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1

Anaerobic thermophilic culture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A newly discovered thermophilic anaerobe is described that was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC 3/550. T. Ethanolicus is cultured in aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions and is used in a novel process for producing ethanol by subjecting carbohydrates, particularly the saccharides, to fermentation action of the new microorganism in a biologically pure culture.

Ljungdahl, Lars G. (Athens, GA); Wiegel, Jurgen K. W. (Gottingen, DE)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Anaerobic thermophilic culture system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

Ljungdahl, Lars G. (Athens, GA); Wiegel, Jurgen K. W. (Gottingen, DE)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The longterm goal of this research effort is to obtain an anaerobic thermophilic bacterium that efficiently converts various hemicellulose-containing biomass to ethanol over a broad pH range. The strategy is to modify the outfit and regulation of the rate-limiting xylanases, glycosidases and xylan esterases in the ethanologenic, anaerobic thermophile Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, which grows between pH 4.5 and 9.5. Although it utilizes xylans, the xylanase, acetyl(xylan) esterase and O-methylglucuronidase activities in T. ethanolicus are barely measurable and regarded as the rate limiting steps in its xylan utilization. Thus, and also due to the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophiles, we characterize the hemicellulolytic enzymes from this and other anaerobic thermophiles as enzyme donors. Beside the active xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus, exhibiting the two different activities, we characterized 2 xylosidases, two acetyl(xylan) esterases, and an O-methylglucuronidase from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. We will continue with the characterization of xylanases from novel isolated slightly acidophilic, neutrophilic and slightly alkalophilic thermophiles. We have cloned, subcloned and partially sequenced the 165,000 Da (2 x 85,000) xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus and started with the cloning of the esterases from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. Consequently, we will develop a shuttle vector and continue to apply electroporation of autoplasts as a method for cloning into T. ethanolicus.

Wiegel, J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Complete genome sequences for the anaerobic, extremely thermophilic plant biomass-degrading bacteria Caldicellulosiruptor hydrothermalis, Caldicellulosiruptor kristjanssonii, Caldicellulosiruptor kronotskyensis, Caldicellulosiruptor owensenis, and Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The genus Caldicellulosiruptor contains the most thermophilic, plant biomass-degrading bacteria isolated to date. Previously, genome sequences from three cellulolytic members of this genus were reported (C. saccharolyticus, C. bescii, and C. obsidiansis). To further explore the physiological and biochemical basis for polysaccharide degradation within this genus, five additional genomes were sequenced: C. hydrothermalis, C. kristjanssonii, C. kronotskyensis, C. lactoaceticus, and C. owensensis. Taken together, the seven completed and one draft-phase Caldicellulosiruptor genomes suggest that, while central metabolism is highly conserved, significant differences in glycoside hydrolase inventories and numbers of carbohydrate transporters exist, a finding which likely relates to variability observed in plant biomass degradation capacity.

Blumer-Schuette, Sara E. [North Carolina State University; Ozdemir, Inci [North Carolina State University; Mistry, Dhaval [North Carolina State University; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Walston Davenport, Karen [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kelly, Robert M [North Carolina State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Cassava Stillage Treatment by Thermophilic Anaerobic Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper assesses the performance of a thermophilic anaerobic Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) in the treatment of cassava stillage under various organic loading rates (OLRs) without suspended solids (SS) separation. The reactor was seeded with mesophilic anaerobic granular sludge

Gang Luo; Li Xie; Zhonghai Zou; Qi Zhou

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Extreme thermophiles: moving beyond single-enzyme biocatalysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COCHE-51; NO. OF PAGES 10 COCHE-51; NO. OF PAGES 10 Please cite this article in press as: Frock AD, Kelly RM. Extreme thermophiles: moving beyond single-enzyme biocatalysis, Curr Opin Chem Eng (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ j.coche.2012.07.003 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Extreme thermophiles: moving beyond single-enzyme biocatalysis Andrew D Frock and Robert M Kelly Extremely thermophilic microorganisms have been sources of thermostable and thermoactive enzymes for over 30 years. However, information and insights gained from genome sequences, in conjunction with new tools for molecular genetics, have opened up exciting new possibilities for biotechnological opportunities based on extreme thermophiles that go beyond single-step biotransformations. Although the pace for discovering novel microorganisms has slowed over

7

Hemicellulases from the ethanologenic thermophile, Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus and related anaerobic thermophiles. Final report, September 1992--June 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The short term goals of this application were to characterize hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles on the biochemical and molecular level to extend the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophilic bacteria. This objective includes the following tasks: (1) Traditional purification and biochemical/biophysical characterization of xylanases from the newly isolated, slightly alkalitolerant strain NDF190, and the slightly acid-tolerant strain YS485, both with high xylanolytic activities, and of the 4-O-methyl glucuronidase and arabinosidase from strain NDF190 and the acetyl (xylan) esterase from T. ethanolicus. This also includes determining the N-terminal sequences and obtaining gene probes. (2) Elucidation of the regulation of hemicellulolytic enzymes in anaerobic thermophiles. (3) To clone into E. coli and identify the multiplicity of the enzymes involved in hemicellulose degradation by T. ethanolicus and other suitable organisms. (4) To purify and characterize the recombinant enzymes with the goal of identifying the best enzymes for cloning into the ethanologenic T. ethanolicus to obtain an optimized hemicellulose utilization by this bacterium.

Wiegel, J.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

High rate mesophilic, thermophilic, and temperature phased anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge: A pilot scale study  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High temperatures were tested in single and two-stage anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The increased temperature demonstrated the possibility of improving typical yields of the conventional mesophilic process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The temperature phased anaerobic digestion process (65 + 55 Degree-Sign C) showed the best performances with yields of 0.49 m{sup 3}/kgVS{sub fed}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonia and phosphate released from solids destruction determined the precipitation of struvite in the reactor. - Abstract: The paper reports the findings of a two-year pilot scale experimental trial for the mesophilic (35 Degree-Sign C), thermophilic (55 Degree-Sign C) and temperature phased (65 + 55 Degree-Sign C) anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge. During the mesophilic and thermophilic runs, the reactor operated at an organic loading rate of 2.2 kgVS/m{sup 3}d and a hydraulic retention time of 20 days. In the temperature phased run, the first reactor operated at an organic loading rate of 15 kgVS/m{sup 3}d and a hydraulic retention time of 2 days while the second reactor operated at an organic loading rate of 2.2 kgVS/m{sup 3}d and a hydraulic retention time of 18 days (20 days for the whole temperature phased system). The performance of the reactor improved with increases in temperature. The COD removal increased from 35% in mesophilic conditions, to 45% in thermophilic conditions, and 55% in the two stage temperature phased system. As a consequence, the specific biogas production increased from 0.33 to 0.45 and to 0.49 m{sup 3}/kgVS{sub fed} at 35, 55, and 65 + 55 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The extreme thermophilic reactor working at 65 Degree-Sign C showed a high hydrolytic capability and a specific yield of 0.33 gCOD (soluble) per gVS{sub fed}. The effluent of the extreme thermophilic reactor showed an average concentration of soluble COD and volatile fatty acids of 20 and 9 g/l, respectively. Acetic and propionic acids were the main compounds found in the acids mixture. Because of the improved digestion efficiency, organic nitrogen and phosphorus were solubilised in the bulk. Their concentration, however, did not increase as expected because of the formation of salts of hydroxyapatite and struvite inside the reactor.

Bolzonella, David, E-mail: david.bolzonella@univr.it [University of Verona, Department of Biotechnology, Strada Le Grazie, 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Cavinato, Cristina, E-mail: cavinato@unive.it [University of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Computer Science and Statistics, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Fatone, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.fatone@univr.it [University of Verona, Department of Biotechnology, Strada Le Grazie, 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Pavan, Paolo, E-mail: pavan@unive.it [University of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Computer Science and Statistics, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Cecchi, Franco, E-mail: franco.cecchi@univr.it [University of Verona, Department of Biotechnology, Strada Le Grazie, 15, 37134 Verona (Italy)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Anaerobic High-Throughput Cultivation Method for Isolation of Thermophiles Using Biomass-Derived Substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flow cytometry (FCM) techniques have been developed for sorting mesophilic organisms, but the difficulty increases if the target microbes are thermophilic anaerobes. We demonstrate a reliable, high-throughput method of screening thermophilic anaerobic organisms using FCM and 96-well plates for growth on biomass-relevant substrates. The method was tested using the cellulolytic thermophiles Clostridium ther- mocellum (Topt = 55 C), Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis (Topt = 78 C) and the fermentative hyperthermo- philes, Pyrococcus furiosus (Topt = 100 C) and Thermotoga maritima (Topt = 80 C). Multi-well plates were incubated at various temperatures for approximately 72 120 h and then tested for growth. Positive growth resulting from single cells sorted into individual wells containing an anaerobic medium was verified by OD600. Depending on the growth substrate, up to 80 % of the wells contained viable cultures, which could be transferred to fresh media. This method was used to isolate thermophilic microbes from Rabbit Creek, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming. Substrates for enrichment cultures including crystalline cellulose (Avicel), xylan (from Birchwood), pretreated switchgrass and Populus were used to cultivate organisms that may be of interest to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Allman, Steve L [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Elkins, James G [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste: Methane production modeling  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methane generation may be modeled by means of modified product generation model of Romero Garcia (1991). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic matter content and particle size influence the kinetic parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher organic matter content and lower particle size enhance the biomethanization. - Abstract: The influence of particle size and organic matter content of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) in the overall kinetics of dry (30% total solids) thermophilic (55 Degree-Sign C) anaerobic digestion have been studied in a semi-continuous stirred tank reactor (SSTR). Two types of wastes were used: synthetic OFMSW (average particle size of 1 mm; 0.71 g Volatile Solids/g waste), and OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant (average particle size of 30 mm; 0.16 g Volatile Solids/g waste). A modification of a widely-validated product-generation kinetic model has been proposed. Results obtained from the modified-model parameterization at steady-state (that include new kinetic parameters as K, Y{sub pMAX} and {theta}{sub MIN}) indicate that the features of the feedstock strongly influence the kinetics of the process. The overall specific growth rate of microorganisms ({mu}{sub max}) with synthetic OFMSW is 43% higher compared to OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant: 0.238 d{sup -1} (K = 1.391 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.167 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 7.924 days) vs. 0.135 d{sup -1} (K = 1.282 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.150 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 9.997 days) respectively. Finally, it could be emphasized that the validation of proposed modified-model has been performed successfully by means of the simulation of non-steady state data for the different SRTs tested with each waste.

Fdez-Gueelfo, L.A., E-mail: alberto.fdezguelfo@uca.es [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Alvarez-Gallego, C. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Sales, D. [Department of Environmental Technologies, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Romero Garcia, L.I. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Glycoside hydrolase inventory drives plant polysaccharide deconstruction by the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glycoside Glycoside Hydrolase Inventory Drives Plant Polysaccharide Deconstruction by the Extremely Thermophilic Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus Amy L. VanFossen, Inci Ozdemir, Samantha L. Zelin, Robert M. Kelly Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7905; telephone: 919-515-6396; fax: 919-515-3465; e-mail: rmkelly@eos.ncsu.edu Received 15 November 2010; revision received 22 January 2011; accepted 1 February 2011 Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.23093 ABSTRACT: The genome of Caldicellulosiruptor saccharoly- ticus encodes a range of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) that mediate plant biomass deconstruction by this bacterium. Two GH-based genomic loci that appear to be central to the hydrolysis of hemicellulosic and cellulosic substrates

12

Trichloroethene Removal From Waste Gases in Anaerobic Biotrickling Filters Through Reductive Dechlorination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1) during thermophilic anaerobic digestion for production ofa keen interest in anaerobic digestion as well, and it wasfor thermophilic anaerobic digestion, and should stimulate

Popat, Sudeep Chandrakant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov., a lipolytic, anaerobic, alkalitolerant, thermophilic bacterium utilizing short- and long-chain fatty acids in syntrophic coculture with a methanogenic archaeum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three strains of an anaerobic thermophilic organoheterotrophic lipolytic alkalitolerant bacterium, Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain JW/VS-264{sup T}; DSM 11003) were isolated from alkaline hot springs of Lake Bogoria (Kenya). The cells were nonmotile, non-spore forming, straight or slightly curved rods. At 60{degrees}C, the pH range for growth determined at 25{degrees}C [pH{sup 25{degrees}C}] was 7.15 to 9.5, with an optimum between 8.1 and 8.9 (pH{sup 60{degrees}C} of 7.6 and 8.1). At a pH{sup 25{degrees}C} of 8.5 temperature range for growth was from 52 to 70{degrees}C, with an optimum between 60 and 66{degrees}C. The shortest doubling time was around 1 h. In pure culture the bacterium grew in a mineral base medium supplemented with yeast extract, tryptone, Casamino Acids, betaine, and crotonate as carbon sources, producing acetate as a major product and constitutively a lipase. During growth in the presence of olive oil, free long-chain fatty acids were accumulated in the medium but the pure culture syntrophic coculture (Methanobacterium strain JW/VS-M29) the lipolytic bacteria grew on triacylglycerols and linear saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with 4 to 18 carbon atoms, but glycerol was not utilized. Fatty acids with even numbers of carbon atoms were degraded to acetate and methane, while from odd-numbered fatty acids 1 mol of propionate per mol of fatty acid was additionally formed. 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified Syntrophospora and Syntrophomonas spp. as closest phylogenetic neighbors.

Svetlitshnyi, V.; Wiegel, J. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Rainey, F. [German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures, Braunschweig (Germany)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Efficient degradation of lignocellulosic plant biomass without pretreatment by the 9 thermophilic anaerobe, Anaerocellum thermophilum DSM 6725  

SciTech Connect

Very few cultivated microorganisms can degrade lignocellulosic biomass without chemical pretreatment. We show here that 'Anaerocellum thermophilum' DSM 6725, an anaerobic bacterium that grows optimally at 75 C, efficiently utilizes various types of untreated plant biomass, as well as crystalline cellulose and xylan. These include hardwoods such as poplar, low-lignin grasses such as napier and Bermuda grasses, and high-lignin grasses such as switchgrass. The organism did not utilize only the soluble fraction of the untreated biomass, since insoluble plant biomass (as well as cellulose and xylan) obtained after washing at 75 C for 18 h also served as a growth substrate. The predominant end products from all growth substrates were hydrogen, acetate, and lactate. Glucose and cellobiose (on crystalline cellulose) and xylose and xylobiose (on xylan) also accumulated in the growth media during growth on the defined substrates but not during growth on the plant biomass. A. thermophilum DSM 6725 grew well on first- and second-spent biomass derived from poplar and switchgrass, where spent biomass is defined as the insoluble growth substrate recovered after the organism has reached late stationary phase. No evidence was found for the direct attachment of A. thermophilum DSM 6725 to the plant biomass. This organism differs from the closely related strain A. thermophilum Z-1320 in its ability to grow on xylose and pectin. Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus DSM 8903 (optimum growth temperature, 70 C), a close relative of A. thermophilum DSM 6725, grew well on switchgrass but not on poplar, indicating a significant difference in the biomass-degrading abilities of these two otherwise very similar organisms.

Yang, Sung-Jae [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kataeva, Irina [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Doeppke, Crissa [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Davis, Dr. Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Westpheling, Janet [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense sp. nov., a slightly acidophilic, anaerobic thermophile isolated from various hot springs in New Zealand, and emendation of the genus Thermoanaerobacterium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six moderately acidophilic, thermophilic bacterial strains with similar properties were isolated from geothermally heated water and sediment samples collected in New Zealand. These Gram stain-negative but Gram type-positive, rod-shaped bacteria formed oval terminal endospores. The cells were peritrichously flagellated and exhibited tumbling motility. At 60{degrees}C the pH range for growth was 3.8 to 6.8, and the optimum pH was 5.2 when the organisms were grown with xylose. At pH 5.2 the temperature range for growth was 35 to 66{degrees}C, and the optimum temperature was 60 to 63{degrees}C. The fermentation products from flucose or xylose were ethanol, acetate, lactate, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}. The DNA G+C content was 34.5 to 35 mol%. On the basis of properties such as formation of elemental sulfur from thiosulfate, growth at acidic pH values at elevated temperatures, and the results of a 16S rRNA sequence comparison performed with previously validly published species belonging to the genus Thermoanaerobacterium, we propose that strain JW/SL-NZ613{sup T} (T = type strain) and five similar strains isolated from samples collected in New Zealand represent a new species, Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense. Strain JW/SL-NZ613{sup T} (= DSM 10170) is the type strain of this species.

Shu-Ying Liu; Wiegel, J. [Univ. of Georiga, Athens, GA (United States); Rainey, F.A. [Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen, Braunschweig (Germany)] [and others

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Extremism  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

i i LEFT-WING EXTREMISM: The Current Threat Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Safeguards and Security Washington, DC Prepared by Karl A. Seger, Ph.D. Center for Human Reliability Studies Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge, TN April 2001 ORISE 01-0439 i TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .............................................................................................ii I. LEFTIST EXTREMISM IS ALIVE AND WELL....................................................... 1 TERROR NETWORK U.S.A. ..................................................................................... 1 EXTREMISM ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT .............................................................. 3 THE THREAT.............................................................................................................

17

Liquid Fuel from Heat-Loving Microorganisms: H2-Dependent Conversion of CO2 to Liquid Electrofuels by Extremely Thermophilic Archaea  

SciTech Connect

Electrofuels Project: NC State is working with the University of Georgia to create Electrofuels from primitive organisms called extremophiles that evolved before photosynthetic organisms and live in extreme, hot water environments with temperatures ranging from 167-212 degrees Fahrenheit The team is genetically engineering these microorganisms so they can use hydrogen to turn carbon dioxide directly into alcohol-based fuels. High temperatures are required to distill the biofuels from the water where the organisms live, but the heat-tolerant organisms will continue to thrive even as the biofuels are being distilled—making the fuel-production process more efficient. The microorganisms don’t require light, so they can be grown anywhere—inside a dark reactor or even in an underground facility.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

[Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles: Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to provide an understanding of thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms capable of breaking down acetic acid, the precursor of two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors. Recent results include: (1) the isolation of Methanothrix strain CALLS-1, which grows much more rapidly than mesophilic strains; (2) the demonstration that thermophilic cultures of Methanosarcina and Methanothrix show minimum thresholds for acetate utilization of 1--2.5 mM and 10--20{mu}m respectively, in agreement with ecological data indicating that Methanothrix is favored by low acetate concentration; (3) the demonstration of high levels of thermostable acetyl-coA synthetase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strains CALS-1; (4) the demonstration of methanogenesis from acetate and ATP in cell free extracts of strain CALS-1. (5) the demonstration that methanogenesis from acetate required 2 ATP/methane, and, in contrast to Methanosarcina, was independent of hydrogen and other electron donors; (6) the finding that entropy effects must be considered when predicting the level of hydrogen in thermophilic syntrophic cultures. (7) the isolation and characterization of the Desulfotomaculum thermoacetoxidans. Current research is centered on factors which allow thermophilic Methanothrix to compete with Methanosarcina.

Zinder, S.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Complete Genome Sequence of the Anaerobic Halophilic Alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophilus JW/NM-WN-LFT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The genome of the anaerobic halophilic alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophiles consists of one chromosome and two plasmids.The present study is the first to report the completely sequenced genome of polyextremophile and the harboring genes harboring genes associated with roles in regulation of intracellular osmotic pressure, pH homeostasis, and thermophilic stability.

Mesbah, Noha [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wiegel, Juergen [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Why Sequence Thermophilic Methanoarchaea?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermophilic Methanoarchaea? Thermophilic Methanoarchaea? Microbes that reduce carbon dioxide to methane catalyze a significant component of the carbon cycle on Earth and are responsible for most of the methane in the atmospere. Since methane contributes significantly to the greenhouse effect, understanding the biological controls on emissions of methane may provide the opportunity to compensate for the emission of other important trace gases, such as CO2. In addition, methane is a common fuel, and the biological production of methane catalyzed by these bacteria has great potential as an alternative fuel source. This application is of special significance because it is "CO2 neutral", ie., it does not result in the net emissions of greenhouse gases to the earth's atmosphere.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Why sequence thermophiles in Great Basin hot springs?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermophiles in Great Basin hot springs? thermophiles in Great Basin hot springs? A thermophile is an organism that thrives in extremely hot temperature conditions. These conditions are found in the Great Basin hot springs, where the organisms have been exposed to unique conditions which guide their lifecycle. High temperature environments often support large and diverse populations of microorganisms, which appear to be hot spots of biological innovation of carbon fixation. Sequencing these microbes that make their home in deadly heat could provide various insights into understanding energy production and carbon cycling. Converting cellulosic biomass to ethanol is one of the most promising strategies to reduce petroleum consumption in the near future. This can only be achieved by enhancing recovery of fermentable sugars from complex

22

Anaerobic Digestion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Anaerobic digestion is a common technology in today's agriculture, municipal waste, and brewing industries. It uses bacteria to break down waste organic materials into methane and other gases,...

23

Computational design and characterization of a temperature-sensitive plasmid replicon for gram positive thermophiles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

design design and characterization of a temperature-sensitive plasmid replicon for gram positive thermophiles Olson and Lynd Olson and Lynd Journal of Biological Engineering 2012, 6:5 http://www.jbioleng.org/content/6/1/5 R E S E A R C H Open Access Computational design and characterization of a temperature-sensitive plasmid replicon for gram positive thermophiles Daniel G Olson 1,3 and Lee R Lynd 1,2,3* Abstract Background: Temperature-sensitive (Ts) plasmids are useful tools for genetic engineering, but there are currently none compatible with the gram positive, thermophilic, obligate anaerobe, Clostridium thermocellum. Traditional mutagenesis techniques yield Ts mutants at a low frequency, and therefore requires the development of high-throughput screening protocols, which are also not available for this organism. Recently there has been progress in the development

24

Complete Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic, Piezophilic, Heterotrophic Bacterium Marinitoga piezophila KA3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marinitoga piezophila KA3 is a thermophilic, anaerobic, chemoorganotrophic, sulfur-reducing bacterium isolated from the Grandbonum deep-sea hydrothermal vent site at the East Pacific Rise (13 degrees N, 2,630-m depth). The genome of M. piezophila KA3 comprises a 2,231,407-bp circular chromosome and a 13,386-bp circular plasmid. This genome was sequenced within Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute CSP 2010.

Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Vannier, Pauline [Ifremer, Plouzane, France; Oger, Phil [University of Lyon, France; Bartlett, Douglas [University of California, San Diego & La Jolla; Noll, Kenneth M [University of Connecticut, Storrs; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Jebbar, Mohamed [Ifremer, Plouzane, France

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Energy Basics: Anaerobic Digestion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biomass Biofuels Biopower Anaerobic Digestion Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Anaerobic Digestion Anaerobic digestion is a...

26

Microbial Ecology of Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion. Final Report  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This grant supported research on methanogenic archaea. The two major areas that were supported were conversion of acetic acid to methane and nitrogen fixation by Methanosarcina. Among the achievements of this research were the isolation of novel methanogenic cultures, elucidation of the pathways from acetate to methane, description of a specific DNA-binding complex in nitrogen fixing methanogens, and demonstration of an alternative nitrogenase in Methanosarcina.

Zinder, Stephen H.

2000-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Kinetics of inactivation of indicator pathogens during thermophilic anaerobic digestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in large amounts in coal and natural gas processing, petroleum industries, biogas production, and sewage

28

Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion of metallic oilfield pipelines by microorganisms is a costly but poorly understood phenomenon, with standard treatment methods targeting mesophilic sulfatereducing bacteria. In assessing biocorrosion potential at an Alaskan North Slope oil field, we identified thermophilic hydrogen-using methanogens, syntrophic bacteria, peptideand amino acid-fermenting bacteria, iron reducers, sulfur/thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing archaea. These microbes can stimulate metal corrosion through production of organic acids, CO2, sulfur species, and via hydrogen oxidation and iron reduction, implicating many more types of organisms than are currently targeted. Micromolar quantities of putative anaerobic metabolites of C1-C4 n-alkanes in pipeline fluids were detected, implying that these low molecular weight hydrocarbons, routinely injected into reservoirs for oil recovery purposes, are biodegraded and provide biocorrosive microbial communities with an important source of nutrients.

Duncan, Kathleen E.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Parisi, Victoria A.; Tanner, Ralph S.; Green Tringe, Susannah; Bristow, Jim; Suflita, Joseph M.

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

29

[Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles]. Annual progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Acetate is the precursor of approximately two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors and many other methanogenic habitats. Besides their intrinsic interest, thermophilic acetotrophic methanogenic cultures usually grow at least twice as fast as their mesophilic counterparts, making them more amenable to study. In recent years, attention has been mainly focused on the thermophilic acetate utilizing methanogen Methanothrix strain CALS-1. Methanothrix, also called Methanosaeta, is one of only two methanogenic genera known to convert acetate to methane, the other being Methanosarcina. The faster-growing more versatile Methanosarcina has been better studied. However, when one examines anaerobic digestor contents, Methanothrix is often the dominant acetate-utilizing methanogen. As described in previous progress reports, the authors have achieved methanogenesis from acetate in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strain CALS-1 grown in a pH auxostat. Using these cell extracts, specific activities for methanogenesis from acetate and ATP of 100--300 nmol/min were routinely obtained, levels comparable to the rate in whole cells, which is not usually the case in methanogenic extracts. Recently obtained results are given and discussed for the following: Methanogenesis in crude extracts; Role of the cell membrane in methanogenesis from acetate; Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase; Novel thermophilic cultures converting acetate to methane; and Methanol-utilizing methanogen.

Zinder, S.H.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Community dynamics and glycoside hydrolase activities of thermophilic bacterial consortia adapted to switchgrass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Industrial-scale biofuel production requires robust enzymatic cocktails to produce fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. Thermophilic bacterial consortia are a potential source of cellulases and hemicellulases adapted to harsher reaction conditions than commercial fungal enzymes. Compost-derived microbial consortia were adapted to switchgrass at 60 C to develop thermophilic biomass-degrading consortia for detailed studies. Microbial community analysis using small-subunit rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing and short-read metagenomic sequencing demonstrated that thermophilic adaptation to switchgrass resulted in low-diversity bacterial consortia with a high abundance of bacteria related to thermophilic paenibacilli, Rhodothermus marinus, and Thermus thermophilus. At lower abundance, thermophilic Chloroflexi and an uncultivated lineage of the Gemmatimonadetes phylum were observed. Supernatants isolated from these consortia had high levels of xylanase and endoglucanase activities. Compared to commercial enzyme preparations, the endoglucanase enzymes had a higher thermotolerance and were more stable in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]), an ionic liquid used for biomass pretreatment. The supernatants were used to saccharify [C2mim][OAc]-pretreated switchgrass at elevated temperatures (up to 80 C), demonstrating that these consortia are an excellent source of enzymes for the development of enzymatic cocktails tailored to more extreme reaction conditions.

Gladden, J.M.; Allgaier, M.; Miller, C.S.; Hazen, T.C.; VanderGheynst, J.S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Simmons, B.A.; Singer, S.W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Arnold Schwarzenegger ANAEROBIC DIGESTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor ANAEROBIC DIGESTER IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES Phase I - A Survey of U concrete steps to install an anaerobic digestion (AD) facility and documentation of the factors technology. Keywords Anaerobic digester, biogas, electricity production, manure management #12;4 Table

32

Arnold Schwarzenegger ANAEROBIC DIGESTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor ANAEROBIC DIGESTER IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES Phase II - A Survey who took concrete steps to install an anaerobic digestion (AD) facility and documentation samples are overwhelmingly in favor of AD technology. Keywords Anaerobic digester, biogas, electricity

33

Anaerobic fermentation of beef cattle manure. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research to convert livestock manure and crop residues into methane and a high protein feed ingredient by thermophilic anaerobic fermentation are summarized. The major biological and operational factors involved in methanogenesis were discussed, and a kinetic model that describes the fermentation process was presented. Substrate biodegradability, fermentation temperature, and influent substrate concentration were shown to have significant effects on CH/sub 4/ production rate. The kinetic model predicted methane production rates of existing pilot and full-scale fermentation systems to within 15%. The highest methane production rate achieved by the fermenter was 4.7 L CH/sub 4//L fermenter day. This is the highest rate reported in the literature and about 4 times higher than other pilot or full-scale systems fermenting livestock manures. Assessment of the energy requirements for anaerobic fermentation systems showed that the major energy requirement for a thermophilic system was for maintaining the fermenter temperature. The next major energy consumption was due to the mixing of the influent slurry and fermenter liquor. An approach to optimizing anaerobic fermenter designs by selecting design criteria that maximize the net energy production per unit cost was presented. Based on the results, we believe that the economics of anaerobic fermentation is sufficiently favorable for farm-scale demonstration of this technology.

Hashimoto, A.G.; Chen, Y.R.; Varel, V.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Conversion of sugarcane bagasse to carboxylic acids under thermophilic conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the inevitable depletion of the petroleum supply and increasing energy demands in the world, interest has been growing in bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., sugarcane bagasse). Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant, inexpensive, and renewable resource. Most of current conversion technologies require expensive enzymes and sterility. In contrast, the patented MixAlco process requires no enzymes or sterility, making it attractive to convert lignocellulosic biomass to transportation fuels and valuable chemicals. This study focuses on pretreatment and thermophilic fermentation in the MixAlco process. Ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3) was discovered to be a better pH buffer than previously widely used calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in anaerobic fermentations under thermophilic conditions (55°C). The desired pH should be controlled within 6.5 to 7.5. Over 85% acetate content in the product was found in paper fermentations and bagasse fermentations. Hot-lime-water-treated bagasse countercurrent fermentations buffered by ammonium bicarbonate achieved 50–60% higher total product concentrations than those using calcium carbonate. It was nearly double in paper batch fermentations if the pH was controlled around 7.0. Ammonium bicarbonate is a “weak” methane inhibitor, so a strong methane inhibitor (e.g., iodoform) is still required in ammonium bicarbonate buffered fermentations. Residual calcium salts did not show significant effects on ammonium bicarbonate buffered fermentations. Lake inocula from the Great Salt Lake, Utah, proved to be feasible in ammonium bicarbonate buffered fermentations. Under mesophilic conditions (40°C), the inoculum from the Great Salt Lake increased the total product concentration about 30%, compared to the marine inoculum. No significant fermentation performance difference, however, was found under thermophilic conditions. The Continuum Particle Distribution Model (CPDM) is a powerful tool to predict product concentrations and conversions for long-term countercurrent fermentations, based on batch fermentation data. The experimental acid concentrations and conversions agree well with the CPDM predictions (average absolute error < 15%). Aqueous ammonia treatment proved feasible for bagasse. Air-lime-treated bagasse had the highest acid concentration among the three treated bagasse. Air-lime treatment coupled with ammonium bicarbonate buffered fermentations is preferred for a “crop-tofuel” process. Aqueous ammonia treatment combined with ammonium bicarbonate buffered fermentations is a viable modification of the MixAlco process, if “ammonia recycle” is deployed.

Fu, Zhihong

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Methanogenic Population Dynamics during Start-Up of Anaerobic Digesters Treating Municipal Solid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: An aggressive start-up strategy was used to initiate codigestion in two anaerobic, continuously mixed bench-top reactors at mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. The digesters were inoculated with mesophilic anaerobic sewage sludge and cattle manure and were fed a mixture of simulated municipal solid waste and biosolids in proportions that reflect U.S. production rates. The design organic loading rate was 3.1 kg volatile solids/m 3 /day and the retention time was 20 days. Ribosomal RNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were used to determine the methanogenic community structure in the inocula and the digesters. Chemical analyses were performed to evaluate digester performance. The aggressive start-up strategy was successful for the thermophilic reactor, despite the use of a

Biosolids; Matt E. Griffin; Katherine D. Mcmahon; Roderick I. Mackie; Lutgarde Raskin

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Why sequence carbon monoxide oxidizing thermophiles?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbon monoxide oxidizing thermophiles? carbon monoxide oxidizing thermophiles? Many microbes that use carbon monoxide as an energy source are found in high temperature environments such as geothermal areas. Researchers think that these carboxydotrophs may be involved in reducing potentially toxic carbon monoxide hotspots by combine with water to form hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate, which are in turn used for thermophilic energy conservation and carbon sequestration mechanisms. The project focuses on sequencing two closely related microbes, one of which is Carboxydothermus hydrogenformans. A strain of C. hydrogenformans has been grown in hydrogen-enriched synthesis gas (syngas), which contains a mix of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Researchers are interested in sequencing both microbial strains to track the genome's evolution and

37

Anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residue: potential for improvement and implementation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of studies designed to evaluate the potential of rapidly improving the technology of anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residues and methods of implementing it in existing agricultural operations are reported. The main objectives of this study were to: identify simple and low cost anaerobic fermentor design criteria that would be appropriate in small agricultural operations, develop high rate fermentor concepts that would enable multiple product recovery from the reactor, expand the information base particularly in the area of temperature influence on the process, and to review sociological and economic issues relating to implementation of fermentation technology. This study has identified several major anaerobic fermentation concepts which illustrate that the technology may be rapidly improved. A simple reactor design utilizing an unmixed plug flow concept was shown to be comparable to the more complex completely mixed reactor when using dairy cow residue. A high rate thermophilic reactor designed to encourage flotation of particulate solids illustrated that liquid, solid, and gaseous products can be generated within the anaerobic fermentor thus eliminating an additional dewatering unit process. A third reactor concept involved extension of the anaerobic attached microbial film expanded bed to the treatment of cow manure slurries. A high rate of methane generation was recorded. Comprehensive thermophilic fermentation studies (60/sup 0/C) indicated that the increased temperature resulted in little improvement in total quantity or the rate of yield of gas over that obtained with mesophilic fermentation with reactor retention periods greater than 10 days. Finally, other areas where preliminary date were obtained are noted.

Jewell, W. J.; Capener, H. R.; Dell'orto, S.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Genome sequence of the thermophilic sulfate-reducing ocean bacterium Thermodesulfatator indicus type strain (CIR29812T)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodesulfatator indicus Moussard et al. 2004 is a member of the genomically so far poorly characterized family Thermodesulfobacteriaceae in the phylum Thermodesulfobacteria. Members of this phylum are of interest because they represent a distinct, deep-branching, Gram-negative lineage. T. indicus is an anaerobic, thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reducer isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. The 2,322,224 bp long chromosome with its 2,233 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Anaerobic Digestion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from - Anaerobic Digestion) Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Anaerobic Digestion Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

40

Anaerobic Digestion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Anaerobic Digestion Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAnaerobicDigestion&oldid267145"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy Basics: Anaerobic Digestion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of heat energy per cubic foot (0.028 cubic meters) when burned. Natural gas is a fossil fuel that was created eons ago by the anaerobic decomposition of organic materials. It is...

42

Factors controlling pathogen destruction during anaerobic digestion of biowastes  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic digestion is the principal method of stabilising biosolids from urban wastewater treatment in the UK, and it also has application for the treatment of other types of biowaste. Increasing awareness of the potential risks to human and animal health from environmental sources of pathogens has focused attention on the efficacy of waste treatment processes at destroying pathogenic microorganisms in biowastes recycled to agricultural land. The degree of disinfection achieved by a particular anaerobic digester is influenced by a variety of interacting operational variables and conditions, which can often deviate from the ideal. Experimental investigations demonstrate that Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. are not damaged by mesophilic temperatures, whereas rapid inactivation occurs by thermophilic digestion. A hydraulic, biokinetic and thermodynamic model of pathogen inactivation during anaerobic digestion showed that a 2 log{sub 10} reduction in E. coli (the minimum removal required for agricultural use of conventionally treated biosolids) is likely to challenge most conventional mesophilic digesters, unless strict maintenance and management practices are adopted to minimise dead zones and by-pass flow. Efficient mixing and organic matter stabilisation are the main factors controlling the rate of inactivation under mesophilic conditions and not a direct effect of temperature per se on pathogenic organisms.

Smith, S.R. [Centre for Environmental Control and Waste Management, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk; Lang, N.L. [Centre for Environmental Control and Waste Management, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cheung, K.H.M. [Centre for Environmental Control and Waste Management, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Spanoudaki, K. [Centre for Environmental Control and Waste Management, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana) Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)...

44

Anaerobic Digestion Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As fuel resources become scarcer, it has become more important to identify and harness alternative energy sources. Currently, 24 states have renewable portfolio standards (RPS), requiring electricity providers to obtain a minimum percentage of their power from renewable energy sources, with the purpose of becoming less dependent on fossil fuels, reducing waste and greenhouse gas emissions, and decreasing costs as fuel prices increase. Anaerobic digestion (AD) has proven itself a viable alternative techno...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

45

Anaerobic digestion process  

SciTech Connect

An algae culture grown on the water from the digested slurry of a biogasification plant serves as a means of removing CO/sub 2/ from the methane stream while purifying the wastewater and providing more biomass for the anaerobic digestion plant. Tested on a sewage-sludge digestion system, the proposed process improved the methane yield by 32% and methane concentration by 53-98 vol % while lowering the concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in the final water.

Ishida, M.; Haga, R.; Odawara, Y.

1982-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

46

Weather Extremes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extremes Extremes Nature Bulletin No. 45 December 15, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation WEATHER EXTREMES Chicago lies in a temperate zone. We are fortunate. The lowest temperature recorded here since the establishment of the Weather Bureau in 1870 was -- 23 F on Dec. 24, 1872. The lowest records elsewhere in the United States are--66 F at Riverside Ranger Station, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, on Feb. 9, 1933; and -- 78 F at Fort Yukon, Alaska, on Jan. 14, 1934. The lowest record anywhere on earth is 90 F at Verkhoyansk, Siberia, Feb. 5 and 7, 1892. The greatest snowfall recorded in Chicago in one 24-hour period was 14.9 inches on Jan. 30, 1939; but 19.2 inches fell between 1:10 a.m. on March 24 and 8:33 p.m. on March 26, 1930.

