Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Amorphous Silicon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE has a proven track record of funding successes in amorphous silicon (a-Si)research. A list of current projects, summary of the benefits, and discussion on the production and manufacturing of...

2

Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

5

Understanding and improving hole transport in hydrogenated amorphous silicon photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells have been studied extensively for the previous four decades, the low performance of the devices is still not well understood. The poor efficiency (below 10%, even ...

Johlin, Eric (Eric Carl)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

Devaud, Genevieve (629 S. Humphrey Ave., Oak Park, IL 60304)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Improvement of pin-type amorphous silicon solar cell performance by employing double silicon-carbide p-layer structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improvement of pin-type amorphous silicon solar cell performance by employing double silicon-carbide Received 30 October 2003; accepted 18 November 2003 We investigated a double silicon-carbide p-layer structure consisting of a undiluted p-type amorphous silicon-carbide (p-a-SiC:H) window layer and a hydrogen

Kim, Yong Jung

8

Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Photovoltaic Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amorphous Silicon as a Photovoltaic Material 2.1.2ii Photovoltaic Model . . . . . . . . . . .

Schriver, Maria Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

FINE-GRAINED NANOCRYSTALLINE SILICON P-LAYER FOR HIGH OPEN CIRCUIT VOLTAGE A-SI:H SOLAR CELLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINE-GRAINED NANOCRYSTALLINE SILICON P-LAYER FOR HIGH OPEN CIRCUIT VOLTAGE A-SI:H SOLAR CELLS of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA ABSTRACT Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) single- junction solar). It is found that the p-layer that leads to high Voc a-Si:H solar cells is a mixed-phase material that contains

Deng, Xunming

10

Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/{micro}c-Si) solar cells are disclosed which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell. 4 figs.

Kaschmitter, J.L.

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

11

Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/.mu.c-Si) solar cells which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell.

Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Amorphous silicon/polyaniline heterojunction solar cells: Fermi levels and open-circuit voltages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these open-circuit voltages are lower than for the best a-Si:H cells utilizing nanocrystalline Si or a reports on conducting polymer/ amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) structures [1­4] and conduct- ing polymer/crystalline silicon (c-Si) structures [5,6]. In this paper, we report our research on polyaniline (PANI)/a-Si:H

Schiff, Eric A.

13

Electroabsorption measurements and built-in potentials in amorphous silicon pin solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the capacitance of such devices. We apply this technique to hydrogenated amorphous silicon a-Si:H -based solar-6951 96 04246-5 The internal electric fields of amporphous silicon a- Si:H -based p­i­n solar cells on electroluminescent organic heterostructure diodes . We con- firmed this interpretation by studying a-Si:H n

Schiff, Eric A.

14

Short-and intermediate-range structural correlations in amorphous silicon carbide: A molecular dynamics study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short- and intermediate-range structural correlations in amorphous silicon carbide: A molecular-range structural correlations in amorphous silicon carbide a-SiC are studied in terms of partial pair distributions.43.Dq, 61.43.Bn, 61.66.Dk, 81.05.Gc I. INTRODUCTION Silicon carbide SiC has been receiving increasing

Southern California, University of

15

High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

1992-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

16

High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Amorphous silicon passivated contacts for diffused junction silicon solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carrier recombination at the metal contacts is a major obstacle in the development of high-performance crystalline silicon homojunction solar cells. To address this issue, we insert thin intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon [a-Si:H(i)] passivating films between the dopant-diffused silicon surface and aluminum contacts. We find that with increasing a-Si:H(i) interlayer thickness (from 0 to 16?nm) the recombination loss at metal-contacted phosphorus (n{sup +}) and boron (p{sup +}) diffused surfaces decreases by factors of ?25 and ?10, respectively. Conversely, the contact resistivity increases in both cases before saturating to still acceptable values of ? 50 m? cm{sup 2} for n{sup +} and ?100 m? cm{sup 2} for p{sup +} surfaces. Carrier transport towards the contacts likely occurs by a combination of carrier tunneling and aluminum spiking through the a-Si:H(i) layer, as supported by scanning transmission electron microscopyenergy dispersive x-ray maps. We explain the superior contact selectivity obtained on n{sup +} surfaces by more favorable band offsets and capture cross section ratios of recombination centers at the c-Si/a-Si:H(i) interface.

Bullock, J., E-mail: james.bullock@anu.edu.au; Yan, D.; Wan, Y.; Cuevas, A. [Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Demaurex, B.; Hessler-Wyser, A.; De Wolf, S. [cole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of micro engineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronic Laboratory, Maladire 71, CH-200 Neuchtel (Switzerland)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

18

amorphous silicon arrays: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

amorphous carbon Wang, Zhong L. 8 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

19

Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

1985-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Boron-doped amorphous diamondlike carbon as a new p-type window material in amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-i-n solar cells Chang Hyun Lee and Koeng Su Lim Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced this film, amorphous silicon (a-Si solar cells with a novel p-a-DLC:H/p-a-SiC double p-layer structure were as window materials for amorphous silicon (a-Si based solar cells.14 In using such films as a p layer

Kim, Yong Jung

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen dilution in silane on light induced degradation of hydrogenated amor- phous silicon films for solar photovoltaichydrogen content from 14-22%[76]. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon has promise as a photovoltaic

Schriver, Maria Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Atomistic modeling of amorphous silicon carbide using a bond...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

modeling of amorphous silicon carbide using a bond-order potential. Atomistic modeling of amorphous silicon carbide using a bond-order potential. Abstract: Molecular dynamics...

23

Irradiation-induced defect clustering and amorphization in silicon...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Irradiation-induced defect clustering and amorphization in silicon carbide. Irradiation-induced defect clustering and amorphization in silicon carbide. Abstract: Previous computer...

24

amorphous silicon carbon: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 11 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

25

amorphous silicon film: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

values previously Hellman, Frances 8 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

26

amorphous hydrogenated silicon: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gunther; Baets, Roel 2011-01-01 36 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

27

amorphous silicon epid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 7 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

28

amorphous silicon alloy: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 11 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

29

amorphous silicon studied: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Yang, Cheng-Chieh 2012-01-01 22 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

30

amorphous silicon films: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

values previously Hellman, Frances 8 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

31

amorphous silicon sensor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 9 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

32

amorphous silicon nanoparticles: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 9 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

33

amorphous silicon alloys: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 11 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

34

amorphous silicon solar: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 26 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

35

amorphous silicon thin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

values previously Hellman, Frances 6 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

36

amorphous silicon tft: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 20 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

37

amorphous silicon photovoltaic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

properties Mazur, Eric 20 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

38

amorphous silicon final: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 7 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

39

amorphous silicon diodes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 9 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

40

amorphous silicon surfaces: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 10 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

amorphous silicon technology: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

technologies is presented. Then 11 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

42

amorphous silicon electronic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

technologies is presented. Then 22 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

43

amorphous silicon dioxide: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 8 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

44

amorphous silicon oxynitride: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 15 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

45

amorphous silicon schottky: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 13 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

46

amorphous silicon nitride: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 26 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

47

amorphous silicon layers: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 16 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

48

amorphous silicon detector: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 7 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

49

area amorphous silicon: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 9 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

50

amorphous silicon measured: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 13 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

51

amorphous silicon deposited: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 23 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

52

amorphous silicon flat: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 7 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

53

amorphous silicon modules: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 10 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

54

amorphous silicon sensors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 9 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

55

amorphous silicon carbonitride: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 7 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

56

amorphous silicon research: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 9 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

57

amorphous silicon prepared: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nominanda, Helinda 2008-10-10 10 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

58

amorphous silicon microdisk: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 24 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

59

amorphous silicon germanium: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(Si-I or Ge Wang, Wei Hua 37 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

60

amorphous silicon radiation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 9 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

amorphous silicon pixel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ph. Emplit; S. Massar 2011-02-04 14 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

62

Deng & Schiff, Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells rev. 7/30/2002, Page 1 Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deng & Schiff, Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells rev. 7/30/2002, Page 1 Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells Xunming Deng and Eric A. Schiff Table of Contents 1 Overview 3 1.1 Amorphous Silicon: The First Bipolar Amorphous Semiconductor 3 1.2 Designs for Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells: A Guided Tour 6

Deng, Xunming

63

Exciton harvesting, charge transfer, and charge-carrier transport in amorphous-silicon nanopillar/polymer hybrid solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

report on the device physics of nanostructured amorphous-silicon a-Si:H /polymer hybrid solar cells and nanostructured a-Si:H/polymer systems. We find that strong energy transfer occurs in the a-Si:H/MEH-PPV system. However, inefficient hole transfer from the a-Si:H to the polymers renders negligible photocurrent

McGehee, Michael

64

Compensated amorphous-silicon solar cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the elecrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF/sub 3/ doped intrinsic layer.

Devaud, G.

1982-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

65

AMORPHOUS SILICON-BASED MINIMODULES WITH SILICONE ELASTOMER ENCAPSULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based polymers (silicones) may not show this effect. Although silicones were used to encapsulate solar cells improved, which may make them suitable for encapsulating solar cells once again. We have recentlyAMORPHOUS SILICON-BASED MINIMODULES WITH SILICONE ELASTOMER ENCAPSULATION Aarohi Vijh 1

Deng, Xunming

66

Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH{sub 4}) over a high temperature, 2,000 C, tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400 C, substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20--30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content. 7 figs.

Mahan, A.H.; Carapella, J.C.; Gallagher, A.C.

1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

67

amorphous silicon thin-film: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

amorphous silicon Kanicki, Jerzy 17 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

68

Temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in pure amorphous silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature nanoindentation has been performed on pure ion-implanted amorphous silicon (unrelaxed a-Si) and structurally relaxed a-Si to investigate the temperature dependence of mechanical deformation, including pressure-induced phase transformations. Along with the indentation load-depth curves, ex situ measurements such as Raman micro-spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis on the residual indents reveal the mode of deformation under the indenter. While unrelaxed a-Si deforms entirely via plastic flow up to 200?C, a clear transition in the mode of deformation is observed in relaxed a-Si with increasing temperature. Up to 100?C, pressure-induced phase transformation and the observation of either crystalline (r8/bc8) end phases or pressure-induced a-Si occurs in relaxed a-Si. However, with further increase of temperature, plastic flow rather than phase transformation is the dominant mode of deformation. It is believed that the elevated temperature and pressure together induce bond softening and defect formation in structurally relaxed a-Si, leading to the inhibition of phase transformation due to pressure-releasing plastic flow under the indenter.

Kiran, M. S. R. N., E-mail: kiran.mangalampalli@anu.edu.au; Haberl, B.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

69

Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc) bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause of the observed increase in the optical bandgap of a-Si:H films close to the a-Si:H/cSi interface.

Abdulraheem, Yaser, E-mail: yaser.abdulraheem@kuniv.edu.kw [Electrical Engineering Department, College of Engineering and Petroleum, Kuwait University. P.O. Box 5969, 13060 Safat (Kuwait); Gordon, Ivan; Bearda, Twan; Meddeb, Hosny; Poortmans, Jozef [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001, Leuven (Belgium)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Spin-dependent processes in amorphous silicon-rich silicon-nitride S.-Y. Lee,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diodes9 and a-Si:H solar cells.10 Fol- lowing coherent manipulation of paramagnetic centers, tran- sient-band , TSAMPLE=15 K. Dark and illuminated IV curves of the p-i-n devices were measured at room temperature and T amorphous silicon nitride a-SiNx:H has been used widely as a dielectric for thin-film transistors,1 solar

McCamey, Dane

71

Fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells by varying the temperature _of the substrate during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

Williams, Richard (Princeton, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Figure 3-1 IV curve of a UT fabricated triple cell, showing 12.7% initial, active-area efficiency. Figure1 High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells PHASE I Annual-junction a-Si Solar Cells with Heavily Doped Thin Interface Layers at the Tunnel Junctions Section 4 High

Deng, Xunming

74

Study of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films and the application to p-channel thin film transistor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The material and process characteristics of boron doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique (PECVD) have been studied. The goal is to apply the high quality films...

Nominanda, Helinda

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900.degree. C.), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180.degree. C. for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180.degree. C.) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide.

Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Truher, Joel B. (Palo Alto, CA); Weiner, Kurt H. (Campbell, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Beaverton, OR)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate is disclosed. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900 C), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180 C for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180 C) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide. 5 figs.

Kaschmitter, J.L.; Truher, J.B.; Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

77

Monolithic amorphous silicon modules on continuous polymer substrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines manufacturing monolithic amorphous silicon modules on a continuous polymer substrate. Module production costs can be reduced by increasing module performance, expanding production, and improving and modifying production processes. Material costs can be reduced by developing processes that use a 1-mil polyimide substrate and multilayers of low-cost material for the front encapsulant. Research to speed up a-Si and ZnO deposition rates is needed to improve throughputs. To keep throughput rates compatible with depositions, multibeam fiber optic delivery systems for laser scribing can be used. However, mechanical scribing systems promise even higher throughputs. Tandem cells and production experience can increase device efficiency and stability. Two alternative manufacturing processes are described: (1) wet etching and sheet handling and (2) wet etching and roll-to-roll fabrication.

Grimmer, D.P. (Iowa Thin Film Technologies, Inc., Ames, IA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells comprise a plurality of first and second lattices of amorphous silicon alternatingly formed on one another. Each of the first lattices has a first optical bandgap and each of the second lattices has a second optical bandgap different from the first optical bandgap. A method of fabricating the superlattice doped layers also is disclosed.

Arya, Rajeewa R. (Doylestown, PA)

1988-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

79

Method for improving the stability of amorphous silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing a metastable degradation resistant amorphous hydrogenated silicon film is provided, which comprises the steps of growing a hydrogenated amorphous silicon film, the film having an exposed surface, illuminating the surface using an essentially blue or ultraviolet light to form high densities of a light induced defect near the surface, and etching the surface to remove the defect.

Branz, Howard M.

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

80

Hydrogen plasma enhanced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen plasma enhanced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films K. Pangal,a) J. C August 1998; accepted for publication 21 October 1998 We report that a room temperature hydrogen plasma thermal crystallization of amorphous silicon time by a factor of five. Exposure to hydrogen plasma reduces

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Unexpected short- and medium-range atomic structure of sputtered amorphous silicon upon thermal annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the structure of magnetron-sputtered (MS) amorphous silicon (a-Si) prepared under standard deposition conditions and compare this to pure ion-implanted (II) a-Si. The structure of both films is characterized in their as-prepared and thermally annealed states. Significant differences are observed in short- and medium-range order following thermal annealing. Whereas II a-Si undergoes structural relaxation toward a continuous random network, MS a-Si exhibits little change. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals the presence of nanopores in the MS film consistent with reduced mass-density. Therefore, the short- and medium-range order of annealed, MS a-Si is tentatively attributed to these pores.

Haberl, B.; McKerracher, I.; Ruffell, S.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Bogle, S. N.; Li, T.; Abelson, J. R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Munroe, P. [Electron Microscope Unit, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunctions: The future of high-efficiency silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;5 Record efficiencies #12;6 Diffused-junction solar cells Diffused-junction solar cell Chemical passivation to ~650 mV #12;7 Silicon heterojunction solar cells a-Si:H provides excellent passivation of c-Si surface Heterojunction solar cell Chemical passivation Chemical passivation #12;8 Voc and silicon heterojunction solar

Firestone, Jeremy

83

Solar-to-Hydrogen Photovoltaic/Photoelectrochemical Devices Using Amorphous Silicon Carbide as the Photoelectrode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the use of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) as the photoelectrode in an integrated 'hybrid' photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell to produce hydrogen directly from water using sunlight. Results on the durability of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) photoelectrodes in an electrolyte are presented. In a pH2 electrolyte, the a-SiC:H photoelectrode exhibits excellent stability for 100 hour test so far performed. A photocurrent onset shift (anodically) after a 24- or 100-hour durability test in electrolyte is observed, likely due to changes in the surface chemical structure of the a-SiC:H photoelectrode. It is also observed that a thin SiOx layer native to the air exposed surface of the a-SiC:H affects the photocurrent and the its onset shift. Finally, approaches for eliminating the external bias voltage and enhancing the solar-to-hydrogen efficiency in a PV/PEC hybrid structure to achieve {>=} 10% are presented.

Hu, J.; Zhu, F.; Matulionis, I.; Kunrath, A.; Deutsch, T.; Kuritzky, L.; Miller, E.; Madan, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT AMORPHOUS SILICON SOLAR CELLS DEPOSITED OIN 7.5pn-1 THICK STAINLESS STEEL SUBSTRATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT AMORPHOUS SILICON SOLAR CELLS DEPOSITED OIN 7.5pn-1 THICK STAINLESS STEEL specific power for space application, we deposited a-Si thin film solar cells on ultra-thin stainless steel-thin stainless steel (SS) substrates (down to 7.5 pm) for space power applications. In this paper, we report our

Deng, Xunming

85

Well-Passivated a-Si:H Back Contacts for Double-Heterojunction Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a Si:H) back contacts to both p- and n-type silicon wafers, and employed them in double-heterojunction solar cells. These contacts are deposited entirely at low temperature (<250 C) and replace the standard diffused or alloyed back-surface-field contacts used in single-heterojunction (front-emitter only) cells. High-quality back contacts require excellent surface passivation, indicated by a low surface recombination velocity of minority-carriers (S) or a high open-circuit voltage (Voc). The back contact must also provide good conduction for majority carriers to the external circuit, as indicated by a high light I-V fill factor. We use hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) to grow a-Si:H layers for both the front emitters and back contacts. Our improved a-Si:H back contacts contribute to our recent achievement of a confirmed 18.2% efficiency in double-heterojunction silicon solar cells on p type textured silicon wafers.

Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; Wang, Q.; Yan, Y.; Roybal, L.; Branz, H. M.; Wang, T. H.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous-silicon-based solar cell Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vol. 609 2000 Materials Research Society Preparation of Microcrystalline Silicon Based Solar Cells at High i-layer Summary: light exposure as do the amorphous silicon-based...

87

Transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes a thin layer of metal, such as aluminum or other low work function metal, coated on the amorphous silicon with an antireflective layer coated on the metal. A transparent substrate, such as glass, is positioned on the light reflective layer. The metallic layer is preferably thin enough to transmit at least 50% of light incident thereon, yet thick enough to conduct electricity. The antireflection layer is preferably a transparent material that has a refractive index in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 and is approximately 550A to 600A thick.

