The number of FRs in operation was assumed to increase in successive years until the rate that actinides were recovered from permanently discharged spent MOX fuel equaled the rate the actinides were consumed by the operating fleet of FRs. To compare the two fuel cycles, the study analyzed recycle of nuclear fuel in LWRs and FRs and determined the radiological characteristics of irradiated nuclear fuel, nuclear waste products, and recycle nuclear fuels. It also developed a model to simulate the flows of nuclear materials that could occur in the two advanced nuclear fuel cycles over 81 years beginning in 2020 and ending in 2100. Simulations projected the flows of uranium, plutonium, and minor actinides as these nuclear fuel materials were produced and consumed in a fleet of 100 1,000 MWe LWRs and in FRs. The model als

E. R. Johnson; R. E. Best

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

306

An Experiment with an Advanced Surface Parameterization in a Mesobeta-Scale Model. Part II: The 16 June 1986 Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this second part, we report on a one-day simulation with the French Weather Service limited-area model PERIDOT, including the new parameterization of land-surface energy budget. The emphasis is put on the assessment of the general quality of ...

P. Bougeault; B. Bret; P. Lacarrre; J. Noilhan

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Tropical Cyclone Wind Retrievals from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit: Application to Surface Wind Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal winds at 850 hPa from tropical cyclones retrieved using the nonlinear balance equation, where the mass field was determined from Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) temperature soundings, are compared with the surface wind fields ...

Kotaro Bessho; Mark DeMaria; John A. Knaff

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Development and Analysis of Advanced High-Temperature Technology for Nuclear Heat Transport and Power Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project by the Thermal Hydraulics Research Laboratory at U.C. Berkeley Studied advanced high-temperature heat transport and power conversion technology, in support of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative and Generation IV.

Per F. Peterson

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Satellite Analysis of Tropical Cyclones Using the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) was launched aboard the NOAA15 satellite on 13 May 1998. The AMSU is well suited for the observation of tropical cyclones because its measurements are not significantly affected by the ice clouds ...

Stanley Q. Kidder; Mitchell D. Goldberg; Raymond M. Zehr; Mark DeMaria; James F. W. Purdom; Christopher S. Velden; Norman C. Grody; Sheldon J. Kusselson

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The Analysis of Typhoon Structures Using Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit Data and Its Application to Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) data are used to retrieve the temperature and velocity fields of typhoons and assimilate them with the three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVAR) routines for uses in ...

Chien-Ben Chou; Ching-Yuang Huang; Huei-Ping Huang; Kung-Hwa Wang; Tien-Chiang Yeh

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. G. MacPherson The molten salt adventure Nuclear Scienceand P.F. Peterson, Molten-Salt-Cooled Advanced High-Clarno Assessment of candidate molten salt coolants for the

Galvez, Cristhian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Simulation-Length Requirements in the Loads Analysis of Offshore Floating Wind Turbines: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to examine the appropriate length of a floating offshore wind turbine (FOWT) simulation - a fundamental question that needs to be answered to develop design requirements. To examine this issue, a loads analysis of an example FOWT was performed in FAST with varying simulation lengths. The offshore wind system used was the OC3-Hywind spar buoy, which was developed for use in the International Energy Agency Code Comparison Collaborative Project and supports NREL's offshore 5-megawatt baseline turbine. Realistic metocean data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and repeated periodic wind files were used to excite the structure. The results of the analysis clearly show that loads do not increase for longer simulations. In regards to fatigue, a sensitivity analysis shows that the procedure used for counting half cycles is more important than the simulation length itself. Based on these results, neither the simulation length nor the periodic wind files affect response statistics and loads for FOWTs (at least for the spar studied here); a result in contrast to the offshore oil and gas industry, where running simulations of at least 3 hours in length is common practice.

Haid, L.; Stewart, G.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Lackner, M.; Matha, D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Simulation-Length Requirements in the Loads Analysis of Offshore Floating Wind Turbines: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this paper is to examine the appropriate length of a floating offshore wind turbine (FOWT) simulation - a fundamental question that needs to be answered to develop design requirements. To examine this issue, a loads analysis of an example FOWT was performed in FAST with varying simulation lengths. The offshore wind system used was the OC3-Hywind spar buoy, which was developed for use in the International Energy Agency Code Comparison Collaborative Project and supports NREL's offshore 5-megawatt baseline turbine. Realistic metocean data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and repeated periodic wind files were used to excite the structure. The results of the analysis clearly show that loads do not increase for longer simulations. In regards to fatigue, a sensitivity analysis shows that the procedure used for counting half cycles is more important than the simulation length itself. Based on these results, neither the simulation length nor the periodic wind files affect response statistics and loads for FOWTs (at least for the spar studied here); a result in contrast to the offshore oil and gas industry, where running simulations of at least 3 hours in length is common practice.

Haid, L.; Stewart, G.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Lackner, M.; Matha, D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

YT: A Multi-Code Analysis Toolkit for Astrophysical Simulation Data  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of complex multiphysics astrophysical simulations presents a unique and rapidly growing set of challenges: reproducibility, parallelization, and vast increases in data size and complexity chief among them. In order to meet these challenges, and in order to open up new avenues for collaboration between users of multiple simulation platforms, we present yt (available at http://yt.enzotools.org/) an open source, community-developed astrophysical analysis and visualization toolkit. Analysis and visualization with yt are oriented around physically relevant quantities rather than quantities native to astrophysical simulation codes. While originally designed for handling Enzo's structure adaptive mesh refinement data, yt has been extended to work with several different simulation methods and simulation codes including Orion, RAMSES, and FLASH. We report on its methods for reading, handling, and visualizing data, including projections, multivariate volume rendering, multi-dimensional histograms, halo finding, light cone generation, and topologically connected isocontour identification. Furthermore, we discuss the underlying algorithms yt uses for processing and visualizing data, and its mechanisms for parallelization of analysis tasks.

Turk, Matthew J.; /San Diego, CASS; Smith, Britton D.; /Michigan State U.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Skory, Stephen; Skillman, Samuel W.; /Colorado U., CASA; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Norman, Michael L.; /aff San Diego, CASS

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

315

SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF UNSTEADY FLOW SIMULATION IN A SMALL VAWT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vertical axis wind turbine studied in this paper combine two rotations: one rotating movement of each blade around its own axis and one rotating movement around turbines axis. The aim of this paper is to analyse the effect of this two combine movements on fields of pressure and on global forces on each blade with time. Preliminary calculations showed, for some initial blade stagger angles (angle between blade 1 and x axis), that flow is highly unsteady and sometimes hardly periodic. The main goal here is to present spectral analysis of unsteady results like temporal pressure on specific points in the domain and temporal forces on blades and to show the influence of the two combine movements for two different blade stagger angles for elliptic blades.

Annie-claude Bayeul-lain; Sophie Simonet; Grard Bois; Leconte P; Rapin M; Szechenyi E; Martin J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Using EnergyPlus to Simulate the Dynamic Response of a Residential Building to Advanced Cooling Strategies: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study demonstrates the ability of EnergyPlus to accurately model complex cooling strategies in a real home with a goal of shifting energy use off peak and realizing energy savings. The house was retrofitted through the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) deep energy retrofit demonstration program; field tests were operated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The experimental data were collected as part of a larger study and are used here to validate simulation predictions.

Booten, C.; Tabares-Velasco, P. C.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Using EnergyPlus to Simulate the Dynamic Response of a Residential Building to Advanced Cooling Strategies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrates the ability of EnergyPlus to accurately model complex cooling strategies in a real home with a goal of shifting energy use off peak and realizing energy savings. The house was retrofitted through the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) deep energy retrofit demonstration program; field tests were operated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The experimental data were collected as part of a larger study and are used here to validate simulation predictions.

Booten, C.; Tabares-Velasco, P. C.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Advances in Filter Miniaturization and Design/Analysis of RF MEMS Tunable Filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main purpose of this dissertation was to address key issues in the design and analysis of RF/microwave filters for wireless applications. Since RF/microwave filters are one of the bulkiest parts of communication systems, their miniaturization is one of the most important technological challenges for the development of compact transceivers. In this work, novel miniaturization techniques were investigated for single-band, dual-band, ultra-wideband and tunable bandpass filters. In single-band filters, the use of cross-shaped fractals in half-mode substrate-integrated-waveguide bandpass filters resulted in a 37 percent size reduction. A compact bandpass filter that occupies an area of 0.315 mm2 is implemented in 90-nm CMOS technology for 20 GHz applications. For dual-band filters, using half-mode substrate-integrated-waveguides resulted in a filter that is six times smaller than its full-mode counterpart. For ultra-wideband filters, using slow-wave capacitively-loaded coplanar-waveguides resulted in a filter with improved stopband performance and frequency notch, while being 25 percent smaller in size. A major part of this work also dealt with the concept of 'hybrid' RF MEMS tunable filters where packaged, off-the-shelf RF MEMS switches were used to implement high-performance tunable filters using substrate-integrated-waveguide technology. These 'hybrid' filters are very easily fabricated compared to current state-of-the-art RF MEMS tunable filters because they do not require a clean-room facility. Both the full-mode and half-mode substrate-integrated waveguide tunable filters reported in this work have the best Q-factors (93 - 132 and 75 - 140, respectively) compared to any 'hybrid' RF MEMS tunable filter reported in current literature. Also, the half-mode substrate-integrated waveguide tunable filter is 2.5 times smaller than its full-mode counterpart while having similar performance. This dissertation also presented detailed analytical and simulation-based studies of nonlinear noise phenomena induced by Brownian motion in all-pole RF MEMS tunable filters. Two independent mathematical methods are proposed to calculate phase noise in RF MEMS tunable filters: (1) pole-perturbation approach, and (2) admittance-approach. These methods are compared to each other and to harmonic balance noise simulations using the CAD-model of the RF MEMS switch. To account for the switch nonlinearity in the mathematical methods, a nonlinear nodal analysis technique for tunable filters is also presented. In summary, it is shown that output signal-to-noise ratio degradation due to Brownian motion is maximum for low fractional bandwidth, high order and high quality factor RF MEMS tunable filters. Finally, a self-sustained microwave platform to detect the dielectric constant of organic liquids is presented in this dissertation. The main idea is to use a voltage- controlled negative-resistance oscillator whose frequency of oscillation varies according to the organic liquid under test. To make the system self-sustained, the oscillator is embedded in a frequency synthesizer system, which is then digitally interfaced to a computer for calculation of dielectric constant. Such a system has potential uses in a variety of applications in medicine, agriculture and pharmaceuticals.

