National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for analogue strip charts

  1. Penta Charts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Penta Charts Penta Charts A penta chart is a concise one-page description of a specific technical topic, project or capability, created by individuals or teams at LANL. Penta charts cover a wide range of technical capabilities at various stages of development at the Laboratory. Contact Business Development Team Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation Email Small Self-Regulating Fission Reactor System (pdf) Small Self-Regulating Fission Reactor System Resilience / Fault Injection Research (pdf)

  2. Organization Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Organization Chart Organization Chart Organization Chart Printable PDF Mission Leadership

  3. Organizational Chart | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chart Organizational Chart Organizational Chart More Documents & Publications IEA Organizational Chart Office of International Affairs Org Chart Chart of breakout of funds by major...

  4. Notices CHART

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    436 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 168 / Thursday, August 29, 2013 / Notices CHART 5-FIXED-RATE FEDERAL SUBSIDIZED AND UNSUBSIDIZED STAFFORD AND PLUS LOANS-Continued Loan type Student grade level First disbursed on or after First disbursed before Rate (percent) Unsubsidized ................................................... All Students .................................................... 7/1/2006 7/1/2010 6.80 PLUS ............................................................... Parents and

  5. Organizational Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Organizational Chart Organizational Chart AU Organizational Chart, December 22, 2015 Full Resolution Version News

  6. Organizational Chart | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Chart Office presentation icon Organizational Chart More Documents & Publications IEA Organizational Chart Office of International Affairs Org Chart Chart of breakout of...

  7. Public Affairs Organization Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Affairs Organization Chart Public Affairs Communications Community Public Affairs Org Chart Education Creative Services ⇒ Navigate Section Public Affairs Communications Community Public Affairs Org Chart Education Creative Services

  8. Hopper Job Size Charts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Job Size Charts Hopper Job Size Charts Fractional Jobs The following charts show the fraction of hours used on Hopper in each of five job-core-size bins: 2014 Usage by Job Size Chart 2013 2012 2011 Large Jobs The following charts show the fraction of hours used on Hopper by jobs using greater than 16,384 cores: 2014 2013 2012 Usage by Job Size Chart 2011 Last edited: 2016-05-02 09:20:42

  9. Organization Chart - Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LSD Logo About Us People & Organization Research News & Events Safety Internal Resources Organization Chart Departments Scientific Staff Directory Committees Organization Chart...

  10. Laboratory Organization Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Board Directorate Staff Org Chart Berkeley Lab Organization Chart ESnet Protective Services ETAESDR ETAEAEI ETA Chief Operating Officer Laboratory Council RIIO...

  11. Edison Job Size Charts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reports » Edison Job Size Charts Edison Job Size Charts Fraction of Hours Used per Job Size Note: Interactive charts with current and past Cori and Edison data are now available on MyNERSC This chart shows the fraction of hours used on Edison in each of 5 job-core-size bins. 2015 Usage by Job Size Chart 2014 Fraction of Hours Used by Big Jobs This chart shows the fraction of hours used on Edison by jobs using 16,384 or more cores. 2015 Usage by Job Size Chart 2014 Last edited: 2016-04-21

  12. Organization Chart | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organization Chart Download Other Organization Charts Computing, Environment, and Life Sciences Energy and Global Security Physical Science and Engineering Photon Sciences PDF icon argonne_org_chart

  13. Organizational Chart - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    194_v2.jpg Organizational Chart Who We Are JCAP Mission JCAP At A Glance Fact Sheets Organizational Chart Recent Science Technology Transfer Awards & Honors Senior Management Scientific Leadership Researchers Governance & Advisory Boards Operations & Administration Who we are Overview JCAP Mission JCAP At A Glance Fact Sheets Organizational Chart Our Achievements Recent Science Technology Transfer Awards & Honors Our People Senior Management Scientific Leadership Researchers

  14. Charting a Parallel Course

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Charting National Security Science Latest Issue:April 2016 past issues All Issues » submit Charting a Parallel Course Los Alamos has partnered with the U.S. Navy since the Manhattan Project to ensure U.S. national security. March 22, 2016 Charting a Parallel Course A Regulus nuclear-armed cruise missile sits aboard the USS Grayback submarine. The Regulus, designed by Los Alamos, was the first nuclear weapon to enter the Navy's stockpile. (Photo: Open Source) Contact Managing Editor Clay

  15. GS Equivalency Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for General Schedule (i.e., annual) positions. The Chart provides guidance for Human Resource Specialists and Assistants in making qualification determinations when BPA...

  16. Organization Charts | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organization Charts Jefferson Lab Organizational Chart 12 GeV Project Organization Accelerator Operations, Research & Development Division Chief Operating Officer Chief Financial Officer Information Technology Division & Chief Information Office Engineering Division Environment, Safety, Health & Quality Experimental Nuclear Physics Division Theory Center

  17. PNNL: Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis - Organization Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enlarge Image | PDF version EFRC Organization Chart

  18. IEA Organizational Chart | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    IEA Organizational Chart IEA Organizational Chart More Documents & Publications Organizational Chart Office of International Affairs Org Chart Independent Oversight Review, Idaho...

  19. Chart of communications requirements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chart of communications requirements Chart of communications requirements Chart of communications requirements for BGE PDF icon Chart of communications requirements More Documents ...

  20. AU Organization Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AU Organization Chart AU Organization Chart AU Organization Chart: December 22, 2015 PDF icon AU Organization Chart: December 22, 2015 More Documents & Publications FTCP Senior ...

  1. Organization Chart | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organization Chart Organization Chart Organization Chart Printable PDF Mission Leadership

    Contact Us Business Operations Careers/ Human Resources Directory Environment, Safety & Health Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Organization Chart Organization Chart (org chart) Associated Files: PDF icon Organization chart (PDF)

  2. Office of Environmental Management (EM) Organization Chart |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Management (EM) Organization Chart Office of Environmental Management (EM) Organization Chart PDF icon Office of Environmental Management (EM) Organization Chart More ...

  3. OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) ORGANIZATION CHART |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) ORGANIZATION CHART OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) ORGANIZATION CHART OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) ORGANIZATION CHART ...

  4. MA-60 Org chart | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Updated August 12, 2015 OAM Org Chart (MA-60) v18.pptx More Documents & Publications Office of Management Organization Chart Office of International Affairs Org Chart Policy Flash...

  5. Office of International Affairs Organization Chart | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of International Affairs Organization Chart Office of International Affairs Organization Chart PDF icon IA Org Chart Updated June 2014 More Documents & Publications PI ...

  6. GeoVision Process Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Chart GeoVision Process Chart GeoVision Process Chart

  7. WIP Organization Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications WIP Organization Chart Federal Energy Management Program Organization Chart ... Universities Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education - ...

  8. Business Operations Organization Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Business Operations Organization Chart Business Operations Organization Chart A chart showing how the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Business Operations office is organized. PDF icon Business Operations org chart More Documents & Publications Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Organization Chart Federal Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act (FITARA) Data Resources OCIO Organization Chart (printable version)

  9. HC Organization Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HC Organization Chart HC Organization Chart PDF version of the HC Organizational chart PDF icon 10-20-13 HC_Org_Chart.pdf More Documents & Publications Environmental Justice and Tribal Consultation Training OCIO Organization Chart (printable version) MA-60 Org chart

  10. Chart of the Nuclides

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-03-23

    Nucleus is an interactive PC-based graphical viewer of NUBASE nuclear property data. NUBASE contains experimentally known nuclear properties, together with some values that have been estimated from extrapolation of experimental data for 3010 nuclides. NUBASE also contains data on those isomeric states that have half-lives greater than 1 millisecond; there are 669 such nuclides of which 58 have more than one isomeric state. The latest version of NUCLEUS-CHART has been corrected to include the namesmore » and the chemical symbols of the elements 104 to 109 that have been finally adopted by the Commission on Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry (CNIC) of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). They differ from those recommended by the same commission a few years before and that were widely used in the evaluations AME''95 and NUBASE''97. It results in some shuffling of the names and symbols, that may cause confusion in the near future. At AMDC we''ll be as careful as possible to try to avoid such confusion. In advance we apologize if any will occur in the future and recommend the user to always double check these few names.« less

  11. Lateral flow strip assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miles, Robin R.; Benett, William J.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  12. PPPO Organization Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Organization Chart PPPO Organization Chart PPPO Org Chart - 1-12-16 (74 FTEs).jpg PORTSMOUTHPADUCAH PROJECT OFFICE PPPO LOGO-4 4-3.png PPPO Website Directory

  13. PI Organization Chart | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Office of Policy and International Affairs Organization Chart Office of International Affairs Organization Chart Microsoft PowerPoint - Nov...

  14. DOE Organization Chart- May 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy’s structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs.

  15. DOE Organization Chart- October 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy’s structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs.

  16. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This document provides functional organization charts for all NRC Offices and Regions, and their components.

  17. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-11-30

    Functional organization charts for the NRC Commission Offices, Divisions, and Branches are presented.

  18. ARRA Projects Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects Chart ARRA Projects Chart A chart stating the grantee, DOE grant amount,non federal cost share,project lead organization,description,and partners. PDF icon ARRA Projects Chart More Documents & Publications ARRA Project Info Combined 0112110.xls Missouri Recovery Act State Memo The Promise and Challenge of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels

  19. Community Solar Program Comparison Chart

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chart is a supplement to the "Utility Community Solar Handbook: Understanding and Supporting Utility Program Development," provides the utility's perspective on community solar program development and is a resource for government officials, regulators, community organizers, solar energy advocates, non-profits, and interested citizens who want to support their local utilities in implementing projects.

  20. Geometrical deuteron stripping revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neoh, Y. S.; Yap, S. L. [Plasma Research Technology Center, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05

    We investigate the reality of the idea of geometrical deuteron stripping originally envisioned by Serber. By taking into account of realistic deuteron wavefunction, nuclear density, and nucleon stopping mean free path, we are able to estimate inclusive deuteron stripping cross section for deuteron energy up to before pion production. Our semiclassical model contains only one global parameter constant for all nuclei which can be approximated by Woods-Saxon or any other spherically symmetric density distribution.

  1. Goals & Objectives Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Goals & Objectives Chart PDF icon goal and objectives chart.pdf Responsible Contacts Donna Friend HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST E-mail donna.friend@hq.doe.dov Phone 202-586-5880 More ...

  2. Help:Motion Chart | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    information, visit the Google Help page for Motion Charts Step 2 - Setting up the Chart Once you have the data in the google doc, and it is displaying the ranges you'd like, its...

  3. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-15

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented in this document.

  4. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented in this document.

  5. OSDBU Organization Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OSDBU Organization Chart OSDBU Organization Chart The organization chart for the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization is being updated and should be available soon. More Documents & Publications Guidance of the Department of Energy Subcontracting Program SubcontractingGuidelines.doc� Acquisition Guide Chapter 19 Update

  6. Energy Systems Organization Charts | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Systems Organization Charts Charts showing the organizational structure of the Energy Systems Division and the Center for Transportation Research at Argonne. PDF icon es_org_chart_08-25-14.pdf PDF icon es_CTR_orgchart_04-01-16

  7. NNSA Service Center Chart | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NNSA Service Center Chart NNSA Service Center Chart Office of Chief Counsel at the NNSA Service Center in Albuquerque, NM PDF icon NNSA Service Center Chart More Documents & Publications Technical Qualification Program Accreditation Schedule 2011 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA Service Center (NNSASC) EIS-0466: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

  8. Physical Sciences & Engineering Directorate Organization Chart | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory About Us Awards and Achievements Organization Chart Contact Us Physical Sciences & Engineering Directorate Organization Chart PDF icon pse_org_chart.pdf

  9. DOE Organization Chart - December 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 2014 DOE Organization Chart - December 2014 The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy's structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs. PDF icon DOE Organization Chart - December 2014 More Documents & Publications DOE Organization Chart - October 2014 DOE Organization Chart - May 2, 2014 DOE Organization Chart - April 8

  10. DOE Organization Chart - February 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 2015 DOE Organization Chart - February 2015 The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy's structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs. PDF icon DOE Organization Chart - February 2015 More Documents & Publications DOE Organization Chart - May 2015 DOE Organization Chart - December 2014 DOE ORGANIZATION CHART - JULY 2015

  11. OCIO Organization Chart (printable version) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OCIO Organization Chart (printable version) OCIO Organization Chart (printable version) Printable PDF version of the OCIO Organization Chart. PDF icon OCIO Org Chart (as of 4 18 16).pdf More Documents & Publications Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Organization Chart IT Modernization Strategy DOE Organization Chart - May 1, 2013

  12. Retractable barrier strip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marts, Donna J.; Barker, Stacey G.; Wowczuk, Andrew; Vellenoweth, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture spikes for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture spikes have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture spikes removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The plurality of barrier blocks hare hingedly interconnected by complementary hinges integrally formed into the side of each barrier block which allow the strip to be rolled for easy storage and retrieval, but which prevent irregular or back bending of the strip. The shafts of adjacent barrier blocks are pivotally interconnected via a double hinged universal joint to accommodate irregularities in a roadway surface and to transmit torsional motion of the shaft from block to block. A single flexshaft cable is connected to the shaft of an end block to allow a user to selectively cause the shafts of a plurality of adjacently connected barrier blocks to rotate the tire-puncture spikes to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire, and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. The flexshaft is provided with a resiliently biased retracting mechanism, and a release latch for allowing the spikes to be quickly retracted after the intended vehicle tire is punctured.

  13. Retractable barrier strip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.; McQueen, M.A.

    1996-04-16

    A portable barrier strip is described having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use. 13 figs.

  14. LLNL Energy Flow Charts | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization: Lawrence Livermore National Lab Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Pathways analysis References: LLNL Energy Flow Charts 1 Decision makers have...

  15. APS Organization Chart | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APS Organization Chart The Advanced Photon Source (APS) organization comprises three divisions and one project office. Advanced Photon Source Organization Photon Sciences Overview...

  16. Federal Energy Management Program Organization Chart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chart Technical Services Brad Gustafson Procurement Services Skye Schell Customer Service Hayes Jones Metering, Product Procurement, Water Saralyn Bunch Lab and Data Center ...

  17. CDM in Charts | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CDM in Charts AgencyCompany Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Energy Topics: Implementation, Policiesdeployment...

  18. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Christopher L.; Idzorek, George C.; Atencio, Leroy G.

    1987-01-01

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10.sup.6. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  19. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

    1985-02-19

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10/sup 6/. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  20. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Organization Chart |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Organization Chart Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Organization Chart This chart shows how the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is organized. PDF icon EERE Organization Chart More Documents & Publications Business Operations Organization Chart DOE Organization Chart - October 22, 2012 DOE Organization Chart - August 7, 2013 Blog News Mission Leadership Budget

  1. DOE Organization Chart - August 7, 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Organization Chart - August 7, 2013 DOE Organization Chart - August 7, 2013 The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy's structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs. PDF icon DOE Organization Chart - August 7, 2013 More Documents & Publications DOE Organization Chart - May 2, 2014 DOE Organization Chart - October 2014 DOE Organization Chart - April 8, 2014

  2. DOE Organization Chart - October 22, 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Organization Chart - October 22, 2012 DOE Organization Chart - October 22, 2012 The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy's structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs. PDF icon DOE Organizational Chart More Documents & Publications DOE Organization Chart - July 15, 2013 DOE Organization Chart - June 6, 2013 DOE Organization Chart - May 1, 2013

  3. Ames Lab Org Chart | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    American Veterans Hiring Event American Veterans Hiring Event May 18, 2016 10:00AM to 2:20PM EDT AMVETS, Takoma, WA Contact Ed Agodoa

    Ames Lab Org Chart Document Number: NA Effective Date: 01/2016 File (public): PDF icon ameslab_org_chart_01-01-16

  4. Federal Energy Management Program Organization Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Management Program Organization Chart Federal Energy Management Program Organization Chart Federal Energy Management Program Organization Chart Document shows the organization chart for the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program. PDF icon Download the FEMP organization chart.

  5. Office of Management Organization Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Organization Chart Office of Management Organization Chart Following is the link to the latest Office of Management Organization Chart. PDF icon MA_Org_Chart_Revised_03-22-16.pdf More Documents & Publications MA-60 Org chart Agenda 2015 DOE Acquisition and Project Management (APM) Workshop Presentations

  6. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  7. Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R.; Newmark, R.; McConachie, W.; Udell, K.; Rice, D.; Ramirez, A.; Siegel, W.; Buettner, M.; Daily, W.; Krauter, P.; Folsom, E.; Boegel, A.J.; Bishop, D.; Udell, K.

    1992-01-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation and underground imaging techniques for use in rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called ``Dynamic Stripping`` to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first 8 months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques before moving the contaminated site in FY 92.

  8. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Robert S.; Baker, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip.

  9. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, R.S.; Baker, D.F.

    1988-09-20

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip. 6 figs.

  10. DOE ORGANIZATION CHART - JANUARY 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORGANIZATION CHART - JANUARY 2016 DOE ORGANIZATION CHART - JANUARY 2016 The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy's structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs. PDF icon DOECHART-NONAMES-2016-01.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE ORGANIZATION CHART - FEBRUARY 2016 DOE Organization Chart - December 2014 DOE Organization Chart - February

  11. DOE Organization Chart - April 8, 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 8, 2014 DOE Organization Chart - April 8, 2014 The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy's structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs. PDF icon DOE Organization Chart - April 8, 2014 More Documents & Publications DOE Organization Chart - May 2, 2014 DOE Organization Chart - October 2014 DOE Organization Chart - January 17

  12. DOE Organization Chart - July 15, 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    July 15, 2013 DOE Organization Chart - July 15, 2013 The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy's structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs. PDF icon DOE Organization Chart - July 15, 2013 More Documents & Publications DOE Organization Chart - July 23, 2013 DOE Organization Chart - May 2, 2014 DOE Organization Chart - October 2014

  13. DOE ORGANIZATION CHART - FEBRUARY 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORGANIZATION CHART - FEBRUARY 2016 DOE ORGANIZATION CHART - FEBRUARY 2016 The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy's structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs. PDF icon DOECHART-NONAMES-2016-February-22.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE ORGANIZATION CHART - JANUARY 2016 DOE Organization Chart - December 2014 DOE Organization Chart - February 2015

  14. Office of the Chief Financial Officer Organization Chart | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Office of the Chief Financial Officer Organization Chart Office of the Chief Financial Officer Organization Chart OCFOFrontOffice2015.jpg Leadership Organization ...

  15. Office of Policy and International Affairs Organization Chart...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Policy and International Affairs Organization Chart Office of Policy and International Affairs Organization Chart Office of Policy and International Affairs Organization...

  16. DOE Organization Chart- December 16, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy’s structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs.

  17. DOE Organization Chart- January 17, 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy’s structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs.

  18. DOE Organization Chart- May 21, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy’s structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs.

  19. DOE Organization Chart- July 23, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy’s structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs.

  20. DOE Organization Chart- October 6, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy’s structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs.

  1. Bismuth-based electrochemical stripping analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph

    2004-01-27

    Method and apparatus for trace metal detection and analysis using bismuth-coated electrodes and electrochemical stripping analysis. Both anodic stripping voltammetry and adsorptive stripping analysis may be employed.

  2. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  3. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  4. Office of International Affairs Org Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of International Affairs Org Chart Office of International Affairs Org Chart The Organizational Chart for the Office of International Affairs at the U.S. Department of Energy. PDF icon The Organizational Chart for the Office of International Affairs at the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. DOE Organization Chart - May 2, 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 2, 2014 DOE Organization Chart - May 2, 2014 The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy's structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs. PDF icon DOE Organization Chart - May 2014 More Documents & Publications DOE Organization Chart - October

  6. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts, March 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented.

  7. U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions and branches are presented.

  8. U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    Functional organization charts for the NRC Commission Offices, Divisions, Staffs and Branches are presented.

  9. DOE Organization Chart - June 6, 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 6, 2013 DOE Organization Chart - June 6, 2013 The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy's structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs. PDF icon DOECHART-NONAMES 6_2013 More Documents & Publications DOE Organization Chart - May 1, 2013 DOE Organization Chart - May 21, 2013 DOE Organization Chart - June 25, 2012

  10. DOE Organization Chart - May 1, 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1, 2013 DOE Organization Chart - May 1, 2013 The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy's structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs. PDF icon DOECHART-NONAMES 2013-05.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Organization Chart - July 15, 2013 DOE Organization Chart - April 8, 2014 DOE Organization Chart - December 16, 2013

  11. DOE Organization Chart - June 25, 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 25, 2012 DOE Organization Chart - June 25, 2012 The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy's structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs. PDF icon DOECHART-NONAMES 2012-07.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Organization Chart - July 15, 2013 DOE Organization Chart - May 2, 2014 DOE Organization Chart - October

  12. Federal Energy Management Program Organization Chart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Program Director Dr. Timothy Unruh Sustainability Services Daniel Gore Sustainability, Legislative Affairs Nicolas Baker Training Beverly Dyer Large Campus Initiative Daniel Gore Fleet Tom Homan (Acting) Organization Chart Technical Services Brad Gustafson Procurement Services Skye Schell Customer Service Hayes Jones Metering, Product Procurement, Water Saralyn Bunch Lab and Data Center Challenges Will Lintner Special Projects Cyrus Nasseri Renewable Energy Rachel Shepherd ENABLE

  13. Nanoscience & Technology Organization Chart | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscience & Technology Organization Chart The Nanoscience and Technology (NST) Division at Argonne National Laboratory hosts a user facility, the Center for Nanoscale Materials, in addition to performing programmatic science activities. PDF icon NST Org Chart_March2016.pdf

  14. Must all charting and graphing code be written in javascript...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Must all charting and graphing code be written in javascript? Home > Groups > Databus In the documentation chapter entitled Developing charts using 3rd party api, we are told that...

  15. How to use streaming chart? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    use streaming chart? Home > Groups > Databus Hi, how do you use the built-in streaming chart? How do you form the URL for it? Thanks, Submitted by Hopcroft on 31 October, 2013 -...

  16. Chart of Nuclides from the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Chart of Nuclides is a software product that allows users to search and plot nuclear structure and nuclear decay data interactively. The Chart of Nuclides was developed by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). It provides an interface between web users and several databases containing nuclear structure, nuclear decay and some neutron-induced nuclear reaction information. Using the Chart of Nuclides, it is possible to search for nuclear level properties (energy, half-life, spin-parity), gamma-ray information (energy, intensity, multipolarity, coincidences),radiation information following nuclear decay (energy, intensity, dose), and neutron-induced reaction data from the BNL-325 book (thermal cross section and resonance integral). The information provided by the Chart of Nuclides can be seen in tables, level schemes and an interactive chart of nuclides. (From the Chart of Nuclides Description at http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/chart/help/index.jsp?product=chart)

  17. Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart The Status Chart provides the status of ongoing NEPA documents at the Department of Energy, including the dates of important milestones in the NEPA process, links to the project pages, and references to more information (updated monthly). This chart represents anticipated activity and is not a commitment for documentation

  18. Office of the General Counsel Organization Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of the General Counsel Organization Chart Office of the General Counsel Organization Chart The following graphic is an organization chart for the Office of the General Counsel. The office is separated into four major departmental groups: Litigation, Regulation and Enforcement (GC-30) Environment and Compliance (GC-50) Transactions, Technology and Contractor Human Resources (GC-60) Energy Policy (GC-70) PDF icon GCORG 2015 04 names More Documents & Publications DOE Organization Chart -

  19. Charting a New Carbon Route to Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.beta.undp.orgcontentundpenhomeourworkenvironmentandenergyfo Cost: Free Language: English Charting a New Carbon Route to Development Screenshot "UNDP recognizes the...

  20. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The report consists entirely of organizational charts of the US NRC, with functional notes for each office. (GHT)

  1. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts, January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented in this document.

  2. Energy & Global Security Organization Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Reports & Presentations Charts used in the What Drives Crude Oil Prices website Updated monthly and quarterly U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Balance Inventories act as the balancing point between supply and demand. During periods when production exceeds consumption, crude oil and petroleum products can be stored for expected future use. In the economic downturn of late 2008 and early 2009, for example, the unexpected drop

  3. Office of Fossil Energy Organization Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Fossil Energy Organization Chart Office of Fossil Energy Organization Chart PDF icon FE Org Chart April 2016.pdf More Documents & Publications Our Organization and Employees SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR DOWNEAST LNG, INC. - FT DKT. NO. 14-172-LNG - ORDER NO. 3600 (FTA) Zero Energy Ready Home Newsletter: April 2016

  4. SunShot Initiative Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SunShot Initiative Chart SunShot Initiative Chart Enlarged version of SunShot Initiative chart. Image icon lcoewithcoins.jpg More Documents & Publications SunShot Concentrating Solar Power Program SunShot Initiative 2014 Portfolio Overview EERE Science and Technology Policy (STP) Fellowships Application Form

  5. RAP Meeting Transcribed Flip Chart Notes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flip Chart Notes February 15, 2012 Site-wide Permit Workshop May 3 1. Have "post-workshop" session to discuss HAB next steps 2. Recommend Ecology sponsors & facilitates Workshop - Ecology captures notes, but HAB members track issues of concern, too. 3. Web-ex for public when it fits 4. Pre-workshop meeting with HAB issue leaders (potential speakers) Page 1 300 Area HAB next steps... IM & Pam 1. Issue managers meet to review potential issues for HAB/committees 2. Bring back to

  6. Antenna structure with distributed strip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-03-18

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

  7. Antenna structure with distributed strip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-10-21

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

  8. Roll Casting of Aluminum Alloy Clad Strip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, R.; Tsuge, H. [Graduate School of Osaka Institute of Technology (Japan); Haga, T. [Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya Asahiku Osaka city 535-8585 (Japan); Watari, H. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuda Midoriku Yokohama city 226-8502 (Japan); Kumai, S. [Gunma University, 1-5-1 tenjin cho Kiryu city 376-8515 (Japan)

    2011-01-17

    Casting of aluminum alloy three layers of clad strip was tried using the two sets of twin roll casters, and effects of the casting parameters on the cladding conditions were investigated. One twin roll caster was mounted on the other twin roll caster. Base strip was 8079 aluminum alloy and overlay strips were 6022 aluminum alloy. Effects of roll-load of upper and lower casters and melt temperature of the lower caster were investigated. When the roll-load of the upper and lower caster was large enough, the overlay strip could be solidified and be connected. The overlay strip could be connected when the melt of the overlay strip cast by the lower caster was low enough. Sound three layers of clad strip could be cast by proper conditions.

  9. A paediatric X-ray exposure chart

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Stephen P

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this review was to develop a radiographic optimisation strategy to make use of digital radiography (DR) and needle phosphor computerised radiography (CR) detectors, in order to lower radiation dose and improve image quality for paediatrics. This review was based on evidence-based practice, of which a component was a review of the relevant literature. The resulting exposure chart was developed with two distinct groups of exposure optimisation strategies – body exposures (for head, trunk, humerus, femur) and distal extremity exposures (elbow to finger, knee to toe). Exposure variables manipulated included kilovoltage peak (kVp), target detector exposure and milli-ampere-seconds (mAs), automatic exposure control (AEC), additional beam filtration, and use of antiscatter grid. Mean dose area product (DAP) reductions of up to 83% for anterior–posterior (AP)/posterior–anterior (PA) abdomen projections were recorded postoptimisation due to manipulation of multiple-exposure variables. For body exposures, the target EI and detector exposure, and thus the required mAs were typically 20% less postoptimisation. Image quality for some distal extremity exposures was improved by lowering kVp and increasing mAs around constant entrance skin dose. It is recommended that purchasing digital X-ray equipment with high detective quantum efficiency detectors, and then optimising the exposure chart for use with these detectors is of high importance for sites performing paediatric imaging. Multiple-exposure variables may need to be manipulated to achieve optimal outcomes.

  10. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Organization Chart and Contacts | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Cell Technologies Office Organization Chart and Contacts Fuel Cell Technologies Office Organization Chart and Contacts Fuel Cell Technologies Office Organization Chart and Contacts Contact Information U.S. Department of Energy - Fuel Cell Technologies Office General Contact Information 202-586-3388 fuelcells@ee.doe.gov Office Contacts Director Sunita Satyapal 202-586-2336 Sunita.Satyapal@ee.doe.gov Operations Supervisor and Technology Acceleration Program Manager Rick Farmer

  11. Energy Department Charting New Future for Wastewater Treatment | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Charting New Future for Wastewater Treatment Energy Department Charting New Future for Wastewater Treatment March 22, 2016 - 12:45pm Addthis Energy Department Charting New Future for Wastewater Treatment Dr. Valerie Sarisky-Reed Dr. Valerie Sarisky-Reed Deputy Director, Bioenergy Technologies Office What are the key facts? In an effort to modernize transporting and treating wastewater, the Energy Department is working to advance technologies for energy and water systems. The

  12. Excerpt from August 8, 2013 HSEP Meeting Transcribed Flip Charts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 8, 2013 HSEP Meeting Transcribed Flip Charts Emergency PreparednessResponse: Input - Strategies for Awareness 1. Use real examples when trying to increase publicHAB...

  13. Energy and Global Security Directorate Organization Chart | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory Energy and Global Security Directorate Organization Chart PDF icon egs_orgchart_02-18-16.pdf

  14. Widget:Motion Chart Visualizations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References usenergyconsumption: SED data usconsumption2010: SED data worldenergysupply: OECD data Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWidget:MotionChartVisuali...

  15. Scientists meet to chart roadmap to fusion | Princeton Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The workshops aim to help participants chart pathways to the demonstration fusion power plants that the major world programs envision. Such "DEMO" plants would mark the final step ...

  16. stripping | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Low-Energy, Low-Cost Process for Stripping Carbon Dioxide from Absorbents Project No.: FG02-06ER84592 SBIR Glycol Heater, Stripper, MEA Delivery Tank, CO2 and H2O Collection Apparatus Glycol Heater, Stripper, MEA Delivery Tank, CO2 and H2O Collection Apparatus AIL Research, Inc. (AIL) is in the second phase of a small business initiative research (SBIR) project that is assessing the economic and technical feasibility of a carbon dioxide (CO2) stripper that uses an internally heated contactor.

  17. Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R.; Newmark, R.; McConachie, W.; Rice, D.; Ramirez, A.; Siegel, W.; Buettner, M.; Daily, W.; Krauter, P.; Folsom, E.; Boegel, A.J.; Bishop, D. ); udel, K. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-03-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation and underground imaging techniques for use in rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called Dynamic Stripping'' to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first 8 months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques before moving to the contaminated site in FY 92.

  18. Method of stripping metals from organic solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Todd, Terry A.; Law, Jack D.; Herbst, R. Scott; Romanovskiy, Valeriy N.; Smirnov, Igor V.; Babain, Vasily A.; Esimantovski, Vyatcheslav M.

    2009-02-24

    A new method to strip metals from organic solvents in a manner that allows for the recycle of the stripping agent. The method utilizes carbonate solutions of organic amines with complexants, in low concentrations, to strip metals from organic solvents. The method allows for the distillation and reuse of organic amines. The concentrated metal/complexant fraction from distillation is more amenable to immobilization than solutions resulting from current practice.

  19. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    This document is the US NRC organizational structure and chart as of July 1, 1996. It contains the org charts for the Commission, ACRS, ASLAB, Commission staff offices, Executive Director for Operations, Office of the Inspector General, Program offices, and regional offices.

  20. User's Guide to the Energy Charting and Metrics Tool (ECAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taasevigen, Danny J.; Koran, William

    2012-02-28

    The intent of this user guide is to provide a brief description of the functionality of the Energy Charting and Metrics (ECAM) tool, including the expanded building re-tuning functionality developed for Pacific Northwest National laboratory (PNNL). This document describes the tool's general functions and features, and offers detailed instructions for PNNL building re-tuning charts, a feature in ECAM intended to help building owners and operators look at trend data (recommended 15-minute time intervals) in a series of charts (both time series and scatter) to analyze air-handler, zone, and central plant information gathered from a building automation system (BAS).

  1. Dual initiation strip charge apparatus and methods for making...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A Dual Initiation Strip Charge (DISC) apparatus is initiated by a single initiation source and detonates a strip of explosive charge at two separate contacts. The reflection of ...

  2. AIS/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip Casting: Anticipating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AISDOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip Casting: Anticipating New Routes To Steel Sheet Citation Details In-Document Search Title: AISDOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip...

  3. Saving Energy Through Advanced Power Strips (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, D.

    2013-10-01

    Advanced Power Strips (APS) look just like ordinary power strips, except that they have built-in features that are designed to reduce the amount of energy used by many consumer electronics. There are several different types of APSs on the market, but they all operate on the same basic principle of shutting off the supply power to devices that are not in use. By replacing your standard power strip with an APS, you can signifcantly cut the amount of electricity used by your home office and entertainment center devices, and save money on your electric bill. This illustration summarizes the different options.

  4. Scale of Things Chart | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Scale of Things Chart Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science ... The above "Scale of Things" chart was designed by the Office of Basic Energy ...

  5. DOE ORGANIZATION CHART - JULY 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy's structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positionsjobs. PDF icon ...

  6. Dynamic underground stripping demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation techniques for rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called dynamic stripping to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first eight months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques. Tests then began on the contaminated site in FY 1992. This report describes the work at the Clean Site, including design and performance criteria, test results, interpretations, and conclusions. We fielded 'a wide range of new designs and techniques, some successful and some not. In this document, we focus on results and performance, lessons learned, and design and operational changes recommended for work at the contaminated site. Each section focuses on a different aspect of the work and can be considered a self-contained contribution.

  7. Charting the Future of Energy Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Charting the Future of Energy Storage Charting the Future of Energy Storage August 7, 2013 - 2:53pm Addthis Watch the video above to learn how Urban Electric Power is creating a market for energy storage technology. | Video by Matty Greene, Energy Department. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? As we continue to incorporate more renewable energy into the grid, energy storage technologies will be key to

  8. Process development of thin strip steel casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

    1990-12-01

    An important new frontier is being opened in steel processing with the emergence of thin strip casting. Casting steel directly to thin strip has enormous benefits in energy savings by potentially eliminating the need for hot reduction in a hot strip mill. This has been the driving force for numerous current research efforts into the direct strip casting of steel. The US Department of Energy initiated a program to evaluate the development of thin strip casting in the steel industry. In earlier phases of this program, planar flow casting on an experimental caster was studied by a team of engineers from Westinghouse Electric corporation and Armco Inc. A subsequent research program was designed as a fundamental and developmental study of both planar and melt overflow casting processes. This study was arranged as several separate and distinct tasks which were often completed by different teams of researchers. An early task was to design and build a water model to study fluid flow through different designs of planar flow casting nozzles. Another important task was mathematically modeling of melt overflow casting process. A mathematical solidification model for the formation of the strip in the melt overflow process was written. A study of the material and conditioning of casting substrates was made on the small wheel caster using the melt overflow casting process. This report discusses work on the development of thin steel casting.

  9. FUNCTION GENERATOR FOR ANALOGUE COMPUTERS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skramstad, H.K.; Wright, J.H.; Taback, L.

    1961-12-12

    An improved analogue computer is designed which can be used to determine the final ground position of radioactive fallout particles in an atomic cloud. The computer determines the fallout pattern on the basis of known wind velocity and direction at various altitudes, and intensity of radioactivity in the mushroom cloud as a function of particle size and initial height in the cloud. The output is then displayed on a cathode-ray tube so that the average or total luminance of the tube screen at any point represents the intensity of radioactive fallout at the geographical location represented by that point. (AEC)

  10. The Valles natural analogue project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stockman, H.; Krumhansl, J.; Ho, C.; McConnell, V.