Madan, A.

1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

88

Latent ion tracks in amorphous silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present experimental evidence for the formation of ion tracks in amorphous Si induced by swift heavy ion irradiation. An underlying core-shell structure consistent with remnants of a high density liquid structure was revealed by small-angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. Ion track dimensions dier for as-implanted and relaxed Si as attributed to dierent microstructures and melting temperatures. The identication and characterisation of ion tracks in amorphous Si yields new insight into mechanisms of damage formation due to swift heavy ion irradiation in amorphous semiconductors.

Bierschenk, Thomas [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Giulian, Raquel [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Afra, Boshra [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Rodriguez, Matias D [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Schauries, D [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Mudie, Stephen [Australian Synchrotron] [Australian Synchrotron; Pakarinen, Olli H [ORNL] [ORNL; Djurabekova, Flyura [University of Helsinki] [University of Helsinki; Nordlund, Kai [University of Helsinki] [University of Helsinki; Osmani, Orkhan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany] [University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany; Medvedev, Nikita [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany] [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Rethfield, Baerbel [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany] [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Ridgway, Mark C [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Kluth, Patrick [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Thermal rectification at silicon-amorphous polyethylene interface Ming Hu,1,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal rectification at silicon-amorphous polyethylene interface Ming Hu,1,a Pawel Keblinski,1,b heat currents. We estimate that in the limit of large heat currents, the silicon-amorphous polyethylene by amorphous polymer polyethylene PE and silicon crystal. We will also show that the mecha- nism governing

Li, Baowen

90

Infrared modulation spectroscopy of interfaces in amorphous silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared modulation spectroscopy of interfaces in amorphous silicon solar cells Kai Zhu a,1 , E Solar, Toano, VA 23168, USA Abstract We report infrared depletion modulation spectra for near an infrared modulation spectroscopy technique that probes the optical spectra of dopants and defects

Schiff, Eric A.

91

Amorphous Silicon as Semiconductor Material for High Resolution LAPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-08 3.E -08 0 200 400 600 800 displacem ent/µµµµm current/A 1000 2000 3000 4000 1000 2000 3000 4000-substrate Amorphous silicon -4 -2 0 2 4 0,2 0,4 0,6 0,8 1,0 photocurrenta.u. gate voltage/V 600µm x 600µm area scan

Moritz, Werner

92

Threshold irradiation dose for amorphization of silicon carbide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amorphization of silicon carbide due to ion and electron irradiation is reviewed with emphasis on the temperature-dependent critical dose for amorphization. The effect of ion mass and energy on the threshold dose for amorphization is summarized, showing only a weak dependence near room temperature. Results are presented for 0.56 MeV silicon ions implanted into single crystal 6H-SiC as a function of temperature and ion dose. From this, the critical dose for amorphization is found as a function of temperature at depths well separated from the implanted ion region. Results are compared with published data generated using electrons and xenon ions as the irradiating species. High resolution TEM analysis is presented for the Si ion series showing the evolution of elongated amorphous islands oriented such that their major axis is parallel to the free surface. This suggests that surface or strain effects may be influencing the apparent amorphization threshold. Finally, a model for the temperature threshold for amorphization is described using the Si ion irradiation flux and the fitted interstitial migration energy which was found to be {approximately}0.56eV. This model successfully explains the difference in the temperature dependent amorphization behavior of SiC irradiated with 0.56 MeV Si{sup +} at 1 x 10{sup -3} dpa/s and with fission neutrons irradiated at 1 x 10{sup -6} dpa/s irradiated to 15 dpa in the temperature range of {approximately}340{+-}10K.

Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

film is deposited over the window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A carbon film is deposited over the window. Figure 4.11:films and the silicon is unknown. However, changes in geometry such as varying the window

Schriver, Maria Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Anti-reflection zinc oxide nanocones for higher efficiency thin-film silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin film silicon solar cells, which are commonly made from microcrystalline silicon ([mu]c-Si) or amorphous silicon (a-Si), have been considered inexpensive alternatives to thick polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) solar ...

Mailoa, Jonathan P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Electrospun a-Si using Liquid Silane/Polymer Inks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amorphous silicon nanowires (a-SiNWs) were prepared by electrospinning cyclohexasilane (Si{sub 6}H{sub 12}) admixed with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in toluene. Raman spectroscopy characterization of these wires (d {approx} 50-2000 nm) shows 350 C treatment yields a-SiNWs. Porous a-SiNWs are obtained using a volatile polymer.

Doug Schulz

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

96

Electron-beam-induced information storage in hydrogenated amorphous silicon devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for recording and storing information in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, comprising: depositing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate to form a charge collection device; and generating defects in the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device, wherein the defects act as recombination centers that reduce the lifetime of carriers, thereby reducing charge collection efficiency and thus in the charge collection mode of scanning probe instruments, regions of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon device that contain the defects appear darker in comparison to regions of the device that do not contain the defects, leading to a contrast formation for pattern recognition and information storage.

Yacobi, B.G.

1985-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

97

amorphous silicon flat-panel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Asymmetric Electrical Properties of Half Corbino Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Thin-Film Transistor and Its Applications to Flat Panel Displays Materials Science...

98

Improved method of preparing p-i-n junctions in amorphous silicon semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing p/sup +/-i-n/sup +/ junctions for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes depositing amorphous silicon on a thin layer of trivalent material, such as aluminum, indium, or gallium at a temperature in the range of 200/sup 0/C to 250/sup 0/C. At this temperature, the layer of trivalent material diffuses into the amorphous silicon to form a graded p/sup +/-i junction. A layer of n-type doped material is then deposited onto the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer in a conventional manner to finish forming the p/sup +/-i-n/sup +/ junction.

Madan, A.

1984-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous silicon multijunction Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: amorphous silicon multijunction Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report Photoelectrochemical...

100

Enhanced electrochemical etching of ion irradiated silicon by localized amorphization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tailored distribution of ion induced defects in p-type silicon allows subsequent electrochemical anodization to be modified in various ways. Here we describe how a low level of lattice amorphization induced by ion irradiation influences anodization. First, it superposes a chemical etching effect, which is observable at high fluences as a reduced height of a micromachined component. Second, at lower fluences, it greatly enhances electrochemical anodization by allowing a hole diffusion current to flow to the exposed surface. We present an anodization model, which explains all observed effects produced by light ions such as helium and heavy ions such as cesium over a wide range of fluences and irradiation geometries.

Dang, Z. Y.; Breese, M. B. H. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Lin, Y.; Tok, E. S. [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Vittone, E. [Physics Department, NIS Excellence Centre and CNISM, University of Torino, via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

LASER TRANSFER DOPING USING AMORPHOUS SILICON Rafel Ferr (Correspondence author)1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASER TRANSFER DOPING USING AMORPHOUS SILICON Rafel Ferré (Correspondence author)1 , Ralf Gogolin1@isfh.de ABSTRACT: We demonstrate and characterize "Laser Transfer Doping" (LTD) for producing locally doped regions. For this purpose we use nanosecond pulsed laser for transferring phosphorus doped amorphous silicon from a carrier

102

The specific heat of pure and hydrogenated amorphous silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of of a-Si:H photovoltaics to 10% efficiency. However, a-Si:a-Si:H) photovoltaics undergo a loss in efficiency upon

Queen, Daniel Robert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous silicon solar cells. Annual subcontract report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transparent and reflecting electrodes are important parts of the structure of amorphous silicon solar cells. We report improved methods for depositing zinc oxide, deposition of tin nitride as a potential reflection-enhancing diffusion barrier between the a-Si and back metal electrodes. Highly conductive and transparent fluorine-doped zinc oxide was successfully produced on small areas by atmospheric pressure CVD from a less hazardous zinc precursor, zinc acetylacetonate. The optical properties measured for tin nitride showed that the back-reflection would be decreased if tin nitride were used instead of zinc oxide as a barrier layer over silver on aluminum. Niobium-doped titanium dioxide was produced with high enough electrical conductivity so that normal voltages and fill factors were obtained for a-Si cells made on it.

Gordon, R.G. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

See-through amorphous silicon solar cells with selectively transparent and conducting photonic crystal back reflectors for building integrated photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin semi-transparent hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells with selectively transparent and conducting photonic crystal (STCPC) back-reflectors are demonstrated. Short circuit current density of a 135?nm thick a-Si:H cell with a given STCPC back-reflector is enhanced by as much as 23% in comparison to a reference cell with an ITO film functioning as its rear contact. Concurrently, solar irradiance of 295?W/m{sup 2} and illuminance of 3480 lux are transmitted through the cell with a given STCPC back reflector under AM1.5 Global tilt illumination, indicating its utility as a source of space heating and lighting, respectively, in building integrated photovoltaic applications.

Yang, Yang [The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Room GB254B, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada)] [The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Room GB254B, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); OBrien, Paul G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Room 140, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Room 140, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Ozin, Geoffrey A., E-mail: gozin@chem.utoronto.ca, E-mail: kherani@ecf.utoronto.ca [Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Kherani, Nazir P., E-mail: gozin@chem.utoronto.ca, E-mail: kherani@ecf.utoronto.ca [The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Room GB254B, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Room 140, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada)

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

105

FILM ADHESION IN TRIPLE JUNCTION a-Si SOLAR CELLS ON POLYIMIDE and X. Deng1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FILM ADHESION IN TRIPLE JUNCTION a-Si SOLAR CELLS ON POLYIMIDE SUBSTRATES A. Vijh1,2 , X. Yang1 , W of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous), and the effect of tie coats on film adhesion. INTRODUCTION Amorphous silicon (a-Si) based solar cells

Deng, Xunming

106

Amorphous silicon cell array powered solar tracking apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An array of an even number of amorphous silicon solar cells are serially connected between first and second terminals of opposite polarity. The terminals are connected to one input terminal of a DC motor whose other input terminal is connected to the mid-cell of the serial array. Vane elements are adjacent the end cells to selectively shadow one or the other of the end cells when the array is oriented from a desired attitude relative to the sun. The shadowing of one cell of a group of cells on one side of the mid-cell reduces the power of that group substantially so that full power from the group of cells on the other side of the mid-cell drives the motor to reorient the array to the desired attitude. The cell groups each have a full power output at the power rating of the motor. When the array is at the desired attitude the power output of the two groups of cells balances due to their opposite polarity so that the motor remains unpowered.

Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Light harvesting by planar photonic crystal in solar cells: The case of amorphous silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light harvesting by planar photonic crystal in solar cells: The case of amorphous silicon Guillaume on light management in silicon thin film solar cells, using photonic crystals (PhC) structures. We by means of optical simulations performed on realistic thin film solar cell stacks. Theoretically

Boyer, Edmond

108

Amorphous silicon enhanced metal-insulator-semiconductor contacts for silicon solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carrier recombination at the metal-semiconductor contacts has become a significant obstacle to the further advancement of high-efficiency diffused-junction silicon solar cells. This paper provides the proof-of-concept of a procedure to reduce contact recombination by means of enhanced metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures. Lightly diffused n{sup +} and p{sup +} surfaces are passivated with SiO{sub 2}/a-Si:H and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-Si:H stacks, respectively, before the MIS contacts are formed by a thermally activated alloying process between the a-Si:H layer and an overlying aluminum film. Transmission/scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are used to ascertain the nature of the alloy. Idealized solar cell simulations reveal that MIS(n{sup +}) contacts, with SiO{sub 2} thicknesses of ?1.55?nm, achieve the best carrier-selectivity producing a contact resistivity ?{sub c} of ?3 m? cm{sup 2} and a recombination current density J{sub 0c} of ?40 fA/cm{sup 2}. These characteristics are shown to be stable at temperatures up to 350?C. The MIS(p{sup +}) contacts fail to achieve equivalent results both in terms of thermal stability and contact characteristics but may still offer advantages over directly metallized contacts in terms of manufacturing simplicity.

Bullock, J., E-mail: james.bullock@anu.edu.au; Cuevas, A.; Yan, D. [Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Demaurex, B.; Hessler-Wyser, A.; De Wolf, S. [Ecole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Micro Engineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronic Laboratory PVLab, Maladire 71b, CH-200 Neuchtel (Switzerland)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

109

Elasticity, strength, and toughness of single crystal silicon carbide, ultrananocrystalline diamond, and hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elasticity, strength, and toughness of single crystal silicon carbide, ultrananocrystalline diamond carbide 3C-SiC , ultrananocrystalline diamond, and hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous carbon

Espinosa, Horacio D.

110

Status and future of government-supported amorphous silicon research in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Amorphous Silicon Research Project (ASRP) was established at the Solar Energy Research Institute in 1983 and is responsible for all US Department of Energy government supported research activities in the field of amorphous silicon photovoltaics. The objectives and research directions of the project have been established by a Five-Year Research Plan, which was developed at SERI in cooperation with the Department of Energy in 1984 and is divided into research on single-junction and multi-junction solar cells. DOE/SERI has recently initiated a new three year program to be performed in collaboration with US industry to perform work on high efficiency amorphous silicon solar cells and submodules. The objectives of this initiative are: (i) to achieve 18% efficiencies for small area multi-junction amorphous silicon cells, and (ii) to achieve amorphous silicon submodule efficiencies in the 10 to 13% range for single-junction and multi-junction submodule configurations over areas of at least 1000 cm/sup 2/.

Wallace, W.L.; Sabisky, E.S.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Hydrogen dynamics and light-induced structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon T. A. Abtew* and D. A. Drabold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen dynamics and light-induced structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon T. A first-principles methods to study the network dynamics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, including the motion of hydrogen. In addition to studies of atomic dynamics in the electronic ground state, we also

Drabold, David

112

Single-crystalline silicon lift-off films for metaloxidesemiconductor devices on arbitrary substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

foils using plasma- enhanced chemical-vapor deposition CVD of hydrogen- passivated, amorphous silicon (a-Si:HGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors on silicon,10 and high electron mobility transistors on quartz and sapphire11

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

113

Multi-resonant silver nano-disk patterned thin film hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells for Staebler-Wronski effect compensation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study polarization independent improved light trapping in commercial thin film hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar photovoltaic cells using a three-dimensional silver array of multi-resonant nano-disk structures embedded in a silicon nitride anti-reflection coating (ARC) to enhance optical absorption in the intrinsic layer (i-a-Si:H) for the visible spectrum for any polarization angle. Predicted total optical enhancement (OE) in absorption in the i-a-Si:H for AM-1.5 solar spectrum is 18.51% as compared to the reference, and producing a 19.65% improvement in short-circuit current density (JSC) over 11.7 mA/cm2 for a reference cell. The JSC in the nano-disk patterned solar cell (NDPSC) was found to be higher than the commercial reference structure for any incident angle. The NDPSC has a multi-resonant optical response for the visible spectrum and the associated mechanism for OE in i-a-Si:H layer is excitation of Fabry-Perot resonance facilitated by surface plasmon resonances. The detrimental Staebl...

Vora, Ankit; Pearce, Joshua M; Bergstrom, Paul L; Gney, Durdu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Optimization of the absorption efficiency of an amorphous-silicon thin-film tandem solar cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of the absorption efficiency of an amorphous-silicon thin-film tandem solar cell-wave approach was used to compute the plane-wave absorptance of a thin-film tandem solar cell with a metallic­4]. In this context, a basic idea is to periodically texture the metallic back reflector of a thin-film solar cell

115

Numerical simulation of the heat transfer in amorphous silicon nitride membrane-based microcalorimeters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical simulation of the heat transfer in amorphous silicon nitride membrane July 2003 Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional 2D heat flow in a membrane-based microcalorimeter have been performed. The steady-state isotherms and time-dependent heat flow have been calculated

Hellman, Frances

116

Short Channel Amorphous-Silicon TFT's on High-Temperature Clear Plastic Substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short Channel Amorphous-Silicon TFT's on High-Temperature Clear Plastic Substrates K. Long, H@princeton.edu To achieve light-weight flexible AMOLED displays on plastic substrates, the substratesmust be optically clear for plastic. High-temperature plastics such as polyimide (e.g. KaptonB E) have a glass transition temperature

117

Defect transition energies and the density of electronic states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Si:H. The data allow us to determine the dominant ra- diative transitions and the corresponding positionsDefect transition energies and the density of electronic states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon G of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA Abstract Using photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy, we

Tolk, Norman H.

118

Infrared Charge-Modulation Spectroscopy of Defects in Phosphorus Doped Amorphous Silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared Charge-Modulation Spectroscopy of Defects in Phosphorus Doped Amorphous Silicon KAI ZHU Solar, Toano, VA 23168 USA ABSTRACT We present infrared charge-modulation absorption spectra have been developing an infrared modulation spectroscopy technique that probes the optical spectra

Schiff, Eric A.

119

amorphous silicon based: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The researchers have managed to create Rogers, John A. 279 A Silicon-Based Micro Gas Turbine Engine for Power Generation CERN Preprints Summary: This paper reports on our...

120

amorphous silicon carbide: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The high power densities expected for the MIT microengine (silicon MEMS-based micro-gas turbine generator) require the turbine and compressor spool to rotate at a very high...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Off-axis dose response characteristics of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have typically been calibrated to dose at central axis (CAX). Division of acquired images by the flood-field (FF) image that corrects for pixel sensitivity variation as well as open field energy-dependent off-axis response variation should result in a flat EPID response over the entire matrix for the same field size. While the beam profile can be reintroduced to the image by an additional correction matrix, the CAX EPID response to dose calibration factor is assumed to apply to all pixels in the detector. The aim of this work was to investigate the dose response of the Varian aS500 amorphous silicon detector across the entire detector area. First it was established that the EPID response across the panel became stable (within {approx}0.2%) for MU settings greater than {approx}200 MU. The EPID was then FF calibrated with a high MU setting of {approx}400 for all subsequent experiments. Whole detector images with varying MU settings from 2-500 were then acquired for two dose rates (300 and 600 MU/min) for 6 MV photons for two EPIDs. The FF corrected EPID response was approximately flat or uniform across the detector for greater than 100 MU delivered (within 0.5%). However, the off-axis EPID response was greater than the CAX response for small MU irradiations, giving a raised EPID profile. Up to 5% increase in response at 20 cm off-axis compared to CAX was found for very small MU settings for one EPID, while it was within 2% for the second (newer) EPID. Off-axis response nonuniformities attributed to detector damage were also found for the older EPID. Similar results were obtained with the EPID at 18 MV energy and operating in asynchronous mode (acquisition not synchronized with beam pulses), however the profiles were flatter and more irregular for the small MU irradiations. By moving the detector laterally and repeating the experiments, the increase in response off-axis was found to depend on the pixel position relative to the beam CAX. When the beam was heavily filtered by a phantom the off-axis response variation was reduced markedly to within 0.5% for all MU settings. Independent measurements of off-axis point doses with ion chamber did not show any change in off-axis factor with MUs. Measurements of beam quality (TMR{sub 20-10}) for MU settings of 2, 5, and 100 at central axis and at 15 cm off-axis could not explain the effect. The response change is unlikely to be significant for clinical IMRT verification with this imaging/acclerator system where MUs are of the order of 100-300, provided the detector does not exhibit radiation damage artifacts.