Sekar, Vikram

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Simulations and Experiments on Modifying the q-Profile for Advanced Tokamak Discharges on Alcator C-Mod  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Experiments on and Experiments on Modifying the q-Profile for Advanced Tokamak Discharges on Alcator C-Mod C. E. Kessel 1 , A. E. Hubbard 2 P. Bonoli 2 , M. Greenwald, J. Ko 2 , Y. Lin 2 , R. Parker 2 , A. E. Schmidt 2 , S. Scott 1 , J. Snipes, D. Terry 2 , G. Wallace 2 , R. Wilson 1 , S. Wolfe 2 , S. Wukitch 2 1 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 2 Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT APS Division of Plasma Physics, November 2007 Controlling the q-Profile in Alcator C-Mod * Lower Hybrid current drive provides a strong source of non- inductive current at large minor radius * ICRF provides central and off-axis heating * Cryopump provides density control * MSE/Faraday rotation provide current profile diagnostics * Goal is to produce 100% non-inductive plasma current with LHCD and bootstrap current * Goal is to elevate the safety factor and control the q-profile

320

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Advanced Vehicle Cost and Energy-use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicle Cost and Energy-use Model (AVCEM) Advanced Vehicle Cost and Energy-use Model (AVCEM) Project Summary Full Title: Advanced Vehicle Cost and Energy-use Model (AVCEM) Project ID: 123 Principal Investigator: Mark Delucchi Brief Description: AVCEM is an electric and gasoline vehicle energy-use and lifetime-cost model. AVCEM designs a motor vehicle to meet range and performance requirements specified by the modeler, and then calculates the initial retail cost and total private and social lifetime cost of the designed vehicle. Purpose AVCEM designs a motor vehicle to meet range and performance requirements specified by the modeler, and then calculates the initial retail cost and total private and social lifetime cost of the designed vehicle. It can be used to investigate the relationship between the lifetime cost -- the total

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Design, Simulation, and Analysis of Substation Automation Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Society depends on computer networks for communication. The networks were built to support and facilitate several important applications such as email, web browsing and instant messaging. Recently, there is a significant interest in leveraging modern local and wide area communication networks for improving reliability and performance in critical infrastructures. Emerging critical infrastructure applications, such as smart grid, require a certain degree of reliability and Quality of Service (QoS). Supporting these applications requires network protocols that enable delay sensitive packet delivery and packet prioritization. However, most of the traditional networks are designed to provide best effort service without any support for QoS. The protocols used in these networks do not support packet prioritization, delay requirements and reliability. In this thesis, we focus on the design and analysis of communication protocols for supporting smart grid applications. In particular, we focus on the Substation Automation Systems (SAS). Substations are nodes in the smart grid infrastructure that help the in transportation of power by connecting the transmission and distribution lines. The SAS applications are con figured to operate with minimal human intervention. The SAS monitors the line loads continuously. If the load values are too high and can lead to damage, the SAS declares those conditions as faults. On fault detection, the SAS must take care of the communication with the relay to open the circuit to prevent any damage. These messages are of high priority and require reliable, delay sensitive delivery. There is a threshold for the delay of these messages, and a slight increase in the delay above the threshold might cause severe damages. Along with such high priority messages, the SAS has a lot of background traffic as well. In spite of the background traffic, the substation network must take care of delivering the priority messages on time. Hence, the network plays a vital role in the operation of the substation. Networks designed for such applications should be analyzed carefully to make sure that the requirements are met properly. We analyzed and compared the performance of the SAS under di erent network topologies. By observing the characteristics of the existing architectures, we came up with new architectures that perform better. We have suggested several modi cations to existing solutions that allow significant improvement in the performance of the existing solutions.

Kembanur Natarajan, Elangovan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Analysis and Visualization of Multi-Scale Astrophysical Simulations using Python and NumPy  

SciTech Connect

The study the origins of cosmic structure requires large-scale computer simulations beginning with well-constrained, observationally-determined, initial conditions. We use Adaptive Mesh Refinement to conduct multi-resolution simulations spanning twelve orders of magnitude in spatial dimensions and over twenty orders of magnitude in density. These simulations must be analyzed and visualized in a manner that is fast, accurate, and reproducible. I present 'yt,' a cross-platform analysis toolkit written in Python. 'yt' consists of a data-management layer for transporting and tracking simulation outputs, a plotting layer, a parallel analysis layer for handling mesh-based and particle-based data, as well as several interfaces. I demonstrate how the origins of cosmic structure--from the scale of clusters of galaxies down to the formation of individual stars--can be analyzed and visualized using a NumPy-based toolkit. Additionally, I discuss efforts to port this analysis code to other adaptive mesh refinement data formats, enabling direct comparison of data between research groups using different methods to simulate the same objects.

Turk, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

In-situ sampling of a large-scale particle simulation for interactive visualization and analysis  

SciTech Connect

We propose storing a random sampling of data from large scale particle simulations, such as the Roadrunner Universe MC{sup 3} cosmological simulation, to be used for interactive post-analysis and visualization. Simulation data generation rates will continue to be far greater than storage bandwidth rates and other limiting technologies by many orders of magnitude. This implies that only a very small fraction of data generated by the simulation can ever be stored and subsequently post-analyzed. The limiting technology in this situation is analogous to the problem in many population surveys: there aren't enough human resources to query a large population. To cope with the lack of resources, statistical sampling techniques are used to create a representative data set of a large population. Mirroring that situation, we propose to store a simulation-time random sampling of the particle data to cope with the bOlllenecks and support interactive, exploratory post-analysis. The particle samples are immediately stored in a level-ol-detail format for post-visualization and analysis, which amortizes the cost of post-processing for interactive visualization. Additionally, we incorporate a system for recording and visualizing sample approximation error information for confidence and importance highlighting.

Woodring, Jonathan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Heitmann, Katrin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

324

Analysis of Petroleum Technology Advances Through Applied Research by Independent Oil Producers  

SciTech Connect

Petroleum Technology Advances Through Applied Research by Independent Oil Producers is a program of the National Oil Research Program, U.S. Department of Energy. Between 1995 and 1998, the program competitively selected and cost-shared twenty-two projects with small producers. The purpose was to involve small independent producers in testing technologies of interest to them that would advance (directly or indirectly) one or more of four national program objectives: (1) Extend the productive life of reservoirs; (2) Increase production and/or reserves; (3) Improve environmental performance; and (4) Broaden the exchange of technology information.

Brashear, Jerry P.; North, Walter B.; Thomas Charles P.; Becker, Alan B.; Faulder, David D.

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

325

An Analysis of DES Cluster Simulations through the IMCAT and Shapelets Weak Lensing Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have run two completely independent weak lensing analysis pipelines on a set of realistic simulated images of a massive galaxy cluster with a singular isothermal sphere profile (galaxy velocity dispersion sigma_v=1250 km/ sec). The suite of images was constructed using the simulation tools developed by the Dark Energy Survey. We find that both weak lensing pipelines can accurately recover the velocity dispersion of our simulated clusters, suggesting that current weak lensing tools are accurate enough for measuring the shear profile of massive clusters in upcoming large photometric surveys. We also demonstrate how choices of some cuts influence the final shear profile and sigma_v measurement. Analogously to the STEP program, we make all of these cluster simulation images publically available for other groups to analyze through their own weak lensing pipelines.