    1994-12-01

    The contact between an obsidian flow and a steep-walled tuff canyon was examined as an analogue for a highlevel waste repository. The analogue site is located in the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, where a massive obsidian flow filled a paleocanyon in the Battleship Rock tuff. The obsidian flow provided a heat source, analogous to waste panels or an igneous intrusion in a repository, and caused evaporation and migration of water. The tuff and obsidian samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and mineralogy by INAA, XRF, X-ray diffraction; and scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe. Samples were also analyzed for D/H and {sup 39}Ar/{sup 4O} isotopic composition. Overall,the effects of the heating event seem to have been slight and limited to the tuff nearest the contact. There is some evidence of devitrification and migration of volatiles in the tuff within 10 meters of the contact, but variations in major and trace element chemistry are small and difficult to distinguish from the natural (pre-heating) variability of the rocks.

  11. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts, March 15, 1993. Revision 16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented.

  12. Bimetallic strip for low temperature use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bussiere, Jean F.; Welch, David O.; Suenaga, Masaki

    1981-01-01

    There is provided a class of mechanically pre-stressed structures, suitably bi-layer strips comprising a layer of group 5 transition metals in intimate contact with a layer of an intermetallic compound of said transition metals with certain group 3A, 4A or 5A metals or metalloids suitably gallium, indium, silicon, germanium, tin, arsenic or antimony. The changes of Young's modulus of these bi-layered combinations at temperatures in the region of but somewhat above absolute zero provides a useful means of sensing temperature changes. Such bi-metallic strips may be used as control strips in thermostats, in direct dial reading instruments, or the like. The structures are made by preparing a sandwich of a group 5B transition metal strip between the substantially thicker strips of an alloy between copper and a predetermined group 3A, 4A or 5A metal or metalloid, holding the three layers of the sandwich in intimate contact heating the same, cooling the same and removing the copper alloy and then removing one of the two thus formed interlayer alloys between said transition metal and the metal previously alloyed with copper.

  13. New Reports Chart Offshore Wind's Path Forward | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reports Chart Offshore Wind's Path Forward New Reports Chart Offshore Wind's Path Forward December 12, 2012 - 2:29pm Addthis Taking a look at the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead as the U.S. prepares to enter the offshore wind market. <a href=" http://energy.gov/articles/infographic-offshore-wind-outlook"> Click here</a> to view the full infographic. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. Taking a look at the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead as the U.S.

  14. DASHBOARDS & CONTROL CHARTS EXPERIENCES IN IMPROVING SAFETY AT HANFORD WASHINGTON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2006-02-27

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of safety methodology, quality tools, leadership, and teamwork at Hanford and their significant positive impact on safe performance of work. Dashboards, Leading Indicators, Control charts, Pareto Charts, Dr. W. Edward Deming's Red Bead Experiment, and Dr. Deming's System of Profound Knowledge have been the principal tools and theory of an integrated management system. Coupled with involved leadership and teamwork, they have led to significant improvements in worker safety and protection, and environmental restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

  15. Alternative solvents/technologies for paint stripping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, M.N.; Harris, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    Paint stripping is a necessary part of maintenance at US Air Force Air Logistics Centers. The Waste from Air Force paint stripping operations contains toxic chemicals that require special handling and disposal at considerable cost. Solvent emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere are another source of pollution. These wastes are hazardous to the environment and to operating personnel, and are now regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency, which can impose fines for discharges that exceed the established limits. This report describes the research project titled Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping being conducted by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the Engineering and Services Center at Tyndall Air Force Base. This report also includes the results obtained in Phase 1. 8 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Validation of the Hot Strip Mill Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Shulkosky; David Rosberg; Jerrud Chapman

    2005-03-30

    The Hot Strip Mill Model (HSMM) is an off-line, PC based software originally developed by the University of British Columbia (UBC) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) under the AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program. The HSMM was developed to predict the temperatures, deformations, microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of steel strip or plate rolled in a hot mill. INTEG process group inc. undertook the current task of enhancing and validating the technology. With the support of 5 North American steel producers, INTEG process group tested and validated the model using actual operating data from the steel plants and enhanced the model to improve prediction results.

  17. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    This document contains organization charts for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and for the five offices of the NRC. Function statements are provided delineating the major responsibilities and operations of each office. Organization and function are provided to the branch level. The head of each office, division, and branch is also listed.

  18. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-19

    This document is the organizational chart for the US NRC. It contains organizational structure and functional statements for the following: (1) the Commission, (2) committees and boards, (3) staff offices, (4) office of the Inspector General, (5) executive director for operations, (6) program offices, and (7) regional offices.

  19. Minimizing glovebox glove breaches, Part 4: control charts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, M.E.; Lee, M.B.; Schreiber, S.

    2007-07-01

    At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Plutonium Facility, plutonium isotopes and other actinides are handled in a glovebox environment. The spread of radiological contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the worker's breathing zone, are minimized and/or prevented through the use of glovebox technology. Evaluating the glovebox configuration, the glovebox gloves are the most vulnerable part of this engineering control. Recognizing this vulnerability, the Glovebox Glove Integrity Program was developed to minimize and/or prevent unplanned openings in the glovebox environment, e.g., glove failures and breaches. In addition, LANL implement the 'Lean Six Sigma (LSS)' program that incorporates the practices of Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma technologies and tools to effectively improve administrative and engineering controls and work processes. One tool used in LSS is the use of control charts, which is an effective way to characterize data collected from unplanned openings in the glovebox environment. The benefit management receives from using this tool is two-fold. First, control charts signal the absence or presence of systematic variations that result in process instability, in relation to glovebox glove breaches and failures. Second, these graphical representations of process variation determine whether an improved process is under control. Further, control charts are used to identify statistically significant variations (trends) that can be used in decision making to improve processes. This paper discusses performance indicators assessed by the use control charts, provides examples of control charts, and shows how managers use the results to make decisions. This effort contributes to LANL Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations. (authors)

  20. MINIMIZING GLOVEBOX GLOVE BREACHES, PART IV: CONTROL CHARTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COURNOYER, MICHAEL E.; LEE, MICHELLE B.; SCHREIBER, STEPHEN B.

    2007-02-05

    At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Plutonium Facility, plutonium. isotopes and other actinides are handled in a glovebox environment. The spread of radiological contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the worker's breathing zone, are minimized and/or prevented through the use of glovebox technology. Evaluating the glovebox configuration, the glovebo gloves are the most vulnerable part of this engineering control. Recognizing this vulnerability, the Glovebox Glove Integrity Program (GGIP) was developed to minimize and/or prevent unplanned openings in the glovebox environment, i.e., glove failures and breaches. In addition, LANL implement the 'Lean Six Sigma (LSS)' program that incorporates the practices of Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma technologies and tools to effectively improve administrative and engineering controls and work processes. One tool used in LSS is the use of control charts, which is an effective way to characterize data collected from unplanned openings in the glovebox environment. The benefit management receives from using this tool is two-fold. First, control charts signal the absence or presence of systematic variations that result in process instability, in relation to glovebox glove breaches and failures. Second, these graphical representations of process variation detennine whether an improved process is under control. Further, control charts are used to identify statistically significant variations (trends) that can be used in decision making to improve processes. This paper discusses performance indicators assessed by the use control charts, provides examples of control charts, and shows how managers use the results to make decisions. This effort contributes to LANL Continuous Improvement Program by improving the efficiency, cost effectiveness, and formality of glovebox operations.

  1. Strip edge cracking simulation in cold rolling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubert, C.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Dubois, A.

    2011-01-17

    This research work focuses on a specific defect which occurs during cold rolling of steel strips: edge-serration. Investigations on the industrial processes have led to the conclusion that this defect is the result of the edge-trimming and cold rolling sequences. The aim of this research work is to analyze the effect of the cutting process and the cold rolling on cracks occurrence, especially on strip edges.This study is performed using an experimental testing stand called Upsetting Rolling Test (URT). It allows to reproduce cold rolling contact parameters such as forward slip, reduction ratio and friction coefficients. Specimens sampled near trimmed industrial strip edges are deformed using the URT stand. Two sets of specimens with different stress states, obtained by annealing, are submitted to two reduction passes with extreme forward slips.Scanning electron microscopy observations added to 3D optical surface profiler topographies show that on one hand, forward slip has a major effect on cracks opening. On the other hand, cracks opening decreases according to high roll strip speed gradient. Concerning the heat-treated specimens, no crack appeared after all reduction passes, showing a large influence of the cutting process and consequently of the local stress state in the vicinity of the burnish and fracture regions.

  2. Lab Tests Demonstrate Effectiveness of Advanced Power Strips (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-09-01

    NREL engineers evaluate the functionalities of advanced power strips and help consumers choose the right one for their plug loads.

  3. Ethanol Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    This chart shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for ethanol.

  4. Propane Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    This chart shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for propane.

  5. Biodiesel Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    This chart shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for biodiesel.

  6. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts, January 31, 1992. Revision 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented in this document.

  7. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements. Revision 19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-31

    Functional statements and organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented.

  8. Electric Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    This chart shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for electric.

  9. Natural Gas Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    This chart shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for natural gas.

  10. Elastic-plastic response charts for nuclear overpressures. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guice, L.K.; Kiger, S.A.

    1984-06-01

    The single-degree-of-freedom equation of motion for an elastic-plastic system with forcing functions that are representative of nuclear weapon simulations is nondimensionalized and solved. Numerical solutions are calculated by the Newmark Beta method, and response charts incorporating nondimensionalized structural and loading parameters for the Speicher-Brode nuclear pressure history description are provided. A computer code is presented for solving the elastic-plastic problem for Speicher-Brode overpressure as well as triangular-shaped overpressures.

  11. Pf/Zeolite Catalyst for Tritium Stripping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, R.H.

    2001-03-26

    This report described promising hydrogen (protium and tritium) stripping results obtained with a Pd/zeolite catalyst at ambient temperature. Preliminary results show 90-99+ percent tritium stripping efficiency may be obtained, with even better performance expected as bed configuration and operating conditions are optimized. These results suggest that portable units with single beds of the Pd/zeolite catalyst may be utilized as ''catalytic absorbers'' to clean up both tritium gas and tritiated water. A cart-mounted prototype stripper utilizing this catalyst has been constructed for testing. This portable stripper has potential applications in maintenance-type jobs such as tritium line breaks. This catalyst can also potentially be utilized in an emergency stripper for the Replacement Tritium Facility.

  12. Antenna with distributed strip and integrated electronic components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T. (Albuquerque, NM); Payne, Jason A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ottesen, Cory W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-08-05

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element can be in proximity to a ground conductor and/or arranged as a dipole. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. An antenna can comprise a distributed strip patterned on a printed wiring board, integrated with electronic components mounted on top of or below the distributed strip, and substantially within the extents of the distributed strip. Mounting of electronic components on top of or below the distributed strip has little effect on the performance of the antenna, and allows for realizing the combination of the antenna and integrated components in a compact form. An embodiment of the invention comprises an antenna including a distributed strip, integrated with a battery mounted on the distributed strip.

  13. Multiple Electron Stripping of Heavy Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Mueller; L. Grisham; I. Kaganovich; R. L. Watson; V. Horvat; K. E. Zaharakis; Y. Peng

    2002-06-25

    One approach being explored as a route to practical fusion energy uses heavy ion beams focused on an indirect drive target. Such beams will lose electrons while passing through background gas in the target chamber, and therefore it is necessary to assess the rate at which the charge state of the incident beam evolves on the way to the target. Accelerators designed primarily for nuclear physics or high energy physics experiments utilize ion sources that generate highly stripped ions in order to achieve high energies economically. As a result, accelerators capable of producing heavy ion beams of 10 to 40 Mev/amu with charge state 1 currently do not exist. Hence, the stripping cross-sections used to model the performance of heavy ion fusion driver beams have, up to now, been based upon theoretical calculations. We have investigated experimentally the stripping of 3.4 Mev/amu Kr 7+ and Xe +11 in N2; 10.2 MeV/amu Ar +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 19 MeV/amu Ar +8 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 30 MeV He 1 + in He, N2, Ar and Xe; and 38 MeV/amu N +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe. The results of these measurements are compared with the theoretical calculations to assess their applicability over a wide range of parameters.

  14. Spray-formed tooling and aluminum strip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHugh, K.M.

    1995-11-01

    Spray forming is an advanced materials processing technology that converts a bulk liquid metal to a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a suitably shaped substrate. By combining rapid solidification processing with product shape control, spray forming can reduce manufacturing costs while improving product quality. De Laval nozzles offer an alternative method to the more conventional spray nozzle designs. Two applications are described: high-volume production of aluminum alloy strip, and the production of specialized tooling, such as injection molds and dies, for rapid prototyping.

  15. AIS/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip Casting: Anticipating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: AISDOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip Casting: Anticipating New Routes To Steel Sheet Citation Details In-Document Search Title: AISDOE Technology Roadmap...

  16. TRANSPARENT HELIUM IN STRIPPED ENVELOPE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piro, Anthony L.; Morozova, Viktoriya S., E-mail: piro@caltech.edu [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., M/C 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Using simple arguments based on photometric light curves and velocity evolution, we propose that some stripped envelope supernovae (SNe) show signs that a significant fraction of their helium is effectively transparent. The main pieces of evidence are the relatively low velocities with little velocity evolution, as are expected deep inside an exploding star, along with temperatures that are too low to ionize helium. This means that the helium should not contribute to the shaping of the main SN light curve, and thus the total helium mass may be difficult to measure from simple light curve modeling. Conversely, such modeling may be more useful for constraining the mass of the carbon/oxygen core of the SN progenitor. Other stripped envelope SNe show higher velocities and larger velocity gradients, which require an additional opacity source (perhaps the mixing of heavier elements or radioactive nickel) to prevent the helium from being transparent. We discuss ways in which similar analysis can provide insights into the differences and similarities between SNe Ib and Ic, which will lead to a better understanding of their respective formation mechanisms.

  17. Web-enabled Milestones Chart | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Web-enabled Milestones Chart Over the last decade, numerous milestones have been achieved, including many "firsts" in government web search technology. Mouse over the year to view ...

  18. ChallengeX_2008_Team_Technologies_Chart.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ChallengeX2008TeamTechnologiesChart.pdf More Documents & Publications The Drive for Energy Diversity and Sustainability: The Impact on Transportation Fuels and Propulsion...

  19. Microsoft Word - 2015_0908_HAB_PIC_TranscribedFlipCharts.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Involvement and Communications Committee Transcribed Flip Chart Notes - September 8, 2015 Draft Advice principles: (Potentially for November advice) Coincide Board...

  20. Method and apparatus for corrugating strips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, J.R.; Curtis, C.H.

    1981-10-27

    The invention relates to a method and a machine for transversely corrugating a continuous strip of metallic foil. The product foil comprises a succession of alternately disposed corrugations, each defining in a cross section, a major segment of a circle. The foil to be corrugated is positioned to extend within a vertical passage in the machine. The walls of the passage are heated to promote the desired deformation of the foil. Foil-deforming rollers are alternately passed obliquely across the passage to respectively engage transverse sections of the foil. The rollers and their respective section of deformed foil comprise a stacked assembly which is moved incrementally through the heated passageway. As the assembly emerges from the passageway, the rollers spill from the corrugated foil and are recovered for re-use.

  1. Method and apparatus for corrugating strips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, Jack R.; Curtis, Charles H.

    1983-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a machine for transversely corrugating a continuous strip of metallic foil. The product foil comprises a succession of alternately disposed corrugations, each defining in cross section, a major segment of a circle. The foil to be corrugated is positioned to extend within a vertical passage in the machine. The walls of the passage are heated to promote the desired deformation of the foil. Foil-deforming rollers are alternately passed obliquely across the passage to respectively engage transverse sections of the foil. The rollers and their respective section of deformed foil comprise a stacked assembly which is moved incrementally through the heated passageway. As the assembly emerges from the passageway, the rollers spill from the corrugated foil and are recovered for re-use.

  2. Useful Graphs and Charts - Ion Beams - Radiation Effects Facility /

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cyclotron Institute / Texas A&M University Ion Beams Available Beams / Beam Change Times / Measurements / Useful Graphs Useful Graphs and Charts LET vs. Range in Si Graphs: 15 MeV/u Beams 24.8 MeV/u Beams 40 MeV/u Beams Beam energy, Let and range in si at various air-gaps from rear foil: 15 MeV/u Beams 24.8 and 40 MeV/u Beams Quick Links Beam Characterization and verification Beam List Beam Change Times 15 MeV/u LET vs Range Graph 25 MeV/u LET vs Range Graph 40 Mev/u LET vs Range Graph

  3. Choose the Right Advanced Power Strip for You | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Renewable Energy Laboratory for more information about APS functionality and all of the different types that are available to help you save energy. Follow the flow chart in the...

  4. Biodiesel Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Many standards development organizations (SDOs) are working to develop codes and standards needed for the utilization of alternative fuel vehicle technologies. This chart shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for biodiesel. Biodiesel Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart Vehicles Storage Dispensing Infrastructure Engine Testing: Fuel Systems: Fuel Lubricants: Powertrain Systems: Containers: Dispensing Operations: Dispensing

  5. Reductive stripping process for uranium recovery from organic extracts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurst, Jr., Fred J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1985-01-01

    In the reductive stripping of uranium from an organic extractant in a uranium recovery process, the use of phosphoric acid having a molarity in the range of 8 to 10 increases the efficiency of the reductive stripping and allows the strip step to operate with lower aqueous to organic recycle ratios and shorter retention time in the mixer stages. Under these operating conditions, less solvent is required in the process, and smaller, less expensive process equipment can be utilized. The high strength H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 is available from the evaporator stage of the process.

  6. Reductive stripping process for uranium recovery from organic extracts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurst, F.J. Jr.

    1983-06-16

    In the reductive stripping of uranium from an organic extractant in a uranium recovery process, the use of phosphoric acid having a molarity in the range of 8 to 10 increases the efficiency of the reductive stripping and allows the strip step to operate with lower aqueous to organic recycle ratios and shorter retention time in the mixer stages. Under these operating conditions, less solvent is required in the process, and smaller, less expensive process equipment can be utilized. The high strength H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ is available from the evaporator stage of the process.

  7. CO2 Removal using a Synthetic Analogue of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry Cordatos

    2010-09-14

    Project attempts to develop a synthetic analogue for carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it in a membrane for separation of CO2 from coal power plant flue gas. Conference poster presents result of first 9 months of project progress including concept, basic system architecture and membrane properties target, results of molecular modeling for analogue - CO2 interaction, and next steps of testing analogue resistance to flue gas contaminants.

  8. Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earle, L.; Sparn, B.

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes the results of a laboratory investigation to evaluate the technical performance of advanced power strip (APS) devices when subjected to a range of home entertainment center and home office usage scenarios.

  9. Cooling of stripped catalyst prior to regeneration in cracking process

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Patent) | SciTech Connect Cooling of stripped catalyst prior to regeneration in cracking process Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Cooling of stripped catalyst prior to regeneration in cracking process A process is described for controlling the fluid catalytic cracking of a feedstock containing hydrocarbons, comprising the steps of: passing a mixture comprising catalyst and the feedstock through a riser conversion zone under fluid catalytic cracking conditions to crack the

  10. Development of a thin steel strip casting process. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.S.

    1994-04-01

    This is a comprehensive effort to develop direct strip casting to the point where a pilot scale program for casting carbon steel strip could be initiated. All important aspects of the technology were being investigated, however the program was terminated early due to a change in the business strategy of the primary contractor, Armco Inc. (focus to be directed at specialty steels, not low carbon steel). At termination, the project was on target on all milestones and under budget. Major part was casting of strip at the experiment casting facility. A new caster, capable of producing direct cast strip of up to 12 in. wide in heats of 1000 and 3000 lb, was used. A total of 81 1000-1200 lb heats were cast as well as one test heat of 3000 lb. Most produced strip of from 0.016 to 0.085 in. thick. Process reliability was excellent for short casting times; quality was generally poor from modern hot strip mill standards, but the practices necessary for good surface quality were identified.

  11. Reducing Office Plug Loads through Simple and Inexpensive Advanced Power Strips: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, I.; Sheppy, M.; Cutler, D.

    2013-07-01

    This paper documents the process (and results) of applying Advanced Power Strips with various control approaches.

  12. Methane storage capabilities of diamond analogues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haranczyk, M; Lin, LC; Lee, K; Martin, RL; Neaton, JB; Smit, B

    2013-01-01

    Methane can be an alternative fuel for vehicular usage provided that new porous materials are developed for its efficient adsorption-based storage. Herein, we search for materials for this application within the family of diamond analogues. We used density functional theory to investigate structures in which tetrahedral C atoms of diamond are separated by-CC-or-BN-groups, as well as ones involving substitution of tetrahedral C atoms with Si and Ge atoms. The adsorptive and diffusive properties of methane are studied using classical molecular simulations. Our results suggest that the all-carbon structure has the highest volumetric methane uptake of 280 VSTP/V at p = 35 bar and T = 298 K. However, it suffers from limited methane diffusion. Alternatively, the considered Si and Ge-containing analogies have fast diffusive properties but their adsorption is lower, ca. 172-179 VSTP/V, at the same conditions.

  13. Propane Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Many standards development organizations (SDOs) are working to develop codes and standards needed for the utilization of alternative fuel vehicle technologies. This chart shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for propane. Propane Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart Vehicle Systems Safety: Vehicle Tanks and Piping: Vehicle Components: Vehicle Dispensing Systems: Vehicle Dispensing System Components: Storage Systems: Storage

  14. OSTI Organization Chart | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Information OSTI Organization Chart Document Files and References Available Downloads for this Document: application/pdf icon OSTI Organization Chart (March 2015) About | OSTI Vision, Mission, and Goals | OSTI Strategic Plan | Catalogue of Collections | Achievements | Alliances | OSTI History The Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored R&D results that are the

  15. USVI Energy Road Map: Charting the Course to a Clean Energy Future

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Brochure), EDIN (Energy Development in Island Nations), U.S. Virgin Islands | Department of Energy USVI Energy Road Map: Charting the Course to a Clean Energy Future (Brochure), EDIN (Energy Development in Island Nations), U.S. Virgin Islands USVI Energy Road Map: Charting the Course to a Clean Energy Future (Brochure), EDIN (Energy Development in Island Nations), U.S. Virgin Islands This brochure provides an overview of the integrated clean energy deployment process and progress of the

  16. United States Industrial Motor-Driven Systems Market Assessment: Charting a

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmap to Energy Savings for Industry | Department of Energy Motor-Driven Systems Market Assessment: Charting a Roadmap to Energy Savings for Industry United States Industrial Motor-Driven Systems Market Assessment: Charting a Roadmap to Energy Savings for Industry This paper is an overview of the results of a market assessment commissioned by the DOE Motor Challenge program in 1995 to better understand the characteristics of the installed population of motor systems in the manufacturing

  17. 6 Charts that Will Make You Optimistic About America's Clean Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Future | Department of Energy Charts that Will Make You Optimistic About America's Clean Energy Future 6 Charts that Will Make You Optimistic About America's Clean Energy Future November 13, 2015 - 1:05pm Addthis Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Clean Energy & Climate A new MIT report explores how rapid growth of solar and wind energy could help nations around the world meet -- and beat -- their targets for reducing

  18. State of the Union Remarks on Energy in Four Charts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Union Remarks on Energy in Four Charts State of the Union Remarks on Energy in Four Charts January 22, 2015 - 10:23am Addthis Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Sarah Gerrity Sarah Gerrity Former Multimedia Editor, Office of Public Affairs More State of the Union Coverage Interested in hearing the President's energy and climate change related remarks from the State of the Union? Watch the video! In Tuesday's State of the Union

  19. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, R.S.; O`Malley, R.J.; Sussman, R.C.

    1997-07-29

    A strip caster for producing a continuous strip includes a tundish for containing a melt, a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls and devices for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls with a powder flux material. The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin for receiving the melt through a teeming tube thereby establishing a meniscus between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line to a sealing chamber. A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550 C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll. 3 figs.

  20. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Robert S.; O'Malley, Ronald J.; Sussman, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) includes a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14), a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22) and devices (29) for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces (44) of the casting rolls with a powder flux material (56). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550.degree. C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll.

  1. Performance studies of the CMS Strip Tracker before installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam, W.; et al.

    2009-06-01

    In March 2007 the assembly of the Silicon Strip Tracker was completed at the Tracker Integration Facility at CERN. Nearly 15% of the detector was instrumented using cables, fiber optics, power supplies, and electronics intended for the operation at the LHC. A local chiller was used to circulate the coolant for low temperature operation. In order to understand the efficiency and alignment of the strip tracker modules, a cosmic ray trigger was implemented. From March through July 4.5 million triggers were recorded. This period, referred to as the Sector Test, provided practical experience with the operation of the Tracker, especially safety, data acquisition, power, and cooling systems. This paper describes the performance of the strip system during the Sector Test, which consisted of five distinct periods defined by the coolant temperature. Significant emphasis is placed on comparisons between the data and results from Monte Carlo studies.

  2. Graded pitch electromagnetic pump for thin strip metal casting systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuznetsov, S.B.

    1986-04-01

    A metal strip casing system is provided with an electromagnetic pump which includes a pair of primary blocks having a graded pole pitch, polyphase ac winding and being arranged on opposite sides of a movable heat sink. A nozzle is provided for depositing liquid metal on the heat sink such that the resulting metal strip and heat sink combination is subjected to a longitudinal electromagnetic field which increases in wavelength in the direction of travel of the heat sink, thereby subjecting the metal and heat sink to a longitudinal force having a magnitude which increases in the direction of travel. 4 figs.

  3. Graded pitch electromagnetic pump for thin strip metal casting systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuznetsov, Stephen B.

    1986-01-01

    A metal strip casing system is provided with an electromagnetic pump which includes a pair of primary blocks having a graded pole pitch, polyphase ac winding and being arranged on opposite sides of a movable heat sink. A nozzle is provided for depositing liquid metal on the heat sink such that the resulting metal strip and heat sink combination is subjected to a longitudinal electromagnetic field which increases in wavelength in the direction of travel of the heat sink, thereby subjecting the metal and heat sink to a longitudinal force having a magnitude which increases in the direction of travel.

  4. In-well vapor stripping drilling and characterization work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koegler, K.J.

    1994-03-13

    This work plan provides the information necessary for drilling, sampling, and hydrologic testing of wells to be completed in support of a demonstration of the in-well vapor stripping system. The in-well vapor stripping system is a remediation technology designed to preferentially extract volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater by converting them to a vapor phase. Air-lift pumping is used to lift and aerate groundwater within the well. The volatiles escaping the aerated water are drawn off by a slight vacuum and treated at the surface while the water is allowed to infiltrate the vadose zone back to the watertable.

  5. Overview of the Dynamic Underground Stripping demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R.; Newmark, R.; McConachie, W.; Rice, D.; Ramirez, A.; Siegel, W.; Buettner, M.; Daily, W.; Krauter, P.; Folsom, E.; Boegel, A.J.; Bishop, D.; Udell, K.

    1992-08-01

    Dynamic Underground Stripping is a limited-scope demonstration of a system of thermal remediation and underground imaging techniques for use in rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called ``Dynamic Stripping`` to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it combines steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. The system is targeted toward the removal of free-phase organics of all kinds. The LLNL gasoline spill is a convenient test site because much of the gasoline has been trapped below the water table, mimicking the behavior of dense organic liquids.

  6. Dynamic underground stripping to remediate a deep hydrocarbon spill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.; Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.

    1995-09-01

    Dynamic Underground Stripping is a combination of in situ steam injection, electrical resistance heating, and fluid extraction for rapid removal and recovery of subsurface contaminants such as solvents or fuels. Underground imaging and other measurement techniques monitor the system in situ for process control. Field tests at a deep gasoline spill at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recovered over 26,500 liters (7000 gallons) of gasoline during several months of field operations. Preliminary analysis of system cost and performance indicate that Dynamic Underground Stripping compares favorably with conventional pump-and-treat methods and vacuum extraction schemes for removing non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) such as gasoline from deep subsurface plumes.

  7. Overview of the Dynamic Underground Stripping demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R.; Newmark, R.; McConachie, W.; Rice, D.; Ramirez, A.; Siegel, W.; Buettner, M.; Daily, W.; Krauter, P.; Folsom, E.; Boegel, A.J.; Bishop, D. ); Udell, K. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    Dynamic Underground Stripping is a limited-scope demonstration of a system of thermal remediation and underground imaging techniques for use in rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called Dynamic Stripping'' to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it combines steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. The system is targeted toward the removal of free-phase organics of all kinds. The LLNL gasoline spill is a convenient test site because much of the gasoline has been trapped below the water table, mimicking the behavior of dense organic liquids.

  8. Consideration of Factors Affecting Strip Effluent PH and Sodium Content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  9. Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Sparn, L. Earle

    2012-08-01

    Presented at the ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings on August 12-17, 2012, this presentation reports on laboratory tests of 20 currently available advanced power strip products, which reduce wasteful electricity use of miscellaneous electric loads in buildings.

  10. All-dielectric metasurface analogue of electromagnetically induced

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transparency [High Quality Factor Fano-Resonant All-Dielectric Metamaterials] (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect All-dielectric metasurface analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency [High Quality Factor Fano-Resonant All-Dielectric Metamaterials] Citation Details In-Document Search Title: All-dielectric metasurface analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency [High Quality Factor Fano-Resonant All-Dielectric Metamaterials] Fano-resonant plasmonic metamaterials and

  11. Advanced Power Strips (APS): How to Use in an Office Setting (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-03-01

    This poster describes the difference between the three outlet types in an advanced power strip and discusses their uses.

  12. Choose the Right Advanced Power Strip for You | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Choose the Right Advanced Power Strip for You Choose the Right Advanced Power Strip for You October 28, 2013 - 11:33am Addthis Choose the right advanced power strip based on your habits to reduce the electricity wasted when your electronic devices are idle. Choose the right advanced power strip based on your habits to reduce the electricity wasted when your electronic devices are idle. Lieko Earle, Ph.D. Senior Engineer, Residential Buildings, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Bethany Sparn,

  13. New Report Charts Dynamic, Steady Growth of the U.S. Solar Jobs Market |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Report Charts Dynamic, Steady Growth of the U.S. Solar Jobs Market New Report Charts Dynamic, Steady Growth of the U.S. Solar Jobs Market November 16, 2012 - 2:00pm Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? The solar industry is one of the fastest growing job markets in the U.S., employing more than 119,000 skilled workers. The market is growing at an annual rate of 13.2 percent. A new

  14. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q3 Quad Chart Abstract not provided. Authors: Andraka, Charles E. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States) Publication Date: 2015-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1211552 Report Number(s): SAND2015--6472R 598782 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type:

  15. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, J.C.; Campbell, S.L.

    1991-11-12

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification. 5 figures.

  16. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, John C.; Campbell, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification.

  17. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements. Revision 18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-23

    This document (NUREG-0325) is the current US NRC organization chart, listing all NRC offices and regions and their components down through the branch level as of July 23, 1995. Functional statements of each position are given, as is the name of the individual holding the position.

  18. Understanding the Initial Stages of Reversible Mg Deposition and Stripping

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Inorganic Nonaqueous Electrolytes - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research April 8, 2015, Research Highlights Understanding the Initial Stages of Reversible Mg Deposition and Stripping in Inorganic Nonaqueous Electrolytes MgCl+ Desolvation Diagram Scientific Achievement The chemical species at the Mg-anode surface in the presence of Magnesium Aluminum-Chloro complex (MACC) electrolyte were identified. While solvent molecules (THF and DME) are loosely bound at the Mg(0001) surface, the

  19. In-situ conditioning of a strip casting roll

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Robert S.; Campbell, Steven L.

    1997-01-01

    A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) has a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14) and a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouring basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming a strip (24). The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). Devices (29) for conditioning the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls includes grit blasting nozzles (30A, 30B, 30C, 30D), a collection trough (32) for gathering the grit, a line (34) for recycling the grit to a bag house (36), a feeder (38) and a pressurized distributor (40) for delivering the grit to the nozzles. The conditioning nozzles remove dirt, metal oxides and surface imperfections providing a clean surface readily wetted by the melt.

  20. In-situ conditioning of a strip casting roll

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, R.S.; Campbell, S.L.

    1997-07-29

    A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) has a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14) and a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouring basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming a strip (24). The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). Devices (29) for conditioning the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls includes grit blasting nozzles (30A, 30B, 30C, 30D), a collection trough (32) for gathering the grit, a line (34) for recycling the grit to a bag house (36), a feeder (38) and a pressurized distributor (40) for delivering the grit to the nozzles. The conditioning nozzles remove dirt, metal oxides and surface imperfections providing a clean surface readily wetted by the melt.

  1. Application of Hotelling’s T{sup 2} charts in monitoring quality parameters in a drinking water supply system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costa, Mafalda T.; Carolino, Elisabete; Oliveira, Teresa A.

    2015-03-10

    In water supply systems with distribution networkthe most critical aspects of control and Monitoring of water quality, which generates crises system, are the effects of cross-contamination originated by the network typology. The classics of control of quality systems through the application of Shewhart charts are generally difficult to manage in real time due to the high number of charts that must be completed and evaluated. As an alternative to the traditional control systems with Shewhart charts, this study aimed to apply a simplified methodology of a monitoring plan quality parameters in a drinking water distribution, by applying Hotelling’s T{sup 2} charts and supplemented with Shewhart charts with Bonferroni limits system, whenever instabilities with processes were detected.

  2. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included.

  3. Tracing ram-pressure stripping with warm molecular hydrogen emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivanandam, Suresh; Rieke, Marcia J.; Rieke, George H.

    2014-12-01

    We use the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph to study four infalling cluster galaxies with signatures of ongoing ram-pressure stripping. H{sub 2} emission is detected in all four, and two show extraplanar H{sub 2} emission. The emission usually has a warm (T ? 115-160 K) and a hot (T ? 400-600 K) component that is approximately two orders of magnitude less massive than the warm one. The warm component column densities are typically 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 20} cm{sup 2} with masses of 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8} M {sub ?}. The warm H{sub 2} is anomalously bright compared with normal star-forming galaxies and therefore may be excited by ram-pressure. In the case of CGCG 97-073, the H{sub 2} is offset from the majority of star formation along the direction of the galaxy's motion in the cluster, suggesting that it is forming in the ram-pressure wake of the galaxy. Another galaxy, NGC 4522, exhibits a warm H{sub 2} tail approximately 4 kpc in length. These results support the hypothesis that H{sub 2} within these galaxies is shock-heated from the interaction with the intracluster medium. Stripping of dust is also a common feature of the galaxies. For NGC 4522, where the distribution of dust at 8 ?m is well resolved, knots and ripples demonstrate the turbulent nature of the stripping process. The H? and 24 ?m luminosities show that most of the galaxies have star-formation rates comparable to similar mass counterparts in the field. Finally, we suggest a possible evolutionary sequence primarily related to the strength of ram-pressure that a galaxy experiences to explain the varied results observed in our sample.

  4. Interval Data Analysis with the Energy Charting and Metrics Tool (ECAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taasevigen, Danny J.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Koran, William

    2011-07-07

    Analyzing whole building interval data is an inexpensive but effective way to identify and improve building operations, and ultimately save money. Utilizing the Energy Charting and Metrics Tool (ECAM) add-in for Microsoft Excel, building operators and managers can begin implementing changes to their Building Automation System (BAS) after trending the interval data. The two data components needed for full analyses are whole building electricity consumption (kW or kWh) and outdoor air temperature (OAT). Using these two pieces of information, a series of plots and charts and be created in ECAM to monitor the buildings performance over time, gain knowledge of how the building is operating, and make adjustments to the BAS to improve efficiency and start saving money.