Greer, Peter B. [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Template structure at the silicon/amorphous-silicide interface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface x-ray diffraction was used to monitor the reaction of Ni on Si(111) at room temperature. Intensity oscillations during deposition signify that a layerwise reaction occurs for the first 30 A of metal deposited, forming a silicide overlayer with stoichiometry Ni{sub 2}Si. Structural analysis of the interfacial layers detects an epitaxial and commensurate phase, Ni{sub 2}Si-{theta}, with long range order imposed by the substrate but with very large local atomic displacements. This epitaxial structure remains at the interface as amorphous silicide forms above it.

Bennett, P.A.; Lee, M.Y.; Yang, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, Box 871504, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, Box 871504, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States); Schuster, R.; Eng, P.J.; Robinson, I.K. [Physics Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

1995-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

123

Recombination and metastability in amorphous silicon and silicon germanium alloys. Annual subcontract report, 1 February 1991--31 January 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the first year of a continuing research study to understand how recombination, trapping, and band-mobility modification affecting the electronic properties of amorphous semiconductors can be measured, characterized, and described by an appropriate spectrum of defect states, and how light-induced defects in a-Si:H and native defects in a-SiGe:H affect transport properties in these materials. The objective was to determine how the Staebler-Wronski defects affect the electronic processes in a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H films. To do this, electroluminescence (EL) and forward bias current in p-i-n devices (i-layer thickness > 2 {mu}m) were studied both experimentally and theoretically before and after light soaking. A simple picture was developed to compare forward bias current to the EL signal. The result was unexpected: the product of the final current times the rise time was not constant before and after light soaking as expected from the concept of gain band width, but instead changed radically. The rise time t{sub x} increased by more than one order of magnitude while the final current I{sub f} did not change significantly with light soaking. On the other hand the I{sub f}t{sub x} product did hold close to a constant when only the applied voltage changed.

Silver, M. [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States)] [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Energy transfer and 1.54 m emission in amorphous silicon nitride films S. O. Kucheyev,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectrometry RBS and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy HRTEM to quantify the amount of Si, NEnergy transfer and 1.54 m emission in amorphous silicon nitride films S. Yerci,1 R. Li,1 S. O a broad energy spectrum and attributed to disorder-induced localized transitions in amorphous Er

125

Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of boron-doped layers in amorphous thin film silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of boron-doped layers in amorphous thin film silicon solar cells. de Bariloche, Argentina 3 ECN Solar Energy, High Tech Campus, Building 5, 5656 AE Eindhoven energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is used to study p-doped layers in n-i-p amorphous thin film Si solar

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

126

Polyaniline on crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells Weining Wanga  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Si have long been of fundamental interest, and amorphous silicon a-Si:H /c-Si heterojunctions are now is about the current limit achieved with a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunctions. The largest VOC we ob- tained was 0Polyaniline on crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells Weining Wanga and E. A. Schiff

Schiff, Eric A.

127

Research Progress in the DOE/SERI Amorphous Silicon Research Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Amorphous Silicon Research Project (ASRP), established at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) in 1983, is responsible for all U.S. DOE government-supported research activities in the field of amorphous silicon photovoltaics. The objectives and research directions of the project have been established by a Five-Year Research Plan developed at SERI in cooperation with the Department of Energy in 1984. In order to accomplish project goals, research is performed by a combination of i) multi-year programs consisting of multi-disciplinary research teams based on strong government/industry partnerships and ii) basic research performed in university, government, and industrial laboratories. A summary of recent research progress in the ASRP program is presented.

Sabisky, E.; Wallace, W.; Stafford, B.; Sadlon, K.; Luft, W.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Efficient Crystalline Si Solar Cell with Amorphous/Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction as Back Contact: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study an amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction (Si HJ) as a back contact in industrial standard p-type five-inch pseudo-square wafer to replace Al back surface field (BSF) contact. The best efficiency in this study is over 17% with open-circuit (Voc) of 0.623 V, which is very similar to the control cell with Al BSF. We found that Voc has not been improved with the heterojunction structure in the back. The typical minority carrier lifetime of these wafers is on the order of 10 us. We also found that the doping levels of p-layer affect the FF due to conductivity and band gap shifting, and an optimized layer is identified. We conclude that an amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction can be a very promising structure to replace Al BSF back contact.

Nemeth, B.; Wang, Q.; Shan, W.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Amorphization of Silicon Carbide by Carbon Displacement. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mail ShareRed Cross Blood Driveover a broadof Silicon

130

Asymmetric electrical properties of fork a-Si:H thin-film transistor and its application to flat panel displays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA 2 LG-effect hydrogen- ated amorphous silicon a-Si:H solar cells to enhance out- put power.6 In an a-Si:H TFT, one pair

Kanicki, Jerzy

131

The correlation of open-circuit voltage with bandgap in amorphous silicon-based {ital pin} solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We briefly review the correlation of open-circuit voltages {ital V}{sub OC} with the bandgap of the intrinsic layer in amorphous silicon based {ital pin} solar cells. We discuss two mechanisms which limit {ital V}{sub OC}: intrinsic layer recombination, and the built-in potential {ital V}{sub BI}. In particular we discuss Li{close_quote}s proposal that the open-circuit voltages in higher bandgap cells ({ital E}{sub G}{gt}1.9 eV) are {ital V}{sub BI}-limited. Based on computer simulations of {ital pin} solar cells we propose that {ital V}{sub BI} limitation occurs when the recombination limit to {ital V}{sub OC} exceeds the cell{close_quote}s field-reversal voltage {ital V}{sub R}. For {ital a}-Si:H based cells this field-reversal voltage occurs at about {ital V}{sub BI}-0.3 V. This proposal would account for the observation that {ital V}{sub BI} limitation occurs for {ital V}{sub OC} significantly smaller than {ital V}{sub BI}. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Crandall, R.S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Schiff, E.A. [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244-1130 (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Photoluminescence properties and crystallization of silicon quantum dots in hydrogenated amorphous Si-rich silicon carbide films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon quantum dots (QDs) embedded in hydrogenated amorphous Si-rich silicon carbide (?-SiC:H) thin films were realized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process and post-annealing. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the room-temperature photoluminescence properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the element compositions and bonding configurations. Ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, Raman scattering, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to display the microstructural properties. Photoluminescence measurements reveal that there are six emission sub-bands, which behave in different ways. The peak wavelengths of sub-bands P1, P2, P3, and P6 are pinned at about 425.0, 437.3, 465.0, and 591.0?nm, respectively. Other two sub-bands, P4 is red-shifted from 494.6 to 512.4?nm and P5 from 570.2 to 587.8?nm with temperature increasing from 600 to 900?C. But then are both blue-shifted, P4 to 500.2?nm and P5 to 573.8?nm from 900 to 1200?C. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows that the samples are in Si-rich nature, Si-O and Si-N bonds consumed some silicon atoms. The structure characterization displays that a separation between silicon phase and SiC phase happened; amorphous and crystalline silicon QDs synthesized with increasing the annealing temperature. P1, P2, P3, and P6 sub-bands are explained in terms of defect-related emission, while P4 and P5 sub-bands are explained in terms of quantum confinement effect. A correlation between the peak wavelength shift, as well as the integral intensity of the spectrum and crystallization of silicon QDs is supposed. These results help clarify the probable luminescence mechanisms and provide the possibility to optimize the optical properties of silicon QDs in Si-rich ?-SiC: H materials.

Wen, Guozhi [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Wuhan Polytechnic University, Wuhan, Hubei 430023 (China); Zeng, Xiangbin, E-mail: eexbzeng@mail.hust.edu.cn; Wen, Xixin; Liao, Wugang [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

133

Energy transfer and 1.54 {mu}m emission in amorphous silicon nitride films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Er-doped amorphous silicon nitride films with various Si concentrations (Er:SiN{sub x}) were fabricated by reactive magnetron cosputtering followed by thermal annealing. The effects of Si concentrations and annealing temperatures were investigated in relation to Er emission and excitation processes. Efficient excitation of Er ions was demonstrated within a broad energy spectrum and attributed to disorder-induced localized transitions in amorphous Er:SiN{sub x}. A systematic optimization of the 1.54 {mu}m emission was performed and a fundamental trade-off was discovered between Er excitation and emission efficiency due to excess Si incorporation. These results provide an alternative approach for the engineering of sensitized Si-based light sources and lasers.

Yerci, S.; Li, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary's Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215-2421 (United States); Kucheyev, S. O.; Buuren, T. van [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Basu, S. N. [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, 15 Saint Mary's Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, 110 Cummington Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Dal Negro, L. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary's Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215-2421 (United States); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, 15 Saint Mary's Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States)

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

Study of the electronic properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films by femtosecond spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental results on the electron relaxation time and diffusion coefficient in hydrogenated amorphous silicon films that exhibit intrinsic and electronic conductivity at room temperature are reported. It is found that, for these two types of films, the relaxation times are 1 ns and 465 ps and the diffusion coefficients are 0.54 and 0.83 cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. It is established that, as the pulse intensity is increased, the decay time of the induced-grating signal shortens.

Sevastyanov, M. G. [Kazan State Power Engineering University (Russian Federation)] [Kazan State Power Engineering University (Russian Federation); Lobkov, V. S.; Shmelev, A. G.; Leontev, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Zavoisky Physical Technical Institute, Kazan Research Center (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Zavoisky Physical Technical Institute, Kazan Research Center (Russian Federation); Matuhin, V. L. [Kazan State Power Engineering University (Russian Federation)] [Kazan State Power Engineering University (Russian Federation); Bobyl, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Terukov, E. I., E-mail: Eug.Terukov@mail.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Zavoisky Physical Technical Institute, Kazan Research Center (Russian Federation); Kukin, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Amorphous Silicon Solar cells with a Core-Shell Nanograting Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We systematically investigate the optical behaviors of an amorphous silicon solar cell based on a core-shell nanograting structure. The horizontally propagating Bloch waves and Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP) waves lead to significant absorption enhancements and consequently short-circuit current enhancements of this structure, compared with the conventional planar one. The perpendicular carrier collection makes this structure optically thick and electronically thin. An optimal design is achieved through full-field numerical simulation, and physical explanation is given. Our numerical results show that this configuration has ultrabroadband, omnidirectional and polarization-insensitive responses, and has a great potential in photovoltaics.

Yang, L; Okuno, Y; He, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

NANO EXPRESS Open Access Characterization of silicon heterojunctions for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the interface between p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) as well as at the interface between n-type a-Si:H and p-type c-Si. This is in good agreement with planar are related to the existence of a strong inversion layer of holes at the c-Si surface of (p) a-Si:H/(n) c

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

137

Method for sputtering a PIN microcrystalline/amorphous silicon semiconductor device with the P and N-layers sputtered from boron and phosphorous heavily doped targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A silicon PIN microcrystalline/amorphous silicon semiconductor device is constructed by the sputtering of N, and P layers of silicon from silicon doped targets and the I layer from an undoped target, and at least one semi-transparent ohmic electrode.

Moustakas, Theodore D. (Annandale, NJ); Maruska, H. Paul (Annandale, NJ)

1985-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

138

Atomic Structure of Interface States in Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells B. M. George,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

silicon (a-Si:H=c-Si) heterojunction solar cells. We find that (i) the interface exhibits microscopic identify the microscopic origin of the conduction band tail state in the a-Si:H layer, and (iv) present-efficiency solar cells, is formed at the a-Si: H=c-Si interface [8]. Here, similar to other crystalline- amorphous

Schmidt, Wolf Gero

139

Metal-induced nanocrystalline structures in Ni-containing amorphous silicon thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanisms of silicon nanocrystal structure formation in amorphous Si films have been studied for a relative Ni impurity content varying between 0.1 and 10 at. %, i.e., from a Ni doping range to the Si-Ni alloy phase. The films, deposited by the cosputtering technique at 200 deg. C, were submitted to isochronal (15 min) annealing cycles up to 800 deg. C. Four different substrates were used to deposit the studied films: crystalline (c-) quartz, c-Si, c-Ge, and glass. Both the two orders of magnitude impurity concentration range variation and the very short annealing times were selected on purpose to investigate the first steps of the mechanism leading to the appearance of crystal seeds. The conclusions of this work are the following: (a) Ni impurity induces the low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicon; (b) the NiSi{sub 2} silicide phase mediates, at the surface or in the bulk of the film, the crystallization process; and (c) the onset of crystallization and the crystalline fraction of the samples at each temperature depend not only on the Ni impurity concentration, but also on the nature of the substrate.

Ferri, F. A.; Zanatta, A. R.; Chambouleyron, I. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos-USP, Sao Carlos 13560-250, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin-UNICAMP, Campinas 13083-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Silicon heterojunction solar cell with passivated hole selective MoOx contact Corsin Battaglia,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

amorphous silicon layer (a-Si:H) as surface passivation layer.3,4 Carrier selectivity at the contacts is traditionally achieved by depos- iting a doped a-Si:H layer after passivation. With this approach record open coefficient combined with a high defect density, a-Si:H, even when only a few nanometers thin, leads to sig

Javey, Ali

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Microstructure factor and mechanical and electronic properties of hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin-films for microelectromechanical systems applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin-film silicon allows the fabrication of MEMS devices at low processing temperatures, compatible with monolithic integration in advanced electronic circuits, on large-area, low-cost, and flexible substrates. The most relevant thin-film properties for applications as MEMS structural layers are the deposition rate, electrical conductivity, and mechanical stress. In this work, n{sup +}-type doped hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin-films were deposited by RF-PECVD, and the influence of the hydrogen dilution in the reactive mixture, the RF-power coupled to the plasma, the substrate temperature, and the deposition pressure on the structural, electrical, and mechanical properties of the films was studied. Three different types of silicon films were identified, corresponding to three internal structures: (i) porous amorphous silicon, deposited at high rates and presenting tensile mechanical stress and low electrical conductivity, (ii) dense amorphous silicon, deposited at intermediate rates and presenting compressive mechanical stress and higher values of electrical conductivity, and (iii) nanocrystalline silicon, deposited at very low rates and presenting the highest compressive mechanical stress and electrical conductivity. These results show the combinations of electromechanical material properties available in silicon thin-films and thus allow the optimized selection of a thin silicon film for a given MEMS application. Four representative silicon thin-films were chosen to be used as structural material of electrostatically actuated MEMS microresonators fabricated by surface micromachining. The effect of the mechanical stress of the structural layer was observed to have a great impact on the device resonance frequency, quality factor, and actuation force.

Mouro, J.; Gualdino, A.; Chu, V. [Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias (INESC-MN) and IN Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal); Conde, J. P. [Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias (INESC-MN) and IN Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal); Department of Bioengineering, Instituto Superior Tcnico (IST), 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

142

CONTINUOUS ROLL-TO-ROLL SERPENTINE DEPOSITION FOR HIGH THROUGHPUT a-Si PV MANUFACTURING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a number of advantages in a fully automated high throughput PV module production plant [l-18--a significant problem in many glass substrate amorphous silicon alloy PV module manufacturing plants. ECDCONTINUOUS ROLL-TO-ROLL SERPENTINE DEPOSITION FOR HIGH THROUGHPUT a-Si PV MANUFACTURING M. Izu, H

Deng, Xunming

143

In-situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy observation of silicon nanocrystal nucleation in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid-state nucleation of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix was observed at temperatures as low as 450?C. This was achieved by aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) with real-time in-situ heating up to 600?C. This technique is a valuable characterization tool especially with the recent interest in Si nanostructures for light emitting devices, non-volatile memories, and third-generation photovoltaics which all typically require a heating step in their fabrication. The control of size, shape, and distribution of the Si nanocrystals are critical for these applications. This experimental study involves in-situ observation of the nucleation of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix fabricated through radio frequency co-sputtering. The results show that the shapes of Si nanocrystals in amorphous SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrices are irregular and not spherical, in contrast to many claims in the literature. Furthermore, the Si nanocrystals are well confined within their layers by the amorphous SiO{sub 2}. This study demonstrates the potential of in-situ HRTEM as a tool to observe the real time nucleation of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix. Furthermore, ideas for improvements on this in-situ heating HRTEM technique are discussed.

Yang, T. C.-J., E-mail: terry.yang@unsw.edu.au; Wu, L.; Lin, Z.; Jia, X.; Puthen-Veettil, B.; Zhang, T.; Conibeer, G.; Perez-Wurfl, I. [School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Kauffmann, Y.; Rothschild, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

144

Thin Ni silicide formation by low temperature-induced metal atom reaction with ion implanted amorphous silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have extended our recent work on buried silicide formation by Ni diffusion into a buried amorphous silicon layer to the case where silicide formation is at lower temperatures on silicon substrates which have been preamorphized. The reaction of metal atoms from a 12 nm Ni film evaporated on top of a 65 nm thick surface amorphous layer formed by 35 keV Si{sup +} ion implantation has been investigated at temperature {le}400C. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) with channeling, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM), x-ray diffraction and four-point-probe measurements were used to determine structure, interfacial morphology, composition and resistivity of the silicide films. It has been found that an increased rate of silicidation occurs for amorphous silicon with respect to crystalline areas permitting a selective control of the silicon area to be contacted during silicide growth. Vacuum furnace annealing at 360C for 8 hours followed by an additional step at 400C for one hour produces a continuos NiSi{sub 2} layer with a resistivity 44 {mu}{Omega} cm.