Gill, M S S; Draskovic, J P; Honscheid, K; Lin, H; Kuropatkin, N; Martini, P; Peeples, M; Rozo, E; Smith, G N; Weinberg, D H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Virtual radiation fields -- A virtual environment tool for radiological analysis and simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A virtual reality system was developed for computational and graphical modeling and simulation of radiation environments. This system, called Virtual Radiation Fields (VRF), demonstrates the usefulness of radiological analysis in simulation-based design for predicting radiation doses for robotic equipment and personnel working in a radiation environment. The system was developed for use in determining the radiation doses for robotic equipment to be used in tank-waste retrieval operations at the Hanford National Laboratory. As a reference case, specific application is made to simulate cleanup operations for Hanford tank C-106. A three-dimensional model representation of the tank and its predicted radiation levels are presented and analyzed. Tank cleanup operations were simulated to understand how radiation levels change during the cleanup phase and to predict cumulative radiation doses to robotic equipment to aid in the development of maintenance and replacement schedules.

Knight, T.W.; Dalton, G.R.; Tulenko, J.S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Sciences

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators is essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modeling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multi-physics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John; /Tech-X, Boulder; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; /Argonne; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Ng, Cho; /SLAC; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators And Accelerator Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John; /Tech-X, Boulder; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; /Argonne; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Ng, Cho; /SLAC; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

329

University Program in Advanced Technology | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

& Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs > Institutional Research & Development > University Program in Advanced...

330

A SIMULATION MODEL FOR THE PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF ROOF POND SYSTEMS FOR HEATING AND COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tex. , 3rd Ann. Solar Heating & Cooling R&D Contractors'Proceedings, Passive Solar Heating & Cooling~'-~&-l~orkshop,Solar Jubilee, Phoenix, AZ, June 2-6, 1980 A SIMULATION MODEL FOR THE PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF ROOF POND SYSTEMS FOR HEATING

Tavana, Medhi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Analysis and optimization of gyrokinetic toroidal simulations on homogenous and heterogenous platforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) uses the particle-in-cell method to efficiently simulate plasma microturbulence. This work presents novel analysis and optimization techniques to enhance the performance of GTC on large-scale machines. We introduce ... Keywords: GPU programming, Particle-in-cell, hybrid programming, memory-centric multi-core tuning, multi-core optimization

Khaled Z Ibrahim, Kamesh Madduri, Samuel Williams, Bei Wang, Stephane Ethier, Leonid Oliker

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

INTERACTIVE SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF EMISSION REDUCTION SYSTEMS IN COMMERCIAL BOILERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERACTIVE SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF EMISSION REDUCTION SYSTEMS IN COMMERCIAL BOILERS Darin an emission reduction sys- tem for commercial boilers. The interactive environment is used to optimize for commercial boilers and incinerators. This work has been done as part of a collaboration between Nalco Fuel

333

Simulation analysis of data processing activities in Compact Muon Solenoid physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scale, complexity and worldwide geographical spread of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) computing and data analysis problems are unprecedented in scientific research. The complexity of processing and accessing this data is increased substantially ... Keywords: Compact Muon Solenoid, large-scale distributed systems, simulation model

Ciprian Dobre

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Impact of Operational Practices on Rail Line Capacity: A Simulation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(AASHTO) predicts that freight rail service will increase 84% based on ton-miles by 2035 (1). In addition trains on certain freight rail corridors, as will commuter rail service in some metropolitan areasImpact of Operational Practices on Rail Line Capacity: A Simulation Analysis Mark Dingler1* , Yung

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

335

Designing and operating through compromise: architectural analysis of CKMS for the advanced metering infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compromises attributable to the Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) highlight the necessity for constant vigilance. The APT provides a new perspective on security metrics (e.g., statistics based cyber security) and quantitative risk assessments. We consider ... Keywords: cryptographic key management system (CKMS), key management, security, security models/metrics, smart grid, testing/experimentation, trusted hardware

Michael Duren; Hal Aldridge; Robert K. Abercrombie; Frederick T. Sheldon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Distance learning in advanced military education: Analysis of joint operations course in the Taiwan military  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-ranking officers require advanced military education in war tactics for future combat. However, line officers rarely have time to take such courses on campus. The conventional solution to this problem used to take the inefficient correspondence ... Keywords: Applications in subject areas, Architectures for educational technology system, Distributed learning environments

Ming-Chih Tung; Jiung-yao Huang; Huan-Chao Keh; Shu-shen Wai

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Complexity analysis and algorithm design for advance bandwidth scheduling in dedicated networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An increasing number of high-performance networks provision dedicated channels through circuit switching or MPLS/GMPLS techniques to support large data transfer. The link bandwidths in such networks are typically shared by multiple users through advance ... Keywords: bandwidth scheduling, dedicated networks, nonapproximable

Yunyue Lin, Qishi Wu

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. J. Hamilton Nuclear Reactor Analysis John Wiley and Sons,R. J. Neuhold, Introductury Nuclear Reactor Dynamics. ANSL. J. Hamilton Nuclear Reactor Analysis John Wiley and Sons,

Galvez, Cristhian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Bitraker Anvil: Binary instrumentation for rapid creation of simulation and workload analysis tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A wide range of ARM developers from architects, to compiler writers, to software developers, need tools to understand, analyze, and simulate program behavior. For developers to achieve high levels of system and program correctness, performance, reliability, and power efficiency these tools must be fast and customizable to the problems at hand. BitRaker Anvil is a tool building framework allowing developers to rapidly build tools to achieve these goals. BitRaker Anvil uses binary instrumentation to modify ARM binaries for the purpose of analyzing program behavior. BitRaker Anvil equips the developer with an easy to use API that allows the user to specify the particular program characteristics to analyze. Using this API, the developer can create custom tools to perform simulation or workload analysis several orders of magnitude faster than using a cycle level simulator. Prior binary instrumentation technology requires that analysis code be merged into the same binary as the code to be analyzed. A key new feature of our binary instrumentation framework is ReHost analysis, which allows an instrumented ARM binary to make calls to analysis code that is written in the native format of the desktop machine. Using this for cross-platform ARM development results in analysis that runs orders of magnitude faster while simultaneously reducing the size of the ARM binary images. 1

Brad Calder; Todd Austin; Don Yang; Timothy Sherwood; Suleyman Sair; David Newquist; Tim Cusac

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2Chapter 7 Reversed-Phase HPLC Analysis of Conjugated Linoleic Acid and Its Metabolites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Chapter 7 Reversed-Phase HPLC Analysis of Conjugated Linoleic Acid and Its Metabolites Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3Chapter 4 Systematic Analysis of trans and Conjugated Linoleic Acids in Milk and Meat of Ruminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3 Chapter 4 Systematic Analysis of trans and Conjugated Linoleic Acids in Milk and Meat of Ruminants Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

342

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century MarketsChapter 3 Advances in Genome Sequencing and Genotyping Technology for Soybean Diversity Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century Markets Chapter 3 Advances in Genome Sequencing and Genotyping Technology for Soybean Diversity Analysis Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Biofuels -

343

Trace component analysis of process hydrogen streams at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes subcontracted work done by the Radian Corporation to analyze trace components in process hydrogen streams at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The data will be used to help define whether the gas streams to be treated in the hydrogen processing unit in the SRC-I Demonstration Plant will require further treatment to remove trace contaminants that could be explosive under certain conditions. 2 references.

Bronfenbrenner, J.C.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Agni: Coupling Model Analysis Tools and High-Performance Subsurface Flow and Transport Simulators for Risk and Performance Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agni is open source /community /multi platform framework for model-based analyses (SA, UQ, PE, RA, DS). Agni can be applied independently from other Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) modules. Agni will be available as Mercurial repository (hg clone https://akuna.labworks.org/hg/Platform) including source code, manual, test and verification examples.

Vesselinov, Velimir V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pau, George [LBNL; Finsterle, Stefan [LBNL

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

345

240 Int. J. Electric and Hybrid Vehicles, Vol. 2, No. 3, 2010 Simulation and analysis of powertrain hybridisation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

240 Int. J. Electric and Hybrid Vehicles, Vol. 2, No. 3, 2010 Simulation and analysis of powertrain and analysis of powertrain hybridisation for construction equipment', Int. J. Electric and Hybrid Vehicles, Vol). Simulations were performed for two typical duty profiles: roading and lorry loading. Figure 1 An example

Cambridge, University of

346

Two-Dimensional X-ray Diffraction for Advanced Materials Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deformation Of Shape Memory Alloys Under Biaxial Loading .... Software Tools for the Monitoring, Analysis and Interpretation of Engineering Neutron Diffraction

347

Analysis of the flamelet concept in the numerical simulation of laminar partially premixed flames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to analyze the application of flamelet models based on the mixture fraction variable and its dissipation rate to the numerical simulation of partially premixed flames. Although the main application of these models is the computation of turbulent flames, this work focuses on the performance of flamelet concept in laminar flame simulations removing, in this way, turbulence closure interactions. A well-known coflow methane/air laminar flame is selected. Five levels of premixing are taken into account from an equivalence ratio {phi}={infinity} (nonpremixed) to {phi}=2.464. Results obtained using the flamelet approaches are compared to data obtained from the detailed solution of the complete transport equations using primitive variables. Numerical simulations of a counterflow flame are also presented to support the discussion of the results. Special emphasis is given to the analysis of the scalar dissipation rate modeling. (author)

Consul, R.; Oliva, A.; Perez-Segarra, C.D.; Carbonell, D. [Centre Tecnologic de Transferencia de Calor (CTTC), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Colom 11, E-08222, Terrassa, Barcelona (Spain); de Goey, L.P.H. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Final report on LDRD project: Simulation/optimization tools for system variability analysis  

SciTech Connect

>This work was conducted during FY98 (Proposal Number 98-0036) and FY99 (Proposal Number 99-0818) under the auspices of the Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. Electrical simulation typically treats a single data point in the very large input space of component properties. For electrical simulation to reach its full potential as a design tool, it must be able to address the unavoidable variability and uncertainty in component properties. Component viability is strongly related to the design margin (and reliability) of the end product. During the course of this project, both tools and methodologies were developed to enable analysis of variability in the context of electrical simulation tools. Two avenues to link relevant tools were also developed, and the resultant toolset was applied to a major component.