  5. Laser stripping of hydrogen atoms by direct ionization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brunetti, E.; Becker, W.; Bryant, H. C.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Chou, W.

    2015-05-08

    Direct ionization of hydrogen atoms by laser irradiation is investigated as a potential new scheme to generate proton beams without stripping foils. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation describing the atom-radiation interaction is numerically solved obtaining accurate ionization cross-sections for a broad range of laser wavelengths, durations and energies. Parameters are identified where the Doppler frequency up-shift of radiation colliding with relativistic particles can lead to efficient ionization over large volumes and broad bandwidths using currently available lasers.

  6. INJECTION CARBON STRIPPING FOIL ISSUES IN THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BEEBE-WANG,J.; LEE,Y.Y.; RAPARIA,D.; WEI,J.

    2001-06-18

    We are reporting the results of studies on issues related to the injection stripping foil in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring. The problems related to foil heating and foil lifetime, such as current density distribution and temperature distribution in the foil, are investigated. The impact of injection errors on the beam losses at the foil is studied. The particle traversal rate and the beam losses due to scattering in the foil are summarized. Finally, SNS end-to-end simulation results of the foil-missing rate, the foil-hitting rate and the maximum foil temperature are presented.

  7. Container lid gasket protective strip for double door transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Jr., Burgess M

    2013-02-19

    An apparatus and a process for forming a protective barrier seal along a "ring of concern" of a transfer container used with double door systems is provided. A protective substrate is supplied between a "ring of concern" and a safety cover in which an adhesive layer of the substrate engages the "ring of concern". A compressive foam strip along an opposite side of the substrate engages a safety cover such that a compressive force is maintained between the "ring of concern" and the adhesive layer of the substrate.

  8. Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration Project. Interim progress report, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R.; Newmark, R.; McConachie, W.; Rice, D.; Ramirez, A.; Siegel, W.; Buettner, M.; Daily, W.; Krauter, P.; Folsom, E.; Boegel, A.J.; Bishop, D.; udel, K.

    1992-03-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation and underground imaging techniques for use in rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called ``Dynamic Stripping`` to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first 8 months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques before moving to the contaminated site in FY 92.

  9. Ethanol Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    pipeline safety) CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: State and Local Government (zoning, building permits) CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: State and Local Government (zoning, building permits) CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: DOT/NHTS (crashworthiness) EPA (emissions) Many standards development organizations (SDOs) are working to develop codes and standards needed for the utilization of alternative fuel vehicle technologies. This chart shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - PM Org Chart w-DivCh Names (002)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Organizational Chart Office of Project Management Oversight and Assessments (PM) PM-1 Paul Bosco Director Under Secretary for Management and Performance (S3) Tony Ermovick PM-20 Departmental Project Oversight Melvin Frank PM-30 Project Management Policy & Systems Linda Ott PM-40 Professional Development PM-2 Michael Peek Deputy Director New Organization Effective: July 12, 2015 John White PM-10 Project Assessments Jay Glascock Chief of Staff

  11. NWTC Helps Chart the World's Wind Resource Potential (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chart the World's Wind Resource Potential The potential wind capacity of the United States at a hub height of 140 meters. This resource map represents near-future technology options. It shows land area with a gross capacity factor of 35% and higher, which may be suitable for wind energy development. The darker the color, the larger the potentially developable area. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) provide the wind industry,

  12. Organizational Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Shalf Jeff Broughton Katie Antypas Jay Srinivasan Nick Wright Brent Draney Elizabeth Bautista Shane Cannon Prabhat David Skinner Richard Gerber Damian Hazen Last edited:...

  13. Organization Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General Counsel David Sosinski Chief Financial Officer Jay Johnson LANS, LLC Executive ... Sciences Associate Director Mary Hockaday Theory, Simulation, & Computation Associate ...

  14. Hexahedron Projection by Triangle Fans and Strips () | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hexahedron Projection by Triangle Fans and Strips Citation Details Software Request Title: Hexahedron Projection by Triangle Fans and Strips The program divides the projection of a hexahedron with not-necessarily-planar quadrilateral faces, such as would arise in a curvilinear grid, by the projections of its edges, into polygons overlapped by a single front-facing and a single back-facing face. These polygons are further organized into triangle strips and fans, for rapid volume rendering in

  15. Cryogenic fractionator gas as stripping gas of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeGeorge, Charles W.

    1981-01-01

    In an integrated coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped with a stripping gas to remove acidic gases, at least a portion of the stripping gas comprises a gas comprising hydrogen, nitrogen and methane separated from the coker products.

  16. Overgeneration from Solar Energy in California - A Field Guide to the Duck Chart

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, Paul; Brinkman, Gregory; Jorgenson, Jennie

    2015-11-01

    In 2013, the California Independent System Operator published the "duck chart,"" which shows a significant drop in mid-day net load on a spring day as solar photovoltaics (PV) are added to the system. The chart raises concerns that the conventional power system will be unable to accommodate the ramp rate and range needed to fully utilize solar energy, particularly on days characterized by the duck shape. This could result in "overgeneration"" and curtailed renewable energy, increasing its costs and reducing its environmental benefits. This paper explores the duck chart in detail, examining how much PV might need to be curtailed if additional grid flexibility measures are not taken, and how curtailment rates can be decreased by changing grid operational practices. It finds that under business-as-usual types of assumptions and corresponding levels of grid flexibility in California, solar penetrations as low as 20 percent of annual energy could lead to marginal curtailment rates that exceed 30 percent. However, by allowing (or requiring) distributed PV and storage (including new installations that are part of the California storage mandate) to provide grid services, system flexibility could be greatly enhanced. Doing so could significantly reduce curtailment and allow much greater penetration of variable generation resources in achieving a 50 percent renewable portfolio standard. Overall, the work described in this paper points to the need to fully integrate distributed resources into grid system planning and operations to allow maximum use of the solar resource.

  17. Overgeneration from Solar Energy in California. A Field Guide to the Duck Chart

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, Paul; O'Connell, Matthew; Brinkman, Gregory; Jorgenson, Jennie

    2015-11-01

    In 2013, the California Independent System Operator published the 'duck chart,' which shows a significant drop in mid-day net load on a spring day as solar photovoltaics (PV) are added to the system. The chart raises concerns that the conventional power system will be unable to accommodate the ramp rate and range needed to fully utilize solar energy, particularly on days characterized by the duck shape. This could result in 'overgeneration' and curtailed renewable energy, increasing its costs and reducing its environmental benefits. This paper explores the duck chart in detail, examining how much PV might need to be curtailed if additional grid flexibility measures are not taken, and how curtailment rates can be decreased by changing grid operational practices. It finds that under "business-as-usual"" types of assumptions and corresponding levels of grid flexibility in California, solar penetrations as low as 20% of annual energy could lead to marginal curtailment rates that exceed 30%. However, by allowing (or requiring) distributed PV and storage (including new installations that are part of the California storage mandate) to provide grid services, system flexibility could be greatly enhanced. Doing so could significantly reduce curtailment and allow much greater penetration of variable generation resources. Overall, the work described in this paper points to the need to fully integrate distributed resources into grid system planning and operations to allow maximum use of the solar resource.

  18. Reductive stripping process for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurst, Fred J.; Crouse, David J.

    1984-01-01

    A reductive stripping flow sheet for recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid is described. Uranium is stripped from a uranium-loaded organic phase by a redox reaction converting the uranyl to uranous ion. The uranous ion is reoxidized to the uranyl oxidation state to form an aqueous feed solution highly concentrated in uranium. Processing of this feed through a second solvent extraction cycle requires far less stripping reagent as compared to a flow sheet which does not include the reductive stripping reaction.

  19. Integration of stripping of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeGeorge, Charles W.

    1980-01-01

    In an integrated fluid coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a wet scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped to remove acidic gases, the stripped vapors of the stripping zone are sent to the gas cleanup stage of the gasification product gas. The improved stripping integration is particularly useful in the combination coal liquefaction process, fluid coking of bottoms of the coal liquefaction zone and gasification of the product coke.

  20. Sheet, strip, and plate, corrosion resistant alloy 67Ni 30Cu, annealed (reaffirmed, 1992). (SAE standard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-01-01

    This specification covers a corrosion-resistant nickel-copper alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate. Alloy: Monel 400 UNS Number: N0440.

  1. Thermal cleanups using dynamic underground stripping and hydrous pyrolysis oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R D; Knauss, K; Leif, R; Newmark, R L

    1999-05-01

    In the early 1990s, in collaboration with the School of Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed dynamic underground stripping (DUS), a method for treating subsurface contaminants with heat that is much faster and more effective than traditional treatment methods. more recently, Livermore scientists developed hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO), which introduces both heat and oxygen to the subsurface to convert contaminants in the ground to such benign products as carbon dioxide, chloride ion, and water. This process has effectively destroyed all contaminants it encountered in laboratory tests. With dynamic underground stripping, the contaminants are vaporized and vacuumed out of the ground, leaving them still to be destroyed elsewhere. Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation technology takes the cleanup process one step further by eliminating the treatment, handling, and disposal requirements and destroying the contamination in the ground. When used in combination, HPO is especially useful in the final polishing of a site containing significant free-product contaminant, once the majority of the contaminant has been removed.

  2. Natural Gas Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Natural Gas Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart Many standards development organizations (SDOs) are working to develop codes and standards needed for the utilization of alternative fuel vehicle technologies. This chart shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for natural gas. Vehicle Safety: Vehicle Fuel Systems: Vehicle Containers: Vehicle Fuel System Components: Dispensing Component Standards: Dispensing Operations:

  3. Note: Simulation and test of a strip source electron gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iqbal, Munawar; Islam, G. U.; Misbah, I.; Iqbal, O.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-06-15

    We present simulation and test of an indirectly heated strip source electron beam gun assembly using Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) electron beam trajectory program. The beam is now sharply focused with 3.04 mm diameter in the post anode region at 15.9 mm. The measured emission current and emission density were 1.12 A and 1.15 A/cm{sup 2}, respectively, that corresponds to power density of 11.5 kW/cm{sup 2}, at 10 kV acceleration potential. The simulated results were compared with then and now experiments and found in agreement. The gun is without any biasing, electrostatic and magnetic fields; hence simple and inexpensive. Moreover, it is now more powerful and is useful for accelerators technology due to high emission and low emittance parameters.

  4. Electrical oscillation in Pt/VO{sub 2} bilayer strips

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ying; Qi, Long; Xu, Yanjun; Wu, Yihong; Chai, Jianwei; Wang, Shijie; Yang, Yumeng; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2015-02-14

    We report on the observation of stable electrical oscillation in Pt/vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) bilayer strips, in which the Pt overlayer serves the dual purposes of heating up the VO{sub 2} and weakening the electric field in the VO{sub 2} layer. Systematic measurements in an ultrahigh vacuum nanoprobe system show that the oscillation frequency increases with the bias current and/or with decreasing device dimension. In contrast to most VO{sub 2}-based oscillators reported to date, which are electrically triggered, current-induced Joule heating in the Pt overlayer is found to play a dominant role in the generation of oscillation in Pt/VO{sub 2} bilayers. A simple model involving thermally triggered transition of VO{sub 2} on a heat sink is able to account for the experimental observations. The results in this work provide an alternative view of the triggering mechanism in VO{sub 2}-based oscillators.

  5. Studies on the stripping of cerium from the loaded tbp-kerosene solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizk, S.E.; Abdel Rahman, N.; Daoud, J.A.; Aly, H.F.

    2008-07-01

    The reductive stripping of Ce(IV) from the loaded organic phase (30% TBP in kerosene) was investigated, using two stripping agents, EDTA and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, in nitric acid. The results are compared to determine the optimum conditions for the reduction of Ce(IV) in the organic phase to Ce(III) in the aqueous phase. For each of the two stripping agents, the effect of different parameters affecting the reduction process was investigated: stripping-agent concentration, nitric acid concentration, phase ratio, shaking time, and temperature. The results are compared and discussed in terms of the conditions required for maximum reductive stripping of Ce(IV). (authors)

  6. Attachment 1 - PIC Transcribed Flip Chart Notes Final Meeting Summary Page 12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - PIC Transcribed Flip Chart Notes Final Meeting Summary Page 12 Public Involvement Committee September 4, 2013 Strategic Planning: Quarters by month * Q1: Oct. - Dec. * Q2: Jan - March * Q3: April - June * Q4: July - Sept. Page 1 Strategic Planning: 2014 Topics (Interactive activity) * = priority topic for discussion at meeting; �= priority for future discussion | Quarter prioritized for discussion (Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4) * 100-F Proposed Plan | *** Q2 * 100 D-H Proposed Plan * Draft Land

  7. THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.J. Saulnier Jr; W. Statham

    2006-03-10

    The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site. (1) Analogous source: UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geologic setting: fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs overlying carbonate rocks; (3) Analogous climate: Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous geochemistry: Oxidizing conditions; and (5) Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table. The Nopal I deposit is approximately 8 {+-} 0.5 million years old and has been exposed to oxidizing conditions during the last 3.2 to 3.4 million years. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model considers that the uranium oxide and uranium silicates in the ore deposit were originally analogous to uranium-oxide spent nuclear fuel. The Pena Blanca site has been characterized using field and laboratory investigations of its fault and fracture distribution, mineralogy, fracture fillings, seepage into the mine adits, regional hydrology, and mineralization that shows the extent of radionuclide migration. Three boreholes were drilled at the Nopal I mine site in 2003 and these boreholes have provided samples for lithologic characterization, water-level measurements, and water samples for laboratory analysis of the saturated zone water chemistry. The results of the field investigations and laboratory analyses of rock and water samples collected at Nopal I are used to calibrate the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model.

  8. Effect of CO{sub 2} air mixtures on the pH of air-stripped water...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pH of air-stripped water at Treatment Facility D Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of COsub 2 air mixtures on the pH of air-stripped water at Treatment Facility ...

  9. CONTROL CHART DASHBOARDS MANAGING YOUR NUMBERS INSTEAD OF YOU NUMBER MANAGING YOU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2006-11-15

    This paper, which documents Fluor Hanford's application of Statistical Process Control (SPC) and Dashboards to support planning and decision making, is a sequel to ''Leading with Leading Indicators'' that was presented at WM 05. This year's paper provides more detail on management's use of SPC and control charts and discusses their integration into an executive summary using the popular color-cod3ed dashboard methodology. Fluor Hanford has applied SPC in a non-traditional (that is non-manufacturing) manner. Dr. Shewhart's 75-year-old control-chart methodologies have been updated to modern data processing, but are still founded on his sound, tried and true principles. These methods are playing a key role in safety and quality at what has been called the world's largest environmental cleanup project. The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site played a pivotal role in the nation's defense, beginning in the 1940s when it was established as part of the Manhattan Project. After more than 50 years of producing nuclear weapons, Hanford--which covers 586 square miles in southeastern Washington state--is now focused on three outcomes: (1) restoring the Columbia River corridor for multiple uses; (2) transitioning the central plateau to support long-term waste management; and (3) putting DOE assets to work for the future.

  10. Characterization of radiolytically generated degradation products in the strip section of a TRUEX flowsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean R. Peterman; Lonnie G. Olson; Gary S. Groenewold; Rocklan G. McDowell; Richard D. Tillotson; Jack D. Law

    2013-08-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet the FCRD level 2 milestone M3FT-13IN0302053, Identification of TRUEX Strip Degradation. The INL radiolysis test loop has been used to identify radiolytically generated degradation products in the strip section of the TRUEX flowsheet. These data were used to evaluate impact of the formation of radiolytic degradation products in the strip section upon the efficacy of the TRUEX flowsheet for the recovery of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from acidic solution. The nominal composition of the TRUEX solvent used in this study is 0.2 M CMPO and 1.4 M TBP dissolved in n-dodecane and the nominal composition of the TRUEX strip solution is 1.5 M lactic acid and 0.050 M diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Gamma irradiation of a mixture of TRUEX process solvent and stripping solution in the test loop does not adversely impact flowsheet performance as measured by stripping americium ratios. The observed increase in americium stripping distribution ratios with increasing absorbed dose indicates the radiolytic production of organic soluble degradation compounds.

  11. Dynamics of water in prussian blue analogues: Neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, V. K.; Mitra, S.; Thakur, N.; Yusuf, S. M.; Mukhopadhyay, R.; Juranyi, Fanni

    2014-07-21

    Dynamics of crystal water in Prussian blue (PB), Fe(III){sub 4}[Fe(II)(CN){sub 6}]{sub 3}.14H{sub 2}O and its analogue Prussian green (PG), ferriferricynaide, Fe(III){sub 4}[Fe(III)(CN){sub 6}]{sub 4}.16H{sub 2}O have been investigated using Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) technique. PB and its analogue compounds are important materials for their various interesting multifunctional properties. It is known that crystal water plays a crucial role towards the multifunctional properties of Prussian blue analogue compounds. Three structurally distinguishable water molecules: (i) coordinated water molecules at empty nitrogen sites, (ii) non-coordinated water molecules in the spherical cavities, and (iii) at interstitial sites exist in PB. Here spherical cavities are created due to the vacant sites of Fe(CN){sub 6} units. However, PG does not have any such vacant N or Fe(CN){sub 6} units, and only one kind of water molecules, exists only at interstitial sites. QENS experiments have been carried out on both the compounds in the temperature range of 260360?K to elucidate the dynamical behavior of different kinds of water molecules. Dynamics is found to be much more pronounced in case of PB, compared to PG. A detailed data analysis showed that localized translational diffusion model could describe the observed data for both PB and PG systems. The average diffusion coefficient is found to be much larger in the PB than PG. The obtained domain of dynamics is found to be consistent with the geometry of the structure of the two systems. Combining the data of the two systems, a quantitative estimate of the dynamics, corresponding to the water molecules at different locations is made.

  12. Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Project: Summary of activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, S.; Goldstein, S.; Dobson, P.F.; Goodell, P.; Ku, T.-L.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Saulnier, G.; Fayek, M.; de la Garza, R.

    2011-02-01

    The inactive Nopal I uranium mine in silicic tuff north of Chihuahua City, Chihuahua, Mexico, was studied as a natural analogue for an underground nuclear-waste repository in the unsaturated zone. Site stratigraphy was confirmed from new drill cores. Data from site studies include chemical and isotopic compositions of saturated- and unsaturated-zone waters. A partial geochronology of uranium enrichment and mineralization was established. Evidence pertinent to uranium-series transport in the soil zone and changing redox conditions was collected. The investigations contributed to preliminary, scoping-level performance assessment modeling.

  13. Pena blanca natural analogue project: summary of activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, Schon S; Goldstein, Steven J; Abdel - Fattah, Amr I

    2010-12-08

    The inactive Nopal I uranium mine in silicic tuff north of Chihuahua City, Chihuahua, Mexico, was studied as a natural analogue for an underground nuclear-waste repository in the unsaturated zone. Site stratigraphy was confirmed from new drill core. Datafrom site studies include chemical and isotopic compositions of saturated- and unsaturated-zone waters. A partial geochronology of uranium enrichment and mineralization was established. Evidence pertinent to uranium-series transport in the soil zone and changing redox conditions was collected. The investigations contributed to preliminary, scoping-level performance assessment modeling.

  14. COLLISIONAL STRIPPING AND DISRUPTION OF SUPER-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcus, Robert A.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Hernquist, Lars; Stewart, Sarah T.

    2009-08-01

    The final stage of planet formation is dominated by collisions between planetary embryos. The dynamics of this stage determine the orbital configuration and the mass and composition of planets in the system. In the solar system, late giant impacts have been proposed for Mercury, Earth, Mars, and Pluto. In the case of Mercury, this giant impact may have significantly altered the bulk composition of the planet. Here we present the results of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of high-velocity (up to {approx}5v {sub esc}) collisions between 1 and 10 M {sub +} planets of initially terrestrial composition to investigate the end stages of formation of extrasolar super-Earths. As found in previous simulations of collisions between smaller bodies, when collision energies exceed simple merging, giant impacts are divided into two regimes: (1) disruption and (2) hit-and-run (a grazing inelastic collision and projectile escape). Disruption occurs when the impact parameter is near zero, when the projectile mass is small compared to the target, or at extremely high velocities. In the disruption regime, we derive the criteria for catastrophic disruption (when half the total colliding mass is lost), the transition energy between accretion and erosion, and a scaling law for the change in bulk composition (iron-to-silicate ratio) resulting from collisional stripping of a mantle.

  15. Treatment studies of paint stripping waste from plastic media blasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spence, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    Blasting with plastic media is used to strip paint and decontaminate surfaces. For disposal the plastic media is pulverized into a plastic dust. About 10 wt % of the waste from plastic media blasting is pulverized paint, which makes the waste a characteristically hazardous waste because of the presence of barium, cadmium, chromium and lead in the paint pigments. Four separate treatments of this hazardous waste were studied: (1) density separation to remove the paint, (2) self-encapsulation of the mix of plastic and paint dust into plastic pellets, (3) solidification/stabilization (S/S) into cementitious waste forms, and (4) low-temperature ashing to destroy the large mass of nonhazardous polymer. Two types of plast blasting wastes were studied: a urea formaldehyde thermoset polymer and an acrylic thermoplastic polymer (polymethylmethacrylate). Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP) extraction concentrations for the treated and untreated wastes are listed. Density separation failed to adequately separate the paint with an aqueous carbonate solution. Self-encapsulation reduced the waste volume by about 50%, but did not meet TCLP criteria. Cementitious solidification gave the lowest TCLP concentrations, but increased the waste volume by about 50%. Low-temperature ashing at 600 C resulted in a mass decrease of 93 to 98% for the wastes; the metals remaining in the ash could be stabilized with cementitious solidification and still result in a volume decrease of 75 to 95 volume percent.

  16. Dynamic underground stripping demonstration project. Interim engineering report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation techniques for rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called dynamic stripping to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first eight months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques. Tests then began on the contaminated site in FY 1992. This report describes the work at the Clean Site, including design and performance criteria, test results, interpretations, and conclusions. We fielded `a wide range of new designs and techniques, some successful and some not. In this document, we focus on results and performance, lessons learned, and design and operational changes recommended for work at the contaminated site. Each section focuses on a different aspect of the work and can be considered a self-contained contribution.

  17. May 19, 2011, HSS/Union Focus Group Meeting - Key Milestone Status Chart

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HSS Directives Reform - Key Milestone Status Chart (June 15, 2011) 100 60 80 Directives 40 # HSS D 0 20 1- Mar -10 1- Apr- 10 1- May -10 1- Jun -10 1- Jul- 10 1- Aug -10 1- Sep -10 1- Oct- 10 1- Nov -10 1- Dec -10 1- Jan -11 1- Feb -11 1- Mar -11 1- Apr- 11 1- May -11 1- Jun -11 15- Jun -11 COMPLETE - Cancelled 1 1 1 1 13 13 13 13 13 14 17 20 21 22 27 32 32 COMPLETE - Revised or Re-Certified 1 1 5 5 6 6 6 9 12 18 19 23 26 28 34 36 36 Into DOE-wide Review or Comment Resolution 6 24 27 27 14 15

  18. Column Sorption Uptake and Regeneration Study; Rare Earth Element Sorbent Uptake and Sorbent Stripping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Lanyk

    2015-12-18

    Study of rare earth element (REE) uptake from geothermal brine simulant by column loading, metal recovery through stripping, and regeneration of column for re-loading. Simulated brine testing.

  19. Regeneration of an aqueous solution from an acid gas absorption process by matrix stripping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.; Oyenekan, Babatunde A.

    2011-03-08

    Carbon dioxide and other acid gases are removed from gaseous streams using aqueous absorption and stripping processes. By replacing the conventional stripper used to regenerate the aqueous solvent and capture the acid gas with a matrix stripping configuration, less energy is consumed. The matrix stripping configuration uses two or more reboiled strippers at different pressures. The rich feed from the absorption equipment is split among the strippers, and partially regenerated solvent from the highest pressure stripper flows to the middle of sequentially lower pressure strippers in a "matrix" pattern. By selecting certain parameters of the matrix stripping configuration such that the total energy required by the strippers to achieve a desired percentage of acid gas removal from the gaseous stream is minimized, further energy savings can be realized.

  20. DRAMATIC IMPROVEMENTS IN CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF CESIUM THROUGH MORE EFFICIENT STRIPPING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Bazelaire, Eve; Bonnesen, Peter V; Engle, Nancy L; Gorbunova, Maryna; Haverlock, Tamara; Moyer, Bruce A; Ensor, Dale; Meadors, Viola M; Harmon, Ben; Bartsch, Richard A.; Surowiec, Malgorzata A.; Zhou, Hui

    2008-01-01

    Dramatic potential improvements to the chemistry of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process are presented as related to enhancement of cesium stripping. The current process for removing cesium from the alkaline high-level waste (HLW) at the USDOE Savannah River Site employs acidic scrub and strip stages and shows remarkable extraction and selectivity properties for cesium. It was determined that cesium stripping can be greatly improved with caustic or near-neutral stages using sodium hydroxide and boric acid as scrub and strip solutions, respectively. Improvements can also be achieved by appending pH-sensitive functional groups to the calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant. Addition of a proton-ionizable group to the calixarene frame leads to a dramatic "pH swing" of up to 6 orders of magnitude change in cesium distribution ratio.

  1. Performance potential of the coal strip mining in the east of Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheskidov, V.I.

    2007-07-15

    The potentialities of the leading mining districts in Russia to improve coal production by strip mining are analyzed. The operational issues of the Erunakovskiy (Kuzbass), Kansko-Achinskiy and South Yakutia territorial production complexes are considered.

  2. Numerical simulations of stripping effects in high-intensity hydrogen ion linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carneiro, J.-P.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne

    2008-12-01

    Numerical simulations of H{sup -} stripping losses from blackbody radiation, electromagnetic fields, and residual gas have been implemented into the beam dynamics code TRACK. Estimates of the stripping losses along two high-intensity H{sup -} linacs are presented: the Spallation Neutron Source linac currently being operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an 8 GeV superconducting linac currently being designed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

  3. Time and position resolution of the scintillator strips for a muon system at future colliders

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Denisov, Dmitri; Evdokimov, Valery; Lukic, Strahinja

    2016-03-31

    In this study, prototype scintilator+WLS strips with SiPM readout for a muon system at future colliders were tested for light yield, time resolution and position resolution. Depending on the configuration, light yield of up to 36 photoelectrons per muon per SiPM has been observed, as well as time resolution of 0.45 ns and position resolution along the strip of 7.7 cm.

  4. Extraction of uranium: comparison of stripping with ammonia vs. strong acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moldovan, B.; Grinbaum, B.; Efraim, A.

    2008-07-01

    Following extraction of uranium in the first stage of solvent extraction using a tertiary amine, typically Alamine 336, the stripping of the extracted uranium is accomplished either by use of an aqueous solution of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} /NH{sub 4}OH or by strong-acid stripping using 400-500 g/L H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Both processes have their merits and determine the downstream processing. The classical stripping with ammonia is followed by addition of strong base, to precipitate ammonium uranyl sulfate (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}UO{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}, which yields finally the yellow cake. Conversely, stripping with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, followed by oxidation with hydrogen peroxide yields uranyl oxide as product. At the Cameco Key Lake operation, both processes were tested on a pilot scale, using a Bateman Pulsed Column (BPC). The BPC proved to be applicable to both processes. It met the process criteria both for extraction and stripping, leaving less than 1 mg/L of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the raffinate, and product solution had the required concentration of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} at high flux and reasonable height of transfer unit. In the Key Lake mill, each operation can be carried out in a single column. The main advantages of the strong-acid stripping over ammonia stripping are: (1) 60% higher flux in the extraction, (2) tenfold higher concentration of the uranium in the product solution, and (3) far more robust process, with no need of pH control in the stripping and no need to add acid to the extraction in order to keep the pH above the point of precipitation of iron compounds. The advantages of the ammoniacal process are easier stripping, that is, less stages needed to reach equilibrium and lower concentration of modifier needed to prevent the creation of a third phase. (authors)

  5. A Control Chart Approach for Representing and Mining Data Streams with Shape Based Similarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A

    2014-01-01

    The mining of data streams for online condition monitoring is a challenging task in several domains including (electric) power grid system, intelligent manufacturing, and consumer science. Considering a power grid application in which thousands of sensors, called the phasor measurement units, are deployed on the power grid network to continuously collect streams of digital data for real-time situational awareness and system management. Depending on design, each sensor could stream between ten and sixty data samples per second. The myriad of sensory data captured could convey deeper insights about sequence of events in real-time and before major damages are done. However, the timely processing and analysis of these high-velocity and high-volume data streams is a challenge. Hence, a new data processing and transformation approach, based on the concept of control charts, for representing sequence of data streams from sensors is proposed. In addition, an application of the proposed approach for enhancing data mining tasks such as clustering using real-world power grid data streams is presented. The results indicate that the proposed approach is very efficient for data streams storage and manipulation.

  6. Energy Flow: Flow Charts Illustrating United States Energy Resources and Usage, from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Decision makers have long recognized the importance of visualizing energy and material flows in a way that distinguishes between resources, transformations and services. Research priorities can be defined in terms of changes to the flows, and the consequences of policy or technology shifts can be traced both upstream and downstream. The usefulness of this top-down view is limited by the level of detail that can be conveyed in a single image. We use two techniques to balance information content with readability. First we employe visualization techniques, such as those embodied in the energy Sankey diagram below (Figure 1), to display both qualitative (relative line weight) and quantitative (listed values) information in a reader-friendly package. The second method is to augment static images with dynamic, scalable digital content containing multiple layers (e.g. energy, carbon and economic data). This transitions the audience from that of a passive reader to an active user of the information. When used in conjunction these approaches enable relatively large, interconnected processes to be described and analyzed efficiently. [copied from the description at http://en.openei.org/wiki/LLNL_Energy_Flow_Charts#cite_note-1

  7. Bimetallic strip for low temperature use. [4-300/sup 0/K

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bussiee, J.F.; Welch, D.O.; Suenaga, M.

    A class of mechanically pre-stressed structures is provided suitably bi-layer strips, consisting of a layer of group 5 transition metals in intimate contact with a layer of an intermetallic compound of transition metals with certain group 3A, 4A or 5A metals or metalloids such as Ga, In, Si, Ge, Sn, As or Sb. The changes of Young's modulus of these bi-layered combinations at temperatures in the region of somewhat above absolute zero provides a useful means of sensing temperature changes. Such bi-metallic strips may be used as control strips in thermostats, or in direct dial reading instruments. The structures are made by preparing a sandwich of a group 5B transition metal strip between the substantially thicker strips of an alloy between copper and a predetermined group 3A, 4A or 5A metal or metalloid, holding the three layers are heated, cooled the copper alloys and is removed. Removing one of the two formed interlayer alloys between the transition metal and the metal previously alloyed with copper remain.

  8. Development Of Chemical Reduction And Air Stripping Processes To Remove Mercury From Wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Looney, Brian B.; Craig, Robert R.; Thompson, Martha C.; Kmetz, Thomas F.

    2013-07-10

    This study evaluates the removal of mercury from wastewater using chemical reduction and air stripping using a full-scale treatment system at the Savannah River Site. The existing water treatment system utilizes air stripping as the unit operation to remove organic compounds from groundwater that also contains mercury (C ~ 250 ng/L). The baseline air stripping process was ineffective in removing mercury and the water exceeded a proposed limit of 51 ng/L. To test an enhancement to the existing treatment modality a continuous dose of reducing agent was injected for 6-hours at the inlet of the air stripper. This action resulted in the chemical reduction of mercury to Hg(0), a species that is removable with the existing unit operation. During the injection period a 94% decrease in concentration was observed and the effluent satisfied proposed limits. The process was optimized over a 2-day period by sequentially evaluating dose rates ranging from 0.64X to 297X stoichiometry. A minimum dose of 16X stoichiometry was necessary to initiate the reduction reaction that facilitated the mercury removal. Competing electron acceptors likely inhibited the reaction at the lower 1 doses, which prevented removal by air stripping. These results indicate that chemical reduction coupled with air stripping can effectively treat large-volumes of water to emerging part per trillion regulatory standards for mercury.

  9. Performance of the first prototype of the CALICE scintillator strip electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, K.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Smith, J.; Xia, L.; Baldolemar, E.; Li, J.; Park, S. T.; Sosebee, M.; White, A. P.; Yu, J.; Eigen, G.; Mikami, Y.; Watson, N. K.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Dotti, A.; Folger, G.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Cârloganu, C.; Gay, P.; Manen, S.; Royer, L.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Lima, J. G.R.; Zutshi, V.; Hostachy, J. -Y.; Morin, L.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Ebrahimi, A.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Lu, S.; Marchesini, I.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Sudo, Y.; Yoshioka, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Wing, M.; Salvatore, F.; Cortina Gil, E.; Mannai, S.; Baulieu, G.; Calabria, P.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Della Negra, R.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J. -C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Vander Donckt, M.; Zoccarato, Y.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M. -C.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Corriveau, F.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Popov, V.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Ilyin, A.; Kantserov, V.; Kaplin, V.; Karakash, A.; Popova, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Kiesling, C.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M. S.; Bonis, J.; Callier, S.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Cornebise, P.; Doublet, Ph.; Dulucq, F.; Fleury, J.; Frisson, T.; van der Kolk, N.; Li, H.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Richard, F.; de la Taille, Ch.; Pöschl, R.; Raux, L.; Rouëné, J.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J. -C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Guliyev, E.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Musat, G.; Ruan, M.; Tran, T. H.; Videau, H.; Bulanek, B.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Belhorma, B.; Ghazlane, H.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Uozumi, S.; Jeans, D.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2014-11-01

    A first prototype of a scintillator strip-based electromagnetic calorimeter was built, consisting of 26 layers of tungsten absorber plates interleaved with planes of 45 × 10 × 3 mm³ plastic scintillator strips. Data were collected using a positron test beam at DESY with momenta between 1 and 6 GeV/c. The prototype's performance is presented in terms of the linearity and resolution of the energy measurement. These results represent an important milestone in the development of highly granular calorimeters using scintillator strip technology. A number of possible design improvements were identified, which should be implemented in a future detector of this type. This technology is being developed for a future linear collider experiment, aiming at the precise measurement of jet energies using particle flow techniques.

  10. Continuous production of strip by Rheocasting. Final report, August 16, 1978-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flemings, M.C.

    1981-01-01

    The report presents results of the mathematical and experimental modeling study undertaken, and also (1) describes the basic mechanism and process of Rheocasting (shaping in semisolid state), (2) outlines work done to date, and (3) attempts to delineate areas of potential engineering applications of the process. Two such areas appear most fruitful for further work. One is that of forming shapes, where processes such as die casting or forging are used today. Pilot projects in industry indicate this process is well advanced for the nonferrous alloys of aluminum and magnesium, but important potential applications also exist for copper, gray iron, and steel. The second is in continuous casting, especially of strip. Significant technical and economic advantages could result from Rheocasting strip of aluminum, magnesium, and steel alloys. Potential technical advantages include improved surface, greater freedom from cracking and segregation, ability to strip cast alloys not now castable, and increased productivity.