Erokhin, Yu.N.; Pramanick, S.; Hong, F.; Rozgonyi, G.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Patnaik, B.K. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Manipulating hybrid structures of polymer/a-Si for thin film solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of uniform polymer/amorphous silicon hybrid structures have been fabricated by means of solution-casting for polymer and radio frequency excited plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition for amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) functioned as a photoactive donor, while the silicon layer acted as an acceptor. It is found that matching the hole mobility of the polymer to the electron mobility of amorphous silicon is critical to improve the photovoltaic performance from hybrid cells. A three-layer p-i-n structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS(200?nm)/i-Si(450?nm)/n-Si(200?nm)/Al with a power conversion efficiency of 4.78% under a standard test condition was achieved.

Peng, Ying; He, Zhiqun, E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: J.I.B.Wilson@hw.ac.uk; Zhang, Zhi; Liang, Chunjun [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Diyaf, Adel; Ivaturi, Aruna; Wilson, John I. B., E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: J.I.B.Wilson@hw.ac.uk [SUPA, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

146

Increasing Stabilized Performance Of Amorphous Silicon Based Devices Produced By Highly Hydrogen Diluted Lower Temperature Plasma Deposition.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High quality, stable photovoltaic and electronic amorphous silicon devices which effectively resist light-induced degradation and current-induced degradation, are produced by a special plasma deposition process. Powerful, efficient single and multi-junction solar cells with high open circuit voltages and fill factors and with wider bandgaps, can be economically fabricated by the special plasma deposition process. The preferred process includes relatively low temperature, high pressure, glow discharge of silane in the presence of a high concentration of hydrogen gas.

Li, Yaun-Min (Langhorne, PA); Bennett, Murray S. (Langhorne, PA); Yang, Liyou (Plainsboro, NJ)

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

147

Increased Stabilized Performance Of Amorphous Silicon Based Devices Produced By Highly Hydrogen Diluted Lower Temperature Plasma Deposition.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High quality, stable photovoltaic and electronic amorphous silicon devices which effectively resist light-induced degradation and current-induced degradation, are produced by a special plasma deposition process. Powerful, efficient single and multi-junction solar cells with high open circuit voltages and fill factors and with wider bandgaps, can be economically fabricated by the special plasma deposition process. The preferred process includes relatively low temperature, high pressure, glow discharge of silane in the presence of a high concentration of hydrogen gas.

Li, Yaun-Min (Langhorne, PA); Bennett, Murray S. (Langhorne, PA); Yang, Liyou (Plainsboro, NJ)

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

148

Real-time process sensing and metrology in amorphous and selective area silicon plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using in situ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-time process sensing and metrology in amorphous and selective area silicon plasma enhanced Materials Processing, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 Received 11 July 1996 silicon deposition. The ability of mass spectrometry to observe process faults in real time is also

Rubloff, Gary W.

149

amorphous-nanocrystalline silicon thin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

THE POROUS SILICON PROCESS APPLYING CONVECTION for the first time to monocrystalline Si thin-film solar cells from the porous silicon (PSI) layer transfer for manufacturing high...

150

Silicon Solar Cells with Front Hetero-Contact and Aluminum Alloy Back Junction: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We prototype an alternative n-type monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell structure that utilizes an n/i-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) front hetero-contact and a back p-n junction formed by alloying aluminum (Al) with the n-type Si wafer.

Yuan, H.-C.; Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; Roybal, L.; Wang, Q.; Branz, H. M.; Meier, D. L.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Enhanced quantum efficiency of amorphous silicon thin film solar cells with the inclusion of a rear-reflector thin film  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the growth mechanism of amorphous silicon thin films by implementing hot-wire chemical vapor deposition and fabricated thin film solar cell devices. The fabricated cells showed efficiencies of 7.5 and 8.6% for the samples without and with the rear-reflector decomposed by sputtering, respectively. The rear-reflector enhances the quantum efficiency in the infrared spectral region from 550 to 750?nm. The more stable quantum efficiency of the sample with the inclusion of a rear-reflector than the sample without the rear-reflector due to the bias effect is related to the enhancement of the short circuit current.

Park, Seungil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Energy Conversions Technology Center, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan 331-825 (Korea, Republic of); Yong Ji, Hyung; Jun Kim, Myeong; Hyeon Peck, Jong [Energy Conversions Technology Center, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan 331-825 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Keunjoo, E-mail: kimk@chonbuk.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

152

Transition from Irradiation-Induced Amorphization to Crystallization...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from Irradiation-Induced Amorphization to Crystallization in Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide. Transition from Irradiation-Induced Amorphization to Crystallization in...

153

amorphous insulating thin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chuang3 , Barry G Kanicki, Jerzy 38 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

154

amorphization sputter rate: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nakamura, Hiroaki 2012-01-01 154 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

155

amorphous biophotonic nanostructure: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanostructure Anitescu, Mihai 169 Integration of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors through selective crystallization of amorphous silicon Engineering...

156

New Approaches for Passivation of Crystalline and Amorphous Silicon: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-351  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New approaches of passivating crystalline, multicrystalline, and amorphous silicon will be explored. These will include the use of aqueous solution of KCN and a proprietary composition formulated by Mallinckrodt Baker, Inc. The surface passivation will be compared with that provided by an iodine-ethanol solution, and bulk passivation will be compared with that of H-passivation obtained by silicon nitride, in a fire-through process.

Sopori, B.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous-silicon solar cells Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with silver nanoparticlessolar cells with silver nanoparticles C. Eminian, F... silicon solar cells to achieve light trapping. Nanoparticles have a size 200nm and are...

158

Lithium implantation at low temperature in silicon for sharp buried amorphous layer formation and defect engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crystalline-to-amorphous transformation induced by lithium ion implantation at low temperature has been investigated. The resulting damage structure and its thermal evolution have been studied by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy channelling (RBS/C) and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). Lithium low-fluence implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature is shown to produce a three layers structure: an amorphous layer surrounded by two highly damaged layers. A thermal treatment at 400 Degree-Sign C leads to the formation of a sharp amorphous/crystalline interfacial transition and defect annihilation of the front heavily damaged layer. After 600 Degree-Sign C annealing, complete recrystallization takes place and no extended defects are left. Anomalous recrystallization rate is observed with different motion velocities of the a/c interfaces and is ascribed to lithium acting as a surfactant. Moreover, the sharp buried amorphous layer is shown to be an efficient sink for interstitials impeding interstitial supersaturation and {l_brace}311{r_brace} defect formation in case of subsequent neon implantation. This study shows that lithium implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature can be suitable to form a sharp buried amorphous layer with a well-defined crystalline front layer, thus having potential applications for defects engineering in the improvement of post-implantation layers quality and for shallow junction formation.

Oliviero, E. [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud, Batiment 108, 91405 Orsay (France); David, M. L.; Beaufort, M. F.; Barbot, J. F. [Institut Pprime, CNRS-Universite de Poitiers-ENSMA, SP2MI, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP30179, 86962 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Fichtner, P. F. P. [Departamento de Metalurgia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av Bento Goncalves 9500, Caixa Postal 15051, 90035-190 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

159

Research on stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon multijunction modules. Annual subcontract report, 1 November 1992--31 May 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress made in the first half of Phase II of a three-phase program to develop high-efficiency, same-band-gap, amorphous-silicon, tandem-junction modules. Results for both 1-cm- {sup 2} devices and 0.3-m (0.09-m{sup 2}) modules are given. considerable effort was devoted to finding a device structure and layer conditions that reconcile the conflicting requirements of a good ``tunnel junction`` contact between the two stacks and a high-efficiency device. High-band-gap p{sub 2}layers, which enable good voltage and current from the second stack, were found to result in poor tunnel junctions. The best results were obtained by using a thin (1-nm-thick) p{sup +} layer (no carbon) between the n{sub 1} and p{sub 2} layers of the device.

Ghosh, M.; Kampas, F.; Xi, J. [Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

amorphous silicon-based solar: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

networking issues away from the programmer via ... Beal, Jacob 58 A Silicon-Based Micro Gas Turbine Engine for Power Generation CERN Preprints Summary: This paper reports on our...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Amorphous silicon solar cells. Quarterly report No. 1, 1 October 1980-31 December 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following: theoretical modeling, deposition and doping studies, experimental methods for the characterization of a-Si:H, formation of solar-cell structures, theoretical and experimental evaluation of solar-cell parameters, and stability studies. (MHR)

Carlson, D.E.; Balberg, I.; Crandall, R.S.; Dresner, J.; Goldstein, B.; Hanak, J.J.; Schade, H.E.; Staebler, D.L.; Weakliem, H.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon at high deposition rates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of fabricating device quality, thin-film a-Si:H for use as semiconductor material in photovoltaic and other devices, comprising in any order; positioning a substrate in a vacuum chamber adjacent a plurality of heatable filaments with a spacing distance L between the substrate and the filaments; heating the filaments to a temperature that is high enough to obtain complete decomposition of silicohydride molecules that impinge said filaments into Si and H atomic species; providing a flow of silicohydride gas, or a mixture of silicohydride gas containing Si and H, in said vacuum chamber while maintaining a pressure P of said gas in said chamber, which, in combination with said spacing distance L, provides a P.times.L product in a range of 10-300 mT-cm to ensure that most of the Si atomic species react with silicohydride molecules in the gas before reaching the substrate, to thereby grow a a-Si:H film at a rate of at least 50 .ANG./sec.; and maintaining the substrate at a temperature that balances out-diffusion of H from the growing a-Si:H film with time needed for radical species containing Si and H to migrate to preferred bonding sites.

Mahan, Archie Harvin (Golden, CO); Molenbroek, Edith C. (Rotterdam, NL); Gallagher, Alan C. (Louisville, CO); Nelson, Brent P. (Golden, CO); Iwaniczko, Eugene (Lafayette, CO); Xu, Yueqin (Golden, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Energetics of hydrogen in amorphous silicon: An ab initio study Blair Tuttle*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and diffusion are well under- stood. The details of hydrogen transport and bonding in amor- phous silicon have bonding and diffusion.7 The quantity Ea in Fig. 1 is the activation energy for long-range diffusion, Em to H diffusion in c-Si with the bond center site being the transport level.8,11 Regarding the shallow

Adams, James B

164

Transport, Interfaces, and Modeling in Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 11 February 2002 - 30 September 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results for a-Si characteristics/modeling; photocarrier drift mobilities in a-Si;H, ..mu..c-Si:H, CIGS; hole-conducting polymers as p-layer for a-Si and c-Si; IR spectra of p/i and n/i interfaces in a-Si.

Schiff, E. A.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The freezing tendency towards 4-coordinated amorphous network causes increase in heat capacity of supercooled Stillinger-Weber silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The supercooled liquid silicon, modeled by Stillinger-Weber potential, shows anomalous increase in heat capacity $C_p$, with a maximum $C_p$ value close to 1060 K at zero pressure. We study equilibration and relaxation of the supercooled SW Si, in the temperature range of 1060 K--1070 K at zero pressure. We find that as the relaxation of the metastable supercooled liquid phase initiates, a straight line region (SLR) is formed in cumulative potential energy distributions. The configurational temperature corresponding to the SLR is close to 1060 K, which was earlier identified as the freezing temperature of 4-coordinated amorphous network. The SLR is found to be tangential to the distribution of the metastable liquid phase and thus influences the broadness of the distribution. As the bath temperature is reduced from 1070 K to 1060 K, the effective temperature approaches the bath temperature which results in broadening of the metastable phase distribution. This, in turn, causes an increase in overall fluctuations of potential energy and hence an increase of heat capacity. We also find that during initial stages of relaxation, 4-coordinated atoms form 6-membered rings with a chair--like structure and other structural units that indicate crystallization. Simultaneously a strong correlation is established between the number of chair-shaped 6-membered rings and the number of 4-coordinated atoms in the system. This shows that all properties related to 4-coordinated particles are highly correlated as the SLR is formed in potential energy distributions and this can be interpreted as a consequence of `freezing' of amorphous network formed by 4-coordinated particles.

Pankaj A. Apte; Nandlal Pingua; Arvind Kumar Gautam; Uday Kumar; Soohaeng Yoo Willow; Xiao Cheng Zeng; B. D. Kulkarni

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

ENHANCED GROWTH RATE AND SILANE UTILIZATION IN AMORPHOUS SILICON AND NANOCRYSTALLINE-SILICON SOLAR CELL DEPOSITION VIA GAS PHASE ADDITIVES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products set out to investigate the impact of additives on the deposition rate of both ???µCSi and ???±Si-H films. One criterion for additives was that they could be used in conventional PECVD processing, which would require sufficient vapor pressure to deliver material to the process chamber at the required flow rates. The flow rate required would depend on the size of the substrate onto which silicon films were being deposited, potentially ranging from 200 mm diameter wafers to the 5.7 m2 glass substrates used in GEN 8.5 flat-panel display tools. In choosing higher-order silanes, both disilane and trisilane had sufficient vapor pressure to withdraw gas at the required flow rates of up to 120 sccm. This report presents results obtained from testing at Air Products?¢???? electronic technology laboratories, located in Allentown, PA, which focused on developing processes on a commercial IC reactor using silane and mixtures of silane plus additives. These processes were deployed to compare deposition rates and film properties with and without additives, with a goal of maximizing the deposition rate while maintaining or improving film properties.

Ridgeway, R.G.; Hegedus, S.S.; Podraza, N.J.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Si6H12/Polymer Inks for Electrospinning a-Si Nanowire Lithium Ion Battery Anodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amorphous silicon nanowires 'a-SiNWs' have been prepared by electrospinning a liquid silane-based precursor. Cyclohexasilane 'Si6H12' was admixed with poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) in toluene giving an ink that was electrospun into the Si6H12/PPMA wires with diameters of 50-2000 nm. Raman spectroscopy revealed that thermal treatment at 350 C transforms this deposit into a-SiNWs. These materials were coated with a thin carbon layer and then tested as half-cells where a reasonable plateau in electrochemical cycling was observed after an initial capacity fade. Additionally, porous a-SiNWs were realized when the thermally decomposable binder polypropylene carbonate/polycyclohexene carbonate was used as the polymer carrier.

Schulz, Douglas L.; Hoey, Justin; Smith, Jeremiah; Elangovan, Arumugasamy; Wu, Xiangfa; Akhatov, Iskander; Payne, Scott; Moore, Jayma; Boudjouk, Philip; Pederson, Larry; Xiao, Jie; Zhang, Jiguang

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

168

Amorphous silicon as electron transport layer for colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals light emitting diode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the fabrication of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) made from all-inorganic colloidal semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs). The diode utilizes a sandwich structure formed by placing CdSe/CdS NCs between two layers of Si and Ag{sub x}O, which act as electron- and hole-transporting materials, respectively. The photoluminescence properties of NCs are rendered less dependent upon surface chemistry and chemical environment by growing a thick CdS shell. It also enhances stability of the NCs during the process of magnetron sputtering for silicon deposition. The resulting LED device exhibits a low turn-on voltage of 2.5 V and the maximum external quantum efficiency of nearly 0.08%.

Song Tao; Shen Xiaojuan; Sun Baoquan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Functional Nano and Soft Materials Laboratory (FUNSOM), Soochow University, 199 Ren'ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhang Fute [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Functional Nano and Soft Materials Laboratory (FUNSOM), Soochow University, 199 Ren'ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhang Xiaohong [Nano-Organic Photoelectronic Laboratory and Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronic Functional Materials and Molecular Engineering, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhu Xiulin [Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

Ambipolar silicon nanowire FETs with stenciled-deposited metal gate Davide Sacchetto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ambipolar silicon nanowire FETs with stenciled-deposited metal gate Davide Sacchetto , Veronica Keywords: Schottky barrier Ambipolarity Si nanowire Stencil lithography FET Silicide a b s t r a c t We chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of amorphous Si (a-Si) and SiO2 layers as well as metal gate patterning

De Micheli, Giovanni

170

Optical absorption band at 5.8 eV associated with the E{sub {gamma}}{sup '} centers in amorphous silicon dioxide: Optical absorption and EPR measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Line shape modifications induced by thermal treatment in the optical absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals associated with the E{sub {gamma}}{sup '} center are experimentally investigated in various types of {gamma}-irradiated amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO{sub 2}). The g values of the EPR main resonance line of the E{sub {gamma}}{sup '} center show a shift correlated with the peak energy variation of the absorption band at about 5.8 eV associated with this defect. These spectroscopic changes are proposed to originate from structural modifications of the defect environment. The correlation is theoretically explained considering that the spin-orbit interaction couples the g-tensor's elements and the electronic energy level distribution of the defect. Our results suggest that the optical band at 5.8 eV is due to an intracenter electron promotion from the Si-O bonding states to the dangling bond of the O{identical_to}Si moiety.

Agnello, S.; Buscarino, G.; Gelardi, F. M.; Boscaino, R. [Department of Physical and Astronomical Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

Weil, R.B.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Junction Transport in Epitaxial Film Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report our progress toward low-temperature HWCVD epitaxial film silicon solar cells on inexpensive seed layers, with a focus on the junction transport physics exhibited by our devices. Heterojunctions of i/p hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si) on our n-type epitaxial crystal Si on n++ Si wafers show space-charge-region recombination, tunneling or diffusive transport depending on both epitaxial Si quality and the applied forward voltage.

Young, D. L.; Li, J. V.; Teplin, C. W.; Stradins, P.; Branz, H. M.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Buried oxide layer in silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

Sadana, Devendra Kumar (Pleasantville, NY); Holland, Orin Wayne (Lenoir, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon at high deposition rates with increased stability using the hot wire filament technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method or producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate, comprising the steps of: positioning the substrate in a deposition chamber at a distance of about 0.5 to 3.0 cm from a heatable filament in the deposition chamber; maintaining a pressure in said deposition chamber in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr and pressure times substrate-filament spacing in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr-cm, heating the filament to a temperature in the range of about 1,500 to 2,000.degree. C., and heating the substrate to a surface temperature in the range of about 280 to 475.degree. C.; and flowing silicohydride gas into the deposition chamber with said heated filament, decomposing said silicohydride gas into silicon and hydrogen atomic species and allowing products of gas reactions between said atomic species and the silicohydride gas to migrate to and deposit on said substrate while adjusting and maintaining said pressure times substrate-filament spacing in said deposition chamber at a value in said 10 to 100 millitorr range to produce statistically about 3 to 50 atomic collisions between the silicon and hydrogen atomic species migrating to said substrate and undecomposed molecules of the silane or other silicohydride gas in the deposition chamber.