47

Anaerobic digestion of equine waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The goals of this project were to determine the methane production potential of horse manure during anaerobic digestion; to examine the effect of softwood chip… (more)

Wartell, Brian A., 1984-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Encapsulated in silica: genome, proteome and physiology of the thermophilic bacterium Anoxybacillus flavithermus  

SciTech Connect

Gram-positive bacteria of the genus Anoxybacillus have been found in diverse thermophilic habitats, such as geothermal hot springs and manure, and in processed foods such as gelatin and milk powder. Anoxybacillus flavithermus is a facultatively anaerobic bacterium found in super-saturated silica solutions and in opaline silica sinter. The ability of A. flavithermus to grow in super-saturated silica solutions makes it an ideal subject to study the processes of sinter formation, which might be similar to the biomineralization processes that occurred at the dawn of life. We report here the complete genome sequence of A. flavithermus strain WK1, isolated from the waste water drain at the Wairakei geothermal power station in New Zealand. It consists of a single chromosome of 2,846,746 base pairs and is predicted to encode 2,863 proteins. In silico genome analysis identified several enzymes that could be involved in silica adaptation and biofilm formation, and their predicted functions were experimentally validated in vitro. Proteomic analysis confirmed the regulation of biofilm-related proteins and crucial enzymes for the synthesis of long-chain polyamines as constituents of silica nanospheres. Microbial fossils preserved in silica and silica sinters are excellent objects for studying ancient life, a new paleobiological frontier. An integrated analysis of the A. flavithermus genome and proteome provides the first glimpse of metabolic adaptation during silicification and sinter formation. Comparative genome analysis suggests an extensive gene loss in the Anoxybacillus/Geobacillus branch after its divergence from other bacilli.

Saw, Jimmy H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mountain, Bruce W [NEW ZEALAND; Feng, Lu [NANKAI UNIV; Omelchenko, Marina V [NCBI/NLM/NIH; Hou, Shaobin [UNIV OF HAWAII; Saito, Jennifer A [UNIV OF HAWAII; Stott, Matthew B [NEW ZEALAND; Li, Dan [NANKAI UNIV; Zhao, Guang [NANKAI UNIV; Wu, Junli [NANKAI UNIV; Galperin, Michael Y [NCBI/NLM/NIH; Koonin, Eugene V [NCBI/NLM/NIH; Makarova, Kira S [NCBI/NLM/NIH; Wolf, Yuri I [NCBI/NLM/NIH; Rigden, Daniel J [UNIV OF LIVERPOOL; Dunfield, Peter F [UNIV OF CALGARY; Wang, Lei [NANKAI UNIV; Alam, Maqsudul [UNIV OF HAWAII

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Extreme MPG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extreme MPG Extreme MPG World Record Fuel Efficiency Link to video of Pac Car Link to Pac Car Animation Pac II vehicle and team The PAC-Car II set a new world record in fuel efficient driving during the Shell Eco-marathon in Ladoux (France) on June 26, 2005. Running on hydrogen, the PAC-Car II achieved a fuel economy of 12,665 miles per gallon gasoline equivalent (MPGe)! Most Efficient EPA-Certified Vehicles* Current Model Year 2013 Chevrolet Volt 2014 Chevrolet Volt City 63 Hwy 61 Comb 62 Fuel Type: Gas/Electricity Gasoline - All Years 2000 Honda Insight 2000 Honda Insight City 49 Hwy 61 Comb 53 Fuel Type: Gasoline All Fuels - All Years 2013 Scion iQ EV 2013 Scion iQ EV City 138 Hwy 105 Comb 121 Fuel Type: Electricity *Based on Combined MPG rating. Current Model Year excludes pure EVs.

50

MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance Data For Anaerobic Digestion of Various Types ofMARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OFMARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF

Haven, Kendall F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF IN-SITU RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to conventional anaerobic digestion systems used forly, was treated by anaerobic digestion to remove from 65 to

Ossio, Edmundo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Multiple Syntrophic Interactions in a Terephthalate-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lipids on thermophilic anaerobic-digestion and reduction ofrecently isolated from anaerobic digestion processes (Imachilipids on thermophilic anaerobic-digestion and reduction of

Lykidis, Athanasios

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Anaerobic Digesters Design and Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public awar'eness of the need to develop systems for producing energy from readilyrenewable sources, as an alternative to energy from expensive and diminishing supplies of fossil fuels, led to research at The Pennsylvania State University on systems for methane production by anaerobic digestion of animal manures. Experiences with design, construction, and operation of a two-stage heated continuous-feed digester for a herd of 100 dairy cows are reported in this Bulletin. The publication contains discussions of the microbiological processes involved in the anaerobic digestion of organic materials;

S. P. E. Persson; R. W. Regan

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Extreme Value Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... "Recent approaches to extreme value estimation with application to wind speeds. Part II: prediction of extreme winds." Proceedings of the First ...

55

Solubilization, Solution Equilibria, and Biodegradation of PAH's under Thermophilic Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biodegradation rates of PAHs are typically low at mesophilic conditions and it is believed that the kinetics of degradation is controlled by PAH solubility and mass transfer rates. Solubility tests were performed on phenanthrene, fluorene and fluoranthene at 20 C, 40 C and 60 C and, as expected, a significant increase in the equilibrium solubility concentration and of the rate of dissolution of these polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was observed with increasing temperature. A first-order model was used to describe the PAH dissolution kinetics and the thermodynamic property changes associated with the dissolution process (enthalpy, entropy and Gibb's free energy of solution) were evaluated. Further, other relevant thermodynamic properties for these PAHs, including the activity coefficients at infinite dilution, Henry's law constants and octanol-water partition coefficients, were calculated in the temperature range 20-60 C. In parallel with the dissolution studies, three thermophilic Geobacilli were isolated from compost that grew on phenanthrene at 60 C and degraded the PAH more rapidly than other reported mesophiles. Our results show that while solubilization rates of PAHs are significantly enhanced at elevated temperatures, the biodegradation of PAHs under thermophilic conditions is likely mass transfer limited due to enhanced degradation rates.

Viamajala, S.; Peyton, B. M.; Richards, L. A.; Petersen, J. N.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Anaerobic Digestion Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Anaerobic Digestion Basics Anaerobic Digestion Basics Anaerobic Digestion Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:07pm Addthis Anaerobic digestion is a common technology in today's agriculture, municipal waste, and brewing industries. It uses bacteria to break down waste organic materials into methane and other gases, which can be used to produce electricity or heat. Methane and Anaerobic Bacteria Methane is a gas that contains molecules of methane with one atom of carbon and four atoms of hydrogen (CH4). It is the major component of the natural gas used in many homes for cooking and heating. It is odorless, colorless, and yields about 1,000 British thermal units (Btu) [252 kilocalories (kcal)] of heat energy per cubic foot (0.028 cubic meters) when burned. Natural gas is a fossil fuel that was created eons ago by the anaerobic

57

Pathway engineering to improve ethanol production by thermophilic bacteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Continuation of a research project jointly funded by the NSF and DOE is proposed. The primary project goal is to develop and characterize strains of C. thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum having ethanol selectivity similar to more convenient ethanol-producing organisms. An additional goal is to document the maximum concentration of ethanol that can be produced by thermophiles. These goals build on results from the previous project, including development of most of the genetic tools required for pathway engineering in the target organisms. As well, we demonstrated that the tolerance of C. thermosaccharolyticum to added ethanol is sufficiently high to allow practical utilization should similar tolerance to produced ethanol be demonstrated, and that inhibition by neutralizing agents may explain the limited concentrations of ethanol produced in studies to date. Task 1 involves optimization of electrotransformation, using either modified conditions or alternative plasmids to improve upon the low but reproducible transformation, frequencies we have obtained thus far.

Lynd, L.R.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Extreme Scale Visual Analytics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme-scale visual analytics (VA) is about applying VA to extreme-scale data. The articles in this special issue examine advances related to extreme-scale VA problems, their analytical and computational challenges, and their real-world applications.

Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Pascucci, Valerio

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

59

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi...

60

Siting Requirements for Anaerobic Lagoons (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute provides regulations for required distances between anaerobic lagoons and residences or public use areas. The separation distances may be waived or reduced with the agreement of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Proteogenomic Analysis of a Thermophilic Bacterial Consortium Adapted to Deconstruct Switchgrass  

SciTech Connect

Thermophilic bacteria are a potential source of enzymes for the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. However, the complement of proteins used to deconstruct biomass and the specific roles of different microbial groups in thermophilic biomass deconstruction are not well-explored. Here we report on the metagenomic and proteogenomic analyses of a compost-derived bacterial consortium adapted to switchgrass at elevated temperature with high levels of glycoside hydrolase activities. Near-complete genomes were reconstructed for the most abundant populations, which included composite genomes for populations closely related to sequenced strains of Thermus thermophilus and Rhodothermus marinus, and for novel populations that are related to thermophilic Paenibacilli and an uncultivated subdivision of the littlestudied Gemmatimonadetes phylum. Partial genomes were also reconstructed for a number of lower abundance thermophilic Chloroflexi populations. Identification of genes for lignocellulose processing and metabolic reconstructions suggested Rhodothermus, Paenibacillus and Gemmatimonadetes as key groups for deconstructing biomass, and Thermus as a group that may primarily metabolize low molecular weight compounds. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of the consortium was used to identify .3000 proteins in fractionated samples from the cultures, and confirmed the importance of Paenibacillus and Gemmatimonadetes to biomass deconstruction. These studies also indicate that there are unexplored proteins with important roles in bacterial lignocellulose deconstruction.

D'haeseleer, Patrik; Gladden, John M.; Allgaier, Martin; Chain, Patrick; Tringe, Susannah G.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hugenholtz, Philip; Simmons, Blake A.; Singer, Steven W.

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

62

Continuous high-solids anaerobic co-digestion of organic solid wastes under mesophilic conditions  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > High-solids (dry) anaerobic digestion is attracting a lot of attention these days. > One reactor was fed with food waste (FW) and paper waste. > Maximum biogas production rate of 5.0 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d was achieved at HRT 40 d and 40% TS. > The other reactor was fed with FW and livestock waste (LW). > Until a 40% LW content increase, the reactor exhibited a stable performance. - Abstract: With increasing concerns over the limited capacity of landfills, conservation of resources, and reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions, high-solids (dry) anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste (OSW) is attracting a great deal of attention these days. In the present work, two dry anaerobic co-digestion systems fed with different mixtures of OSW were continuously operated under mesophilic conditions. Dewatered sludge cake was used as a main seeding source. In reactor (I), which was fed with food waste (FW) and paper waste (PW), hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solid content were controlled to find the maximum treatability. At a fixed solid content of 30% total solids (TS), stable performance was maintained up to an HRT decrease to 40 d. However, the stable performance was not sustained at 30 d HRT, and hence, HRT was increased to 40 d again. In further operation, instead of decreasing HRT, solid content was increased to 40% TS, which was found to be a better option to increase the treatability. The biogas production rate (BPR), CH{sub 4} production yield (MPY) and VS reduction achieved in this condition were 5.0 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d, 0.25 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub added}, and 80%, respectively. Reactor (II) was fed with FW and livestock waste (LW), and LW content was increased during the operation. Until a 40% LW content increase, reactor (II) exhibited a stable performance. A BPR of 1.7 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d, MPY of 0.26 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub added}, and VS reduction of 72% was achieved at 40% LW content. However, when the LW content was increased to 60%, there was a significant performance drop, which was attributed to free ammonia inhibition. The performances in these two reactors were comparable to the ones achieved in the conventional wet digestion and thermophilic dry digestion processes.

Kim, Dong-Hoon [Wastes Energy Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 102, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sae-Eun, E-mail: saeun@hanbat.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanbat National University, San 16-1, Duckmyoung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Extreme Computing | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extreme Computing Extreme Computing Petascale computing and the emerging era of exascale computing pose numerous challenges, both from the underlying hardware architectures and the...

64

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

65

Anaerobic treatment of gasifier effluents. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed during the quarter ending December 30, 1981. The major efforts have been directed toward the continued acclimation of two anaerobic treatment systems, start up of a third anaerobic treatment system, GC/MS characterization of the coal gasification wastewater, data acquisition for determination of distribution coefficients for the extraction of phenol from the wastewater using MIBK, and preliminary design of a solvent extraction system for wastewater pretreatment. The progress of these efforts are depicted in the Gannt Chart, along with project expenditures for the above contract, and are presented in detail in the following sections.

Cross, W.H.; Chian, E.S.K.; Pohland, F.G.; Giabbai, M.; Harper, S.R.; Kharkar, S.; Cheng, S.S.; Shuey, P.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Anaerobic digestion of industrial activated aerobic sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Eastman Company manufactures a variety of organic chemicals, plastics and fibers at their Kingsport Tennessee Facility. The wastewater generated during the manufacture of these compounds is currently treated using an activated sludge process. The objective of the project is to evaluate the economic potential of an anaerobic digestion process to convert industrial sludge at the Tennessee Eastman Company into biogas. The evaluation will require collection and analysis of experimental data on the anaerobic digestion of industrial sludge obtained from Kingsport. Although the experiments will be conducted using Tennessee Eastman sludge, these results should be also generally applicable to similar industrial sludge.

Goodloe, J.G.; Roberts, R.S.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Anaerobic Co-Digestion on Dairies in Washington State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Anaerobic Co-Digestion on Dairies in Washington State The solid waste handling permit exemption W This factsheet briefly reviews the role of co-digestion within anaerobic digestion (AD), explains the potential Digestion and the Role of Co-Digestion Anaerobic digestion is increasingly used to treat livestock manure

Collins, Gary S.

68

Effect of Trace Elements on Anaerobic Digestion of Coking Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pretreatment of coking wastewater using ASBR was conducted at 35? in this paper. The addition of trace elements to the anaerobic reactor has positive effect on the anaerobic treatment of coking wastewater, but too much or too little of it will ... Keywords: trace elements, anaerobic digestion, coking wastewater

Yu-ying Li; Bing Li

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

(Anaerobic O-demethylation of phenylmethylethers)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers progress made during the last 8--20 month interval. Topics covered include: the in vitro assay for anaerobic O-demethylation; fractionation of cell-free extracts; optimization of cellular AOD levels and structure-activity relationships; and analysis of corrinoid involvement in AOD. (JL)

Frazer, A.C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar April 16, 2013 1:00PM MDT Webinar This free webinar will be held on April 16, 2013, from 1-2:15 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time. It will provide information on San Jose, California's, commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system, and the Forest County Potawatomi Community's anaerobic digester project. Implementing Anaerobic Digestion in San Jose's Integrated Processing Infrastructure This presentation will provide background on San Jose, California's, leading-edge program using the nation's first commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system to process commercial organics from more than 8,000 businesses in the city. Phase one of the Zero Waste

71

High-solids enrichment of thermophilic microbial communities and their enzymes on bioenergy feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

Thermophilic microbial communities that are active in a high-solids environment offer great potential for the discovery of industrially relevant enzymes that efficiently deconstruct bioenergy feedstocks. In this study, finished green waste compost was used as an inoculum source to enrich microbial communities and associated enzymes that hydrolyze cellulose and hemicellulose during thermophilic high-solids fermentation of the bioenergy feedstocks switchgrass and corn stover. Methods involving the disruption of enzyme and plant cell wall polysaccharide interactions were developed to recover xylanase and endoglucanase activity from deconstructed solids. Xylanase and endoglucanase activity increased by more than a factor of 5, upon four successive enrichments on switchgrass. Overall, the changes for switchgrass were more pronounced than for corn stover; solids reduction between the first and second enrichments increased by a factor of four for switchgrass while solids reduction remained relatively constant for corn stover. Amplicon pyrosequencing analysis of small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes recovered from enriched samples indicated rapid changes in the microbial communities between the first and second enrichment with the simplified communities achieved by the third enrichment. The results demonstrate a successful approach for enrichment of unique microbial communities and enzymes active in a thermophilic high-solids environment.

Reddy, A. P.; Allgaier, M.; Singer, S.W.; Hazen, T.C.; Simmons, B.A.; Hugenholtz, P.; VanderGheynst, J.S.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Mineralogy under extreme conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have performed measurements of minerals based on the synchrotron source for single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, inelastic scattering, spectroscopy and radiography by using diamond anvil cells. We investigated the properties of iron (Fe), iron-magnesium oxides (Fe, Mg)O, silica(SiO{sub 2}), iron-magnesium silicates (Fe, Mg)SiO{sub 3} under simulated high pressure-high temperature extreme conditions of the Earth's crust, upper mantle, low mantle, core-mantle boundary, outer core, and inner core. The results provide a new window on the investigation of the mineral properties at Earth's conditions.

Shu, Jinfu (CIW)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

73

Generating multivariate extreme value distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define in a probabilistic way a parametric family of multivariate extreme value distributions. We derive its copula, which is a mixture of several complete dependent copulas and total independent copulas, and the bivariate tail dependence and extremal coefficients. Based on the obtained results for these coefficients, we propose a method to built multivariate extreme value distributions with prescribed tail/extremal coefficients. We illustrate the results with examples of simulation of these distributions.

Ferreira, Helena

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

DESIGN OF SOFTWARE SENSORS FOR UNMEASURABLE VARIABLES OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESIGN OF SOFTWARE SENSORS FOR UNMEASURABLE VARIABLES OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION PROCESSES Simeonov, I variables of anaerobic digestion processes. For this purpose, different mathematical models of anaerobic on a pilot-scale anaerobic bioreactor with computer monitoring system. Key words: Anaerobic digestion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

75

Anaerobic O-demethylation of phenylmethylethers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anaerobic O-demethylation (AOD) of phenylmethylethers is a process of both basic and applied significance. The aryl-O-methyl ethers are abundant in natural products, particularly as components of lignin. They are present as methoxylated lignin monomers in anaerobic environments and can be completely degraded there by mixed microbial populations. AOD is an essential early step in this process, and it is also a key reaction in the utilization of the O-methyl substituent as a C-one substrate by acetogens. An understanding of the AOD reaction mechanism might suggest new ways in which chemicals could be derived from lignocellulosic materials. The biochemical mechanism for the anaerobic cleavage of the aryl-O-methyl ether bond is an intriguing, but relatively unexplored process. In contrast to aerobic O-demethylating enzymes, AOD appears to involve methyl group transfer. Thus, novel biochemical information on an important biotransformation reaction will be gained from the research proposed. Recently, we have shown that AOD activity is inducible and have developed an assay for detecting AOD activity in cell-free extracts of Acetobacterium woodii. AOD activity is stimulated in vitro by the addition of ATP (1mM) and pyruvate (30 mM), the K{sub M} for vanillate being 0.4 mM. In collaboration with protein purification experts, we proposed to purify the AOD enzyme and characterize the protein(s) and the enzymatic reaction involved. 8 figs., 5 tabs.

Frazer, A.C.; Young, L.Y.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Archaeal community composition affects the function of anaerobic co-digesters in response to organic overload  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two types of methanogens are necessary to respond successfully to perturbation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diversity of methanogens correlates with the VFA concentration and methane yield. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aggregates indicate tight spatial relationship between minerals and microorganisms. - Abstract: Microbial community diversity in two thermophilic laboratory-scale and three full-scale anaerobic co-digesters was analysed by genetic profiling based on PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes. In parallel operated laboratory reactors a stepwise increase of the organic loading rate (OLR) resulted in a decrease of methane production and an accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). However, almost threefold different OLRs were necessary to inhibit the gas production in the reactors. During stable reactor performance, no significant differences in the bacterial community structures were detected, except for in the archaeal communities. Sequencing of archaeal PCR products revealed a dominance of the acetoclastic methanogen Methanosarcina thermophila, while hydrogenotrophic methanogens were of minor importance and differed additionally in their abundance between reactors. As a consequence of the perturbation, changes in bacterial and archaeal populations were observed. After organic overload, hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanospirillum hungatei and Methanoculleus receptaculi) became more dominant, especially in the reactor attributed by a higher OLR capacity. In addition, aggregates composed of mineral and organic layers formed during organic overload and indicated tight spatial relationships between minerals and microbial processes that may support de-acidification processes in over-acidified sludge. Comparative analyses of mesophilic stationary phase full-scale reactors additionally indicated a correlation between the diversity of methanogens and the VFA concentration combined with the methane yield. This study demonstrates that the coexistence of two types of methanogens, i.e. hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens is necessary to respond successfully to perturbation and leads to stable process performance.

Lerm, S.; Kleyboecker, A. [International Centre for Geothermal Research (ICGR), GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Miethling-Graff, R. [International Centre for Geothermal Research (ICGR), GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Johann Heinrich von Thuenen Institut, Bundesforschungsinstitut fuer Laendliche Raeume, Wald und Fischerei Institut fuer Biodiversitaet, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Alawi, M.; Kasina, M.; Liebrich, M. [International Centre for Geothermal Research (ICGR), GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Wuerdemann, H., E-mail: wuerdemann@gfz-potsdam.de [International Centre for Geothermal Research (ICGR), GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

List of Anaerobic Digestion Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anaerobic Digestion Incentives Anaerobic Digestion Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 285 Anaerobic Digestion Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 285) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Advanced Energy Job Stimulus Program (Ohio) Industry Recruitment/Support Ohio Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government

78

Optimization of running strategies based on anaerobic energy and ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 13, 2013 ... We extend this analysis, based on the equation of motion and aerobic energy, to include a balance of anaerobic energy (or accumulated ...

79

MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

synthetic natural gas (SNG) via anaerobic decomposition byof algal substrate for an SNG process involves increasingof characteristics for SNG production. Limiting factors in

Haven, Kendall F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Biogeochemistry of Isoprenoid Production and Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Biodgeradation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation is an exploration of microbial isoprenoid production and destruction by anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation. Isoprenoids are methyl-branched hydrocarbons, and include biomarkers from all three… (more)

Dawson, Katherine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Xylose anaerobic conversion by open-mixed cultures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

methane-rich biogas production. An alternative anaerobic process could aim for the production of intermediates in the methanogenic process from complex ...

82

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive Incentive Type State Rebate Program Applicable Sector Agricultural, Commercial, Industrial, Institutional,...

83

Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks  

SciTech Connect

Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at itsoptimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to resistance; and strengthen the case for a role in survival of systems involved in manganese and iron homeostasis.

Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

84

Effect of organic loading rate on bio-hydrogen production from sweet sorghum syrup by anaerobic mixed cultures in anaerobic sequencing batch reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This present study reported the effect of 4 organic loading rates (OLR) varied from 25-40 g hexose/L-d on bio-hydrogen production from sweet sorghum syrup by anaerobic mixed cultures in anaerobic sequencing batch reactor. The optimum OLR was found to ... Keywords: anaerobic mixed cultures, anaerobic sequencing batch reactor, organic loading rate, sweet sorghum syrup

Piyawadee Saraphirom; Alissara Reungsang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Location and chemical composition of microbially induced phosphorus precipitates in anaerobic and aerobic granular sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. However, anaerobic digestion is not effective for nutrient removal and should be followed by a processLocation and chemical composition of microbially induced phosphorus precipitates in anaerobic different operating conditions. Three dairy wastewater effluents, from three different upflow anaerobic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

86

On a Three Step Model of Anaerobic Digestion Including the Hydrolysis of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On a Three Step Model of Anaerobic Digestion Including the Hydrolysis of Particulate Matter R degradation, chemostat, models, growth rate, equilibrium, bistability. 1. INTRODUCTION Anaerobic digestion, the anaerobic digestion is generally considered as a three step process: hydrolysis and liquefaction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

87

Experimental study on rheological characteristics of high solid content sludge and it is mesophilic anaerobic digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compared to conventional low solid content anaerobic digestion high solid content anaerobic digestion can offer attractive advantages such as higher biogas generation and smaller reactor volume demand. However

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Anaerobic bioprocessing of low rank coals  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal liquefaction. The main objectives for this quarter were: (1) enrichment of anaerobic microbial consortia in a coal fed chemostat, (2) characterization of biocoal products and examination of liquefaction potential, (3) isolation of decarboxylating organisms and evaluation of the isolated organisms for decarboxylation. The project began on September 12, 1990. 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) Portfolio  

Abstract Fees; Passivating Overcoat Bilayer for Multilayer Reflective Coatings for Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography. 5,958,605. A passivating overcoat bilayer is ...

90

Complete Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic Bacterium Exiguobacterium sp. AT1b  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here we present the genome of strain Exiguobacterium sp. AT1b, a thermophilic member of the genus Exiguobacterium whose representatives were isolated from various environments along a thermal and physicochemical gradient. This genome was sequenced to be a comparative resource for the study of thermal adaptation with a psychroactive representative of the genus, Exiguobacterium sibiricum strain 255-15, that was previously sequenced by the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) (http://genome.ornl.gov/microbial/exig/).

Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L [ORNL; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kathariou, Sophia [North Carolina State University; Ramaley, Robert F. [University of Nebraska Medical Center; Rodrigues, Debora F. [University of Houston, Houston; Hendrix, Christie [Yellowstone National Park; Richardson, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Complete Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic Bacterium Exiguobacterium sp. AT1b  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here we present the genome of strain Exiguobacterium sp. AT1b, a thermophilic member of the genus Exiguobacterium whose representatives were isolated from various environments along a thermal and physico-chemical gradient. This genome was sequenced to be a comparative resource for study of thermal adaptation with a psychroactive representative of the genus, Exiguobacterium sibiricum strain 255-15, that was previously sequenced by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) (http://genome.ornl.gov/microbial/exig/).

Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kathariou, Sophia [North Carolina State University; Ramaley, Robert F. [University of Nebraska Medical Center; Rodrigues, Debora F. [University of Houston, Houston; Hendrix, Christie [Yellowstone National Park; Richardson, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Anaerobic Digestion Process Identification Using Recurrent Neural Network Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes the use of a Recurrent Neural Network Model (RNNM) for decentralized and centralized identification of an aerobic digestion process, carried out in a fixed bed and a recirculation tank anaerobic wastewater treatment system. The analytical ... Keywords: Recurrent neural network model, backpropagation learning, decentralized model, centralized model, system identification, anaerobic digestion bioprocess

Rosalba Galvan-Guerra; Ieroham S. Baruch

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

NSERC-Laflche Industrial Research Chair Advanced Anaerobic Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. LANDFILL BIOREACTORS EXSITU ANAEROBIC DIGESTION Apply stand alone reactor technology to digest solidNSERC- Laflèche Industrial Research Chair Advanced Anaerobic Treatment Residuals to Energy R2E 6133. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 Digestion Time

Petriu, Emil M.

94

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures. The Engineering ... section. I. Extreme Winds: ... II. Wind Effects on Buildings. Database ...

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

95

Global Warming and Extreme Weather  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming and Extreme Weather Global Warming and Extreme Weather Speaker(s): Michael Wehner Date: November 28, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Surabi Menon Extreme weather events can have serious impacts on human and ecological systems. Changes in the magnitude and frequency of extreme weather associated with changes in the mean climate are likely the most serious consequence of human induced global warming. Understanding what the future portends is vital if society hopes to adapt to the very different world that awaits. In this talk, we will exploit simple extreme value theory to make predictions about the late 21st century climate. Current work on the relationship between global warming and the hurricane cycle will also be presented. The bottom line is that events that are considered rare today

96

Complete genome of the cellulolytic thermophile Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B provides insights into its ecophysiological and evolutionary adaptations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present here the complete 2.4 MB genome of the actinobacterial thermophile, Acidothermus cellulolyticus lIB, that surprisingly reveals thermophilic amino acid usage in only the cytosolic subproteome rather than its whole proteome. Thermophilic amino acid usage in the partial proteome implies a recent, ongoing evolution of the A. cellulolyticus genome since its divergence about 200-250 million years ago from its closest phylogenetic neighbor Frankia, a mesophilic plant symbiont. Differential amino acid usage in the predicted subproteomes of A. cellulolyticus likely reflects a stepwise evolutionary process of modern thermophiles in general. An unusual occurrence of higher G+C in the non-coding DNA than in the transcribed genome reinforces a late evolution from a higher G+C common ancestor. Comparative analyses of the A. cellulolyticus genome with those of Frankia and other closely-related actinobacteria revealed that A. cellulolyticus genes exhibit reciprocal purine preferences at the first and third codon positions, perhaps reflecting a subtle preference for the dinucleotide AG in its mRNAs, a possible adaptation to a thermophilic environment. Other interesting features in the genome of this cellulolytic, hot-springs dwelling prokaryote reveal streamlining for adaptation to its specialized ecological niche. These include a low occurrence of pseudogenes or mobile genetic elements, a flagellar gene complement previously unknown in this organism, and presence of laterally-acquired genomic islands of likely ecophysiological value. New glycoside hydrolases relevant for lignocellulosic biomass deconstruction were identified in the genome, indicating a diverse biomass-degrading enzyme repertoire several-fold greater than previously characterized, and significantly elevating the industrial value of this organism.

Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Detter, Chris [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Challacome, Jean F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brettin, Thomas S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barabote, Ravi D [UC DAVIS; Leu, David [UC DAVIS; Normand, Philippe [CNRS, UNIV LYON; Necsula, Anamaria [CNRS, UNIV LYON; Daubin, Vincent [CNRS, UNIV LYON; Medigue, Claudine [CNRS/GENOSCOPE; Adney, William S [NREL; Xu, Xin C [UC DAVIS; Lapidus, Alla [DOE JOINT GENOME INST.; Pujic, Pierre [CNRS, UNIV LYON; Richardson, Paul [DOE JOINT GENOME INST; Berry, Alison M [UC DAVIS

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Complete genome of the cellulolytic thermophile Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B provides insights into its ecophysiological and evolutionary adaptations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present here the complete 2.4 MB genome of the actinobacterial thermophile, Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B, that surprisingly reveals thermophilic amino acid usage in only the cytosolic subproteome rather than its whole proteome. Thermophilic amino acid usage in the partial proteome implies a recent, ongoing evolution of the A. cellulolyticus genome since its divergence about 200-250 million years ago from its closest phylogenetic neighbor Frankia, a mesophilic plant symbiont. Differential amino acid usage in the predicted subproteomes of A. cellulolyticus likely reflects a stepwise evolutionary process of modern thermophiles in general. An unusual occurrence of higher G+C in the non-coding DNA than in the transcribed genome reinforces a late evolution from a higher G+C common ancestor. Comparative analyses of the A. cellulolyticus genome with those of Frankia and other closely-related actinobacteria revealed that A. cellulolyticus genes exhibit reciprocal purine preferences at the first and third codon positions, perhaps reflecting a subtle preference for the dinucleotide AG in its mRNAs, a possible adaptation to a thermophilic environment. Other interesting features in the genome of this cellulolytic, hot-springs dwelling prokaryote reveal streamlining for adaptation to its specialized ecological niche. These include a low occurrence of pseudo genes or mobile genetic elements, a flagellar gene complement previously unknown in this organism, and presence of laterally-acquired genomic islands of likely ecophysiological value. New glycoside hydrolases relevant for lignocellulosic biomass deconstruction were identified in the genome, indicating a diverse biomass-degrading enzyme repertoire several-fold greater than previously characterized, and significantly elevating the industrial value of this organism.

Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Detter, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bruce, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Challacombe, Jean F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brettin, Thomas S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Necsulea, Anamaria [UNIV LYON; Daubin, Vincent [UNIV LYON; Medigue, Claudine [GENOSCOPE; Adney, William S [NREL; Xu, Xin C [UC DAVIS; Lapidus, Alla [JGI; Pujic, Pierre [UNIV LYON; Berry, Alison M [UC DAVIS; Barabote, Ravi D [UC DAVIS; Leu, David [UC DAVIS; Normand, Phillipe [UNIV LYON

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Anaerobic digestion for methane generation and ammonia reforming for hydrogen production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion for methane generation and ammonia reforming for hydrogen production Accepted 24 May 2013 Available online Keywords: Anaerobic digestion Ammonia Bioenergy Bioammonia Hydrogen Anaerobic digestion-bioammonia to hydrogen (ADBH) a b s t r a c t During anaerobic digestion, organic matter

99

Photoenhanced anaerobic digestion of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for rapid conversion of organic acids and alcohols in anaerobic digesters into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the optimal precursor substrates for production of methane. The process includes addition of photosynthetic bacteria to the digester and exposure of the bacteria to radiant energy (e.g., solar energy). The process also increases the pH stability of the digester to prevent failure of the digester. Preferred substrates for photosynthetic bacteria are the organic acid and alcohol waste products of fermentative bacteria. In mixed culture with methanogenic bacteria or in defined co-culture with non-aceticlastic methanogenic bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria are capable of facilitating the conversion of organic acids and alcohols into methane with low levels of light energy input. 8 figs.

Weaver, P.F.

1989-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

100

Photoenhanced anaerobic digestion of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for rapid conversion of organic acids and alcohols anaerobic digesters into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the optimal precursor substrates for production of methane. The process includes addition of photosynthetic bacteria to the digester and exposure of the bacteria to radiant energy (e.g., solar energy). The process also increases the pH stability of the digester to prevent failure of the digester. Preferred substrates for photosynthetic bacteria are the organic acid and alcohol waste products of fermentative bacteria. In mixed culture with methanogenic bacteria or in defined co-culture with non-aceticlastic methanogenic bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria are capable of facilitating the conversion or organic acids and alcohols into methane with low levels of light energy input.

Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Bio-Terre Cook Farm Anaerobic Digester Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the preliminary research and construction of a novel low temperature earthen cell for anaerobic digestion and biogas production facility at Cook Feeders Ltd., a 6,000 head swine finisher operation, located in central Manitoba, Canada.

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

102

Cascade Fuzzy Logic Controller for an Anaerobic Digester  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cascade controller is introduced for operating Up flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) digesters efficiently. The Upper-level controller is a Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC) and the Lower-level controller is a conventional PI controller. The inner loop ...

Albino Martinez-Sibaja; Ruben Posada-Gomez; Alejandro Alvarado-Lassman; Angel Sebastia-Cortes

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

EA-1907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas 907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas EA-1907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE and USDA to provide funding to Western Plains Energy, LLC (WPE) to construct, purchase equipment, and operate a new Biogas Anaerobic Digester at WPE's existing Ethanol Facility, located at 3022 County Road 18, Grinnell Township (Oakley), Gove County, Kansas. The proposed facility will include a receiving building, digester, and related infrastructure. Based on the analysis in USDA's Final EA and FONSI, DOE has determined that DOE's proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human or natural environment.

104

Stabilization of a nonlinear anaerobic wastewater treatment model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonlinear anaerobic digester model of wastewater treatment plants is considered. The stabilizability of the dynamic system is studied and a continuous stabilizing feedback, depending only on an on-line measurable variable, is proposed. Computer simulations ...

Neli S. Dimitrova; Mikhail I. Krastanov

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Ammonia Emissions from Anaerobic Swine Lagoons: Model Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concentrated animal production may represent a significant source for ammonia emissions to the environment. Most concentrated animal production systems use anaerobic or liquid/slurry systems for wasteholding; thus, it is desirable to be able to ...

A. De Visscher; L. A. Harper; P. W. Westerman; Z. Liang; J. Arogo; R. R. Sharpe; O. Van Cleemput

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste?recycling Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food waste?recycling (FWR) wastewater was evaluated as feedstock for two?stage anaerobic digestion at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The FWR wastewater tested contained high concentrations of organic materials and had chemical oxygen demand (COD) >130 g/L and volatile solids (VS) >55 g/L. Two identical two?stage anaerobic digesters were operated to investigate the performance at six HRTs ranging from 10–25 days. In the acidogenic reactor

Gyuseong Han; Seung Gu Shin; Juntaek Lim; Minho Jo; Seokhwan Hwang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Anaerobic digestion as a waste disposal option for American Samoa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tuna sludge and municipal solid waste (MSW) generated on Tutuila Island, American Samoa, represent an ongoing disposal problem as well as an emerging opportunity for use in renewable fuel production. This research project focuses on the biological conversion of the organic fraction of these wastes to useful products including methane and fertilizer-grade residue through anaerobic high solids digestion. In this preliminary study, the anaerobic bioconversion of tuna sludge with MSW appears promising.

Rivard, C

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Apparatus for the anaerobic digestion of natural organic waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The title system consists of a feed tank, from which sewage is provided to a digester tank at an adjustable continuous weight, in which the sewage is anaerobically digested. The gas produced in the anaerobic digester is collected at the top and pumped to a diffuser at the bottom of the digester. The supernatent from the treated sewage is transferred to an outlet tank, and sludge is removed from the bottom of the digester tank.

Hawkes, D.L.; Horton, R.; Stafford, D.A.

1980-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

109

Ultrastable phosphoglucose isomerase through immobilization of cellulosebinding moduletagged thermophilic enzyme on lowcost highcapacity cellulosic adsorbent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultra-stable phosphoglucose isomerase through immobilization of cellulose- Ultra-stable phosphoglucose isomerase through immobilization of cellulose- binding module-tagged thermophilic enzyme on low-cost high-capacity cellulosic adsorbent Suwan Myung 1,2 , Xiao-Zhou Zhang 1 , Y.-H. Percival Zhang 1,2,3* Running title: One-step protein purification and immobilization 1 Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA 2 Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA 3 DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA *Corresponding author. Tel: 540-231-7414; Fax: 540-231-7414; Email: ypzhang@vt.edu Biocatalysts and Bioreactor Design

110

Effect of alkaline pretreatment on anaerobic digestion of solid wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The introduction of the anaerobic digestion for the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is currently of special interest. The main difficulty in the treatment of this waste fraction is its biotransformation, due to the complexity of organic material. Therefore, the first step must be its physical, chemical and biological pretreatment for breaking complex molecules into simple monomers, to increase solubilization of organic material and improve the efficiency of the anaerobic treatment in the second step. This paper describes chemical pretreatment based on lime addition (Ca(OH){sub 2}), in order to enhance chemical oxygen demand (COD) solubilization, followed by anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW. Laboratory-scale experiments were carried out in completely mixed reactors, 1 L capacity. Optimal conditions for COD solubilization in the first step of pretreatment were 62.0 mEq Ca(OH){sub 2}/L for 6.0 h. Under these conditions, 11.5% of the COD was solubilized. The anaerobic digestion efficiency of the OFMSW, with and without pretreatment, was evaluated. The highest methane yield under anaerobic digestion of the pretreated waste was 0.15 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg volatile solids (VS), 172.0% of the control. Under that condition the soluble COD and VS removal were 93.0% and 94.0%, respectively. The results have shown that chemical pretreatment with lime, followed by anaerobic digestion, provides the best results for stabilizing the OFMSW.