R. L. Bierbaum; R. F. Billau; J. E. Campbell; K. D. Marx; R. J. Sikorski; B. M. Thompson; S. D. Wix

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Experience with advanced nodal codes at YAEC  

SciTech Connect

Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) has been performing reload licensing analysis since 1969. The basic pressurized water reactor (PWR) methodology involves the use of LEOPARD for cross-section generation, PDQ for radial power distributions and integral control rod worth, and SIMULATE for axial power distributions and differential control rod worth. In 1980, YAEC began performing reload licensing analysis for the Vermont Yankee boiling water reactor (BWR). The basic BWR methodology involves the use of CASMO for cross-section generation and SIMULATE for three-dimensional power distributions. In 1986, YAEC began investigating the use of CASMO-3 for cross-section generation and the advanced nodal code SIMULATE-3 for power distribution analysis. Based on the evaluation, the CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 methodology satisfied all requirements. After careful consideration, the cost of implementing the new methodology is expected to be offset by reduced computing costs, improved engineering productivity, and fuel-cycle performance gains.

Cacciapouti, R.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Technical analysis of US Army Weapons Systems and related advanced technologies of military interest. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of an US Army technology security project designed to identify and develop effective policy guidelines for militarily critical technologies in specific Army systems and in broad generic technology areas of military interest, Individual systems analyses are documented in separate Weapons Systems Technical Assessments (WSTAs) and the general generic technology areas are evaluated in the Advanced Technology Assessment Reports (ATARs), However, specific details of these assessments are not addressed here, only recommendations regarding aspects of the defined approach, methodology, and format are provided and discussed.

NONE

1991-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

351

Analysis of five forest harvesting simulation models. II. Paths, pitfalls, and other considerations  

SciTech Connect

This is the second of two papers describing the conclusions from a study to determine the state of the art in timber harvesting computer simulation modeling. Five models were evaluated -- Forest Harvesting Simulation Model (FHSM), Full Tree Field Chipping (FTFC), Harvesting System Simulator (HSS), Simulation Applied to Logging Systems (SAPLOS), and Timber Harvesting and Transport Simulator (THATS) -- for their potential use in southern forest harvesting operations. In Part I, modeling characteristics and overall model philosophy were identified and illustrated. This included a detailed discussion of the wood flow process in each model, accounting strategies for productive/nonproductive times, performance variables used, and the different harvesting systems modelable. In Part II user implementation problems are discussed. Those dealt with in detail are the following: What questions can be asked of the model. What are the modeling tradeoffs, and how do they impact on the analysis. What are the computer skills necessary to work effectively with the model. What computer support is needed. Are the models operational. The results provide a good picture of the state of the art in timber harvesting computer simulation. Much learning has occurred in the generation of these models, and many modeling and implementation problems have been uncovered, some of which remain unsolved. Hence, the user needs to examine closely the model and the intended application so that results will represent useable, valid data. It is recommended that the development of timber harvesting computer simulation modeling continue so that existing and proposed timber harvesting strategies can be adequately evaluated. Design criteria are proposed. (Refs. 22).

Goulet, D.V.; Iff, R.H.; Sirois, D.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Correlated Component Analysis for diffuse component separation with error estimation on simulated Planck polarization data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a data analysis pipeline for CMB polarization experiments, running from multi-frequency maps to the power spectra. We focus mainly on component separation and, for the first time, we work out the covariance matrix accounting for errors associated to the separation itself. This allows us to propagate such errors and evaluate their contributions to the uncertainties on the final products.The pipeline is optimized for intermediate and small scales, but could be easily extended to lower multipoles. We exploit realistic simulations of the sky, tailored for the Planck mission. The component separation is achieved by exploiting the Correlated Component Analysis in the harmonic domain, that we demonstrate to be superior to the real-space application (Bonaldi et al. 2006). We present two techniques to estimate the uncertainties on the spectral parameters of the separated components. The component separation errors are then propagated by means of Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the corresponding contributi...

Ricciardi, S; Natoli, P; Polenta, G; Baccigalupi, C; Salerno, E; Kayabol, K; Bedini, L; De Zotti, G; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.16819.x

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Second law analysis of advanced power generation systems using variable temperature heat sources  

SciTech Connect

Many systems produce power using variable temperature (sensible) heat sources. The Heat Cycle Research Program is currently investigating the potential improvements to such power cycles utilizing moderate temperature geothermal resources to produce electrical power. It has been shown that mixtures of saturated hydrocarbons (alkanes) or halogenated hydrocarbons operating with a supercritical Rankine cycle gave improved performance over boiling Rankine cycles with the pure working fluids for typical applications. Recently, in addition to the supercritical Rankine Cycle, other types of cycles have been proposed for binary geothermal service. This paper explores the limits on efficiency of a feasible plant and discusses the methods used in these advanced concept plants to achieve the maximum possible efficiency. The advanced plants considered appear to be approaching the feasible limit of performance so that the designer must weigh all considerations to fine the best plant for a given service. These results would apply to power systems in other services as well as to geothermal power plants. 17 refs., 15 figs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Designing and Operating Through Compromise: Architectural Analysis of CKMS for the Advanced Metering Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compromises attributable to the Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) highlight the necessity for constant vigilance. The APT provides a new perspective on security metrics (e.g., statistics based cyber security) and quantitative risk assessments. We consider design principals and models/tools that provide high assurance for energy delivery systems (EDS) operations regardless of the state of compromise. Cryptographic keys must be securely exchanged, then held and protected on either end of a communications link. This is challenging for a utility with numerous substations that must secure the intelligent electronic devices (IEDs) that may comprise complex control system of systems. For example, distribution and management of keys among the millions of intelligent meters within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) is being implemented as part of the National Smart Grid initiative. Without a means for a secure cryptographic key management system (CKMS) no cryptographic solution can be widely deployed to protect the EDS infrastructure from cyber-attack. We consider 1) how security modeling is applied to key management and cyber security concerns on a continuous basis from design through operation, 2) how trusted models and key management architectures greatly impact failure scenarios, and 3) how hardware-enabled trust is a critical element to detecting, surviving, and recovering from attack.

Duren, Mike [Sypris Electronics, LLC; Aldridge, Hal [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Advanced Data Analysis Tools for World-Wide X-ray ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of ifeffit, a multi-platform, open-source XAS data analysis software ... The energy dependent interaction of the intense synchrotron X-ray beam with ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Analysis of the differences in energy simulation results between building information modeling (BIM)-based simulation method and the detailed simulation method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building Information Modeling (BIM)-based simulation models have been used to automate lengthy building energy modeling processes and it enable fast acquisition of results. Recent improvements of simulation programs have continued to the increase in ...

Seongchan Kim; Jeong-Han Woo

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Simulation and Analysis of Energy Consumption of Public Building in Chongquig  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calculation and analysis of energy consumption must be on the base of simulation of building load. DeST is adopted to calculate dynamic cooling load of the main building in Chongqing city. Then water chilling unit's plant capability is checked and energy consumption of the building is calculated. After energy efficiency potency analyzed, optimum running-program is put out and some suggestions are given.

Chen, G.; Lu, J.; Chen, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Application of a Tractive Energy Analysis to Quantify the Benefits of Advanced Efficiency Technologies Using Characteristic Drive Cycle Data  

SciTech Connect

Accurately predicting the fuel savings that can be achieved with the implementation of various technologies developed for fuel efficiency can be very challenging, particularly when considering combinations of technologies. Differences in the usage of highway vehicles can strongly influence the benefits realized with any given technology, which makes generalizations about fuel savings inappropriate for different vehicle applications. A model has been developed to estimate the potential for reducing fuel consumption when advanced efficiency technologies, or combinations of these technologies, are employed on highway vehicles, particularly medium- and heavy-duty trucks. The approach is based on a tractive energy analysis applied to drive cycles representative of the vehicle usage, and the analysis specifically accounts for individual energy loss factors that characterize the technologies of interest. This tractive energy evaluation is demonstrated by analyzing measured drive cycles from a long-haul trucking fleet and the results of an assessment of the fuel savings potential for combinations of technologies are presented. The results of this research will enable more reliable estimates of the fuel savings benefits that can be realized with particular technologies and technology combinations for individual trucking applications so that decision makers can make informed investment decisions for the implementation of advanced efficiency technologies.

LaClair, Tim J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Quantum to Atomistic Simulations - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational Modeling and Simulation of Advanced Materials for Energy Applications: Quantum to Atomistic Simulations Sponsored by: TMS/ASM:...