Molenbroek, Edith C. (Utrecht, NL); Mahan, Archie Harvin (Golden, CO); Gallagher, Alan C. (Louisville, CO)

2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

175

The formation of the positive, fixed charge at c-Si(111)/a-Si$_3$N$_{3.5}$:H interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modern electronic devices are unthinkable without the well-controlled formation of interfaces at heterostructures. These often involve at least one amorphous material. Modeling such interfaces poses a significant challenge, since a meaningful result can only be expected by using huge models or by drawing from many statistically independent samples. Here we report on the results of high throughput calculations for interfaces between crystalline silicon (c-Si) and amorphous silicon nitride (a-Si$_3$N$_{3.5}$:H), which are omnipresent in commercially available solar cells. The findings reconcile only partly understood key features. At the interface, threefold coordinated Si atoms are present. These are caused by the structural mismatch between the amorphous and crystalline part. The local Fermi level of undoped c-Si lies well below that of a-SiN:H. To align the Fermi levels in the device, charge is transferred from the a-SiN:H part to the c-Si part resulting in an abundance of positively charged, threefold coord...

Hintzsche, L E; Marsman, M; Lamers, M W P E; Weeber, A W; Kresse, G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Performance Test of Amorphous Silicon Modules in Different Climates - Year Four: Progress in Understanding Exposure History Stabilization Effects; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The four-year experiment involved three identical sets of thin-film a-Si modules from various manufacturers deployed outdoors simultaneously in three sites with distinct climates. Each PV module set spent a one-year period at each site before a final period at the original site where it was first deployed.

Ruther, R.; Montenegro, A. A.; del Cueto, J.; Rummel, S.; Anderberg, A.; von Roedern, B.; Tamizh-Mani, G.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Electronic Origin For The Phase Transition From Amorphous LixSi...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

lithiation, silicon transforms to amorphous LixSi (a-LixSi) via electrochemical driven solid state amorphization. With increasing lithium concentration, a-LixSi transforms to...

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous taiyo denchi Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by metal diffusion... into amorphous silicon with the formation of metastable amorphous metal silicide. Supersaturation Source: Grigoriev, Alexei - Department of Materials...

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous track models Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by metal diffusion... into amorphous silicon with the formation of metastable amorphous metal silicide. Supersaturation Source: Grigoriev, Alexei - Department of Materials...

180

Amorphous thin films for solar-cell applications. Final report, September 11, 1978-September 10, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Section II, Theoretical Modeling, theories for the capture of electrons by deep centers in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and for field-dependent quantum efficiency in a-Si:H are presented. In Section III, Deposition and Doping Studies, the optimization of phosphorus-doped a-Si:H carried out in four different discharge systems is described. Some details of the dc proximity and rf magnetron discharge systems are also provided. Preliminary mass spectroscopy studies of the rf magnetron discharge in both SiH/sub 4/ and SiF/sub 4/ are presented. In Section IV, Experimental Methods for Characterizing a-Si:H, recent work involving photoluminescence of fluorine-doped a-Si:H, photoconductivity spectra, the photoelectromagnetic effect, the photo-Hall effect and tunneling into a-Si:H is presented. Also, studies of the growth mechanism of Pt adsorbed on both crystalline Si and a-Si:H are described. Measurements of the surface photovoltage have been used to estimate the distribution of surface states of phosphorus-doped and undoped a-Si:H. Section V, Formation of Solar-Cell Structures, contains information on stacked or multiple-junction a-Si:H solar cells. In Section VI, Theoretical and Experimental Evaluation of Solar-Cell Parameters, an upper limit of approx. = 400 A is established for the hole diffusion length in undoped a-Si:H. A detailed description of carrier generation, recombination and transport in a-Si:H solar cells is given. Finally, some characteristics of Pd-Schottky-barrier cells are described for different processing histories.

Carlson, D E; Balberg, I; Crandall, R S; Goldstein, B C; Hanak, J J; Pankove, J I; Staebler, D L; Weakliem, H A; Williams, R

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Effects of the amorphous oxide intergranular layer structure and bonding on the fracture toughness of a high purity silicon nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructural evolution and structural characteristics and transitions in the thin grain-boundary oxide films in a silicon nitride ceramic, specifically between two adjacent grains and not the triple junctions, are investigated to find their effect on the macroscopic fracture properties. It is found that by heat treating a model Si3N4-2wt percent Y2O3 ceramic for {approx}200 hr at 1400 degrees C in air, the fracture toughness can be increased by {approx}100 percent, coincident with a change in fracture mechanism from transgranular to intergranular.

Ziegler, A.; Kisielowski, C.; Hoffmann, M.J.; Ritchie, R.O.

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

182

Studies on relative effects of charged and neutral defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Final report, 1 October 1989--31 December 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the third year of a continuing research study to understand the relative importance of charged and neutral defects in amorphous silicon. The objective of the study is to explore the electronic structure, including neutral and charged defects, an optoelectronic effects including the formation of Staebler-Wronski defects. The study concentrated on exploring electroluminescence experimentally and interpreting the results employing a simple guiding model. The simple guiding model assumes an exponential density of states and recombination rate constants (radiative and non-radiative) which are governed by hopping transitions. Measurements were also made as a function of photodegradation of the material. The results implicate that the radiative recombination processes are not distant pair tunneling but rather results from electrons hopping down due to the coulomb interactions. Preliminary experiments have been made on the effect of photodegradation on transient space charge limited currents in n/i/n structures. These experiments can directly yield information on the occupied defects centers induced by the photodegradation and are not a result of recombination processes. To date the results seems to be consistent with a picture which places the doubly occupied defects at quite a high energy ({approx_equal} 0.4 e.v. below the conduction band).

Silver, M. [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Equilibrium shapes of polycrystalline silicon nanodots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is concerned with the topography of nanostructures consisting of arrays of polycrystalline nanodots. Guided by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements of crystalline Si (c-Si) nanodots that evolved from a dewetting process of an amorphous Si (a-Si) layer from a SiO{sub 2} coated substrate, we investigate appropriate formulations for the surface energy density and transitions of energy density states at grain boundaries. We introduce a new numerical minimization formulation that allows to account for adhesion energy from an underlying substrate. We demonstrate our approach first for the free standing case, where the solutions can be compared to well-known Wulff constructions, before we treat the general case for interfacial energy settings that support partial wetting and grain boundaries for the polycrystalline case. We then use our method to predict the morphologies of silicon nanodots.

Korzec, M. D., E-mail: korzec@math.tu-berlin.de; Wagner, B., E-mail: bwagner@math.tu-berlin.de [Department of Mathematics, Technische Universitt Berlin, Strae des 17. Juni 136, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Roczen, M., E-mail: maurizio.roczen@physik.hu-berlin.de [Department of Physics, Humboldt-Universitt zu Berlin, Newtonstrae 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schade, M., E-mail: martin.schade@physik.uni-halle.de [Zentrum fr Innovationskompetenz SiLi-nano, Martin-Luther-Universitt Halle-Wittenberg, Karl-Freiherr-von-Fritsch-Strae 3, 06120 Halle (Germany); Rech, B., E-mail: bernd.rech@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Institute for Silicon Photovoltaics, Kekulstrae 5, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

184

amorphous hydrogenated carbon: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PLASMA DISCHARGE CiteSeer Summary: Abstract. Nickelhydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films have been deposited on silicon and stainless steel substrates by combining...

185

Structure-property relations in amorphous carbon for photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon is emerging as a material with great potential for photovoltaics (PV). However, the amorphous form (a-C) has not been studied in detail as a PV material, even though it holds similarities with amorphous Silicon (a-Si) that is widely employed in efficient solar cells. In this work, we correlate the structure, bonding, stoichiometry, and hydrogen content of a-C with properties linked to PV performance such as the electronic structure and optical absorption. We employ first-principles molecular dynamics and density functional theory calculations to generate and analyze a set of a-C structures with a range of densities and hydrogen concentrations. We demonstrate that optical and electronic properties of interest in PV can be widely tuned by varying the density and hydrogen content. For example, sunlight absorption in a-C films can significantly exceed that of a same thickness of a-Si for a range of densities and H contents in a-C. Our results highlight promising features of a-C as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

Risplendi, Francesca; Cicero, Giancarlo [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy); Bernardi, Marco [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Grossman, Jeffrey C., E-mail: jcg@mit.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

186

Amorphous-diamond electron emitter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

a-si solar cells: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for the development of amorphous Si solar cells Seung May 2010 Keywords: a-Si:H Thin film Si solar cell Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) a b s t r a c t We Park, Byungwoo...

188

a-si solar cell: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for the development of amorphous Si solar cells Seung May 2010 Keywords: a-Si:H Thin film Si solar cell Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) a b s t r a c t We Park, Byungwoo...

189

Local network structure of a-SiC:H and its correlation with dielectric function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microscopic disordered structures of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si{sub 1?x}C{sub x}:H) layers with different carbon contents have been determined based on the correlations between the dielectric function in the ultraviolet/visible region and the local bonding states studied by high-sensitivity infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy. We find that the microscopic structure of the a-Si{sub 1?x}C{sub x}:H layers fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition shows a sharp structural transition at a boundary of x = 6.3 at. %. In the regime of x ? 6.3 at. %, (i) the amplitude of the a-SiC:H dielectric function reduces and (ii) the SiH{sub 2} content increases drastically with x, even though most of the C atoms are introduced into the tetrahedral sites without bonding with H. In the regime of x > 6.3 at. %, on the other hand, (i) the amplitude of the dielectric function reduces further and (ii) the concentration of the sp{sup 3} CH{sub n} (n = 2,3) groups increases. Moreover, we obtained the direct evidence that the sp{sup 2} C bonding state in the a-SiC matrix exists in the configuration of C = CH{sub 2} and the generation of the graphite-like C = CH{sub 2} unit suppresses the band gap widening significantly. At high C contents of x > 6.3 at. %, the a-SiC:H layers show quite porous structures due to the formation of microvoids terminated with the SiH{sub 2}/CH{sub n} groups. By taking the SiH{sub 2}/CH{sub n} microvoid generation in the network and the high-energy shift of the dielectric function by the local bonding states into account, the a-SiC:H dielectric function model has been established. From the analysis using this model, we have confirmed that the a-SiC:H optical properties in the ultraviolet/visible region are determined almost completely by the local network structures.

Kageyama, Shota; Matsuki, Nobuyuki; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki [Center of Innovative Photovoltaic Systems (CIPS), Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)] [Center of Innovative Photovoltaic Systems (CIPS), Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

190

Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

Sadana, Devendra Kumar (Pleasantville, NY); Holland, Orin Wayne (Lenoir City, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Research on defects and transport in amorphous-silicon-based semiconductors. Annual subcontract report, 20 February 1992--19 February 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes Phase 2 progress in two areas: (1) electron drift and conduction band tails in a-Si{sub 1{minus}x}Ge{sub x}:H and a-Si{sub 1{minus}x}C{sub x}:H alloys, and (2) optical bias effects on electron trapping and emission in a-Si:H. The authors completed a comprehensive study of electron drift in a-Si{sub 1{minus}x}Ge{sub x}:H alloys, including correlations of the drift parameters with {open_quotes}blue{close_quotes} fill factor measurements and open-circuit voltages in solar cells. They began a study of electron and hole drift in a-Si{sub 1{minus}x}C{sub x}:H, but, at present, they have only confirmed that C alloying degrades the electron drift mobility in a-Si{sub 1{minus}x}C{sub x}:H. They completed a study of optical bias effects on transient photocharge measurements in a-Si:H, which clarified that optical bias effects found in earlier photocurrent transient measurements occur because deep trapping is suppressed by optical bias.

Schiff, E.A.; Gu, Q.; Wang, Q. [Syracuse Univ., NY (US)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Thermal decomposition of silane to form hydrogenated amorphous Si film  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by thermally decomposing silano (SiH.sub.4) or other gases comprising H and Si, at elevated temperatures of about 1700.degree.-2300.degree. C., and preferably in a vacuum of about 10.sup.-8 to 10.sup.-4 torr, to form a gaseous mixture of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon, and depositing said gaseous mixture onto a substrate outside said source of thermal decomposition to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

Strongin, Myron (Center Moriches, NY); Ghosh, Arup K. (Rocky Point, NY); Wiesmann, Harold J. (Wantagh, NY); Rock, Edward B. (Oxford, GB); Lutz, III, Harry A. (Midlothian, VA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

alkali-resistant silicon nitride: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Amorphous Silicon B. L. Zink,1,2,* R. Pietri,1. Above 50 K the thermal conductivity of thin-film amorphous silicon agrees with values previously Hellman, Frances 131 Profiles:...

194

Development of Thin Film Silicon Solar Cell Using Inkjet Printed Silicon and Other Inkjet Processes: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-260  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of silicon photovoltaics (Si-PV) can be greatly lowered by developing thin-film crystalline Si solar cells on glass or an equally lower cost substrate. Typically, Si film is deposited by thermal evaporation, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and sputtering. NREL and Silexos have worked under a CRADA to develop technology to make very low cost solar cells using liquid organic precursors. Typically, cyclopentasilane (CPS) is deposited on a glass substrate and then converted into an a-Si film by UV polymerization followed by low-temperature optical process that crystallizes the amorphous layer. This technique promises to be a very low cost approach for making a Si film.

Sopori, B.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Strained Silicon on Silicon by Wafer Bonding and Layer Transfer from Relaxed SiGe Buffer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the creation of strained silicon on silicon (SSOS) substrate technology. The method uses a relaxed SiGe buffer as a template for inducing tensile strain in a Si layer, which is then bonded to another Si handle ...

Isaacson, David M.

196

amorphous thin films: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Amorphous Silicon Thin-Film Transistor Pixel.S.A. 1 LG Philips LCD Research and Development Center, An-Yang, 431-080, Korea (Received July 23, 2006; accepted October 31, 2006;...

197

amorphous thin film: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Amorphous Silicon Thin-Film Transistor Pixel.S.A. 1 LG Philips LCD Research and Development Center, An-Yang, 431-080, Korea (Received July 23, 2006; accepted October 31, 2006;...

198

More stable hybrid organic solar cells deposited on amorphous Si electron transfer layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on defect densities, performance, and stability of organic/inorganic hybrid solar cells produced using n-doped inorganic amorphous silicon-carbide layers as the electron transport layer (ETL). The organic material was poly-3-hexyl-thiophene (P3HT) and heterojunction was formed using phenyl-C{sub 71}-Butyric-Acid-Methyl Ester (PCBM). For comparison, inverted solar cells fabricated using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as ETL were fabricated. Defect densities and subgap quantum efficiency curves were found to be nearly identical for both types of cells. The cells were subjected to 2xsun illumination and it was found that the cells produced using doped a-Si as ETL were much more stable than the cells produced using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.

Samiee, Mehran; Modtland, Brian; Dalal, Vikram L., E-mail: vdalal@iastate.edu [Iowa State University, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Aidarkhanov, Damir [Nazarbayev University, Astana (Kazakhstan)

2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

199

Electroabsorption measurements and built-in potentials in amorphous silicongermanium solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1130 S. Guha and J. Yang United Solar Systems Corporation, 1100 West Maple Road, Troy, Michigan 48084Electroabsorption measurements and built-in potentials in amorphous silicon­germanium solar cells J spectra in n-i-p solar cells with hydrogenated amorphous silicon­germanium alloy absorber layers. At lower

Schiff, Eric A.

200

.beta.-silicon carbide protective coating and method for fabricating same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polycrystalline beta-silicon carbide film or coating and method for forming same on components, such as the top of solar cells, to act as an extremely hard protective surface, and as an anti-reflective coating. This is achieved by DC magnetron co-sputtering of amorphous silicon and carbon to form a SiC thin film onto a surface, such as a solar cell. The thin film is then irradiated by a pulsed energy source, such as an excimer laser, to synthesize the poly- or .mu.c-SiC film on the surface and produce .beta.--SiC. While the method of this invention has primary application in solar cell manufacturing, it has application wherever there is a requirement for an extremely hard surface.

Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Thompson, Jesse B. (Brentwood, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

[beta]-silicon carbide protective coating and method for fabricating same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polycrystalline beta-silicon carbide film or coating and method for forming same on components, such as the top of solar cells, to act as an extremely hard protective surface, and as an anti-reflective coating are disclosed. This is achieved by DC magnetron co-sputtering of amorphous silicon and carbon to form a SiC thin film onto a surface, such as a solar cell. The thin film is then irradiated by a pulsed energy source, such as an excimer laser, to synthesize the poly- or [mu]c-SiC film on the surface and produce [beta]-SiC. While the method of this invention has primary application in solar cell manufacturing, it has application wherever there is a requirement for an extremely hard surface. 3 figs.

Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Diamond-silicon carbide composite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=58 GPa, T=1400K2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

203

JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 31, NO. 19, OCTOBER 1, 2013 3181 Noise Figure in Near-Infrared Amorphous and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 31, NO. 19, OCTOBER 1, 2013 3181 Noise Figure in Near-Infrared, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--The noise figures (NF) of near-infrared (near-IR) amorphous silicon (a Amorphous and Mid-Infrared Crystalline Silicon Optical Parametric Amplifiers Jichi Ma and Sasan Fathpour

Fathpour, Sasan

204

Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fracking or of tar sands via destruction of pristine wilderness creates new threats to our personal and environmental health.

Schriver, Maria Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

way to do better. A photovoltaic cell, or solar cell, is aFor this thesis, I made photovoltaic cells using a Schottkyphotovoltaic processes oc- cur in a Schottky barrier solar cell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Schriver, Maria Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

globally[5]. Total global energy use using past data andFigure 4.3 shows the total global energy use and predictions5]. Figure 4.3: Total global energy use using past data and

Schriver, Maria Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reductions in costs for installed photovoltaic systems. Thisreductions in costs for installed photovoltaic systems. Thisphotovoltaic technologies that improve upon current solutions by being lower cost,

Schriver, Maria Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Structure, Properties, and Dynamics of Oxygen Vacancies in Amorphous SiO2 Zhong-Yi Lu,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure, Properties, and Dynamics of Oxygen Vacancies in Amorphous SiO2 Zhong-Yi Lu,1 C. J vacancies in SiO2 have long been regarded as bistable, forming a Si-Si dimer when neutral and a puckered configuration when positively charged. We report first-principles calculations of O vacancies in amorphous SiO2

Pantelides, Sokrates T.