Lopez Torres, M. [National Center for Scientific Researcher (CNIC), Environmental Pollution Department (DECA), Ave. 25 y 158, Cubanacan, Playa, Havana City (Cuba)], E-mail: matilde.lopez@cnic.edu.cu; Espinosa Llorens, Ma. del C. [National Center for Scientific Researcher (CNIC), Environmental Pollution Department (DECA), Ave. 25 y 158, Cubanacan, Playa, Havana City (Cuba)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Effects of selected thermophilic microorganisms on crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past several years, a considerable amount of work has been carried out showing that microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is promising and the resulting biotechnology may be deliverable. At the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), systematic studies have been conducted which dealt with the effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted bacteria on the chemical and physical properties of selected types of crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Particular attention was paid to heavy crude oils from Venezuela, California, Alabama, Arkansas, Wyoming, Alaska, and other oil producing areas. Current studies indicate that during the biotreatment several chemical and physical properties of crude oils are affected. The oils are (1) emulsified; (2) acidified; (3) there is a qualitative and quantitative change in light and heavy fractions of the crudes; (4) there are chemical changes in fractions containing sulfur compounds; (5) there is an apparent reduction in the concentration of trace metals; (6) the qualitative and quantitative changes appear to be microbial species dependent; and (7) there is a distinction between {open_quotes}biodegraded{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}biotreated{close_quotes} oils. Preliminary results indicate the introduced microorganisms may become the dominant species in the bioconversion of oils. These studies also indicate the biochemical interactions between crude oils and microorganisms follow distinct trends, characterized by a group of chemical markers. Core-flooding experiments have shown significant additional crude oil recoveries are achievable with thermophilic microorganisms at elevated temperatures similar to those found in oil reservoirs. In addition, the biochemical treatment of crude oils has technological applications in downstream processing of crude oils such as in upgrading of low grade oils and the production of hydrocarbon based detergents.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Thermophilic Thermotoga maritima ribose-5-phosphate isomerase RpiB: Optimized heat treatment purification and basic characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermophilic Thermophilic Thermotoga maritima ribose-5-phosphate isomerase RpiB: Optimized heat treatment purification and basic characterization Fangfang Sun a , Xiao-Zhou Zhang a,b , Suwan Myung a,c , Y.-H. Percival Zhang a,b,c,d,⇑ a Biological Systems Engineering Department, 304 Seitz Hall, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA b Gate Fuels Inc., 3107 Alice Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA c Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA d DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 27 December 2011 and in revised form 26 January 2012 Available online 8 February 2012 Keywords: Biofuel Cascade enzyme factories Heat treatment purification Pentose phosphate isomerase Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase Thermoenzyme a b s t r a c t The open reading frame TM1080 from Thermotoga

113

Extremal graphs without 4-cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We prove an upper bound for the number of edges a C"4-free graph on q^2+q vertices can contain for q even. This upper bound is achieved whenever there is an orthogonal polarity graph of a plane of even order q. Keywords: Extremal graph, Polarity, Projective plane

Frank A. Firke, Peter M. Kosek, Evan D. Nash, Jason Williford

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation-resistant Microorganisms. ... Elucidated radiation protection by intracellular halides. ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

2006 ANNUAL POULTRY ACTIVITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Shih designed and patented a thermophilic anaerobic digestion system that converts poultry waste the thermophilic anaerobic digester developed in his lab. The enzyme was purified and characterized. Later his

116

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns

Columbia University

117

Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors for treatment of wastewater from the brewery industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion can be utilized to convert industrial wastewater into clean water and energy. The goal of this project was to set up lab-scale anaerobic digesters to collect data that will be used to develop and validate ...

Scampini, Amanda C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Studying Materials Under Extreme Pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studying Materials Under Extreme Pressure Studying Materials Under Extreme Pressure Coupling undulator radiation from Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamlines 3-ID and 13-ID to nuclear resonant inelastic scattering techniques, researchers have determined the phonon density of states for iron under pressures up to 153 gigapascals, equivalent to those found at the Earth's core. Image of the Earth's core. Although indirect measurements and theory have, since the early 1950s, produced an informed picture of the structure and composition of the materials that make up the core of the Earth, direct proof and the answers to some intriguing questions remain unanswered. Previously, ultrahigh-pressure experiments using nuclear resonant inelastic scattering have been difficult to carry out due the tiny samples required.

119

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate Total Incentive: $2 million (combined production and capacity incentives) Fixed Base + Capacity Incentive: varies, limited to the total maximum incentive of $2 million minus the applicable performance incentive Program Info Funding Source RPS surcharge; NYPA Expiration Date 01/31/2013 State New York Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Fixed Base Incentive: varies Capacity Incentive: varies Production Incentive: $0.025/kWh production payment for new systems for up

120

Ecovation Inc formerly AnAerobics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecovation Inc formerly AnAerobics Ecovation Inc formerly AnAerobics Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecovation Inc (formerly AnAerobics) Place Victor, New York Zip 14564 Product The company build and operate organic waste management systems. Coordinates 38.15924°, -81.034233° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.15924,"lon":-81.034233,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Community-Scale Anaerobic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community-Scale Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters (text version) Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters (text version) Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters," originally presented on April 16, 2013. Operator: The broadcast is now starting. All attendees are in listen-only mode. Sarah Busche: Good afternoon, everyone, and welcome to today's webinar sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. I'm Sarah Busche, and I'm here with Devin Egan, and we're broadcasting live from a very snowy National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. Thank you so much for joining us today. We're going to give folks a few minutes to call in and log on, but while we wait Devin will go over some logistics, and then we'll get started with

122

Thermochemical Pretreatment for Anaerobic Digestion of Sorted Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of alkaline hydrothermal pre?treatment for anaerobic digestion of mechanically?sorted municipal solid waste (MSW) and source?sorted waste was studied. Waste was hydrothermally pre?treated in dilute alkali solution. Hydrolysis product was incubated in 500 ml saline bottle to determine methane potential (MP) under mesospheric anaerobic conditions. Optimum reaction condition obtained in the study is 170?°C at the dose of 4 g NaOH/100 g solid for one hour. Soluble COD was 13936 mg/L and methane yield was 164 ml/g VS for 6 days incubation at optimum conditions. More than 50% biogas increase was achieved over the control

W. Hao; W. Hongtao

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Analysis, anaerobic treatment and ozonation of wool scouring wastewater  

SciTech Connect

Wool scouring effluents (WSE) were analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HRGC-MS), and then exposed to anaerobic biological treatment using laboratory scale fixed-bed filters. This resulted in a nearly 50% reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD). Ozonation of the effluent from the biological step led to an even further decrease in total organic carbon (TOC). The fatty acid content of the WSE was affected by both biological treatment and ozonation. Finally, steroids in the WSE underwent reduction reactions when exposed to the anaerobic biological treatment.

Monteverdi, A.; Rindone, B.; Sorlini, C. (Univ. di Milano (Italy)); Andreoni, V. (Univ. di Torino (Italy)); Rozzi, A. (Inst. di Ingegneria Sanitaria del Politechnico di Milano (Italy))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Engineered microorganisms capable of producing target compounds under anaerobic conditions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is generally provides recombinant microorganisms comprising engineered metabolic pathways capable of producing C3-C5 alcohols under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The invention further provides ketol-acid reductoisomerase enzymes which have been mutated or modified to increase their NADH-dependent activity or to switch the cofactor preference from NADPH to NADH and are expressed in the modified microorganisms. In addition, the invention provides isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes expressed in modified microorganisms. Also provided are methods of producing beneficial metabolites under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by contacting a suitable substrate with the modified microorganisms of the present invention.

Buelter, Thomas (Denver, CO); Meinhold, Peter (Denver, CO); Feldman, Reid M. Renny (San Francisco, CA); Hawkins, Andrew C. (Parker, CO); Urano, Jun (Irvine, CA); Bastian, Sabine (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Frances (La Canada, CA)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

125

Advanced Instrumentation for Extreme Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is pursuing embedded instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology for next generation nuclear power generation applications. Embedded systems encompass a wide range of configurations and technologies; we define embedding in this instance as the integration of the sensors and the control system design into the component design using a systems engineering process. Embedded I&C systems are often an essential part of developing new capabilities, improving reliability, enhancing performance, and reducing operational costs. The new intrinsically safe, more efficient, and cost effective reactor technologies (Next Generation Nuclear Plant and Small Modular Reactors) require the development and application of new I&C technologies. These new designs raise extreme environmental challenges such as high temperatures (over 700 C) and material compatibility (e.g., molten salts). The desired reliability and functionality requires measurements in these extreme conditions including high radiation environments which were not previously monitored in real time. The DOE/NE Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program currently has several projects investigating I&C technologies necessary to make these reactor designs realizable. The project described in this paper has the specific goal of investigating embedded I&C with the following objectives: 1.Explore and quantify the potential gains from embedded I&C improved reliability, increased performance, and reduced cost 2.Identify practical control, sensing, and measurement techniques for the extreme environments found in high-temperature reactors 3.Design and fabricate a functional prototype high-temperature cooling pump for molten salts represents target demonstration of improved performance, reliability, and widespread usage There are many engineering challenges in the design of a high-temperature liquid salt cooling pump. The pump and motor are in direct contact with molten fluoride salt at 700 C (1,292 F) as part of a reactor cooling loop. The motor-pump combination during normal operation would be red-hot (Figure 1). This environment challenges every facet of the design including seals, wiring, magnetic materials, and sensors. In this paper, we discuss the challenges of sensor design in extreme environments and specifically the sensor design for a high-temperature fluoride salt coolant pump. This pump will be used as a test-bed for embedded I&C development and validation in extreme environments.

Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Kisner, Roger [ORNL; Fugate, David L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

QUALITATIVE PROPERTIES OF A 3-STEPS MODEL OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION INCLUDING HYDROLYSIS OF PARTICULATE MATTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUALITATIVE PROPERTIES OF A 3-STEPS MODEL OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION INCLUDING HYDROLYSIS-SupAgro MISTEA, 2 p. Viala 34060 Montpellier, France, fekih@supagro.inra.fr Introduction. Anaerobic digestion, the anaerobic digestion is generally considered as a three step process: hydrolysis and liquefaction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

127

Reduction of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Present in Food Animal Manures by Composting and Anaerobic Digestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Anaerobic Digestion Frederick C. Michel, Food, Agricultural, and Biological Engineering Zhongtang Yu, Animal concluded that both anaerobic digestion and composting--especially at elevated temperatures--are effective effectiveness of anaerobic digestion and composting at high temperatures is of interest to industry

Jones, Michelle

128

Optimizing the anaerobic digestion of microalgae in a coupled Terence Bayen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimizing the anaerobic digestion of microalgae in a coupled process Terence Bayen , Francis by light and an anaerobic digester. The mathematical model for the dynamics of the reactors takes for sustainable energy production [2]. Anaerobic digestion can be applied to recover the energy stored

Recanati, Catherine

129

Reducing the Anaerobic Digestion Model N1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant treating 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 2 Abstract The Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 (ADM1., 2005). Anaerobic digestion process involves many interactions between species that may not all have

130

Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reduce volume, remove pathogens, and to gain energy. Anaerobic digestion is by far the most commonRemoval of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N treatment in a wastewater treatment plant. They therefore proceed directly to the anaerobic post treatment

131

Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering Fall 2011 Small Scale Anaerobic Digestion by PENERGY Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by wood-fired boilers. By generating biogas through anaerobic digestion of swine manure, fuel can: A mechanical anaerobic digester to handle organic farm waste. A complete biogas collection system with hookPENNSTATE Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering Fall 2011 Small Scale Anaerobic

Demirel, Melik C.

132

A dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The dynamics of this process are the ones of standard anaerobic digestion, and depend on the type of organic is devoted to the description of the model of the specific anaerobic digestion processA dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater

133

An integrated system to remote monitor and control anaerobic wastewater treatment plants through the internet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and manages the problem. Keywords Anaerobic digestion, automation, control, fault detection and isolationAn integrated system to remote monitor and control anaerobic wastewater treatment plants through of the anaerobic wastewater treatment plants that do not benefit from a local expert in wastewater treatment

Bernard, Olivier

134

Bifurcation and stability analysis of a two step model for monitoring anaerobic digestion processes$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bifurcation and stability analysis of a two step model for monitoring anaerobic digestion processes in simulation. Keywords: Anaerobic digestion, biotechnology, steady state analysis, $ This work was supported the phenomenologic behavior of anaerobic digestion systems following the idea that all the available information

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

135

Research review paper1 Anaerobic digestion of microalgae as a necessary step to make3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Research review paper1 2 Anaerobic digestion of microalgae as a necessary step to make3 of residual biomass and the17 high amounts of fertilizers must be considered. Anaerobic digestion is a key and concentrate methane is discussed.31 32 33 Keywords: anaerobic digestion, microalgae, biochemical methane

136

Design and study of a risk management criterion for an unstable anaerobic wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an unstable biological process used for wastewater treat- ment. This anaerobic digestion ecosystem can have steady-state to another. This is especially the case for the anaerobic digestion process: a more and more There exists numerous dynamical models for anaerobic digestion, from the basic ones considering only one

Bernard, Olivier

137

THE RUMEN ANAEROBIC FUNGI : COLONIZERS OF PLANT FIBRE Applied Biochemistry Division, DSIR, Palmerston North, New Zealand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

» fraction that the rumen anaerobic fungi are to be found. Digestion of cellulose and related plant fibrousTHE RUMEN ANAEROBIC FUNGI : COLONIZERS OF PLANT FIBRE T. BAUCHOP Applied Biochemistry Division, DSIR, Palmerston North, New Zealand. Large numbers of anaerobic phycomyce- tous fungi colonize plant

Recanati, Catherine

138

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIM J.W. Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery Jun Wei LIM, Singapore 639798 (E-mail: jwlim3@e.ntu.edu.sg) Abstract The anaerobic digestion of brown water (BW), food in a decentralized reactor via anaerobic digestion. The bio-methane potential of these substrates at different feed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

139

Thermophilic α-glucan phosphorylase from Clostridium thermocellum: Cloning, characterization and enhanced thermostability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Molecular Catalysis B: Enzymatic 65 (2010) 110-116 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Journal of Molecular Catalysis B: Enzymatic j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / m o l c a t b Thermophilic ␣-glucan phosphorylase from Clostridium thermocellum: Cloning, characterization and enhanced thermostability Xinhao Ye a , Joe Rollin a , Yi-Heng Percival Zhang a,b,c,∗ a Biological Systems Engineering Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA b Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA c DOE Bioenergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Available online 25 January 2010 Keywords: ␣-Glucan phosphorylase Biocatalysis Building

140

Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by co-disposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Pu(IV)-EDTA is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds. Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) is likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions and the anaerobic biodegradation of Pu-EDTA. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV), the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA, how the Pu(III)-EDTA competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, soluble Pu(III)-EDTA under anaerobic conditions would require anaerobic degradation of the EDTA to limit Pu(III) transport. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have never been isolated. Recent results have shown that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, can reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III). The Pu(IV) was provided as insoluble PuO2. The highest rate of Pu(IV) reduction was with the addition of AQDS, an electron shuttle. Of the total amount of Pu solubilized (i.e., soluble through a 0.36 nm filter), approximately 70% was Pu(III). The amount of soluble Pu was between 4.8 and 3.2 micromolar at day 1 and 6, respectively, indicating rapid reduction. The micromolar Pu is significant since the drinking water limit for Pu is 10{sup -12} M. On-going experiments are investigating the influence of EDTA on the rate of Pu reduction and the stability of the formed Pu(III). We have also begun to enrich and isolate bacteria capable of aerobic and anaerobic degradation of EDTA. Environmental samples (e.g., sludges, river sediments) were incubated aerobically and anaerobically with EDTA or NTA as the sole carbon and energy source. Aerobic enrichment with EDTA has not resulted in any cultures, but NTA has provided several isolates. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequence and sequence comparison identified four separate strains closely related to Microbacterium oxydans, Aminobacter sp., Achromobacter sp., Aminobacter sp., respectively. Anaerobic enrichments with either EDTA or NTA are still in progress since metabolism and growth is relatively slow. In addition to the biotransformation experiments, studies are underway to determine/validate complexation constants of Pu(III) with EDTA and the influence of competing ions on Pu(III)-EDTA complexes. These data are being obtained through solubility studies of PuPO{sub 4}(s) and Pu(OH){sub 3}(s) as a function of time, pH, and EDTA and competing ion concentrations. These results have begun to fill-in knowledge gaps of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop Pu transport in groundwater at DOE sites.

Bolton, H., Jr.; Bailey, V.L.; Plymale, A.E.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A mixed plug flow anaerobic digester for dairy manure  

SciTech Connect

In 1982, a ''mixed plug-flow'' anaerobic digester has been built to produce biogas from the manure of 350 dairy cows and, subsequently, to produce electricity for on-farm use only. This paper describes the digester and presents the main results of one year of technical follow-up.

Cournoyer, M.S.; Delisle, U.; Ferland, D.; Chagnon, R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Anaerobic digestion of the liquid fraction of dairy manure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors tested several solid liquid separation systems suitable for processing dairy manure prior to anaerobic digestion. None of the systems tried have completely satisfied the requirements. Evaluated effects of separation on biogas production. Unseparated dairy manure produced more biogas than the liquid fraction.

Haugen, V.; Dahlberg, S.; Lindley, J.A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Advanced Materials and Processes for Extreme Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil & Gas Environments. Presentation Title, Advanced Materials and Processes for ...

144

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures. Description/Summary: The Building and Fire Research Laboratory has an ...

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

145

Nanocrystalline and Nanotwinned Metals under Extreme Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The applicability of nanostructured metals under extreme environment (high temperature, ... of Transport Phenomena for Enhanced Oil Recovery Applications .

146

Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: Extreme Sensitivity in Biological ...  

THE LLNL TECHNOLOGY COMPANY PRODUCT 24 Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: Extreme Sensitivity in Biological Research

147

Complete genome of the cellyloytic thermophile Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B provides insights into its ecophysiological and evloutionary adaptations  

SciTech Connect

We present here the complete 2.4 Mb genome of the cellulolytic actinobacterial thermophile, Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B. New secreted glycoside hydrolases and carbohydrate esterases were identified in the genome, revealing a diverse biomass-degrading enzyme repertoire far greater than previously characterized, and significantly elevating the industrial value of this organism. A sizable fraction of these hydrolytic enzymes break down plant cell walls and the remaining either degrade components in fungal cell walls or metabolize storage carbohydrates such as glycogen and trehalose, implicating the relative importance of these different carbon sources. A novel feature of the A. cellulolyticus secreted cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes is that they are fused to multiple tandemly arranged carbohydrate binding modules (CBM), from families 2 and 3. Interestingly, CBM3 was found to be always N-terminal to CBM2, suggesting a functional constraint driving this organization. While the catalytic domains of these modular enzymes are either diverse or unrelated, the CBMs were found to be highly conserved in sequence and may suggest selective substrate-binding interactions. For the most part, thermophilic patterns in the genome and proteome of A. cellulolyticus were weak, which may be reflective of the recent evolutionary history of A. cellulolyticus since its divergence from its closest phylogenetic neighbor Frankia, a mesophilic plant endosymbiont and soil dweller. However, ribosomal proteins and non-coding RNAs (rRNA and tRNAs) in A. cellulolyticus showed thermophilic traits suggesting the importance of adaptation of cellular translational machinery to environmental temperature. Elevated occurrence of IVYWREL amino acids in A. cellulolyticus orthologs compared to mesophiles, and inverse preferences for G and A at the first and third codon positions also point to its ongoing thermoadaptation. Additional interesting features in the genome of this cellulolytic, hot-springs dwelling prokaryote include a low occurrence of pseudogenes or mobile genetic elements, an unexpected complement of flagellar genes, and presence of three laterally-acquired genomic islands of likely ecophysiological value.

Barabote, Ravi D.; Xie, Gary; Leu, David H.; Normand, Philippe; Necsulea, Anamaria; Daubin, Vincent; Medigue, Claudine; Adney, William S.; Xu,Xin Clare; Lapidus, Alla; Detter, Chris; Pujic, Petar; Bruce, David; Lavire, Celine; Challacombe, Jean F.; Brettin, Thomas S.; Berry, Alison M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters This webinar was held April 16, 2013, and provided information on San Jose, California's, commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system, and the Forest County Potawatomi Community's (FCPC) anaerobic digester project. Download the presentations below, watch the webinar (WMV 125 MB), or view the text version. Find more CommRE webinars. Implementing Anaerobic Digestion in San Jose's Integrated Processing Infrastructure This presentation provided background on San Jose, California's, leading-edge program using the nation's first commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system to process commercial organics

149

Granular gases under extreme driving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study inelastic gases in two dimensions using event-driven molecular dynamics simulations. Our focus is the nature of the stationary state attained by rare injection of large amounts of energy to balance the dissipation due to collisions. We find that under such extreme driving, with the injection rate much smaller than the collision rate, the velocity distribution has a power-law high energy tail. The numerically measured exponent characterizing this tail is in excellent agreement with predictions of kinetic theory over a wide range of system parameters. We conclude that driving by rare but powerful energy injection leads to a well-mixed gas and constitutes an alternative mechanism for agitating granular matter. In this distinct nonequilibrium steady-state, energy cascades from large to small scales. Our simulations also show that when the injection rate is comparable with the collision rate, the velocity distribution has a stretched exponential tail.

W. Kang; J. Machta; E. Ben-Naim

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

150

Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by codisposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Our previous NABIR research investigated the aerobic biodegradation and biogeochemistry of Pu(IV)-EDTA. Plutonium(IV) forms stable complexes with EDTA under aerobic conditions and an aerobic EDTA degrading bacterium can degrade EDTA in the presence of Pu and decrease Pu mobility. However, our recent studies indicate that while Pu(IV)-EDTA is stable in simple aqueous systems, it is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds (i.e., Fe(OH){sub 3}(s)--2-line ferrihydrite). Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) in likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA in groundwater. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed in this brand new project to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV) as PuO2(am) by metal reducing bacteria, the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA complex, how the Pu(III)-EDTA complex competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, the formation of a stable soluble Pu(III)-EDTA complex under anaerobic conditions would require degradation of the EDTA complex to limit Pu(III) transport in geologic environments. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have not been isolated. These knowledge gaps preclude the development of a mechanistic understanding of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop Pu transport in groundwater at DOE sites.

Bolton, H., Jr.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

The winds of (evolutionary) change: Breathing new life into microbiology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To date, over 1500 prokaryotes have been characterized by small subunit rRNA sequencing and molecular phylogeny has had an equally profound effect on our understanding of relationship among eukaryotic microorganisms. The universal phylogenetic tree readily shows however how artificial the strong distinction between the eukaryote and prokaryotes has become. The split between the Archaea and the Bacteria is now recognized as the primary phylogenetic division and that the Eucarya have branched from the same side of the tree as the Archaea. Both prokaryotic domains would seem to be of thermophilic origin suggesting that life arose in a very warm environment. Among the Archaea, all of the Crenarchaeota cultured to date are thermophiles, and the deepest euryarchaeal branchings are represented exclusively by thermophiles. Among the Bacteria, the deepest known branchings are again represented exclusively by thermophiles, and thermophilia is widely scattered throughout the domain. The Archaea comprise a small number of quite disparate phenotypes that grow in unusual niches. All are obligate or facultative anaerobes. All cultured crenarchaeotes are thermophilic, some even growing optimally above the normal boiling temperature of water. The Archaeoglobales are sulfate reducers growing at high temperatures. The extreme halophiles grow only in highly saline environments. The methanogens are confined to a variety of anaerobic niches, often thermophilic. The Bacteria, on the other hand, are notable as being the source of life`s photosynthetic capacity. Five kingdoms of bacteria contain photosynthetic species; and each of the five manifests a distinct type of (chlorophyll-based) photosynthesis.

Olsen, G.J.; Woese, C.R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Microbiology; Overbeek, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Announcing the Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Announcing the Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing Providing Extreme-Scale Supercomputing Training for...

153

In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annika Mosier, graduate student from Stanford University presents a talk titled "In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

Mosier, Annika [Stanford University

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

154

Complete genome sequence of the moderate thermophile Anaerobaculum mobile type strain (NGAT)  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobaculum mobile Menes and Muxi 2002 is one of three described species of the genus Anaerobaculum, family Synergistaceae, phylum Synergistetes. This anaerobic and motile bac- terium ferments a range of carbohydrates and mono- and dicarboxylic acids with acetate, hy- drogen and CO2 as end products. A. mobile NGAT is the first member of the genus Anaerobaculum and the sixth member of the phylum Synergistetes with a completely se- quenced genome. Here we describe the features of this bacterium, together with the com- plete genome sequence, and annotation. The 2,160,700 bp long single replicon genome with its 2,053 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Stackebrandt, Erko [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Single stage anaerobic digester at Tarleton State University. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and operation of the demonstration plant facilities at Tarleton State University to produce methane in a single stage anaerobic digester are described. A combination of manures from hogs and poultry are used as feedstock. Uses for the methane, cost of the digester, and value of the energy produced are discussed. During the 21 months of operation, 310 people have visited the project. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Metagenome of an Anaerobic Microbial Community Decomposing Poplar Wood Chips  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study describes the composition and metabolic potential of a lignocellulosic biomass degrading community that decays poplar wood chips under anaerobic conditions. We examined the community that developed on poplar biomass in a non-aerated bioreactor over the course of a year, with no microbial inoculation other than the naturally occurring organisms on the woody material. The composition of this community contrasts in important ways with biomass-degrading communities associated with higher organisms, which have evolved over millions of years into a symbiotic relationship. Both mammalian and insect hosts provide partial size reduction, chemical treatments (low or high pH environments), and complex enzymatic 'secretomes' that improve microbial access to cell wall polymers. We hypothesized that in order to efficiently degrade coarse untreated biomass, a spontaneously assembled free-living community must both employ alternative strategies, such as enzymatic lignin depolymerization, for accessing hemicellulose and cellulose and have a much broader metabolic potential than host-associated communities. This would suggest that such a community would make a valuable resource for finding new catalytic functions involved in biomass decomposition and gaining new insight into the poorly understood process of anaerobic lignin depolymerization. Therefore, in addition to determining the major players in this community, our work specifically aimed at identifying functions potentially involved in the depolymerization of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and to assign specific roles to the prevalent community members in the collaborative process of biomass decomposition. A bacterium similar to Magnetospirillum was identified among the dominant community members, which could play a key role in the anaerobic breakdown of aromatic compounds. We suggest that these compounds are released from the lignin fraction in poplar hardwood during the decay process, which would point to lignin-modification or depolymerization under anaerobic conditions.

van der Lelie, D.; Taghavi, S.; McCorkle, S. M.; Li, L. L.; Malfatti, S. A.; Monteleone, D.; Donohoe, B. S.; Ding, S. Y.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Tringe, S. G.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Extremely Low Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Extremely Low Temperature Extremely Low Temperature Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: Extremely Low Temperature Dictionary.png Extremely Low Temperature: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Reservoir fluid less than 100°C is considered to to be "extremely low temperature." Note: Sanyal classified fluids of these temperatures to be "non-electrical grade" in 2005, but electricity has since been generated from these

158

Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury1-4. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury5. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally-relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings5, we show that Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 can both oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. However, the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is only about one third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidise, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA is able to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

Hu, Haiyan [ORNL] [ORNL; Lin, Hui [ORNL] [ORNL; Zheng, Wang [ORNL] [ORNL; Tomanicek, Stephen J [ORNL] [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL] [ORNL; Feng, Xinbin [ORNL] [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Liquidization of dewatered organic sludge and anaerobic treatment  

SciTech Connect

Dewatered sewage sludge was thermochemically liquidized at 175 {degrees}C and the liquidized sludge was separated by centrifugation to 58% (w/w) supernatant and 42% precipitate. The amount of proteins in the liquidized sludge slightly decreased through the liquidization process, however, that of lipids increased. The supernatant separated from the sludge liquidized with dewatered sewage sludge was successfully anaerobically digested. Biogas yield from the supernatant from dewatered sewage sludge at organic loading concentrations of 1.9-2.2 g VS/l during 9 days incubation was 440 ml/g-added VS and digestion ratio was 66% (w/w). Biogas yield in the case of dewatered sewage sludge was 257 ml/g-added VS and digestion ratio was 45%. Similar results were obtained in the case of the anaerobically digested with sewage sludge and dewatered sludge. Anaerobic digestion of the supernatants from the liquidized sludges resulted in high biogas productivity and high digestion ratio compared with these of the original sludges. Moreover, the precipitates contained lower moisture, therefore, they can be incinerated easier than the respective original sludges.

Sawayama, Shigeki; Inoue, Seiichi; Ogi, Tomoko [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Anaerobic methane oxidation in metalliferous hydrothermal sediments: influence on carbon flux and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biology, 2 Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, 3 School of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 01238, USA. 4 Department of Marine Sciences, University mesophilic to thermophilic AOM in hydro- thermal sediments recovered from the Middle Valley vent field

Girguis, Peter R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) Multiple EUV ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and the Extreme ultraviolet SpectroPhotometer (ESP). The radiometric ... the calibration of the ESP instrument is addressed by Didkovsky et al. (Solar Phys.

162

Extremely Hazardous Substances Risk Management Act (Delaware)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act lays out provisions for local governments to implement regulations and standards for the management of extremely hazardous substances, which are defined and categorized as follows:

163

Extreme Value Analysis of Heart Beat Fluctuations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have performed an extreme value analysis of the heart beat fluctuations. We have analyzed 24?h ECG time series: by considering both

C. Pennetta; S. Conte

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Anaerobic Digesters in the Agricultural Sector: A Distributed Energy Resources Market Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory pressure is creating a need for agricultural animal operations to better handle animal organic waste products. One option available to dairies, hog farms, and other operations to address these challenges is to develop anaerobic digesters. A by-product of anaerobic digesters is a methane rich gas that can be used for electric power generation and/or meeting thermal needs. This report explores the market potential for anaerobic digesters in the agricultural sector, and the role that electric pow...

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Investigation of microalgae cultivation and anaerobic codigestion of algae and sewage sludge for wastewater treatment facilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main goals of this research are to investigate the anaerobic digestibility of algae and to investigate the effects of growth media on the growth… (more)

Wang, Meng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community- A Case Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presented by Jason Rieth, Industrial Construction Executive at Miron Construction at the April 16, 2013, Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters CommRE Webinar.

167

Pretreatment of Pulp Mill Wastewater Treatment Residues to Improve Their Anaerobic Digestion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Anaerobic digestion of excess biological wastewater treatment sludge (WAS) from pulp mills has the potential to reduce disposal costs and to generate energy through biogas… (more)

Wood, Nicholas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Modeling Hydrogen Sulfide Adsorption by Activated Carbon made from Anaerobic Digestion By-product.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biogas, produced from anaerobic digestion of cattle manure, is an attractive alternative energy source as it is rich in methane. However, it is necessary to… (more)

Ho, Natalie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Treatment program of organic matter by anaerobic digestion and composting (PTMOBC) (Quebec, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program for processing of organic matter by anaerobic digestion and composting (PTMOBC) provides financial assistance to municipalities and the private sector for the installation of...

170

DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the ACGME website with information relating to the ACGME response to the disaster. 3. The University-specific Program Requirements. Defined Responsibilities Following the Declaration of a Disaster or Extreme EmergentPage 123 DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES) The University of Connecticut

Oliver, Douglas L.

171

Information Causality and Extremal Tripartite Correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the principle of information causality for the set of extremal correlations in the tripartite scenario. We show that all but one nonlocal extremal correlations in this scenario violate information causality. This undetected correlation is shown to satisfy any bipartite physical principle.

Yang, Tzyh Haur; Almeida, Mafalda; Teo, Colin; Scarani, Valerio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Complex Plasma Research Under Extreme Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complex plasma research under extreme conditions is described. The extreme conditions include low-dimensionality for self-organized structures of dust particles, dust magnetization in high magnetic field, criticality in phase transition, and cryogenic environment for Coulomb crystals and dust dynamics.

Ishihara, Osamu [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

173

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC GROWTH OF BACILLUS MOJAVENSIS STRAIN JF-2 FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC BIOSURFACTANT PRODUCTION FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our work focuses on the use of microorganisms to recover petroleum hydrocarbons that remain entrapped after current recovery technologies reach their economic limit. Capillary forces between the hydrocarbon and aqueous phases are largely responsible for trapping the hydrocarbons in the pores of the rock and large reductions in the interfacial tension between the hydrocarbon and aqueous phases are needed for hydrocarbon mobilization (1-3, 10, 11). Microorganisms produce a variety of biosurfactants (4), several of which generate the ultra low interfacial tensions needed for hydrocarbon mobilization (4, 5, 8). In particular, the lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus mojavensis strain JF-2 reduces the interfacial tension between hydrocarbon and aqueous phases to very low levels (herring sperm DNA, E. coli DNA or synthetic DNA (single or double stranded) to Medium E all supported anaerobic growth of JF-2. Further, we found that JF-2 required all four deoxyribonucleosides (deoxyadeonosine, deoxyguanosine, deoxycytidine and thymidine) for growth under strict anaerobic conditions. The requirement for the deoxyribonucleosides did not occur under aerobic growth conditions. DNA was not used as a sole energy source; sucrose was required for anaerobic growth and biosurfactant production in DNA-supplemented Medium E. In addition to DNA or deoxyribonucleosides, nitrate, amino acids and vitamins were all required for anaerobic growth of JF-2. Bacillus mojavensisT (ABO21191), Bacillus mojavensis, strain ROB2 also required DNA or deoxyribonucleosides for anaerobic growth. The improved anaerobic growth of Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 was a prerequisite for studies that will lead to improved anaerobic biosurfactant production.

M.J. McInerney; M. Folmsbee; D. Nagle

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EXTREMES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EXTREMES EXTREMES EXTREMES logo. Synthesizes extreme, but statistically possible, hot, cold or average sequences of hourly weather data for periods of up to one week for a specified month and for 329 locations in North America, with the capability of modifying or expanding the data for greater flexibility. Such data are needed in the design of building heating and cooling systems, particularly systems which utilize some form of energy storage. Screen Shots Keywords extreme weather, weather sequences, simulation, energy calculation Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required Student or engineer of HVAC system design. Low level of computer literacy required. Users Worldwide distribution. Useful for U.S. and Canada locations Audience Researchers, Students, Engineers and Architects

175

Extreme wave impinging and overtopping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This investigates the velocity fields of a plunging breaking wave impinging on a structure through measurements in a two-dimensional wave tank. As the wave breaks and overtops the structure, so-called green water is generated. The flow becomes multi-phased and chaotic as a highly aerated region is formed in the flow in the vicinity of the structure while water runs up onto the structure. In this study, particle image velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the velocity field of the water dominant region. For measurements of an aerated region that cannot be measured by PIV, a new measurement method called bubble image velocimetry (BIV) was developed. The principle and setup of the BIV method were introduced and validated. Mean and turbulence properties were obtained through ensemble averaging repeated tests measured by both methods. The dominant and maximum velocity of the breaking wave and associated green water are discussed for the three distinct phases of the impingement-runup-overtopping sequence. The distribution of the green water velocity along the top of the structure has a nonlinear profile and the maximum velocity occurs near the front of the fast moving water. Using the measured data and applying dimensional analysis, a similarity profile for the green water flow on top of the structure was obtained, and a prediction equation was formulated. The dam breaking solution used for the green water prediction was examined with determining initial water depth based on the experiment conditions. Comparison between measurements, the prediction equation, and the dam breaking flow was made. The prediction equation and the dam break flow with appropriate initial water depth may be used to predict the green water velocity caused by extreme waves in a hurricane. To demonstrate the aeration of the breaking wave and overtopping water, void fraction was also investigated. There is strong aeration in the region of overtopping water front generated by a plunging breaker. Void fraction of overtopping water was measured using a fiber optic reflectometer (FOR). The measured velocity and void fraction were also used to estimate flow rate and water volume of overtopping water.

Ryu, Yong Uk

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Scalable economic extracellular synthesis of CdS nanostructured particles by a non-pathogenic thermophile  

SciTech Connect

We report microbially facilitated synthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanostructured particles (NP) using anaerobic, metal-reducing Thermoanaerobacter sp. The extracellular CdS crystallites were <10 nm in size with yields of ~3 g/L of growth medium/month with demonstrated reproducibility and scalability up to 24 L. During synthesis, Thermoanaerobacter cultures reduced thiosulfate and sulfite salts to H2S, which reacted with Cd2+ cations to produce thermodynamically favored NP in a single step at 65oC with catalytic nucleation on the cell surfaces. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis of dry CdS NP revealed an exciton-dominated PL peak at 440 nm, having a narrow full width at half maximum of 10 nm. A PL spectrum of CdS NP produced by dissimilatory sulfur reducing bacteria was dominated by features associated with radiative exciton relaxation at the surface. High reproducibility of CdS NP PL features important for scale-up conditions was confirmed from test tubes to 24L batches at a small fraction of the manufacturing cost associated with conventional inorganic NP production processes.