  11. Performance of the first prototype of the CALICE scintillator strip electromagnetic calorimeter

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Francis, K.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Smith, J.; Xia, L.; Baldolemar, E.; Li, J.; Park, S. T.; Sosebee, M.; White, A. P.; et al

    2014-11-01

    A first prototype of a scintillator strip-based electromagnetic calorimeter was built, consisting of 26 layers of tungsten absorber plates interleaved with planes of 45 × 10 × 3 mm³ plastic scintillator strips. Data were collected using a positron test beam at DESY with momenta between 1 and 6 GeV/c. The prototype's performance is presented in terms of the linearity and resolution of the energy measurement. These results represent an important milestone in the development of highly granular calorimeters using scintillator strip technology. A number of possible design improvements were identified, which should be implemented in a future detector of thismore » type. This technology is being developed for a future linear collider experiment, aiming at the precise measurement of jet energies using particle flow techniques.« less

  12. CHART SUPPLEMENT TO ACQUISTION GUIDE CHAPTER 42.101, AUDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The attached chart supplements the guidance in Acquisition Guide Chapter 42.101, Audit Requirements for Non-Management and Operating Contracts. The chart presents the audit services requirements discussed in Acquisition Guide Chapter 42.101 in a series of tables arranged by contract type. The order of the tables follows the order used in the Subparts of FAR Part 16—TYPES OF CONTRACTS, which is: Fixed-Price, Cost-Reimbursement, Incentive, Indefinite-Delivery, Time-and-Materials, and Labor-Hour Contracts. Each table provides when the requirement arises (pre-award or post-award), how often, what the requirement is, and the source of the requirement (FAR, DEAR, or DOE Policy), including specific references.

  13. Papers Based Electrochemical Biosensors: From Test Strips to Paper-Based Microfluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Bingwen; Du, Dan; Hua, Xin; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-05-08

    Papers based biosensors such as lateral flow test strips and paper-based microfluidic devices (or paperfluidics) are inexpensive, rapid, flexible, and easy-to-use analytical tools. An apparent trend in their detection is to interpret sensing results from qualitative assessment to quantitative determination. Electrochemical detection plays an important role in quantification. This review focuses on electrochemical (EC) detection enabled biosensors. The first part provides detailed examples in paper test strips. The second part gives an overview of paperfluidics engaging EC detections. The outlook and recommendation of future directions of EC enabled biosensors are discussed in the end.

  14. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT PROGRAM REAL WASTE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.

    2013-06-03

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed multiple Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) testing using real waste solutions, and three Next Generation Solvent (NGS) variations, which included radiologically clean pure NGS, a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically clean BOBCalixC6 (NGS-MCU), and a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically contaminated BOBCalixC6 from the MCU Solvent system. The results from the tests indicate that both the NGS and the NGS-MCU blend exhibit adequate extraction, scrub and strip behavior.

  15. Sample Results From The Next Generation Solvent Program Real Waste Extraction-Scrub-Strip Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

    2013-08-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed multiple Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) testing using real waste solutions, and three Next Generation Solvent (NGS) variations, which included radiologically clean pure NGS, a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically clean BOBCalixC6 (NGS-MCU), and a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically contaminated BOBCalixC6 from the MCU Solvent system. The results from the tests indicate that both the NGS and the NGS-MCU blend exhibit adequate extraction, scrub and strip behavior.

  16. Dual initiation strip charge apparatus and methods for making and implementing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos; Todd,; Steven N.; Polisar, Stephen; Hughs, Chance

    2011-03-22

    A Dual Initiation Strip Charge (DISC) apparatus is initiated by a single initiation source and detonates a strip of explosive charge at two separate contacts. The reflection of explosively induced stresses meet and create a fracture and breach a target along a generally single fracture contour and produce generally fragment-free scattering and no spallation. Methods for making and implementing a DISC apparatus provide numerous advantages over previous methods of creating explosive charges by utilizing steps for rapid prototyping; by implementing efficient steps and designs for metering consistent, repeatable, and controlled amount of high explosive; and by utilizing readily available materials.

  17. Rhapsody: II. Subhalo Properties and the Impact of Tidal Stripping from a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Statistical Sample of Cluster-Size Halos (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Rhapsody: II. Subhalo Properties and the Impact of Tidal Stripping from a Statistical Sample of Cluster-Size Halos Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rhapsody: II. Subhalo Properties and the Impact of Tidal Stripping from a Statistical Sample of Cluster-Size Halos Authors: Wu, Hao-Yi ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Michigan U. ; Hahn, Oliver ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

  18. Method for separating actinides. [Patent application; stripping of Np from organic extractant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedman, H.A.; Toth, L.M.

    1980-11-10

    An organic solution used for processing spent nuclear reactor fuels is contacted with an aqueous nitric acid solution to strip Np(VI), U(VI), and Pu(IV) from the organic solution into the acid solution. The acid solution is exposed to ultraviolet light, which reduces Np(VI) to Np(V) without reducing U(VI) and Pu(IV). Since the solubility of Np(V) in the organic solution is much lower than that of Np(VI), U(VI), and Pu(IV), a major part of the Np is stripped from the organic solution while leaving most of the U and Pu therein.

  19. Technical, environmental, and economic evaluation of Plastic Media Blasting for paint stripping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darvin, C.H.; Wilmoth, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency and the U.S. EPA Water Engineering Research Laboratory cooperated to investigate the feasibility of Plastic Media Blasting (PMB) as a paint-removal technique for aluminum military shelters. The PMB process was compared in field tests with sandblasting and with chemical stripping to determine relative cost, effectiveness, efficiency, and environmental consequence. The PMB process was judged superior to the chemical-stripping process and marginally better than sandblasting based upon the evaluation criteria.

  20. Dynamic Underground Stripping: In situ steam sweeping and electrical heating to remediate a deep hydrocarbon spill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.; Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.; Udell, K.S.; Ziagos, J.P.

    1994-07-01

    Dynamic Underground Stripping is a combination of in situ steam injection, electrical resistance heating, and fluid extraction for rapid removal and recovery of subsurface contaminants such as solvents or fuels. Underground imaging and other measurement techniques monitor the system in situ for process control. Field tests at a deep gasoline spill at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recovered over 7000 gallons of gasoline during several months of field operations. Preliminary analysis of system cost and performance indicate that Dynamic Underground Stripping compares favorably with conventional pump-and-treat and vacuum extraction schemes for removing non-aqueous phase liquids such as gasoline from deep subsurface plumes.

  1. Hydrogen adsorption in thin films of Prussian blue analogue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Dali [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ding, Vivian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Junhua [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Currier, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Obrey, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhao, Yusheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) measurement was used to investigate the kinetics of the molecular hydrogen adsorption into thin films of prussian blue analogues - Cu{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}]{sub 2} at ambient conditions. Although the equilibrium adsorption seems to be independent of the thickness, the adsorption rate substantially decreases with the thickness of the films. In addition, the reversibility of H{sub 2} adsorption into the Cu{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}]{sub 2} films was investigated. The results indicate that the Cu{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}]{sub 2} maily interacts with H{sub 2} molecules physically. The highest H{sub 2} uptake by the Cu{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}]{sub 2} films is obtained when the gas phase is stagnant inside the testing cell. However, the unusual high H{sub 2} uptake obtained from the QCM-D measurement makes us question how reliable this analytic methodology is.

  2. Fission barriers at the end of the chart of the nuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mller, Peter; Sierk, Arnold J.; Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira; Mumpower, Matthew

    2015-02-12

    We present calculated fission-barrier heights for 5239 nuclides for all nuclei between the proton and neutron drip lines with 171 ? A ? 330. The barriers are calculated in the macroscopic-microscopic finite-range liquid-drop (FRLDM) with a 2002 set of macroscopic-model parameters. The saddle-point energies are determined from potential-energy surfaces based on more than five million different shapes, defined by five deformation parameters in the three-quadratic-surface shape parametrization: elongation, neck diameter, left-fragment spheroidal deformation, right-fragment spheroidal deformation, and nascent-fragment mass asymmetry. The energy of the ground state is determined by calculating the lowest-energy configuration in both the Nilsson perturbed-spheroid (?) and the spherical-harmonic (?) parametrizations, including axially asymmetric deformations. The lower of the two results (correcting for zero-point motion) is defined as the ground-state energy. The effect of axial asymmetry on the inner barrier peak is calculated in the (?,?) parametrization. We have earlier benchmarked our calculated barrier heights to experimentally extracted barrier parameters and found average agreement to about one MeV for known data across the nuclear chart. Here we do additional benchmarks and investigate the qualitative and, when possible, quantitative agreement and/or consistency with data on ?-delayed fission, isotope generation along prompt-neutron-capture chains in nuclear-weapons tests, and superheavy-element stability. In addition these studies all indicate that the model is realistic at considerable distances in Z and N from the region of nuclei where its parameters were determined.

  3. Fission barriers at the end of the chart of the nuclides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Möller, Peter; Sierk, Arnold J.; Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira; Mumpower, Matthew

    2015-02-12

    We present calculated fission-barrier heights for 5239 nuclides for all nuclei between the proton and neutron drip lines with 171 ≤ A ≤ 330. The barriers are calculated in the macroscopic-microscopic finite-range liquid-drop (FRLDM) with a 2002 set of macroscopic-model parameters. The saddle-point energies are determined from potential-energy surfaces based on more than five million different shapes, defined by five deformation parameters in the three-quadratic-surface shape parametrization: elongation, neck diameter, left-fragment spheroidal deformation, right-fragment spheroidal deformation, and nascent-fragment mass asymmetry. The energy of the ground state is determined by calculating the lowest-energy configuration in both the Nilsson perturbed-spheroid (ϵ) andmore » the spherical-harmonic (β) parametrizations, including axially asymmetric deformations. The lower of the two results (correcting for zero-point motion) is defined as the ground-state energy. The effect of axial asymmetry on the inner barrier peak is calculated in the (ϵ,γ) parametrization. We have earlier benchmarked our calculated barrier heights to experimentally extracted barrier parameters and found average agreement to about one MeV for known data across the nuclear chart. Here we do additional benchmarks and investigate the qualitative and, when possible, quantitative agreement and/or consistency with data on β-delayed fission, isotope generation along prompt-neutron-capture chains in nuclear-weapons tests, and superheavy-element stability. In addition these studies all indicate that the model is realistic at considerable distances in Z and N from the region of nuclei where its parameters were determined.« less

  4. Fission barriers at the end of the chart of the nuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Möller, Peter; Sierk, Arnold J.; Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira; Mumpower, Matthew

    2015-02-12

    We present calculated fission-barrier heights for 5239 nuclides for all nuclei between the proton and neutron drip lines with 171 ≤ A ≤ 330. The barriers are calculated in the macroscopic-microscopic finite-range liquid-drop (FRLDM) with a 2002 set of macroscopic-model parameters. The saddle-point energies are determined from potential-energy surfaces based on more than five million different shapes, defined by five deformation parameters in the three-quadratic-surface shape parametrization: elongation, neck diameter, left-fragment spheroidal deformation, right-fragment spheroidal deformation, and nascent-fragment mass asymmetry. The energy of the ground state is determined by calculating the lowest-energy configuration in both the Nilsson perturbed-spheroid (ϵ) and the spherical-harmonic (β) parametrizations, including axially asymmetric deformations. The lower of the two results (correcting for zero-point motion) is defined as the ground-state energy. The effect of axial asymmetry on the inner barrier peak is calculated in the (ϵ,γ) parametrization. We have earlier benchmarked our calculated barrier heights to experimentally extracted barrier parameters and found average agreement to about one MeV for known data across the nuclear chart. Here we do additional benchmarks and investigate the qualitative and, when possible, quantitative agreement and/or consistency with data on β-delayed fission, isotope generation along prompt-neutron-capture chains in nuclear-weapons tests, and superheavy-element stability. In addition these studies all indicate that the model is realistic at considerable distances in Z and N from the region of nuclei where its parameters were determined.

  5. A Study Of Scale Deposition- An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Study Of Scale Deposition- An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal Ore Formation In The Volcano Of Milos, Aegean Arc, Greece Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  6. Consideration of factors affecting strip effluent pH and sodium content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  7. Physical processes involved in strip electrode welding using the method of slatted splicing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bushma, V. O. [Moscow State Technological University 'Stankin' (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15

    Physical processes that take place in a strip electrode during welding using the slatted splicing technique are considered. Flowing of the welding current in the electrode is shown to be the key process which determines electrode heating and melting. Technological receipts are proposed that allow obtaining high-quality welds by the method of slatted splicing.

  8. Tests of Scintillator+WLS Strips for Muon System at Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denisov, Dmitri; Evdokimov, Valery; Luki?, Strahinja

    2015-10-11

    Prototype scintilator+WLS strips with SiPM readout for muon system at future colliders were tested for light yield, time resolution and position resolution. Depending on the configuration, light yield of up to 36 photoelectrons per muon per SiPM has been achieved, as well as time resolution of 0.5 ns and position resolution of ~ 7 cm.

  9. The distribution of an illustrated timeline wall chart and teacher's guide of 20th century physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Brian

    2000-12-26

    The American Physical Society's part of its centennial celebration in March of 1999 decided to develop a timeline wall chart on the history of 20th century physics. This resulted in eleven consecutive posters, which when mounted side by side, create a 23-foot mural. The timeline exhibits and describes the millstones of physics in images and words. The timeline functions as a chronology, a work of art, a permanent open textbook, and a gigantic photo album covering a hundred years in the life of the community of physicists and the existence of the American Physical Society. Each of the eleven posters begins with a brief essay that places a major scientific achievement of the decade in its historical context. Large portraits of the essays' subjects include youthful photographs of Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, and Richard Feynman among others, to help put a face on science. Below the essays, a total of over 130 individual discoveries and inventions, explained in dated text boxes with accompanying images, form the backbone of the timeline. For ease of comprehension, this wealth of material is organized into five color-coded story lines the stretch horizontally across the hundred years of the 20th century. The five story lines are: Cosmic Scale, relate the story of astrophysics and cosmology; Human Scale, refers to the physics of the more familiar distances from the global to the microscopic; Atomic Scale, focuses on the submicroscopic world of atoms, nuclei and quarks; Living World, chronicles the interaction of physics with biology and medicine; Technology, traces the applications of physic to everyday living. Woven into the bottom border of the timeline are period images of significant works of art, architecture, and technological artifacts such as telephones, automobiles, aircraft, computers, and appliances. The last poster, covering the years since 1995, differs from the others. Its essay concerns the prospect for physics into the next century, and is illustrated with pictures of promising award winning high school students who, it is hoped, will be the leading researchers of physics in the decades ahead. Appropriately the last entries in the timeline are not achievements but open questions to be answered in the future.

  10. Quality Assurance Peer Review Chart Rounds in 2011: A Survey of Academic Institutions in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, Yaacov Richard; Whiton, Michal A.; Department of Radiation Oncology, Skagit Valley Hospital Regional Cancer Care Center, Mt. Vernon, Washington ; Symon, Zvi; Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University ; Wuthrick, Evan J.; Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio ; Doyle, Laura; Harrison, Amy S.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: In light of concerns regarding the quality of radiation treatment delivery, we surveyed the practice of quality assurance peer review chart rounds at American academic institutions. Methods and Materials: An anonymous web-based survey was sent to the chief resident of each institution across the United States. Results: The response rate was 80% (57/71). The median amount of time spent per patient was 2.7 minutes (range, 0.6-14.4). The mean attendance by senior physicians and residents was 73% and 93%, respectively. A physicist was consistently present at peer review rounds in 66% of departments. There was a close association between attendance by senior physicians and departmental organization: in departments with protected time policies, good attendance was 81% vs. 31% without protected time (p = 0.001), and in departments that documented attendance, attending presence was 69% vs. 29% in departments without documentation (p < 0.05). More than 80% of institutions peer review all external beam therapy courses; however, rates were much lower for other modalities (radiosurgery 58%, brachytherapy 40%-47%). Patient history, chart documentation, and dose prescription were always peer reviewed in >75% of institutions, whereas dosimetric details (beams, wedges), isodose coverage, intensity-modulated radiation therapy constraints, and dose-volume histograms were always peer reviewed in 63%, 59%, 42%, and 50% of cases, respectively. Chart rounds led to both minor (defined as a small multileaf collimator change/repeated port film) and major (change to dose prescription or replan with dosimetry) treatment changes. Whereas at the majority of institutions changes were rare (<10% of cases), 39% and 11% of institutions reported that minor and major changes, respectively, were made to more than 10% of cases. Conclusion: The implementation of peer review chart rounds seems inconsistent across American academic institutions. Brachytherapy and radiosurgical procedures are rarely reviewed. Attendance by senior physicians is variable, but it improves when scheduling clashes are avoided. The potential effect of a more thorough quality assurance peer review on patient outcomes is not known.

  11. Air stripping of volatile organic chlorocarbons: System development, performance, and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKillip, S.T.; Sibley, K.L.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-12-31

    The Savannah River Site, which has been in operation since the 1950`s, is a 780-square kilometer reservation that produces tritium for the national defense program. As a result of past waste handling practices, the ground water at several locations on the Site has become contaminated with solvents, metals, and radionuclides. In 1981, the ground water located under the Site`s fuel and target rod fabrication area (M-Area) was found to be contaminated with degreasing solvents, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). In 1983, a program was started to evaluate air stripping and determine its applicability to cleanup of M-Area contamination. Lessons learned regarding the efficiency and effectiveness of air stripping technology are presented.

  12. Air stripping of volatile organic chlorocarbons: System development, performance, and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKillip, S.T.; Sibley, K.L.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    The Savannah River Site, which has been in operation since the 1950's, is a 780-square kilometer reservation that produces tritium for the national defense program. As a result of past waste handling practices, the ground water at several locations on the Site has become contaminated with solvents, metals, and radionuclides. In 1981, the ground water located under the Site's fuel and target rod fabrication area (M-Area) was found to be contaminated with degreasing solvents, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). In 1983, a program was started to evaluate air stripping and determine its applicability to cleanup of M-Area contamination. Lessons learned regarding the efficiency and effectiveness of air stripping technology are presented.

  13. Thicker, more efficient superconducting strip-line detectors for high throughput macromolecules analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casaburi, A.; Ejrnaes, M.; Cristiano, R.; Zen, N.; Ohkubo, M.; Pagano, S.

    2011-01-10

    Fast detectors with large area are required in time-of-flight mass spectrometers for high throughput analysis of biological molecules. We fabricated and characterized subnanosecond 1x1 mm{sup 2} NbN superconducting strip-line detectors. The influence of the strip-line thickness on the temporal characteristics and efficiency of the detector for the impacts of keV accelerated molecules is investigated. We find that the increase of thickness improves both efficiency and response time. In the thicker sample we achieved a rise time of 380 ps, a fall time of 1.38 ns, and a higher count rate. The physics involved in this behavior is investigated.

  14. Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Follstaedt, D.W.; King, E.L.; Schneider, K.C.

    1991-11-12

    The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points. 8 figures.

  15. Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Follstaedt, Donald W.; King, Edward L.; Schneider, Ken C.

    1991-11-12

    The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points.

  16. Interaction of Josephson Junction and Distant Vortex in Narrow Thin-Film Superconducting Strips

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogan, V. G.; Mints, R. G.

    2014-01-31

    The phase difference between the banks of an edge-type planar Josephson junction crossing the narrow thin-film strip depends on wether or not vortices are present in the junction banks. For a vortex close to the junction this effect has been seen by Golod, Rydh, and Krasnov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 227003 (2010)], who showed that the vortex may turn the junction into ? type. It is shown here that even if the vortex is far away from the junction, it still changes the 0 junction to a ? junction when situated close to the strip edges. Within the approximation used, the effect is independent of the vortex-junction separation, a manifestation of the topology of the vortex phase which extends to macroscopic distances of superconducting coherence.

  17. Dynamic underground stripping: steam and electric heating for in situ decontamination of soils and groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, William D.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Newmark, Robin L.; Udell, Kent; Buetnner, Harley M.; Aines, Roger D.

    1995-01-01

    A dynamic underground stripping process removes localized underground volatile organic compounds from heterogeneous soils and rock in a relatively short time. This method uses steam injection and electrical resistance heating to heat the contaminated underground area to increase the vapor pressure of the contaminants, thus speeding the process of contaminant removal and making the removal more complete. The injected steam passes through the more permeable sediments, distilling the organic contaminants, which are pumped to the surface. Large electrical currents are also applied to the contaminated area, which heat the impermeable subsurface layers that the steam has not penetrated. The condensed and vaporized contaminants are withdrawn by liquid pumping and vacuum extraction. The steam injection and electrical heating steps are repeated as necessary. Geophysical imaging methods can be used to map the boundary between the hot, dry, contamination-free underground zone and the cool, damp surrounding areas to help monitor the dynamic stripping process.

  18. Dynamic underground stripping: steam and electric heating for in situ decontamination of soils and groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.; Newmark, R.L.; Udell, K.; Buetnner, H.M.; Aines, R.D.

    1995-09-12

    A dynamic underground stripping process removes localized underground volatile organic compounds from heterogeneous soils and rock in a relatively short time. This method uses steam injection and electrical resistance heating to heat the contaminated underground area to increase the vapor pressure of the contaminants, thus speeding the process of contaminant removal and making the removal more complete. The injected steam passes through the more permeable sediments, distilling the organic contaminants, which are pumped to the surface. Large electrical currents are also applied to the contaminated area, which heat the impermeable subsurface layers that the steam has not penetrated. The condensed and vaporized contaminants are withdrawn by liquid pumping and vacuum extraction. The steam injection and electrical heating steps are repeated as necessary. Geophysical imaging methods can be used to map the boundary between the hot, dry, contamination-free underground zone and the cool, damp surrounding areas to help monitor the dynamic stripping process. 4 figs.

  19. User's Guide to Pre-Processing Data in Universal Translator 2 for the Energy Charting and Metrics Tool (ECAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taasevigen, Danny J.

    2011-11-30

    This document is a user's guide for the Energy Charting and Metrics Tool to facilitate the examination of energy information from buildings, reducing the time spent analyzing trend and utility meter data. This user guide was generated to help pre-process data with the intention of utilizing the Energy Charting and Metrics (ECAM) tool to improve building operational efficiency. There are numerous occasions when the metered data that is received from the building automation system (BAS) isn't in the right format acceptable for ECAM. This includes, but isn't limited to, cases such as inconsistent time-stamps for the trends (e.g., each trend has its own time-stamp), data with holes (e.g., some time-stamps have data and others are missing data), each point in the BAS is trended and exported into an individual .csv or .txt file, the time-stamp is unrecognizable by ECAM, etc. After reading through this user guide, the user should be able to pre-process all data files and be ready to use this data in ECAM to improve their building operational efficiency.

  20. Disposable Electrochemical Immunosensor Diagnosis Device Based on Nanoparticle Probe and Immunochromatographic Strip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Ying-Ying; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-10-15

    We describe a disposable electrochemical immunosensor diagnosis device that is based on the immunochromatographic strip technique and an electrochemical immunoassay based on quantum dot (QD, CdS@ZnS) labels. The device takes advantage of the speed and low-cost of the conventional immunochromatographic strip test and the high-sensitivity of the nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunoassay. A sandwich immunoreaction was performed on the immunochromatographic strip, and the captured QD labels in the test zone were determined by highly sensitive stripping voltammetric measurement of the dissolved metallic component (cadmium) with a disposable-screen-printed electrode, which is embedded underneath the membrane on the test zone. The new device coupled with a portable electrochemical analyzer shows great promise for in-field and point-of-care quantitative testing of disease-related protein biomarkers. The parameters (e.g., voltammetric measurement of QD labels, antibody immobilization, the loading amount of QD-antibody, and the immunoreaction time) that govern the sensitivity and reproducibility of the device were optimized with IgG model analyte. The voltammetric response of the optimized device is highly linear over the range of 0.1 to 10 ng mL-1 IgG, and the limit of detection is estimated to be 30 pg mL-1 in association with a 7-min immunoreaction time. The detection limit was improved to 10 pg mL-1 using a 20-min immunoreaction time. The new disposable electrochemical diagnosis device thus provides a more user-friendly, rapid, clinically accurate, less expensive, and quantitative tool for protein detection.

  1. Detonation wave detection probe including parallel electrodes on a flexible backing strip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Uher, Kenneth J.

    1995-01-01

    A device for sensing the occurrence of destructive events and events involving mechanical shock in a non-intrusive manner. A pair of electrodes is disposed in a parallel configuration on a backing strip of flexible film. Electrical circuitry is used to sense the time at which an event causes electrical continuity between the electrodes or, with a sensor configuration where the electrodes are shorted together, to sense the time at which electrical continuity is lost.

  2. Stripping ethanol from ethanol-blended fuels for use in NO.sub.x SCR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kass, Michael Delos; Graves, Ronald Lee; Storey, John Morse Elliot; Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur; Sluder, Charles Scott; Thomas, John Foster

    2007-08-21

    A method to use diesel fuel alchohol micro emulsions (E-diesel) to provide a source of reductant to lower NO.sub.x emissions using selective catalytic reduction. Ethanol is stripped from the micro emulsion and entered into the exhaust gasses upstream of the reducing catalyst. The method allows diesel (and other lean-burn) engines to meet new, lower emission standards without having to carry separate fuel and reductant tanks.

  3. Detonation wave detection probe including parallel electrodes on a flexible backing strip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Uher, K.J.

    1995-12-19

    A device is disclosed for sensing the occurrence of destructive events and events involving mechanical shock in a non-intrusive manner. A pair of electrodes is disposed in a parallel configuration on a backing strip of flexible film. Electrical circuitry is used to sense the time at which an event causes electrical continuity between the electrodes or, with a sensor configuration where the electrodes are shorted together, to sense the time at which electrical continuity is lost. 4 figs.

  4. Performance assessment of the In-Well Vapor-Stripping System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, T.J.; White, M.D.; Spane, F.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    In-well vapor stripping is a remediation technology designed to preferentially extract volatile organic compounds dissolved in groundwater by converting them to a vapor phase and then treating the vapor. This vapor-stripping system is distinctly different from the more traditional in situ air-sparging concept. In situ sparging takes place in the aquifer formation; in-well vapor stripping takes place within the well casing. The system was field demonstrated at Edwards Air Force Base, California; the first-time demonstration of this technology in the United States. Installation and testing of the system were completed in late 1995, and the demonstration was operated nearly continuously for 6 months (191 days) between January 16 and July 25, 1996. Postdemonstration hydrochemical sampling continued until September 1996. The demonstration was conducted by collaborating researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (a) and Stanford University as part of an interim cleanup action at the base. Edwards Air Force Base and its environmental subcontractor, Earth Technology Corporation, as well as EG&G Environmental, holders of the commercial rights to the technology, were also significant contributors to the demonstration.

  5. Recovery and reuse of MEK from paint stripping operation emissions using specialized adsorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blystone, P.G.; Goltz, H.R.; Springer, J. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    The reduction of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions is a significant goal of the 1990 Clean Air Act. Industrial operations relating to surface preparation, surface coating and paint striping operations constitute one of the largest industrial sources of VOC emissions. This paper describes a new emission control system offered by Purus, Inc. which captures and recovers VOCs from paint stripping operations. The system is based on an on-site adsorption-desorption process which utilizes a specialized polymeric resin adsorbent. Adsorbent beds are regenerated through a computer controlled pressure-temperature swing process (PTSA). The adsorbent resin offers significant operational advantages over conventional activated carbon adsorbents with respect to treating air laden with methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) vapors. Treatment of MEK with activated carbon can be problematic due to reactivity (degradation) and high heats of adsorption of ketones with carbon. The Purus process was successfully demonstrated at Tinker Air Force Base in or under the EPA`s Waste Reduction Evaluation at Federal Sites program. MEK emissions from a paint stripping booth vent were controlled at greater than 95% reduction levels. The recovered solvent was returned to depainting process and reused with no loss in paint stripping efficiency.

  6. Natural analogue synthesis report, TDR-NBS-GS-000027 rev00 icn02

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, A.; Nieder-Westermann, G.; Stuckless, J.; Dobson, P.; Unger, A.J.A.; Kwicklis, E.; Lichtner, P.; Carey, B.; Wolde, G.; Murrel,M.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Meijer, A.; Faybishenko, B.

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to present analogue studies and literature reviews designed to provide qualitative and quantitative information to test and provide added confidence in process models abstracted for performance assessment (PA) and model predictions pertinent to PA. This report provides updates to studies presented in the Yucca Mountain Site Description (CRWMS M&O 2000 [151945], Section 13) and new examples gleaned from the literature, along with results of quantitative studies conducted specifically for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The intent of the natural analogue studies was to collect corroborative evidence from analogues to demonstrate additional understanding of processes expected to occur during postclosure at a potential Yucca Mountain repository. The report focuses on key processes by providing observations and analyses of natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) systems to improve understanding and confidence in the operation of these processes under conditions similar to those that could occur in a nuclear waste repository. The process models include those that represent both engineered and natural barrier processes. A second purpose of this report is to document the various applications of natural analogues to geologic repository programs, focusing primarily on the way analogues have been used by the YMP. This report is limited to providing support for PA in a confirmatory manner and to providing corroborative inputs for process modeling activities. Section 1.7 discusses additional limitations of this report. Key topics for this report are analogues to emplacement drift degradation, waste form degradation, waste package degradation, degradation of other materials proposed for the engineered barrier, seepage into drifts, radionuclide flow and transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ), analogues to coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical processes, saturated zone (SZ) transport, impact of radionuclide release on the biosphere, and potentially disruptive events. Results of these studies will be used to corroborate estimates of the magnitude and limitation of operative processes in order to build realism into conceptual and numerical process models used as a foundation for PA in the representative case of postclosure safety.

  7. LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC HELICITY FLUXES ESTIMATED FROM MDI MAGNETIC SYNOPTIC CHARTS OVER THE SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Shangbin; Zhang Hongqi

    2012-10-10

    To investigate the characteristics of large-scale and long-term evolution of magnetic helicity with solar cycles, we use the method of Local Correlation Tracking to estimate the magnetic helicity evolution over solar cycle 23 from 1996 to 2009 using 795 MDI magnetic synoptic charts. The main results are as follows: the hemispheric helicity rule still holds in general, i.e., the large-scale negative (positive) magnetic helicity dominates the northern (southern) hemisphere. However, the large-scale magnetic helicity fluxes show the same sign in both hemispheres around 2001 and 2005. The global, large-scale magnetic helicity flux over the solar disk changes from a negative value at the beginning of solar cycle 23 to a positive value at the end of the cycle, while the net accumulated magnetic helicity is negative in the period between 1996 and 2009.

  8. Impact of low-dose electron irradiation on $$n^{+}p$$ silicon strip sensors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adam, W.

    2015-08-28

    The response of n+p silicon strip sensors to electrons from a 90Sr source was measured using a multi-channel read-out system with 25 ns sampling time. The measurements were performed over a period of several weeks, during which the operating conditions were varied. The sensors were fabricated by Hamamatsu Photonics on 200 μm thick float-zone and magnetic-Czochralski silicon. Their pitch was 80 μm, and both p-stop and p-spray isolation of the n+ strips were studied. The electrons from the 90Sr source were collimated to a spot with a full-width-at-half-maximum of 2 mm at the sensor surface, and the dose rate inmore » the SiO2 at the maximum was about 50 Gy(SiO2)/d. After only a few hours of making measurements, significant changes in charge collection and charge sharing were observed. Annealing studies, with temperatures up to 80 °C and annealing times of 18 h showed that the changes can only be partially annealed. The observations can be qualitatively explained by the increase of the positive oxide-charge density due to the ionization of the SiO2 by the radiation from the β source. TCAD simulations of the electric field in the sensor for different oxide-charge densities and different boundary conditions at the sensor surface support this explanation. As a result, the relevance of the measurements for the design of n+p strip sensors is discussed.« less

  9. Impact of low-dose electron irradiation on $n^{+}p$ silicon strip sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam, W.

    2015-08-28

    The response of n+p silicon strip sensors to electrons from a 90Sr source was measured using a multi-channel read-out system with 25 ns sampling time. The measurements were performed over a period of several weeks, during which the operating conditions were varied. The sensors were fabricated by Hamamatsu Photonics on 200 μm thick float-zone and magnetic-Czochralski silicon. Their pitch was 80 μm, and both p-stop and p-spray isolation of the n+ strips were studied. The electrons from the 90Sr source were collimated to a spot with a full-width-at-half-maximum of 2 mm at the sensor surface, and the dose rate in the SiO2 at the maximum was about 50 Gy(SiO2)/d. After only a few hours of making measurements, significant changes in charge collection and charge sharing were observed. Annealing studies, with temperatures up to 80 °C and annealing times of 18 h showed that the changes can only be partially annealed. The observations can be qualitatively explained by the increase of the positive oxide-charge density due to the ionization of the SiO2 by the radiation from the β source. TCAD simulations of the electric field in the sensor for different oxide-charge densities and different boundary conditions at the sensor surface support this explanation. As a result, the relevance of the measurements for the design of n+p strip sensors is discussed.

  10. PROBING SHOCK BREAKOUT AND PROGENITORS OF STRIPPED-ENVELOPE SUPERNOVAE THROUGH THEIR EARLY RADIO EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    We study properties of early radio emission from stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe; those of Type IIb/Ib/Ic). We suggest there is a sub-class of stripped-envelope SNe based on their radio properties, including the optically well-studied Type Ic SNe (SNe Ic) 2002ap and 2007gr, showing a rapid rise to a radio peak within {approx}10 days and reaching a low luminosity (at least an order of magnitude fainter than a majority of SNe IIb/Ib/Ic). They show a decline after the peak that is shallower than that of other stripped-envelope SNe while their spectral index is similar. We show that all these properties are naturally explained if the circumstellar material (CSM) density is low and therefore the forward shock is expanding into the CSM without deceleration. Since the forward shock velocity in this situation, as estimated from the radio properties, still records the maximum velocity of the SN ejecta following the shock breakout, observing these SNe in radio wavelengths provides new diagnostics on the nature of both the breakout and the progenitor which otherwise require a quite rapid follow-up in other wavelengths. The inferred post-shock breakout velocities of SNe Ic 2002ap and 2007gr are sub-relativistic, {approx}0.3c. These are higher than that inferred for SN II 1987A, in line with suggested compact progenitors. However, these are lower than expected for a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) progenitor. It may reflect an as yet unresolved nature of the progenitors just before the explosion, and we suggest that the W-R progenitor envelopes might have been inflated which could quickly reduce the maximum ejecta velocity from the initial shock breakout velocity.

  11. JELLYFISH: EVIDENCE OF EXTREME RAM-PRESSURE STRIPPING IN MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebeling, H.; Stephenson, L. N.; Edge, A. C.

    2014-02-01

    Ram-pressure stripping by the gaseous intracluster medium has been proposed as the dominant physical mechanism driving the rapid evolution of galaxies in dense environments. Detailed studies of this process have, however, largely been limited to relatively modest examples affecting only the outermost gas layers of galaxies in nearby and/or low-mass galaxy clusters. We here present results from our search for extreme cases of gas-galaxy interactions in much more massive, X-ray selected clusters at z > 0.3. Using Hubble Space Telescope snapshots in the F606W and F814W passbands, we have discovered dramatic evidence of ram-pressure stripping in which copious amounts of gas are first shock compressed and then removed from galaxies falling into the cluster. Vigorous starbursts triggered by this process across the galaxy-gas interface and in the debris trail cause these galaxies to temporarily become some of the brightest cluster members in the F606W passband, capable of outshining even the Brightest Cluster Galaxy. Based on the spatial distribution and orientation of systems viewed nearly edge-on in our survey, we speculate that infall at large impact parameter gives rise to particularly long-lasting stripping events. Our sample of six spectacular examples identified in clusters from the Massive Cluster Survey, all featuring M {sub F606W} < 21 mag, doubles the number of such systems presently known at z > 0.2 and facilitates detailed quantitative studies of the most violent galaxy evolution in clusters.

  12. Sample Results From The Extraction, Scrub, And Strip Test For The Blended NGS Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.