209

Method for processing silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystalline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation. 2 figs.

Tsuo, Y.S.; Landry, M.D.; Pitts, J.R.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

210

Method for processing silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystallline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation.

Tsuo, Y. Simon (Golden, CO); Landry, Marc D. (Lafayette, CO); Pitts, John R. (Lakewood, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

212

Crystalline silicon growth in nickel/a-silicon bilayer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of substrate temperature on amorphous Silicon crystallization, mediated by metal impurity is reported. Bilayers of Ni(200nm)/Si(400nm) are deposited on fused silica substrate by electron beam evaporator at 200 and 500 Degree-Sign C. Raman mapping shows that, 2 to 5 micron size crystalline silicon clusters are distributed over the entire surface of the sample. X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies demonstrate silicon crystallizes over the metal silicide seeds and grow with the annealing temperature.

Mohiddon, Md Ahamad; Naidu, K. Lakshun [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500046 (India) and Department of Physics, University of Trento, 38123 POVO (Trento) (Italy); Dalba, G. [Department of Physics, University of Trento, 38123 POVO (Trento) (Italy); Rocca, F. [IFN-CNR, Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, Unit FBK-Photonics of Trento, 38123, Trento (Italy); Krishna, M. Ghanashyam [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500046 (India)

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

213

Aluminum recycling from reactor walls: A source of contamination in a-Si:H thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article, the authors investigate the contamination of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films with aluminum recycled from the walls and electrodes of the deposition reactor. Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon were prepared under various conditions by a standard radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process in two reactors, the chambers of which were constructed of either aluminum or stainless steel. The authors have studied the electronic properties of these thin films and have found that when using an aluminum reactor chamber, the layers are contaminated with aluminum recycled from the chamber walls and electrode. This phenomenon is observed almost independently of the deposition conditions. The authors show that this contamination results in slightly p-doped films and could be detrimental to the deposition of device grade films. The authors also propose a simple way to control and eventually suppress this contamination.

Longeaud, C.; Ray, P. P.; Bhaduri, A.; Daineka, D.; Johnson, E. V.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris (UMR 8507 CNRS), Supelec, Universites Paris VI and XI, 11 Rue Joliot-Curie, Plateau de Moulon, 91190 Gif sur Yvette (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces (UMR 7647 CNRS), Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Amorphization of crystalline Si due to heavy and light ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of amorphous silicon in crystalline silicon by bombardment with light (Si) and heavy (Xe) ions has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy with in situ ion irradiation. Experiments have been carried out at room temperature and low temperature (50 K) and the results are compared to a simple numerical model for amorphization. The results indicate that the amorphization mechanisms for both irradiations are heterogeneous in nature and that numerous overlaps of the collision cascade are generally required to render the crystal amorphous. Following from this, the nature of the material within the confines of collision cascades will be discussed and it will be shown that the individual cascade volume is not necessarily amorphous as previously described in the scientific literature but contains varying degrees of damage depending on the energy deposited within the cascade.

Edmondson, P. D.; Riley, D. J.; Donnelly, S. E. [Institute for Materials Research, University of Salford, Manchester M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Birtcher, R. C. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Amorphization of crystalline Si due to heavy and light ion irradiation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of amorphous silicon in crystalline silicon by bombardment with light (Si) and heavy (Xe) ions has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy with in situ ion irradiation. Experiments have been carried out at room temperature and low temperature (50 K) and the results are compared to a simple numerical model for amorphization. The results indicate that the amorphization mechanisms for both irradiations are heterogeneous in nature and that numerous overlaps of the collision cascade are generally required to render the crystal amorphous. Following from this, the nature of the material within the confines of collision cascades will be discussed and it will be shown that the individual cascade volume is not necessarily amorphous as previously described in the scientific literature but contains varying degrees of damage depending on the energy deposited within the cascade.

Edmondson, P. D.; Riley, D. J.; Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Salford

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Amorphous Medium Language  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Programming reliable behavior on a large mesh network composed of unreliable parts is difficult. Amorphous Medium Language addresses this problem by abstracting robustness and networking issues away from the programmer via ...

Beal, Jacob

217

Understanding Why Silicon Anodes of Lithium-Ion Batteries Are...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Understanding Why Silicon Anodes of Lithium-Ion Batteries Are Fast to Discharge but Slow to Charge December 02, 2014 Measured and calculated rate-performance of a Si thin-film (70...

218

Silicone metalization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

219

Silicone metalization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

220

Characterization of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors....  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors. Characterization of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors. Abstract: Amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) was investigated to determine the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Low cost routes to high purity silicon and derivatives thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a method for providing an agricultural waste product having amorphous silica, carbon, and impurities; extracting from the agricultural waste product an amount of the impurities; changing the ratio of carbon to silica; and reducing the silica to a high purity silicon (e.g., to photovoltaic silicon).

Laine, Richard M; Krug, David James; Marchal, Julien Claudius; Mccolm, Andrew Stewart

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

222

Performance of Ultrathin Silicon Solar Microcells with Nanostructures of Relief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the materials. Solar cells based on thin films of amorphous or polycrystalline silicon require sub- stantially, Urbana, Illinois 61801 ABSTRACT Recently developed classes of monocrystalline silicon solar microcells systems that benefit from thin construction and efficient materials utilization. KEYWORDS Nanoimprint

Rogers, John A.

223

Growth process of microcrystalline silicon studied by combined photoluminescence and Raman investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon on glass substrates leads to formation of silicon amorphous films with partial crystallization of nano-grains in the amorphous matrix. We studied the transition of amorphous to microcrystalline silicon during such deposition. Formation of silicon nano-grains was detected by means of photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. The crystalline fraction and the mean size of the nano-grains were estimated by the position and the intensity of the peaks in the Raman spectrum. We showed that the fraction of crystalline silicon in the layers and the size of the nano-grains are strongly dependent on the growth conditions. The photoluminescence spectra exhibit distinct features related to recombination in the amorphous and in the crystalline phases. A significant narrowing of the photoluminescence peak related to the amorphous phase with increasing crystalline fraction indicates a structural modification in the amorphous silicon. It suggests an ordering process occurring before the start of the actual crystallization. A peak at about 1.4 eV was associated with isolated nano-crystalline grains within the amorphous matrix. A correlation between the peak energy and grain size was found, indicating effects of carrier quantum confinement. The experimental results confirm the established theoretical models for growth of microcrystalline silicon films.

Klossek, A.; Mankovics, D.; Ratzke, M. [Brandenburg University of Technology, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 1, D-03046 Cottbus (Germany)] [Brandenburg University of Technology, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 1, D-03046 Cottbus (Germany); Arguirov, T.; Kittler, M. [Brandenburg University of Technology, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 1, D-03046 Cottbus (Germany) [Brandenburg University of Technology, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 1, D-03046 Cottbus (Germany); IHP Microelectronics, Im Technologiepark 25, D-15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Kirner, S.; Gabriel, O.; Stannowski, B.; Schlatmann, R. [Competence Centre Thin-Film- and Nanotechnology for Photovoltaics Berlin, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany)] [Competence Centre Thin-Film- and Nanotechnology for Photovoltaics Berlin, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Friedrich, F. [Competence Centre Thin-Film- and Nanotechnology for Photovoltaics Berlin, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany) [Competence Centre Thin-Film- and Nanotechnology for Photovoltaics Berlin, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Department of Semiconductor Devices, Technische Universitt Berlin, Sekr. E2, Einsteinufer 19, D-10587 Berlin (Germany)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

224

Laser Assisted Crystallization of Ferromagnetic Amorphous Ribbons...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ferromagnetic Amorphous Ribbons: A Multimodal Characterization and Thermal Model Study. Laser Assisted Crystallization of Ferromagnetic Amorphous Ribbons: A Multimodal...

225

Diamond-Silicon Carbide Composite And Method For Preparation Thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5-8 GPa, T=1400K-2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.multidot.m.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

Qian, Jiang (Los Alamos, NM); Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM)

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

226

Annealing kinetics of ^311 defects and dislocation loops in the end-of-range damage region of ion implanted silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 L. M. Rubin and J. Jackson Eaton Corporation, Beverly was implanted using an Eaton NV-GSD 200E. The wafer was amorphized using a Si implantation, with an energy of 20

Florida, University of

227

PECVD Silicon Carbide Waveguides for Multichannel G. Pandraud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PECVD Silicon Carbide Waveguides for Multichannel Sensors G. Pandraud Kavli Institute of Nano Deposition (PECVD) Silicon Carbide (SiC) waveguides. Thin SiC films have been deposited onto Si substrates with a SiO2 film acting as a cladding layer around the carbide core. In the sensor, the evanescent tale

Technische Universiteit Delft

228

Atomistic simulation of the interface structure of Si nanocrystals embedded in amorphous silica Flyura Djurabekova and Kai Nordlund*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomistic simulation of the interface structure of Si nanocrystals embedded in amorphous silica 11 February 2008; published 14 March 2008 An efficient means to obtain light emission from a silicon in industrial wafer manufacturing lines, this has opened up a promising avenue for using low-cost silicon chips

Nordlund, Kai

229

Kinetics of dissolution and bio-availability of iron in amorphous siliceous iron oxides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard H. Loeppert Amorphous iron (Fe) oxides are of interest because of their high reactivity, surface area, and influence on Fe availability in the soil environment. These materials may have... potential utilization as slow-release Fe amendments for calcareous soils. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of various concentrations of silicon (Si), present during precipitation, on the dissolution kinetics of amorphous Fe oxides...

Seaman, John C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Solar cell structure incorporating a novel single crystal silicon material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel hydrogen rich single crystal silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystal silicon without out-gassing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semiconductor devices such as single crystal silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystal silicon without hydrogen.

Pankove, Jacques I. (Princeton, NJ); Wu, Chung P. (Trenton, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Thin Solid Films 430 (2003) 125129 0040-6090/03/$ -see front matter 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for a-Si:H solar cell fabrication. In addition to photovoltaic applications, a-Si:H is also used of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H)-based photovoltaic devices, it is important to deposit high- quality a progress has been made in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H)-based thin film photovoltaic devices

Deng, Xunming

232

Holey Silicon as an Efficient Thermoelectric Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work investigated the thermoelectric properties of thin silicon membranes that have been decorated with high density of nanoscopic holes. These ?holey silicon? (HS) structures were fabricated by either nanosphere or block-copolymer lithography, both of which are scalable for practical device application. By reducing the pitch of the hexagonal holey pattern down to 55 nm with 35percent porosity, the thermal conductivity of HS is consistently reduced by 2 orders of magnitude and approaches the amorphous limit. With a ZT value of 0.4 at room temperature, the thermoelectric performance of HS is comparable with the best value recorded in silicon nanowire system.

Tang, Jinyao; Wang, Hung-Ta; Hyun Lee, Dong; Fardy, Melissa; Huo, Ziyang; Russell, Thomas P.; Yang, Peidong

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

High-Rate Fabrication of a-Si-Based Thin-Film Solar Cells Using Large-Area VHF PECVD Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Toledo (UT), working in concert with its a-Si-based PV industry partner Xunlight Corporation (Xunlight), has conducted a comprehensive study to develop a large-area (3ft x 3ft) VHF PECVD system for high rate uniform fabrication of silicon absorber layers, and the large-area VHF PECVD processes to achieve high performance a-Si/a-SiGe or a-Si/nc-Si tandem junction solar cells during the period of July 1, 2008 to Dec. 31, 2011, under DOE Award No. DE-FG36-08GO18073. The project had two primary goals: (i) to develop and improve a large area (3 ft 3 ft) VHF PECVD system for high rate fabrication of > = 8 /s a-Si and >= 20 /s nc-Si or 4 /s a-SiGe absorber layers with high uniformity in film thicknesses and in material structures. (ii) to develop and optimize the large-area VHF PECVD processes to achieve high-performance a-Si/nc-Si or a-Si/a-SiGe tandem-junction solar cells with >= 10% stable efficiency. Our work has met the goals and is summarized in Accomplishments versus goals and objectives.

Deng, Xunming [University of Toledo] [University of Toledo; Fan, Qi Hua

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Amorphous Diamond MEMS and Sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a new microsystems technology for the creation of microsensors and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) using stress-free amorphous diamond (aD) films. Stress-free aD is a new material that has mechanical properties close to that of crystalline diamond, and the material is particularly promising for the development of high sensitivity microsensors and rugged and reliable MEMS. Some of the unique properties of aD include the ability to easily tailor film stress from compressive to slightly tensile, hardness and stiffness 80-90% that of crystalline diamond, very high wear resistance, a hydrophobic surface, extreme chemical inertness, chemical compatibility with silicon, controllable electrical conductivity from insulating to conducting, and biocompatibility. A variety of MEMS structures were fabricated from this material and evaluated. These structures included electrostatically-actuated comb drives, micro-tensile test structures, singly- and doubly-clamped beams, and friction and wear test structures. It was found that surface micromachined MEMS could be fabricated in this material easily and that the hydrophobic surface of the film enabled the release of structures without the need for special drying procedures or the use of applied hydrophobic coatings. Measurements using these structures revealed that aD has a Young's modulus of {approx}650 GPa, a tensile fracture strength of 8 GPa, and a fracture toughness of 8 MPa{center_dot}m {sup 1/2}. These results suggest that this material may be suitable in applications where stiction or wear is an issue. Flexural plate wave (FPW) microsensors were also fabricated from aD. These devices use membranes of aD as thin as {approx}100 nm. The performance of the aD FPW sensors was evaluated for the detection of volatile organic compounds using ethyl cellulose as the sensor coating. For comparable membrane thicknesses, the aD sensors showed better performance than silicon nitride based sensors. Greater than one order of magnitude increase in chemical sensitivity is expected through the use of ultra-thin aD membranes in the FPW sensor. The discoveries and development of the aD microsystems technology that were made in this project have led to new research projects in the areas of aD bioMEMS and aD radio frequency MEMS.

SULLIVAN, JOHN P.; FRIEDMANN, THOMAS A.; ASHBY, CAROL I.; DE BOER, MAARTEN P.; SCHUBERT, W. KENT; SHUL, RANDY J.; HOHLFELDER, ROBERT J.; LAVAN, D.A.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Performance of Hydrogenated a-Si:H Solar Cells with Downshifting Coating: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We apply a thin luminescent downshifting (LDS) coating to a hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) solar cell and study the mechanism of possible current enhancement. The conversion material used in this study converts wavelengths below 400 nm to a narrow line around 615 nm. This material is coated on the front of the glass of the a-Si:H solar cell with a glass/TCO/p/i/n/Ag superstrate configuration. The initial efficiency of the solar cell without the LDS coating is above 9.0 % with open circuit voltage of 0.84 V. Typically, the spectral response below 400 nm of an a-Si:H solar cell is weaker than that at 615 nm. By converting ultraviolet (UV) light to red light, the solar cell will receive more red photons; therefore, solar cell performance is expected to improve. We observe evidence of downshifting in reflectance spectra. The cell Jsc decreases by 0.13 mA/cm2, and loss mechanisms are identified.

Nemeth, B.; Xu, Y.; Wang, H.; Sun, T.; Lee, B. G.; Duda, A.; Wang, Q.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Distinct local electronic structure and magnetism for Mn in amorphous Si and Ge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition metals such as Mn generally have large local moments in covalent semiconductors due to their partially filled d shells. However, Mn magnetization in group-IV semiconductors is more complicated than often recognized. Here we report a striking crossover from a quenched Mn moment (<0.1 {mu}{sub B}) in amorphous Si (a-Si) to a large distinct local Mn moment ({ge}3{mu}{sub B}) in amorphous Ge (a-Ge) over a wide range of Mn concentrations (0.005-0.20). Corresponding differences are observed in d-shell electronic structure and the sign of the Hall effect. Density-functional-theory calculations show distinct local structures, consistent with different atomic density measured for a-Si and a-Ge, respectively, and the Mn coordination number N{sub c} is found to be the key factor. Despite the amorphous structure, Mn in a-Si is in a relatively well-defined high coordination interstitial type site with broadened d bands, low moment, and electron (n-type) carriers, while Mn in a-Ge is in a low coordination substitutional type site with large local moment and holes (p-type) carriers. Moreover, the correlation between N{sub c} and the magnitude of the local moment is essentially independent of the matrix; the local Mn moments approach zero when N{sub c} > 7 for both a-Si and a-Ge.

Zeng, Li; Cao, J. X.; Helgren, E.; Karel, J.; Arenholz, E.; Ouyang, Lu; Smith, David J.; Wu, R. Q.; Hellman, F.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Interaction potential for silicon carbide: A molecular dynamics study of elastic constants and vibrational density of states for crystalline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interaction potential for silicon carbide: A molecular dynamics study of elastic constants and vibrational density of states for crystalline and amorphous silicon carbide Priya Vashishta,a Rajiv K. Kalia Silicon carbide SiC has been proposed for a wide range of technological applications

Southern California, University of

238

Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon (a-C) films grown on silicon using pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) is correlated to both growth energetic and film thickness. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray reflectivity probe both the topological nature of 3- and 4-fold coordinated carbon atom bonding and the topographical clustering of their distributions within a given film. In general, increasing the energetic of PLD growth results in films becoming more ``diamondlike'', i.e. increasing mass density and decreasing optical absorbance. However, these same properties decrease appreciably with thickness. The topology of carbon atom bonding is different for material near the substrate interface compared to material within the bulk portion of an a-C film. A simple model balancing the energy of residual stress and the free energies of resulting carbon topologies is proposed to provide an explanation of the evolution of topographical bonding clusters in a growing a-C film.

SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.; BARBOUR,J. CHARLES; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

Programming an Amorphous Computational Medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Amorphous computing considers the problem of controllingmillions of spatially distributed unreliable devices which communicateonly with nearby neighbors. To program such a system, we need a highleveldescription language ...

Beal, Jacob

240

Silicon-germanium saturable absorbers and erbium-doped waveguides for integrated mode-locked lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) Saturable Bragg Reflectors (SBR) and Erbium-doped waveguide chips are fabricated and characterized as crucial components for integration of a mode-locked laser on a Si-chip. The ...