Moon, Ji Won [ORNL] [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL] [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL] [ORNL; Love, Lonnie J [ORNL] [ORNL; Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL; Wang, Wei [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Dr. Yi-Liang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Madden, Andrew [ORNL] [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL] [ORNL; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL] [ORNL; Suresh, Anil K [ORNL] [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL] [ORNL; Jung, Hyunsung [ORNL] [ORNL; Lauf, Robert J [ORNL] [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Oxygen Effects on Thermophilic Microbial Populations in Biofilters Treating Nitric Oxide Containing Off-Gas Streams  

SciTech Connect

Electricity generation from coal has increased by an average of 51 billion kWh per year over the past 3 years. For this reason cost-effective strategies to control nitrogen oxides (NOx) from coal-fired power plant combustion gases must be developed. Compost biofilters operated at 55°C at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 13 seconds were shown to be feasible for removal of nitric oxide (NO) from synthetic flue gas. Denitrifying microbial populations in these biofilters were shown to reduce influent NO feeds by 90 to 95% at inlet NO concentrations of 500 ppmv. Oxygen was shown to have a significant effect on the NO removal efficiency demonstrated by these biofilters. Two biofilters were set up under identical conditions for the purpose of monitoring NO removal as well as changes in the microbial population in the bed medium under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Changes in the microbial population were monitored to determine the maximum oxygen tolerance of a denitrifying biofilter as well as methods of optimizing microbial populations capable of denitrification in the presence of low oxygen concentrations. Nitric oxide removal dropped to between 10 and 20% when oxygen was present in the influent stream. The inactive compost used to pack the biofilters may have also caused the decreased NO removal efficiency compared to previous biofiltration experiments. Analysis of the bed medium microbial population using environmental scanning electron microscopy indicated significant increases in biomass populating the surface of the compost when compared to unacclimated compost.

Lee, Brady Douglas; Apel, William Arnold; Smith, William Aaron

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, was studied in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. The threshold value for benzoate degradation was dependent on the acetate concentration with benzoate threshold values ranging from 2.4 [mu]M at 20 mM acetate to 30.0 [mu]M at 65 mM acetate. Increasing acetate concentrations also inhibited the rate of benzoate degradation with a apparent K[sub i] for acetate inhibition of 7.0 mM. Lower threshold values were obtained when nitrate rather than sulfate was the terminal electron acceptor. These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and suggest that there is a minimum Gibbs free energy value required for the degradation of benzoate. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase has been isolated from Syntrophomonas wolfei; it is apparently a key enzyme controlling the synthesis of poly-B-hydroxyalkanoate from acetyl-CoA in this organism. Kinetic characterization of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from S. wolfei showed that it is similar in its structural, kinetic, and apparent regulatory properties to other biosynthetic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases from phylogenetically distinct bacteria that synthesize PHA. Intracellular concentrations of CoA and acetyl-CoA are believed to be critical factors regulating the activity of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase in S. wolfei. We have also isolated and characterized several new halophilic anaerobic fermentative anaerobes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that one of these bacteria is a new species in the genus, Haloanaerobium. Two other species appear to be members of the genus, Halobacteroides. Several halophilic acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria have also been isolated and their physiological properties are currently under investigation. We have also isolated an acetate-using dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

McInerney, M.J.

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

179

Deploying anaerobic digesters: Current status and future possibilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unmanaged pollutants from putrescible farm, industrial, and municipal wastes degrade in the environment, and methane emitted from their decomposition may contribute to global climate change. Under modern environmental regulations, these wastes are becoming difficult to dispose of using traditional means. One waste management system, anaerobic digestion or AD, not only provides pollution prevention but can also convert a disposal problem into a new profit center. This report is drawn from a special session of the Second Biomass Conference of the Americas. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Lusk, P. [International Energy Agency, Paris (France); Wheeler, P. [ETSU (United Kingdom); Rivard, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Tumble-mix anaerobic digestion of dry beef manure  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic digestion of beef manure at an influent total solids concentration of 26% was demonstrated using an innovative tumble-mix fermenter. At an organic loading rate of 4.7 kg VS m-/sup 3/ d-/sup 1/ and a 23% VS influent concentration, a 54% volatile solids reduction was achieved. The average biogas production was 1.37 m/sup 3/ m-/sup 3/ d-/sup 1/ with a gas quality of 54% CH/sub 4/.

Kottwitz, D.; Schulte, D.D.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Clausen, Edgar C. (Fayetteville, AR)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H[sub 2]O and/or CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate. 3 figs.

Gaddy, J.L.; Clausen, E.C.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

183

1190 J. ENVIRON. QUAL., VOL. 26, JULY-AUGUST 1997 Proc. lnt. Symp. on Anaerobic Digestion of Soild Waste, Venice,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1190 J. ENVIRON. QUAL., VOL. 26, JULY-AUGUST 1997 Proc. lnt. Symp. on Anaerobic Digestion of Soild USSR. Chemosphere 26:401-417. Orlygsson, J., F.P. Houwen, and B.H. Svensson. 1993. Anaerobic

Fischlin, Andreas

184

Effects of Fe2+ on the Anaerobic Digestion of Chicken Manure: A Batch Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trace elements are considered to be essential for anaerobic process. Laboratory-scale batch studies were undertaken to evaluate the effect of Fe2+on the biogas production from chicken manure at mesophilic condition (37 ±1°C). The biogas production ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, chicken manure, dynamics, iron, stimulation and inhibition

Zhang Wanqin; Guo Jianbin; Wu Shubiao; Dong Renjie; Zhou Jie; Lang Qianqian; Li Xin; Lv Tao; Pang Changle; Chen Li; Wang Baozhi

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

On differential algebraic decision methods for the estimation of anaerobic digestion models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring and control of anaerobic digestion of organic wastes by microorganisms are parts of actual world efforts to preserve environment. The anaerobic digestion is a biochemical process in which microorganisms (or bacteria) biodegrade organic matters ... Keywords: characteristic set, differential algebra, differential algebraic decision methods, dynamic systems, observability, software sensors

Elena Chorukova; Sette Diop; Ivan Simeonov

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study Presented by Jason Rieth, P.E., LEED AP BD + C Industrial Construction Executive Miron Construction Co., Inc. 715.841.4029 | jason.rieth@miron-construction.com * Overview of the FCPC Renewable Generation Facility

187

Literature analysis of anaerobic wastewater treatment in China from 1998 to 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the bibliometric method, this paper analyzes statistically the research papers on anaerobic wastewater treatment in China collected by China Journal Whole-length Database of National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) published during the period ... Keywords: anaerobic treatment, bibliometric method, literature, wastewater

Liu Min; Huang Zhan-bin; Huang Zhen

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Compartmental anaerobic baffled reactor kinetic model for treatment of dilute aircraft deicing fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A four-compartment, anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) incorporating granular sludge biomass (GSB) was operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) in the range of 3 to 24 hours using dilute aircraft deicing fluid (ADF) with different chemical ... Keywords: anaerobic, baffled reactor, deicing fluid

Juan Marin; Kevin J. Kennedy; Cigdem Eskicioglu; Mohamed F. Hamoda

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Operation of a 200-kW PAFC Unit on Anaerobic Digestor Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anaerobic digestor process used by over 90% of wastewater treatment plants generates methane-rich gas as a byproduct. This report describes the initial phases of a twelve-month demonstration project in which a fuel cell power plant in Yonkers, New York, is being successfully run on anaerobic digestor gas (ADG).

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS BY STRICTLY ANAEROBIC BACTERIA IN THE DIGESTIVE TRACT OF GNOTOXENIC MICE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS BY STRICTLY ANAEROBIC BACTERIA IN THE DIGESTIVE TRACT OF « GNOTOXENIC » MICE. INHIBITORY EFFECT ON SHIGELLA FLEXNERI Various strains of strictly anaerobic bacteria of holoxenic animals, were implanted in the digestive tract of axenic mice. The in vivo production of VFA

Recanati, Catherine

191

Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates and concentrations of bacteria for the anaerobic digestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the estimator performance. I. Introduction Anaerobic digestion is a biotechnological process with a promisingDynamic estimation of specific growth rates and concentrations of bacteria for the anaerobic digestion S. Diop1 and I. Simeonov2 Abstract-- The paper proposes an observability anal- ysis and estimation

192

Centralized Indirect Control of an Anaerobic Digestion Bioprocess Using Recurrent Neural Identifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper proposed to use a Recurrent Neural Network Model (RNNM) and a dynamic Backpropagation learning for centralized identification of an anaerobic digestion bioprocess, carried out in a fixed bed and a recirculation tank of a wastewater treatment ... Keywords: Recurrent neural network model, anaerobic digestion bioprocess, backpropagation learning, distributed parameter system, sliding mode control, systems identification, wastewater treatment bioprocess

Ieroham S. Baruch; Rosalba Galvan-Guerra; Boyka Nenkova

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Analysis of the Changing Microbial Phase in an Underground River Anaerobic Digestion Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The underground river anaerobic fermentation system was adopted in this experiment was that a pipeline buried underground just like an underground river. The hydrolysis, acidification and degradation of initial fermentation were carried out when raw ... Keywords: underground river anaerobic digestion reactor, microbial phase, methane-producing bacteria, dominant bacteria

Bingbing Li; Xiao Bo; Zhiquan Hu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Colonisation of the sheep rumen with polycentric anaerobic fungi isolated from cattle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colonisation of the sheep rumen with polycentric anaerobic fungi isolated from cattle MW Phillips, GLR Gordon CSIRO Animal Production, Locked Bag 1, Blacktown, New South Wales 2148, Australia Anaerobic suggests that these organisms play an important role in the digestion of diets high in fibre (Gordon

Recanati, Catherine

195

High Solid Anaerobic Co-digestion Pilot Scale Experiment of Kitchen Waste and Cow-dung  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under mesophilic condition (37°C), a bench-scale experiment based on high solid anaerobic digestion process was conducted in a fed-batch single phase reactor. The result shows: (1) According to gas production and ph value change, there are mainly ... Keywords: Kitchen waste, Cow-dung, High solid, Anaerobic co-digestion, Pilotsate

Lei Feng; Yan Chen; Rundong Li; Jie Xu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The Effects of Different Anaerobic Fermentation Temperature on Biogas Fermentation of Swine Manure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas yields and methane productivity were studied at different temperatures (15¡æ, 20¡æ, 25¡æ, 30¡æ and 35¡æ) by the way of anaerobic fermentation experiment which takes wine manure as biogas fermentation raw material, and ... Keywords: Temperature, Biogas, Swine manure, Anaerobic fermentation

Zhu Zongqiang; Cheng Guanwen; Zhu Yinian; Zeng Honghu; Wei Rongrong; Wei Caichun

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Computational co-design may facilitate revolutionary designs in the next generation of supercomputers. Get Expertise Tim Germann Physics and Chemistry of Materials Email Allen McPherson Energy and Infrastructure Analysis Email Turab Lookman Physics and Condensed Matter and Complex Systems Email Computational co-design involves developing the interacting components of a computational system as a whole. Informing system design, ensuring productive and efficient code Project Description To address the increasingly complex problems of the modern world, scientists at Los Alamos are pushing the scale of computing to the extreme, forming partnerships with other national laboratories and industry to

198

Measures of Economic Impacts of Weather Extremes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the primary driving forces behind weather research and development has been the losses caused by weather extremes. Unfortunately, available loss values have been more qualitative than quantitative. There has never been a concerted, ...

Stanley D. Changnon

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Extreme Rainfall Events in the Hawaiian Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy rainfall and the associated floods occur frequently in the Hawaiian Islands and have caused huge economic losses as well as social problems. Extreme rainfall events in this study are defined by three different methods based on 1) the mean ...

Pao-Shin Chu; Xin Zhao; Ying Ruan; Melodie Grubbs

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Review of composting and anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and a methodological proposal for a mid-size city  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review of composting and anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and a methodological proposal and processes on composting and anaerobic digestion are compiled, showing the versatility and multivariable of the compost. In addition, anaerobic decomposition followed by vermicomposting is pointed as one of the best

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Alternative method for producing organic fertiliser from anaerobic digestion liquor and limestone powder: High shear Wet Granulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ã?Ã? Ã? Ã?Ã?Ã? Ã? Ã?Ã? Alternative method for producing organic fertiliser from anaerobic digestion liquor.M. Walker, Alternative method for producing organic fertiliser from anaerobic digestion liquor and limestone method for producing organic fertiliser from Anaerobic Digestion liquor and limestone powder: High Shear

Paxton, Anthony T.

202

Effects of temperature and temperature shock on the performance and microbial community structure of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the biological wastewater treatment performance and stability. Anaerobic digestion can be conducted., 2004). Earlier studies investigating effect of temperature on the anaerobic digestion process have of the mesophilic anaerobic digestion were re- cently studied (Chae et al., 2008). Some of the studies were only

Qin, Wensheng

203

Can we assess the model complexity for a bioprocess ? Theory and example of the anaerobic digestion process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can we assess the model complexity for a bioprocess ? Theory and example of the anaerobic digestion the bioreactor. This provides the dimension of K. The method is applied to data from an anaerobic digestion can be obtained with 2 biomasses. Keywords Anaerobic digestion; Bioreactors; Modelling; Nonlinear

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

204

ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM DIFFERENT CARBON SOURCES USING ANAEROBICALLY DIGESTED AND WETOXIDISED MANURE AS NUTRIENT AND WATER SUPPLY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM DIFFERENT CARBON SOURCES USING ANAEROBICALLY DIGESTED AND WETOXIDISED. The nutrients in anaerobically digested manure are sufficient for yeast fermentation, which means that the cost at 121o C was chosen as the most suitable method for pretreating anaerobically digested manure. Moreover

205

Jordan Algebras and Extremal Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review various properties of the exceptional Euclidean Jordan algebra of degree three. Euclidean Jordan algebras of degree three and their corresponding Freudenthal triple systems were recently shown to be intimately related to extremal black holes in N=2, d=4 homogeneous supergravities. Using a novel type of eigenvalue problem with eigenmatrix solutions, we elucidate the rich matrix geometry underlying the exceptional N=2, d=4 homogeneous supergravity and explore the relations to extremal black holes.

Michael Rios

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

206

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Feb.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feb. Feb. 2010, p. 1014-1020 Vol. 76, No. 4 0099-2240/10/$12.00 doi:10.1128/AEM.01903-09 Copyright © 2010, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov., an Anaerobic, Extremely Thermophilic, Cellulolytic Bacterium Isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park ᰔ Scott D. Hamilton-Brehm, Jennifer J. Mosher, Tatiana Vishnivetskaya, Mircea Podar, Sue Carroll, Steve Allman, Tommy J. Phelps, Martin Keller, and James G. Elkins* BioEnergy Science Center, Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 Received 7 August 2009/Accepted 2 December 2009 A novel, obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, designated OB47 T , was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, WY. The isolate was a nonmotile, non-spore-forming, Gram- positive

207

Fate of neptunium in an anaerobic, methanogenic microcosm.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neptunium is found predominantly as Np(IV) in reducing environments, but Np(V) in aerobic environments. However, currently it is not known how the interplay between biotic and abiotic processes affects Np redox speciation in the environment. In order to evaluate the effect of anaerobic microbial activity on the fate of Np in natural systems, Np(V) was added to a microcosminoculated with anaerobic sediments from a metal-contaminated fresh water lake. The consortium included metal-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic microorganisms, and acetate was supplied as the only exogenous substrate. Addition of more than 10{sup {minus}5} M Np did not inhibit methane production. Total Np volubility in the active microcosm, as well as in sterilized control samples, decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude. A combination of analytical techniques, including VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy and XANES, identified Np(IV) as the oxidation state associated with the sediments. The similar results from the active microcosm and the abiotic controls suggest that microbian y produced Mn(II/HI) and Fe(II) may serve as electron donors for Np reduction.

Banaszak, J. E.

1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

208

A mass transfer model of ammonia volatilisation from anaerobic digestate  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic digestion (AD) is becoming increasingly popular for treating organic waste. The methane produced can be burned to generate electricity and the digestate, which is high in mineral nitrogen, can be used as a fertiliser. In this paper we evaluate potential losses of ammonia via volatilisation from food waste anaerobic digestate using a closed chamber system equipped with a sulphuric acid trap. Ammonia losses represent a pollution source and, over long periods could reduce the agronomic value of the digestate. Observed ammonia losses from the experimental system were linear with time. A simple non-steady-state partitioning model was developed to represent the process. After calibration, the model was able to describe the behaviour of ammonia in the digestate and in the trap very well. The average rate of volatilisation was approximately 5.2 g N m{sup -2} week{sup -1}. The model was used to extrapolate the findings of the laboratory study to a number of AD storage scenarios. The simulations highlight that open storage of digestate could result in significant losses of ammonia to the atmosphere. Losses are predicted to be relatively minor from covered facilities, particularly if depth to surface area ratio is high.

Whelan, M.J., E-mail: m.j.whelan@cranfield.ac.u [School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, College Road, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Everitt, T.; Villa, R. [School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, College Road, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Anaerobic digestion analysis model: User`s manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Anaerobic Digestion Analysis Model (ADAM) has been developed to assist investigators in performing preliminary economic analyses of anaerobic digestion processes. The model, which runs under Microsoft Excel{trademark}, is capable of estimating the economic performance of several different waste digestion process configurations that are defined by the user through a series of option selections. The model can be used to predict required feedstock tipping fees, product selling prices, utility rates, and raw material unit costs. The model is intended to be used as a tool to perform preliminary economic estimates that could be used to carry out simple screening analyses. The model`s current parameters are based on engineering judgments and are not reflective of any existing process; therefore, they should be carefully evaluated and modified if necessary to reflect the process under consideration. The accuracy and level of uncertainty of the estimated capital investment and operating costs are dependent on the accuracy and level of uncertainty of the model`s input parameters. The underlying methodology is capable of producing results accurate to within {+-} 30% of actual costs.

Ruth, M.; Landucci, R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to an anaerobic bacterial culture of Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 which solubilizes lead oxide under anaerobic conditions in coal and industrial wastes and therefore presents a method of removing lead from such wastes before they are dumped into the environment. The rate of lead dissolution during logarithmic growth of the bacteria in 40 ml medium containing 3.32 .mu.moles of lead as lead oxide was 0.042 .mu.moles ml.sup.-1 hr.sup.-1. Dissolution of lead oxide by the bacterial isolate is due to the production of metabolites and acidity in the culture medium. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 can be used in the recovery of strategic metals from ores and wastes and also for the production of lactic acid for commercial purposes. The process yields large quantities of lactic acid as well as lead complexed in a stable form with said acids.

Francis, Arokiasamy J. (Middle Island, NY); Dodge, Cleveland (Wading River, NY); Chendrayan, Krishnachetty (Coimbatore Tamil Nadu, IN); Quinby, Helen L. (Cambridge, MD)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention related to an anaerobic bacterial culture of Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 which solubilizes lead oxide under anaerobic conditions in coal and industrial wastes and therefore presents a method of removing lead from such wastes before they are dumped into the environment. The rat of lead dissolution during logarithmic growth of the bacteria in 40 ml medium containing 3.32 ..mu..moles of lead as lead oxide was 0.042 ..mu..moles m1/sup /-/1/ hr/sup /-/1/. Dissolution of lead oxide by the bacterial isolate is due to the production of metabolites and acidity in the culture medium. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 can be used in the recovery of the strategic metals from ores and wastes and also for the production of lactic acid for commercial purposes. The process yields large quantities of lactic acid as well as lead complexed in a stable form with said acids. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.; Chendrayan, K.; Quinby, H.L.

1987-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

212

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC GROWTH OF BACILLUS MOJAVENSIS STRAIN JF-2 FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC BIOSURFACTANT PRODUCTION FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

Our work focuses on the use of microorganisms to recover petroleum hydrocarbons that remain entrapped after current recovery technologies reach their economic limit. Capillary forces between the hydrocarbon and aqueous phases are largely responsible for trapping the hydrocarbons in the pores of the rock and large reductions in the interfacial tension between the hydrocarbon and aqueous phases are needed for hydrocarbon mobilization (1-3, 10, 11). Microorganisms produce a variety of biosurfactants (4), several of which generate the ultra low interfacial tensions needed for hydrocarbon mobilization (4, 5, 8). In particular, the lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus mojavensis strain JF-2 reduces the interfacial tension between hydrocarbon and aqueous phases to very low levels (<0.016 mN/m) (8) (9). B. mojavensis JF-2 grows under the environmental conditions found in many oil reservoirs, i. e., anaerobic, NaCl concentrations up to 80 g l{sup -1}, and temperatures up to 45 C (6, 7), making it ideally suited for in situ applications. However, anaerobic growth of B. mojavensis JF-2 was inconsistent and difficult to replicate, which limited its use for in situ applications. Our initial studies revealed that enzymatic digests, such as Proteose Peptone, were required for anaerobic growth of Bacillus mojavensis JF-2. Subsequent purification of the growth-enhancing factor in Proteose Peptone resulted in the identification of the growth-enhancing factor as DNA or deoxyribonucleosides. The addition of salmon sperm DNA, herring sperm DNA, E. coli DNA or synthetic DNA (single or double stranded) to Medium E all supported anaerobic growth of JF-2. Further, we found that JF-2 required all four deoxyribonucleosides (deoxyadeonosine, deoxyguanosine, deoxycytidine and thymidine) for growth under strict anaerobic conditions. The requirement for the deoxyribonucleosides did not occur under aerobic growth conditions. DNA was not used as a sole energy source; sucrose was required for anaerobic growth and biosurfactant production in DNA-supplemented Medium E. In addition to DNA or deoxyribonucleosides, nitrate, amino acids and vitamins were all required for anaerobic growth of JF-2. Bacillus mojavensisT (ABO21191), Bacillus mojavensis, strain ROB2 also required DNA or deoxyribonucleosides for anaerobic growth. The improved anaerobic growth of Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 was a prerequisite for studies that will lead to improved anaerobic biosurfactant production.

M.J. McInerney; M. Folmsbee; D. Nagle

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Sharper Images for Extreme...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sharper Images for Extreme LCLS Experiments By Glenn Roberts Jr. April 17, 2013 PHOTO: Researchers working with MEC instruments The Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) station at...

214

Anaerobic digestion of livestock manures: A current opportunities casebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Growth and concentration of the livestock industry creates new opportunities for proper disposal of the large quantities of manures generated at dairy, swine, and poultry farms. One manure management system provides not only pollution prevention but also converts a problem into a new profit center. Economic evaluations and case studies of operating systems indicate that the anaerobic digestion of livestock manures is a commercially-available bioconversion technology with considerable potential for providing profitable co-products, including a renewable fuel. An introduction to the engineering economies of these technologies is provided, based on estimates of digesters that generate electricity from the recovered methane. Regression models used to estimate digester cost and internal rate of return are developed from the evaluations. Case studies of operating digesters, including project and maintenance histories, and the operator`s {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes}, are provided as a reality check.

Lusk, P.D.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of solubilizing lead, in the form of lead oxide, found in industrial wastes, before these wastes are dumped into the environment. The lead is solubilized by dissolving the lead oxide in the wastes through contact with an anaerobic bacterial culture containing the bacterium ATCC No. 53464. The solubilized lead can then be removed from the wastes by chemical separation. It could also be removed by extending the contact period with the bacterial culture. As the culture grows, the solubilized lead is removed from the wastes by bioaccumulation by the microorganism or by immobilization by a polymer-like material produced by the microorganism. At this point, the lead is then removed from the wastes when the waste material is separated from the bacterial culture. If desired, the bacterial culture could be digested at this point to yield relatively pure lead for further industrial use.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.; Chendrayan, K.

1986-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

216

Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Informing system design, ensuring productive and efficient code Project Description To address the increasingly complex problems of the modern world, scientists at Los Alamos are pushing the scale of computing to the extreme, forming partnerships with other national laboratories and industry to develop supercomputers that can achieve "exaflop" speeds-that is, a quintillion (a million trillion) calculations per second. To put such speed in perspective, it is equivalent to 50 million laptops all working together at the same time. Researchers are also developing the interacting components of a computational system as a whole. This approach, known as computational co-design, may facilitate revolutionary designs in the next generation of supercomputers.

217

Extreme Computing Software | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extreme Computing Software Extreme Computing Software Argonne's Mathematics and Computer Science Division is exploring new approaches to systems software, fault tolerance, and innovative programming models for next-generation computers. Software for extreme computing includes: ADLB (Asynchronous Dynamic Load Balancing) is an MPI-based software library designed to help rapidly build scalable parallel programs. It provides a master/worker system with a put/get API for task descriptions, thus allowing workers to add work dynamically to the system. The library has been used as an execution engine for complicated applications such as Green's function Monte Carlo and higher level "many-task" programming models. Aesop is a high-productivity programming language designed for highly concurent services.

218

Statistics of Extreme Waves in Random Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waves traveling through random media exhibit random focusing that leads to extremely high wave intensities even in the absence of nonlinearities. Although such extreme events are present in a wide variety of physical systems and the statistics of the highest waves is important for their analysis and forecast, it remains poorly understood in particular in the regime where the waves are highest. We suggest a new approach that greatly simplifies the mathematical analysis and calculate the scaling and the distribution of the highest waves valid for a wide range of parameters.

Jakob J. Metzger; Ragnar Fleischmann; Theo Geisel

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

219

Technological change: educating for extreme collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers pedagogical strategies and techniques in design for attaining sustained innovation collaboratively, in order to assist in the New Product Design process and enhance opportunities for creating truly innovative products. The authors ... Keywords: collaborative working, design education, design innovation, design teams, extreme collaboration, multidisciplinary design, technological change

Vasilije Kokotovich; Tom Barker

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigating Extreme Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Wednesday, 28 July 2010 00:00 Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using 13-nm-wavelength light, opens the way to future generations of smaller, faster, and cheaper semiconductors. EUV lithography relies on specialized lenses made of curved mirrors with reflective coatings called multilayers to print patterns with high resolution. One special flat mirror called a mask is particularly sensitive to even the smallest imperfections. To better detect and characterize mask defects, scientists at Berkeley Lab worked with SEMATECH, an international semiconductor industry consortium, to create a unique Fresnel zone-plate microscope on Advanced Light Source Beamline 11.3.2 called the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

CFT Duals for Extreme Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is argued that the general four-dimensional extremal Kerr-Newman-AdS-dS black hole is holographically dual to a (chiral half of a) two-dimensional CFT, generalizing an argument given recently for the special case of extremal Kerr. Specifically, the asymptotic symmetries of the near-horizon region of the general extremal black hole are shown to be generated by a Virasoro algebra. Semiclassical formulae are derived for the central charge and temperature of the dual CFT as functions of the cosmological constant, Newton's constant and the black hole charges and spin. We then show, assuming the Cardy formula, that the microscopic entropy of the dual CFT precisely reproduces the macroscopic Bekenstein-Hawking area law. This CFT description becomes singular in the extreme Reissner-Nordstrom limit where the black hole has no spin. At this point a second dual CFT description is proposed in which the global part of the U(1) gauge symmetry is promoted to a Virasoro algebra. This second description is also found to re...

Hartman, Thomas; Nishioka, Tatsuma; Strominger, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

CFT Duals for Extreme Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is argued that the general four-dimensional extremal Kerr-Newman-AdS-dS black hole is holographically dual to a (chiral half of a) two-dimensional CFT, generalizing an argument given recently for the special case of extremal Kerr. Specifically, the asymptotic symmetries of the near-horizon region of the general extremal black hole are shown to be generated by a Virasoro algebra. Semiclassical formulae are derived for the central charge and temperature of the dual CFT as functions of the cosmological constant, Newton's constant and the black hole charges and spin. We then show, assuming the Cardy formula, that the microscopic entropy of the dual CFT precisely reproduces the macroscopic Bekenstein-Hawking area law. This CFT description becomes singular in the extreme Reissner-Nordstrom limit where the black hole has no spin. At this point a second dual CFT description is proposed in which the global part of the U(1) gauge symmetry is promoted to a Virasoro algebra. This second description is also found to reproduce the area law. Various further generalizations including higher dimensions are discussed.

Thomas Hartman; Keiju Murata; Tatsuma Nishioka; Andrew Strominger

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

223

Simulation of chemical reaction fronts in anaerobic digestion of solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study for parallelisation of a code for a nonlinear system of evolution equations is presented. It describes the propagation of reaction fronts in anaerobic waste digestion. These occur as a consequence of heterogeneous initial distributions of ...

Hermann J. Eberl

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Effects of corn stover as carbon supplement on an integrated anaerobic digestion and ethanol fermentation process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated anaerobic digestion (AD) and ethanol fermentation process on a mixed feedstock of dairy manure and corn stover was performed to investigate the influence of corn stover on biogas production

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Culturing Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria and Mammalian Cells with a Microfluidic Differential Oxygenator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this manuscript, we report on the culture of anaerobic and aerobic species within a disposable multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device with an integrated differential oxygenator. A gas-filled microchannel ...

Lam, Raymond H. W.

226

Contribution of Anaerobic Digesters to Emissions Mitigation and Electricity Generation Under U.S. Climate Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Livestock husbandry in the U.S. significantly contributes to many environmental problems, including the release of methane, a potent greenhouse gas (GHG). Anaerobic digesters (ADs) break down organic wastes using bacteria ...

Zaks, David P. M.

227

Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and of Pu-EDTA  

SciTech Connect

The enhanced mobility of radionuclides by co-disposed chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), is likely to occur only under anaerobic conditions. Our extensive effort to enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading bacteria has failed. Others has tried and also failed. To explain the lack of anaerobic biodegradation of EDTA, we proposed that EDTA has to be transported into the cells for metabolism. A failure of uptake may contribute to the lack of EDTA degradation under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that an aerobic EDTA-degrading bacterium strain BNC1 uses an ABC-type transporter system to uptake EDTA. The system has a periplasmic binding protein that bind EDTA and then interacts with membrane proteins to transport EDTA into the cell at the expense of ATP. The bind protein EppA binds only free EDTA with a Kd of 25 nM. The low Kd value indicates high affinity. However, the Kd value of Ni-EDTA is 2.4 x 10^(-10) nM, indicating much stronger stability. Since Ni and other trace metals are essential for anaerobic respiration, we conclude that the added EDTA sequestrates all trace metals and making anaerobic respiration impossible. Thus, the data explain the lack of anaerobic enrichment cultures for EDTA degradation. Although we did not obtain an EDTA degrading culture under anaerobic conditions, our finding may promote the use of certain metals that forms more stable metal-EDTA complexes than Pu(III)-EDTA to prevent the enhanced mobility. Further, our data explain why EDTA is the most dominant organic pollutant in surface waters, due to the lack of degradation of certain metal-EDTA complexes.

Xun, Luying

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

228

Economic implications of anaerobic digesters on dairy farms in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, air and water have been considered common property resources and, therefore, over utilized as waste receptors. Dairy waste is a leading environmental concern in the North Bosque River watershed in Texas. Changing societal attitudes are forcing dairies and policymakers to balance environmental concerns with farm profitability. Dairies are entering a realm filled with technologies to combat waste concerns. Anaerobic digester technology may play a role in helping dairies balance profit and the environment. Digesters capture methane from livestock waste and transform it into electricity which can be sold to utilities or used on-farm. Because a digester facility is confined, air and water pollution can be reduced. Technological advancement and institutional factor changes allowing the sale of on-farm produced electricity and green power requirements have increased the economic feasibility of digesters. The study of the economic implications of anaerobic digesters for Texas dairies provides producers and policymakers with information to make good decisions concerning adoption and subsidization of this technology. At the beginning of this study, no digesters were operating in Texas. Dairies operating digesters in four states, therefore, were interviewed on-site to provide necessary data. The expected net present value, E(NPV), of a plug-flow digester is negative with and without selling electricity, indicating it should not be constructed based strictly on its financial contribution. At the current electricity-selling price, digesters are less economically feasible than current waste management strategies, lagoons, even after considering potential environmental penalties. However, selling electricity and capturing by-product heat for cost savings makes the digester's E(NPV) less negative than lagoons. The E(NPV) of a covered lagoon digester is positive. This indicates digesters are a potentially feasible waste management strategy. For plug-flow digesters to show a positive E(NPV), the selling price needs to be approximately 82.38% higher than the current price. The breakeven selling price is 12% higher than the current price. Below the breakeven price, lagoons have a larger E(NPV) than plug-flow digesters, therefore making lagoons the preferred waste management strategy. Results suggest changes in rules and technology efficiency make digesters economically competitive with current waste management systems.

Jackson, Randy Scott, Jr.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

LANL | Physics | Hydrodynamic Material Instabilities at extremes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding hydrodynamic material instabilities at extremes Understanding hydrodynamic material instabilities at extremes The National Nuclear Security Administration science-based stockpile stewardship program funds research that will improve critical physics-based dynamic materials models. Los Alamos National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as nuclear weapon design laboratories, are mandated to predict the reliability and durability of the nuclear weapons stockpile. This is done using state-of-the-art supercomputers and computer codes. It is also important to have state-of-the-art physics models in these codes. Los Alamos has theory experts in dynamic materials, thus creating powerful working groups when combined with experimental experts in Physics Division and elsewhere. Key to the science-based stockpile stewardship program is making

230

Extremal Quantum Correlations and Cryptographic Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate fundamental properties of device independent security in quantum cryptography and show a one-to-one correspondence between extremal and secure probability distributions. This allows us to give a characterization of security in algebraic terms. We apply the method to common examples for two-party as well as multi-party setups and present a scheme for verifying the security of correlations with two parties, two measurement settings, and two outcomes.

Franz, T; Werner, R F

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using 13-nm-wavelength light, opens the way to future generations of smaller, faster, and cheaper semiconductors. EUV lithography relies on specialized lenses made of curved mirrors with reflective coatings called multilayers to print patterns with high resolution. One special flat mirror called a mask is particularly sensitive to even the smallest imperfections. To better detect and characterize mask defects, scientists at Berkeley Lab worked with SEMATECH, an international semiconductor industry consortium, to create a unique Fresnel zone-plate microscope on Advanced Light Source Beamline 11.3.2 called the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT).

232

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using 13-nm-wavelength light, opens the way to future generations of smaller, faster, and cheaper semiconductors. EUV lithography relies on specialized lenses made of curved mirrors with reflective coatings called multilayers to print patterns with high resolution. One special flat mirror called a mask is particularly sensitive to even the smallest imperfections. To better detect and characterize mask defects, scientists at Berkeley Lab worked with SEMATECH, an international semiconductor industry consortium, to create a unique Fresnel zone-plate microscope on Advanced Light Source Beamline 11.3.2 called the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT).

233

Chiral gravity, log gravity, and extremal CFT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that the linearization of all exact solutions of classical chiral gravity around the AdS{sub 3} vacuum have positive energy. Nonchiral and negative-energy solutions of the linearized equations are infrared divergent at second order, and so are removed from the spectrum. In other words, chirality is confined and the equations of motion have linearization instabilities. We prove that the only stationary, axially symmetric solutions of chiral gravity are BTZ black holes, which have positive energy. It is further shown that classical log gravity--the theory with logarithmically relaxed boundary conditions--has finite asymptotic symmetry generators but is not chiral and hence may be dual at the quantum level to a logarithmic conformal field theories (CFT). Moreover we show that log gravity contains chiral gravity within it as a decoupled charge superselection sector. We formally evaluate the Euclidean sum over geometries of chiral gravity and show that it gives precisely the holomorphic extremal CFT partition function. The modular invariance and integrality of the expansion coefficients of this partition function are consistent with the existence of an exact quantum theory of chiral gravity. We argue that the problem of quantizing chiral gravity is the holographic dual of the problem of constructing an extremal CFT, while quantizing log gravity is dual to the problem of constructing a logarithmic extremal CFT.

Maloney, Alexander [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Song Wei [Key Laboratory of Frontiers in Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Center for the Fundamental Laws of Nature Jefferson Physical Laboratory, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Strominger, Andrew [Center for the Fundamental Laws of Nature Jefferson Physical Laboratory, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Chiral Gravity, Log Gravity and Extremal CFT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the linearization of all exact solutions of classical chiral gravity around the AdS3 vacuum have positive energy. Non-chiral and negative-energy solutions of the linearized equations are infrared divergent at second order, and so are removed from the spectrum. In other words, chirality is confined and the equations of motion have linearization instabilities. We prove that the only stationary, axially symmetric solutions of chiral gravity are BTZ black holes, which have positive energy. It is further shown that classical log gravity-- the theory with logarithmically relaxed boundary conditions --has finite asymptotic symmetry generators but is not chiral and hence may be dual at the quantum level to a logarithmic CFT. Moreover we show that log gravity contains chiral gravity within it as a decoupled charge superselection sector. We normally evaluate the Euclidean sum over geometries of chiral gravity and show that it gives precisely the holomorphic extremal CFT partition function. The modular invariance and integrality of the expansion coefficients of this partition function are consistent with the existence of an exact quantum theory of chiral gravity. We argue that the problem of quantizing chiral gravity is the holographic dual of the problem of constructing an extremal CFT, while quantizing log gravity is dual to the problem of constructing a logarithmic extremal CFT.

Alexander Maloney; Wei Song; Andrew Strominger

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

235

Analysis of Metabolic Pathways and Fluxes in a Newly Discovered Thermophilic and Ethanol-Tolerant Geobacillus Strain  

SciTech Connect

A recently discovered thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius M10EXG, ferments a range of C5 (e.g., xylose) and C6 sugars (e.g., glucose) and istolerant to high ethanol concentrations (10percent, v/v). We have investigated the central metabolism of this bacterium using both in vitro enzyme assays and 13C-based flux analysis to provide insights into the physiological properties of this extremophile and explore its metabolism for bio-ethanol or other bioprocess applications. Our findings show that glucose metabolism in G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG proceeds via glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the TCA cycle; the Entner?Doudoroff pathway and transhydrogenase activity were not detected. Anaplerotic reactions (including the glyoxylate shunt, pyruvate carboxylase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) were active, but fluxes through those pathways could not be accuratelydetermined using amino acid labeling. When growth conditions were switched from aerobic to micro-aerobic conditions, fluxes (based on a normalized glucose uptake rate of 100 units (g DCW)-1 h-1) through the TCA cycle and oxidative pentose phosphate pathway were reduced from 64+-3 to 25+-2 and from 30+-2 to 19+-2, respectively. The carbon flux under micro-aerobic growth was directed formate. Under fully anerobic conditions, G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG used a mixed acid fermentation process and exhibited a maximum ethanol yield of 0.38+-0.07 mol mol-1 glucose. In silico flux balance modeling demonstrates that lactate and acetate production from G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG reduces the maximum ethanol yieldby approximately threefold, thus indicating that both pathways should be modified to maximize ethanol production.