    2014-03-03

    This report summarizes the results of the extraction, scrub, and strip testing for the September 2013 sampling of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Blended solvent from the Modular Caustic Side-Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Solvent Hold Tank. MCU is in the process of transitioning from the BOBCalixC6 solvent to the NGS Blend solvent. As part of that transition, MCU has intentionally created a blended solvent to be processed using the Salt Batch program. This sample represents the first sample received from that blended solvent. There were two ESS tests performed where NGS blended solvent performance was assessed using either the Tank 21 material utilized in the Salt Batch 7 analyses or a simulant waste material used in the V-5/V-10 contactor testing. This report tabulates the temperature corrected cesium distribution, or DCs values, step recovery percentage, and actual temperatures recorded during the experiment. This report also identifies the sample receipt date, preparation method, and analysis performed in the accumulation of the listed values. The calculated extraction DCs values using the Tank 21H material and simulant are 59.4 and 53.8, respectively. The DCs values for two scrub and three strip processes for the Tank 21 material are 4.58, 2.91, 0.00184, 0.0252, and 0.00575, respectively. The D-values for two scrub and three strip processes for the simulant are 3.47, 2.18, 0.00468, 0.00057, and 0.00572, respectively. These values are similar to previous measurements of Salt Batch 7 feed with lab-prepared blended solvent. These numbers are considered compatible to allow simulant testing to be completed in place of actual waste due to the limited availability of feed material.

  13. Borehole induction logging for the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project LLNL gasoline spill site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, S.; Newmark, R.; Wilt, M.

    1994-01-21

    Borehole induction logs were acquired for the purpose of characterizing subsurface physical properties and monitoring steam clean up activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This work was part of the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project`s demonstrated clean up of a gasoline spin. The site is composed of unconsolidated days, sands and gravels which contain gasoline both above and below the water table. Induction logs were used to characterize lithology, to provide ``ground truth`` resistivity values for electrical resistance tomography (ERT), and to monitor the movement of an underground steam plume used to heat the soil and drive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the extraction wells.

  14. Passivation Dynamics in the Anisotropic Deposition and Stripping of Bulk Magnesium Electrodes During Electrochemical Cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetzel, David J.; Malone, Marvin A.; Haasch, Richard T.; Meng, Yifei; Vieker, Henning; Hahn, Nathan; Golzhauser, Armin; Zuo, Jian-Min; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Gewirth, Andrew A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.

    2015-08-10

    Rechargeable magnesium (Mg) batteries show promise for use as a next generation technology for high-density energy storage, though little is known about the Mg anode solid electrolyte interphase and its implications for the performance and durability of a Mg-based battery. We explore in this report passivation effects engendered during the electrochemical cycling of a bulk Mg anode, characterizing their influences during metal deposition and dissolution in a simple, nonaqueous, Grignard electrolyte solution (ethylmagnesium bromide, EtMgBr, in tetrahydrofuran). Scanning electron microscopy images of Mg foil working electrodes after electrochemical polarization to dissolution potentials show the formation of corrosion pits. The pit densities so evidenced are markedly potential-dependent. When the Mg working electrode is cycled both potentiostatically and galvanostatically in EtMgBr these pits, formed due to passive layer breakdown, act as the foci for subsequent electrochemical activity. Detailed microscopy, diffraction, and spectroscopic data show that further passivation and corrosion results in the anisotropic stripping of the Mg {0001} plane, leaving thin oxide-comprising passivated side wall structures that demark the {0001} fiber texture of the etched Mg grains. Upon long-term cycling, oxide side walls formed due to the pronounced crystallographic anisotropy of the anodic stripping processes, leading to complex overlay anisotropic, columnar structures, exceeding 50 ?m in height. Finally, the passive responses mediating the growth of these structures appear to be an intrinsic feature of the electrochemical growth and dissolution of Mg using this electrolyte.

  15. Passivation dynamics in the anisotropic deposition and stripping of bulk magnesium electrodes during electrochemical cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetzel, David J.; Malone, Marvin A.; Haasch, Richard T.; Meng, Yifei; Vieker, Henning; Hahn, Nathan; Golzhauser, Armin; Zuo, Jian-Min; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Gewirth, Andrew A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.

    2015-08-10

    Rechargeable magnesium (Mg) batteries show promise for use as a next generation technology for high-density energy storage, though little is known about the Mg anode solid electrolyte interphase and its implications for the performance and durability of a Mg-based battery. We explore in this report passivation effects engendered during the electrochemical cycling of a bulk Mg anode, characterizing their influences during metal deposition and dissolution in a simple, nonaqueous, Grignard electrolyte solution (ethylmagnesium bromide, EtMgBr, in tetrahydrofuran). Scanning electron microscopy images of Mg foil working electrodes after electrochemical polarization to dissolution potentials show the formation of corrosion pits. The pit densities so evidenced are markedly potential-dependent. When the Mg working electrode is cycled both potentiostatically and galvanostatically in EtMgBr these pits, formed due to passive layer breakdown, act as the foci for subsequent electrochemical activity. Detailed microscopy, diffraction, and spectroscopic data show that further passivation and corrosion results in the anisotropic stripping of the Mg {0001} plane, leaving thin oxide-comprising passivated side wall structures that demark the {0001} fiber texture of the etched Mg grains. Upon long-term cycling, oxide side walls formed due to the pronounced crystallographic anisotropy of the anodic stripping processes, leading to complex overlay anisotropic, columnar structures, exceeding 50 μm in height. Finally, the passive responses mediating the growth of these structures appear to be an intrinsic feature of the electrochemical growth and dissolution of Mg using this electrolyte.

  16. Influence of sulfur and welding conditions on penetration in thin strip stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheller, P.R. ); Brooks, R.F.; Mills, K.C. . Division of Materials Metrology)

    1995-02-01

    Welding trials and surface tension measurements have been carried out on 304 stainless steels with sulfur (S) contents between 20 and 100 ppm. Surface tension measurements, determined by the levitated drop method, indicated that the temperature coefficient of surface tension (d[gamma]/dT) changed from negative to positive values at S contents exceeding approximately 50 ppm. Strips with a thickness of approximately 1 mm were GTA welded on both single-electrode, small-scale and multi-electrode industrial-scale units. Welding speeds of 1 to 2 m min[sup [minus]1] were used on the small-scale unit and up to 5 m min[sup [minus]1] on the industrial unit. The weld penetration was found to increase, for both full and partial penetration welds, with (1) increasing sulfur contents; and (2) increasing linear energy. On the small scale-unit markedly higher penetration was observed in heats with S contents > 60 ppm. But the influence of S contents was only of minor importance for welds obtained on the industrial unit. It was found that the similar weld geometry could be obtained for both low ([<=] 60 ppm) and high (> 60 ppm) sulfur contents by careful adjustment of welding parameters. The observed changes in weld geometry are consistent with the proposition that the fluid flow in the weld pool is dominated by thermo-capillary (Marangoni) forces during the GTA welding of thin strips.

  17. Acoustic-wave sensor for ambient monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Hoyt, Andrea E.; Frye, Gregory C.

    1998-01-01

    The acoustic-wave sensor. The acoustic-wave sensor is designed for ambient or vapor-phase monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent such as N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP), ethoxyethylpropionate (EEP) or the like. The acoustic-wave sensor comprises an acoustic-wave device such as a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device, a flexural-plate-wave (FPW) device, an acoustic-plate-mode (APM) device, or a thickness-shear-mode (TSM) device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance or QCM) having a sensing region on a surface thereof. The sensing region includes a sensing film for sorbing a quantity of the photoresist-stripping agent, thereby altering or shifting a frequency of oscillation of an acoustic wave propagating through the sensing region for indicating an ambient concentration of the agent. According to preferred embodiments of the invention, the acoustic-wave device is a SAW device; and the sensing film comprises poly(vinylacetate), poly(N-vinylpyrrolidinone), or poly(vinylphenol).

  18. Acoustic-wave sensor for ambient monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Hoyt, A.E.; Frye, G.C.

    1998-08-18

    The acoustic-wave sensor is disclosed. The acoustic-wave sensor is designed for ambient or vapor-phase monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent such as N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP), ethoxyethylpropionate (EEP) or the like. The acoustic-wave sensor comprises an acoustic-wave device such as a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device, a flexural-plate-wave (FPW) device, an acoustic-plate-mode (APM) device, or a thickness-shear-mode (TSM) device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance or QCM) having a sensing region on a surface thereof. The sensing region includes a sensing film for sorbing a quantity of the photoresist-stripping agent, thereby altering or shifting a frequency of oscillation of an acoustic wave propagating through the sensing region for indicating an ambient concentration of the agent. According to preferred embodiments of the invention, the acoustic-wave device is a SAW device; and the sensing film comprises poly(vinylacetate), poly(N-vinylpyrrolidinone), or poly(vinylphenol). 3 figs.

  19. Strip2CubeFace user%3CU%2B2019%3Es manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forden, Geoffrey Ethan

    2013-03-01

    Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) software for producing linked virtual tours based on 360 degree panoramas are becoming more and more available. However, the best current products for taking the images, stitching them into 360 degree panoramas, and then linking them together into complex virtual tours require different and incompatible input and output formats. This program is designed to bridge the gap between the iPix Interactive Studio export format, which consists of a single JPEG with the six faces of a cube connected horizontally, with the six individual JPEGs needed to be imported into Panotour Pro software. This report describes how to use the software program Strip2CubeFace, which takes the cube-strip JPEG exported from iPix Studio and coverts it into six JPEGs representing the six cube faces that Panotour Pro imports. As such, it represents a necessary link between the two COTS software programs key to making virtual tours quickly and easily. It becomes one member of the suite of software programs known as %E2%80%9CRaPP-TOURS%E2%80%9D or Rapid Processing of PanoTours Software necessary to simulate managed access and other permission requesting arms control-type training exercises.

  20. Geophysical monitoring of active hydrologic processes as part of the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.L.

    1992-05-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with University of California at Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is conducting the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project (DUSP), an integrated project demonstrating the use of active thermal techniques to remove subsurface organic contamination. Complementary techniques address a number of environmental restoration problems: (1) steam flood strips organic contaminants from permeable zones, (2) electrical heating drives contaminants from less permeable zones into the more permeable zones from which they can be extracted, and (3) geophysical monitoring tracks and images the progress of the thermal fronts, providing feedback and control of the active processes. The first DUSP phase involved combined steam injection and vapor extraction in a ``clean`` site in the Livermore Valley consisting of unconsolidated alluvial interbeds of clays, sands and gravels. Steam passed rapidly through a high-permeability gravel unit, where in situ temperatures reached 117{degree}C. An integrated program of geophysical monitoring was carried out at the Clean Site. We performed electrical resistance tomography (ERT), seismic tomography (crossborehole), induction tomography, passive seismic monitoring, a variety of different temperature measurement techniques and conventional geophysical well logging.

  1. Geophysical monitoring of active hydrologic processes as part of the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.L.

    1992-05-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with University of California at Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is conducting the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project (DUSP), an integrated project demonstrating the use of active thermal techniques to remove subsurface organic contamination. Complementary techniques address a number of environmental restoration problems: (1) steam flood strips organic contaminants from permeable zones, (2) electrical heating drives contaminants from less permeable zones into the more permeable zones from which they can be extracted, and (3) geophysical monitoring tracks and images the progress of the thermal fronts, providing feedback and control of the active processes. The first DUSP phase involved combined steam injection and vapor extraction in a clean'' site in the Livermore Valley consisting of unconsolidated alluvial interbeds of clays, sands and gravels. Steam passed rapidly through a high-permeability gravel unit, where in situ temperatures reached 117{degree}C. An integrated program of geophysical monitoring was carried out at the Clean Site. We performed electrical resistance tomography (ERT), seismic tomography (crossborehole), induction tomography, passive seismic monitoring, a variety of different temperature measurement techniques and conventional geophysical well logging.

  2. Studies on the stripping of transuranic elements from loaded TRPO by N,N-Dimethyl-3-oxa-glutaramic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jing; Wang, Jianchen; Duan, Wuhua

    2008-07-01

    The partitioning and transmutation of long-lived nuclides such as minor actinides from HLW is a method to reduce the long-term radiotoxicity of high-level waste (HLW). The TRPO partitioning process to remove actinides from HLW was developed in China. In the original TRPO process, Am and lanthanides, Pu, and Np are stripped by 5.5 M HNO{sub 3} and 0.6 M oxalic acid from the loaded solvent, respectively. In order to simplify the stripping of transuranic elements, a new compound N,N-dimethyl-3-oxa-glutaramic acid (DOGA) was synthesized. Two pilot tests were carried out in the centrifugal-contactor facility. Nd and Zr were used to simulate Am and Pu, respectively. Stripping of >99.9% Zr and >99.9% Nd was achieved using DOGA from the loaded 30% TRPO-kerosene. (authors)

  3. Analysis of T = 1 {sup 10}B States Analogue to {sup 10}Be Cluster States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uroic, M.; Miljanic, D.; Blagus, S.; Bogovac, M.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Majer, M.; Milin, M.; Lattuada, M.; Musumarra, A.; Acosta, L.

    2009-08-26

    Current status of the search for T = 1 cluster states in {sup 10}Be, {sup 10}B and {sup 10}C is presented. The best known of the three, {sup 10}Be, has an established rotational band (6.18, 7.54 and 10.15 MeV) with unusually large moment of inertia. Search of their isobaric analogue in {sup 10}B is presented, with emphasis on {sup 3}He+{sup 11}B reaction.

  4. Tritium stripping in a nitrogen glove box using palladium/zeolite and SAES St 198{trademark}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klien, J.E.; Wermer, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Glove box clean-up experiments were conducted in a nitrogen glove box using palladium deposited on zeolite (Pd/z) and a SAES St 198{trademark} getter as tritium stripping materials. Protium/deuterium samples spiked with tritium were released into a 620 liter glove box to simulate tritium releases in a 10,500 liter glove box. The Pd/z and the SAES St 198{trademark} stripper beds produced a reduction in tritium activity of approximately two to three orders of magnitude and glove box clean-up was limited by a persistent background tritium activity level. Attempts to significantly reduce the glove box activity to lower levels without purging were unsuccessful.

  5. Tritium stripping in a nitrogen glove box using palladium/zeolite and SAES St 198

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, J.E.; Wermer, J.R.

    1995-10-01

    Glove box clean-up experiments were conducted in a nitrogen glove box using palladium deposited on zeolite (Pd/z) and a SAES St 198 getter as tritium stripping materials. Protium/deuterium samples spiked with tritium were released into a 620 liter glove box to simulate tritium releases in a 10,500 liter glove box. The Pd/z and the SAES St 198 stripper beds produced a reduction in tritium activity of approximately two to three orders of magnitude and glove box clean-up was limited by a persistent background tritium activity level. Attempts to significantly reduce the glove box activity to lower levels without purging were unsuccessful. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. FPHX: A New Silicon Strip Readout Chip for the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoff, James R.; Zimmerman, Tom N.; Yarema, Raymond J.; Kapustinsky, Jon S.; Brookes, Melynda L.; /LOS ALAMOS

    2009-01-01

    The FPHX chip is a silicon strip readout chip developed at Fermilab for use in the FVTX Detector of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. Each front end consists of an integrator which is AC coupled to a shaper, followed by a discriminator and a 3-bit analog-to-digital converter. The backend is a novel architecture in two stages that permits dead-timeless operation and high-speed readout with very low latency. A slow controller provides an interface for all on-chip programmable functions. This chip has been fabricated in the 0.25um TSMC process. All functionality including the analog front-end, the digital back-end, and the slow controller has been verified experimentally.

  7. Note: Design and development of improved indirectly heated cathode based strip electron gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maiti, Namita; Patil, D. S.; Dasgupta, K.; Bade, Abhijeet; Tembhare, G. U.

    2015-02-15

    An improved design of indirectly heated solid cathode based electron gun (200 kW, 45 kV, 270° bent strip type electron gun) has been presented. The solid cathode is made of thoriated tungsten, which acts as an improved source of electron at lower temperature. So, high power operation is possible without affecting structural integrity of the electron gun. The design issues are addressed based on the uniformity of temperature on the solid cathode and the single long filament based design. The design approach consists of simulation followed by extensive experimentation. In the design, the effort has been put to tailor the non-uniformity of the heat flux from the filament to the solid cathode to obtain better uniformity of temperature on the solid cathode. Trial beam experiments have been carried out and it is seen that the modified design achieves one to one correspondence of the solid cathode length and the electron beam length.

  8. Method and apparatus for separating continuous cast strip from a rotating substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, E.L.; Follstaedt, D.W.; Sussman, R.C.

    1991-08-20

    The continuous casting of strip, ribbon and wire is improved by using a free jet nozzle which provides a fluid that follows a rotating substrate surface to the separation point. The nozzle includes an inclined surface having a ratio of its length to the gap between the substrate and the nozzle edge of 5:1 to 15:1. The inclined surface improves the ability of the jet to tangentially follow the substrate in a direction opposite to its rotation to the separation point. This also allows a close positioning of the nozzle to the substrate which serves to provide a back-up mechanical separation means by using the edge of nozzle lip. The nozzle may be rotated from its operating position for cleaning of the substrate and the nozzle. 4 figures.

  9. Method and apparatus for separating continuous cast strip from a rotating substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Edward L.; Follstaedt, Donald W.; Sussman, Richard C.

    1991-01-01

    The continuous casting of strip, ribbon and wire is improved by using a free jet nozzle which provides a fluid that follows a rotating substrate surface to the separation point. The nozzle includes an inclined surface having a ratio of its length to the gap between the substrate and the nozzle edge of 5:1 to 15:1. The inclined surface improves the ability of the jet to tangentially follow the substrate in a direction opposite to its rotation to the separation point. This also allows a close positioning of the nozzle to the substrate which serves to provide a back-up mechanical separation means by using the edge of nozzle lip. The nozzle may be rotated from its operating position for cleaning of the substrate and the nozzle.

  10. Understanding the Initial Stages of Reversible Mg Deposition and Stripping in Inorganic Non-Aqueous Electrolytes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Canepa, Pieremanuele; Gautam, Gopalakrishnan Sai; Malik, Rahul; Jayaraman, Saivenkataraman; Rong, Ziqin; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Persson, Kristin; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2015-04-08

    Multivalent (MV) battery architectures based on pairing a Mg metal anode with a high-voltage (~3 V) intercalation cathode offer a realistic design pathway toward significantly surpassing the energy storage performance of traditional Li-ion-based batteries, but there are currently only few electrolyte systems that support reversible Mg deposition. Using both static first-principles calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics, we perform a comprehensive adsorption study of several salt and solvent species at the interface of Mg metal with an electrolyte of Mg2+ and Cl–dissolved in liquid tetrahydrofuran (THF). Our findings not only provide a picture of the stable species at the interfacemore » but also explain how this system can support reversible Mg deposition, and as such, we provide insights in how to design other electrolytes for Mg plating and stripping. Furthermore, the active depositing species are identified to be (MgCl)+ monomers coordinated by THF, which exhibit preferential adsorption on Mg compared to possible passivating species (such as THF solvent or neutral MgCl2 complexes). We found that upon deposition, the energy to desolvate these adsorbed complexes and facilitate charge transfer is shown to be small (~61–46.2 kJ mol–1 to remove three THF from the strongest adsorbing complex), and the stable orientations of the adsorbed but desolvated (MgCl)+ complexes appear to be favorable for charge transfer. Finally, observations of Mg–Cl dissociation at the Mg surface at very low THF coordinations (0 and 1) suggest that deleterious Cl incorporation in the anode may occur upon plating. In the stripping process, this is beneficial by further facilitating the Mg removal reaction.« less

  11. Understanding the initial stages of reversible Mg deposition and stripping in inorganic nonaqueous electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canepa, Pieremanuele; Gautam, Gopalakrishnan Sai; Malik, Rahul; Jayaraman, Saivenkataraman; Rong, Ziqin; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Persson, Kristin; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2015-04-08

    Multivalent (MV) battery architectures based on pairing a Mg metal anode with a high-voltage (~3 V) intercalation cathode offer a realistic design pathway toward significantly surpassing the energy storage performance of traditional Li-ion-based batteries, but there are currently only few electrolyte systems that support reversible Mg deposition. Using both static first-principles calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics, we perform a comprehensive adsorption study of several salt and solvent species at the interface of Mg metal with an electrolyte of Mg2+ and Cl–dissolved in liquid tetrahydrofuran (THF). Our findings not only provide a picture of the stable species at the interface but also explain how this system can support reversible Mg deposition, and as such, we provide insights in how to design other electrolytes for Mg plating and stripping. Furthermore, the active depositing species are identified to be (MgCl)+ monomers coordinated by THF, which exhibit preferential adsorption on Mg compared to possible passivating species (such as THF solvent or neutral MgCl2 complexes). We found that upon deposition, the energy to desolvate these adsorbed complexes and facilitate charge transfer is shown to be small (~61–46.2 kJ mol–1 to remove three THF from the strongest adsorbing complex), and the stable orientations of the adsorbed but desolvated (MgCl)+ complexes appear to be favorable for charge transfer. Lastly, observations of Mg–Cl dissociation at the Mg surface at very low THF coordinations (0 and 1) suggest that deleterious Cl incorporation in the anode may occur upon plating. In the stripping process, this is beneficial by further facilitating the Mg removal reaction.

  12. Passivation dynamics in the anisotropic deposition and stripping of bulk magnesium electrodes during electrochemical cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wetzel, David J.; Malone, Marvin A.; Haasch, Richard T.; Meng, Yifei; Vieker, Henning; Hahn, Nathan; Golzhauser, Armin; Zuo, Jian-Min; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Gewirth, Andrew A.; et al

    2015-08-10

    Rechargeable magnesium (Mg) batteries show promise for use as a next generation technology for high-density energy storage, though little is known about the Mg anode solid electrolyte interphase and its implications for the performance and durability of a Mg-based battery. We explore in this report passivation effects engendered during the electrochemical cycling of a bulk Mg anode, characterizing their influences during metal deposition and dissolution in a simple, nonaqueous, Grignard electrolyte solution (ethylmagnesium bromide, EtMgBr, in tetrahydrofuran). Scanning electron microscopy images of Mg foil working electrodes after electrochemical polarization to dissolution potentials show the formation of corrosion pits. The pitmore » densities so evidenced are markedly potential-dependent. When the Mg working electrode is cycled both potentiostatically and galvanostatically in EtMgBr these pits, formed due to passive layer breakdown, act as the foci for subsequent electrochemical activity. Detailed microscopy, diffraction, and spectroscopic data show that further passivation and corrosion results in the anisotropic stripping of the Mg {0001} plane, leaving thin oxide-comprising passivated side wall structures that demark the {0001} fiber texture of the etched Mg grains. Upon long-term cycling, oxide side walls formed due to the pronounced crystallographic anisotropy of the anodic stripping processes, leading to complex overlay anisotropic, columnar structures, exceeding 50 μm in height. Finally, the passive responses mediating the growth of these structures appear to be an intrinsic feature of the electrochemical growth and dissolution of Mg using this electrolyte.« less

  13. Understanding the initial stages of reversible Mg deposition and stripping in inorganic nonaqueous electrolytes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Canepa, Pieremanuele; Gautam, Gopalakrishnan Sai; Malik, Rahul; Jayaraman, Saivenkataraman; Rong, Ziqin; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Persson, Kristin; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2015-04-08

    Multivalent (MV) battery architectures based on pairing a Mg metal anode with a high-voltage (~3 V) intercalation cathode offer a realistic design pathway toward significantly surpassing the energy storage performance of traditional Li-ion-based batteries, but there are currently only few electrolyte systems that support reversible Mg deposition. Using both static first-principles calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics, we perform a comprehensive adsorption study of several salt and solvent species at the interface of Mg metal with an electrolyte of Mg2+ and Cl–dissolved in liquid tetrahydrofuran (THF). Our findings not only provide a picture of the stable species at the interfacemore » but also explain how this system can support reversible Mg deposition, and as such, we provide insights in how to design other electrolytes for Mg plating and stripping. Furthermore, the active depositing species are identified to be (MgCl)+ monomers coordinated by THF, which exhibit preferential adsorption on Mg compared to possible passivating species (such as THF solvent or neutral MgCl2 complexes). We found that upon deposition, the energy to desolvate these adsorbed complexes and facilitate charge transfer is shown to be small (~61–46.2 kJ mol–1 to remove three THF from the strongest adsorbing complex), and the stable orientations of the adsorbed but desolvated (MgCl)+ complexes appear to be favorable for charge transfer. Lastly, observations of Mg–Cl dissociation at the Mg surface at very low THF coordinations (0 and 1) suggest that deleterious Cl incorporation in the anode may occur upon plating. In the stripping process, this is beneficial by further facilitating the Mg removal reaction.« less

  14. Summary of the LLNL gasoline spill demonstration - dynamic underground stripping project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.L.; Aines, R.D.

    1995-04-03

    Underground spills of volatile hydrocarbons (solvents or fuels) can be difficult to clean up when the hydrocarbons are present both above and below the water table and are found in relatively impermeable clays. Years of groundwater pumping may not completely remove the contamination. Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the College of Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) have collaborated to develop a technique called Dynamic Underground Stripping to remove localized underground spills in a relatively short time. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management has sponsored a full-scale demonstration of this technique at the LLNL gasoline spill site. When highly concentrated contamination is found above the standing water table, vacuum extraction has been very effective at both removing the contaminant and enhancing biological remediation through the addition of oxygen. Below the water table, however, these advantages cannot be obtained. For such sites where the contamination is too deep for excavation, there are currently no widely applicable cleanup methods. Dynamic Underground Stripping removes separate-phase organic contaminants below the water table by heating the subsurface above the boiling point of water, and then removing both contaminant and water by vacuum extraction. The high temperatures both convert the organic to vapor and enhance other removal paths by increasing diffusion and eliminating sorption. Because this method uses rapid, high-energy techniques in cleaning the soil, it requires an integrated system of underground monitoring and imaging methods to control and evaluate the process in real time.

  15. Understanding the Initial Stages of Reversible Mg Deposition and Stripping in Inorganic Non-Aqueous Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canepa, Pieremanuele; Gautam, Gopalakrishnan Sai; Malik, Rahul; Jayaraman, Saivenkataraman; Rong, Ziqin; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Persson, Kristin; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2015-04-08

    Multivalent (MV) battery architectures based on pairing a Mg metal anode with a high-voltage (~3 V) intercalation cathode offer a realistic design pathway toward significantly surpassing the energy storage performance of traditional Li-ion-based batteries, but there are currently only few electrolyte systems that support reversible Mg deposition. Using both static first-principles calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics, we perform a comprehensive adsorption study of several salt and solvent species at the interface of Mg metal with an electrolyte of Mg2+ and Cldissolved in liquid tetrahydrofuran (THF). Our findings not only provide a picture of the stable species at the interface but also explain how this system can support reversible Mg deposition, and as such, we provide insights in how to design other electrolytes for Mg plating and stripping. Furthermore, the active depositing species are identified to be (MgCl)+ monomers coordinated by THF, which exhibit preferential adsorption on Mg compared to possible passivating species (such as THF solvent or neutral MgCl2 complexes). We found that upon deposition, the energy to desolvate these adsorbed complexes and facilitate charge transfer is shown to be small (~6146.2 kJ mol1 to remove three THF from the strongest adsorbing complex), and the stable orientations of the adsorbed but desolvated (MgCl)+ complexes appear to be favorable for charge transfer. Finally, observations of MgCl dissociation at the Mg surface at very low THF coordinations (0 and 1) suggest that deleterious Cl incorporation in the anode may occur upon plating. In the stripping process, this is beneficial by further facilitating the Mg removal reaction.

  16. USVI Energy Road Map: Charting the Course to a Clean Energy Future (Brochure), EDIN (Energy Development in Island Nations), U.S. Virgin Islands

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USVI Energy Road Map Charting the Course to a Clean Energy Future EDIN Energy Development in Island Nations U.S. Virgin Islands EDIN Energy Development in Island Nations U.S. Virgin Islands EDIN Energy Development in Island Nations EDIN Energy Development in Island Nations U.S. Virgin Islands EDIN Energy Development in Island Nations EDIN Energy Development in Island Nations 1 USVI Energy Road Map Energy transformation. It's an enormous undertaking. One that has been discussed for decades.

  17. photo_org_chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corrective Actions Program LANL TRU Program Repository Science & Operations Business & Project Services Regulatory Management ADEP Environmental Programs Assoc. Director Jeff...

  18. EERE Organization Chart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Transportation EE 3 Reuben Sarkar Deputy Assistant Secretary Office of Renewable Power EE 4 Douglas Hollett Deputy Assistant Secretary Office of Energy Efficiency EE 5 Dr. ...

  19. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INSTITUTE April 1, 2000 - March 31, 2001 Health Physics Rodriguez DIRECTOR Natowitz SEE Line Proj. Manager Clark Horvat Hyman Utley Senior ME Derrig Graduate Students Research Associates Research Scientists Research Group Leaders Administration Harris Wellmann Batson Valerian Deason Computer Syst. Hagel Burch Student Wkrs Senior Acc. Phys. May Acc. Phys. Kim Clark Operations Chief Abegglen Target Maker Utley Building Maintenance Mynar Gallegos Kingsbury Shumbera Electrical Shop Cowden Haisler

  20. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Physics Rodriguez DIRECTOR Tribble SEE Line Proj. Manager Clark Horvat Hyman Utley Senior ME Derrig Graduate Students Research Associates Research Scientists Research Group Leaders Administration/ Accounting Wellmann Computer Systems Hagel Burch Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim Clark Operations Chief Abegglen Target Maker Utley Building Maint. Gallegos Kingsbury Mynar Piolet Shumbera Electrical Shop Cowden Eisenmann Malave Morgan O'Berski Peeler Yendrey Zajicek

  1. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wellmann Computer Systems Hagel Burch Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark Operations Chief Abegglen Target Maker Utley Building Maint. Gallegos Kingsbury Mynar Piolet Shumbera Electrical Shop Cowden Eisenmann Malave Morgan O'Berski Peeler Yendrey Zajicek Student Workers Machine Shop Supervisor Norris Bielamowicz A. Clark Peters Whiteley Wilganowski Mechanical Engineer Olsen Designer II Dewees Designer I Molitor Batson Deason Valerian DIRECTOR Tribble VII-8

  2. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark Operations Chief Abegglen Target Maker Utley Building Maint. Gallegos Kingsbury Mynar Piolet Electrical Shop Cowden Eisenmann Malave Morgan O'Berski Peeler Yendrey Zajicek Student Workers Machine Shop Supervisor Norris Bielamowicz A. Clark Peters Whiteley Wilganowski Mechanical Engineer Olsen Designer II Dewees Designer I Molitor Batson Deason Valerian Student Worker DIRECTOR Tribble VII-10

  3. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Horvat Hyman Utley Senior ME Derrig Graduate Students Research Associates Research Scientists Research Group Leaders Administration/ Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark G. Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Gallegos Kingsbury Mynar Piolet Electrical Shop Andrews Cowden Eisenmann Gathings LaPoint Malave Morgan O'Berski Peeler Sassano Yendrey Zajicek Student Workers Machine Shop Supervisor Norris

  4. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hodges Deason Speikes Student Worker Administration/ Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark G. Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Gallegos Kingsbury Mynar Piolet Electrical Shop Andrews Cowden Eisenmann Gathings LaPoint Malave Morgan O'Berski Peeler Russell Sassano Yendrey Zajicek Student Workers Machine Shop Supervisor Norris Bielamowicz A. Clark Peters Whiteley Sr. Mechanical Engineer Olsen Designer II

  5. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Munsey Speikes Student Worker Administration/ Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark G. Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Gallegos Kingsbury Mynar Piolet Electrical Shop Black Cowden Eisenmann Ford Gathings LaPoint Morgan O'Berski Peeler Russell Sherman Yendrey Zajicek Machine Shop Supervisor Norris Bielamowicz A. Clark Raines Whiteley Udovicic

  6. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 DIRECTOR Tribble SEE Line Proj. Manager H. Clark Brinkley Chubaryan Horvat Hyman Senior ME Derrig Graduate Students Research Associates Research Scientists Research Group Leaders Administration/ Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Gallegos Kingsbury Mynar Piolet Electrical Shop Cowden Eisenmann Ford Gathings LaPoint Law Morgan O'Berski Peeler Russell Sherman Yendrey

  7. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 DIRECTOR Tribble SEE Line Proj. Manager H. Clark Brinkley Chubaryan Horvat Hyman Senior ME Derrig Graduate Students Research Associates Research Scientists Research Group Leaders Administration/ Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Gallegos Kingsbury Mynar Piolet Electrical Shop Cowden Eisenmann Ford Gathings LaPoint Law Morgan O'Berski Peeler Russell Sherman Yendrey

  8. HPC - Platforms Penta Chart

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trujillo, Angelina Michelle

    2015-10-08

    Strategy, Planning, Acquiring- very large scale computing platforms come and go and planning for immensely scalable machines often precedes actual procurement by 3 years. Procurement can be another year or more. Integration- After Acquisition, machines must be integrated into the computing environments at LANL. Connection to scalable storage via large scale storage networking, assuring correct and secure operations. Management and Utilization – Ongoing operations, maintenance, and trouble shooting of the hardware and systems software at massive scale is required.

  9. lead paint chart

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1930 Assume Lead Will WX Disturb Paint? No Yes Will WX Disturb More than 2 ft 2 . per Room? Yes HUD Housing or Using HUD ? Yes More than 50ugm 3 ? No LSW & HUD Rule 35.900 **...

  10. EERE Organization Chart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    title style - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - March 21, 2016 Vehicle Technologies (VTO) EE 3V Christy Cooper Director (Acting) Bioenergy ...

  11. DOE Organizational Chart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secretary Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary Daniel B. Poneman, Deputy Secretary* Melvin G. Williams Jr Associate Deputy Secretary 18 Oct 12 Associate Administrator for Emergency Operations Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security Office of the Under Secretary for Nuclear Security Thomas P. D'Agostino Under Secretary for Nuclear Security * The Deputy Secretary also serves as the Chief Operating Officer Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Deputy Administrator for Naval

  12. EERE Organization Chart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Click to edit Master title style - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Assistant Secretary EE 1 Dr. David Danielson Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary EE 2 Vehicle Technologies (VTO) EE 3V Christy Cooper Director (Acting) Bioenergy Technologies (BETO) EE 3B Dr. Jonathan Male Director Fuel Cells Technologies (FCTO) EE 3F Dr. Sunita Satyapal Director Solar Energy Technologies (SETO) EE 4S Lidija Sekaric Director (Acting) Geothermal Technologies (GTO) EE 4G Dr. Susan

  13. org-chart.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S. Dytman Experimental Liaison Officer (ELO) B. Lee D. Torretta (deputy) Cryogenics B. Norris Division Safety Officer (ND) A. Aparicio Publications Committee Shift Policy Committee ...

  14. Charting a Parallel Course

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Before Parsons came to Los Alamos, he worked at the Naval Proving Ground at Dahlgren, Virginia, with a young Naval Reserve commander named Norris Bradbury. Parsons ordered ...

  15. Charting a Parallel Course

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STEM | National Nuclear Security Administration Charter school on Sandia's doorstep gives students hands-on experience in STEM Wednesday, December 30, 2015 - 9:35am NNSA Blog A math project at the school included cake baking. The approach to education is interdisciplinary, pulling subjects like algebra, physics, and language arts into a single, hands-on assignment. Technology Leadership High School, a public charter located close to Sandia National Laboratories and technology-based

  16. EERE Organization Chart

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EA-48-M El Paso Electric Company EA-48-M El Paso Electric Company Order authorizing El Paso Electric Company to export electric energy to Mexico PDF icon EA-48-M El Paso Electric Company More Documents & Publications EA-48-N El Paso Electric Company Ea-48-L El Paso Electric Company EA-127 SPS Southwestern Public Service

    Meeting October 20, 2011 - Speaker Biographies EAC Meeting October

  17. Description of Chart

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Restructuring by State Map. State: 51 items, 51 with data. Alabama is 0. Value is in the Not Active range, Alabama Deregulation: NO Retail Choice: NO Click for more information (State Restructuring Activities: None since 10/2000), Detail for AL. Arkansas is 9. Value is in the Suspended range, Arkansas Deregulation: SUSPENDED Retail Choice: NO Click for more information (State Restructuring Activities: None since 03/2003), Detail for AR. Arizona is 9. Value is in the Suspended range, Arizona

  18. Business Operations Organization Chart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hine, Director Information and Technology Services Office Steve VonVital, Director (Acting) Workforce Management Office Jennifer Blankenheim, Director Golden Field Office ...