360

Computational atmospheric trajectory simulation analysis of spin-stabilised projectiles and small bullets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model is based on the full equations of motion set up in the no-roll body reference frame and is integrated numerically from given initial conditions at the firing site. The computational flight analysis takes into consideration the ... Keywords: Coriolis effect, Mach number, Magnus effect, aerodynamic jump, atmospheric trajectory, constant aerodynamic coefficients, equations of motion, flight analysis, flight trajectories, gyroscopic stability, no-roll body reference frame, simulation, small bullets, spin-stabilised projectiles, static stability, total angle of attack, variable aerodynamic coefficients

D. N. Gkritzapis; E. E. Panagiotopoulos; D. P. Margaris; D. G. Papanikas

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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361

Conference on Advances in Materials Science - Presentations ...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

- Presentations Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing Institutional Research...

362

Advanced Reactor Development and Technology - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Overview Advanced Fast Reactor...

363

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) verification and validation plan. version 1.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. To meet this objective, NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities will be applied to challenging spatial domains, temporal domains, multiphysics couplings, and multiscale couplings. A strategic verification and validation (V&V) goal is to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities. Because it is economically impractical to apply the maximum V&V rigor to each and every M&S capability, M&S capabilities will be ranked for their impact on the performance assessments of various components of the repository systems. Those M&S capabilities with greater impact will require a greater level of confidence and a correspondingly greater investment in V&V. This report includes five major components: (1) a background summary of the NEAMS Waste IPSC to emphasize M&S challenges; (2) the conceptual foundation for verification, validation, and confidence assessment of NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities; (3) specifications for the planned verification, validation, and confidence-assessment practices; (4) specifications for the planned evidence information management system; and (5) a path forward for the incremental implementation of this V&V plan.

Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Urbina, Angel; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); McCornack, Marjorie Turner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Modeling and analysis of hydrogen detonation events in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor containment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes salient aspects of the modeling, analyses, and evaluations for hydrogen detonation in selected regions of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) containment during hypothetical severe accident conditions. Shock wave generation and transport modeling and analyses were conducted for two stratified configurations in the dome region of the high bay. Principal tools utilized for these purposes were the CTH and CET89 computer codes. Dynamic pressure loading functions were generated for key locations and used for evaluating structural response behavior for which a finite-element model was developed using the ANSYS code. For the range of conditions analyzed in the two critical dome regions, it was revealed that the ANS containment would be able to withstand detonation loads without failure.

Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Kim, S.H.; Valenti, S.N.; Simpson, D.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sawruk, W. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Millimeter Laser Ranging to the Moon: a comprehensive theoretical model for advanced data analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements are crucial for advanced exploration of the evolutionary history of the lunar orbit, the laws of fundamental gravitational physics, selenophysics and geophysics as well as for future human missions to the Moon. Current LLR technique measures distance to the Moon with a precision approaching one millimeter that strongly demands further significant improvement of the theoretical model of the orbital and rotational dynamics of the Earth-Moon system. This model should inevitably be based on the theory of general relativity, fully incorporate the relevant geophysical/selenophysical processes and rely upon the most recent IAU standards in order to give us the opportunity to perform the most precise fundamental test of general relativity in the solar system in robust and physically-adequate way. The talk discusses new methods and approaches in developing such a mathematical model.

Sergei Kopeikin

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

366

Millimeter Laser Ranging to the Moon: a comprehensive theoretical model for advanced data analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements are crucial for advanced exploration of the evolutionary history of the lunar orbit, the laws of fundamental gravitational physics, selenophysics and geophysics as well as for future human missions to the Moon. Current LLR technique measures distance to the Moon with a precision approaching one millimeter that strongly demands further significant improvement of the theoretical model of the orbital and rotational dynamics of the Earth-Moon system. This model should inevitably be based on the theory of general relativity, fully incorporate the relevant geophysical/selenophysical processes and rely upon the most recent IAU standards in order to give us the opportunity to perform the most precise fundamental test of general relativity in the solar system in robust and physically-adequate way. The talk discusses new methods and approaches in developing such a mathematical model.

Kopeikin, Sergei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Fuel plate stability experiments and analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planned reactor for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will use closely spaced arrays of involute-shaped fuel plates that will be cooled by water flowing through the channels between the plates. There is concern that at certain coolant flow velocities, adjacent plates may deflect and touch, with resulting failure of the plates. Experiments have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to examine this potential phenomenon. Results of the experiments and comparison with analytical predictions are reported. The tests were conducted using full-scale epoxy plate models of the aluminum/uranium silicide ANS involute-shaped fuel plates. Use of epoxy plates and model theory allowed lower flow velocities and pressures to explore the potential failure mechanism. Plate deflections and channel pressures as functions of the flow velocity are examined. Comparisons with mathematical models are noted.

Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Luttrell, C.R.; Yahr, G.T.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Analysis and simulation of the structure of nanoparticles that undergo a surface-driven structural transformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4-ID-D at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne, in4-ID-D, at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Use of the

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Preliminary Feasibility, Design, and Hazard Analysis of a Boiling Water Test Loop Within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A Boiling Water Test Loop (BWTL) is being designed for one of the irradiation test positions within the. The objective of the new loop will be to simulate boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions to support clad corrosion and related reactor material testing. Further it will accommodate power ramping tests of candidate high burn-up fuels and fuel pins/rods for the commercial BWR utilities. The BWTL will be much like the pressurized water loops already in service in 5 of the 9 flux traps (region of enhanced neutron flux) in the ATR. The loop coolant will be isolated from the primary coolant system so that the loops temperature, pressure, flow rate, and water chemistry can be independently controlled. This paper presents the proposed general design of the in-core and auxiliary BWTL systems; the preliminary results of the neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses; and the preliminary hazard analysis for safe normal and transient BWTL and ATR operation.

Douglas M. Gerstner

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Advanced methods development for LWR trsansient analysis, final report : 1981-1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The initial development of TITAN, a three-dimensional coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics code for LWR safety analysis, has been completed. The transient neutronics code QUANDRY has been joined to the two-fluid ...

Griggs, D. P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Advanced Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Availability Technology Express Licensing Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And...

374

Environmental Aspects of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles: Parametric Modeling and Preliminary Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear power has the potential to help reduce rising carbon emissions, but to be considered sustainable, it must also demonstrate the availability of an indefinite fuel supply as well as not produce any significant negative environmental effects. The objective of this research was to evaluate the sustainability of nuclear power and to explore the nuclear fuel cycles that best meet this goal. First, the study quantified current and promising nuclear fuel cycles to be further evaluated and developed a set of objective metrics to describe the environmental effects of each cycle. The metrics included such factors as the amount of waste generated and the isotopic composition of the waste. Next, the evaluation used the International Atomic Energy Agency's Nuclear Fuel Cycle Simulation System to compute nuclide compositions at various stages of the fuel cycles. Finally, the study looked at the radioactivity of the waste generated and used this and other characteristics to determine which fuel cycle meets the objectives of sustainability. Results confirm that incorporating recycling into the fuel cycle would help reduce the volume of waste needing to be stored long-term. Also, calculations made with data from the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Simulation System predicted that the waste from fuel cycles using recycling would be slightly more radiotoxic than the open fuel cycle?s waste. However, the small increase in radiotoxicity is a manageable issue and would not detract from the benefits of recycling. Therefore, recycling and reprocessing spent fuel must be incorporated into the nuclear fuel cycle to achieve sustainability.

Yancey, Kristina D.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Simulation of wind-speed time series for wind-energy conversion analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to investigate operating characteristics of a wind energy conversion system it is often desirable to have a sequential record of wind speeds. Sometimes a long enough actual data record is not available at the time an analysis is needed. This may be the case if, e.g., data are recorded three times a day at a candidate wind turbine site, and then the hourly performance of generated power is desired. In such cases it is often possible to use statistical characteristics of the wind speed data to calibrate a stochastic model and then generate a simulated wind speed time series. Any length of record may be simulated by this method, and desired system characteristics may be studied. A simple wind speed simulation model, WEISIM, is developed based on the Weibull probability distribution for wind speeds with a correction based on the lag-one autocorrelation value. The model can simulate at rates from one a second to one an hour, and wind speeds can represent short-term averages (e.g., 1-sec averages) or longer-term averages (e.g., 1-min or 1 hr averages). The validity of the model is verified with PNL data for both histogram characteristics and persistance characteristics.

Corotis, R.B.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Advanced geothermal technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research and development in advanced technologies for geothermal energy production continue to increase the energy production options for the Nation. The high-risk investment over the past few years by the US Department of Energy in geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma energy resources is producing new means to lower production costs and to take advantage of these resources. The Nation has far larger and more regionally extensive geothermal resources than heretofore realized. At the end of a short 30-day closed-loop flow test, the manmade hot dry rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was producing 10 MW thermal - and still climbing - proving the technical feasibility of this new technology. The scientific feasibility of magma energy extraction has been demonstrated, and new field tests to evaluate this technology are planned. Analysis and field tests confirm the viability of geopressured-geothermal energy and the prospect that many dry-hole or depleted petroleum wells can be turned into producing geopressured-geothermal wells. Technological advances achieved through hot dry rock, magma, geopressured, and other geothermal research are making these resources and conventional hydrothermal resources more competitive. Noteworthy among these technological advances are techniques in computer simulation of geothermal reservoirs, new means for well stimulation, new high-temperature logging tools and packers, new hard-rock penetration techniques, and new methods for mapping fracture flow paths across large underground areas in reservoirs. In addition, many of these same technological advances can be applied by the petroleum industry to help lower production costs in domestic oil and gas fields. 5 refs., 4 figs.