Tang, Yinjie J.; Sapra, Rajat; Joyner, Dominique; Hazen, Terry C.; Myers, Samuel; Reichmuth, David; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

236

Anaerobic Digestion of Corn Ethanol Thin Stillage for Biogas Production in Batch and By Downflow Fixed Film Reactor .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Anaerobic digestion (AD) of corn thin stillage (CTS) offers the potential to reduce corn grain ethanol production energy consumption. This thesis focuses on results collected… (more)

Wilkinson, Andrea

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Ultrahigh Energy Neutrals from Extreme Magnetic Flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that bulk acceleration during reconnection of extremely strong magnetic fields near compact objects can accelerate ions to Lorentz factors of $\\sim 10^2 \\sigma^{3/5}$ under general conditions, where $\\sigma$, the magnetic energy per current-carrying proton rest energy, can approach $10^{15}$. For magnetar-type fields, neutrons and neutrinos can be generated at potentially detectable levels via hadron polarization. Ultrahigh energy photons can also be emitted and escorted from the high field region by Poynting flux.

David Eichler

2003-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

238

Extremal Quantum Correlations and Cryptographic Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate a fundamental property of device independent security in quantum cryptography by characterizing probability distributions which are necessarily independent of the measurement results of any eavesdropper. We show that probability distributions that are secure in this sense are exactly the extremal quantum probability distributions. This allows us to give a characterization of security in algebraic terms. We apply the method to common examples for two-party as well as multi-party setups and present a scheme for verifying security of probability distributions with two parties, two measurement settings, and two outcomes.

T. Franz; F. Furrer; R. F. Werner

2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

239

Anaerobic Digestion and Combined Heat and Power Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the underlying objectives of this study is to recover the untapped energy in wastewater biomass. Some national statistics worth considering include: (1) 5% of the electrical energy demand in the US is used to treat municipal wastewater; (2) This carbon rich wastewater is an untapped energy resource; (3) Only 10% of wastewater treatment plants (>5mgd) recover energy; (4) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to produce > 575 MW of energy nationwide; and (5) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to capture an additional 175 MW of energy from waste Fats, Oils and Grease. The WSSC conducted this study to determine the feasibility of utilizing anaerobic digestion and combined heat and power (AD/CHP) and/or biosolids gasification and drying facilities to produce and utilize renewable digester biogas. Digester gas is considered a renewable energy source and can be used in place of fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The project focus includes: (1) Converting wastewater Biomass to Electricity; (2) Using innovative technologies to Maximize Energy Recovery; and (3) Enhancing the Environment by reducing nutrient load to waterways (Chesapeake Bay), Sanitary Sewer Overflows (by reducing FOG in sewers) and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The study consisted of these four tasks: (1) Technology screening and alternative shortlisting, answering the question 'what are the most viable and cost effective technical approaches by which to recover and reuse energy from biosolids while reducing disposal volume?'; (2) Energy recovery and disposal reduction potential verification, answering the question 'how much energy can be recovered from biosolids?'; (3) Economic environmental and community benefit analysis, answering the question 'what are the potential economic, environmental and community benefits/impacts of each approach?'; and (4) Recommend the best plan and develop a concept design.

Frank J. Hartz

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

Long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste stabilized by trace elements  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Korean food waste was found to contain low level of trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved by adding trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron played an important role in anaerobic digestion of food waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt addition further enhanced the process performance in the presence of iron. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine if long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste in a semi-continuous single-stage reactor could be stabilized by supplementing trace elements. Contrary to the failure of anaerobic digestion of food waste alone, stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved for 368 days by supplementing trace elements. Under the conditions of OLR (organic loading rates) of 2.19-6.64 g VS (volatile solid)/L day and 20-30 days of HRT (hydraulic retention time), a high methane yield (352-450 mL CH{sub 4}/g VS{sub added}) was obtained, and no significant accumulation of volatile fatty acids was observed. The subsequent investigation on effects of individual trace elements (Co, Fe, Mo and Ni) showed that iron was essential for maintaining stable methane production. These results proved that the food waste used in this study was deficient in trace elements.

Zhang Lei, E-mail: wxzyfx@yahoo.com [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Dalian 116024 (China); Jahng, Deokjin, E-mail: djahng@mju.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering and Biotechnology, Myongji University, San 38-2, Namdong, Cheoin-Gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-Do 449-728 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Anaerobic fermentation of simulated in-situ oil shale retort water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of removing soluble organics from oil shale retort water by anaerobic digestion with methane production was experimentally investigated. The following conclusions were made. The retort water studied had to be pretreated to remove toxic and add deficient constituents before it could be successfully treated with the anaerobic fermentation process. Pretreatment included pH adjustment to 7, ammonia reduction, and nutrient addition. A digested sludge from a conventional municipal sewage treatment plant was successfully acclimated to the retort water studied. A major fraction of the organics in the retort water studied was stabilized by conversion to CH/sub 4/ and CO/sub 2/ using the anaerobic fermentation process. BOD/sub 5/ and COD removal efficiences were 76 to 80 percent. The effluent from anaerobic fermentation of the retort water studied (BOD/sub 5/ : 530 to 580 mg/l) may be suitable for treatment by conventional aerobic processes. The growth of the methane formers, which stabilize the organics, is nutrient limited in the retort water studied. The pretreatment of the retort water studied removed 49 percent of the BOD/sub 5/. This was probably due to the reduction in solubility of high molecular weight fatty acids at neutral pHs. A major component removed from the retort water studied during anaerobic fermentation was fatty acids. The long hydraulic residence time used in this study would not be used in practice.

Ossio, E.A.; Fox, J.P.; Thomas, J.F.; Poulson, R.E.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Predicting Extreme Phases of the Indian Summer Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme active and break phases of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) often bring about devastating floods and severe draughts. Here it is shown that these extreme phases exhibit distinctive precursory circulation conditions in both the tropics and ...

Qinghua Ding; Bin Wang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A Probability Model for Verifying Deterministic Forecasts of Extreme Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article proposes a method for verifying deterministic forecasts of rare, extreme events defined by exceedance above a high threshold. A probability model for the joint distribution of forecasts and observations, and based on extreme-value ...

Christopher A. T. Ferro

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Observed Trends and Changes in Temperature Extremes over Argentina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this note, changes in temperature extremes over a 40-yr period are analyzed, based on daily minimum and maximum temperatures over Argentina. Trend analysis was performed on seasonal means, standard deviations, and extremes (5th and 95th ...

Matilde Rusticucci; Mariana Barrucand

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Extreme Benchmark Suite : measuring high-performance embedded systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Extreme Benchmark Suite (XBS) is designed to support performance measurement of highly parallel "extreme" processors, many of which are designed to replace custom hardware implementations. XBS is designed to avoid many ...

Gerding, Steven (Steven Bradley)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Short-Term Climate Extremes: Prediction Skill and Predictability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecasts for extremes in short-term climate (monthly means) are examined to understand the current prediction capability and potential predictability. This study focuses on 2-m surface temperature and precipitation extremes over North and South ...

Emily J. Becker; Huug van den Dool; Malaquias Peña

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Charged black holes from near extremal black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We recover the properties of a wide class of far from extremal charged black branes from the properties of near extremal black branes, generalizing the results of Danielsson, Guijosa and Kruczenski.

Gilad Lifschytz

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

248

Climatology Models for Extreme Hurricane Winds near the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rarity of severe coastal hurricanes implies that empirical estimates of extreme wind speed return levels will be unreliable. Here climatology models derived from extreme value theory are estimated using data from the best-track [Hurricane ...

Thomas H. Jagger; James B. Elsner

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Impacts of Extreme Weather Events on Transmission and Distribution Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme weather encompasses weather phenomena that are especially severe, unseasonal, or at the extremes of historical distributions. Extreme weather events, such as Hurricane Katrina, for example, have resulted in widespread damage to the power infrastructure and caused severe outages, which affected millions of customers. This report discusses the impacts of extreme weather events on power systems and synthesizes utility experiences, lessons learned from different storms occurring around the globe, and...

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

High Strength Nickel Alloys for Extreme Oil and Gas Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil & Gas ...

251

New Texas wholesale power market weathers extreme cold ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Monthly › Quarterly Coal Report › Monthly Energy Review › Residential Energy ... Solar › Energy in Brief. What's ... major test during the extreme ...

252

Corrosion of Mild Steel in Extreme Oil and Gas Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil & Gas ...

253

Constructive hidden nodes selection of extreme learning machine for regression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we attempt to address the architectural design of ELM regressor by applying a constructive method on the basis of ELM algorithm. After the nonlinearities of ELM network are fixed by randomly generating the parameters, the network will ... Keywords: Constructive method, Error-minimized extreme learning machine, Extreme learning machine, Incremental extreme learning machine

Yuan Lan; Yeng Chai Soh; Guang-Bin Huang

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Focus Area 2 - Biomass Deconstruction and Conversion : BioEnergy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deconstruction and Conversion BESC research in biomass deconstruction and conversion targets CBP by studying model organisms and thermophilic anaerobes to understand novel...

256

Removal of polychlorinated phenols in sequential anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors packed with tire chips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scrap vehicle tire chips were used as packing material for sequential anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors to remove persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons. Adsorption capacity of scrap tires was greater under acidic conditions than under basic conditions. However, it was only approximately 0.04 to 0.3% of that of activated carbon. The amount of biomass that attached to the surface of scrap tires was 3.16 and 3.72 mg volatile suspended solids/cm{sup 2} after 14 and 37 days, respectively. Two laboratory-scale, down-flow anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors packed with tire chips were operated to remove 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) and 4-chlorophenol (CP). More than 98% of DCP was dehalogenated to CP in the anaerobic reactor, 70 to 98% of which was subsequently degraded in the aerobic reactor. Scrap tires did not cause any operational problems when used as biofilter media.

Shin, H.S.; Yoo, K.S.; Park, J.K.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Correlation between Organic Matter Degradation and the Rheological Performance of Waste Sludge During Anaerobic Digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion has demonstrated to be a good possibility to reduce the organic matter contents in waste activated sludge resulting in the effluents treatment. An anaerobic digestion was carried out in a 3.5 L reactor at 35?°C for a period of 20 days. An electronic thermostat controlled the temperature. The reactor was agitated at a rate of 200 rpm. The study of the rheological behavior of the waste activated sludge was done with an Anton Paar™ rheometer model MCR301 with a peltier plate for temperature control. Four?blade vane geometry was used with samples of 37 mL for determining rheological properties. Sampling (two samples) was taken every four days of anaerobic digestion through a peristaltic pump. The samples behavior was characterized by the Herschel?Bulkley model

Evangelina S. Morel; José A. Hernández?Hernándes; Juan M. Méndez?Contreras; Denis Cantú?Lozano

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Treatment of Wine Distillery Wastewater Using an Anaerobic Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor with Low Density of Polyethylene Support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor filled with small and low density polyethylene support as biofilm carrier was operated to treat wine distillery wastewater for nearly 8 months. The support packed in the reactor is Bioflow 30 with density 0.92g/cm3 ... Keywords: Anaerobic digestion, moving bed biofilm reactor, low density polyethylene support, wine distillery wastewater

Chai Sheli; Rene Moletta

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Use of 18S-rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for detection and quantification of anaerobic fungi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use of 18S-rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for detection and quantification of anaerobic fungi Clermont-Ferrand-Theix, 63122 Saint-Genès-Champanelle, France Strictly anaerobic fungi are natural the subject of numerous studies (Fonty and Joblin, 1991, in: Physio- logical aspects of digestion

Recanati, Catherine

260

Isolation of High-Efficient Low-Temperature Methanogen and Comparation on Flora in Anaerobic Fermentation Production Biogas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Hun gate anaerobic techniques, a low-temperature methanogen strain was isolated from sludge in De Qing Alpine region from Tibet, named XZF21. The colony is white, not transparent, Gram-negative, uses formate as the substrate forCH4 formation, ... Keywords: methane, purification, sludge, anaerobic fermentation, biogas

Fan Tingting; Wang Jinhua; Lei Yanmin; Liu Siying; Wang Zhi; Wang Yongze

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Decomposition of Fresh and Anaerobically Digested Plant Biomass in Soil1 K. K. MOORHEAD, D. A, GRAETZ, AND K. R. REDDY2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decomposition of Fresh and Anaerobically Digested Plant Biomass in Soil1 K. K. MOORHEAD, D. A to produce CH4 or added to soil directly as an amendment.In this study, fresh and anaerobically digested digested plant biomass in soil. J. En- viron. Qual. 16:25-28. Anaerobic digestion of organic materials

Florida, University of

262

Optimizing the anaerobic digestion of microalgae in a coupled process Terence Bayen1,4 and Francis Mairet2 and Pierre Martinon3 and Matthieu Sebbah4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimizing the anaerobic digestion of microalgae in a coupled process Terence Bayen1,4 and Francis the production of methane in a bioreactor coupling an anaerobic digester and a culture of micro-algae limited as an attractive alternative for sustainable energy production [2]. Anaerobic digestion can be applied to convert

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

263

Anaerobic Digestion of Algal Biomass Residues with Nutrient Recycle Microalgae are currently considered as a renewable source of liquid and gaseous biofuels and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;1 Anaerobic Digestion of Algal Biomass Residues with Nutrient Recycle Background Microalgae a lower- value use and simpler processing approach representative of anaerobic digestion (AD) (Sialve et-in replacements of gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel (Jones & Mayfield, 2012; Regalbuto, 2009), and anaerobically

Collins, Gary S.

264

Left-Wing Extremism: The Current Threat  

SciTech Connect

Left-wing extremism is ''alive and well'' both in the US and internationally. Although the current domestic terrorist threat within the U. S. is focused on right-wing extremists, left-wing extremists are also active and have several objectives. Leftist extremists also pose an espionage threat to U.S. interests. While the threat to the U.S. government from leftist extremists has decreased in the past decade, it has not disappeared. There are individuals and organizations within the U.S. who maintain the same ideology that resulted in the growth of left-wing terrorism in this country in the 1970s and 1980s. Some of the leaders from that era are still communicating from Cuba with their followers in the U.S., and new leaders and groups are emerging.

Karl A. Seger

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Holography at an Extremal De Sitter Horizon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rotating maximal black holes in four-dimensional de Sitter space, for which the outer event horizon coincides with the cosmological horizon, have an infinite near-horizon region described by the rotating Nariai metric. We show that the asymptotic symmetry group at the spacelike future boundary of the near-horizon region contains a Virasoro algebra with a real, positive central charge. This is evidence that quantum gravity in a rotating Nariai background is dual to a two-dimensional Euclidean conformal field theory. These results are related to the Kerr/CFT correspondence for extremal black holes, but have two key differences: one of the black hole event horizons has been traded for the cosmological horizon, and the near-horizon geometry is a fiber over dS_2 rather than AdS_2.

Dionysios Anninos; Thomas Hartman

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

266

Holography at an Extremal De Sitter Horizon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rotating maximal black holes in four-dimensional de Sitter space, for which the outer event horizon coincides with the cosmological horizon, have an infinite near-horizon region described by the rotating Nariai metric. We show that the asymptotic symmetry group at the spacelike future boundary of the near-horizon region contains a Virasoro algebra with a real, positive central charge. This is evidence that quantum gravity in a rotating Nariai background is dual to a two-dimensional Euclidean conformal field theory. These results are related to the Kerr/CFT correspondence for extremal black holes, but have two key differences: one of the black hole event horizons has been traded for the cosmological horizon, and the near-horizon geometry is a fiber over dS_2 rather than AdS_2.

Anninos, Dionysios

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Extreme-UV electrical discharge source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation electric capillary discharge source that includes a boron nitride housing defining a capillary bore that is positioned between two electrodes one of which is connected to a source of electric potential can generate a high EUV and soft x-ray radiation flux from the capillary bore outlet with minimal debris. The electrode that is positioned adjacent the capillary bore outlet is typically grounded. Pyrolytic boron nitride, highly oriented pyrolytic boron nitride, and cubic boron nitride are particularly suited. The boron nitride capillary bore can be configured as an insert that is encased in an exterior housing that is constructed of a thermally conductive material. Positioning the ground electrode sufficiently close to the capillary bore outlet also reduces bore erosion.

Fornaciari, Neal R. (Tracey, CA); Nygren, Richard E. (Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, NM); Ulrickson, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Extreme overbalance perforating improves well performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of extreme overbalance perforating, by Oryx Energy Co., is consistently outperforming the unpredictable, tubing-conveyed, underbalance perforating method which is generally accepted as the industry standard. Successful results reported from more than 60 Oryx Energy wells, applying this technology, support this claim. Oryx began this project in 1990 to address the less-than-predictable performance of underbalanced perforating. The goal was to improve the initial completion efficiency, translating it into higher profits resulting from earlier product sales. This article presents the concept, mechanics, procedures, potential applications and results of perforating using overpressured well bores. The procedure can also be used in wells with existing perforations if an overpressured surge is used. This article highlights some of the case histories that have used these techniques.

Dees, J.M.; Handren, P.J. [Oryx Energy Co., Dallas, TX (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A Road Map to Extreme High Vacuum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ultimate pressure of a well-designed vacuum system very much depends on pretreatments, processing and the procedures [1,2]. Until now much attention has been paid in minimizing hydrogen outgassing from the chamber material. However, procedures and processing deserves further scrutiny than hitherto given so far. For reducing the gas load, high sensitivity helium leak detection techniques with sensitivities better than 1× 10-12 Torr l/sec need to be used. Effects that are induced by vacuum instrumentation need to be reduced in order to obtain accurate pressure measurements. This presentation will discuss: clean assembly procedures, metal sponges for cryosorption pumping of hydrogen to extreme high vacuum, low cost surface diffusion barriers for reducing the hydrogen gas load, cascade pumping, sensitive helium leak detection techniques and the use of modified extractor and residual gas analyzers. Further, alternative back up pumping systems based on active NEG’s [3] for turbo molecular pumps will be presented.

Ganapati Rao Myneni

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

270

Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States); Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang [Department of Animal Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Li Yebo, E-mail: li.851@osu.edu [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Column Studies of Anaerobic Carbon Tetrachloride Biotransformation with Hanford Aquifer Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on CT transformations in Hanford soil. This work assessed the potential for in situ CT biotransColumn Studies of Anaerobic Carbon Tetrachloride Biotransformation with Hanford Aquifer Material a column reactor system containing Hanford Aquifer material in order to assess the potential of in situ

Semprini, Lewis

272

Analysis of microbial diversity and optimal conditions for enhanced biogas production from swine waste anaerobic digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Swine wastewater pretreated by solid–liquid separation was optimized for biogas production and water purification. Dynamic diversity of the bacterial community in the anaerobic plug flow reactor was investigated under various temperatures and hydraulic retention times (HRT). Results of batch experiments indicated that under optimal operating conditions

Hsiao-Hsien Lin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

An environmental assessment of recovering methane from municipal solid waste by anaerobic digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of an experimental process which produces synthetic natural gas (SNG) or biogas by anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste (MSW) is evaluated. This technology, if implemented, would be utilized in lieu of incineration or directly landfilling waste. An environmental assessment describing the principal impacts associated with operating the MSW anaerobic digestion process is presented. Variations in process configurations provide for SNG or electricity production and digester residue incineration, composting, or landfilling. Four process configuration are compared to the conventional solid waste disposal alternative of mass burn incineration and landfilling. Emissions are characterized, effluents quantified, and landfill areas predicted. The quantity of SNG and electricity recovered, and aluminum and ferrous metals recycled is predicted along with the emissions and effluents avoided by recovering energy and recycling metals. Air emissions are the primary on-site concern with the anaerobic digestion process. However, when compared to mass burn incineration, the projected particulate emissions for the anaerobic digestion process range from 2.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.6 {times} {sup 10{minus}5} pounds per ton of waste vs. 3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} pounds per ton for mass burn. SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and PCCD emissions have a similar relationship.

O'Leary, P.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Compost filters for H/sub 2/S removal from anaerobic digestion and rendering exhausts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for the disposal of anaerobic digester gas from meat waste treatment plants has been developed as an alternative to atmospheric disposal. Hydrogen sulfide waste gases are filtered through by-product compost. Operation and effectiveness of such a treatment process are detailed. (2 diagrams, 5 references, 4 tables)

Rands, M.B.; Cooper, D.E.; Woo, C.; Fletcher, G.C.; Rolfe, K.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR) for Alkali-minimization Dyeing-printing Wastewater Biodegradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the laboratory scale anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) was investigated by the use of granular sludge to treat alkali-minimization and dyeing-printing wastewater (ADW-water). The experiment showed that the start-up of reactor was completed ... Keywords: ABR, ADW-water, Granular sludge, UV254, VFA

Qijun Zhong; Bo Yang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Manual of procedures for the operation of bench-scale anaerobic digesters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful operation of any laboratory-scale biological system is often a difficult and frustrating experience. This is especially true when dealing with the anaerobic digestion process. Because of the stringent environmental requirements associated with anaerobic digesters, efficient operation of bench-scale units requires rigid monitoring and control. The purpose of this manual is to present the methods and procedures which are followed in bench-scale anaerobic digestion studies at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Among the topics discussed are operating parameters, a description of the experimental system, typical digestion substrates, operational procedures, analytical techniques, and safety considerations. The document serves as a technical guide to PNL personnel assigned to a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored program evaluating the effect of powdered activated carbon on the anaerobic digestio of sewage sludge. It should be noted that the methods described in this manual do not necessarily represent the best or only means of conducting the research. They are merely procedures that have been found to be successful at PNL. It is hoped that this information may be useful to other researchers who are contemplating or pursuing bench-scale studies of their own.

Spencer, R.R.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A Study on Biogas from Anaerobic Digestion with the Distiller's Grains via Lactic Acid Fermentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The methane production of the distiller’s grains via lactic acid fermentation (shorter for the fermentation residue) was investigated, and the variable trend of pH values, alkali concentration and volatile fatty acids were examined. The results ... Keywords: the residue of distillers' grains via lactic acid fermentation, biomass wastes, anaerobic digestion, volatile fatty acids, biogas production

Li-Hong Wang; Wang Qunhui; Sun Xiaohong; Xin Zhao

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Water as a leaching medium for hydrolysis of sorghum in anaerobic digestion systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect of using water to leach hydrolysis products from sorghum used as an anaerobic digestion feedstock. The pH of the leachate had no effect on the cumulative COD measured in the leachate. Milling the sorghum with a three roll mill prior to leaching appeared to slightly increase the hydrolysis of structural carbohydrates in the sorghum.

Egg, R.; Coble, C.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Complete genome sequence of the thermophilic sulfur-reducer Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum type strain (BSAT) from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent  

SciTech Connect

Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum L'Haridon et al. 1998 is the type species of the ge- nus Desulfurobacterium which belongs to the family Desulfurobacteriaceae. The species is of interest because it represents the first thermophilic bacterium that can act as a primary pro- ducer in the temperature range of 45-75 C (optimum 70 C) and is incapable of growing un- der microaerophilic conditions. Strain BSAT preferentially synthesizes high-melting-point fatty acids (C18 and C20) which is hypothesized to be a strategy to ensure the functionality of the membrane at high growth temperatures. This is the second completed genome sequence of a member of the family Desulfurobacteriaceae and the first sequence from the genus Desulfu- robacterium. The 1,541,968 bp long genome harbors 1,543 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Daligault, Hajnalka E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Mwirichia, Romano [Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Wirth, Reinhard [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Enzyme inactivation by ethanol and development of a kinetic model for thermophilic simultaneous saccharification and fermentation at 50C with Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum ALK2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enzyme Enzyme Inactivation by Ethanol and Development of a Kinetic Model for Thermophilic Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation at 50 -C with Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum ALK2 Kara K. Podkaminer, 1 Xiongjun Shao, 1 David A. Hogsett, 2 Lee R. Lynd 1 1 Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755; telephone: 603-646-2231; fax: 603-646-2277; e-mail: lee.lynd@dartmouth.edu 2 Mascoma Corporation, Lebanon, New Hampshire Received 6 August 2010; revision received 16 November 2010; accepted 14 December 2010 Published online 29 December 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.23050 ABSTRACT: Studies were undertaken to understand phe- nomena operative during simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of a model cellulosic substrate (Avicel) at 508C with enzymatic hydrolysis mediated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Adaptive extremal optimization by detrended fluctuation analysis  

SciTech Connect

Global optimization is one of the key challenges in computational physics as several problems, e.g. protein structure prediction, the low-energy landscape of atomic clusters, detection of community structures in networks, or model-parameter fitting can be formulated as global optimization problems. Extremal optimization (EO) has become in recent years one particular, successful approach to the global optimization problem. As with almost all other global optimization approaches, EO is driven by an internal dynamics that depends crucially on one or more parameters. Recently, the existence of an optimal scheme for this internal parameter of EO was proven, so as to maximize the performance of the algorithm. However, this proof was not constructive, that is, one cannot use it to deduce the optimal parameter itself a priori. In this study we analyze the dynamics of EO for a test problem (spin glasses). Based on the results we propose an online measure of the performance of EO and a way to use this insight to reformulate the EO algorithm in order to construct optimal values of the internal parameter online without any input by the user. This approach will ultimately allow us to make EO parameter free and thus its application in general global optimization problems much more efficient.

Hamacher, K. [Bioinformatics and Theoretical Biology Group, Technical University Darmstadt, Schnittspahnstr. 10, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)], E-mail: hamacher@bio.tu-darmstadt.de

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

282

Reflective masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography  

SciTech Connect

Extreme ultraviolet lithographic masks are made by patterning multilayer reflective coatings with high normal incidence reflectivity. Masks can be patterned by depositing a patterned absorber layer above the coating or by etching the pattern directly into the coating itself. Electromagnetic simulations showed that absorber-overlayer masks have superior imaging characteristics over etched masks (less sensitive to incident angles and pattern profiles). In an EUVL absorber overlayer mask, defects can occur in the mask substrate, reflective coating, and absorber pattern. Electromagnetic simulations showed that substrate defects cause the most severe image degradation. A printability study of substrate defects for absorber overlayer masks showed that printability of 25 nm high substrate defects are comparable to defects in optical lithography. Simulations also indicated that the manner in which the defects are covered by multilayer reflective coatings can affect printability. Coverage profiles that result in large lateral spreading of defect geometries amplify the printability of the defects by increasing their effective sizes. Coverage profiles of Mo/Si coatings deposited above defects were studied by atomic force microscopy and TEM. Results showed that lateral spread of defect geometry is proportional to height. Undercut at defect also increases the lateral spread. Reductions in defect heights were observed for 0.15 {mu}m wide defect lines. A long-term study of Mo/Si coating reflectivity revealed that Mo/Si coatings with Mo as the top layer suffer significant reductions in reflectivity over time due to oxidation.

Nguyen, Khanh Bao

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Treatment of municipal landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic digester and activated sludge system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of treating sanitary landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic and activated sludge system. A high-strength leachate from Shiraz municipal landfill site was treated using this system. A two-stage laboratory-scale anaerobic digester under mesophilic conditions and an activated sludge unit were used. Landfill leachate composition and characteristics varied considerably during 8 months experiment (COD concentrations of 48,552-62,150 mg/L). It was found that the system could reduce the COD of the leachate by 94% at a loading rate of 2.25 g COD/L/d and 93% at loading rate of 3.37 g COD/L/d. The anaerobic digester treatment was quite effective in removing Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni. However, in the case of Zn, removal efficiency was about 50%. For the rest of the HMs the removal efficiencies were in the range 88.8-99.9%. Ammonia reduction did not occur in anaerobic digesters. Anaerobic reactors increased alkalinity about 3.2-4.8% in the 1st digester and 1.8-7.9% in the 2nd digester. In activated sludge unit, alkalinity and ammonia removal efficiency were 49-60% and 48.6-64.7%, respectively. Methane production rate was in the range of 0.02-0.04, 0.04-0.07, and 0.02-0.04 L/g COD{sub rem} for the 1st digester, the 2nd digester, and combination of both digesters, respectively; the methane content of the biogas varied between 60% and 63%.

Kheradmand, S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Shiraz, Shiraz 7134851156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi-Jashni, A., E-mail: akarimi@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Shiraz, Shiraz 7134851156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sartaj, M. [Department of Civil Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 841568311 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Kinetic Simulations of Fusion Energy Dynamics at the Extreme...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kinetic Simulations of Fusion Energy Dynamics at the Extreme Scale PI Name: William Tang PI Email: tang@pppl.gov Institution: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Allocation...

285

Professor and Director of the Fusion Science Center of Extreme...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Professor and Director of the Fusion Science Center of Extreme States of Matter and Fast Ignition, University of Rochester | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission...

286

ORNL analysis predicts losses from extreme weather damage could...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL analysis predicts losses from extreme weather damage could double by 2050 Researcher tackles unprecedented county-by-county economic loss forecast Research in impacts,...

287

Attributing Changes in the Risk of Extreme Weather and Climate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

many locations around the planet, including the tropics to support analyses of changes in tropical cyclone statistics, as well as extremes of temperature and precipitation. We aim...

288

Regularity of the extremal solutions in a Gelfand system problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine a Gelfand type system and show the extremal solutions are bounded provided we are close enough to the scalar case.

Cowan, Craig

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Gas flow behavior in extremely low permeability rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical model and modeling study of gas flow through extremely low permeability unconventional reservoirs. In contrast to conventional reservoirs

Yu-Shu Wu; Cong Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Extreme Chromatography: Faster, Hotter, SmallerChapter 3 Chiral Separations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme Chromatography: Faster, Hotter, Smaller Chapter 3 Chiral Separations Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Chiral Separations from ...

291

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

warming and electricity demand: A study of California.Extreme Heat, and Electricity Demand in California Norman L.high temperature and electricity demand for air-conditioned

Miller, N.L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Extreme Wind Speed Data Sets: Texas Tech/CSU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... B-indicates a beacon tower exposure. ... 93839 Memphis TN 4 3 1968 123 107 WIND SPEEDS GREATER ... [ SED Home | Extreme Winds Home | Data ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

293

Special Report: Graphics Processing Units Speed Results in Extreme...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Special Report: Graphics Processing Units Speed Results in Extreme-Scale Supercomputers American Fusion News Category: U.S. Universities Link: Special Report: Graphics Processing...

294

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

projected extreme heat and peak demand for electricity areadequately kept up with peak demand, and electricity supplytrend in aggregate peak demand in California is expected to

Miller, N.L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

LDRD symposium focuses on materials in extremes, big data, and...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

symposium focuses on materials in extremes, big data, and energy use impacts | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

296

Preservation of an extreme transient geotherm in the Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

transient geotherm in the Raft River detachment shear zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Preservation of an extreme transient...

297

Thermophilic Methanol Utilization by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: acetate ADH: alcohol dehydrogenase Bio-FGD: biological flue-gas desulfurization COD: chemical oxygen desulfurization In sub-section 1.1.1, sulfur dioxide emission and general aspects of the flue gas desulfurization heaters, metallurgical operations, roasting and sintering, coke oven plants, processing of titanium

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

298

Photon Sciences Worksheet 05-02 Extreme Conditions Extreme Environments Diff.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-02 Extreme Conditions 5-02 Extreme Conditions Extreme Environments Diff. Resources Available - BE Mid 2012 Mid 2014 Mid 2016 Beamline X-ray Source Total Total Total NSLS 1.16 1.16 0 X17B2 Wiggler 0.33 0.33 0 X17B3 Wiggler 0.33 0.33 0 X17C Wiggler 0.5 0.5 0 APS 5.4 6.1 6.1 3-ID Bend 0 0 0 11-ID-B Undulator 0.1 0.1 0.1 11-ID-C Undulator 0.1 0.1 0.1 13-BM-D a Bend 0.4 0.4 0.4 CAT 13-ID-D a Undulator 0.3 1 1 CAT 16-BM-B b Bend 1 1 1 CAT 16-BM-D b Bend 1 1 1 CAT 16-ID-B b Undulator 1 1 1 CAT 16-ID-D Undulator 1 1 1 CAT 13-BM-C Bend 0.5 0.5 0.5 CAT ALS 1 1 1 12.2.2 Superbend 1 1 1 SSRL 0 0 0 NSLS-II 0 0 0.3 XPD c Dampingwiggler 0 0 0.3 Project Funded and under construction in NSLS-II Project - Available 2015 4DE Wiggler 0 0 0 TEC Undulator 0 0 0 Totals 7.56 8.26 7.4 Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) only Large Volume Press (LVP) only DAC & LVP BE - Beamline equivalent - 1 BE is a station running the full operating schedule of the facility. Typically 5000 Hrs/yr

299

Climate, Extreme Heat, and Electricity Demand in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the twenty-first century, the frequency of extreme-heat events for major cities in heavily air conditioned California is projected to increase rapidly. Extreme heat is defined here as the temperature threshold for the 90th-percentile ...

Norman L. Miller; Katharine Hayhoe; Jiming Jin; Maximilian Auffhammer

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Odds Ratio Forecasts Increase Precautionary Action for Extreme Weather Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What is the best way to communicate the risk of rare but extreme weather to the public? One suggestion is to communicate the relative risk of extreme weather in the form of odds ratios; but, to the authors’ knowledge, this suggestion has never ...

Jared LeClerc; Susan Joslyn

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Free Extreme Values Gerard Ben Arous and Dan Virgil Voiculescu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Extreme Values Gerard Ben Arous and Dan Virgil Voiculescu New York University and University at Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720-3840 E-mail:dvv@math.berkeley.edu Abstract: Free probability analogues- sification of freely max-stable laws and their domains of attraction, using "free extremal convolutions

Ben Arous, Gérard

302

Regional Analysis of Temperature Extremes: Spatial Analog for Climate Change?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The statistical theory of extreme values is applied to daily minimum and maximum temperature time series in the U.S. Midwest and Southeast. If the spatial pattern in the frequency of extreme temperature events can be explained simply by shifts in ...

Barbara G. Brown; Richard W. Katz

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Enhanced biogas production by increasing organic load rate in mesophilic anaerobic digestion with sludge recirculation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? For enhancing anaerobic sludge digestion and biogas recovery, an increase in organic load rate (OLR) from 1.0 to 3.0kgVS/(m3·day) was imposed upon a new… (more)

Huang, Zhanzhao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Extreme Associated Functions: Optimally Linking Local Extremes to Large-scale Atmospheric Circulation Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new statistical method to optimally link local weather extremes to large-scale atmospheric circulation structures. The method is illustrated using July-August daily mean temperature at 2m height (T2m) time-series over the Netherlands and 500 hPa geopotential height (Z500) time-series over the Euroatlantic region of the ECMWF reanalysis dataset (ERA40). The method identifies patterns in the Z500 time-series that optimally describe, in a precise mathematical sense, the relationship with local warm extremes in the Netherlands. Two patterns are identified; the most important one corresponds to a blocking high pressure system leading to subsidence and calm, dry and sunny conditions over the Netherlands. The second one corresponds to a rare, easterly flow regime bringing warm, dry air into the region. The patterns are robust; they are also identified in shorter subsamples of the total dataset. The method is generally applicable and might prove useful in evaluating the performance of climate models in s...

Panja, Debabrata

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

DOE/EA-1624: Environmental Assessment for Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities (December 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities Auburn, New York Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1624 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 2009 INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK AUBURN LANDFILL GAS ELECTRIC GENERATORS AND ANAEROBIC DIGESTER ELECTRIC FACILITIES FINAL EA DOE/EA-1624 i Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 BACKGROUND............................................................................................................................................... 2 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED ...................................................................................................................................... 4

306

Revisiting the Statewide Climate Extremes for the United States: Evaluating Existing Extremes, Archived Data, and New Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New all-time extreme climate records have been set in several states over the past few years. These records highlighted a need to review the existing statewide climate extremes tables maintained by the NOAA National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). Also, ...

Karsten A. Shein; Dennis P. Todey; F. Adnan Akyuz; James R. Angel; Timothy M. Kearns; James L. Zdrojewski

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Real-Time Molecular Monitoring of Chemical Environment in ObligateAnaerobes during Oxygen Adaptive Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment canelucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms which enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bonding in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of wellorchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses.

Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David. A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

308

Characterization and environmental studies of Pompano Beach anaerobic digestion facility. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Municipal solid wastes contain numerous substances of potential environmental concern. While some understanding of the composition of raw municipal waste and its leachate products is available, no information regarding characteristics of solid, liquid and gaseous outputs from anaerobic digestion exists. If centralized anaerobic digestion plants are to be environmentally viable, the characteristics and environmental effects of effluents from these plants must be acceptable. The environmental concerns are particularly acute where ground water supplies are precariously low and the water table is high, South Florida is such a location. A characterization and environmental study was initiated by the Resource Recovery Group on August 1978. The specific objectives are: (1) systematic characterization of solid, liquid and gaseous inputs and outputs; (2) investigations of leaching characteristic of output solid and liquid effluents, and the transport of pollutants to and through ground water systems; and (3) analysis of environmental and process parameters to obtain causal relationships.