Byun, Hyunil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Carbon-Silicon Core-Shell Nanowires as High Capacity Electrode for Lithium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon-Silicon Core-Shell Nanowires as High Capacity Electrode for Lithium Ion Batteries Li lithium battery electrodes. Amorphous silicon was coated onto carbon nanofibers to form a core during lithium cycling and can function as a mechanical support and an efficient electron conducting

Cui, Yi

242

Two-and three-dimensional folding of thin film single-crystalline silicon for photovoltaic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two- and three-dimensional folding of thin film single-crystalline silicon for photovoltaic power of a functional, nonpla- nar photovoltaic (PV) device. A mechanics model based on the theory of thin plates self-folding photovoltaics capillary force Silicon, in crystalline and amorphous forms, is currently

Lewis, Jennifer

243

Phonon Heat Conduction in Corrugated Silicon Nanowires Below the Casimir Limit Christophe Blanc,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

very low thermal conductances of highly rough silicon nanowires [7, 18], far below the amorphous limit, 2013) The thermal conductance of straight and corrugated monocrystalline silicon nanowires has been of nanostructured materials or low dimen- sional materials has attracted growing interest [1­4], es- pecially

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

244

Amorphous metal alloy and composite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

Wang, Rong (Richland, WA); Merz, Martin D. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Surface and Coatings Technology 171 (2003) 4650 0257-8972/03/$ -see front matter 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) and crystalline silicon carbide (c-SiC) with different compositions were deposited on Si(1 0 0) substrates by both RF plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and thermal metal-PECVD; Thermal MOCVD 1. Introduction Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) films are widely used

Boo, Jin-Hyo

246

Scattering Properties of nanostructures : applications to photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen during deposition, dangling bonds are compensated and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) can be made into a promising photovoltaic

Derkacs, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Method of making selective crystalline silicon regions containing entrapped hydrogen by laser treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel hydrogen rich single crystalline silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystalline silicon without out-gasing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semi-conductor devices such as single crystalline silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystalline silicon without hydrogen.

Pankove, Jacques I. (Princeton, NJ); Wu, Chung P. (Trenton, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M. G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Ji, Xiaoyan (Jane); Day, Sumner D.; Blue, Craig A.; Rivard, John D. K.; Aprigliano, Louis F.; Kohler, Leslie K.; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J.; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J.

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

249

Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

Farmer, Joseph C; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J; Ji, Xiaoyan; Day, Sumner D; Blue, Craig A; Rivard, John D.K.; Aprigliano, Louis F; Kohler, Leslie K; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

250

Linear Stability and Instability Patterns in Ion Bombarded Silicon Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surfaces. I experimentally determined the topographical phase diagram resulting from Ar+ ion irradiation measurements using the Multi-beam Optical Stress Sensor system were performed during amorphization of silicon by normal incidence 250 eV ion irradiation. An average compressive saturation stress built up

251

Amorphous silicon thin film transistor as nonvolatile device.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

layer all of which are exposed to the radiation source during operation.62 Under the high dose x-ray irradiation, the TFT needs to be electrically biased or thermally annealed in order to perform the switching function effectively.59 For the extra...-terrestrial use, the gamma ray is naturally abundant in the cosmic space. Gamma-ray is more energetic than the x-ray. An x-ray has longer wavelength than a gamma ray, i.e., 10-0.1 nm vs. gamma ray irradiation can result in different photoelectron...

Nominanda, Helinda

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

Research on stable, high-efficiency, amorphous silicon multijunction modules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present effort seeks to develop modules with a stabilized performance of 8.8% aperture area conversion after 600 hours light exposure (AM1.5) at 50{degrees}C in modules with aperture areas over 900 cm{sup 2}. Good progress towards this goal has been obtained with the demonstration of 9.8% initial performance in a submodule incorporating devices with relatively thin middle junction i-layer thickness of 4000{Angstrom}. Devices with this design have been shown to lose about 10% of their initial performance after 1000 hours of exposure. Modules lose between 18--23% largely due to light induced shunting, probably related to the contact metallization. Achieving long-term stabilized efficiencies of 12% or more requires substantial improvements in materials and devices. Our analysis has shown that substantial optical losses occur at both front and rear contacts which we hope to address with ZnO films prepared by CVD and sputtering processes now under development. Further progress is doped layers and alloys are also needed. Fundamental studies of the relationship between material structure and processes (particularly the effect of hydrogen dilution) are reported here. 32 refs., 28 figs., 9 tabs.

Catalano, A.; Bennet, M.; Chen, L.; Fieselmann, B.; Li, Y.; Newton, J.; Podlesny, R.; Wiedeman, S.; Yang, L. (Solarex Corp., Newtown, PA (United States). Thin Film Div.)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

amorphous silicon oxide: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: alloy of composition correspond- ing to the metallic components of the superconduct- ing oxides respectivement. Abstract. - Previous quenching experiments on 2212...

254

Single-crystal germanium growth on amorphous silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The integration of photonics with electronics has emerged as a leading platform for microprocessor technology and the continuation of Moore's Law. As electronic device dimensions shrink, electronic signals encounter crippling ...

McComber, Kevin A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Atomic Layer Deposition for Stabilization of Amorphous Silicon Anodes |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope Change #1Impacts |Services

256

Structure of Pentacene Monolayers on Amorphous Silicon Oxide and Relation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategicOur MissionStructureSynthetaseGDNFHumanDrugto

257

Irradiation-induced defect clustering and amorphization in silicon carbide.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared LandResponsesIon/Surface ReactionsIrradiationtemperature for|

258

Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

Dunmead, Stephen D. (Midland, MI); Weimer, Alan W. (Midland, MI); Carroll, Daniel F. (Midland, MI); Eisman, Glenn A. (Midland, MI); Cochran, Gene A. (Midland, MI); Susnitzky, David W. (Midland, MI); Beaman, Donald R. (Midland, MI); Nilsen, Kevin J. (Midland, MI)

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

259

Specific features of recombination in layered a-Si:H films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The absorbed light spectral composition determines the type of carrier generation: interband generation or mixed generation that also includes the generation of electrons from levels of the valence-band tail. The generation type affects the value and temperature dependence of the electron recombination rate in a-Si:H layered films. This effect is caused by a variation in the occupation of the levels of silicon dangling bonds and the valence band tail with electrons upon a change in the carrier generation type. As a result, in the case of mixed carrier generation in the investigated films with a low concentration of native dangling bonds, electron recombination in the films is slow and recombination at the levels of the valence-band tail can prevail up to room temperature.

Kurova, I. A.; Ormont, N. N., E-mail: ormont@phys.msu.ru [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Mechanics of amorphous polymers and polymer gels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many applications of amorphous polymers require a thermo-mechanically coupled large-deformation elasto-viscoplasticity theory which models the strain rate and temperature dependent response of amorphous polymeric materials ...

Chester, Shawn Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Glass nanoimprint using amorphous Ni-P mold etched by focused-ion beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors succeeded in glass-nanoimprint lithography of micropatterns and nanopatterns using an amorphous Ni-P alloy mold. Glasslike carbon has been used as a mold material to mold not only Pyrex glass but also quartz, because it is still stable at a temperature of 1650 deg. C. However, it is difficult to process glasslike carbon substrates into arbitrary shapes by machining. They thought that amorphous Ni-P alloy could be used as a mold material for industrial glass molding. If Ni is electroless plated when mixed with suitable amount of P on a Si wafer, the Ni-P alloy layer becomes amorphous. An appropriate ratio of Ni and P was determined by the results of x-ray-diffraction measurements. The optimized composition ratio of Ni-P was Ni:P=92:8 wt %. Moreover, line and space patterns and dot arrays with linewidths of as little as 500 nm were etched on the mold using focused-ion beam (FIB) and the processing accuracy for the amorphous Ni-P layer was compared with that for the pure Ni layer. The result was that patterns of 500 nm width were etched to a depth of 2 {mu}m on an amorphous Ni-P alloy mold and the processed surfaces were smooth. In contrast, in the case of the pure Ni layer, the processing line was notched and the sidewalls were very rough. The crystal grain seems to hinder the processing of the nanopattern. After FIB etching, the amorphous Ni-P alloy was thermally treated at 400 deg. C to improve the hardness. Finally, line and space patterns and dot arrays on the amorphous Ni-P alloy mold were nanoimprinted on Pyrex glass using a glass-nanoimprint system (ASHE0201) that National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology developed.

Mekaru, Harutaka; Kitadani, Takeshi; Yamashita, Michiru; Takahashi, Masaharu [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1, Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan); SAWA Plating Co., Ltd., 753 Hoshiro, Himeji, Hyogo 670-0804 (Japan); Hyogo Prefectural Institute of Technology, 3-1-12 Yukihira-cho, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0037 (Japan); National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Silicon heterojunction solar cell with passivated hole selective MoO{sub x} contact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore substoichiometric molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub x}, x?silicon solar cells. Using an intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon passivation layer between the oxide and the silicon absorber, we demonstrate a high open-circuit voltage of 711?mV and power conversion efficiency of 18.8%. Due to the wide band gap of MoO{sub x}, we observe a substantial gain in photocurrent of 1.9?mA/cm{sup 2} in the ultraviolet and visible part of the solar spectrum, when compared to a p-type amorphous silicon emitter of a traditional silicon heterojunction cell. Our results emphasize the strong potential for oxides as carrier selective heterojunction partners to inorganic semiconductors.

Battaglia, Corsin; Yin, Xingtian; Zheng, Maxwell; Javey, Ali, E-mail: ajavey@eecs.berkeley.edu [Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Martn de Nicols, Silvia; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe [Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Ecole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne, 2000 Neuchtel (Switzerland)

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

263

Spatially selective single-grain silicon films induced by hydrogen plasma seeding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

small holes. The solid-phase crystallization SPC of amorphous sili- con involves two steps, i- ation of a-Si:H SPC, such as metal-induced SPC,5 germanium-induced SPC,6 ion-beam-induced SPC,7 and plasma-induced SPC.8,9 Although the original motivation of these methods was to reduce the thermal budget

264

Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate is disclosed, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27--730 C is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including HETEROJUNCTION-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

Truher, J.B.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Thompson, J.B.; Sigmon, T.W.

1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

265

Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27.degree.-730.degree. C. is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including hetero-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

Truher, Joel B. (San Rafael, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Thompson, Jesse B. (Brentwood, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Beaverton, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Low temperature front surface passivation of interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction solar cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cell requires a low temperature front surface passivation/anti-reflection structure. Conventional silicon surface passivation using SiO2 or a-SiNx is performed at temperature higher than 400C, which is not suitable for the IBC-SHJ cell. In this paper, we propose a PECVD a-Si:H/a-SiNx:H/a-SiC:H stack structure to passivate the front surface of crystalline silicon at low temperature. The optical properties and passivation quality of this structure are characterized and solar cells using this structure are fabricated. With 2 nm a-Si:H layer, the stack structure exhibits stable passivation with effective minority carrier lifetime higher than 2 ms, and compatible with IBC-SHJ solar cell processing. A critical advantage of this structure is that the SiC allows it to be HF resistant, thus it can be deposited as the first step in the process. This protects the a-Si/c-Si interface and maintains a low surface recombination velocity.

Shu, Brent; Das, Ujjwal; Jani, Omkar; Hegedus, Steve; Birkmire, Robert

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

267

Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Fabricated by Pulsed Rapid Thermal Annealing of Amorphous Silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The gas supply into the reactor through the mass flow controllers include: N2 (ultra high purity, Acetylene Oxygen Company), N2 (semiconductor, 99.9999% purity, Praxair), Ar (semiconductor, 99.9999% purity, Praxair), SiH4 (semiconductor, 99.999% Air... Liquide), B2H6 (2 % in H2, 99.999% purity, Air Liquide), PH3 (7.1 % in H2, 99.999%, Air Liquide), NH3 (semiconductor, 99.999% purity, Matheson Tri-Gas), and H2 (semiconductor, 99.9999% purity, Praxair). Figure 4 shows the heating zones and the dimension...

Lee, I-Syuan

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

Electrical Properties of MetalSilicon NitrideHydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Capacitor Elucidated Using Admittance Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan 300, Republic of China 2 AU Optronics Corporation, Technology Center

269

amorphous carbon substrates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CaF2 films on amorphous substrates Wang, Gwo-Ching 5 NICKELHYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS CARBON COMPOSITE FILMS DEPOSITED IN ACETYLENEARGON MICROWAVE PLASMA DISCHARGE CiteSeer...

270

Formation of Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous Solid Films of Methanol and Ethanol. Formation of Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous Solid Films of...

271

Infrared Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous Solid Water. Infrared Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous Solid Water. Abstract: Reflection-absorption...

272

Electron-Stimulated Production of Molecular Oxygen in Amorphous...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water. Electron-Stimulated Production of Molecular Oxygen in Amorphous Solid Water. Abstract: The low-energy, electron-stimulated production of molecular oxygen from pure amorphous...

273

Structure, Morphology, and Optical Properties of Amorphous and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Morphology, and Optical Properties of Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Gallium Oxide Thin Films. Structure, Morphology, and Optical Properties of Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Gallium...

274

Growth mechanisms study of microcrystalline silicon deposited by SiH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} plasma using tailored voltage waveforms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of Tailored Voltage Waveforms is a technique wherein one uses non-sinusoidal waveforms with a period equivalent to RF frequencies to excite a plasma. It has been shown to be an effective technique to decouple maximum Ion Bombardment Energy (IBE) from the ion flux at the surface of the electrodes. In this paper, we use it for the first time as a way to scan through the IBE in order to study the growth mechanism of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon using a SiH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} chemistry. We find that at critical energies, a stepwise increase in the amorphous to microcrystalline transition thickness is observed, as detected by Real Time Spectroscopic Ellipsometry. The same energy thresholds (30?eV and 70?eV) are found to be very influential on the final surface morphology of the samples, as observed by Atomic Force Microscopy. These thresholds correspond to SiH{sub x}{sup +} bulk displacement (30?eV) and H{sub x}{sup +} (70?eV) surface displacement energies. A model is therefore proposed to account for the impact of these ions on the morphology of ?c-Si:H growth.

Bruneau, B., E-mail: bastien.bruneau@polytechnique.edu; Johnson, E. V. [LPICM-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Wang, J. [LPICM-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); ICARE China-Europe Institute for Clean and Renewable Energy at Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, 430074 Wuhan (China); Dornstetter, J.-C. [LPICM-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); TOTAL New Energies, 24 cours Michelet, 92069 Paris La Dfense Cedex (France)

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

275

Crystallization and phase transformations in amorphous NiTi thin films for microelectromechanical systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amorphous sputtered nickel-titanium thin films were deposited onto micromachined silicon-nitride membranes and subjected to heating and cooling conditions. Their associated microstructure was monitored directly and simultaneously with in situ transmission electron microscopy. These electron-transparent membranes constrained the NiTi films and rendered it possible for observation of the complete transformation cycle, which includes: the crystallization of the amorphous phase to austenite phase (cubic B2 structure) with heating; and the conversion of austenite (B2) to martensite (monoclinic B19{sup '} structure) with cooling. Electron micrographs show the nucleation and growth of grains occurs at a temperature of 470 deg. C and at a rate that indicates a polymorphic transformation. The onset of martensitic transformation occurs between 25 and 35 deg. C. Calorimetric measurements are consistent with the observed crystallization.

Lee, Hoo-Jeong; Ramirez, Ainissa G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

2004-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - a-si alloy solar Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1m intrinsic a-Si:H layers were... intrinsic a-Si:H layer and the metal film. For the solar cell test, the light is coming from the bottom... through structure innovations....

277

CVD of refractory amorphous metal alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, a novel process is described for the fabrication of multi-metallic amorphous metal alloy coatings using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Of special interest in this work are amorphous metal alloys containing Mo and/or Cr which have high crystallization temperatures and readily available low decomposition temperature metal-bearing precursors. The conditions for amorphous alloy formation via CVD are described as well as the chemical properties of these materials. High temperature, aqueous corrosion tests have shown these materials (especially those containing Cr) are among the most corrosion resistant metal alloys known.

Tenhover, M. [The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States). Technology Div.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films is critically influenced by the hydrogen/silane ratio during (a-Si:H) films. The passivation quality of such a-Si:H films is critically influenced by the hydrogen for very high hydrogen/silane ratios. 2. Experiments For the a-Si:H depositions we use a CS 400P PECVD

279

Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Wong, Frank M. G. (Livermore, CA); Haslam, Jeffery J. (Livermore, CA); Yang, Nancy (Lafayette, CA); Lavernia, Enrique J. (Davis, CA); Blue, Craig A. (Knoxville, TN); Graeve, Olivia A. (Reno, NV); Bayles, Robert (Annandale, VA); Perepezko, John H. (Madison, WI); Kaufman, Larry (Brookline, MA); Schoenung, Julie (Davis, CA); Ajdelsztajn, Leo (Walnut Creek, CA)

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

280

Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

a-si alloy production: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for silicon metal comes primarily from the aluminum and chemical industries. Domestic secondary aluminum production--the primary materials source for aluminum-silicon alloys--was...

282

Advanced silicon photonic modulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Various electrical and optical schemes used in Mach-Zehnder (MZ) silicon plasma dispersion effect modulators are explored. A rib waveguide reverse biased silicon diode modulator is designed, tested and found to operate at ...

Sorace, Cheryl M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Valencia, Spain, 6-10 September 2010, 2AO.2.3 EFFECT OF SiN DEPOSITION TEMPERATURE ON SURFACE PASSIVATION OF N-TYPE CZ SILICON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

25th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Valencia, Spain, 6-10 September 2010, 2AO.2N deposition leads to increasing the hydrogen content of the SiN layers. This improves the supply of hydrogen silicon using thermally grown oxide or amorphous films based on hydrogenated silicon compounds has been

284

Method of making selective crystalline silicon regions containing entrapped hydrogen by laser treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel hydrogen rich single crystalline silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystalline silicon without out-gassing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semi-conductor devices such as single crystalline silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystalline silicon without hydrogen. 2 figs.

Pankove, J.I.; Wu, C.P.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Glass-silicon column  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

Yu, Conrad M.