Whetten, J.T.; Murphy, H.D.; Hanold, R.J.; Myers, C.W.; Dunn, J.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Computer simulation and economic analysis for ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) pretreatment process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ammonia fiber explosion (AFFECT) process is a promising new pretreatment for enhancing the reactivity of lignocerulose materials with many advantages over existing processes. The material is soaked in high-pressure liquid ammonia for a few minutes then the pressure is explosively released. A combined chemical (cellulose decrystamution) and physical (increased surface area) effect increases the enzymatic digestibility of lignocelmose. The laboratory phase of AFEX development is nearing completion, and a brief preliminary economic analysis (without detailed sizing) was finished. However, a commercial size plant has not been developed. This study was undertaken in an effort to support and assist AFEX commercialization through process simulation and cost analysis. In this study, a steady state computer simulation package was developed for the AFEX process. Corn fiber was used as the representative biomass treated by AFEX. Different ammonia loadings, water loadings, temperatures and pressures were used as operational parameters. Mass balances and energy balances are the major determinants of the equipments selected and sized. 'nermodynamic models or kinetic models are also included. A preliminary cost estimate includes total purchased-equipment cost using the equipment cost ratio method. The process computer simulation model was programmed in FORTRAN. FORTRAN subroutine libraries from IMSL (International Mathematical and Statistics Library), Inc. were used as needed. To increase the portability of the program, the programming was done on an EBM compatible PC.

Wang, Lin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Resonance Region Nuclear Data Analysis to Support Advanced Fuel Cycle Development  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) are performing collaborative research as part of a three-year United States (U.S.) / Republic of Korea (ROK) International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) project to provide improved neutron cross-section data with uncertainty or covariance data important for advanced fuel cycle and nuclear safeguards applications. ORNL and KAERI have initiated efforts to prepare new cross-section evaluations for 240Pu, 237Np, and the stable Cm isotopes. At the current stage of the I-NERI project, ORNL has recently completed a preliminary resonance-region cross-section evaluation with covariance data for 240Pu and initiated resonance evaluation efforts for 237Np and 244Cm. Likewise, KAERI is performing corresponding high-energy cross-section analyses (i.e., above the resonance region) for the noted isotopes. The paper provides results pertaining to the new resonance region evaluation efforts with emphasis on the new 240Pu evaluation.

Dunn, Michael E [ORNL; Derrien, Herve [ORNL; Leal, Luiz C [ORNL; Gil, Choong-Sup [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute; Kim, D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Incorporation of a risk analysis approach for the nuclear fuel cycle advanced transparency framework.  

SciTech Connect

Proliferation resistance features that reduce the likelihood of diversion of nuclear materials from the civilian nuclear power fuel cycle are critical for a global nuclear future. A framework that monitors process information continuously can demonstrate the ability to resist proliferation by measuring and reducing diversion risk, thus ensuring the legitimate use of the nuclear fuel cycle. The automation of new nuclear facilities requiring minimal manual operation makes this possible by generating instantaneous system state data that can be used to track and measure the status of the process and material at any given time. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) are working in cooperation to develop an advanced transparency framework capable of assessing diversion risk in support of overall plant transparency. The ''diversion risk'' quantifies the probability and consequence of a host nation diverting nuclear materials from a civilian fuel cycle facility. This document introduces the details of the diversion risk quantification approach to be demonstrated in the fuel handling training model of the MONJU Fast Reactor.

Mendez, Carmen Margarita (Sociotecnia Solutions, LLC); York, David L.; Inoue, Naoko (Japan Atomic Energy Agency); Kitabata, Takuya (Japan Atomic Energy Agency); Vugrin, Eric D.; Vugrin, Kay White; Rochau, Gary Eugene; Cleary, Virginia D.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Dynamic Human Reliability Analysis: Benefits and Challenges of Simulating Human Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, there has been considerable work on dynamic event trees and other areas related to dynamic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The counterpart to these efforts in human reliability analysis (HRA) has centered on the development of specific methods to account for the dynamic nature of human performance. In this paper, the author posits that the key to dynamic HRA is not in the development of specific methods but in the utilization of cognitive modeling and simulation to produce a framework of data that may be used in quantifying the likelihood of human error. This paper provides an overview of simulation approaches to HRA; reviews differences between first, second, and dynamic generation HRA; and outlines potential benefits and challenges of this approach.

R. L. Boring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

3D/4D facial expression analysis: An advanced annotated face model approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Facial expression analysis has interested many researchers in the past decade due to its potential applications in various fields such as human-computer interaction, psychological studies, and facial animation. Three-dimensional facial data has been ... Keywords: 3D face models, 4D face videos, Expression recognition, Mesh registration

Tianhong Fang; Xi Zhao; Omar Ocegueda; Shishir K. Shah; Ioannis A. Kakadiaris

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

An advanced BEM-based CAE tool for the analysis of earthing systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in most large electrical over-ground substations with a grounding grid embedded in a multiple present TOTBEM: a freeware application for the in-house computer aided design and analysis of grounding potentials and compact underground substations. 1 Introduction The main objective of an earthing system

Colominas, Ignasi

383

GIS-Based Hazardous Gas Dispersion, Simulations and Analysis Debasis Karmakar, Samit Ray Chaudhuri and Eduardo Jose Maguino  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GIS-Based Hazardous Gas Dispersion, Simulations and Analysis Debasis Karmakar, Samit Ray Chaudhuri of Plant Area Performed scenario-based simulation of hazardous gas dispersion from a continuous area source comparison to be made under other conditions such as Jet fire, explosion, dispersion of heavy dense gas

Shinozuka, Masanobu

384

Continuum-based sensitivity analysis for coupled atomistic and continuum simulations for 2-D applications using bridging scale decomposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of linking simulations at multiple length and time scales is found useful for studying local physical phenomena such as crack propagation. Many multi-scale methods, which couple molecular dynamics models with continuum models, have been proposed ... Keywords: Bridging scale method, Design sensitivity analysis, Multi-scale simulation

Yunxiang Wang, Kuang-Hua Chang

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Performance analysis of co-firing waste materials in an advanced pressurized fluidized-bed combustor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The co-firing of waste materials with coal in utility scale power plants has emerged as an effective approach to produce energy and manage municipal wastes. Leading this approach is the atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC). It has demonstrated its commercial acceptance in the utility market as a reliable source of power by burning a variety of waste and alternative fuels. The application of pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) technology, although relatively new, can provide significant enhancements to the efficient production of electricity while maintaining the waste management benefits of AFBC. A study was undertaken to investigate the technical and economical feasibility of co-firing a PFBC with coal and municipal and industrial wastes. Focus was placed on the production of electricity and the efficient disposal of wastes for application in central power station and distributed locations. Issues concerning waste material preparation and feed, PFBC operation, plant emissions, and regulations are addressed. The results and conclusions developed are generally applicable to current and advanced PFBC design concepts. Wastes considered for co-firing include municipal solid waste (MSW), sewage sludge, and industrial de-inking sludge. Conceptual designs of two power plants rated at 250 MWe and 150 MWe were developed. Heat and material balances were completed for each plant along with environmental issues. With the PFBC`s operation at high temperature and pressure, efforts were centered on defining feeding systems capable of operating at these conditions. Air emissions and solid wastes were characterized to assess the environmental performance comparing them to state and Federal regulations. This paper describes the results of this investigation, presents conclusions on the key issues, and provides recommendations for further evaluation.

Bonk, D.L.; McDaniel, H.M. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); DeLallo, M.R. Jr.; Zaharchuk, R. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Balanced and Unbalanced Circulations in a Primitive Equation Simulation of a Midlatitude MCC. Part II: Analysis of Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonlinear balance condition, which permits the diagnosis of both balanced divergent and nondivergent flows, is presented. This analysis approach is applied to the results of a numerical simulation of a midlatitude mesoscale convective complex (...

Peter Q. Olsson; William R. Cotton

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

The second skin approach : skin strain field analysis and mechanical counter pressure prototyping for advanced spacesuit design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary aim of this thesis is to advance the theory of advanced locomotion mechanical counter pressure (MCP) spacesuits by studying the changes in the human body shape during joint motion. Two experiments take advantage ...