Sengupta, S; Gerrish, H P; Wong, K F; Nemerow, N; Daly, Jr, E L; Farooq, S; Chriswell, C

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Full scale field demonstration of unheated anaerobic contact stabilization. Project status report, October 1980-February 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the study reported here is to demonstrate that municipal sewage sludges can be anaerobically digested with little or no heating. To this end, two digesters at the Jackson Pike Wastewater Treatment Plant in Columbus, Ohio, have been converted to the anaerobic contact stabilization process. This, it is hoped, will permit positive and independent control of the solids retention time (SRT) in the system, so that solids may be retained long enough to ensure substantially complete digestion even at reduced temperatures. Digestion at a temperature of 71/sup 0/F and an SRT of 33 days produces results similar to digestion at a temperature of 91/sup 0/F and an SRT of 11 days. There is no evidence of impaired or unstable digestion at the lower temperature. (DMC)

Sykes, R.M.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Digestion of frozen/thawed food waste in the hybrid anaerobic solid-liquid system  

SciTech Connect

The hybrid anaerobic solid-liquid (HASL) system, which is a modified two-phase anaerobic digester, is to be used in an industrial scale operation to minimize disposal of food waste at incineration plants in Singapore. The aim of the present research was to evaluate freezing/thawing of food waste as a pre-treatment for its anaerobic digestion in the HASL system. The hydrolytic and fermentation processes in the acidogenic reactor were enhanced when food waste was frozen for 24 h at -20 deg. C and then thawed for 12 h at 25 deg. C (experiment) in comparison with fresh food waste (control). The highest dissolved COD concentrations in the leachate from the acidogenic reactors were 16.9 g/l on day 3 in the control and 18.9 g/l on day 1 in the experiment. The highest VFA concentrations in the leachate from the acidogenic reactors were 11.7 g/l on day 3 in the control and 17.0 g/l on day 1 in the experiment. The same volume of methane was produced during 12 days in the control and 7 days in the experiment. It gave the opportunity to diminish operational time of batch process by 42%. The effect of freezing/thawing of food waste as pre-treatment for its anaerobic digestion in the HASL system was comparable with that of thermal pre-treatment of food waste at 150 deg. C for 1 h. However, estimation of energy required either to heat the suspended food waste to 150 deg. C or to freeze the same quantity of food waste to -20 deg. C showed that freezing pre-treatment consumes about 3 times less energy than thermal pre-treatment.

Stabnikova, O. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)], E-mail: costab@ntu.edu.sg; Liu, X.Y.; Wang, J.Y. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Microwave Thermal Hydrolysis Of Sewage Sludge As A Pretreatment Stage For Anaerobic Digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article focuses on the effects of microwave thermal hydrolysis on sewage sludge anaerobic digestion. Volatile suspended solid (VSS) and COD solubilization of treated sludge were investigated. It was found that the microwave hydrolysis provided a rapid and efficient process to release organics from sludge. The increase of organic dissolution ratio was not obvious when holding time was over 5 min. The effect of the VSS solubilization was mainly dependent on temperature. The highest value of VSS dissolving ratio

W. Qiao; W. Wang; R. Xun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Enhanced anaerobic treatment of CSTR-digested effluent from chicken manure: The effect of ammonia inhibition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced anaerobic treatment of CSTR-digested effluent from chicken manure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SCOD/TAN (soluble COD/total ammonia nitrogen) ratio was key controlling factor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The threshold of the SCOD/TAN ratio was 2.4 at an influent pH of 8.5-9. - Abstract: The effect of ammonia inhibition was evaluated during the enhanced anaerobic treatment of digested effluent from a 700 m{sup 3} chicken-manure continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). A 12.3 L internal circulation (IC) reactor inoculated with an anaerobic granular sludge and operated at 35 {+-} 1 Degree-Sign C was employed for the investigation. With a corresponding organic loading rate of 1.5-3.5 kg-COD/m{sup 3} d over a hydraulic retention time of 1.5 d, a maximum volumetric biogas production rate of 1.2 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3} d and TCOD (total COD) removal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80% was achieved. However, the continual increase in the influent TAN content led to ammonia inhibition in the methanogenesis system. The SCOD/TAN (soluble COD/total ammonia nitrogen) ratio was presented to be the key controlling factor for the anaerobic treatment of semi-digested chicken manure, and further validation through shock loading and ammonia inhibition experiments was conducted. The threshold value of the SCOD/TAN ratio was determined to be 2.4 (corresponding to a TAN of 1250 mg/L) at an influent pH of 8.5-9.

Liu Zhanguang; Zhou Xuefei [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Water Environment of Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory of Pollution and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Yalei, E-mail: zhangyalei2003@163.com [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Water Environment of Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory of Pollution and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhu Hongguang [Institute of Modern Agricultural Science and Engineering, National Engineering Research Center of Protected Agriculture, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

The metagenome of an anaerobic microbial community decomposing poplar wood chips  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study describes the composition and metabolic potential of a lignocellulosic biomass degrading community that decays poplar wood chips under anaerobic conditions. We examined the community that developed on poplar biomass in a non-aerated bioreactor over the course of a year, with no microbial inoculation other than the naturally occurring organisms on the woody material. The composition of this community contrasts in important ways with biomass-degrading communities associated with higher organisms, which have evolved over millions of years into a symbiotic relationship. Both mammalian and insect hosts provide partial size reduction, chemical treatments (low or high pH environments), and complex enzymatic 'secretomes' that improve microbial access to cell wall polymers. We hypothesized that in order to efficiently degrade coarse untreated biomass, a spontaneously assembled free-living community must both employ alternative strategies, such as enzymatic lignin depolymerization, for accessing hemicellulose and cellulose and have a much broader metabolic potential than host-associated communities. This would suggest that such a community would make a valuable resource for finding new catalytic functions involved in biomass decomposition and gaining new insight into the poorly understood process of anaerobic lignin depolymerization. Therefore, in addition to determining the major players in this community, our work specifically aimed at identifying functions potentially involved in the depolymerization of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and to assign specific roles to the prevalent community members in the collaborative process of biomass decomposition. A bacterium similar to Magnetospirillum was identified among the dominant community members, which could play a key role in the anaerobic breakdown of aromatic compounds. We suggest that these compounds are released from the lignin fraction in poplar hardwood during the decay process, which would point to lignin-modification or depolymerization under anaerobic conditions.

van der Lelie D.; Taghavi, S.; McCorkle, S. M.; Li, L.-L.; Malfatti, S. A.; Monteleone, D.; Donohoe, B. S.; Ding, S.-Y.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Tringe, S. G.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Anaerobic treatment of sludge from a nitrification-denitrification landfill leachate plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The viability of anaerobic digestion of sludge from a MSW landfill leachate treatment plant, with COD values ranging between 15,000 and 19,400 mg O{sub 2} dm{sup -3}, in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor was studied. The reactor employed had a useful capacity of 9 l, operating at mesophilic temperature. Start-up of the reactor was carried out in different steps, beginning with diluted sludge and progressively increasing the amount of sludge fed into the reactor. The study was carried out over a period of 7 months. Different amounts of methanol were added to the feed, ranging between 6.75 and 1 cm{sup 3} dm{sup -3} of feed in order to favour the growth of methanogenic flora. The achieved biodegradation of the sludge using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket Reactor was very high for an HRT of 9 days, obtaining decreases in COD of 84-87% by the end of the process. Purging of the digested sludge represented {approx}16% of the volume of the treated sludge.

Maranon, E. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus of Viesques, 33204 Gijon (Spain)]. E-mail: emara@uniovi.es; Castrillon, L. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus of Viesques, 33204 Gijon (Spain); Fernandez, Y. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus of Viesques, 33204 Gijon (Spain); Fernandez, E. [COGERSA, 33697 Serin, Gijon (Spain)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Anaerobic co-digestion of aquatic flora and quinoa with manures from Bolivian Altiplano  

SciTech Connect

Quinoa stalk (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) from agricultural crop residue, totora (Schoenoplectus tatora) and o-macrophytes (aquatic flora) from Lake Titicaca (on the Bolivian Altiplano) were studied in a wet anaerobic co-digestion process together with manure from llama, cow and sheep. Anaerobic semi-continuous experiments were performed in (10) 2-l reactors at a temperature of 25 deg. C with 30 days of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.8 kg VS m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. Totora was found to be the best co-substrate. In mixture ratios of 1:1 (VS basis), it increased the biogas productivity by 130% for llama manure, 60% for cow manure, and 40% for sheep manure. It was possible to use up to 58% (VS basis) of totora in the substrate. Higher concentrations (including pure totora) could not be digested, as that caused acidification problems similar to those caused by other lignocellulosic materials. When quinoa and o-macrophytes were used as co-substrates, the increase in biogas productivity was slightly less. However, these co-substrates did not cause any operational problems. An additional advantage of quinoa and o-macrophytes was that they could be used in any proportion (even in pure form) without causing any destabilization problems in the anaerobic digestion process.

Alvarez, Rene [IIDEPROQ, UMSA, Plaza del Obelisco 1175, La Paz (Bolivia)], E-mail: Rene.alvarez@iideproq.org; Liden, Gunnar [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Atomistic simulations of chemomechanical processes in nanomaterials under extreme environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complex chemomechanical behavior of nanomaterials under extreme thermal and mechanical environments is of interest for a range of basic science and defense applications. By the limitation of experimental approaches for ...

Cho, Hansohl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The 1993 Midwest Extreme Precipitation in Historical and Probabilistic Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme rainfall amounts that resulted in severe flooding during the spring and summer of 1993 along the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers are examined from a historical and probabilistic viewpoint. Long-term average precipitation amounts and the ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman; J. R. M. Hosking; James R. Wallis

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Former Assistant Secretary Shares Experiences Leading EM: 'Extremely  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'Extremely Rewarding' Former Assistant Secretary Shares Experiences Leading EM: 'Extremely Rewarding' September 30, 2013 - 10:25am Addthis Dr. Inés Triay said serving as EM Assistant Secretary was challenging and extremely rewarding. Dr. Inés Triay said serving as EM Assistant Secretary was challenging and extremely rewarding. In an occasional EM Update series, we feature interviews with former EM Assistant Secretaries to reflect on their achievements and challenges in the Cold War cleanup and to discuss endeavors in life after EM. Before serving as EM's Assistant Secretary in 2009 - leading the largest, most diverse and most technically complex environmental cleanup program in the world - Dr. Inés Triay was the cleanup program's Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Chief Operations Officer, Deputy

319

'Extreme Makeover: Home Edition' Builds Efficiently | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'Extreme Makeover: Home Edition' Builds Efficiently 'Extreme Makeover: Home Edition' Builds Efficiently 'Extreme Makeover: Home Edition' Builds Efficiently February 12, 2010 - 9:30am Addthis Joshua DeLung You may recall this post on Energy Empowers, which previewed an upcoming episode of ABC's "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition" where the U.S. Department of Energy collaborated with builders to incorporate energy-efficiency and renewable energy technologies at The Fishing School, one of two such collaborative projects in an episode that was set to air during a special 2010 Valentine's Day episode, featuring filmmaker Tyler Perry as a guest. The episode aired and told the story of energy efficiency changing the lives of some very special mentors and of America's youth. Additionally, Clean Skies News covered the builds. Here's its first video

320

Explaining Extreme Events of 2011 from a Climate Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Attribution of extreme events shortly after their occurrence stretches the current state-of-theart of climate change assessment. To help foster the growth of this science, this article illustrates some approaches to answering questions about the role of ...

Thomas C. Peterson; Peter A. Stott; Stephanie Herring

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Monitoring and Understanding Trends in Extreme Storms: State of Knowledge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state of knowledge regarding trends and an understanding of their causes is presented for a specific subset of extreme weather and climate types. For severe convective storms (tornadoes, hailstorms, and severe thunderstorms), differences in time and ...

Kenneth E. Kunkel; Thomas R. Karl; Harold Brooks; James Kossin; Jay H. Lawrimore; Derek Arndt; Lance Bosart; David Changnon; Susan L. Cutter; Nolan Doesken; Kerry Emanuel; Pavel Ya. Groisman; Richard W. Katz; Thomas Knutson; James O'Brien; Christopher J. Paciorek; Thomas C. Peterson; Kelly Redmond; David Robinson; Jeff Trapp; Russell Vose; Scott Weaver; Michael Wehner; Klaus Wolter; Donald Wuebbles

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

@ E A R T H L I N K . N E T SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND CHARACTERISTICS AT NUCLEAR FACILITY SITES Categorization of Natural Hazard Phenomenon...

323

A Homogenized Historical Temperature Extreme Dataset for the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A subset of stations from the daily U.S. Historical Climatology Network (HCN) is used as a basis for a historical database of temperature extreme occurrence in the United States. The dataset focuses on daily temperature occurrences that exceed (...

Arthur T. DeGaetano; Robert J. Allen; Kevin P. Gallo

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Multimodel Detection and Attribution of Extreme Temperature Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies have detected anthropogenic influences due to increases in greenhouse gases on extreme temperature changes during the latter half of the 20th century at global and regional scales. Most of the studies, however, were based on a ...

Seung-Ki Min; Xuebin Zhang; Francis Zwiers; Hideo Shiogama; Yu-Shiang Tung; Michael Wehner

325

Characterizing and Modeling Temporal and Spatial Trends in Rainfall Extremes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hierarchical spatial model for daily rainfall extremes that characterizes their temporal variation due to interannual climatic forcing as well as their spatial pattern is proposed. The model treats the parameters of at-site probability ...

Santosh K. Aryal; Bryson C. Bates; Edward P. Campbell; Yun Li; Mark J. Palmer; Neil R. Viney

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts at Extreme Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Gamma-Ray Bursts . . . . . . . . . . . . . Redshift-CRUZ OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AT EXTREME ENERGIES ADedication xix Acknowledgments xx 1 Gamma-Ray Bursts 1.1

Aune, Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Extreme Flood Response: The June 2008 Flooding in Iowa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the hydroclimatology, hydrometeorology and hydrology of extreme floods through analyses that center on the June 2008 flooding in Iowa. The most striking feature of the June 2008 flooding was the flood peak of the Cedar River at Cedar ...

James A. Smith; Mary Lynn Baeck; Gabriele Villarini; Daniel B. Wright; Witold Krajewski

328

Long-Term Statistics and Extreme Waves of Sea Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stochastic model of sea storms for describing long-term statistics of extreme wave events is presented. The formulation generalizes Boccotti’s equivalent triangular storm model by describing an actual storm history in the form of a generic ...

Francesco Fedele; Felice Arena

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Geocomputation's future at the extremes: high performance computing and nanoclients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geocomputation's future at the extremes: high performance computing and nanoclients K.C. Clarke; High performance computing; Tractability; Geocom- putation E-mail address: kclarke@geog.ucsb.edu (K

Clarke, Keith

330

A Climatological Measure of Extreme Snowdrift Loading on Building Roofs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physical model of snow transport and deposition is used in combination with historical climatological data to derive a climatological measure of extreme snowdrift loads on building roofs. The snowdrift metric used relies on hourly wind speed, ...

Arthur T. DeGaetano; Michael J. O'Rourke

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Global Estimates of Extreme Wind Speed and Wave Height  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-term dataset of satellite altimeter measurements of significant wave height and wind speed, spanning 23 years, is analyzed to determine extreme values corresponding to a 100-yr return period. The analysis considers the suitability of both ...

J. Vinoth; I. R. Young

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Regional Extreme Monthly Precipitation Simulated by NARCCAP RCMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the ability of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) ensemble of regional climate models to simulate extreme monthly precipitation and its supporting circulation for regions of North America, ...

William J. Gutowski Jr.; Raymond W. Arritt; Sho Kawazoe; David M. Flory; Eugene S. Takle; Sébastien Biner; Daniel Caya; Richard G. Jones; René Laprise; L. Ruby Leung; Linda O. Mearns; Wilfran Moufouma-Okia; Ana M. B. Nunes; Yun Qian; John O. Roads; Lisa C. Sloan; Mark A. Snyder

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Mesoscale Predictability of an Extreme Warm-Season Precipitation Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mesoscale model is used to investigate the mesoscale predictability of an extreme precipitation event over central Texas on 29 June 2002 that lasted through 7 July 2002. Both the intrinsic and practical aspects of warm-season predictability, ...

Fuqing Zhang; Andrew M. Odins; John W. Nielsen-Gammon

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Canadian RCM Projected Changes to Extreme Precipitation Characteristics over Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes to the intensity and frequency of hydroclimatic extremes can have significant impacts on sectors associated with water resources, and therefore it is relevant to assess their vulnerabilities in a changing climate. This study focuses on the ...

B. Mladjic; L. Sushama; M. N. Khaliq; R. Laprise; D. Caya; R. Roy

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The effect of sulfide inhibition and organic shock loading on anaerobic biofilm reactors treating a low-temperature, high-sulfate wastewater.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In order to assess the long-term treatment of sulfate- and carbon- rich wastewater at low temperatures, three anaerobic biofilm reactors were operated at 20°C,… (more)

McDonald, Heather Brown

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The development of an index for the proximal upper extremity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis techniques specific to the proximal upper extremity have historically been overlooked in the field of ergonomics. This research effort provides a methodology that will allow the ergonomics practitioner to analyze a job and predict whether or not that job exposes workers to increased risk of proximal upper extremity disorders. Literature from the fields of physiology, biomechanics, and epidemiology was assimilated in order to understand the theories of pathogenesis of disorders in the rotator cuff and to identify the risk factors associated with proximal upper extremity disorders. A retrospective epidemiological study was conducted to identify job task variables that may contribute to the occurrence of proximal upper extremity disorders. Two proximal upper extremity constructs were proposed: a fatigue-based model and a compressive load-based model. The constructs incorporated lessons learned from the literature and results from the epidemiological study. Validation of the models was performed using data from the epidemiological study. It was determined that the fatigue-based model was a good predictor of proximal upper extremity disorders.

Walline, Erin Kurusz

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Mapping the Hazard of Extreme Rainfall by Peaks over Threshold Extreme Value Analysis and Spatial Regression Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The occurrence of rainfalls of high magnitude constitutes a primary natural hazard in many parts of the world, and the elaboration of maps showing the hazard of extreme rainfalls has great theoretical and practical interest. In this work a ...

Santiago Beguería; Sergio M. Vicente-Serrano

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Predicted 21st century changes in seasonal extreme precipitation events in the parallel climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

series suitable for extreme event analysis at climate modelother forms of extreme event analysis are not enabled byThe study of extreme events is the analysis of the tails of

Wehner, Michael F.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Observed Changes in Return Values of Annual Temperature Extremes over Argentina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme temperature events are one of the most studied extreme events since their occurrence has a huge impact on society. In this study, the frequency of occurrence of absolute extreme temperature events in Argentina is analyzed. Four annual ...

Matilde Rusticucci; Bárbara Tencer

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Role of Human Activity in the Recent Warming of Extremely Warm Daytime Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formal detection and attribution analyses of changes in daily extremes give evidence of a significant human influence on the increasing severity of extremely warm nights and decreasing severity of extremely cold days and nights. This paper ...

Nikolaos Christidis; Peter A. Stott; Simon J. Brown

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, June 1991--November 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, was studied in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. The threshold value for benzoate degradation was dependent on the acetate concentration with benzoate threshold values ranging from 2.4 {mu}M at 20 mM acetate to 30.0 {mu}M at 65 mM acetate. Increasing acetate concentrations also inhibited the rate of benzoate degradation with a apparent K{sub i} for acetate inhibition of 7.0 mM. Lower threshold values were obtained when nitrate rather than sulfate was the terminal electron acceptor. These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and suggest that there is a minimum Gibbs free energy value required for the degradation of benzoate. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase has been isolated from Syntrophomonas wolfei; it is apparently a key enzyme controlling the synthesis of poly-B-hydroxyalkanoate from acetyl-CoA in this organism. Kinetic characterization of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from S. wolfei showed that it is similar in its structural, kinetic, and apparent regulatory properties to other biosynthetic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases from phylogenetically distinct bacteria that synthesize PHA. Intracellular concentrations of CoA and acetyl-CoA are believed to be critical factors regulating the activity of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase in S. wolfei. We have also isolated and characterized several new halophilic anaerobic fermentative anaerobes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that one of these bacteria is a new species in the genus, Haloanaerobium. Two other species appear to be members of the genus, Halobacteroides. Several halophilic acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria have also been isolated and their physiological properties are currently under investigation. We have also isolated an acetate-using dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

McInerney, M.J.

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

342

Biogas generation by two-phase anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The organic fraction of municipal solid waste can be a significant energy source for renewable energy generation. The total production of municipal solid waste in Turkey was 25?×?106 tones per year. Anaerobic digestion (AD) process may be a solution to the problems of energy demand and waste management since it provides biomethanation along with waste stabilization. AD can be operated in single or two phase configurations. Two-phase processes have some advantages over one phase systems in terms of selection of microorganisms

Eylem Dogan; Göksel N. Demirer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Intensification of hot extremes in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Governments are currently considering policies that will limit greenhouse gas concentrations, including negotiation of an international treaty to replace the expiring Kyoto Protocol. Existing mitigation targets have arisen primarily from political negotiations, and the ability of such policies to avoid dangerous impacts is still uncertain. Using a large suite of climate model experiments, we find that substantial intensification of hot extremes could occur within the next 3 decades, below the 2 C global warming target currently being considered by policy makers. We also find that the intensification of hot extremes is associated with a shift towards more anticyclonic atmospheric circulation during the warm season, along with warm-season drying over much of the U.S. The possibility that intensification of hot extremes could result from relatively small increases in greenhouse gas concentrations suggests that constraining global warming to 2 C may not be sufficient to avoid dangerous climate change.

Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Supercomputers: Extreme Computing at the National Labs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supercomputers: Extreme Computing at the National Labs Supercomputers: Extreme Computing at the National Labs Supercomputers: Extreme Computing at the National Labs September 4, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Titan 1 of 5 Titan Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Titan has a theoretical peak performance of more than 20 petaflops, or more than 20 quadrillion calculations per second. This will enable researchers across the scientific arena, from materials to climate change to astrophysics, to acquire unparalleled accuracy in their simulations and achieve research breakthroughs more rapidly than ever before. Titan is currently the second fastest supercomputer in the world. Image: Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Sequoia 2 of 5 Sequoia Sequoia is a 20 petaflop, that is 20 quadrillion floating point operations per second, IBM BlueGene/Q system at Lawrence Livermore National

345

Extreme high-head portables provide more pumping options  

SciTech Connect

Three years ago, Godwin Pumps, one of the largest manufacturers of portable pumps, introduced its Extreme Duty High Lift (HL) series of pumps and more mines are finding unique applications for these pumps. The Extreme HL series is a range single-stage Dri-Prime pumps with heads up to 600 feet and flows up to 5,000 gallons per minute. The American Coal Co.'s Galatia mine, an underground longwall mine in southern Illinois, used an HL 160 to replace a multiple-staged centrifugal pump. It provided Galatia with 1,500 gpm at 465 ft. 3 photos.

Fiscor, S.

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

SciTech Connect

Climate projections from three atmosphere-ocean climate models with a range of low to mid-high temperature sensitivity forced by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change SRES higher, middle, and lower emission scenarios indicate that, over the 21st century, extreme heat events for major cities in heavily air-conditioned California will increase rapidly. These increases in temperature extremes are projected to exceed the rate of increase in mean temperature, along with increased variance. Extreme heat is defined here as the 90 percent exceedance probability (T90) of the local warmest summer days under the current climate. The number of extreme heat days in Los Angeles, where T90 is currently 95 F (32 C), may increase from 12 days to as many as 96 days per year by 2100, implying current-day heat wave conditions may last for the entire summer, with earlier onset. Overall, projected increases in extreme heat under the higher A1fi emission scenario by 2070-2099 tend to be 20-30 percent higher than those projected under the lower B1 emission scenario, ranging from approximately double the historical number of days for inland California cities (e.g. Sacramento and Fresno), up to four times for previously temperate coastal cities (e.g. Los Angeles, San Diego). These findings, combined with observed relationships between high temperature and electricity demand for air-conditioned regions, suggest potential shortfalls in transmission and supply during T90 peak electricity demand periods. When the projected extreme heat and peak demand for electricity are mapped onto current availability, maintaining technology and population constant only for demand side calculations, we find the potential for electricity deficits as high as 17 percent. Similar increases in extreme heat days are suggested for other locations across the U.S. southwest, as well as for developing nations with rapidly increasing electricity demands. Electricity response to recent extreme heat events, such as the July 2006 heat wave in California, suggests that peak electricity demand will challenge current supply, as well as future planned supply capacities when population and income growth are taken into account.

Miller, N.L.; Hayhoe, K.; Jin, J.; Auffhammer, M.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Top Ten Challenges in Extreme-Scale Visual Analytics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the current special issue of IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications (CG&A), researchers share their research and development (R&D) findings and results on applying visual analytics to extreme-scale data. Having surveyed the special issue articles and other related R&D efforts in the area, we have identified what we consider to be the top challenges of extreme-scale visual analytics. To cater to the diverse readership of CG&A, our discussion evaluates challenges in all areas of the field, including algorithms, hardware, software, engineering, and social issues.

Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Christopher R.; Chen, Chaomei; Ross, Rob

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

348

TECA: A Parallel Toolkit for Extreme Climate Analysis  

SciTech Connect

We present TECA, a parallel toolkit for detecting extreme events in large climate datasets. Modern climate datasets expose parallelism across a number of dimensions: spatial locations, timesteps and ensemble members. We design TECA to exploit these modes of parallelism and demonstrate a prototype implementation for detecting and tracking three classes of extreme events: tropical cyclones, extra-tropical cyclones and atmospheric rivers. We process a modern TB-sized CAM5 simulation dataset with TECA, and demonstrate good runtime performance for the three case studies.

Prabhat, Mr; Ruebel, Oliver; Byna, Surendra; Wu, Kesheng; Li, Fuyu; Wehner, Michael; Bethel, E. Wes

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

349

Controllable Gaussian-qubit interface for extremal quantum state engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study state engineering through bilinear interactions between two remote qubits and two-mode Gaussian light fields. The attainable two-qubit states span the entire physically allowed region in the entanglement-versus-global-purity plane. Two-mode Gaussian states with maximal entanglement at fixed global and marginal entropies produce maximally entangled two-qubit states in the corresponding entropic diagram. We show that a small set of parameters characterizing extremally entangled two-mode Gaussian states is sufficient to control the engineering of extremally entangled two-qubit states, which can be realized in realistic matter-light scenarios.

G. Adesso; S. Campbell; F. Illuminati; M. Paternostro

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

350

Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration  

SciTech Connect

Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the wellstudied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lianming; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha B.; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, David E.; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

351

Study of the operational conditions for anaerobic digestion of urban solid wastes  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an experimental evaluation of anaerobic digestion technology as an option for the management of organic solid waste in developing countries. As raw material, a real and heterogeneous organic waste from urban solid wastes was used. In the first experimental phase, seed selection was achieved through an evaluation of three different anaerobic sludges coming from wastewater treatment plants. The methanization potential of these sludges was assessed in three different batch digesters of 500 mL, at two temperature levels. The results showed that by increasing the temperature to 15 deg. C above room temperature, the methane production increases to three times. So, the best results were obtained in the digester fed with a mixed sludge, working at mesophilic conditions (38-40 deg. C). Then, this selected seed was used at the next experimental phase, testing at different digestion times (DT) of 25, 20 and 18 days in a bigger batch digester of 20 L with a reaction volume of 13 L. The conversion rates were registered at the lowest DT (18 days), reaching 44.9 L/kg{sup -1} of wet waste day{sup -1}. Moreover, DT also has a strong influence over COD removal, because there is a direct relationship between solids removal inside the reactor and DT.

Castillo M, Edgar Fernando [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Ambientales, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9a Carrera 27, Aptdo. Aereo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)]. E-mail: efcastil@uis.edu.co; Cristancho, Diego Edison [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Ambientales, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9a Carrera 27, Aptdo. Aereo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Victor Arellano, A. [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Ambientales, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9a Carrera 27, Aptdo. Aereo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Bacterial and Archaeal Lipid Biomarkers from Anaerobically Digested Sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) was used in the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinone (RQ), bacterial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and archaeal phospholipid ether lipid (PLEL) from anaerobically digested sludge. Bacterial RQ were determined using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). Determination of bacterial PLFA and archaeal PLEL was simultaneously performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effects of pressure, temperature, and modifier concentration on the total amounts of RQ, PLFA, and PLEL were investigated by 23 experiments with five settings chosen for each variable. The optimal extraction conditions that were obtained through a multiple-response optimization included a pressure of 23.6 MPa, temperature of 77.6 °C, and 10.6 % (v/v) of methanol as the modifier. Thirty nine components of microbial lipid biomarkers were identified in the anaerobically digested sludge. Overall, the SFE method proved to be more effective, rapid, and quantitative for simultaneously extracting bacterial and archaeal lipid biomarkers, compared to conventional organic solvent extraction. This work shows the potential application of SFE as a routine method for the comprehensive analysis of microbial community structures in environmental assessments using the lipid biomarkers profile. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13 3023

Muhammad Hanif; Yoichi Atsuta; Koichi Fujie; Hiroyuki Daimon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Intermediate-scale high-solids anaerobic digestion system operational development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. Operation of the anaerobic digestion process at high solids reduces the level of process water and thereby the size and capital costs for the digester system. In addition, by virtue of the lack of available water, the microbial catalysts are more productive in feedstock polymer hydrolysis. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. Information gained from laboratory-scale digester research was used to develop die intermediate-scale digester system. This system represents a 50-fold scale-up of the original digester system and includes continuous feed addition and computer monitoring and control. During the first 1.15 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements -- which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using the NREL high-solids digester design -- are detailed in this report.

Rivard, C.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Chicken Processing Wastewater and Crude Glycerol from Biodiesel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this thesis was to study the anaerobic digestion (AD) of wastewater from a chicken processing facility and of crude glycerol from local biodiesel operations. The AD of these substrates was conducted in bench-scale reactors operated in the batch mode at 35°C. The secondary objective was to evaluate two sources of glycerol as co-substrates for AD to determine if different processing methods for the glycerol had an effect on CH? production. The biogas yields were higher for co-digestion than for digestion of wastewater alone, with average yields at 1 atmosphere and 0°C of 0.555 and 0.540 L (g VS added)?¹, respectively. Another set of results showed that the glycerol from an on-farm biodiesel operation had a CH? yield of 0.702 L (g VS added)?¹, and the glycerol from an industrial/commercial biodiesel operation had a CH? yield of 0.375 L (g VS added)?¹. Therefore, the farm glycerol likely had more carbon content than industrial glycerol. It was believed that the farm glycerol had more impurities, such as free fatty acids, biodiesel and methanol. In conclusion, anaerobic co-digestion of chicken processing wastewater and crude glycerol was successfully applied to produce biogas rich in CH?.

Foucault, Lucas Jose

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Anaerobic biprocessing of low rank coals. Final technical report, September 12, 1990--August 10, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Coal solubilization under aerobic conditions results in oxygenated coal product which, in turn, makes the coal poorer fuel than the starting material. A novel approach has been made in this project is to remove oxygen from coal by reductive decarboxylation. In Wyodak subbituminous coal the major oxygen functionality is carboxylic groups which exist predominantly as carboxylate anions strongly chelating metal cations like Ca{sup 2+} and forming strong macromolecular crosslinks which contribute in large measure to network polymer structure. Removal of the carboxylic groups at ambient temperature by anaerobic organisms would unravel the macromoleculer network, resulting in smaller coal macromolecules with increased H/C ratio which has better fuel value and better processing prospects. These studies described here sought to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal liquefaction. Efforts were made to establish anaerobic microbial consortia having decarboxylating ability, decarboxylate coal with the adapted microbial consortia, isolate the organisms, and characterize the biotreated coal products. Production of CO{sup 2} was used as the primary indicator for possible coal decarboxylation.

Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.

1993-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

356

Biochar Produced from Anaerobically Digested Fiber Reduces Phosphorus in Dairy Lagoons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the use of biochar produced from anaerobic digester dairy fiber (ADF) to sequester phosphorus (P) from dairy lagoons. The ADF was collected from a plugged flow digester, air-dried to Biochar was produced by slow pyrolysis in a barrel retort. The potential of biochar to reduce P in the anaerobic digester effluent (ADE) was assessed in small-scale filter systems through which the effluent was circulated. Biochar sequestered an average of 381 mg L?1 P from the ADE, and 4 g L?1 ADF was captured as a coating on the biochar. There was an increase of total (1.9 g kg?1), Olsen (763 mg kg?1), and water-extractable P (914 mg kg?1) bound to the biochar after 15 d of filtration. This accounted for a recovery of 32% of the P in the ADE. The recovered P on the biochar was analyzed using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance for P speciation, which confirmed the recovery of inorganic orthophosphate after liquid extraction of the biochar and the presence of inextractable Ca-P in the solid state. The inorganic phosphate was sequestered on the biochar through physical and weak chemical bonding. Results indicate that biochar could be a beneficial component to P reduction in the dairy system.

Streubel, Jason D.; Collins, Harold P.; Tarara, Julie M.; Cochran, Rebecca L.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Method for generating extreme ultraviolet with mather-type plasma accelerators for use in Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for generating extremely short-wave ultraviolet electromagnetic wave uses two intersecting plasma beams generated by two plasma accelerators. The intersection of the two plasma beams emits electromagnetic radiation and in particular radiation in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength. In the preferred orientation two axially aligned counter streaming plasmas collide to produce an intense source of electromagnetic radiation at the 13.5 nm wavelength. The Mather type plasma accelerators can utilize tin, or lithium covered electrodes. Tin, lithium or xenon can be used as the photon emitting gas source.

Hassanein, Ahmed (Bolingbrook, IL); Konkashbaev, Isak (Bolingbrook, IL)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

358

On the design of experiments to study extreme field limits  

SciTech Connect

We propose experiments on the collision of high intensity electromagnetic pulses with electron bunches and on the collision of multiple electromagnetic pulses for studying extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves. The effects of nonlinear QED will be revealed in these laser plasma experiments.

Bulanov, S. S.; Chen, M.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Koga, J. K.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Chen, P.; Mur, V. D.; Narozhny, N. B.; Popov, V. S.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Korn, G. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) and University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow 117218 (Russian Federation); University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik, Garching 85748 (Germany) and ELI Beamline Facility, Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

359

Probability Models for Annual Extreme Water-Equivalent Ground Snow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical analysis of annual extreme water-equivalents of ground snow (reported as inches of water) measured up through the winter of 1979–80 at 76 weather stations in the northeast quadrant of the United States is presented. The analysis ...

Bruce Ellingwood; Robert K. Redfield

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Rule-Based prediction of rare extreme values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a rule learning method that obtains models biased towards a particular class of regression tasks. These tasks have as main distinguishing feature the fact that the main goal is to be accurate at predicting rare extreme values of ...

Rita Ribeiro; Luís Torgo

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A new method for estimating extreme rainfall probabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an EPRI-funded research program, the Yankee Atomic Electric Company developed a new method for estimating probabilities of extreme rainfall. It can be used, along with other techniques, to improve the estimation of probable maximum precipitation values for specific basins or regions.

Harper, G.A.; O'Hara, T.F. (Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Bolton, MA (United States)); Morris, D.I. (Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Extreme conditions during multibubble cavitation: Sonoluminescence as a spectroscopic probe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cavitation MBSL Plasma a b s t r a c t We review recent work on the use of sonoluminescence (SL) to probe to $9000 K. The effective pressure during MBSL is $300 bar, based on atomic line shifts. Given nanosecond in a liquid, which can create extreme conditions in localized, short- lived hot spots. During the past few

Zimmerman, Steven C.

363

Causal Analysis of the Unanticipated Extremity Exposure at HFEF  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the unintended extremity exposure to an operator while handling a metallurgical mount sample of irradiated fuel following an off-scale high beta radiation reading of the sample. The decision was made to continue working after the meter indicated high off-scale by the HPT Supervisor, which resulted in the operator at the next operation being exposed.

David E. James; Charles R. Posegate; Thomas P. Zahn; Alan G. Wagner

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Laura Roach Islamic Extremism: Undermining a Fundamentalist Movement in Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laura Roach Islamic Extremism: Undermining a Fundamentalist Movement in Indonesia College: COLSA, Major: EREC Freshman Editor: Stephanie Weiner #12;I. Problem Indonesia has the largest Muslim population, Indonesia is not an Islamic state; it is the third largest democracy in the world.1 Unsurprisingly

New Hampshire, University of

365

Estimation of Extreme Wind Speeds with Very Long Return Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long series of hourly mean wind speeds and the maximum hourly 3-s gust are simulated for four sites in the British Isles in order to investigate methods for the determination of extreme wind speed events. The simulation is performed using a one-...

M. D. G. Dukes; J. P. Palutikof

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

ENSO and Extreme Rainfall Events in South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the opposite phases of ENSO on the frequency of extreme rainfall events over South America is analyzed for each month of the ENSO cycle on the basis of a large set of daily station rainfall data and compared with the influence of ...

Alice M. Grimm; Renata G. Tedeschi

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

An extreme-distance approach to multiple criteria ranking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A distance approach based on extreme points, or predefined ideal and anti-ideal points, is proposed to improve on the TOPSIS (Technique for Order Performance [or Ordered Preference] by Similarity to Ideal Solution) method of multiple criteria ranking. ... Keywords: Comparative study, Distance-based ranking, Multiple criteria decision analysis, Multiple criteria ranking, TOPSIS

Ye Chen; D. Marc Kilgour; Keith W. Hipel

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A tree augmented classifier based on Extreme Imprecise Dirichlet Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present TANC, a TAN classifier (tree-augmented naive) based on imprecise probabilities. TANC models prior near-ignorance via the Extreme Imprecise Dirichlet Model (EDM). A first contribution of this paper is the experimental comparison between EDM ... Keywords: Classification, Classifier, Imprecise Dirichlet Model, Naive credal, TANC

G. Corani; C. P. de Campos

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A Nonstationary Extreme Value Analysis for the Assessment of Changes in Extreme Annual Wind Speed over the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the extreme annual wind speed in and around the Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada) were investigated through a nonstationary extreme value analysis of the annual maximum 10-m wind speed obtained from the North American Regional Reanalysis (...