  19. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Systems Hagel Burch Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark G. Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Gallegos Kingsbury Mynar...

  20. Climatic Forecasting of Net Infiltration at Yucca Montain Using Analogue Meteororological Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Faybishenko

    2006-09-11

    At Yucca Mountain, Nevada, future changes in climatic conditions will most likely alter net infiltration, or the drainage below the bottom of the evapotranspiration zone within the soil profile or flow across the interface between soil and the densely welded part of the Tiva Canyon Tuff. The objectives of this paper are to: (a) develop a semi-empirical model and forecast average net infiltration rates, using the limited meteorological data from analogue meteorological stations, for interglacial (present day), and future monsoon, glacial transition, and glacial climates over the Yucca Mountain region, and (b) corroborate the computed net-infiltration rates by comparing them with the empirically and numerically determined groundwater recharge and percolation rates through the unsaturated zone from published data. In this paper, the author presents an approach for calculations of net infiltration, aridity, and precipitation-effectiveness indices, using a modified Budyko's water-balance model, with reference-surface potential evapotranspiration determined from the radiation-based Penman (1948) formula. Results of calculations show that net infiltration rates are expected to generally increase from the present-day climate to monsoon climate, to glacial transition climate, and then to the glacial climate. The forecasting results indicate the overlap between the ranges of net infiltration for different climates. For example, the mean glacial net-infiltration rate corresponds to the upper-bound glacial transition net infiltration, and the lower-bound glacial net infiltration corresponds to the glacial transition mean net infiltration. Forecasting of net infiltration for different climate states is subject to numerous uncertainties-associated with selecting climate analogue sites, using relatively short analogue meteorological records, neglecting the effects of vegetation and surface runoff and runon on a local scale, as well as possible anthropogenic climate changes.

  1. Natural analogue studies of the role of colloids, natural organics and microorganisms on radionuclide transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, J.F.

    1994-10-01

    Colloids may be important as a geochemical transport mechanism for radionuclides at geological repositories if they are (1) present in the groundwater, (2) stable with respect to both colloidal and chemical stabilities, (3) capable of adsorbing radionuclides, especially if the sorption is irreversible, and (4) mobile in the subsurface. The available evidence from natural analogue and other field studies relevant to these issues is reviewed, as is the potential role of mobile microorganisms ({open_quotes}biocolloids{close_quotes}) on radionuclide migration. Studies have demonstrated that colloids are ubiquitous in groundwater, although colloid concentrations in deep, geochemically stable systems may be too low to affect radionuclide transport. However, even low colloid populations cannot be dismissed as a potential concern because colloids appear to be stable, and many radionuclides that adsorb to colloids are not readily desorbed over long periods. Field studies offer somewhat equivocal evidence concerning colloid mobility and cannot prove or disprove the significance of colloid transport in the far-field environment. Additional research is needed at new sites to properly represent a repository far-field. Performance assessment would benefit from natural analogue studies to examine colloid behavior at sites encompassing a suite of probable groundwater chemistries and that mimic the types of formations selected for radioactive waste repositories.

  2. Feasibility study for reconstruction of the reheat furnaces for the 2000 Hot Strip Mill (Novolipetsk Steel Works, Lipetsk, Russia): Final report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a furnace design that would be instrumental in advancing the NLMK 2000 Hot Strip Mill to a level of world class strip mills capable of producing high quality strip with improved energy efficiency and minimal environmental impact. The contents include the following: (1) executive summary; (2) capital cost assessment; (3) project financial analysis; (4) study overview; (5) basic furnace design; (6) silicon design specification; (7) utilities; (8) NOx reduction technologies for reheat furnaces; (9) site investigation and construction schedule; (10) hot connect.

  3. The impedance problem of wave diffraction by a strip with higher order boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, L. P.; Simões, A. M.

    2013-10-17

    This work is devoted to analyse an impedance boundary-transmission problem for the Helmholtz equation originated by a problem of wave diffraction by an infinite strip with higher order imperfect boundary conditions. A constructive approach of operator relations is built, which allows a transparent interpretation of the problem in an operator theory framework. In particular, different types of operator relations are exhibited for different types of operators acting between Lebesgue and Sobolev spaces on a finite interval and the positive half-line. All this has consequences in the understanding of the structure of this type of problems. In particular, a Fredholm characterization of the problem is obtained in terms of the initial space order parameters. At the request of the author and the Proceedings Editor the above article has been replaced with a corrected version. The original PDF file supplied to AIP Publishing contained an error in the title of the article. The original title appeared as: 'The Impedance Problem of Wave Diffraction by a trip with Higher Order Boundary Conditions.' This article has been replaced and the title now appears correctly online. The corrected article was published on 8 November 2013.

  4. Influence of H/sub 2/ stripping on methane production in conventional digesters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poels, J.; Van Assche, P.; Verstraete, W.

    1985-12-01

    Hydrogen is a central metabolite in the methanization process. In this study the partial pressure of hydrogen in the gas phase of laboratory manure digesters was monitored over extensive periods of time and found to vary between 50 and 100.10/sup -6/ atm. By sparging the gas phase of the digester through an auxiliary reactor, hydrogenotrophic methanogens were allowed to develop at the expense of hydrogen and carbon dioxide present in the biogas, independently of the liquid or cell residence time in the main reactor. By scrubbing ca. 100 volumes of biogas per liter reactor per day through an auxiliary reactor, hydrogen concentration could be decreased maximally 25%. This resulted in an increase in the gas production rate of the main digester of ca. 10% and a concomitant improved removal of volatile fatty acids from the mixed liquor. The results obtained indicate that considerable stripping of hydrogen from the digester could be achieved at acceptable energy expenditure. However, the microbial removal of the hydrogen at these low concentrations is extremely slow and limits the applicability of this approach.

  5. MULTI-COLOR OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED LIGHT CURVES OF 64 STRIPPED-ENVELOPE CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bianco, F. B.; Modjaz, M. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Hicken, M.; Friedman, A.; Kirshner, R. P.; Challis, P.; Marion, G. H. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bloom, J. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Wood-Vasey, W. M. [PITT PACC, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 3941 O'Hara Street, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Rest, A., E-mail: fb55@nyu.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We present a densely sampled, homogeneous set of light curves of 64 low-redshift (z ? 0.05) stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe of Type IIb, Ib, Ic, and Ic-BL). These data were obtained between 2001 and 2009 at the Fred L. Whipple Observatory (FLWO) on Mount Hopkins in Arizona, with the optical FLWO 1.2 m and the near-infrared (NIR) Peters Automated Infrared 1.3 m telescopes. Our data set consists of 4543 optical photometric measurements on 61 SNe, including a combination of U BV RI, U BV r{sup ?}i{sup ?}, and u{sup ?} BV r{sup ?}i{sup ?}, and 1919 JHK{sub s} NIR measurements on 25 SNe. This sample constitutes the most extensive multi-color data set of stripped-envelope SNe to date. Our photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host-galaxy light contamination. This work presents these photometric data, compares them with data in the literature, and estimates basic statistical quantities: date of maximum, color, and photometric properties. We identify promising color trends that may permit the identification of stripped-envelope SN subtypes from their photometry alone. Many of these SNe were observed spectroscopically by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) SN group, and the spectra are presented in a companion paper. A thorough exploration that combines the CfA photometry and spectroscopy of stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe will be presented in a follow-up paper.

  6. Hadron-therapy beam monitoring: Towards a new generation of ultra-thin p-type silicon strip detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouterfa, M.; Aouadi, K.; Bertrand, D.; Olbrechts, B.; Delamare, R.; Raskin, J. P.; Gil, E. C.; Flandre, D.

    2011-07-01

    Hadron-therapy has gained increasing interest for cancer treatment especially within the last decade. System commissioning and quality assurance procedures impose to monitor the particle beam using 2D dose measurements. Nowadays, several monitoring systems exist for hadron-therapy but all show a relatively high influence on the beam properties: indeed, most devices consist of several layers of materials that degrade the beam through scattering and energy losses. For precise treatment purposes, ultra-thin silicon strip detectors are investigated in order to reduce this beam scattering. We assess the beam size increase provoked by the Multiple Coulomb Scattering when passing through Si, to derive a target thickness. Monte-Carlo based simulations show a characteristic scattering opening angle lower than 1 mrad for thicknesses below 20 {mu}m. We then evaluated the fabrication process feasibility. We successfully thinned down silicon wafers to thicknesses lower than 10 {mu}m over areas of several cm{sup 2}. Strip detectors are presently being processed and they will tentatively be thinned down to 20 {mu}m. Moreover, two-dimensional TCAD simulations were carried out to investigate the beam detector performances on p-type Si substrates. Additionally, thick and thin substrates have been compared thanks to electrical simulations. Reducing the pitch between the strips increases breakdown voltage, whereas leakage current is quite insensitive to strips geometrical configuration. The samples are to be characterized as soon as possible in one of the IBA hadron-therapy facilities. For hadron-therapy, this would represent a considerable step forward in terms of treatment precision. (authors)

  7. Multi-wavelength studies of spectacular ram-pressure stripping of a galaxy. II. Star formation in the tail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yagi, Masafumi; Gu, Liyi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Makishima, Kazuo; Fujita, Yutaka; Akahori, Takuya; Hattori, Takashi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2013-12-01

    With multiband photometric data in public archives, we detected four intracluster star-forming regions in the Virgo Cluster. Two of them were at a projected distance of 35 kpc from NGC 4388 and the other two were 66 kpc away. Our new spectroscopic observations revealed that their recessional velocities were comparable to the ram-pressure-stripped tail of NGC 4388 and confirmed the association. The stellar mass of the star-forming regions ranged from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 4.5} M {sub ?} except for that of the faintest one, which was <10{sup 3} M {sub ?}. The metallicity was comparable to a solar abundance and the age of the stars was ?10{sup 6.8} yr. Their young stellar age meant that the star formation should have started after the gas was stripped from NGC 4388. This implied in situ condensation of the stripped gas. We also found that two star-forming regions were located near the leading edge of a filamentary dark cloud. The extinction of the filament was smaller than that derived from the Balmer decrement of the star-forming regions, implying that the dust in the filament would be locally dense around the star-forming regions.

  8. Alternatives to Nitric Acid Stripping in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process for Cesium Removal from Alkaline High-Level Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Haverlock, Tamara; Bazelaire, Eve; Bonnesen, Peter V; Ditto, Mary E; Moyer, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    Effective alternatives to nitric acid stripping in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent have been demonstrated in this work. The CSSX solvent employs calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-18-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) as the cesium extractant in a modified alkane diluent for decontamination of alkaline high-level wastes. Results reported in this paper support the idea that replacement of the nitrate anion by a much more hydrophilic anion like borate can substantially lower cesium distribution ratios on stripping. Without any other change in the CSSX flowsheet, however, the use of a boric acid stripping solution in place of the 1 mM nitric acid solution used in the CSSX process marginally, though perhaps still usefully, improves stripping. The less-than-expected improvement was explained by the carryover of nitrate from scrubbing into stripping. Accordingly, more effective stripping is obtained after a scrub of the solvent with 0.1 M sodium hydroxide. Functional alternatives to boric acid include sodium bicarbonate or cesium hydroxide as strip solutions. Profound stripping improvement is achieved when trioctylamine, one of the components of the CSSX solvent, is replaced with a commercial guanidine reagent (LIX 79). The more basic guanidine affords greater latitude in selection of aqueous conditions in that it protonates even at mildly alkaline pH values. Under process-relevant conditions, cesium distributions on stripping are decreased on the order of 100-fold compared with current CSSX performance. The extraction properties of the solvent were preserved unchanged over three successive extract-scrub-strip cycles. From the point of view of compatibility with downstream processing, boric acid represents an attractive stripping agent, as it is also a potentially ideal feed for borosilicate vitrification of the separated 137Cs product stream. Possibilities for use of these results toward a dramatically better next-generation CSSX process, possibly one employing the more soluble cesium extractant calix[4]arene-bis(2 ethylhexylbenzo-18-crown-6) (BEHBCalixC6) are discussed.

  9. Process Flow Chart for Immobilizing of Radioactive High Concentration Sodium Hydroxide Product from the Sodium Processing Facility at the BN-350 Nuclear power plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkitbayev, M.; Omarova, K.; Tolebayev, T.; Galkin, A.; Bachilova, N.; Blynskiy, A.; Maev, V.; Wells, D.; Herrick, A.; Michelbacher, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a joint research investigations carried out by the group of Kazakhstan, British and American specialists in development of a new material for immobilization of radioactive 35% sodium hydroxide solutions from the sodium coolant processing facility of the BN-350 nuclear power plant. The resulting solid matrix product, termed geo-cement stone, is capable of isolating long lived radionuclides from the environment. The physico-mechanical properties of geo-cement stone have been investigated and the flow chart for its production verified in a full scale experiments. (author)

  10. Development of a novel depth of interaction PET detector using highly multiplexed G-APD cross-strip encoding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolb, A. Parl, C.; Liu, C. C.; Pichler, B. J.; Mantlik, F.; Lorenz, E.; Renker, D.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a prototype PET detector module for a combined small animal positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) system. The most important factor for small animal imaging applications is the detection sensitivity of the PET camera, which can be optimized by utilizing longer scintillation crystals. At the same time, small animal PET systems must yield a high spatial resolution. The measured object is very close to the PET detector because the bore diameter of a high field animal MR scanner is limited. When used in combination with long scintillation crystals, these small-bore PET systems generate parallax errors that ultimately lead to a decreased spatial resolution. Thus, we developed a depth of interaction (DoI) encoding PET detector module that has a uniform spatial resolution across the whole field of view (FOV), high detection sensitivity, compactness, and insensitivity to magnetic fields. Methods: The approach was based on Geiger mode avalanche photodiode (G-APD) detectors with cross-strip encoding. The number of readout channels was reduced by a factor of 36 for the chosen block elements. Two 12 × 2 G-APD strip arrays (25μm cells) were placed perpendicular on each face of a 12 × 12 lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal block with a crystal size of 1.55 × 1.55 × 20 mm. The strip arrays were multiplexed into two channels and used to calculate the x, y coordinates for each array and the deposited energy. The DoI was measured in step sizes of 1.8 mm by a collimated {sup 18}F source. The coincident resolved time (CRT) was analyzed at all DoI positions by acquiring the waveform for each event and applying a digital leading edge discriminator. Results: All 144 crystals were well resolved in the crystal flood map. The average full width half maximum (FWHM) energy resolution of the detector was 12.8% ± 1.5% with a FWHM CRT of 1.14 ± 0.02 ns. The average FWHM DoI resolution over 12 crystals was 2.90 ± 0.15 mm. Conclusions: The novel DoI PET detector, which is based on strip G-APD arrays, yielded a DoI resolution of 2.9 mm and excellent timing and energy resolution. Its high multiplexing factor reduces the number of electronic channels. Thus, this cross-strip approach enables low-cost, high-performance PET detectors for dedicated small animal PET and PET/MRI and potentially clinical PET/MRI systems.

  11. Characterization of a double-sided silicon strip detector autoradiography system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Örbom, Anders Ahlstedt, Jonas; Östlund, Karl; Strand, Sven-Erik; Serén, Tom; Auterinen, Iiro; Kotiluoto, Petri; Hauge, Håvard; Olafsen, Tove; Wu, Anna M.; Dahlbom, Magnus

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The most commonly used technology currently used for autoradiography is storage phosphor screens, which has many benefits such as a large field of view but lacks particle-counting detection of the time and energy of each detected radionuclide decay. A number of alternative designs, using either solid state or scintillator detectors, have been developed to address these issues. The aim of this study is to characterize the imaging performance of one such instrument, a double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSD) system for digital autoradiography. A novel aspect of this work is that the instrument, in contrast to previous prototype systems using the same detector type, provides the ability for user accessible imaging with higher throughput. Studies were performed to compare its spatial resolution to that of storage phosphor screens and test the implementation of multiradionuclide ex vivo imaging in a mouse preclinical animal study. Methods: Detector background counts were determined by measuring a nonradioactive sample slide for 52 h. Energy spectra and detection efficiency were measured for seven commonly used radionuclides under representative conditions for tissue imaging. System dead time was measured by imaging {sup 18}F samples of at least 5 kBq and studying the changes in count rate over time. A line source of {sup 58}Co was manufactured by irradiating a 10 μm nickel wire with fast neutrons in a research reactor. Samples of this wire were imaged in both the DSSD and storage phosphor screen systems and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) measured for the line profiles. Multiradionuclide imaging was employed in a two animal study to examine the intratumoral distribution of a {sup 125}I-labeled monoclonal antibody and a {sup 131}I-labeled engineered fragment (diabody) injected in the same mouse, both targeting carcinoembryonic antigen. Results: Detector background was 1.81 × 10{sup −6} counts per second per 50 × 50 μm pixel. Energy spectra and detection efficiency were successfully measured for seven radionuclides. The system dead time was measured to be 59 μs, and FWHM for a {sup 58}Co line source was 154 ± 14 μm for the DSSD system and 343 ± 15 μm for the storage phosphor system. Separation of the contributions from {sup 125}I and {sup 131}I was performed on autoradiography images of tumor sections. Conclusions: This study has shown that a DSSD system can be beneficially applied for digital autoradiography with simultaneous multiradionuclide imaging capability. The system has a low background signal, ability to image both low and high activity samples, and a good energy resolution.

  12. Nanodiamond Foils for H- Stripping to Support the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and Related Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vispute, R D; Ermer, Henry K; Sinsky, Phillip; Seiser, Andrew; Shaw, Robert W; Wilson, Leslie L; Harris, Gary; Piazza, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Thin diamond foils are needed in many particle accelerator experiments regarding nuclear and atomic physics, as well as in some interdisciplinary research. Particularly, nanodiamond texture is attractive for this purpose as it possesses a unique combination of diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and high radiation hardness; therefore, it is a potential material for energetic ion beam stripper foils. At the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the installed set of foils must be able to survive a nominal five-month operation period, without the need for unscheduled costly shutdowns and repairs. Thus, a single nanodiamond foil about the size of a postage stamp is critical to the entire operation of SNS and similar sources in U.S. laboratories and around the world. We are investigating nanocrystalline, polycrystalline and their admixture films fabricated using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system for H- stripping to support the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here we discuss optimization of process variables such as substrate temperature, process gas ratio of H2/Ar/CH4, substrate to filament distance, filament temperature, carburization conditions, and filament geometry to achieve high purity diamond foils on patterned silicon substrates with manageable intrinsic and thermal stresses so that they can be released as free standing foils without curling. An in situ laser reflectance interferometry tool (LRI) is used for monitoring the growth characteristics of the diamond thin film materials. The optimization process has yielded free standing foils with no pinholes. The sp3/sp2 bonds are controlled to optimize electrical resistivity to reduce the possibility of surface charging of the foils. The integrated LRI and HFCVD process provides real time information on the growth of films and can quickly illustrate growth features and control over film thickness. The results are discussed in the light of development of nanodiamond foils that will be able to withstand a few MW proton beam and hopefully will be able to be used after possible future upgrades to the SNS to greater than a 3MW beam.

  13. Heterogeneous seepage at the Nopal I natural analogue site, Chihuahua, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Cook, Paul J.; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Rodriguez, J. Alfredo; Villalba, Lourdes; de la Garza, Rodrigo

    2008-10-25

    An integrated field, laboratory, and modeling study of the Pena Blanca (Chihuahua, Mexico) natural analogue site is being conducted to evaluate processes that control the mobilization and transport of radionuclides from a uranium ore deposit. One component of this study is an evaluation of the potential for radionuclide transport through the unsaturated zone (UZ) via a seepage study in an adit at the Nopal I uranium mine, excavated 10 m below a mined level surface. Seasonal rainfall on the exposed level surface infiltrates into the fractured rhyolitic ash-flow tuff and seeps into the adit. An instrumented seepage collection system and local automated weather station permit direct correlation between local precipitation events and seepage within the Nopal I +00 adit. Monitoring of seepage within the adit between April 2005 and December 2006 indicates that seepage is highly heterogeneous with respect to time, location, and quantity. Within the back adit area, a few zones where large volumes of water have been collected are linked to fast flow path fractures (0-4 h transit times) presumably associated with focused flow. In most locations, however, there is a 1-6 month time lag between major precipitation events and seepage within the adit, with longer residence times observed for the front adit area. Seepage data obtained from this study will be used to provide input to flow and transport models being developed for the Nopal I hydrogeologic system.

  14. Parallel Configuration For Fast Superconducting Strip Line Detectors With Very Large Area In Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casaburi, A.; Zen, N.; Suzuki, K.; Ohkubo, M.; Ejrnaes, M.; Cristiano, R.; Pagano, S.

    2009-12-16

    We realized a very fast and large Superconducting Strip Line Detector based on a parallel configuration of nanowires. The detector with size 200x200 {mu}m{sup 2} recorded a sub-nanosecond pulse width of 700 ps in FWHM (400 ps rise time and 530 ps relaxation time) for lysozyme monomers/multimers molecules accelerated at 175 keV in a Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer. This record is the best in the class of superconducting detectors and comparable with the fastest NbN superconducting single photon detector of 10x10 {mu}m{sup 2}. We succeeded in acquiring mass spectra as the first step for a scale-up to {approx}mm pixel size for high throughput MS analysis, while keeping a fast response.

  15. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in landfill leachate during the combined treatment process of air stripping, Fenton, SBR and coagulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, ZhiPing; Wu, WenHui; Shi, Ping; Guo, JinSong; Cheng, Jin

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • DOM fractions spectra analysis during the whole treatment process. • Efficient method was achieved to remove organic matters in landfill leachate. • Molecular weight distribution and fractions were discussed. - Abstract: A combined treatment process of air stripping + Fenton + sequencing batch reactor (SBR)+ coagulation was performed to remove the pollutants in landfill leachate. Molecular weight (MW) distribution and fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were discussed to study the characteristics. The experiment showed that the removal rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD), five day biological oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}) and ammonia nitrogen (NH{sub 3}−N) by the combined process were 92.8%, 87.8% and 98.0%, respectively. Humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) were the main fractions in raw leachate with 81.8% of the total COD concentration, while hydrophilic organic matter (HyI) was the dominant fraction in the final effluent of the combined process with 63.5% of the total COD concentration. After the combined treatment process, the removal rate of DOM and fractions HA, FA, HyI were 91.9%, 97.1%, 95.8% and 71.7%, respectively. Organic matters of MW < 2 k and MW > 100 k were removed with 90.5% and 97.9% COD concentration after the treatment. The ultraviolet–visible spectra (UV–vis), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) and three-dimensional excitation-emission matrices spectra (EEMs) indicated that benzene materials and phenol compounds were preferentially removed in air stripping. High MW matters, aromatic rings, conjugated moieties and some functional groups were mainly removed by Fenton. While small MW fractions, carboxylic acids, alcohols and protein-like materials were preferentially biodegraded via SBR. Fulvic-like and humic-like materials were mainly destroyed via Fenton oxidation and coagulation.

  16. Magnetic Fe3O4@TiO2 Nanoparticles-based Test Strip Immunosensing Device for Rapid Detection of Phosphorylated Butyrylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ge, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Weiying; Lin, Yuehe; Du, Dan

    2013-12-15

    An integrated magnetic nanoparticles-based test-strip immunosensing device was developed for rapid and sensitive quantification of phosphorylated butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), the biomarker of exposure to organophosphous pesticides (OP), in human plasma. In order to overcome the difficulty in scarce availability of OP-specific antibody, here magnetic Fe3O4@TiO2 nanoparticles were used and adsorbed on the test strip through a small magnet inserted in the device to capture target OP-BChE through selective binding between TiO2 and OP moiety. Further recognition was completed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and anti-BChE antibody (Ab) co-immobilized gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Their strong affinities among Fe3O4@TiO2, OP-BChE and HRP/Ab-GNPs were characterized by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and square wave voltammetry (SWV) measurements. After cutting off from test strip, the resulted immunocomplex (HRP/Ab-GNPs/OP-BChE/Fe3O4@TiO2) was measured by SWV using a screen printed electrode under the test zone. Greatly enhanced sensitivity was achieved by introduction of GNPs to link enzyme and antibody at high ratio, which amplifies electrocatalytic signal significantly. Moreover, the use of test strip for fast immunoreactions reduces analytical time remarkably. Coupling with a portable electrochemical detector, the integrated device with advanced nanotechnology displays great promise for sensitive, rapid and in-filed on-site evaluation of OP poisoning.

  17. RESULTS FROM ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST AND SECOND STRIP EFFLUENT COALESCER ELEMENTS FROM RADIOACTIVE OPERATIONS OF THE MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-06-28

    The coalescer elements for the Strip Effluent (SE) acid within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) experienced elevated differential pressure drop during radioactive operations. Following the end of operations for the first Macrobatch campaign and soon after start of the second Macrobatch campaign, personnel removed the coalescer media and provided to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for diagnostic investigation of the causes of reduced flow. This report summarizes those studies. Two Strip Effluent (SE) coalescers were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). One was removed from the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) between processing of Macrobatch 1 and 2 (coalescer 'Alpha'), and the second was removed from MCU after processing of {approx}24,000 gallons of salt solution (coalescer 'Beta'). Both coalescers underwent the same general strip acid flush program to reduce the dose and were delivered to SRNL for analysis of potential occluding solids. Analysis of Coalescer Alpha indicates the presence of aluminum hydroxide solids and aluminosilicate solids, while analysis of Coalescer Beta indicates the presence of aluminum hydroxide solids, but no aluminosilicates. Leaching studies on sections of both coalescers were performed. The results indicate that the coalescers had different amounts of solids present on them at the time of removal. Finally, samples of free liquids retrieved from both coalescers indicate no excessive amounts of CSSX solvent present. Given the strip acid flushing that occurred in the SE coalescers, the solids we detected on the coalescers are probably indicative of a larger quantity of these solids present before the strip acid flushing. Under this scenario, the excessive pressure drops are due to the solids and not from organic fouling.

  18. A natural analogue for high-level waste in tuff: Chemical analysis and modeling of the Valles site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stockman, H.W.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Ho, C.K.; Kovach, L.; McConnell, V.S.

    1995-03-01

    The contact between an obsidian flow and a steep-walled tuff canyon was examined as an analogue for a high-level waste repository. The analogue site is located in the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, where a massive obsidian flow filled a paleocanyon in the Battleship Rock Tuff. The obsidian flow provided a heat source, analogous to waste panels or an igneous intrusion in a repository, and caused evaporation and migration of water. The tuff and obsidian samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and mineralogy by INAA, XRF, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe. Samples were also analyzed for D/H and {sup 39}Ar/{sup 40}Ar isotopic composition. Overall, the effects of the heating event seem to have been slight and limited to the tuff nearest the contact. There is some evidence of devitrification and migration of volatiles in the tuff within 10 m of the contact, but variations in major and trace element chemistry are small and difficult to distinguish from the natural (pre-heating) variability of the rocks.

  19. PIC Transcribed Flip Chart Notes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 31, 2012 Options - Response to SOS Advice 1. Have some smaller topical workshops that don't require agency decision-makers. Still reaching the "new" general audiences 2. Need guidelines/checklist a. How meetings set up, how process worked, etc.  measuring consistently (advice point 3) Page 1 Options - Response to SOS Advice (continued) 3. (Advice point 3 response) trying to say that for meetings being planned, consider these factors in the planning process, responding to

  20. PIC Transcribed Flip Chart Notes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    funding Page 2 SOS Meetings (continued) 3. Location: a. Portland (Hanford Watch, ODOE, PSR, CRK) b. Seattle (Hanford Challenge) c. Hood River (CRK) d. Tri-Cities (LOWV) Page 3...

  1. DOE-ID Organization Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last Updated: 11/14/2011

  2. CNMS Operational Organization Chart: Details

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kalinin* Numan Laanait (5) An-Ping Li Peter Maksymovych Alexander Tselev (1) Sangmo Yang (3) Postdocs: Ye Cao, Marius Chyasnavichyus, Liam Collins, Jeremy Come, Saban Hus,...

  3. organization_chartApril2016

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration Adam Sieminski Deputy Administrator Howard Gruenspecht Assistant Administrator for Energy Statistics Stephen Harvey Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis John Conti Assistant Administrator for Communications Gina Pearson Assistant Administrator for Resource and Technology Management Stephen Nalley O ce of Survey Development and Statistical Integration Nanda Srinivasan O ce of Energy Markets and Financial Analysis Lynn Westfall O ce of

  4. Results of Hg speciation testing on MCU strip effluent hold tank (SEHT) and decontaminated salt solution hold tank (DSSHT) materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2015-09-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team.i,ii The tenth shipment of samples was designated to include Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and MCU Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) materials from processing Salt Batch 7b. The MCU SEHT (MCU-15-722) and DSSHT (MCU-15-709) samples were pulled on June 15, 2015. All MCU samples were received at SRNL on June 16, 2015. The DSSHT sample was moved the same day to refrigeration, while the SEHT sample was placed in the Shielded Cells. On July 9, 2015 it was opened and an aliquot diluted 1:100 with Eurofins deionized water and a portion of the diluted sample transferred to a Teflon® bottle prior to moving it to refrigeration that same day. All samples were kept in the dark and refrigerated until final dilutions were prepared for shipment to Eurofins.

  5. Examples of Department of Energy Successes for Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater: Permeable Reactive Barrier and Dynamic Underground Stripping ASTD Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purdy, C.; Gerdes, K.; Aljayoushi, J.; Kaback, D.; Ivory, T.

    2002-02-27

    Since 1998, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management has funded the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Program to expedite deployment of alternative technologies that can save time and money for the environmental cleanup at DOE sites across the nation. The ASTD program has accelerated more than one hundred deployments of new technologies under 76 projects that focus on a broad spectrum of EM problems. More than 25 environmental restoration projects have been initiated to solve the following types of problems: characterization of the subsurface using chemical, radiological, geophysical, and statistical methods; treatment of groundwater contaminated with DNAPLs, metals, or radionuclides; and other projects such as landfill covers, purge water management systems, and treatment of explosives-contaminated soils. One of the major goals of the ASTD Program is to deploy a new technology or process at multiple DOE sites. ASTD projects are encouraged to identify subsequent deployments at other sites. Some of the projects that have successfully deployed technologies at multiple sites focusing on cleanup of contaminated groundwater include: Permeable Reactive Barriers (Monticello, Rocky Flats, and Kansas City), treating uranium and organics in groundwater; and Dynamic Underground Stripping (Portsmouth, and Savannah River), thermally treating DNAPL source zones. Each year more and more new technologies and approaches are being used at DOE sites due to the ASTD program. DOE sites are sharing their successes and communicating lessons learned so that the new technologies can replace the baseline or standard approaches at DOE sites, thus expediting cleanup and saving money.

  6. Nanoparticle-Based Immunochromatographic Test Strip with Fluorescent Detector for Quantification of Phosphorylated Acetycholinesterase: An Exposure Biomarker of Organophosphorous Agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Weiying; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Tang, Yong; Du, Dan; Liu, Deli; Lin, Yuehe

    2013-09-21

    A nanoparticle-based fluorescence immunochromatographic test strip (FITS) coupled with a hand-held detector for highly selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an exposure biomarker of organophosphate (OP) pesticides and nerve agents, is reported. In this approach, OP-AChE adducts were selectively captured by quantum dot-tagged anti-AChE antibodies (Qdot-anti-AChE) and zirconia nanoparticles (ZrO2 NPs). The sandwich-like immunoreactions were performed among the Qdot-anti-AChE, OP-AChE and ZrO2 NPs to form Qdot-anti-AChE/OP-AChE/ZrO2 complex, which was detected by recording the fluorescence intensity of Qdot captured on the test line. Paraoxon was used as the model OP pesticides. Under optimal conditions, this portable FITS immunosensor demonstrates a highly linear absorption response over the range of 0.01 nM to 10 nM OP-AChE, with a detection limit of 4 pM, coupled with a good reproducibility. Moreover, the FITS immunosensor has been validated with OP-AChE spiked human plasma samples. This is the first report on the development of ZrO2 NPs-based FITS for detection of OP-AChE adduct. The FITS immunosensor provides a sensitive and low-cost sensing platform for on-site screening/evaluating OP pesticides and nerve agents poisoning.

  7. The search for shock-excited H{sub 2} in Virgo spirals experiencing ram pressure stripping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, O. Ivy; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.; Murphy, Eric J.; Helou, George

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the presence of shock-excited H{sub 2} in four Virgo cluster galaxies that show clear evidence of ongoing ram pressure stripping. Mid-infrared spectral mapping of the rotational H{sub 2} emission lines were performed using the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. We target four regions along the leading side of galaxies where the intracluster medium appears to be pushing back the individual galaxy's interstellar medium. For comparison purposes, we also study two regions on the trailing side of these galaxies: a region within an edge-on disk and an extraplanar star-forming region. We find a factor of 2.6 excess of warm H{sub 2}/PAH in our sample relative to the observed fractions in other nearby galaxies. We attribute the H{sub 2}/PAH excess to contributions of shock-excited H{sub 2} which is likely to have been triggered by ongoing ram pressure interaction in our sample galaxies. Ram pressure driven shocks may also be responsible for the elevated ratios of [Fe II]/[Ne II] found in our sample.

  8. From micro- to nano-scale molding of metals : size effect during molding of single crystal Al with rectangular strip punches.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.; Meng, W. J.; Mei, F.; Hiller, J.; Miller, D. J. (Materials Science Division); (Louisiana State Univ.); (Enervana Tech. LLC)

    2011-02-01

    A single crystal Al specimen was molded at room temperature with long, rectangular, strip diamond punches. Quantitative molding response curves were obtained at a series of punch widths, ranging from 5 {micro}m to 550 nm. A significant size effect was observed, manifesting itself in terms of significantly increasing characteristic molding pressure as the punch width decreases to 1.5 {micro}m and below. A detailed comparison of the present strip punch molding results was made with Berkovich pyramidal indentation on the same single crystal Al specimen. The comparison reveals distinctly different dependence of the characteristic pressure on corresponding characteristic length. The present results show the feasibility of micro-/nano-scale compression molding as a micro-/nano-fabrication technique, and offer an experimental test case for size-dependent plasticity theories.

  9. Nanostructured self-assembly materials from neat and aqueous solutions of C18 lipid pro-drug analogues of Capecitabine?a chemotherapy agent. Focus on nanoparticulate cubosomes? of the oleyl analogue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Xiaojuan; Moghaddam, Minoo J.; Sagnella, Sharon M.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Mulet, Xavier; Danon, Stephen J.; Waddington, Lynne J.; Drummond, Calum J.

    2014-09-24

    A series of prodrug analogues based on the established chemotherapy agent, 5-fluorouracil, have been prepared and characterized. C18 alkyl and alkenyl chains with increasing degree of unsaturation were attached to the N{sup 4} position of the 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) base via a carbamate bond. Physicochemical characterization of the prodrug analogues was carried out using a combination of differential scanning calorimetry, cross-polarized optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and small-angle X-ray scattering. The presence of a monounsaturated oleyl chain was found to promote lyotropic liquid crystalline phase formation in excess water with a fluid lamellar phase observed at room temperature and one or more bicontinuous cubic phases at 37 C. The bulk phase was successfully dispersed into liposomes or cubosomes at room and physiological temperature respectively. In vitro toxicity of the nanoparticulate 5-FCOle dispersions was evaluated against several normal and cancer cell types over a 48 h period and exhibited an IC{sub 50} of 100 {micro}M against all cell types. The in vivo efficacy of 5-FCOle cubosomes was assessed against the highly aggressive mouse 4T1 breast cancer model and compared to Capecitabine (a water-soluble commercially available 5-FU prodrug) delivered at the same dosages. After 21 days of treatment, the 0.5 mmol 5-FCOle treatment group exhibited a significantly smaller average tumour volume than all other treatment groups including Capecitabine at similar dosage. These results exemplify the potential of self-assembled amphiphile prodrugs for delivery of bioactives in vivo.