Bethke, Kristen (Kristen Ann)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

An Economic Analysis of Select Fuel Cycles Using the Steady-State Analysis Model for Advanced Fuel Cycles Schemes (SMAFS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is currently considering alternatives to the current U.S. once-through fuel cycle. This report evaluates the relative economics of three alternative fuel cycles to determine those cost components important to overall fuel cycle costs and total generation costs. The analysis determined that the unit cost of nuclear reactors is the most important nuclear generation cost parameter in future fuel cycles. The report also evaluates ...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

389

Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Factors Impacting the Energy Consumption of Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings have a close relationship with climate. There are a lot of important factors that influence building energy consumption such as building shape coefficient, insulation work of building envelope, covered area, and the area ratio of window to wall. The integrated influence result will be different when the building is in different climate zone. This paper studies the variation rule of some aggregative indicators and building energy efficiency rates by simulation and analysis of the same building in different climate zones by eQuest, in order to determine how building energy efficiency works in different climate zones.

Lian, Y.; Hao, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Use of Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis in the Design of Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Experiments for Advanced Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management - Increased Enrichment/High Burnup and Light Water Reactor Fuel Cycle Optimization

B. T. Rearden; W. J. Anderson; G. A. Harms

391

Science-Based Simulation Model of Human Performance for Human Reliability Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human reliability analysis (HRA), a component of an integrated probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), is the means by which the human contribution to risk is assessed, both qualitatively and quantitatively. However, among the literally dozens of HRA methods that have been developed, most cannot fully model and quantify the types of errors that occurred at Three Mile Island. Furthermore, all of the methods lack a solid empirical basis, relying heavily on expert judgment or empirical results derived in non-reactor domains. Finally, all of the methods are essentially static, and are thus unable to capture the dynamics of an accident in progress. The objective of this work is to begin exploring a dynamic simulation approach to HRA, one whose models have a basis in psychological theories of human performance, and whose quantitative estimates have an empirical basis. This paper highlights a plan to formalize collaboration among the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the University of Maryland, and The Ohio State University (OSU) to continue development of a simulation model initially formulated at the University of Maryland. Initial work will focus on enhancing the underlying human performance models with the most recent psychological research, and on planning follow-on studies to establish an empirical basis for the model, based on simulator experiments to be carried out at the INL and at the OSU.

Dana L. Kelly; Ronald L. Boring; Ali Mosleh; Carol Smidts

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

MA Transmutation Performance Simulation and Accompanied Burning-up Analysis for C-ADS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An accelerator-driven subcritical reactor functions well in incinerating high-level radiotoxic waste (HLW) as well as providing energy. China is on his way to establish such a facility to transmutate the annual 1000 tons of HLW. A neutronic analysis has been performed for a reference core with a special task of burning minor actinides 237Np, 241Am, 243Am and 244Cm. Instant operation parameters are determined, including neutron energy spectra, thermal power distribution and transmutation validation. Burning-up analysis is carried out to further confirm the incineration efficiency. The core parameters optimized in this work will be applied to simulate in-core fuel behavior in future research.

Ji-Lang Miao; Zi-Chen Zhao; Zhen-Qi Chang

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

Software Requirements Specification Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Software Requirements Specification (SRS) is to define the top-level requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). This simulation model is intended to serve a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies.

D. E. Shropshire; W. H. West

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Analysis of advanced conceptual designs for single-family-sized absorption chillers. Semi-annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the research program is to develop and analyze new concepts for absorption cycles to improve the performance or reduce the cost (or both) of a 3-ton absorption chiller that can be used with solar-collected heat. New refrigerant-absorbent pairs, additives to currently used refrigerant-absorbent pairs, and modifications to the cycle are being investigated. For the initial analyses the use of a fluid at 160 to 230/sup 0/F from a solar collector as a heating source is assumed. In the initial analyses the chiller is to provide chilled water at 45/sup 0/F at full load; alternatively, if a new refrigerant-absorbent pair appears to be amenable for direct cooling of the occupied space, the temperature of the evaporator is to be 45/sup 0/F. Both water cooling and air cooling of the absorber and the condenser are being studied. The use of ambient air at 95/sup 0/F dry bulb and 75/sup 0/F wet bulb temperatures is assumed. With the water-cooled cycles, the initial and operating costs of a properly sized cooling tower will be included. The research consists of five principal tasks: (a) acquisition of information for analysis, (b) definition of criteria for selection of promising refrigerant-absorbent pairs, additives for currently used pairs, or cycle modifications, (c) preparation and analysis of conceptual designs, (d) comparison and selection of the promising new systems that warrant further study, and (e) recommendations for further research for each promising new system. Progress on each of these tasks is described. (WHK)

None

1978-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

395

Energy Analysis of a Kraft Pulp Mill: Potential for Energy Efficiency and Advanced Biomass Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy use at a Kraft pulp mill in the United States is analyzed in detail. Annual average process steam and electricity demands in the existing mill are 19.3 MMBtu per ADST and 687 kWh per ADST, respectively. This is relatively high by industry standards. The mill meets nearly all its electricity needs with a back-pressure steam turbine. Higher electricity to heat ratios is an industry wide trend and anticipated at the mill. The potential for self-sufficiency in energy using only black liquor and bark available on-site is assessed based on the analysis of the present energy situation and potential process changes. The analysis here suggests that steam and electricity demand could be reduced by 89% by operating consistently at high production rates. Process modifications and retrofits using commercially proven technologies could reduce steam and electricity demand to as low as 9.7 MMBtu per ADST, a 50% reduction, and 556 kWh per ADST, a 19% reduction, respectively. Electricity demand could increase to about 640 kWh per ADST due to closed-cycle operation of the bleach plant and other efforts to improve environmental performance. The retrofitted energy efficient mill with low environmental impact could be self-sufficient in steam and electricity using conventional technology, such as a back pressure steam turbine or a condensing extraction steam turbine. In addition to meeting mill energy demand, about 1,000 kWh per ADST would be available for export from the mill if gasification/combined cycle technology were used instead.

Subbiah, A.; Nilsson, L. J.; Larson, E. D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A limited assessment of the ASEP human reliability analysis procedure using simulator examination results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a limited assessment of the conservatism of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) human reliability analysis (HRA) procedure described in NUREG/CR-4772. In particular, the, ASEP post-accident, post-diagnosis, nominal HRA procedure is assessed within the context of an individual`s performance of critical tasks on the simulator portion of requalification examinations administered to nuclear power plant operators. An assessment of the degree to which operator perforn:Lance during simulator examinations is an accurate reflection of operator performance during actual accident conditions was outside the scope of work for this project; therefore, no direct inference can be made from this report about such performance. The data for this study are derived from simulator examination reports from the NRC requalification examination cycle. A total of 4071 critical tasks were identified, of which 45 had been failed. The ASEP procedure was used to estimate human error probability (HEP) values for critical tasks, and the HEP results were compared with the failure rates observed in the examinations. The ASEP procedure was applied by PNL operator license examiners who supplemented the limited information in the examination reports with expert judgment based upon their extensive simulator examination experience. ASEP analyses were performed for a sample of 162 critical tasks selected randomly from the 4071, and the results were used to characterize the entire population. ASEP analyses were also performed for all of the 45 failed critical tasks. Two tests were performed to assess the bias of the ASEP HEPs compared with the data from the requalification examinations. The first compared the average of the ASEP HEP values with the fraction of the population actually failed and it found a statistically significant factor of two bias on the average.

Gore, B.R.; Dukelow, J.S. Jr.; Mitts, T.M.; Nicholson, W.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Advanced techniques for safety analysis applied to the gas turbine control system of ICARO co-generative plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper describes two complementary and integrable approaches, a probabilistic one and a deterministic one, based on classic and advanced modelling techniques for safety analysis of complex computer based systems. The probabilistic approach is based on classical and innovative probabilistic analysis methods. The deterministic approach is based on formal verification methods. Such approaches are applied to the gas turbine control system of ICARO co generative plant, in operation at ENEA CR Casaccia. The main difference between the two approaches, behind the underlining different theories, is that the probabilistic one addresses the control system by itself, as the set of sensors, processing units and actuators, while the deterministic one also includes the behaviour of the equipment under control which interacts with the control system. The final aim of the research, documented in this paper, is to explore an innovative method which put the probabilistic and deterministic approaches in a strong relation to overcome the drawbacks of their isolated, selective and fragmented use which can lead to inconsistencies in the evaluation results. 1.

Ro Bologna; Ester Ciancamerla; Piero Incalcaterra; Michele Minichino; Andrea Bobbio; Universit Del Piemonte Orientale; Enrico Tronci

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Residual Stresses and Numerical Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2013 ... Advances in Hydroelectric Turbine Manufacturing and Repair: Residual Stresses and Numerical Simulation Sponsored by: Metallurgical...

399

Simulation and analysis of Magnetically-Applied Pressure-Shear (MAPS) experiments.  