Y. Hundecha; A. St-Hilaire; T. B. M. J. Ouarda; S. El Adlouni; P. Gachon

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Study on the Methane Production Capacity and Energy Output of Different Temperatures during Anaerobic Digestion of Swine Manure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was carried out by experimenting with the self-manufactured digestion devices which were fed with swine manure as material with a domesticated inoculums added as yeast. The experiment was on the condition of 6.6% mass fraction of total solid, ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, methane production capacity, temperature, energy, swine manure

Rong-rong Wei; Guan-wen Cheng; Jie-jun Luo; Liang Ling; Zong-qiang Zhu; Xu Shan; Wen-yuan Wei

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Estimation dynamical model of an anaerobic digestion of shrimp culture pond sediment in a biogas process using genetic algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas is one type of renewable energy which is important to the energy and environmental planning of Thailand. The study and analysis of the dynamical model of the biogas process can be explained the variables that affect biogas process and optimization. ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, artificial intelligence, biogas process, mass balance equation, system identification

Jiraphon Srisertpol; Prasit Srinakorn; Adtavirod Kheawnak; Kontorn Chamniprasart; Arthit Srikaew

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

Charania, M.; Brockman, K. L.; Zhang, Y.; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 uses the cAMP receptor protein, CRP, for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an E. coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, DMSO, or Fe(III), whereas the deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III), and to a lesser extent with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and the cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagella biosynthesis, and electron transport, were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant, but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration, and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

Charania, M.; Brockman, K.; Zhang, Yang; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Microbiological characterization and specific methanogenic activity of anaerobe sludges used in urban solid waste treatment  

SciTech Connect

This study presents the microbiological characterization of the anaerobic sludge used in a two-stage anaerobic reactor for the treatment of organic fraction of urban solid waste (OFUSW). This treatment is one alternative for reducing solid waste in landfills at the same time producing a biogas (CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}) and an effluent that can be used as biofertilizer. The system was inoculated with sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) (Rio Frio Plant in Bucaramanga-Colombia) and a methanogenic anaerobic digester for the treatment of pig manure (Mesa de los Santos in Santander). Bacterial populations were evaluated by counting groups related to oxygen sensitivity, while metabolic groups were determined by most probable number (MPN) technique. Specific methanogenic activity (SMA) for acetate, formate, methanol and ethanol substrates was also determined. In the acidogenic reactor (R1), volatile fatty acids (VFA) reached values of 25,000 mg L{sup -1} and a concentration of CO{sub 2} of 90%. In this reactor, the fermentative population was predominant (10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} MPN mL{sup -1}). The acetogenic population was (10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) and the sulphate-reducing population was (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}). In the methanogenic reactor (R2), levels of CH{sub 4} (70%) were higher than CO{sub 2} (25%), whereas the VFA values were lower than 4000 mg L{sup -1}. Substrate competition between sulphate-reducing (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) and methanogenic bacteria (10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) was not detected. From the SMA results obtained, acetoclastic (2.39 g COD-CH{sub 4} g{sup -1} VSS{sup -1} day{sup -1}) and hydrogenophilic (0.94 g COD-CH{sub 4} g{sup -1} VSS{sup -1} day{sup -1}) transformations as possible metabolic pathways used by methanogenic bacteria is suggested from the SMA results obtained. Methanotrix sp., Methanosarcina sp., Methanoccocus sp. and Methanobacterium sp. were identified.

Sandoval Lozano, Claudia Johanna [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Ambientales, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9A Carrera 27, Aptdo Aereo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)], E-mail: ceiam@uis.edu.co; Vergara Mendoza, Marisol; Carreno de Arango, Mariela; Castillo Monroy, Edgar Fernando [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Ambientales, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9A Carrera 27, Aptdo Aereo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

RECIPIENT:WA Department of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of5 of5 RECIPIENT:WA Department of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number DE-EE0000139 GF0-10-604 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA CompUance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the foUowing determination: cx, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and demand studies), and dissemination (including, but not limited to, document mailings, publication, and distribution;

376

Intermediate-Scale High-Solids Anaerobic Digestion System Operational Development  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. During the first 1.5 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements, which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using ,the NREL high-solids digester design are detailed in this report.

Rivard, C. J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Extreme Benchmark Suite: Measuring High-Performance Embedded Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Extreme Benchmark Suite (XBS) is designed to support performance measurement of highly parallel “extreme ” processors, many of which are designed to replace custom hardware implementations. XBS is designed to avoid many of the problems that occur when using existing benchmark suites with nonstandard and experimental architectures. In particular, XBS is intended to provide a fair comparison of a wide range of architectures, from general-purpose processors to hard-wired ASIC implementations. XBS has a clean modular structure to reduce porting effort, and is designed to be usable with slow cycle-accurate simulators. This work presents the motivation for the creation of XBS and describes in detail the XBS framework. Several benchmarks implemented with this framework are discussed, and these benchmarks are used to compare a standard platform, an experimental architecture, and custom

Steven Gerding; Krste Asanovi?

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Microsoft Word - Achieving Extreme Efficiency cvr.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

01E 01E Achieving Extreme Efficiency: How to get the job done when energy is extremely expensive and scarce Rich Brown, Louis-Benoit Desroches, Karina Garbesi and Alan Meier Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2012 To be presented at the 2012 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Asilomar, CA, August 2012, and to be published in the Proceedings of the 2012 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, in Asilomar, CA. August 2012 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes

379

Top Ten Interaction Challenges in Extreme-Scale Visual Analytics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chapter presents ten selected user interfaces and interaction challenges in extreme-scale visual analytics. The study of visual analytics is often referred to as 'the science of analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces' in the literature. The discussion focuses on the issues of applying visual analytics technologies to extreme-scale scientific and non-scientific data ranging from petabyte to exabyte in sizes. The ten challenges are: in situ interactive analysis, user-driven data reduction, scalability and multi-level hierarchy, representation of evidence and uncertainty, heterogeneous data fusion, data summarization and triage for interactive query, analytics of temporally evolving features, the human bottleneck, design and engineering development, and the Renaissance of conventional wisdom. The discussion addresses concerns that arise from different areas of hardware, software, computation, algorithms, and human factors. The chapter also evaluates the likelihood of success in meeting these challenges in the near future.

Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Chen, Chaomei

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Operational characteristics of anaerobic digesters at selected municipal wastewater treatment facilities in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bench-scale and pilot plant studies at PNL have shown that powdered activated carbon is effective in improving volatile solids destruction and gas production in anaerobic digesters that are operating at less than normally expected levels of efficiency. To evaluate the applicability of this technology to digesters in the United States, digester operating characteristics at 60 facilities were surveyed and the number of stressed digesters estimated. The results show that although median values of the operating parameters conformed with those of a well-operated digester, 30% of the digesters surveyed were stressed with regard to at least one important parameter. Of the 30 largest treatment plants in the U.S., 7 fell into this category. Digester gas production and usage were then examined to determine the importance of methane off-gas as an energy source. A conservative estimate is that the gas produced nationally represents a heating value of about 2.36 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year with a present value of $40 million. Of this amount, an estimated 75% is used either onsite or sold. Onsite uses include heating digesters and buildings, incinerating sludge, operating equipment, and generating electricity. The other 25% is flared and the energy value lost. The present value of the flared gas is about $10 million/year. Natural gas prices are projected to increase 150% over the next 7 years. If the present utilization ratio continues, the flared gas will be worth approximately $27 million in 1985. Presently, digester gas is mainly used for process heating and operating equipment. The technical and economic feasibility of recovering digester gas for electrical power generation, onsite equipment operation, and sales to other consumers (utilities, private companies) should be thoroughly investigated. If fuel gas recovery and utilization are found to be desirable, consideration should be given to expanding and upgrading anaerobic digester facilities in the U.S.

Spencer, R.R.; Wong, A.L.; Coates, J.A.; Ahlstrom, S.B.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Characterization and environmental studies of Pompano Beach anaerobic digestion facility. Semi-annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion of municipal waste has been demonstrated to be feasible in bench scale experiments by Pfeffer (1974). Approximately, 50% reduction in mass and production of 6000 ft/sup 3/ of gas/ton have been estimated. The gas composition is estimated to be 50% methane and 50% carbon monoxide. The technical and economic feasibility of anaerobic digestion with an ultimate objective of commercialization are discussed. A plant has been built at Pompano Beach, Florida on an existing shredding and landfill operation site. The plant design capacity is 100 tons/day. Two digesters have been constructed to be used in parallel. The process consists of primary shredding, metal separation, secondary shredding, air classification and digestion of light fraction. Sewage sludge was used to seed the initial mixture in the digester. The output slurry is vacuum filtered and the filter cake disposed on an existing landfill. The filtrate is recycled. Excess filtrate is sprayed on the landfill. At present the output gas is being flared. A flow chart for the plant is presented. It is imperative that environmental investigations be conducted on new energy technology prior to commercialization. A project was initiated to characterize all input and output streams and to assess the potential for ground water contamination by landfill disposal of effluents. Detailed chemical, biological and physical characterization efforts supported by leaching and modelling studies are being conducted to achieve the stated objectives. Some mutagenic studies were also conducted. The environmental investigations were started in August 1978. Sengupta et al (1979a) reported the first year's efforts.

Sengupta, S; Farooq, S; Gerrish, H P; Wong, K F; Daly, Jr, E L; Chriswell, C

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Enhancement of methane production in the anaerobic digestion of sewage sludges  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of powdered activated carbon on stressed anaerobic digesters utilizing a sewage sludge substrate was evaluated. The addition of carbon resulted in increased methanee production and greater process stability. The degree of enhancement appeared to be proportional to carbon concentration over the dose range studied (500-10,000 mg/l). A maximum increase in methane production of about 150% was observed at the highest carbon dose. The effect of 1500 mg/l carbon, 4000 mg/l coal, and 4000 mg/l flyash on relatively unstressed digesters was also examined. Units using a sewage sludge substrate were operated at 10 and 20 day SRT's. A 12% increase in methane production was observed in a carbon dosed digester functioning at a 10 day detention time. Enhancement was not evident with carbon at a 20 day SRT. No significant improvement in methane production was obtained in any of the digesters using coal or flyash as additives. Using the experimental data, a technique was developed for estimating the efficiencies of the methane forming and acid forming steps in the anaerobic digestion process. The results indicated that in stressed systems both stages of the digestion process were enhanced by the addition of powdered carbon. In the relatively unstressed systems, when enhancement did occur, only the scid forming step was affected. This information will supplement current research at determining the mechanism(s) by which carbon enhances the digestion process.Based on the results of this study, it appears that the benefits of carbon addition are greatest in stressed systems. Only very moderate increases in methane production would probably be attainable in well operating digesters. Coal and flyash do not seem to be effective in enhancing gas production in unstressed systems. However, their effectiveness has not been tested in stressed situations.

Spencer, R.R.

1978-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

Anaerobic digestion of pressed off leachate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A highly polluted liquid ('press water') was obtained from the pressing facility for the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in a composting plant. Methane productivity of the squeezed-off leachate was investigated in batch assays. To assess the technical feasibility of 'press water' as a substrate for anaerobic digestion, a laboratory-scale glass column reactor was operated semi-continuously at 37 {sup o}C. A high methane productivity of 270 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} COD{sub added} or 490 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} VS{sub added} was achieved in the batch experiment. The semi-continuously run laboratory-scale reactor was initially operated at an organic loading rate of 10.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The loading was increased to finally 27.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}, corresponding to a reduction of the hydraulic retention time from initially 20 to finally 7.7 days. During the digestion, a stable elimination of organic material (measured as COD elimination) of approximately 60% was achieved. Linearly with the increment of the OLR, the volumetric methane production of the reactor increased from 2.6 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1} to 7.1 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The results indicated that 'press water' from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste was a suitable substrate for anaerobic digestion which gave a high biogas yield even at very high loading rates.

Nayono, Satoto E. [Department of Civil Engineering, Yogyakarta State University, Campus UNY Karangmalang Yogyakarta 55281 (Indonesia); Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Winter, Josef, E-mail: josef.winter@iba.uka.d [Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Gallert, Claudia [Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Microbial dechlorination of PCBs in vitro studies using an anaerobic environmental isolate. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An earlier progress report, prepared in September 1990, gave an account of the scientific concepts on which this research project is based. It described the design and initial results of an experiment that was carried out to examine this important scientific question. The question, on which scientific and technical personnel of the Oak Ridge Research Institute (ORRI) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been collaborating, is whether there are microbial isolates whose metabolism may be harnessed for the biodegradation of complex organic molecules containing chlorine, such as PCBs. These compounds have been shown to have a persistent long-term presence in the environment and to represent a health hazard to the populations. The demonstration that certain strains of microorganisms have the capability to degrade these complex organic molecules would be important because of the difficulty of remediating PCB-polluted environmental sites by other noninvasive methods. The adaptability of microbial metabolism is key to the concept that bacteria isolated from contaminated sites may be the most likely candidates for strains that could have developed the capability to either tolerate or possibly metabolize the organic contaminants. Consequently, a number of bacterial strains have been isolated from PCB-contaminated sites on the Department of Energy (DOE) reservation and screened for possible PCB dechlorination activity. The subject of the experiment described herein is an isolate designated ES-3 (an obligate anaerobe isolated from a PCB-contaminated site), which is considered on initial screening to possess possible PCB dechlorination ability. The experiment described in this report involved the incubation of aliquots of this isolate in an anaerobic environment for up to eight weeks with various concentrations, separately, of either of the Arochlors 1016 or 1260.

Reyis, N.W.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Reductive Disslocation of Pu(IV) by Clostridium sp. Under Anaerobic Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An anaerobic, gram positive, spore-forming bacterium Clostridium sp., common in soils and wastes, capable of reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), Mn(IV) to Mn(II), Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), and U(VI) to U(IV), reduced Pu(IV) to Pu(III). Addition of 242Pu (IV)-nitrate to the bacterial growth medium at pH 6.4 resulted in the precipitation of Pu as amorphous Pu(OH)4 due to hydrolysis and polymerization reactions. The Pu (1 x 10-5 M) had no effect upon growth of the bacterium as evidenced by glucose consumption; carbon dioxide and hydrogen production; a decrease in pH of the medium from 6.4 to 3.0 due to production of acetic and butyric acids from glucose fermentation; and a change in the Eh of the culture medium from +50 to -180 mV. Commensurate with bacterial growth, Pu was rapidly solubilized as evidenced by an increase in Pu concentration in solution which passed through a 0.03 {mu}m filtration. Selective solvent extraction of the culture by thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) indicated the presence of a reduced Pu species in the soluble fraction. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopic (XANES) analysis of Pu in the culture sample at the Pu LIII absorption edge (18.054 keV) showed a shift of -3 eV compared to a Pu(IV) standard indicating reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III). These results suggest that, although Pu generally exists as insoluble Pu(IV) in the environment, under appropriate conditions, anaerobic microbial activity could affect the long-term stability and mobility of Pu by its reductive dissolution.

Francis,A.; Dodge, C.; Gillow, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Impacts of Extreme Weather on Power Systems and Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat storm events resulted in an abnormally high rate of failure among small distribution transformers across California in 2006 and 2007. Hurricanes, such as Katrina and Ike, also resulted in widespread damage to the power infrastructure and caused severe outages, which affected millions of customers for days. The costs of such events, and other extreme weather conditions, amounted to hundreds of millions of dollars in damages and brought heavy scrutiny from public officials and regulatory bodies. This ...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

Extremely long hard bursts observed by Konus-Wind  

SciTech Connect

We report the observations of the prompt emission of the extremely long hard burst, GRB 060814B, discovered by Konus-Wind and localized by the IPN. The observations reveal a smooth, hard, {approx}40-min long pulse followed by weaker emission seen several hours after the burst onset. We also present the Konus-Wind data on similar burst, GRB 971208, localized by BATSE/IPN. And finally we discuss the different possible origins of these unusual events.

Pal'shin, V.; Aptekar, R.; Frederiks, D.; Golenetskii, S.; Il'inskii, V.; Mazets, E.; Oleynik, P.; Ulanov, M. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Yamaoka, K. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1, Fuchinobe, Sagamihara 229-8558 (Japan); Ohno, M. [Department of Physical Sciences, School of Science, Hiroshima University 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Hurley, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Sakamoto, T. [Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D.; Lirvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Institute for Space Research, Profsojuznaja 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K.; Shinohara, C. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)] (and others)

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

388

The alliance for computing at the extreme scale.  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories have formed a new high performance computing center, the Alliance for Computing at the Extreme Scale (ACES). The two labs will jointly architect, develop, procure and operate capability systems for DOE's Advanced Simulation and Computing Program. This presentation will discuss a petascale production capability system, Cielo, that will be deployed in late 2010, and a new partnership with Cray on advanced interconnect technologies.

Ang, James Alfred; Dosanjh, Sudip Singh; Doerfler, Douglas W.; Hemmert, Karl Scott; Vigil, Manuel (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Koch, Ken (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Morrison, John (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ray-Chaudhurl, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Preface to Symposium: Matter at Extreme Conditions: Theory and Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The subject of ''Matter at Extreme Conditions'' encompasses a wide range of phenomena the thrust of which is to address the physical and chemical behaviors of materials exposed to ''abnormal'' conditions of high pressures, temperature extremes, or external fields. Recent advances in theoretical methodologies and first principle computational studies have predicted unusual properties and unraveled a few surprises when matter is subjected to such strains: a reversed and anomalous Doppler effects in shocked periodic media, the possible existence of low temperature liquid metallic state of hydrogen, and a superionic phase of water at high temperature and pressure. A unified approach from quantum mechanical principles allows for exploring such diverse and disparate subjects as ultracold plasmas in a strong magnetic field, and the dynamic aspects of Bose-Einstein condensates. These topics, which are aptly presented in this symposium, are but a few examples of interesting discoveries and methodologies in this active and exciting area of research. The development of reactive force fields from quantum mechanical principles for use in conjunction with molecular dynamics provide us with an invaluable tool for large-scale simulations to study the chemical transformations and decomposition products of complex organic systems at extreme conditions. Simulations implementing classical fields can provide an unprecedented access to the short time scales of chemical events that occur in dense fluids at high-temperature, and for the study of atomic clusters under strong laser pulses.

Manaa, M R

2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

Low-cost method for producing extreme ultraviolet lithography optics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Spherical and non-spherical optical elements produced by standard optical figuring and polishing techniques are extremely expensive. Such surfaces can be cheaply produced by diamond turning; however, the roughness in the diamond turned surface prevent their use for EUV lithography. These ripples are smoothed with a coating of polyimide before applying a 60 period Mo/Si multilayer to reflect a wavelength of 134 .ANG. and have obtained peak reflectivities close to 63%. The savings in cost are about a factor of 100.

Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA); Montcalm, Claude (Fort Collins, CO); Taylor, John S. (Livermore, CA); Spiller, Eberhard A. (Mt. Kisco, NY)

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

393

Scientific aspects of hydraulic engineering in the Extreme North  

SciTech Connect

Information relative to participation of the B. E. Vedeneev All-Russian Scientific-Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering (VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva) in the solution of problems of scientific verification of the design, construction, and operation of water-development works in regions of the Extreme North are presented. Basic characteristics of changes in the technical condition of high rock-and-earthfill dams, and the conditions under which their safety is ensured for long-term service in these regions are examined.

Panov, S. I.; Krivonogova, N. F.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Global Distribution of Extreme Precipitation and High-Impact Landslides in 2010 Relative to Previous Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well known that extreme or prolonged rainfall is the dominant trigger of landslides worldwide. While research has evaluated the spatiotemporal distribution of extreme rainfall and landslides at local or regional scales using in situ data, ...

Dalia Kirschbaum; Robert Adler; David Adler; Christa Peters-Lidard; George Huffman

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Differential Adaptive Capacity to Extreme Heat: A Phoenix, Arizona, Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change is projected to increase the number of days producing excessive heat across the southwestern United States, increasing population exposure to extreme heat events. Extreme heat is currently the main cause of weather-related mortality ...

Mary H. Hayden; Hannah Brenkert-Smith; Olga V. Wilhelmi

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

CO2 Sensitivity of Extreme Climate Events in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based upon trends in observed climate, extreme events are thought to be increasing in frequency and/or magnitude. This change in extreme events is attributed to enhancement of the hydrologic cycle caused by increased greenhouse gas ...

Jason L. Bell; Lisa C. Sloan

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Methods for Exploring Spatial and Temporal Variability of Extreme Events in Climate Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents various statistical methods for exploring and summarizing spatial extremal properties in large gridpoint datasets. Extremal properties are inferred from the subset of gridpoint values that exceed sufficiently high, time-...

C. A. S. Coelho; C. A. T. Ferro; D. B. Stephenson; D. J. Steinskog

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Tests of the Generalized Pareto Distribution for Predicting Extreme Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme wind speed predictions are often based on statistical analysis of site measurements of annual maxima, using one of the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distributions. An alternative method applies one of the Generalized Pareto ...

B. B. Brabson; J. P. Palutikof

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Developing Synoptic Analogs for Extreme Mass Balance Conditions on Queen Elizabeth Island Ice Caps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed synoptic and climate analyses were undertaken for summer seasons during which extreme mass balance conditions were recorded on glaciers in the Queen Elizabeth Islands in high Arctic Canada. Three types of mass balance extremes were ...

Bea Taylor Alt

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Projected Tasman Sea extremes in sea surface temperature through the 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean climate extremes have received little treatment in the literature, aside from coastal sea level and temperatures affecting coral bleaching. Further, it is notable that extremes, e.g., temperature and precipitation, are typically not well ...

Eric C. J. Oliver; Simon J. Wotherspoon; Matt A. Chamberlain; Neil J. Holbrook

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Are Temperature and Precipitation Extremes Increasing over the U.S. High Plains?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale environmental, social, and economic impacts of recent weather and climate extremes are raising questions about whether the frequency and intensity of these extremes have been increasing. Here, the authors evaluate trends in climate ...

Di Long; Bridget R. Scanlon; D. Nelun Fernando; Lei Meng; Steven M. Quiring

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Global Precipitation Extremes Associated with Diurnally Varying Low-Level Jets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme rainfall events have important societal impacts: for example, by causing flooding, replenishing reservoirs, and affecting agricultural yields. Previous literature has documented linkages between rainfall extremes and nocturnal low-level ...

Andrew J. Monaghan; Daran L. Rife; James O. Pinto; Christopher A. Davis; John R. Hannan

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Extreme Rainfall in the Mediterranean: What Can We Learn from Observations?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flash floods induced by extreme rainfall events represent one of the most life-threatening phenomena in the Mediterranean. While their catastrophic ground effects are well documented by postevent surveys, the extreme rainfall events that generate ...

N. Rebora; L. Molini; E. Casella; A. Comellas; E. Fiori; F. Pignone; F. Siccardi; F. Silvestro; S. Tanelli; A. Parodi

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

How Do You Stay Warm While Saving Money and Energy in Extreme...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stay Warm While Saving Money and Energy in Extreme Weather? How Do You Stay Warm While Saving Money and Energy in Extreme Weather? February 3, 2011 - 6:30am Addthis Many states are...

405

Use of Normalized Anomaly Fields to Anticipate Extreme Rainfall in the Mountains of Northern California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme rainfall events contribute a large portion of wintertime precipitation to northern California. The motivations of this paper were to study the observed differences in the patterns between extreme and more commonly occurring lighter ...

Norman W. Junker; Richard H. Grumm; Robert Hart; Lance F. Bosart; Katherine M. Bell; Frank J. Pereira

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Trends in Extreme Temperatures in Relation to Urbanization in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term trends in extreme summer season temperatures across the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area (TCMA) associated with urbanization are examined. To assess trends in extreme temperature data, maximum and minimum temperatures from 1975 to 2002 ...

Shouraseni Sen Roy; Fei Yuan

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Expected Structure of Extreme Waves in a Gaussian Sea. Part I: Theory and SWADE Buoy Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the expected configuration in space and time surrounding extremely high crests in a random wave field, or, equivalently, the mean configuration averaged over realizations of extreme events. A simple, approximate ...

O. M. Phillips; Daifang Gu; Mark Donelan

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Bayesian Changepoint Analysis for Extreme Events (Typhoons, Heavy Rainfall, and Heat Waves): An RJMCMC Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hierarchical Bayesian framework is developed to identify multiple abrupt regime shifts in an extreme event series. Specifically, extreme events are modeled as a Poisson process with a gamma-distributed rate. Multiple candidate hypotheses are ...

Xin Zhao; Pao-Shin Chu

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Characterizing the Variability and Extremes of the Stratospheric Polar Vortices Using 2D Moment Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean state, variability, and extreme variability of the stratospheric polar vortices, with an emphasis on the Northern Hemisphere (NH) vortex, are examined using two-dimensional moment analysis and extreme value theory (EVT). The use of ...

Daniel M. Mitchell; Andrew J. Charlton-Perez; Lesley J. Gray

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Distribution of Extreme Winds in the Bonneville Power Administration Service Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annual extreme 1 min wind speeds at 78 Pacific Northwest locations were analyzed using the Fisher-Tippet type II extreme value function. From computed mean recurrence intervals, we could easily determine the wind speed likely to recur in a ...

J. William Wantz; Robert E. Sinclair

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Report on the design and operation of a full-scale anaerobic dairy manure digester. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A full-scale anaerobic digester on the Monroe State Dairy Farm was operated and monitored for 24 months with funding provided by the United States Department of Energy, Fuels from Biomass Systems Branch. During the period of operation, operating parameters were varied and the impact of those changes is described. Operational experiences and system component performance are discussed. Internal digester mixing equipment was found to be unnecessary, and data supporting this conclusion are given. An influent/effluent heat exchanger was installed and tested, and results of the tests are included. Recommendations for digester design and operation are presented. Biological stability was monitored, and test results are given. Gas production rates and system net energy are analyzed. The economics of anaerobic digestion are evaluated based on various financing options, design scales, and expected benefits. Under many circumstances digesters are feasible today, and a means of analysis is given.

Coppinger, E.; Brautigam, J.; Lenart, J.; Baylon, D.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Microbiology and physiology of anaerobic fermentation of cellulose. Progress report (4/30/91--4/30/92) and outline of work for the period 9/1/92--9/1/93  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors are continuing their efforts to partly dissociate the cellulolytic enzyme complex of C. thermocellum. This complex named cellulosome (also existing as polycellulosome) consists of perhaps as many as 26 different subunits. It is extremely resistant to dissociation and denaturation. Treatments with urea and SDS have little effect unless the latter treatment is at high temperature. Significantly, some of the subunits after SDS dissociation have CMCase (endoglucanase) activity but no activity toward crystalline cellulose. The only reported success of hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose by cellulosomal subunits is by Wu et al. who isolated two protein fractions labeled SL and SS which when combined exhibit a low (about 1% of the original cellulosome) activity toward crystalline cellulose. The long standing goal is still to determine the activities of the individual subunits, to characterize them, to find out how they are associated in the cellulosome, and to establish the minimum number of subunits needed for efficient hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. This report also presents the results of experiments on cellulose hydrolysis in aerobic fungi, as well as other anaerobic bacteria.

Ljungdahl, L.G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Basic Research Needs for Materials Under Extreme Environments. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Materials Under Extreme Environments, June 11-13, 2007  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the potential for developing revolutionary new materials that will meet demanding future energy requirements that expose materials to environmental extremes.

Wadsworth, J.; Crabtree, G. W.; Hemley, R. J.; Falcone, R.; Robertson, I.; Stringer, J.; Tortorelli, P.; Gray, G. T.; Nicol, M.; Lehr, J.; Tozer, S. W.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Vetrano, J. S.; Ashton, C. L.; Kitts, S.; Landson, C.; Campbell, B.; Gruzalski, G.; Stevens, D.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study demonstrates the feasibility of co-digestion food industrial waste with energy crops. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laboratory batch co-digestion led to improved methane yield and carbon to nitrogen ratio as compared to mono-digestion of industrial waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion was also seen as a means of degrading energy crops with nutrients addition as crops are poor in nutrients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was concluded that co-digestion led an over all economically viable process and ensured a constant supply of feedstock. - Abstract: Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester.

Nges, Ivo Achu, E-mail: Nges.Ivo_Achu@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Escobar, Federico; Fu Xinmei; Bjoernsson, Lovisa [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Impact of ArcA loss in Shewanella oneidensis revealed by comparative proteomics under aerobic and anaerobic conditions  

SciTech Connect

Shewanella inhabit a wide variety of niches in nature and can utilize a broad spectrum of electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions. How they modulate their gene expression to adapt is poorly understood. ArcA, homologue of a global regulator controlling hundreds of genes involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in E. coli, was shown to be important in aerobiosis/anaerobiosis of S. oneidensis as well. Loss of ArcA, in addition to altering transcription of many genes, resulted in impaired growth under aerobic condition, which was not observed in E. coli. To further characterize the impact of ArcA loss on gene expression on the level of proteome under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomic approach was employed. Results show that ArcA loss led to globally altered gene expression, generally consistent with that observed with transcripts. Comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data permitted identification of 17 high-confidence ArcA targets. Moreover, our data indicate that ArcA is required for regulation of cytochrome c proteins, and the menaquinone level may play a role in regulating ArcA as in E. coli. Proteomic-data-guided growth assay revealed that the aerobic growth defect of ArcA mutant is presumably due to impaired peptide utilization.

Yuan, Jie; Wei, Buyun; Lipton, Mary S.; Gao, Haichun

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fnr (EtrA) acts as a fine-tuning regulator of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EtrA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model organism for study of adaptation to varied redox niches, shares 73.6% and 50.8% amino acid sequence identity with the oxygen-sensing regulators Fnr in E. coli and Anr in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively; however, its regulatory role of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella spp. is not well understood. The expression of the nap genes, nrfA, cymA and hcp was significantly reduced in etrA deletion mutant EtrA7-1; however, limited anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction occurred, suggesting that multiple regulators control nitrate reduction in this strain. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and fumarate reductase gene expression was down regulated at least 2-fold and the EtrA7-1 mutant grew poorly with fumarate and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), suggesting both respiratory pathways are under EtrA control. Transcript analysis further suggested a role of EtrA in prophage activation and down regulation of genes implicated in aerobic metabolism. In contrast to previous studies that attributed a minor regulatory role to EtrA in Shewanella spp., this study demonstrates that EtrA acts as a global transcriptional regulator and confers physiological advantages to strain MR-1 under certain growth conditions. In conjunction with other regulators, EtrA fine-tunes the expression of genes involved in anaerobic metabolism in S. oneidensis strain MR-1.

Cruz-Garza, Claribel; Murray, Alison E.; Rodrigues, Jorge L.M.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; McCue, Lee Ann; Romine, Margaret F.; Loffler, F. E.; Tiedje, James M.

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Effect of community structure on the kinetics of anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds. Progress report, March 1989--June 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The physiology of fatty acid metabolism and the kinetics of benzoate degradation by anaerobic syntrophic bacteria were studied. We have shown that: a threshold for benzoate degradation by a syntrophic coculture of Syntrophus buswellii and Desulfovibrio strain G11 exists and the value of the threshold depends on the amount of benzoate and acetate suggesting a thermodynamic limitation. Syntrophomonas wolfei has the enzymatic ability to produce formate and that low levels of formate are made during growth in pure culture with crotonate or in coculture with butyrate. However, the high specific activities of hydrogenase compared to formate dehydrogenase indicate that hydrogen rather than formate is the intermediate involved in the interspecies transfer of reducing equivalents. We have isolated Syntrophus buswellii and a novel anaerobic bacteria that catalyzes an aryl-ether cleavage reaction using crotonate as the energy source. Several novel obligately halophilic anaerobes from hypersaline oil reservoir brines were isolated and characterized. Two of these degraded pyrogallate with the production of acetate. We have shown that S. wolfei synthesizes poly-{beta}hydroxyalkanoate (PHA) by two routes, directly from a {beta}-oxidation intermediate without cleaving a C-C bond and by the condensation of two acetyl-CoA molecules. The formation of D-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA needed for PHA synthesis occurs by the activity of a acetoacetyl-CoA reductase rather than a enoyl-CoA hydratase. The genes for PHA synthesis in S. wolfei have been cloned into Escherichia coli.

McInerney, M.J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

VARIABILITY OF THE INFRARED EXCESS OF EXTREME DEBRIS DISKS  

SciTech Connect

Debris disks with extremely large infrared excesses (fractional luminosities >10{sup -2}) are rare. Those with ages between 30 and 130 Myr are of interest because their evolution has progressed well beyond that of protoplanetary disks (which dissipate with a timescale of order 3 Myr), yet they represent a period when dynamical models suggest that terrestrial planet building may still be progressing through large, violent collisions that could yield large amounts of debris and large infrared excesses. For example, our Moon was formed through a violent collision of two large protoplanets during this age range. We report two disks around the solar-like stars ID8 and HD 23514 in this age range where the 24 {mu}m infrared excesses vary on timescales of a few years, even though the stars are not variable in the optical. Variations this rapid are difficult to understand if the debris is produced by collisional cascades, as it is for most debris disks. It is possible that the debris in these two systems arises in part from condensates from silicate-rich vapor produced in a series of violent collisions among relatively large bodies. If their evolution is rapid, the rate of detection of extreme excesses would indicate that major collisions may be relatively common in this age range.

Meng, Huan Y. A.; Rieke, George H. [Department of Planetary Sciences, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Su, Kate Y. L.; Rujopakarn, Wiphu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ivanov, Valentin D. [European Southern Observatory, Ave. Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19, Santiago, 19001 (Chile); Vanzi, Leonardo [Department of Electrical Engineering and Center of Astro Engineering, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Ave. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile)

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

Characterization and Impact of Extreme Forecast Errors on Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

Extreme events in the electrical power system, caused by the load and wind forecasting errors, can impact the power system infrastructure via two main avenues. The first avenue is a sudden and significant power unbalance exceeding reasonable operating reserve capacity. The second is a sudden increase of power flows on the system critical paths causing transmission violations. The challenge in managing these system unbalances is more significant for a standalone balancing area operation. The consolidation of balancing authorities into a single balancing area can offset the operating reserve problem but this strategy enhances incremental power flows on the transmission interfaces, potentially leading to more unpredictable transmission congestion. This paper evaluates the expectancy of occurrence of tail events due to forecast error extremes using California ISO and BPA data. Having this type of information, independent system operators and operating utilities could be better prepared to address the tail events by exploring alternative reserve options such as: wide area control coordination, new operating proce-dures and remedial actions.

Heydt, Gerald T.; Vittal, Vijay; Malhara, Sunita V.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Zhou, Ning; Etingov, Pavel V.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Natural attenuation of chlorinated ethenes by anaerobic reductive dechlorination coupled with aerobic cometabolism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorinated solvents and their daughter products are the most common contaminants of groundwater at industrial and military facilities in the United States. Natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents is a promising alternative to traditional pump and treat methods but has not been well understood or widely accepted. This modeling study investigated the ability of TCE to completely degrade under various aquifer conditions and rate order constants. It also examined a case study of a former landfill site at Moody AFB. The author found unusually high flow of ground water by advection or dispersion inhibits the complete degradation of TCE. High concentrations of sulfate or nitrate inhibit the creation of methanogenic conditions and therefore inhibit reductive dechlorination of TCE. He also found an electron donor co-contaminant a critical factor for the complete destruction of TCE because it creates anaerobic conditions. The model illustrated a possible explanation for the lack of down gradient contaminants at the landfill site may be the coupling of reductive dechlorination and cometabolism naturally attenuation the contaminants.

Veerkamp, D.D.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Microbial metal reduction by members of the genus Shewanella: novel strategies for anaerobic respiration  

SciTech Connect

Metal-reducing members of the genus Shewanella are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. Metal-reducing gram-negative bacteria such as Shewanella, however, are presented with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal solubility, metal-respiring Shewanella are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3 and SO4. The following chapter highlights the latest findings on the molecular mechanism of Fe(III), U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction by Shewanella, with particular emphasis on electron transport chain physiology.

Dichristina, Thomas; Bates, David J.; Burns, Justin L.; Dale, Jason R.; Payne, Amanda N.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Two-phase anaerobic digestion within a solid waste/wastewater integrated management system  

SciTech Connect

A two-phase, wet anaerobic digestion process was tested at laboratory scale using mechanically pre-treated municipal solid waste (MSW) as the substrate. The proposed process scheme differs from others due to the integration of the MSW and wastewater treatment cycles, which makes it possible to avoid the recirculation of process effluent. The results obtained show that the supplying of facultative biomass, drawn from the wastewater aeration tank, to the solid waste acidogenic reactor allows an improvement of the performance of the first phase of the process which is positively reflected on the second one. The proposed process performed successfully, adopting mesophilic conditions and a relatively short hydraulic retention time in the methanogenic reactor, as well as high values of organic loading rate. Significant VS removal efficiency and biogas production were achieved. Moreover, the methanogenic reactor quickly reached optimal conditions for a stable methanogenic phase. Studies conducted elsewhere also confirm the feasibility of integrating the treatment of the organic fraction of MSW with that of wastewater.

De Gioannis, G. [DIGITA, Department of Geoengineering and Environmental Technologies, University of Cagliari, Piazza D'Armi 09123 Cagliari (Italy); Diaz, L.F. [CalRecovery, Inc., 2454 Stanwell Drive, Concord, California 94520 (United States); Muntoni, A. [DIGITA, Department of Geoengineering and Environmental Technologies, University of Cagliari, Piazza D'Armi 09123 Cagliari (Italy)], E-mail: amuntoni@unica.it; Pisanu, A. [DIGITA, Department of Geoengineering and Environmental Technologies, University of Cagliari, Piazza D'Armi 09123 Cagliari (Italy)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fermentation characteristics of six specific types of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were examined, with an emphasis on properties that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns of a vegetable (cabbage), fruits (banana and citrus peels), fresh leaf litter of bamboo and teak leaves, and paper (newsprint) waste streams as feedstocks were studied. Individual OFMSW components were placed into nylon mesh bags and subjected to various fermentation periods (solids retention time, SRT) within the inlet of a functioning plug-flow biogas fermentor. These were removed at periodic intervals, and their composition was analyzed to monitor decomposition rates and changes in chemical composition. Components like cabbage waste, banana peels, and orange peels fermented rapidly both in a plug-flow biogas reactor (PFBR) as well as under a biological methane potential (BMP) assay, while other OFMSW components (leaf litter from bamboo and teak leaves and newsprint) fermented slowly with poor process stability and moderate biodegradation. For fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), a rapid and efficient removal of pectins is the main cause of rapid disintegration of these feedstocks, which left behind very little compost forming residues (2-5%). Teak and bamboo leaves and newsprint decomposed only to 25-50% in 30 d. These results confirm the potential for volatile fatty acids accumulation in a PFBR's inlet and suggest a modification of the inlet zone or operation of a PFBR with the above feedstocks.