  10. RESULTS OF THE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING USING AN IMPROVED SOLVENT FORMULATION AND SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SIMULATED WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-09

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent - also known as the next generation solvent (NGS) - for deployment at the Savannah River Site to remove cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As part of the program, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed a number of Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests. These batch contact tests serve as first indicators of the cesium mass transfer solvent performance with actual or simulated waste. The test detailed in this report used simulated Tank 49H material, with the addition of extra potassium. The potassium was added at 1677 mg/L, the maximum projected (i.e., a worst case feed scenario) value for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The results of the test gave favorable results given that the potassium concentration was elevated (1677 mg/L compared to the current 513 mg/L). The cesium distribution value, DCs, for extraction was 57.1. As a comparison, a typical D{sub Cs} in an ESS test, using the baseline solvent formulation and the typical waste feed, is {approx}15. The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) uses the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process to remove cesium (Cs) from alkaline waste. This process involves the use of an organic extractant, BoBCalixC6, in an organic matrix to selectively remove cesium from the caustic waste. The organic solvent mixture flows counter-current to the caustic aqueous waste stream within centrifugal contactors. After extracting the cesium, the loaded solvent is stripped of cesium by contact with dilute nitric acid and the cesium concentrate is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), while the organic solvent is cleaned and recycled for further use. The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), under construction, will use the same process chemistry. The Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) expressed an interest in investigating the further optimization of the organic solvent by replacing the BoBCalixC6 extractant with a more efficient extractant. This replacement should yield dividends in improving cesium removal from the caustic waste stream, and in the rate at which the caustic waste can be processed. To that end, EM-31 provided funding for both the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SRNL wrote a Task Technical Quality and Assurance Plan for this work. As part of the envisioned testing regime, it was decided to perform an ESS test using a simulated waste that simulated a typical envisioned SWPF feed, but with added potassium to make the waste more challenging. Potassium interferes in the cesium removal, and its concentration is limited in the feed to <1950 mg/L. The feed to MCU has typically contained <500 mg/L of potassium.

  11. Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process-Based Technology for CO₂ Capture from Post-Combustion Flue Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shiaoguo

    2015-09-30

    A novel Gas Pressurized Stripping (GPS) post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) process has been developed by Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC, CONSOL Energy Inc., Nexant Inc., and Western Kentucky University in this bench-scale project. The GPS-based process presents a unique approach that uses a gas pressurized technology for CO₂ stripping at an elevated pressure to overcome the energy use and other disadvantages associated with the benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) process. The project was aimed at performing laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to prove its technical feasibility and generate process engineering and scale-up data, and conducting a techno-economic analysis (TEA) to demonstrate its energy use and cost competitiveness over the MEA process. To meet project goals and objectives, a combination of experimental work, process simulation, and technical and economic analysis studies were applied. The project conducted individual unit lab-scale tests for major process components, including a first absorption column, a GPS column, a second absorption column, and a flasher. Computer simulations were carried out to study the GPS column behavior under different operating conditions, to optimize the column design and operation, and to optimize the GPS process for an existing and a new power plant. The vapor-liquid equilibrium data under high loading and high temperature for the selected amines were also measured. The thermal and oxidative stability of the selected solvents were also tested experimentally and presented. A bench-scale column-based unit capable of achieving at least 90% CO₂ capture from a nominal 500 SLPM coal-derived flue gas slipstream was designed and built. This integrated, continuous, skid-mounted GPS system was tested using real flue gas from a coal-fired boiler at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The technical challenges of the GPS technology in stability, corrosion, and foaming of selected solvents, and environmental, health and safety risks have been addressed through experimental tests, consultation with vendors and engineering analysis. Multiple rounds of TEA were performed to improve the GPS-based PCC process design and operation, and to compare the energy use and cost performance of a nominal 550-MWe supercritical pulverized coal (PC) plant among the DOE/NETL report Case 11 (the PC plant without CO₂ capture), the DOE/NETL report Case 12 (the PC plant with benchmark MEA-based PCC), and the PC plant using GPS-based PCC. The results reveal that the net power produced in the PC plant with GPS-based PCC is 647 MWe, greater than that of the Case 12 (550 MWe). The 20-year LCOE for the PC plant with GPS-based PCC is 97.4 mills/kWh, or 152% of that of the Case 11, which is also 23% less than that of the Case 12. These results demonstrate that the GPS-based PCC process is energy-efficient and cost-effective compared with the benchmark MEA process.

  12. Characteristic performance evaluation of a photon counting Si strip detector for low dose spectral breast CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The possible clinical applications which can be performed using a newly developed detector depend on the detector's characteristic performance in a number of metrics including the dynamic range, resolution, uniformity, and stability. The authors have evaluated a prototype energy resolved fast photon counting x-ray detector based on a silicon (Si) strip sensor used in an edge-on geometry with an application specific integrated circuit to record the number of x-rays and their energies at high flux and fast frame rates. The investigated detector was integrated with a dedicated breast spectral computed tomography (CT) system to make use of the detector's high spatial and energy resolution and low noise performance under conditions suitable for clinical breast imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate the intrinsic characteristics of the detector, in terms of maximum output count rate, spatial and energy resolution, and noise performance of the imaging system. Methods: The maximum output count rate was obtained with a 50 W x-ray tube with a maximum continuous output of 50 kVp at 1.0 mA. A{sup 109}Cd source, with a characteristic x-ray peak at 22 keV from Ag, was used to measure the energy resolution of the detector. The axial plane modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using a 67 ?m diameter tungsten wire. The two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) was measured using flat field images and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were calculated using the MTF and NPS results. The image quality parameters were studied as a function of various radiation doses and reconstruction filters. The one-dimensional (1D) NPS was used to investigate the effect of electronic noise elimination by varying the minimum energy threshold. Results: A maximum output count rate of 100 million counts per second per square millimeter (cps/mm{sup 2}) has been obtained (1 million cps per 100 100 ?m pixel). The electrical noise floor was less than 4 keV. The energy resolution measured with the 22 keV photons from a {sup 109}Cd source was less than 9%. A reduction of image noise was shown in all the spatial frequencies in 1D NPS as a result of the elimination of the electronic noise. The spatial resolution was measured just above 5 line pairs per mm (lp/mm) where 10% of MTF corresponded to 5.4 mm{sup ?1}. The 2D NPS and NEQ shows a low noise floor and a linear dependence on dose. The reconstruction filter choice affected both of the MTF and NPS results, but had a weak effect on the NEQ. Conclusions: The prototype energy resolved photon counting Si strip detector can offer superior imaging performance for dedicated breast CT as compared to a conventional energy-integrating detector due to its high output count rate, high spatial and energy resolution, and low noise characteristics, which are essential characteristics for spectral breast CT imaging.

  13. STRIPPING METAL COATINGS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siefen, H.T.; Campbell, J.M.

    1959-02-01

    A method is described for removing aluminumuranium-silicon alloy bonded to metallic U comprising subjecting the Al-U -Si alloy to treatment with hot concentrated HNO/sun 3/ to partially dissolve and embrittle the alloy and shot- blasting the embrittled alloy to loosen it from the U.

  14. Dye strip dosimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saisomboon, S.; Siri-Upathum, C.

    1987-10-01

    This paper describes a new method for measuring radiation dose by using natural pigments. The pigments were extracted from Hibiscus rosa sinensis L. and Canna indica L. and were irradiated with gamma ray. Doses of 30 rad and above are indicated by color changes.

  15. STRIPPING PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolodney, M.

    1959-10-01

    A method for removing silver, nickel, cadmium, zinc, and indium coatings from plutonium objects while simultaneously rendering the plutonium object passive is described. The coated plutonium object is immersed as the anode in an electrolyte in which the plutonium is passive and the coating metal is not passive, using as a cathode a metal which does not dissolve rapidly in the electrolyte. and passing an electrical current through the electrolyte until the coating metal is removed from the plutonium body.

  16. Development of nanodiamond foils for H- stripping to Support the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) using hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vispute, R D; Ermer, Henry K; Sinsky, Phillip; Seiser, Andrew; Shaw, Robert W; Wilson, Leslie L

    2014-01-01

    Thin diamond foils are needed in many particle accelerator experiments regarding nuclear and atomic physics, as well as in some interdisciplinary research. Particularly, nanodiamond texture is attractive for this purpose as it possesses a unique combination of diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and high radiation hardness; therefore, it is a potential material for energetic ion beam stripper foils. At the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the installed set of foils must be able to survive a nominal five-month operation period, without the need for unscheduled costly shutdowns and repairs. Thus, a small foil about the size of a postage stamp is critical to the operation of SNS and similar sources in U.S. laboratories and around the world. We are investigating nanocrystalline, polycrystalline and their admixture films fabricated using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system for H- stripping to support the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here we discuss optimization of process variables such as substrate temperature, process gas ratio of H2/Ar/CH4, substrate to filament distance, filament temperature, carburization conditions, and filament geometry to achieve high purity diamond foils on patterned silicon substrates with manageable intrinsic and thermal stresses so that they can be released as free standing foils without curling. An in situ laser reflectance interferometry tool (LRI) is used for monitoring the growth characteristics of the diamond thin film materials. The optimization process has yielded free standing foils with no pinholes. The sp3/sp2 bonds are controlled to optimize electrical resistivity to reduce the possibility of surface charging of the foils. The integrated LRI and HFCVD process provides real time information on the growth of films and can quickly illustrate growth features and control film thickness. The results are discussed in the light of development of nanodiamond foils that will be able to withstand a few MW proton beam and hopefully will be able to be used after possible future upgrades to the SNS to greater than a 3MW beam.

  17. RESULTS OF ROUTINE STRIP EFFLUENT HOLD TANK AND DECONTAMINATED SALT SOLUTION HOLD TANK SAMPLES FROM MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT DURING MACROBATCH 3 OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2011-06-10

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the 'microbatches' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch ('Macrobatch') 3 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 3 samples indicate consistent operations. However, the Decontamination Factors for plutonium and strontium removal have declined in Macrobatch 3, compared to Macrobatch 2. This may be due to the differences in the Pu concentration or the bulk chemical concentrations in the feed material. SRNL is considering the possible reasons for this decline. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in ARP. During operation of the ISDP, quantities of salt waste are processed through the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and MCU in batches of {approx}3800 gallons. Monosodium titanate (MST) is used in ARP to adsorb actinides and strontium from the salt waste and the waste slurry is then filtered prior to sending the clarified salt solution to MCU. The MCU uses solvent extraction technology to extract cesium from salt waste and concentrate cesium in an acidic aqueous stream (Strip Effluent - SE), leaving a decontaminated caustic salt aqueous stream (Decontaminated Salt Solution - DSS). Sampling occurs in the Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) and Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) in the MCU process. The MCU sample plan requires that batches be sampled and analyzed for plutonium and strontium content by Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) to determine MST effectiveness. The cesium measurement is used to monitor cesium removal effectiveness and the inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES) is used to monitor inorganic carryover.

  18. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank And Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 5 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-04-30

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 5 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 4 samples indicate generally consistent operations. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in the Actinide Removal process (ARP).

  19. Analysis of alternative modifications for reducing backwater flooding at the Honey Creek coal strip-mine reclamation site in Henry County, Missouri. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    Studies to determine the hydrologic conditions in mined and reclaimed mine areas, as well as areas of proposed mining, have become necessary with the enactment of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Honey Creek in Henry County, Missouri, has been re-routed to flow through a series of former strip mining pits which lie within the Honey Creek coal strip mine reclamation site. During intense or long duration rainfalls within the Honey Creek basin, surface runoff has caused flooding on agricultural land near the upstream boundary of the reclamation site. The calculated existing design discharge (3,050 cubic feet per second) water-surface profile is compared to the expected water-surface profiles from three assumed alternative channel modifcations within the Honey Creek study area. The alternative channel modifications used in these analyses include (1) improvement of channel bottom slope, (2) relocation of spoil material, and (3) improved by-pass channel flow conditions. The alternative 1, 2, and 3 design discharge increase will reduce the agricultural field current (1990) frequency of backwater flooding from a 3-year to a 6.5-year event.

  20. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 3 of 6: MICROSTRUCTURAL ENGINEERING IN HOT-STRIP MILLS Part 2 of 2: Constitutive Behavior Modeling of Steels Under Hot-Rolling Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi-Wen Cheng; Patrick Purtscher

    1999-07-30

    This report describes the development of models for predicting (1) constitutive behaviors and (2) mechanical properties of hot-rolled steels as functions of chemical composition, microstructural features, and processing variables. The study includes the following eight steels: A36, DQSK, HSLA-V, HSLA-Nb, HSLA-50/Ti-Nb, and two interstitial-free (IF) grades. These developed models have been integrated into the Hot-Strip Mill Model (HSMM), which simulates the hot strip rolling mills and predicts the mechanical properties of hot-rolled products. The HSMM model has been developed by the University of British Columbia-Canada as a part of project on the microstructural engineering in hot-strip mills.

  1. Recent T980 Crystal Collimation Studies at the Tevatron Exploiting a Pixel Detector System and a Multi-Strip Crystal Array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Still, D.; Annala, G.E.; Carrigan, R.A.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Johnson, T.R.; Mokhov, N.V.; Previtali, V.; Rivera, R.; Shiltsev, V.; Zagel, J.; Zvoda, V.V.; / /CERN /INFN, Pisa / /

    2012-05-15

    With the shutdown of the Tevatron, the T-980 crystal collimation experiment at Fermilab has been successfully completed. Results of dedicated beam studies in May 2011 are described in this paper. For these studies, two multi-strip crystals were installed in the vertical goniometer and an O-shaped crystal installed in a horizontal goniometer. A two-plane CMS pixel detector was also installed in order to enhance the experiment with the capability to image the profile of crystal channeled or multiple volume reflected beam. The experiment successfully imaged channeled beam from a crystal for 980-GeV protons for the first time. This new enhanced hardware yielded impressive results. The performance and characterization of the crystals studied have been very reproducible over time and consistent with simulations.

  2. Natural and industrial analogues for release of CO2 from storagereservoirs: Identification of features, events, and processes and lessonslearned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-03-03

    The injection and storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in deep geologic formations is a potentially feasible strategy to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and atmospheric concentrations. While the purpose of geologic carbon storage is to trap CO{sub 2} underground, CO{sub 2} could migrate away from the storage site into the shallow subsurface and atmosphere if permeable pathways such as well bores or faults are present. Large-magnitude releases of CO{sub 2} have occurred naturally from geologic reservoirs in numerous volcanic, geothermal, and sedimentary basin settings. Carbon dioxide and natural gas have also been released from geologic CO{sub 2} reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities, respectively, due to influences such as well defects and injection/withdrawal processes. These systems serve as natural and industrial analogues for the potential release of CO{sub 2} from geologic storage reservoirs and provide important information about the key features, events, and processes (FEPs) that are associated with releases, as well as the health, safety, and environmental consequences of releases and mitigation efforts that can be applied. We describe a range of natural releases of CO{sub 2} and industrial releases of CO{sub 2} and natural gas in the context of these characteristics. Based on this analysis, several key conclusions can be drawn, and lessons can be learned for geologic carbon storage. First, CO{sub 2} can both accumulate beneath, and be released from, primary and secondary reservoirs with capping units located at a wide range of depths. Both primary and secondary reservoir entrapments for CO{sub 2} should therefore be well characterized at storage sites. Second, many natural releases of CO{sub 2} have been correlated with a specific event that triggered the release, such as magmatic fluid intrusion or seismic activity. The potential for processes that could cause geomechanical damage to sealing cap rocks and trigger the release of CO{sub 2} from a storage reservoir should be evaluated. Third, unsealed fault and fracture zones may act as fast and direct conduits for CO{sub 2} flow from depth to the surface. Risk assessment should therefore emphasize determining the potential for and nature of CO{sub 2} migration along these structures. Fourth, wells that are structurally unsound have the potential to rapidly release large quantities of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Risk assessment should therefore be focused on the potential for both active and abandoned wells at storage sites to transport CO{sub 2} to the surface, particularly at sites with depleted oil or gas reservoirs where wells are abundant. Fifth, the style of CO{sub 2} release at the surface varies widely between and within different leakage sites. In rare circumstances, the release of CO{sub 2} can be a self-enhancing and/or eruptive process; this possibility should be assessed in the case of CO{sub 2} leakage from storage reservoirs. Sixth, the hazard to human health has been small in most cases of large surface releases of CO{sub 2}. This could be due to implementation of public education and CO{sub 2} monitoring programs; these programs should therefore be employed to minimize potential health, safety, and environmental effects associated with CO{sub 2} leakage. Finally, while changes in groundwater chemistry were related to CO{sub 2} leakage due to acidification and interaction with host rocks along flow paths, waters remained potable in most cases. Groundwaters should be monitored for changes that may be associated with storage reservoir leakage.

  3. Benzene analogues of (quasi-)planar M@B{sub n}H{sub n} compounds (M = V{sup ?}, Cr, Mn{sup +}): A theoretical investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Lifen; Xu, Chang; Jin, Baokang; Cheng, Longjiu

    2013-11-07

    The stability of M@B{sub n}H{sub n} (M = V{sup ?}, Cr, Mn{sup +}; n = 58) is investigated by density functional theory. For n = 68, the isomers possess (quasi-)planar local minima showed by geometry optimization at TPSSh/6-311+G{sup **} level. All the optimized structures are thermodynamics stable according to the large HOMO-LUMO gap, binding energy, vertical ionization potential, and vertical electron affinity analysis. The peripheral and central atomic radius fit each other best at n = 7 confirmed by the variation of the binding energy values. The availability of d atom orbitals in M for participation in the ?-delocalized bonding with the peripheral ring leads to the aromaticity of the (quasi-)planar structures and makes them the benzene analogues. This work establishes firmly the metal-doped borane rings as a new type of aromatic molecule.

  4. Innovation to Go - Penta Chart Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring tree health with NMR LA-UR-16-20316 This document is approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited Monitoring tree health with NMR Tree mortality threatens the climate regulation functions of forests * Continental-scale climate-induced mortality observed globally * Climate predictions indicate increased in drought * We lack non-destructive measurement methods to verify theories and improve models A portable Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) system for identifying plant

  5. Technology and Commercialization Organization Chart | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Validation Technology Validation In addition to the technical challenges being addressed through research, design, and development, there are obstacles to successful implementation of fuel cells and the corresponding hydrogen infrastructure that can be addressed only by integrating the components into complete systems. After a technology achieves its technical targets in the laboratory, the next step is to show that it can work as designed within complete systems (i.e., fuel cell

  6. Physical Sciences and Engineering Directorate Organization Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physical Market Conditions, Paper Market Activity, and the WTI-Brent Spread Bahattin Büyükşahin Thomas K. Lee James T. Moser Michel A. Robe* Abstract We document that, starting in the Fall of 2008, the benchmark West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil has periodically traded at unheard of discounts to the corresponding Brent benchmark. We further document that this discount is not reflected in spreads between Brent and other benchmarks that are directly comparable to WTI. Drawing on extant

  7. MA Org Chart, March 22, 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management MA-1 Ingrid Kolb, Director Laurie Morman, Chief of Staff Office of Resource Management and Planning MA-1.1 Marilyn Dillon, Director Sandra Hersh, Dep. Director Office of Scheduling and Advance Charles Quintero, Director MA-10 MA-70 Office of Executive Secretariat Amy B. Demagistris, Deputy Director Office of Policy Analysis Michael Coogan Office of Correspondence Management Steven Johnsen MA-72 Administration, MIS, and Executive Commitments Group Shena Kennerly MA-74 Office of History

  8. Bioassay Chart 5-22-14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ,000 mrem Site Employees' Positive Sample Results Millirems (not to scale) 10 8 9 7 2 6 4 3 1 5 0 Minimum Reporting Limit (10 mrem) Treatment Recommended Limit 5,000 mrem Federal Limit 1,000 3,000 4,000 2,000 5,000 If internal contamination is suspected to deliver a dose greater than 2 Rem (2,000 mrem), the manager of Radiation Control or designee may recommend treatment after consulting with an occupational medicine physician. May 22, 2014 Understanding the Bioassay Results Typical Average

  9. Government Buildings CHARTING YOUR JOURNEY REACHING MILESTONES

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Holland, Michigan | Department of Energy Gov. Granholm, Administration Officials to Preview the President's Trip to Holland, Michigan Gov. Granholm, Administration Officials to Preview the President's Trip to Holland, Michigan July 14, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON- Today at 4:00 p.m. EDT, Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm, White House Communications Director Dan Pfeiffer, and Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Energy Secretary Chu, will hold a press conference call ahead of the

  10. fe_org_chart_November2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    r i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s i s t a n t S e c r e t a r y J u l i o F r i e d ma n n A s s i s t a n t S e c r e t a r y C h r i s t o p h e r A . S mi t h Di r e c t o r , Na...

  11. FE Org Chart April 2016.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  12. FE Org Chart Feb2016.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  13. CNM Organization Chart | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Natural gas is a clean-burning, abundant, and domestically produced energy source. In the fleet world, these attributes have garnered growing interest in compressed natural gas (CNG) for medium- and heavy- duty vehicles 1 . CNG can also reduce operating costs and offer relative price stability compared to conventional petroleum fuels. For fleets considering a transition to CNG, there are many aspects of CNG vehicles and fueling infrastructure that impact the viability and financial soundness of

  14. CMIME_org_chart_Dec2011.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amit Misra, D irector Irene J . Beyerlein, C o---Director Irradia4on e xtremes t hrust Mechanical e xtremes t hrust Metals Michael J. Demkowicz (MIT), lead J. Alfredo Caro, PI Amit Misra, PI $ Stuart Maloy, Co-I $ Mike Nastasi (UNL), Co-I Nan Li, 50%, (Misra) Osman Anderoglu, 50%, (Maloy/Misra) Enrique Martinez-Seaz, (Caro) Engang Fu, (Nastasi/ Y. Wang) Liang Zhang, MIT (Demkowicz) Abishek Kashinath, MIT (Demkowicz) Oxides Blas P. Uberuaga, lead Steve M. Valone, Co-I $ Arthur F. Voter, Co-I $

  15. Charting the Course for Elementary Particle Physics

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Richter, B.

    2007-02-16

    "It was the best of times; it was the worst of times" is the way Dickens begins the Tale of Two Cities. The line is appropriate to our time in particle physics. It is the best of times because we are in the midst of a revolution in understanding, the third to occur during my career. It is the worst of times because accelerator facilities are shutting down before new ones are opening, restricting the opportunity for experiments, and because of great uncertainty about future funding. My task today is to give you a view of the most important opportunities for our field under a scenario that is constrained by a tight budget. It is a time when we cannot afford the merely good, but must give first priority to the really important. The defining theme of particle physics is to learn what the universe is made of and how it all works. This definition spans the full range of size from the largest things to the smallest things. This particle physics revolution has its origins in experiments that look at both.

  16. OrgChart-151218a.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of WI Simone Raugei, PNNL Governance Board Doug Ray, PNNL Bruce Garrett, PNNL Michael Thompson, PNNL Morris Bullock, Director Aaron Appel, Deputy Director Center for Molecular...

  17. Project Management Coordination Office Organization Chart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Baker) Lead Jennifer Holman(GO) Joe Lucas (GO) Jono Sher (GO) Yana Rasulova (GO) Patrick Shipp (HQ) (on Detail) Angela Crooks (HQ) Tweedie Doe (GO) Luke Gomes (GO) Kara ...

  18. Microsoft Word - 2016-comparison-chart.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  19. MA Org Chart, January 5, 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Director Office of Scheduling and Advance Charles Quintero, Director MA-10 MA-70 Office of ... Information Technology Program Emily Stanton Chris Morris, FOIA Officer Vacant Office of ...

  20. Grant use chart HACSA.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 p e r u n i t B P A U t i l i t y f u n d s L I H E A P h e a t c r i s i s floor insulation SIR 1 yes SIR 1 SIR 1 SIR 1 SIR 1 100% NA SIR 1 Cost effecti Duct seal SIR 1 Yes...

  1. Federal Energy Management Program Organization Chart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Affairs, Technology Deployment Nicolas Baker FEMP Website Joe Konrade Budget Peter Murphy O&M, Energy Security Cyrus Nasseri Interagency Coordination, Data Management Chris Tremper...

  2. PPPL_OrgChart_01.2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diagnostic Development B. Stratton Innovative Fusion Concepts and Technology R. Majeski Projects: LTX, FRC Low Temperature Plasma Y. Raitses Beam Dynamics and Non-Neutral Plasmas ...

  3. MA Org Chart, November 16, 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Staff MA-80 Office of the Ombudsman Rita R. Franklin, Director November 2015 Adrian Collins, Dep. Director MA-50 Office of Asset Management Carmelo Melendez, Director MA-40...

  4. MA Org Chart, August 13, 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Staff MA-80 Office of the Ombudsman Rita R. Franklin, Director August 2015 Adrian Collins, Dep. Director MA-50 Office of Asset Management Carmelo Melendez, Director MA-40...

  5. 2015_OCTOBER.FermiOrgChart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Particle Astrophysics Craig Hogan CMS Center Kevin Burkett Office of the General Counsel John Myer Office of Integrated Planning & Performance Management Erik Gottschalk Workforce...

  6. Federal Energy Management Program Organization Chart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cyrus Nasseri Renewable Energy Rachel Shepherd ENABLE Program, DOE Qualified List Ira Birnbaum Project Facilitation Service, Life of Contract Program Brandi Eng-Rohrbach ...

  7. 2016_FEB.FermiOrgChart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organization Fermi Research Alliance, LLC Neutrino Division Gina Rameika Particle Physics Division Patricia McBride Office of the CRO Joe Lykken Chief Research Officer Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics Craig Hogan CMS Center Kevin Burkett Office of the General Counsel John Myer Office of Integrated Planning & Performance Management Erik Gottschalk Workforce Development & Resources Section Kay Van Vreede Office of the COO Timothy Meyer Chief Operating Officer Office of

  8. FE Org Chart May 2016.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Safety Specialist FAQS Reference Guide - Nuclear Safety Specialist This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the November 2007 edition of DOE Standard DOE-STD-1183-2007, Nuclear Safety Specialist Functional Area Qualification Standard. PDF icon Nuclear Safety Specialist Qualification Standard Reference Guide, August 2014 More Documents & Publications DOE-STD-3009-94 DOE-STD-3009-94 DOE-STD-3009-2014 Requirements Matrix

    Safeguards and Security

  9. Pay Chart | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  10. VII-7 Org Chart - 2002.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  11. PPPL_OrgChart_12.2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Infrastructure Head: L. Dudek* Dep for Ops: A. vonHalle* Dep for INF: E. Perry* Business Ops & CFO Head: K.A. Fischer NSTX - U Project: M. Ono Program: J.E. Menard Dep:...

  12. HSEP Committee Meeting - Transcribed Flip Chart Notes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    actually are (health, public perception, cleanup, etc.) o Lessons learned from Fukushima Page 3 Emergency Preparedness: Suggestions (cont.) 8. Ensure public knows what ...

  13. Attachment_3_DOE_Organizational_Chart.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  14. Resveratrol analogue 3,4,4?,5-tetramethoxystilbene inhibits growth, arrests cell cycle and induces apoptosis in ovarian SKOV?3 and A-2780 cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piotrowska, Hanna; Myszkowski, Krzysztof; Zi?kowska, Alicja; Kulcenty, Katarzyna; Wierzchowski, Marcin; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Murias, Marek; Kwiatkowska-Borowczyk, Eliza; Department of Cancer Diagnostics and Immunology, Greater Poland Cancer Centre, Poznan ; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga

    2012-08-15

    In the screening studies, cytotoxicity of 12 methylated resveratrol analogues on 11 human cancer cell lines was examined. The most active compound 3,4,4?5-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-212) and two ovarian cancer cell lines A-2780 (IC{sub 50} = 0.71 ?M) and SKOV-3 (IC{sub 50} = 11.51 ?M) were selected for further investigation. To determine the mechanism of DMU-212 cytotoxicity, its ability to induce apoptosis was examined. DMU-212 arrested cell cycle in the G2/M or G0/G1 phase which resulted in apoptosis of both cell lines. The expression level of 84 apoptosis-related genes was investigated. In SKOV-3 cells DMU-212 caused up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax, Apaf-1 and p53 genes, specific to intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, and a decrease in Bcl-2 and Bcl 2110 mRNA expressions. Conversely, in A-2780 cells an increased expression of pro-apoptotic genes Fas, FasL, TNF, TNFRSF10A, TNFRSF21, TNFRSF16 specific to extracellular mechanism of apoptosis was observed. There are no data published so far regarding the receptor mediated apoptosis induced by DMU-212. The activation of caspase-3/7 was correlated with decreased TRAF-1 and BIRC-2 expression level in A-2780 cells exposed to DMU-212. DMU-212 caused a decrease in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA levels in A-2780 by 50% and 75%, and in SKOV-3 cells by 15% and 45%, respectively. The protein expression was also reduced in both cell lines. It is noteworthy that the expression of CYP1B1 protein was entirely inhibited in A-2780 cells treated with DMU-212. It can be suggested that different CYP1B1 expression patterns in either ovarian cell line may affect their sensitivity to cytotoxic activity of DMU-212. -- Highlights: ? DMU-212 was the most cytotoxic among 12 O-methylated resveratrol analogues. ? DMU-212 arrested cell cycle at G2/M and G0/G1phase ? DMU-212 triggered mitochondria- and receptor?mediated apoptosis. ? DMU-212 entirely inhibited CYP1B1 protein expression in A-2780 cells.

  15. FERRIC ION-SPECIFIC SEQUESTERING AGENTS. 7. SYNTHESIS, IRON EXCHANGE KINETICS, AND STABILITY CONSTANTS OF N-SUBSTITUTED, SULFONATED CATECHOYLAMIDE ANALOGUES OF ENTEROBACTIN.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pecoraro, Vincent L.; Weitl, Frederick L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    1980-10-01

    For treatment of chronic iron overload (as occurs in Cooley's anemia), ferric ion sequestering agents with specific properties are necessary. Two analogues of enterobactin [a microbial chelating agent with the greatest stability constant known for an Fe(III) complex] are reported which exhibit: i) hydrolytic stability; ii) water solubility; iii) N-substitution to block peptidase hydrolysis. The first compound, N,N',N"- trimethyl-N,N',N"-tris(2,3-dihydroxysulfobenzoyl)1,3,5-triaminomethyl- benzene, [Me{sub 3}MECAMS, 6] was prepared from the amide of trimesloyl chloride (1) and MeNH{sub 2}. The resulting amide was reduced to the triamine (3) and converted in three steps to the final product 6 in 6% overall yield. The proton-dependent formation constant (log K*) for the reaction: Fe{sup 3+} + H{sub 3}L{sup 6-} = FeL{sup 6-} + 3H{sup +} is 4.87, which gives an equilibrium concentration of [Fe{sup 3+}] at pH 7.4 of 2 x 10{sup -27} M for 10{sup -5} M L (6) and 10{sup -6} M total Fe{sup 3+}. The estimated formation constant (log {beta}{sub 110}) is 40. At low pH the FeL{sup 6-} complex undergoes a series of three, one-proton reactions which probably gives a tris-salicylate complex formed by the carbonyl and ortho-catechol oxygen of the 2,3~dihydroxybenzoyl units (the same reaction that occurs with ferric enterobactin). After six hours in the presence of 6 mM ascorbate, Me{sub 3}MECAMS (6.0 mM) removed 3.7% of the ferric ion initially sequestered by the iron storage protein, ferritin. The human iron transport protein transferrin goves up iron to Me{sub 3}MECAMS with a pseudo first-order rate constant of 1.9 x 10{sup -3}min{sup -1} (ligand concentration 2 X 10{sup -4} M). This rate is comparable to that of enterobactin and other catechoyl amide sequestering agents. and greatly exceeds that of desferrioxamine B (Desferal{reg-sign}). the current drug of choice in treating iron overload. Two related compounds have been prepared in which the catechol ring is attached to the amide nitrogen through a methylene group, with amide formation with an acetyl group. In N,N',N"-triacetyl-N,N' ,N"-tris(2,3- dihydroxysulfobenzoyl) -N,N',N"-triaminomethylbenzene [NAcMECAMS, 111... and its unsulfonated precursor, the amide linkage of the catechoyl amides such as Me{sub 3}MECAMS (6) has been shifted from an endo position relative to the benzene and catechol rings to an exo position in which the amide carbonyl is not conjugated with the catechol ring and cannot form a stable chelate ring in conjunction with a catechol oxygen. The preparation of 11 and 10 proceeded from the previously described precursor of TRIMCAM, 7. borane reduction to the tri.amine 8, and amide formation with acetyl chloride to 9, followed by deprotection of the catechol oxygens with BBr{sub 3}/CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} to give 10. Sulfonation of 10 to NAcMECAMS, 11, is carried out in fuming sulfuric acid. In comparison with Me{sub 3}MECAMS, the protonation of NAcMECAMS (11) proceeds by an initial two-proton step in contrast to the one-proton reactions typical of the catechoyl amides, which can form a salicylate mode of coordination involving the amide carbonyl group. Also as a result of the removal of the carbonyl group from conjugation with the catechol ring, the acidity of NAcMECAMS (11) is less than Me{sub 3}MECAMS (6). While the estimated log {beta{sub 110} is approximately the same as for Me{sub 3}MECAMS (40). the effective formation constant (log K*) and pM.(- log [Fe{sub aq}{sup 3+}] ) values are lower (4.0 and 25.0, respectively).

  16. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, And Caustic Wash Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 4 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-10-25

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) samples from several of the ?microbatches? of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (?Macrobatch?) 4 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES). Furthermore, samples from the CWT have been analyzed by a variety of methods to investigate a decline in the decontamination factor (DF) of the cesium observed at MCU. The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 3 samples indicate generally consistent operations. There is no indication of a disruption in plutonium and strontium removal. The average cesium DF and concentration factor (CF) for samples obtained from Macrobatch 4 are slightly lower than for Macrobatch 3, but still well within operating parameters. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in Actinide Removal Process (ARP).

  17. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2014-01-02

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 6 have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The Pu, Sr, and Cs results from the current Macrobatch 6 samples are similar to those from comparable samples in previous Macrobatch 5. In addition the SEHT and DSSHT heel samples (i.e. ‘preliminary’) have been analyzed and reported to meet NGS Demonstration Plan requirements. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous samples. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST has increased in ARP at the higher free hydroxide concentrations in the current feed.

  18. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2013-10-01

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 6 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from comparable samples in Macrobatch 5. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous macrobatch. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST in ARP continues to occur. Both the CST and CWT samples indicate that the target Free OH value of 0.03 has been surpassed. While at this time there is no indication that this has caused an operational problem, the CST should be adjusted into specification. The {sup 137}Cs results from the SRNL as well as F/H lab data indicate a potential decline in cesium decontamination factor. Further samples will be carefully monitored to investigate this.