SciTech Connect

A new experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures has been developed for use on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms. The technique is referred to as Magnetically-Applied Pressure-Shear (MAPS). By applying an external static magnetic field to the sample region, the MHD drive directly induces a shear stress wave in addition to the usual longitudinal stress wave. Strength is probed by passing this shear wave through a sample material where the transmissible shear stress is limited to the sample strength. The magnitude of the transmitted shear wave is measured via a transverse velocity interferometry system (VISAR) from which the sample strength is determined. The strength of materials is defined as the ability of a material to sustain deviatoric (shear) stresses. Strength is an important aspect of the response of materials subjected to compression to high pressure. Beyond the elastic response, material strength will govern at what pressure and to what extent a material will plastically deform. The MAPS technique cleverly exploits the property that, for a von Mises yield criterion at a given longitudinal stress, the maximum amplitude shear wave that can be transmitted is limited by the strength at that stress level. Successful fielding of MAPS experiments to measure shear stresses relies upon correct numerical simulation of the experiment. Complex wave interactions among forward and reflected longitudinal and shear waves, as well as the advancing magnetic diffusion front of the MHD drive, can make the design of the experiment complicated. Careful consideration must be given to driver, sample, and anvil materials; to the thicknesses of the driver, sample and anvil layers; as well as to the timing of the interacting waves. This paper will present and analyze the 2D MHD simulations used to design the MAPS experiments. The MAPS experiments are modeled using Sandia's ALEGRA-MHD simulation code. ALEGRA-MHD is an operator-split, multi-physics, multi-material, arbitrary lagrangian-eulerian code developed to model magnetic implosion, ceramic fracture, and electromagnetic launch. We will detail the numerical investigations into MHD shear generation, longitudinal and shear stress coupling, timing of wave interactions, and transmission of shear at material interfaces.

Haill, Thomas A.; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James Russell

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Fuel Cycles - Impact on High-Level Waste Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a dynamic simulation analysis for deployment of advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast burner reactors, as proposed by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program. Conditions for the analysis were selected for their potential to challenge the nuclear fuel simulation codes that were used, due to the large variations in nuclear fuel composition for the burner reactors before equilibrium conditions are approached. The analysis was performed in a U.S. conte...

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "analysis advanced simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Using economic analysis to evaluate the potential of multimodality therapy for elderly patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Development of new and expensive drugs with activity against pancreatic cancer has made economic considerations more relevant to treatment decision-making for advanced disease. Economic modeling can be used to explore the potential of such novel therapies and to inform clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of radiation plus fluorouracil (RT-FU) relative to no treatment in elderly patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and to determine the economic potential of radiation plus gemcitabine (RT-GEM), a novel regimen for this disease. We used the SEER-Medicare database to estimate effectiveness and costs supplemented by data from the literature where necessary. Results: Relative to no treatment, RT-FU was associated with a cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $68,724/QALY in the base case analysis. Compared with RT-FU, the ICER for RT-GEM was below $100,000/QALY when the risk of dying with the new regimen was 1,000 subjects would be necessary to demonstrate this level of efficacy in a randomized trial. The ICER of RT-GEM was most sensitive to utility values, and, at lower efficacy levels, to costs of gemcitabine and treatment-related toxicity. Conclusions: In elderly patients with LAPC, RT-FU is a cost-effective alternative to no treatment. The novel regimen of RT-GEM is likely to be cost-effective at any clinically meaningful benefit, but quality-of-life issues, drug acquisition, and toxicity-related costs may be relevant, especially at lower efficacy levels.

Krzyzanowska, Monika K. [Department of Adult Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States) and Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: monika.krzyzanowska@uhn.on.ca; Earle, Craig C. [Department of Adult Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Kuntz, Karen M. [Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Weeks, Jane C. [Department of Adult Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Advanced Concepts Breakout Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop Workshop Advanced Concepts Working Group Facilitator: John J. Petrovic Scribe: Sherry Marin Advanced Storage Techniques/ Approaches in Priority Order 1. Crystalline Nanoporous Materials (15) 2. Polymer Microspheres (12) Self-Assembled Nanocomposites (12) 3. Advanced Hydrides (11) Metals - Organic (11) 4. BN Nanotubes (5) Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon (5) 5. Mesoporous materials (4) Bulk Amorphous Materials (BAMs) (4) 6. Iron Hydrolysis (3) 7. Nanosize powders (2) 8. Metallic Hydrogen (1) Hydride Alcoholysis (1) Overarching R&D Questions for All Advanced Materials * Maximum storage capacity - theoretical model * Energy balance / life cycle analysis * Hydrogen absorption / desorption kinetics * Preliminary cost analysis - potential for low cost, high

403

Parametric analysis of the electric utility market for advanced load-leveling batteries. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This task examines the market for batteries in utility load-leveling service as a function of the Battery System Cost characteristics in order to give DOE a method of assessing the results of various program alternatives. The sensitivity of the benefits (barrels of oil saved) that might be derived to the timing of the market (i.e. when it begins) is also investigated. (The real cost of fuel is to be assumed to increase 2.4% per year.) How large is the total market for a new technology; how is the relative effectiveness of Battery Storage Systems related to the cost of fuel, the capital cost of the battery, and the perception of the credits associated with batery systems; and how do these vary with time required answers in order to estimate how the market for battery systems might develop. Most of the answers were obtained by studying the data developed by MITRE/METREK for a market assessment of battery systems using lead/acid batteries. MITRE's market analysis considered a large variety of variables; since the resources and time available for the present task were limited, it was not possible to either duplicate or confirm their work in detail. The initial results of this study depend on the assumptions used by MITRE. However, where these assumptions were incomplete, the results are adjusted. The supplementary information was obtained from studies performed by Arthur D. Little, Inc. and by PSE and G.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Non-linear analysis of advanced high-phase number induction machines for adjustable speed drive applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the effect of high order phases on electrical machines' parameters and performance. A general approach has been conducted using the induction motor equivalent circuit, winding function and conventional design methods. This approach was supported with finite element analysis. The study shows that high order phase machines have higher peak torque than the equivalent three phase machines. This is attributed to the lower leakage inductance that decreases as the number of phases increases. However, the peak slip frequency increases causing an increase in the skin effect and losses of the rotor. Some design suggestions are proposed to resolve this issue. The conducted harmonic analysis shows that high order harmonics (3rd, 5th, ..) that generate pulsating torque in the three phase machine can be used in high order phase machines to generate torque. For this purpose, a multiphase coordinate transformation and a revised dq model of the five phase induction motor under the fundamental and third harm,monic currents are established in a newly defined d?q?d?q?n reference frame. An extensive analysis using the finite element package has been conducted to compare the performance of different machines when supplied with quasi-rectangular currents with concentrated windings. From torque per ampere point of view, five-phase machine shows an outstanding performance compared with other machines. Futhermore, additional analysis has been conducted for the five-phase and three-phase machines when supplied with sinusoidal voltage source. Experiments have been performed on a 7.5hp five-phase induction motor using TMS320C32 DSP to systematically test and compare stator tooth flux densities and torques in the presence and absence of third harmonic currents. The results obtained are consistent with theoretical studies and simulation analysis, which further demonstrate the feasibility and practical significance of the high-order phase machines.

Qahtany, Nasser H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Original papers: Aerodynamic analysis and CFD simulation of several cellulose evaporative cooling pads used in Mediterranean greenhouses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work makes an aerodynamic analysis and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the four commercial models of corrugated cellulose evaporative cooling pads that are most widely used in Mediterranean greenhouses. The geometric characteristics ... Keywords: Aerodynamic analysis, CFD, Evaporative cooling, Fan and pad, Greenhouse, Pressure drop

A. Franco; D. L. Valera; A. Pea; A. M. Prez

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & ApplicationChapter 7 Recent Advances in Silver-Ion HPLC Utilizing Acetonitrile in Hexane as Solvent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application Chapter 7 Recent Advances in Silver-Ion HPLC Utilizing Acetonitrile in Hexane as Solvent Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books F98F563E606CED1FD3744F0D6362BAB2

407

Extreme Chromatography: Faster, Hotter, SmallerChapter 7 Recent Advances in Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography for the Analysis of Natural Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme Chromatography: Faster, Hotter, Smaller Chapter 7 Recent Advances in Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography for the Analysis of Natural Products Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books F7E3E452FCB43F6D

408

National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Advanced fenestration systems for improved daylight performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S.E. Selkowitz. Advanced Optical Daylighting Systems: LightAdvanced Fenestration Systems Based on the analysis presented above, we believe that daylighting systems

Selkowitz, S.; Lee, E.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Case study: Visual analysis of complex, time-dependent simulation results of a diesel exhaust system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In previous work we have presented visualization techniques that provide engineers with a high degree of interactivity and flexibility for analyzing large, time-dependent, and high-dimensional data sets resulting from CFD (computational fluid dynamics) simulations. In this case study we apply our techniques in the fields of the automotive engineering industry and demonstrate how users benefit from using them during their routine analysis, as well as for exploring new phenomena. For coping with some of the special requirements in this application, we adapted and extended parts of the system. A comparison of two related cases of a diesel exhaust system is presented, and some important questions about these cases are addressed. 1.

Helmut Doleisch; Michael Mayer; Martin Gasser; Helwig Hauser

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

HEAP: heat energy analysis program. A computer model simulating solar receivers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal design of solar receivers is commonly accomplished via approximate models, where the receiver is treated as an isothermal box with lumped quantities of heat losses to the surroundings by radiation, conduction and convection. These approximate models, though adequate for preliminary design purposes, are not detailed enough to distinguish between different receiver designs, or to predict transient performance under variable solar flux, ambient temperatures, etc. A computer code has been written for this purpose and is given the name HEAP,