Chanakya, H.N. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)], E-mail: chanakya@astra.iisc.ernet.in; Sharma, Isha [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Ramachandra, T.V. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Effect of seasonal changes in quantities of biowaste on full scale anaerobic digester performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 750,000 l digester located in Roppen/Austria was studied over a 2-year period. The concentrations and amounts of CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S and several other process parameters like temperature, retention time, dry weight and input of substrate were registered continuously. On a weekly scale the pH and the concentrations of NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N and volatile fatty acids (acetic, butyric, iso-butyric, propionic, valeric and iso-valeric acid) were measured. The data show a similar pattern of seasonal gas production over 2 years of monitoring. The consumption of VFA and not the hydrogenotrophic CH{sub 4} production appeared to be the limiting factor for the investigated digestion process. Whereas the changes in pH and the concentrations of most VFA did not correspond with changes in biogas production, the ratio of acetic to propionic acid and the concentration of H{sub 2} appeared to be useful indicators for reactor performance. However, the most influential factors for the anaerobic digestion process were the amount and the quality of input material, which distinctly changed throughout the year.

Illmer, P. [University of Innsbruck, Institute of Microbiology, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: Paul.Illmer@uibk.ac.at; Gstraunthaler, G. [Abfallbeseitigungsverband Westtirol, Breite Mure, A-6426 Roppen (Austria)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Energy recovery from agroindustrial wastes with prevalently solute pollutants using fixed-bed anaerobic reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for anaerobic digestion of agroindustrial wastes containing mainly soluble pollutants was developed utilizing fixed-bed reactors. A pilot plant at a sugar refinery with two reactors in parallel, respectively of 10 and 50 m/sup 3/ operating volume, has functioned successfully in treating wastes produced in regenerating ion-exchange columns used to purify the sugar juices. With an hydraulic retention time (HRT) of less than one day, a maximum gas production of 11.5 volumes per operating volume of reactor per day was obtained together with a reduction of up to 80% of the biological oxygen demand for five days (BOD5), and volatile solids and up to 70% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD). The gas contained from 70 to 75% methane. On the basis of these results, a full-scale industrial plant was built which produced up to 7500 m/sup 3/ a day of biogas. The process has been found suitable for a large number of industrial wastes, especially when plants are seasonally operated.

Sanna, P.; Camilli, M.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Kinetics and advanced digester design for anaerobic digestion of water hyacinth and primary sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A research program centered around a facility located at Walt Disney World (WDW) is in progress to evaluate the use of water hyacinth (WH) for secondary and tertiary wastewater treatment, to optimize growth of WH under these conditions, and to convert the resultant primary sludge (PS) and WH to methane via anaerobic digestion. This article describes the status of the biogasification component of this program, which includes baseline and advanced digestion experiments with individual feeds and blends and the design of an experimental test unit (ETU) to be installed at WDW. Experiments with several blends demonstrated that methane yields can be predicted from the fractional content and methane yield of each component. The process was found to adhere to the Monod kinetic model for microbial growth, and associated kinetic parameters were developed for various feed combinations. A novel upflow digester is achieving significantly higher conversion than a stirred-tank digester. Of several pretreatment techniques used, only alkaline treatment resulted in increased biodegradability. A larger scale (4.5 m/sup 3/) experimental test unit is being designed for installation at WDW in 1982. 13 figures, 4 tables.

Chynoweth, D.P.; Dolenc, D.A.; Ghosh, S.; Henry, M.P.; Jerger, D.E.; Srivastava, V.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Processing high solids concentration of municipal solid waste by anaerobic digester for methane production  

SciTech Connect

Cellulosic solids are pretreated by calcium hydroxide to produce salts of volatile orangic acids and other water-soluble substances. Pure cellulose, sawdust, and waste paper are used as model substances for the study of alkaline degradation. It is found that sawdust is more difficult to degrade than the other two substances. The cooking conditions for high conversion of model substances and high yeild of orangic acids are found to be 275/degree/C to 300/degree/C with the corresponding reaction time from 30 minutes to 15 minutes. The cooking liquor can be readily fermented in an anaerobic fluidized-bed digester for methane production. The cooking liquor from different reaction conditions can all be digested by the methanogens. Higher than 90% of COD can be removed under the conditions of low organic loading rate (<2.0 g COD/1/day) and low hydraulic retention time (1.5 to 2.0 days). 14 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Tsao, G.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Calculation of Extreme Wave Loads on Coastal Highway Bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coastal bridges are exposed to severe wave, current and wind forces during a hurricane. Most coastal bridges are not designed to resist wave loads in such extreme situations, and there are no existing analytical methods to calculate wave loads on coastal highway bridges. This study focuses on developing a new scheme to estimate the extreme wave loads on bridges for designing purpose. In order to do this, a 2D wave velocity potential model (2D Model) is set up for the deterministic analysis of wave force on bridge decks. 2D Model is a linear wave model, which has the capability of calculating wave velocity potential components in time domain based on wave parameters such as wave height, wave period and water depth, and complex structural geometries. 2D Model has Laplace equation as general equation. The free surface boundary, incoming and outgoing wave boundary conditions are linearized, decomposed first, and then solved by the finite difference method. Maximum wave forces results calculated by the linear 2D Model are compared with results from CFD software Flow3D that is using Navier Stokes theory up to the 5th order; and 2D Model is validated by comparing results with experiment data. A case study is conducted for calculating extreme wave forces on I-10 Bridge across Escambia Bay, Florida during Hurricane Ivan in September 2004.SWAN model is adapted to investigate the parameters of wave heights and wave periods around bridge sites. SWAN model has the capability of predicting or hindcasting significant wave heights and wave periods as long as the domain and input parameters are given. The predicted significant wave heights are compared with measurements by Buoy Station 42039 and 42040 nearest to Escambia Bay. A new prediction equation of maximum uplift wave forces on bridge decks is developed in terms of wave height, wave period, water depth, bridge width, water clearance and over top water load. To develop the equations, the relationship is investigated between maximum uplift wave forces and wave parameters, water clearance, green water effects and bridge width. 2D Model is used for up to 1886 cases with difference parameters. Flow3D model is adopted to determine coefficients of water clearance and green water effects, which cannot be calculated by 2D Model.

Meng, Bo

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Available Technologies: Thermophilic Endoglucanase Enzymes ...  

... reaction that combines cellulose hydrolysis by the Thermotoga maritima enzyme with pretreatment conditions such as steam expansion or ionic ...

430

Novel Thermophilic Cellobiohydrolase - Energy Innovation ...  

Therefore, the JBEI technology opens the possibility of one pot saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass. In addition, the JBEI technology is ...

431

Thermophilic Endoglucanase Enzymes Engineered for ...  

Hydrolysis of pretreated biomass for biofuels production; Paper recycling and pulp processing for paper manufacturing;

432

Extreme Precipitation and Temperature over the U.S. Pacific Northwest: A Comparison between Observations, Reanalysis Data, and Regional Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme precipitation and temperature indices in reanalysis data and regional climate models are compared to station observations. The regional models represent most indices of extreme temperature well. For extreme precipitation, finer grid ...

Valérie Dulière; Yongxin Zhang; Eric P. Salathé Jr.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Decision support for improvisation in response to extreme events: Learning from the response to the 2001 World Trade Center attack  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme events such as natural or technological disasters challenge society's capabilities for planning and response. While advanced technologies and modeling techniques continue to expand how society can limit and manage extreme events, flexibility ... Keywords: Emergency response, Extreme events, Improvisation

David Mendonça

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

FRONTIER SYNCHROTRON INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY BEAMLINE UNDER EXTREME CONDITIONS (FIS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FRONTIER SYNCHROTRON INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY FRONTIER SYNCHROTRON INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY BEAMLINE UNDER EXTREME CONDITIONS (FIS) Proposal Team: L. Carr 1 , D. Dolan 2 , R. Hemley 3 , S. Jacobson 4 , S. Karato 5 , Z. Liu 3 , W. Panero 6 , M. Pravica 7 , and T. Zhou 8 1 Brookhaven National Laboratory, 2 Sandia National Laboratories, 3 Carnegie Institution of Washington, 4 Northwestern University, 5 Yale University, 6 Ohio State University, 7 University of Nevada, 8 New Jersey Institute of Technology TECHNIQUES AND CAPABILITIES APPLICATIONS SPECIFIC PROJECTS / ADDITIONAL INFORMATION * TECHNIQUE(S): Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; Raman and visible spectroscopy; Diamond anvil cell techniques for static high pressure; Gas-gun launchers for dynamic compression; Cryogenic techniques combined with DACs;

435

Size-Related Behavior of Anatase Nanocrystals under Extreme Pressure |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boron-Based Compounds Trick a Biomedical Protein Boron-Based Compounds Trick a Biomedical Protein A Targeted Cancer Treatment using Nanomaterials When Roots Follow the Path of Least Resistance Perfecting Catalytic Arrays A Stable Open Framework with Wide Open Spaces Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Size-Related Behavior of Anatase Nanocrystals under Extreme Pressure SEPTEMBER 27, 2009 Bookmark and Share Left: A polyhedral representation of the anatase TiO2 crystal structure. Right: Simplified relative cell parameter plots. The smoothly varying curves (+ diamond symbols) represent gold that was used as the pressure standard. The circles represent the 6-nm anatase. From the near vacuum of outer space to the intense pressure at a planet's

436

THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM SUN-GRAZING COMETS  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory has observed two Sun-grazing comets as they passed through the solar atmosphere. Both passages resulted in a measurable enhancement of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiance in several of the AIA bandpasses. We explain this EUV emission by considering the evolution of the cometary atmosphere as it interacts with the ambient solar atmosphere. Molecules in the comet rapidly sublimate as it approaches the Sun. They are then photodissociated by the solar radiation field to create atomic species. Subsequent ionization of these atoms produces a higher abundance of ions than normally present in the corona and results in EUV emission in the wavelength ranges of the AIA telescope passbands.

Bryans, P. [ADNET Systems Inc., NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pesnell, W. D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

Extremal black attractors in 8D maximal supergravity  

SciTech Connect

Motivated by the new higher D-supergravity solutions on intersecting attractors obtained by Ferrara et al. in [Phys. Rev. D 79, 065031 (2009)], we focus in this paper on 8D maximal supergravity with moduli space (SL(3,R)/SO(3))x(SL(2,R)/SO(2)) and study explicitly the attractor mechanism for various configurations of extremal black p-branes (antibranes) with the typical near horizon geometries AdS{sub p+2}xS{sup m}xT{sup 6-p-m} and p=0, 1, 2, 3, 4; 2{<=}m{<=}6. Interpretations in terms of wrapped M2 and M5 branes of the 11D M-theory on 3-torus are also given.

Drissi, L. B [INANOTECH, Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology (Morocco); Hassani, F. Z; Jehjouh, H. [Lab/UFR-High Energy Physics, Faculty of Science, Rabat (Morocco) and GNPHE; Groupement National de Physique des Hautes Energies (Morocco); Saidi, E. H [INANOTECH, Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology (Morocco) and Lab/UFR-High Energy Physics; Faculty of Science, Rabat (Morocco); GNPHE, Groupement National de Physique des Hautes Energies (Morocco)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Amplitude variations on the Extreme Adaptive Optics testbed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-contrast adaptive optics systems, such as those needed to image extrasolar planets, are known to require excellent wavefront control and diffraction suppression. At the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics on the Extreme Adaptive Optics testbed, we have already demonstrated wavefront control of better than 1 nm rms within controllable spatial frequencies. Corresponding contrast measurements, however, are limited by amplitude variations, including those introduced by the micro-electrical-mechanical-systems (MEMS) deformable mirror. Results from experimental measurements and wave optic simulations of amplitude variations on the ExAO testbed are presented. We find systematic intensity variations of about 2% rms, and intensity variations with the MEMS to be 6%. Some errors are introduced by phase and amplitude mixing because the MEMS is not conjugate to the pupil, but independent measurements of MEMS reflectivity suggest that some error is introduced by small non-uniformities in the reflectivity.

Evans, J; Thomas, S; Dillon, D; Gavel, D; Phillion, D; Macintosh, B

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

439

Mid-Infrared Instrumentation for the European Extremely Large Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIDIR is the proposed thermal/mid-IR imager and spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). It will cover the wavelength range of 3 to at least 20 microns. Designed for diffraction-limited performance over the entire wavelength range, MIDIR will require an adaptive optics system; a cryogenically cooled system could offer optimal performance in the IR, and this is a critical aspect of the instrument design. We present here an overview of the project, including a discussion of MIDIR's science goals and a comparison with other infrared (IR) facilities planned in the next decade; top level requirements derived from these goals are outlined. We describe the optical and mechanical design work carried out in the context of a conceptual design study, and discuss some important issues to emerge from this work, related to the design, operation and calibration of the instrument. The impact of telescope optical design choices on the requirements for the MIDIR instrument is demonstrated.

S. Kendrew; B. Brandl; R. Lenzen; L. Venema; H. U. Käufl; G. Finger; A. Glasse; R. Stuik

2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

440

APPROACH TO EXTREME-SCALE SIMULATION OF NOVEL ARCHITECTURES  

SciTech Connect

We outline an approach for simulating computing architectures applicable to extreme-scale systems (thousands of processors) and to advanced, novel architectural configurations. We believe that simulation is the predictive tool of choice for evaluating the performance of such systems. Our component-based design allows for the seamless assembly of architectures from representations of workload, processor, network interface, switches, etc., with disparate resolutions into an integrated simulation model. This accommodates different case studies that may require different levels of fidelity in various parts of a system. Our initial prototype, comprising low-fidelity models of workload and network, aims to model at least 4096 computational nodes in a fat-tree network. It supports studies of simulation performance and scaling rather than the properties of the simulated system themselves. Future work will allow more realistic simulation and visualization of ASCI-like workloads on very large machines.

Alexander, F. J. (Francis J.); Berkbigler, K. P. (Kathryn P.); Booker, G. (Graham)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anaerobic extremely thermophilic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Interspecies acetate transfer influences the extent of anaerobic benzoate degradation by syntrophic consortia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Benzoate degradation by an anaerobic, syntrophic bacterium, strain SB, in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G-11 reached a threshold value which depended on the amount of acetate added, and ranged from about 2.5 to 29.9 {mu}M. Increasing acetate concentrations also uncompetitively inhibited benzoate degradation. The apparent V{sub max} and K{sub m} for benzoate degradation decreased with increasing acetate concentration, but the benzoate degradation capacity (V{sub max}/K{sub m}) of cell suspensions remained comparable. The addition of an acetate-using bacterium to cocultures after the threshold was reached resulted in the degradation of benzoate to below the detection limit. Mathematical simulations showed that the benzoate threshold was not predicted by the inhibitory effect of acetate on benzoate degradation kinetics. With nitrate instead of sulfate as the terminal electron acceptor, no benzoate threshold was observed in the presence of 20 mM acetate even though the degradation capacity was lower with nitrate than with sulfate. When strain SB was grown with a hydrogen-using partner that had a 5-fold lower hydrogen utilization capacity, a 5 to 9-fold lower the benzoate degradation capacity was observed compared to SB/G-11 cocultures. The Gibb`s free energy for benzoate degradation was less negative in cell suspensions with threshold compared to those without threshold. These studies showed that the threshold was not a function of the inhibition of benzoate degradation capacity by acetate, or the toxicity of the undissociated form of acetate. Rather a critical or minimal Gibb`s free energy may exist where thermodynamic constraints preclude further benzoate degradation.

Warikoo, V.; McInerney, M.J.; Suflita, J.M. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Chemical and microbiological hazards associated with recycling of anaerobic digested residue intended for agricultural use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, three full-scale biogas plants (BGP) were investigated for the concentration of heavy metals, organic pollutants, pesticides and the pathogenic bacteria Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli in the anaerobically digested residues (ADR). The BGPs mainly utilize source-separated organic wastes and industrial food waste as energy sources and separate the ADR into an ADR-liquid and an ADR-solid fraction by centrifugation at the BGP. According to the Norwegian standard for organic fertilizers, the ADR were classified as quality 1 mainly because of high zinc (132-422 mg kg{sup -1} DM) and copper (23-93 mg kg{sup -1} DM) concentrations, but also because of high cadmium (0.21-0.60 mg kg{sup -1} DM) concentrations in the liquid-ADR. In the screening of organic pollutants, only DEHP (9.7-62.1 mg kg{sup -1}) and {Sigma} PAH 16 (0.2-1.98 mg kg{sup -1} DM) were detected in high concentrations according to international regulations. Of the 250 pesticides analyzed, 11 were detected, but only imazalil (<0.30-5.77 mg kg{sup -1} DM) and thiabendazol (<0.14-0.73 mg kg{sup -1} DM) were frequently detected in the ADR-fiber. Concentrations of imazalil and thiabendazol were highest during the winter months, due to a high consumption of citrus fruits in Norway in this period. Ten percent of the ADR-liquid samples contained cereulide-producing B. cereus, whereas no verotoxigenic E. coli was detected. The authors conclude that the risk of chemical and bacterial contamination of the food chain or the environment from agricultural use of ADR seems low.

Govasmark, Espen, E-mail: espen.govasmark@bioforsk.no [Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research - Soil and Environment, Fredrik A. Dahlsvei 20, NO-1432 Aas (Norway); Staeb, Jessica [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institut fuer Siedlungswasserbau, Wasserguete- und Abfallwirtschaft, Abteilung Hydrochemie, Bandtaele 2, D-70569 Stuttgart (Buesnau) (Germany); Holen, Borge [Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research - Plant Health, Hogskoleveien 7, NO-1432 Aas (Norway); Hoornstra, Douwe [University of Helsinki, Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, Biocenter, Viikinkaari 9, FIN-00014 (Finland); Nesbakk, Tommy [Mjosanlegget AS, Roverudmyra Miljostasjon, Asmarkveien 301, NO-2600 Lillehammer (Norway); Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja [University of Helsinki, Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, Biocenter, Viikinkaari 9, FIN-00014 (Finland)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Kinetics and dynamic modelling of batch anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in a stirred reactor  

SciTech Connect

A series of batch, slurry anaerobic digestion experiments were performed where the soluble and insoluble fractions, and unwashed MSW were separately digested in a 200 l stirred stainless steel vessel at a pH of 7.2 and a temperature of 38 deg. C. It was found that 7% of the total MSW COD was readily soluble, of which 80% was converted to biogas; 50% of the insoluble fraction was solubilised, of this only 80% was converted to biogas. The rate of digesting the insoluble fraction was about four times slower than the rate of digesting the soluble fraction; 48% of the total COD was converted to biogas and 40% of the total nitrogen was converted to ammonia. Soluble and insoluble fractions were broken down simultaneously. The minimum time to convert 95% of the degradable fraction to biogas was 20 days. The lag phase for the degradation of insoluble fraction of MSW can be overcome by acclimatising the culture with the soluble fraction. The rate of digestion and the methane yield was not affected by particle size (within the range of 2-50 mm). A dynamic model was developed to describe batch digestion of MSW. The parameters of the model were estimated using data from the separate digestion of soluble and insoluble fractions and validated against data from the digestion of unwashed MSW. Trends in the specific aceticlastic and formate-utilising methanogenic activity were used to estimate initial methanogenic biomass concentration and bacterial death rate coefficient. The kinetics of hydrolysis of insoluble fraction could be adequately described by a Contois equation and the kinetics of acidogenesis, and aceticlastic and hydrogen utilising methanogenesis by Monod equations.

Nopharatana, Annop [Division of Environmental of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. 4072 (Australia); Pilot Plant Development and Training Institute, King Mongkut's University of Technology, Thonburi, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Pullammanappallil, Pratap C. [Division of Environmental of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. 4072 (Australia); Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Clarke, William P. [Division of Environmental of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: billc@cheque.uq.edu.au

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Methane and carbon dioxide production from simulated anaerobic degradation of cattle carcasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study evaluates methane and carbon dioxide production after land burial of cattle carcasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disposal of animal mortalities is often overlooked in evaluating the environmental impacts of animal production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer we quantify annual emissions from cattle carcass disposal in the United States as 1.6 Tg CO{sub 2} equivalents. - Abstract: Approximately 2.2 million cattle carcasses require disposal annually in the United States. Land burial is a convenient disposal method that has been widely used in animal production for disposal of both daily mortalities as well as during catastrophic mortality events. To date, greenhouse gas production after mortality burial has not been quantified, and this study represents the first attempt to quantify greenhouse gas emissions from land burial of animal carcasses. In this study, anaerobic decomposition of both homogenized and unhomogenized cattle carcass material was investigated using bench-scale reactors. Maximum yields of methane and carbon dioxide were 0.33 and 0.09 m{sup 3}/kg dry material, respectively, a higher methane yield than that previously reported for municipal solid waste. Variability in methane production rates were observed over time and between reactors. Based on our laboratory data, annual methane emissions from burial of cattle mortalities in the United States could total 1.6 Tg CO{sub 2} equivalents. Although this represents less than 1% of total emissions produced by the agricultural sector in 2009, greenhouse gas emissions from animal carcass burial may be significant if disposal of swine and poultry carcasses is also considered.

Yuan Qi; Saunders, Samuel E. [Department of Civil Engineering, Peter Kiewit Institute, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, NE (United States); Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L., E-mail: sbartelt2@unl.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Peter Kiewit Institute, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, NE (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

ExM: System Support for Extreme-Scale, Many-Task Applications | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ExM: System Support for Extreme-Scale, Many-Task Applications ExM: System Support for Extreme-Scale, Many-Task Applications ExM: System Support for Extreme-Scale, Many-Task Applications ExM (Exascale Many-task) focuses on a novel stack of system services that will enable a broader range of applications to be easily developed and efficiently executed on extreme-scale platforms. The ExM middleware stack supports a highly parallel, functional data model that exposes and automates the many levels of execution needed to efficiently leverage extreme-scale computing systems for complex, many-task applications. The goal of the ExM project is to achieve the technical advances required to execute many-task applications efficiently, reliably, and easily on petascale and exascale computers. In this way, extreme-scale computing will

446

Anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residues: potential for improvement and implementation. Tenth quarter progress report, September 16, 1978--December 15, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the tenth quarter progress report describing the activities of an on-going three-year research effort to facilitate the development of new and/or improved technology that will result in the widespread implementation of anaerobic fermentation as a source of renewable energy for small-scale agriculture. The progress of events in the last three months contributing to the continued demonstration of the simplified reactor concept at the full-scale level in the conversion of dairy farm manure residues to methane is described.

Jewell, W.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Heat treatment of organics for increasing anaerobic biodegradability. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1979-September 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to evaluate thermochemical pretreatment as a method for increasing the anaerobic biodegradability of organic materials so that they can be more completely fermented to methane gas, a potential source of fuel. The current study has four specific phases: (1) biological conversion of lignocellulose to methane, (2) biodegradation of lignin and lignin fractions, (3) pretreatment of nitrogenous organics for increasing biodegradability, (4) biodegradation of lignin aromatic compounds, and (5) biochemical methane potential and toxicity testing. Results are reported for phases one, two, and three. No new information is available for phases four and five at this time.

Stuckey, D.; Colberg, P.J.; Baugh, K.; Young, L.Y.; McCarty, P.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

NETL: News Release - Data Acquisition Processor Fills Gap for Extreme  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9, 2010 9, 2010 Data Acquisition Processor Fills Gap for Extreme Down-hole Conditions Honeywell Develops Unique Reprogrammable High Temperature Device Morgantown, WV - Honeywell International, Inc. has developed a Reconfigurable Processor for Data Acquisition (RPDA) - a reprogrammable, multi-functional device that can operate at temperatures up to 250oC (482oF). The system is housed in a rugged package suitable for deep down-hole oil and natural gas logging and measurement-while-drilling (MWD) operations, and permanent wellbore installation applications. The project was funded through a cooperative agreement with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the Office of Fossil Energy's Oil and Natural Gas Program. Deep wells are generally defined as having a true vertical depth (TVD) greater than 15,000 feet, while ultra-deep wells are deeper than 25,000 feet TVD. Potential recoverable natural gas and oil resources from deep formations are significant, and deep wells tend to produce at much higher daily rates than conventional shallower wells.

449

Extreme Environment Silicon Carbide Hybrid Temperature & Pressure Optical Sensors  

SciTech Connect

This final report contains the main results from a 3-year program to further investigate the merits of SiC-based hybrid sensor designs for extreme environment measurements in gas turbines. The study is divided in three parts. Part 1 studies the material properties of SiC such as temporal response, refractive index change with temperature, and material thermal response reversibility. Sensor data from a combustion rig-test using this SiC sensor technology is analyzed and a robust distributed sensor network design is proposed. Part 2 of the study focuses on introducing redundancy in the sensor signal processing to provide improved temperature measurement robustness. In this regard, two distinct measurement methods emerge. A first method uses laser wavelength sensitivity of the SiC refractive index behavior and a second method that engages the Black-Body (BB) radiation of the SiC package. Part 3 of the program investigates a new way to measure pressure via a distance measurement technique that applies to hot objects including corrosive fluids.

Nabeel Riza

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Mesoscale predictability of an extreme warm-season precipitation event  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the period of June 29 through July 6, 2002, an extreme precipitation event occurred over Texas, resulting in catastrophic flooding. Operational forecasts performed poorly, neither predicting the copious amounts of rain nor its longevity. The Penn State University/NCAR Mesoscale Model version 5 (MM5) was used to conduct predictability experiments, which follow closely to the research conducted by Zhang et al. A control simulation initialized at 00Z 1 July is established over a 30-km grid. First, practical predictability experiments are performed by exploring the impacts due to different lead-times, resolution dependence, and different physics parameterizations. Second, intrinsic predictability is investigated by inducing a random temperature perturbation in the initial conditions, followed by numerous simulations with various perturbed initializations. Similar results to those found by Zhang et al. were discovered here: the prominent initial error growth is associated with moist processes leading to convection. Eventually these errors grow from the convective scale to sub-synoptic scale, essentially below 1000 kilometers. This indicates that as the forecast time extends further beyond initialization, the resulting errors will impact forecasts of larger-scale features such as differences in the positioning and intensity of positive PV anomalies and distribution of precipitation from the control simulation.

Odins, Andrew Michael

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Challenges in optics for Extremely Large Telescope instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe and summarize the optical challenges for future instrumentation for Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). Knowing the complex instrumental requirements is crucial for the successful design of 30-60m aperture telescopes. After all, the success of ELTs will heavily rely on its instrumentation and this, in turn, will depend on the ability to produce large and ultra-precise optical components like light-weight mirrors, aspheric lenses, segmented filters, and large gratings. New materials and manufacturing processes are currently under study, both at research institutes and in industry. In the present paper, we report on its progress with particular emphasize on volume-phase-holographic gratings, photochromic materials, sintered silicon-carbide mirrors, ion-beam figuring, ultra-precision surfaces, and free-form optics. All are promising technologies opening new degrees of freedom to optical designers. New optronic-mechanical systems will enable efficient use of the very large focal planes. We also provide exploratory descriptions of "old" and "new" optical technologies together with suggestions to instrument designers to overcome some of the challenges placed by ELT instrumentation.

P. Spanò; F. M. Zerbi; C. J. Norrie; C. R. Cunningham; K. G. Strassmeier; A. Bianco; P. A. Blanche; M. Bougoin; M. Ghigo; P. Hartmann; L. Zago; E. Atad-Ettedgui; B. Delabre; H. Dekker; M. Melozzi; B. Snyders; R. Takke; D. D. Walker

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

452

Sources for Low Energy Extreme of Ion Implantation  

SciTech Connect

A joint research and development effort focusing on the design of steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress for the past four and a half years. The ultimate goal is to meet the two, energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. This endeavor has resulted in record steady state output currents of higher charge state Antimony and Phosphorous ions: P{sup 2+}(8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+}(1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+}(0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb{sup 4+}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. During the past year the effort was channeled towards low energy implantation, for which the effort involved molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 3 emA of positive Decaborane ions were extracted at 14 keV and a smaller current of negative Decaborane ions were also extracted. Additionally, a Boron fraction of over 70% was extracted from a Bernas-Calutron ion source.

Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B. M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Batalin, V. A.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kropachev, G. N.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Pershin, V. I.; Petrenko, S. V.; Rudskoy, I.; Seleznev, D. N. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bugaev, A. S.; Gushenets, V. I.; Oks, E. M.; Yushkov, G. Yu. [High Current Electronics Institute Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Masunov, E. S.; Polozov, S. M. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow, 115409 (Russian Federation); Poole, H. J. [PVI, Oxnard, California 93031-5023 (United States); Storozhenko, P. A. [State Research Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Organoelement Compounds 38, sh. Entuziastov, Moscow, 111123 (Russian Federation); Svarovski, A. Ya. [Siberian Divisions of Russian National Research Center 'A.A. Bochvara Scientific Research Institute for Inorganic Materials', Seversk, 636070 (Russian Federation)

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

453

ION SOURCES FOR ENERGY EXTREMES OF ION IMPLANTATION.  

SciTech Connect

For the past four years a joint research and development effort designed to develop steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal to develop ion sources and techniques, which meet the two energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. This endeavor has already resulted in record steady state output currents of high charge state of Antimony and Phosphorous ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb{sup 4+}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. For low energy ion implantation our efforts involve molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 1 emA of positive Decaborane ions were extracted at 10 keV and smaller currents of negative Decaborane ions were also extracted. Additionally, Boron current fraction of over 70% was extracted from a Bemas-Calutron ion source, which represents a factor of 3.5 improvement over currently employed ion sources.

HERSCHCOVITCH,A.; JOHNSON, B.M.; BATALIN, V.A.; KROPACHEV, G.N.; KUIBEDA, R.P.; KULEVOY, T.V.; KOLOMIETS, A.A.; PERSHIN, V.I.; PETRENKO, S.V.; RUDSKOY, I.; SELEZNEV, D.N.; BUGAEV, A.S.; GUSHENETS, V.I.; LITOVKO, I.V.; OKS, E.M.; YUSHKOV, G. YU.; MASEUNOV, E.S.; POLOZOV, S.M.; POOLE, H.J.; STOROZHENKO, P.A.; SVAROVSKI, YA.

2007-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

454

BAL QSOs and Extreme UFOs: the Eddington connection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest a common physical origin connecting the fast, highly ionized winds (UFOs) seen in nearby AGN, and the slower and less ionized winds of BAL QSOs. The primary difference is the mass loss rate in the wind, which is ultimately determined by the rate at which mass is fed towards the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) on large scales. This is below the Eddington accretion rate in most UFOs, and slightly super-Eddington in extreme UFOs such as PG1211+143, but ranges up to $\\sim 10-50$ times this in BAL QSOs. For UFOs this implies black hole accretion rates and wind mass loss rates which are at most comparable to Eddington, giving fast, highly-ionized winds. In contrast BAL QSO black holes have mildly super-Eddington accretion rates, and drive winds whose mass loss rates are significantly super-Eddington, and so are slower and less ionized. This picture correctly predicts the velocities and ionization states of the observed winds, including the recently-discovered one in SDSS J1106+1939. We suggest tha...

Zubovas, Kastytis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Chemistry of H2O and HF Under Extreme Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The predicted high pressure superionic phases of water and HF are investigated via ab initio molecular dynamics. These phases could potentially be achieved through either static compression with heating or through shock compression. We study water at densities of 2.0-3.0 g/cc (34-115 GPa) along the 2000K isotherm.We find that extremely rapid (superionic) diffusion of protons occurs in a fluid phase at pressures between 34 and 58 GPa. A transition to a stable body-centered cubic (bcc) O lattice with superionic proton conductivity is observed between 70 and 75 GPa, a much higher pressure than suggested in prior work. We find that all molecular species at pressures greater than 75 GPa are too short lived to be classified as bound states. Up to 95 GPa, we find a solid superionic phase characterized by covalent O-H bonding. Above 95 GPa, a transient network phase is found characterized by symmetric O-H hydrogen bonding with nearly 50% covalent character. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of HF were conducted at densities of 1.8-4.0 g/cc along the 900 K isotherm. According to our simulations, a unique form of (symmetric) hydrogen bonding could play a significant role in superionic conduction. Our work shows that superionic phases could be more prevalent in hydrogen bonded systems than previously thought, such as HCl and HBr.

Fried, L; Goldman, N; Kuo, I W; Mundy, C

2005-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

456

Thin Films for Gas Sensing at Extreme Temperatures and in Harsh ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion of Mild Steel in Extreme Oil and Gas Environments · Corrosion ... Fluorescent Nanoparticle Tracers for Oil Exploration and Production · Formation of ...

457

Optimization criteria for the stabilization of sewage sludge and biogas production through anaerobic digestion: an example of an environmental biotechnology application  

SciTech Connect

According to environmental protection and energy conservation principles, anaerobic digestion of activated sludges should have two main purposes: to stabilize the sludge within allowable limits and to increase biogas production as much as possible, in order to meet ecological requirement without neglecting a particular energy source. This implies optimization procedures for the design of the process, based upon its actual kinetics. This optimization has been developed in the present paper on the basis of experimental results on anaerobic digestion kinetics achieved in previous research.

Ferraiolo, G.; Del Borghi, M.; Gardi, R.; Solisio, C.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

NEW SOLAR EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIANCE OBSERVATIONS DURING FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment provide full coverage in the EUV range from 0.1 to 106 nm and continuously at a cadence of 10 s for spectra at 0.1 nm resolution and even faster, 0.25 s, for six EUV bands. These observations can be decomposed into four distinct characteristics during flares. First, the emissions that dominate during the flare's impulsive phase are the transition region emissions, such as the He II 30.4 nm. Second, the hot coronal emissions above 5 MK dominate during the gradual phase and are highly correlated with the GOES X-ray. A third flare characteristic in the EUV is coronal dimming, seen best in the cool corona, such as the Fe IX 17.1 nm. As the post-flare loops reconnect and cool, many of the EUV coronal emissions peak a few minutes after the GOES X-ray peak. One interesting variation of the post-eruptive loop reconnection is that warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) sometimes exhibit a second large peak separated from the primary flare event by many minutes to hours, with EUV emission originating not from the original flare site and its immediate vicinity, but rather from a volume of higher loops. We refer to this second peak as the EUV late phase. The characterization of many flares during the SDO mission is provided, including quantification of the spectral irradiance from the EUV late phase that cannot be inferred from GOES X-ray diagnostics.

Woods, Thomas N.; Hock, Rachel; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell [Space Sciences Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Mariska, John; Warren, Harry [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Schrijver, Carolus J. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Webb, David F. [Institute for Scientific Research, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Bailey, Scott [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Tobiska, W. Kent, E-mail: tom.woods@lasp.colorado.edu [Space Environment Technologies, Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Detection of Coherent Structures in Extreme-Scale Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of coherent structures is a common problem in many scientific domains ranging from astrophysics to combustion, fusion, and materials science. The data from three-dimensional simulations are analyzed to detect the structures, extract statistics on them, and track them over time to gain insights into the phenomenon being modeled. This analysis is typically done off-line, using data that have been written out by the simulations. However, the move towards extreme scale architectures, with multi-core processors and graphical processing units, will affect how such analysis is done as it is unlikely that the systems will support the I/O bandwidth required for off-line analysis. Moving the analysis in-situ is a solution only if we know a priori what analysis will be done, as well as the algorithms used and their parameter settings. Even then, we need to ensure that this will not substantially increase the memory requirements or the data movement as the former will be limited and the latter will be expensive. In the Exa-DM project, a collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and University of Minnesota, we are exploring ways in which we can address the conflicting demands of coherent structure analysis of simulation data and the architecture of modern parallel systems, while enabling scientific discovery at the exascale. In this paper, we describe our work in two areas: the in situ implementation of an existing algorithm for coherent structure analysis and the use of graph-based techniques to efficiently compress the data.

Kamath, C; Iverson, J; Kirk, R; Karypis, G

2012-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

460

Electrode configuration for extreme-UV electrical discharge source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that debris generation within an electric capillary discharge source, for generating extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray, is dependent on the magnitude and profile of the electric field that is established along the surfaces of the electrodes. An electrode shape that results in uniform electric field strength along its surface has been developed to minimize sputtering and debris generation. The electric discharge plasma source includes: (a) a body that defines a circular capillary bore that has a proximal end and a distal end; (b) a back electrode positioned around and adjacent to the distal end of the capillary bore wherein the back electrode has a channel that is in communication with the distal end and that is defined by a non-uniform inner surface which exhibits a first region which is convex, a second region which is concave, and a third region which is convex wherein the regions are viewed outwardly from the inner surface of the channel that is adjacent the distal end of the capillary bore so that the first region is closest to the distal end; (c) a front electrode positioned around and adjacent to the proximal end of the capillary bore wherein the front electrode has an opening that is communication with the proximal end and that is defined by a non-uniform inner surface which exhibits a first region which is convex, a second region which is substantially linear, and third region which is convex wherein the regions are viewed outwardly from the inner surface of the opening that is adjacent the proximal end of the capillary bore so that the first region is closest to the proximal end; and (d) a source of electric potential that is connected across the front and back electrodes.

Spence, Paul Andrew (Pleasanton, CA); Fornaciari, Neal Robert (Tracey, CA); Chang, Jim Jihchyun (San Ramon, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Fate of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles during Anaerobic Digestion of Wastewater and Post-Treatment Processing of Sewage Sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid development and commercialization of nanomaterials will inevitably result in the release of nanoparticles (NPs) to the environment. As NPs often exhibit physical and chemical properties significantly different from those of their molecular or macrosize analogs, concern has been growing regarding their fate and toxicity in environmental compartments. The wastewater-sewage sludge pathway has been identified as a key release pathway leading to environmental exposure to NPs. In this study, we investigated the chemical transformation of two ZnO-NPs and one hydrophobic ZnO-NP commercial formulation (used in personal care products), during anaerobic digestion of wastewater. Changes in Zn speciation as a result of postprocessing of the sewage sludge, mimicking composting/sto