  19. STRIPPING OF URANIUM FROM ORGANIC EXTRACTANTS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crouse, D.J. Jr.

    1962-09-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction method is given for recovering uranium values from uranium-containing solutions. Uranium is removed from a uranium-containing organic solution by contacting said organic solution with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution substantially saturated in uranium values. A uranium- containing precipitate is thereby formed which is separated from the organic and aqueous phases. Uranium values are recovered from this separated precipitate. (AE C)

  20. Method and apparatus for strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Follstaedt, D.W.; Powell, J.C.; Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

    1991-11-12

    Casting nozzles will provide improved flow conditions with the parameters controlled according to the present invention. The gap relationships between the nozzle slot and exit orifice must be controlled in combination with converging exit passageway to provide a smooth flow without shearing and turbulence in the stream. The nozzle lips are also rounded to improve flow and increase refractory life of the lips of the nozzle. The tundish walls are tapered to provide improve flow for supplying the melt to the nozzle. The nozzle is located about 45[degree] below top dead center for optimum conditions. 2 figures.

  1. Method and apparatus for strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Follstaedt, Donald W.; Powell, John C.; Sussman, Richard C.; Williams, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    Casting nozzles will provide improved flow conditions with the parameters controlled according to the present invention. The gap relationships between the nozzle slot and exit orifice must be controlled in combination with converging exit passageway to provide a smooth flow without shearing and turbulence in the stream. The nozzle lips are also rounded to improve flow and increase refractory life of the lips of the nozzle. The tundish walls are tapered to provide improve flow for supplying the melt to the nozzle. The nozzle is located about 45.degree. below top dead center for optimum conditions.

  2. Caulking/Weather-stripping | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference needed Missing content Broken link Other Additional Comments Cancel Submit Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

  3. Fluidized bed paint stripping and sludge burning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatia, J.; Staffin, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    High volume automated painting, as encountered in the painting of automobiles and appliances, requires that the item being painted be positioned in a conveying frame or fixture so that the painting machine or robot achieves a reproducible, high quality paint job. These conveying frames or fixtures are extensive fabrications carefully designed to position and support the item being painted. In the case of automotive painting, they are rather large and involve substantial weights, because they must be capable of supporting and positioning auto bodies and large sub-assemblies.

  4. Microstructure Engineering for Hot Strip Mills

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Many hot rolled products must achieve strict strength and toughness requirements, making control of the microstructure critical. This causes these products to be difficult to make and requires many...

  5. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Strip mall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  6. Archived Reference Building Type: Strip mall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

  7. Archived Reference Building Type: Strip mall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  8. RPF101, a new capsaicin-like analogue, disrupts the microtubule network accompanied by arrest in the G2/M phase, inducing apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe in the MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S-Jnior, Paulo Luiz de; Pasqualoto, Kerly Fernanda Mesquita; Ferreira, Adilson Kleber; Tavares, Maurcio Temotheo; Damio, Mariana Celestina Frojuello Costa Bernstorff; Azevedo, Ricardo Alexandre de; Cmara, Diana Aparecida Dias; Pereira, Alexandre; Madeiro de Souza, Dener; Parise Filho, Roberto

    2013-02-01

    Breast cancer is the world's leading cause of death among women. This situation imposes an urgent development of more selective and less toxic agents. The use of natural molecular fingerprints as sources for new bioactive chemical entities has proven to be a quite promising and efficient method. Capsaicin, which is the primary pungent compound in red peppers, was reported to selectively inhibit the growth of a variety tumor cell lines. Here, we report for the first time a novel synthetic capsaicin-like analogue, RPF101, which presents a high antitumor activity on MCF-7 cell line, inducing arrest of the cell cycle at the G2/M phase through a disruption of the microtubule network. Furthermore, it causes cellular morphologic changes characteristic of apoptosis and a decrease of ??m. Molecular modeling studies corroborated the biological findings and suggested that RPF101, besides being a more reactive molecule towards its target, may also present a better pharmacokinetic profile than capsaicin. All these findings support the fact that RPF101 is a promising anticancer agent. -- Highlights: ? We report for the first time that RPF101 possesses anticancer properties. ? RPF101 induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. ? RPF 101 decreases mitochondrial potential and induces DNA fragmentation.

  9. Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Process-Based Technology for CO2 Capture from Post-Combustion Flue Gases Preliminary Year 1 Techno-Economic Study Results and Methodology for Gas Pressurized Stripping Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shiaoguo

    2013-03-01

    Under the DOE’s Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program, Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC (CCS) is developing a novel gas pressurized stripping (GPS) process to enable efficient post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) from coal-fired power plants. A technology and economic feasibility study is required as a deliverable in the project Statement of Project Objectives. This study analyzes a fully integrated pulverized coal power plant equipped with GPS technology for PCC, and is carried out, to the maximum extent possible, in accordance to the methodology and data provided in ATTACHMENT 3 – Basis for Technology Feasibility Study of DOE Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000403. The DOE/NETL report on “Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants, Volume 1: Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity (Original Issue Date, May 2007), NETL Report No. DOE/NETL-2007/1281, Revision 1, August 2007” was used as the main source of reference to be followed, as per the guidelines of ATTACHMENT 3 of DE-FOA-0000403. The DOE/NETL-2007/1281 study compared the feasibility of various combinations of power plant/CO2 capture process arrangements. The report contained a comprehensive set of design basis and economic evaluation assumptions and criteria, which are used as the main reference points for the purpose of this study. Specifically, Nexant adopted the design and economic evaluation basis from Case 12 of the above-mentioned DOE/NETL report. This case corresponds to a nominal 550 MWe (net), supercritical greenfield PC plant that utilizes an advanced MEAbased absorption system for CO2 capture and compression. For this techno-economic study, CCS’ GPS process replaces the MEA-based CO2 absorption system used in the original case. The objective of this study is to assess the performance of a full-scale GPS-based PCC design that is integrated with a supercritical PC plant similar to Case 12 of the DOE/NETL report, such that it corresponds to a nominal 550 MWe supercritical PC plant with 90% CO2 capture. This plant has the same boiler firing rate and superheated high pressure steam generation as the DOE/NETL report’s Case 12 PC plant. However, due to the difference in performance between the GPS-based PCC and the MEA-based CO2 absorption technology, the net power output of this plant may not be exactly at 550 MWe.

  10. Charting a course for the future: Technical appendix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Programs in Perspective is the Bonneville Power Administration's public involvement process for engaging customers and other stakeholders in a regional dialog to set strategic direction and broad program plans for BPA. This process leads into a biennial rate setting cycle and offers a more accessible and flexible opportunity for dialog on broad issues than is possible under the strict administrative procedures of ratemaking. The self-financed character of BPA has made this public process a necessary and valuable one to assure that those who play BPA's rates have a clear understanding and a strong voice in the plans for use of the resulting revenues.

  11. Charting an Inflationary Landscape with Random Matrix Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, M.C. David; McAllister, Liam; Pajer, Enrico; Wrase, Timm E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu E-mail: timm.wrase@stanford.edu

    2013-11-01

    We construct a class of random potentials for N >> 1 scalar fields using non-equilibrium random matrix theory, and then characterize multifield inflation in this setting. By stipulating that the Hessian matrices in adjacent coordinate patches are related by Dyson Brownian motion, we define the potential in the vicinity of a trajectory. This method remains computationally efficient at large N, permitting us to study much larger systems than has been possible with other constructions. We illustrate the utility of our approach with a numerical study of inflation in systems with up to 100 coupled scalar fields. A significant finding is that eigenvalue repulsion sharply reduces the duration of inflation near a critical point of the potential: even if the curvature of the potential is fine-tuned to be small at the critical point, small cross-couplings in the Hessian cause the curvature to grow in the neighborhood of the critical point.

  12. PrintRes_PeriodicChartPostCard2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    56 Ba Barium 73 Ta Tantalum 19 K Potassium 20 Ca Calcium 21 Sc Scandium 22 Ti Titanium 30 Zn Zinc 31 Ga Gallium 32 Ge Germanium 33 As Arsenic 34 Se Selenium 35 Br Bromine ...

  13. DOE Organization chart - May 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT 2015 YEAR IN REVIEW "I am proud of all of the work we in EM-both at headquarters and in the field-have accomplished this year. While facing the most complex cleanup challenges, measurable progress was made in 2015-a testament to our skilled workforce. The considerable investment made in cleanup this year has led to strong results across the EM complex. The foundation and planning put in place this year will enable EM to hit the ground running in 2016. I was honored

  14. PIC Committee Meeting - Transcribed Flip-chart Notes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wednesday, September 05, 2012 Tools/Techniques Hanford Challenge * Social media o When and where things are happening * "Inheriting Hanford" o Mentoring project o Informal opportunities to get together o Monthly happy hours, etc. o HAB social events * Annual summer ice cream social o Work for your ice cream o Bloggers picked up Page 1 Tools/Techniques (continued) Hanford Challenge (continued) * Haiku calendar * Monthly discussion groups - Liz's home * Boat trips of Hanford site (5-10

  15. PIC Committee Meeting - Transcribed Flip-chart Notes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wednesday, April 11, 2012 Site-wide Permit 1. Between July 1 and September 30 - single shell tank webinar (provide agencies with input on when, TWC addressing content). 2....

  16. PPPL.ORG.CHART.11.11.14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Academic Affairs: N. J. Fisch Research Staff Development J. Hosea ITER and Tokamaks Head: R.J. Hawryluk DIII-D R. Nazikian C-Mod R.J. Hawryluk Boundary Physics...

  17. Potential Wind Resource Chart for the United States

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

  18. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE VI-11 DIRECTOR Tribble

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tribble SEE Line Proj. Manager H. Clark Brinkley Chen Chubaryan Horvat Hyman Roeder Tabacaru Graduate Students Research Associates Research Scientists Research Group Leaders Administration/ Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Student Workers Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark Roeder Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Adams Mynar Electrical Shop/Accelerator Tech. Bailey Carmona Cowden Eisenmann Foxworth Gathings LaPoint Law Morgan Peeler

  19. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE VII-11 DIRECTOR Yennello

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 DIRECTOR Yennello SEE Line Proj. Manager H. Clark Brinkley Chen Chubaryan Horvat Hyman Roeder Tabacaru Graduate Students Research Associates Research Scientists Research Group Leaders Administration/ Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Student Workers Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark Roeder Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Adams Mynar Electrical Shop/Accelerator Tech. Bailey Carmona Cowden Eisenmann Foxworth Gathings LaPoint Law

  20. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE VII-12 DIRECTOR Tribble

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 DIRECTOR Tribble SEE Line Proj. Manager H. Clark Brinkley Chubaryan Horvat Hyman Roeder Tabacaru Graduate Students Research Associates Research Scientists Research Group Leaders Administration/ Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Student Workers Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark Roeder Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Adams Kingsbury Mynar Piolet Electrical Shop/Accelerator Tech. Bailey Cowden Eisenmann Gathings LaPoint Law Morgan

  1. The Clean Energy Economy in Three Charts | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... When the standards take full effect in 2025, they will reduce oil imports by 2.2 million barrels per day and cut carbon pollution by 6 billion metric tons, which is roughly ...

  2. Project Management Coordination Office Organization Chart | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Project Financing Catalog of Services Project Financing Catalog of Services Document details the Federal Energy Management Program's catalog of technical assistance services it offers for federal agencies that want to use project funding mechanisms to finance energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. PDF icon project_funding_catalog_of_services.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Savings Performance Contract ENABLE Briefing Federal Utility Partnership Working Group 2011 Meeting:

  3. PPPL_OrgChart_04.18.16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Director PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY S. C. Prager Vice President for PPPL D. J. McComas Deputy Director for Research M.C. Zarnstorff Deputy Director for Operations J.W. DeLooper* Laboratory Management Council PPPL Advisory Committee Research Council Associate Director for Academic Affairs: N. J. Fisch Research Staff Development J. Hosea DIII-D R. Nazikian C-Mod R.J. Hawryluk Boundary Physics Coordinator R. Maingi Boundary Physics R. Maingi Theory and Computation Head: A. Bhattacharjee

  4. Microsoft Word - VI_11_Organizational Chart.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yennello SEE Line Proj. Manager H. Clark Brinkley Chen Chubaryan Horvat Hyman Roeder Tabacaru Graduate Students Research Associates Research Scientists Research Group Leaders Administration/ Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Student Worker Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark Roeder Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Adams Mynar Student Worker Electrical Shop/Accelerator Tech. Bailey Carmona Cowden Eisenmann Foxworth Gathings LaPoint

  5. OCIO Org Chart (as of 4.4.16)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chief Information Officer (CIO) Michael Johnson Deputy CIO for Architecture, Engineering, ... Cybersecurity Operations Office VACANT, Director IM-33 Enterprise Architecture Office , ...

  6. Wind for Schools Portal Motion Chart | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    this analytical feature on a browser that has Flash, such as a laptop or desktop computer. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWindforSchoolsPortalMotio...

  7. WindOrgChart_06-27-2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administrator Acting Center Director Brian Smith Paul Veers Chief Engineer - Wind Brian Smith Deputy Director Chief Engineer- Water Jochem Weber Windplant Design & Mfg'g. Derek...

  8. Charts for other users? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    0 answers Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hello-Sorry for the delay in... Use of DynamicAggregationProcessor I submitted a pull...

  9. Microsoft Word - EHS Org Chart Line Management 010714.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Support & D esign Review Joy Fleming Electrical S afety Mark S cott Stephanie Collins Katherine J ohnson Ohmar Sowle James M urphy Optometry Bernard Hale Assurance Bill...

  10. PPPL_OrgChart_05.04.2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B. Stratton Innovative Fusion Concepts and Technology R. Majeski Projects: LTX, FRC Plasma Technology and Off-Site Research Y. Raitses Projects: HTX, MNX,OSUR Beam...

  11. OCIO Org Chart (as of 4.18.16)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deputy CIO for Enterprise Policy, Portfolio Management & Governance Allan Manuel Principal Deputy CIO for Cyber Michael Johnson (Acting) Deputy CIO for Cybersecurity (Acting) Chief ...

  12. NWTC Helps Chart the World's Wind Resource Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) provide the wind industry, policymakers, and other stakeholders with applied wind resource data, information, maps, and technical assistance. These tools, which emphasize wind resources at ever-increasing heights, help stakeholders evaluate the wind resource and development potential for a specific area.

  13. Computing and Computational Sciences Directorate - Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organization Charts CCSD Org Chart (pdf)

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL GAS PRESSURIZED STRIPPING (GPS)-BASED TECHNOLOGY FOR CO2 CAPTURE FROM POST-COMBUSTION FLUE GASES Topical Report: Techno-Economic Analysis of GPS-based Technology for CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shiaoguo

    2015-09-30

    This topical report presents the techno-economic analysis, conducted by Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC (CCS) and Nexant, for a nominal 550 MWe supercritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant utilizing CCS patented Gas Pressurized Stripping (GPS) technology for post-combustion carbon capture (PCC). Illinois No. 6 coal is used as fuel. Because of the difference in performance between the GPS-based PCC and the MEA-based CO2 absorption technology, the net power output of this plant is not exactly 550 MWe. DOE/NETL Case 11 supercritical PC plant without CO2 capture and Case 12 supercritical PC plant with benchmark MEA-based CO2 capture are chosen as references. In order to include CO2 compression process for the baseline case, CCS independently evaluated the generic 30 wt% MEA-based PCC process together with the CO2 compression section. The net power produced in the supercritical PC plant with GPS-based PCC is 647 MW, greater than the MEA-based design. The levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) over a 20-year period is adopted to assess techno-economic performance. The LCOE for the supercritical PC plant with GPS-based PCC, not considering CO2 transport, storage and monitoring (TS&M), is 97.4 mills/kWh, or 152% of the Case 11 supercritical PC plant without CO2 capture, equivalent to $39.6/tonne for the cost of CO2 capture. GPS-based PCC is also significantly superior to the generic MEA-based PCC with CO2 compression section, whose LCOE is as high as 109.6 mills/kWh.

  15. Compression Stripping of Flue Gas with Energy Recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ochs, Thomas L.; O'Connor, William K.

    2005-05-31

    A method of remediating and recovering energy from combustion products from a fossil fuel power plant having at least one fossil fuel combustion chamber, at least one compressor, at least one turbine, at least one heat exchanger and a source of oxygen. Combustion products including non-condensable gases such as oxygen and nitrogen and condensable vapors such as water vapor and acid gases such as SOX and NOX and CO2 and pollutants are produced and energy is recovered during the remediation which recycles combustion products and adds oxygen to support combustion. The temperature and/or pressure of the combustion products are changed by cooling through heat exchange with thermodynamic working fluids in the power generation cycle and/or compressing and/or heating and/or expanding the combustion products to a temperature/pressure combination below the dew point of at least some of the condensable vapors to condense liquid having some acid gases dissolved and/or entrained and/or directly condense acid gas vapors from the combustion products and to entrain and/or dissolve some of the pollutants while recovering sensible and/or latent heat from the combustion products through heat exchange between the combustion products and thermodynamic working fluids and/or cooling fluids used in the power generating cycle. Then the CO2, SO2, and H2O poor and oxygen enriched remediation stream is sent to an exhaust and/or an air separation unit and/or a turbine.

  16. List of Caulking/Weather-stripping Incentives | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydroelectric energy Hydrogen Landfill Gas Methanol Passive Solar Space Heat Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat...

  17. Lab Tests Demonstrate Effectiveness of Advanced Power Strips...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results of these laboratory tests are being used to create a simple buyer guide for the different types of APS. Field tests are also underway to evaluate the real-world energy...

  18. Electroslag Strip Cladding of Steam Generators With Alloy 690

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Consonni, M.; Maggioni, F.; Brioschi, F.

    2006-07-01

    The present paper details the results of electroslag cladding and tube-to-tubesheet welding qualification tests conducted by Ansaldo-Camozzi ESC with Alloy 690 (Alloy 52 filler metal) on steel for nuclear power stations' steam generators shell, tubesheet and head; the possibility of submerged arc cladding on first layer was also considered. Test results, in terms of chemical analysis, mechanical properties and microstructure are reproducible and confidently applicable to production cladding and show that electroslag process can be used for Alloy 52 cladding with exceptionally stable and regular operation and high productivity. The application of submerged arc cladding process to the first layer leads to a higher base metal dilution, which should be avoided. Moreover, though the heat affected zone is deeper with electroslag cladding, in both cases no coarsened grain zone is found due to recrystallization effect of second cladding layer. Finally, the application of electroslag process to cladding of Alloy 52 with modified chemical composition, was proved to be highly beneficial as it strongly reduces hot cracking sensitivity, which is typical of submerged arc cladded Alloy 52, both during tube-to-tubesheet welding and first re-welding. (authors)

  19. Problems Found Using a Radon Stripping Algorithm for Retrospective...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Journal Name: Health Physics; Journal Volume: 94; Journal Issue: 4 Publisher: Health Physics http:www.ncbi.nlm.nih.govpubmed18332729 Research Org: ...

  20. Use of a Radon Stripping Algorithm for Retrospective Assessment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and beta spectroscopy system employing a passive implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detector. ... MODIFICATIONS; PROGENY; RADON; SILICON air monitoring, radon, algorithm, PIPS, ...

  1. Problems Found Using a Radon Stripping Algorithm for Retrospective...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and beta spectroscopy system employing a passive implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detector. ... MODIFICATIONS; PROGENY; RADON; SILICON air monitoring, radon, algorithm, PIPS, ...

  2. Mercantile (Enclosed and Strip Malls) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building Types 1 References EIA CBECS Building Types U.S. Energy Information Administration (Oct 2008) Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMercantile(Encl...

  3. Rhapsody: II. Subhalo Properties and the Impact of Tidal Stripping...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  4. Compression stripping of flue gas with energy recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ochs, Thomas L.; O'Connor, William K.

    2005-05-31

    A method of remediating and recovering energy from combustion products from a fossil fuel power plant having at least one fossil fuel combustion chamber, at least one compressor, at least one turbine, at least one heat exchanger and a source of oxygen. Combustion products including non-condensable gases such as oxygen and nitrogen and condensable vapors such as water vapor and acid gases such as SO.sub.X and NO.sub.X and CO.sub.2 and pollutants are produced and energy is recovered during the remediation which recycles combustion products and adds oxygen to support combustion. The temperature and/or pressure of the combustion products are changed by cooling through heat exchange with thermodynamic working fluids in the power generation cycle and/or compressing and/or heating and/or expanding the combustion products to a temperature/pressure combination below the dew point of at least some of the condensable vapors to condense liquid having some acid gases dissolved and/or entrained and/or directly condense acid gas vapors from the combustion products and to entrain and/or dissolve some of the pollutants while recovering sensible and/or latent heat from the combustion products through heat exchange between the combustion products and thermodynamic working fluids and/or cooling fluids used in the power generating cycle. Then the CO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O poor and oxygen enriched remediation stream is sent to an exhaust and/or an air separation unit and/or a turbine.

  5. Highly Stripped Ion Sources for MeV Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2009-06-30

    Original technical objectives of CRADA number PVI C-03-09 between BNL and Poole Ventura, Inc. (PVI) were to develop an intense, high charge state, ion source for MeV ion implanters. Present day high-energy ion implanters utilize low charge state (usually single charge) ion sources in combination with rf accelerators. Usually, a MV LINAC is used for acceleration of a few rnA. It is desirable to have instead an intense, high charge state ion source on a relatively low energy platform (de acceleration) to generate high-energy ion beams for implantation. This de acceleration of ions will be far more efficient (in energy utilization). The resultant implanter will be smaller in size. It will generate higher quality ion beams (with lower emittance) for fabrication of superior semiconductor products. In addition to energy and cost savings, the implanter will operate at a lower level of health risks associated with ion implantation. An additional aim of the project was to producing a product that can lead to long­ term job creation in Russia and/or in the US. R&D was conducted in two Russian Centers (one in Tomsk and Seversk, the other in Moscow) under the guidance ofPVI personnel and the BNL PI. Multiple approaches were pursued, developed, and tested at various locations with the best candidate for commercialization delivered and tested at on an implanter at the PVI client Axcelis. Technical developments were exciting: record output currents of high charge state phosphorus and antimony were achieved; a Calutron-Bemas ion source with a 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art). Record steady state output currents of higher charge state phosphorous and antimony and P ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb {sup 4 +}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. Ultimate commercialization goals did not succeed (even though a number of the products like high charge state phosphorus and antimony could have resulted in a lower power consumption of 30 kW/implanter) for the following reasons (which were discovered after R&D completion): record output of high charge state phosphorous would have thermally damage wafers; record high charge state of antimony requires tool (ion implanting machine in ion implantation jargon) modification, which did not make economic sense due to the small number of users. Nevertheless, BNL has benefited from advances in high-charge state ion generation, due to high charge state ions need for RHIC preinjection. High fraction boron ion was delivered to PVI client Axcelis for retrofit and implantation testing; the source could have reduced beam preinjector power consumption by a factor of 3.5. But, since the source generated some lithium (though in miniscule amounts); last minute decision was made not to employ the source in implanters. R&D of novel transport and gasless plasmaless deceleration, as well as decaborane molecular ion source to mitigate space charge problems in low energy shallow ion implantation was also conducted though results were not yet ready for commercialization. Future work should be focused on gasless plasmaless transport and deceleration as well as on molecular ions due to their significance to low energy, shallow implantation; which is the last frontier of ion implantation. To summarize the significant accomplishments: 1. Record steady state output currents of high charge state phosphorous, P, ions in particle milli-Ampere: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA). 2. Record steady state output currents of high charge state antimony, Sb, ions in particle milli-Ampere: Sb{sup 3+} (16.2 pmA), Sb{sup 4+} (7.6 pmA), Sb{sup 5+} (3.3 pmA), and Sb{sup 6+} (2.2 pmA). 3. 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art) from a Calutron-Bemas ion source. These accomplishments have the potential of benefiting the semiconductor manufacturing industry by lowering power consumption by as much as 30 kW per ion implanter. Major problem was meeting commercialization goals did not succeed for the following reasons (which were discovered after R&D completion): record output of high charge state phosphorous would have thermally damage wafers; record high charge state of antimony requires tool (ion implanting machine in ion implantation jargon) modification, which did not make economic sense due to the small number of users. High fraction boron ion was delivered to PVI client Axcelis for retrofit and implantation testing; the source could have reduced beam preinjector power consumption by a factor of 3.5. But, since the source generated some lithium (though in miniscule amounts); last minute decision was made not to employ the source in implanters. An additional noteworthy reason for failure to commercialize is the fact that the ion implantation manufacturing industry had been in a very deep bust cycle. BNL, however, has benefited from advances in high-charge state ion generation, due to the need high charge state ions in some RHIC preinjectors. Since the invention of the transistor, the trend has been to miniaturize semiconductor devices. As semiconductors become smaller (and get miniaturized), ion energy needed for implantation decreases, since shallow implantation is desired. But, due to space charge (intra-ion repulsion) effects, forming and transporting ion beams becomes a rather difficult task. A few small manufacturers of low quality semiconductors use plasma immersion to circumvent the problem. However, in plasma immersion undesired plasma impurity ions are also implanted; hence, the quality of those semiconductors is poor. For high quality miniature semiconductor manufacturing, pure, low energy ion beams are utilized. But, low energy ion implanters are characterized by low current (much lower than desirable) and, therefore, low production rates. Consequently, increasing the current of pure low energy ion beams is of paramount importance to the semiconductor industry. Basically, the semiconductor industry needs higher currents and purer ion low energy beams. Therefore R&D of novel transport and gasless plasmaless deceleration, as well as decaborane molecular ion source to mitigate space charge problems in low energy shallow ion implantation was also conducted though results were not yet ready for commercialization. Future work should be focused on gasless plasmaless transport and deceleration as well as cin molecular ions due to their significance to low energy, shallow implantation, which is the last frontier of ion implantation.

  6. Rhapsody: II. Subhalo Properties and the Impact of Tidal Stripping...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SLAC Michigan U. ; Hahn, Oliver ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC ETH, Zurich ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; Behroozi, Peter S. ; Mao, Yao-Yuan ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC Publication Date:...

  7. Use of a Radon Stripping Algorithm for Retrospective Assessment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    using a commercial alpha and beta spectroscopy system employing a passive implanted ... FLOW; ALGORITHMS; BETA SOURCES; BETA SPECTROSCOPY; EVALUATION; MODIFICATIONS; PROGENY; ...

  8. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Strip mall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  9. Cooling of stripped catalyst prior to regeneration in cracking...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    feedstock through a riser conversion zone under fluid catalytic cracking conditions to crack the feedstock; passing the mixture, having a riser exit temperature, from the riser ...

  10. Charting a Course for the Future : BPA Programs in Perspectives, Technical Appendix.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-05-01

    Programs in Perspective is the Bonneville Power Administration`s public involvement process for engaging customers and other stakeholders in a regional dialog to set strategic direction and broad program plans for BPA. This process leads into a biennial rate setting cycle and offers a more accessible and flexible opportunity for dialog on broad issues than is possible under the strict administrative procedures of ratemaking. The self-financed character of BPA has made this public process a necessary and valuable one to assure that those who play BPA`s rates have a clear understanding and a strong voice in the plans for use of the resulting revenues.

  11. Electric Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Dispensing Infrastructure NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: State and Federal Energy Regulatory Commissions CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: Local Building and Fire Departments CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: DOT/NHTS Many standards development organizations (SDOs) are working to develop codes and standards needed for the utilization of alternative fuel

  12. Where Are They Now? National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Participants Charting a Path to Success

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department’s National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition (NCEBPC) is back for its fourth year, providing prizes nationwide. The goal:  creating a new generation of entrepreneurs to...

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - 10-20-13 HC_Org_Chart

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HUMAN CAPITAL OFFICER CHIEF HUMAN CAPITAL OFFICER (CHCO) DEPUTY CHIEF HUMAN CAPITAL OFFICER DIRECTOR, HUMAN CAPITAL MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT STAFF (HC-1.5) SENIOR ADVISOR OFFICE OF HC POLICY, ACCOUNTABILITY AND TECHNOLOGY (HC-10) OFFICE OF LEARNING & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT (HC-20) LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS DIVISION HUMAN CAPITAL POLICY & ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE OF HC STRATEGY BUDGET AND PERFORMANCE METRICS (HC-50) OFFICE OF EXECUTIVE RESOURCES (HC-40) PROJECT &

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Attachment 2 AU Org Chart [Compatibility Mode]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Departmental Representative to the DNFSB Joseph Olencz Director Office of the Associate Under Secretary for Environment, Health, Safety and Security Associate Under Secretary for Environment, Health, Safety and Security Matthew B. Moury Associate Under Secretary Stephen A. Kirchhoff Deputy Associate Under Secretary Employee Concerns Program Andrew C. Lawrence Acting Director Dr. Michael J. Ardaiz Chief Medical Officer Office of Environmental Protection, Sustainability Support, and Corporate

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - EERE org chart public 3-28-2016

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Click to edit Master title style Vehicle Technologies (VTO) EE-3V Christy Cooper Director (Acting) Bioenergy Technologies (BETO) EE-3B Dr. Jonathan Male Director Fuel Cells Technologies (FCTO) EE-3F Dr. Sunita Satyapal Director Solar Energy Technologies (SETO) EE-4S Lidija Sekaric Director (Acting) Geothermal Technologies (GTO) EE-4G Dr. Susan Hamm Director (Acting) Wind & Water Power Technologies (WWPTO) EE-4W Jose Zayas Director Building Technologies (BTO) EE-5B (Vacant) Director Federal

  16. Charting the Course for Major EM Successes in 2016-2017 | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Records Management Central Characterization Program (CCP) Records Management This document was used to determine facts and conditions during the Department of Energy Accident Investigation Board's investigation into the radiological release event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Additional documents referenced and listed in the Phase 2 Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on February 14, 2014, report in Attachment F. Bibliography and References, are

  17. OCIO Org Chart (as of 4.4.16) (v03)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework February 2012 Presentation that outlines the rules, policies and orders that comprise the Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework. PDF icon Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework More Documents & Publications Summary Pamphlet, Nuclear Safety at the Department of Energy Notice of Violation, UChicago Argonne, LLC - WEA-2009-04 Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - EA Org Chart with and without names 04-13-16

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3/16 Office of Resources, Communications and Congressional Affairs Eric G. Nicoll, Director Barbara R. Stone, Deputy Director Office of Enterprise Assessments (EA) Office of Enterprise Assessments Glenn S. Podonsky, Director William A. Eckroade, Deputy Director Office of Enforcement Steven C. Simonson Director Office of Cyber Assessments William F. West Director Office of Security Assessments Pernell B. Watson Director Office of Cyber and Security Assessments John S. Boulden III Director Office

  19. Basic Research of Intrinsic Tamper Indication Markings Defined by Pulsed Laser Irradiation (Quad Chart).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moody, Neville R.

    2015-08-01

    Objective: We will research how short (ns) and ultrashort (fs) laser pulses interact with the surfaces of various materials to create complex color layers and morphological patterns. Method: We are investigating the site-specific, formation of microcolor features. Also, research includes a fundamental study of the physics underlying periodic ripple formation during femtosecond laser irradiation. Status of effort: Laser induced color markings were demonstrated on an increased number of materials (including metal thin films) and investigated for optical properties and microstructure. Technology that allows for marking curved surfaces (and large areas) has been implemented. We have used electro-magnetic solvers to model light-solid interactions leading to periodic surface ripple patterns. This includes identifying the roles of surface plasmon polaritons. Goals/Milestones: Research corrosion resistance of oxide color markings (salt spray, fog, polarization tests); Through modeling, investigate effects of multi-source scattering and interference on ripple patterns; Investigate microspectrophotometry for mapping color; and Investigate new methods for laser color marking curved surfaces and large areas.

  20. UNDP-Charting a New Low-Carbon Route to Development | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (ITCP), from setting objectives and participatory arrangements for the preparation of the Plan, to financing priority activities. The main audience for this publication is the...

  1. The future of automotive lithium-ion battery recycling: Charting a sustainable course

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaines, Linda

    2014-12-01

    This paper looks ahead, beyond the projected large-scale market penetration of vehicles containing advanced batteries, to the time when the spent batteries will be ready for final disposition. It describes a working system for recycling, using leadacid battery recycling as a model. Recycling of automotive lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries is more complicated and not yet established because few end-of-life batteries will need recycling for another decade. There is thus the opportunity now to obviate some of the technical, economic, and institutional roadblocks that might arise. The paper considers what actions can be started now to avoid the impediments to recycling andmoreensure that economical and sustainable options are available at the end of the batteries' useful life.less

  2. 151030_IM1 Org Chart_(v07)_energy.gov

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Acquisition Management Office Alan Andon, Director IM-13 IM-20 Director CIO, DCIO, COO, CTO, CA, ACIO Staff Sub-Division Director Detailed to CF * Effective 3.21.16 Office of the ...

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - Org Chart Color Coded 10_02_2015.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C., HR Specialist Matetic, D., HR Specialist (Lead) Chapman, M., HR Specialist Norris, C., HR Specialist Supervisor: Moody, H. Burns, D., HR Assistant Jezowicz, B., HR ...

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - Org Chart Color Coded 10_02_2015.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Finance, Acquisition & Assistance 726J000000 (805) Director: Wilson, J. Deputy: Riggi, D. ... A, CS Payne, L. CS Tomasiak, C., CS Wilson, J., CS Winaught, C., CS Site Support ...

  5. Semantic MediaWiki GeoChart | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Submitted by Dandrocec on 4 March, 2014 - 05:12 5 answers Points: 1 More accurately, javascript components can be added to SMW via extensions or Widgets. In the case of the Google...

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - Org Chart Color Coded 10_02_2015.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Project Management 726D000000 (500) Director: Zeh, C. Deputy: Bedick, R. SMTA: Bossart, S. Supervisory Administrative Specialist: Roberts, J. Kennedy, M., Program Analyst ...

  7. Policy Flash 2014-22 Chart Supplement to Acquistion Guide | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    42 101 -- requirements by contract type 9.pdf More Documents & Publications Policy Flash 2013-68 Acquisition Guide 42.101 Chapter 42 - Contract Administration Department of Energy...

  8. Policy Flash 2014-22 Chart Supplement to Acquistion Guide | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -- requirements by contract type 9.pdf More Documents & Publications Policy Flash 2013-68 Acquisition Guide 42.101 Acquisition Letter No. AL 2008-02 Chapter 42 - Contract...

  9. Geek-Up[04.01.2011]: Charting Wind, Thermal, Hydro Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Check out Bonneville Power Administration’s new near real-time energy monitoring – it displays the output of all wind, thermal and hydro generation in the agency’s balancing authority against its load. Updated every five minutes, it’s a great resource for universities, research laboratories and other utilities.

  10. 151030_IM1 Org Chart_(v07)_energy.gov

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VACANT Office of the Chief Information Officer Chief Information Security Officer Paul Cunningham (Acting) IT Program Manager Paul Cunningham Senior Advisor, Cyber Strategy...

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - Anderson.ARRA Oversight and Org Chart.042909

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Oversight * Oversight is provided by Departmental offices, other Federal and State agencies, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board, other governmental entities that are autonomous to the EMRAP * These entities make independent, informed judgments of performance and compliance * Project oversight provides insight on: - Poor administration; - Waste, fraud and abuse; - Potential arbitrary and capricious behaviors or decisions; - Actions, products or systems that may be out of compliance or illegal;

  12. The future of automotive lithium-ion battery recycling: Charting a sustainable course

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, Linda

    2014-12-01

    This paper looks ahead, beyond the projected large-scale market penetration of vehicles containing advanced batteries, to the time when the spent batteries will be ready for final disposition. It describes a working system for recycling, using leadacid battery recycling as a model. Recycling of automotive lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries is more complicated and not yet established because few end-of-life batteries will need recycling for another decade. There is thus the opportunity now to obviate some of the technical, economic, and institutional roadblocks that might arise. The paper considers what actions can be started now to avoid the impediments to recycling and ensure that economical and sustainable options are available at the end of the batteries' useful life.

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - Org Chart Color Coded 10_02_2015.pptx

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