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

Effects of surface pretreatments on interface structure during formation of ultra-thin yttrium silicate dielectric films on silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

silicate dielectric films on silicon J. J. Chambers Department of Chemical Engineering, North Carolina indicates that the yttrium silicate films are amorphous with uniform contrast throughout the layer. MEIS (10 ?) SiO2 film and oxidized, a yttrium silicate film is formed with bonding and composition similar

Garfunkel, Eric

287

Cathode encapsulation of organic light emitting diodes by atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-SiN{sub x}:H stacks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films synthesized by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) at room temperature (25 deg. C) have been tested as water vapor permeation barriers for organic light emitting diode devices. Silicon nitride films (a-SiN{sub x}:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition served as reference and were used to develop Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-SiN{sub x}:H stacks. On the basis of Ca test measurements, a very low intrinsic water vapor transmission rate of {<=} 2 x 10{sup -6} g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} and 4 x 10{sup -6} g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} (20 deg. C/50% relative humidity) were found for 20-40 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 300 nm a-SiN{sub x}:H films, respectively. The cathode particle coverage was a factor of 4 better for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films compared to the a-SiN{sub x}:H films and an average of 0.12 defects per cm{sup 2} was obtained for a stack consisting of three barrier layers (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-SiN{sub x}:H/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}).

Keuning, W.; Weijer, P. van de; Lifka, H.; Kessels, W. M. M.; Creatore, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, P.O. Box WAG12, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Controlled epitaxial graphene growth within removable amorphous carbon corrals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We address the question of control of the silicon carbide (SiC) steps and terraces under epitaxial graphene on SiC and demonstrate amorphous carbon (aC) corrals as an ideal method to pin SiC surface steps. aC is compatible with graphene growth, structurally stable at high temperatures, and can be removed after graphene growth. For this, aC is first evaporated and patterned on SiC, then annealed in the graphene growth furnace. There at temperatures above 1200?C, mobile SiC steps accumulate at the aC corral that provide effective step flow barriers. Aligned step free regions are thereby formed for subsequent graphene growth at temperatures above 1330?C. Atomic force microscopy imaging supports the formation of step-free terraces on SiC with the step morphology aligned to the aC corrals. Raman spectroscopy indicates the presence of good graphene sheets on the step-free terraces.

Palmer, James; Hu, Yike; Hankinson, John; Guo, Zelei; Heer, Walt A. de [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State St. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Kunc, Jan [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State St. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Institute of Physics, 12116 Prague (Czech Republic); Berger, Claire [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State St. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Universit Grenoble Alpes/CNRSInstitut Nel, BP166, Grenoble Cedex 9 38042 (France)

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

Results of a Si/CdTe Compton Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have been developing a semiconductor Compton telescope to explore the universe in the energy band from several tens of keV to a few MeV. We use a Si strip and CdTe pixel detector for the Compton telescope to cover an energy range from 60 keV. For energies above several hundred keV, the higher efficiency of CdTe semiconductor in comparison with Si is expected to play an important role as an absorber and a scatterer. In order to demonstrate the spectral and imaging capability of a CdTe-based Compton Telescope, we have developed a Compton telescope consisting of a stack of CdTe pixel detectors as a small scale prototype. With this prototype, we succeeded in reconstructing images and spectra by solving the Compton equation from 122 keV to 662 keV. The energy resolution (FWHM) of reconstructed spectra is 7.3 keV at 511 keV and 3.1 keV at 122 keV, respectively. The angular resolution obtained at 511 keV is measured to be 12.2 degree (FWHM).

Kousuke Oonuki; Takaaki Tanaka; Shin Watanabe; Shin'ichiro Takeda; Kazuhiro Nakazawa; Takefumi Mitani; Tadayuki Takahashi; Hiroyasu Tajima; Yasushi Fukazawa; Masaharu Nomachi

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

290

Direct Evidence of Lithium-Induced Atomic Ordering in Amorphous...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evidence of Lithium-Induced Atomic Ordering in Amorphous TiO2 Nanotubes . Direct Evidence of Lithium-Induced Atomic Ordering in Amorphous TiO2 Nanotubes . Abstract: In this paper,...

291

FORMATION OF A PHYSICALLY STABLE AMORPHOUS DRUG COMPLEX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8 Conclusion 9 References 11 Chapter 2. Formation and Stabilization of Amorphous Solids Introduction 13 Stabilization of Amorphous Solids 14 Using... Experimental a. Materials 25 b. Methods 29 Conclusion 33 References 37...

MacLean, Jenifer Anne

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

292

Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAW Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings havefor Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings J.

Blink, J.; Farmer, J.; Choi, J.; Saw, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

amorphous carbon deposited: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The contamination was believed 2 NICKELHYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS CARBON COMPOSITE FILMS DEPOSITED IN ACETYLENEARGON MICROWAVE PLASMA DISCHARGE CiteSeer Summary:...

294

Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region Zhong­Hui Duan Abstract The statistics of polyethylene chains in the amorphous region between two crystallites have been as models of the chain molecules in the amorphous region of semicrystalline polyethylene, both

Aluffi, Paolo

295

Highly Efficient Silicon Light Emitting Diode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

silicon light-emitting diodes (LED) that efficiently emit photons with energy around the silicon bandgap

Leminh Holleman Wallinga; P. Leminh; J. Holleman; H. Wallinga

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate, created by micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face (patterned silicon plate`s surface) and the silicon wafer it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face. The islands may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face and wafer contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands, together with at least one hole bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas. 6 figs.

Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

Dense colloidal fluids form denser amorphous sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dense colloidal fluids form denser amorphous sediments Shir R. Libera,b , Shai Borohovicha of their randomly packed solid sediments. We demonstrate that the most dilute fluids of colloidal hard spheres form loosely packed sediments, where the volume fraction of the particles approaches in frictional systems

Schofield, Andrew B.

298

Sonochemically Prepared Nanostructured Amorphous Molybdenum Sulfide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. CLASSIFICATION form: amorphous, nanostructured fine powder function: hydrodesulfurization catalyst, lubricant and energy diffusion out of the bubble. As a result, extreme temperatures and pressures are achieved within/s. These unique and severe conditions can be used to drive chemical reactions within the bubble; one result

Suslick, Kenneth S.

299

Solar cells utilizing pulsed-energy crystallized microcrystalline/polycrystalline silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing multi-terminal devices such as solar cells wherein a pulsed high energy source is used to melt and crystallize amorphous silicon deposited on a substrate which is intolerant to high processing temperatures, whereby the amorphous silicon is converted into a microcrystalline/polycrystalline phase. Dopant and hydrogenation can be added during the fabrication process which provides for fabrication of extremely planar, ultra shallow contacts which results in reduction of non-current collecting contact volume. The use of the pulsed energy beams results in the ability to fabricate high efficiency microcrystalline/polycrystalline solar cells on the so-called low-temperature, inexpensive plastic substrates which are intolerant to high processing temperatures.

Kaschmitter, J.L.; Sigmon, T.W.

1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

300

Solar cells utilizing pulsed-energy crystallized microcrystalline/polycrystalline silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing multi-terminal devices such as solar cells wherein a pulsed high energy source is used to melt and crystallize amorphous silicon deposited on a substrate which is intolerant to high processing temperatures, whereby to amorphous silicon is converted into a microcrystalline/polycrystalline phase. Dopant and hydrogenization can be added during the fabrication process which provides for fabrication of extremely planar, ultra shallow contacts which results in reduction of non-current collecting contact volume. The use of the pulsed energy beams results in the ability to fabricate high efficiency microcrystalline/polycrystalline solar cells on the so-called low-temperature, inexpensive plastic substrates which are intolerant to high processing temperatures.

Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Beaverton, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Polymorphism of the glass former ethanol confined in mesoporous silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray diffraction patterns of ethanol confined in parallel-aligned channels of approx. 10 nm diameter and 50 micrometer length in mesoporous silicon have been recorded as a function of filling fraction, temperature and for varying cooling and heating rates. A sorption isotherm, recorded in the liquid state, indicates a three monolayer thick, strongly adsorbed wall layer and a capillary condensed fraction of molecules in the pore center. Though the strongly adsorbed film remains in an amorphous state for the entire temperature range investigated, the capillary condensed molecules reproduce the polymorphism of bulk solid ethanol, that is the formation of either crystalline or glass-like states as a function of cooling rate. The critical rate necessary to achieve a vitrification in the mesopores is, however, at least two orders of magnitude smaller than in the bulk state. This finding can be traced both to pure geometrical constraints and quenched disorder effects, characteristic of confinement in mesoporous silicon.

Anke Henschel; Klaus Knorr; Patrick Huber

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

302

Building Integrated Photovoltaics: New trends and Challenges'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AR coating p-type Si Monocrystalline Silicon solar cell Polycrystalline wafer solar cells #12;· Thin crystalline silicon (mono & multi) Dye cell and organic thin film: a-Si, CdTe, CIGS new concepts the optical absorption in thin a-Si layers, texturing of TCO and reflecting mirror are applied Amorphous

Painter, Kevin

303

Method for producing silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Silicon carbide/silicon nitride composites are prepared by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and optionally crsytalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen.

Dunmead, Stephen D. (Midland, MI); Weimer, Alan W. (Midland, MI); Carroll, Daniel F. (Midland, MI); Eisman, Glenn A. (Midland, MI); Cochran, Gene A. (Midland, MI); Susnitzky, David W. (Midland, MI); Beaman, Donald R. (Midland, MI); Nilsen, Kevin J. (Midland, MI)

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

304

Structure, defects, and strain in silicon-silicon oxide interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure of the interfaces between silicon and silicon-oxide is responsible for proper functioning of MOSFET devices while defects in the interface can deteriorate this function and lead to their failure. In this paper we modeled this interface and characterized its defects and strain. MD simulations were used for reconstructing interfaces into a thermodynamically stable configuration. In all modeled interfaces, defects were found in the form of three-coordinated silicon atom, five coordinated silicon atom, threefold-coordinated oxygen atom, or displaced oxygen atom. Three-coordinated oxygen atom can be created if dangling bonds on silicon are close enough. The structure and stability of three-coordinated silicon atoms (P{sub b} defect) depend on the charge as well as on the electric field across the interface. The negatively charged P{sub b} defect is the most stable one, but the electric field resulting from the interface reduces that stability. Interfaces with large differences in periodic constants of silicon and silicon oxide can be stabilized by buckling of silicon layer. The mechanical stress resulted from the interface between silicon and silicon oxide is greater in the silicon oxide layer. Ab initio modeling of clusters representing silicon and silicon oxide shows about three time larger susceptibility to strain in silicon oxide than in silicon if exposed to the same deformation.

Kova?evi?, Goran, E-mail: gkova@irb.hr; Pivac, Branko [Department of Materials Physics, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijeni?ka 56, P.O.B. 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

305

Silicon avalanche photodiode operation and lifetime analysis for small satellites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Silicon avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are sensitive to operating temperature fluctuations and are also susceptible to radiation flux expected in satellite-based quantum experiments. We introduce a low power voltage adjusting mechanism to overcome the effects of in-orbit temperature fluctuations. We also present data on the performance of Si APDs after irradiation (gamma-ray and proton beam). Combined with an analysis of expected orbital irradiation, we propose that a Si APD in a 400 km equatorial orbit may operate beyond the lifetime of the satellite.

Tan, Yue Chuan; Cheng, Cliff; Ling, Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Silicon avalanche photodiode operation and lifetime analysis for small satellites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Silicon avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are sensitive to operating temperature fluctuations and are also susceptible to radiation flux expected in satellite-based quantum experiments. We introduce a low power voltage adjusting mechanism to overcome the effects of in-orbit temperature fluctuations. We also present data on the performance of Si APDs after irradiation (gamma-ray and proton beam). Combined with an analysis of expected orbital irradiation, we propose that a Si APD in a 400 km equatorial orbit may operate beyond the lifetime of the satellite.

Yue Chuan Tan; Rakhitha Chandrasekara; Cliff Cheng; Alexander Ling

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

307

Electrical detection of spin echoes for phosphorus donors in silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electrical detection of spin echoes via echo tomography is used to observe decoherence processes associated with the electrical readout of the spin state of phosphorus donor electrons in silicon near a SiO$_2$ interface. Using the Carr-Purcell pulse sequence, an echo decay with a time constant of $1.7\\pm0.2 \\rm{\\mu s}$ is observed, in good agreement with theoretical modeling of the interaction between donors and paramagnetic interface states. Electrical spin echo tomography thus can be used to study the spin dynamics in realistic spin qubit devices for quantum information processing.

Hans Huebl; Felix Hoehne; Benno Grolik; Andre R. Stegner; Martin Stutzmann; Martin S. Brandt

2007-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

308

Laser micro-processing of silicon using nanosecond pulse shaped fibre laser at 1 ?m wavelength  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). ............................................................................... 11 Figure 2.2(a): Schematic and (b) SEM image of 19.8% efficient multicrystalline silicon solar cell with honeycomb surface texturing (Zhao, Wang et al. 1998). (c) The inverted pyramid texture on the top surface (Zhao, Wang et al. 1995). (d) A... is 40 m (Tan 2006). (c): SEM image of silicon machined by frequency tripled Nd: YAG laser (355 nm) followed by cleaning in the KOH solution (Chen and Darling 2005). (d) Profiles and SEM images (1.5 k) of ablated a-Si under different irradiation...

Li, Kun

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

309

Fabrication of porous silicon membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF THE FILTER APPLICATION OF POROUS SILICON A. Density of Porous Silicon B. Stabilization of Porous Silicon Membranes C. Flow Test D. Porous Polycrystalline Silicon 54 58 62 65 vn TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) CHAPTER VI EXTENSIONS AND CONCLUSIONS... Membranes 13. Density Change of Porous Silicon at 125'C 14. Density Change oi' Porous Silicon at 250 C 15. Nitrogen Flow on a Porous Silicon Membrane Page 15 16 33 39 39 44 46 54 59 59 62 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 10. 12. 14. 17. 18. 19...

Yue, Wing Kong

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

UNIVERSITE PARIS-SUD COLE DOCTORALE : STITS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hydrogenated amorphous silicon is presented with the focus on its application in photovoltaic devices. Chapter of the reliability and validity of this approach applied to a-Si:H Schottky barriers with various magnitudes

311

Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are: amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M/sub 1/)/sub a/(M/sub 2/)/sub b/ wherein M/sub 1/ is at least one transition metal, M/sub 2/ is at least one main group metal and the integers ''a'' and ''b'' provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

Haushalter, R.C.

1985-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

312

Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

Haushalter, Robert C. (Clinton, NJ)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE supports crystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) research and development efforts that lead to market-ready technologies. Below are a list of the projects, summary of the benefits, and discussion...

314

Research on the stability, electronic properties, and structure of a-Si:H and its alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective is to obtain a comprehensive understanding of structure and electronic properties of a-Si:H as they apply to solar cells. First observations were of light enhancement and field suppression of H diffusion in a-Si:H. Theoretical studies were made of hydrogen density of states distribution and its relation to defect metastability. Reduced density of light induced defect is observed in a-Si:H deposited in a remote hydrogen plasma reactor at 400 C. Kinetics of metastable defect creation using forward bias in a p-i-n diode to induce defects were studied and compared to light-induced defect creation in the same devices. Studies were made of transport at high electric field and low temperature. Detailed studies were made of kinetics of dopant metastability in n-type and p-type a-Si:H.

Street, R.A.; Jackson, W.B.; Johnson, N.; Nebel, C.; Hack, M.; Santos, P.; Thompson, R.; Tsai, C.C.; Walker, J. (Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, CA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

E-Print Network 3.0 - a-si based solar Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

based solar Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: a-si based solar Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 * Corresponding author. E-mail address:...

316

High Efficiency Thin Film CdTe and a-Si Based Solar Cells Final Technical Report for the Period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Efficiency Thin Film CdTe and a-Si Based Solar Cells Final Technical Report for the PeriodTe-based thin-film solar cells and on high efficiency a-Si-based thin-film solar cells. Phases I and II have the performance of a-SiGe solar cells and properties of a-SiGe single layer films with different Ge contents

Deng, Xunming

317

High Efficiency Thin Film CdTe and a-Si Based Solar Cells Annual Technical Report for the Period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Efficiency Thin Film CdTe and a-Si Based Solar Cells Annual Technical Report for the Period solar cells and on high efficiency a-Si-based thin-film solar cells. The effort on CdTe- based materials the performance of a-SiGe solar cells and properties of a-SiGe single layer films with different Ge contents

Deng, Xunming

318

Analysis of a-Si:H/TCO contact resistance for the Si heterojunction back-contact solar cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of a-Si:H/TCO contact resistance for the Si heterojunction back-contact solar cell Seung- circuit voltage (Voc) and the conversion efficiency of the Si solar cell. Recently, a-Si:H heterojunction (heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer) cell [1] even with practical-sized Czochralski-grown (CZ) wafer. The a-Si:H

Park, Byungwoo

319

amorphous hard carbon: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated H NMR spectroscopy Materials Science Websites Summary: Received 14 February 2003; published 5 November 2003 The...

320

amorphous diamond films: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

simulations of the nanometer-scale indentation of amorphous-carbon thin films Materials Science Websites Summary: , and lattice constants of both solid-state diamond and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electron-beam induced recrystallization in amorphous apatite...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

recrystallization observed in the present study. Citation: Bae IT, Y Zhang, WJ Weber, M Higuchi, and L Giannuzzi.2007."Electron-beam induced recrystallization in amorphous...

322

Ionization-induced effects in amorphous apatite at elevated temperatur...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the structural contrast features, respectively. Citation: Bae IT, Y Zhang, WJ Weber, M Ishimaru, Y Hirotsu, and M Higuchi.2008."Ionization-induced effects in amorphous...

323

Electron-Stimulated Production of Molecular Oxygen in Amorphous...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Precursor Transport Through the Hydrogen Electron-Stimulated Production of Molecular Oxygen in Amorphous Solid Water on Pt(111): Precursor Transport Through the Hydrogen...

324

Probing the Interaction of Amorphous Solid Water on a Hydrophobic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface: Dewetting and Crystallization Kinetics of ASW on Abstract: Desorption of carbon tetrachloride from beneath an amorphous solid water (ASW) overlayer is explored...

325

Annealing Simulations of Nano-Sized Amorphous Structures in SiC...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulations of Nano-Sized Amorphous Structures in SiC. Annealing Simulations of Nano-Sized Amorphous Structures in SiC. Abstract: A two-dimensional model of a nano-sized amorphous...

326

Optical properties of nanostructured silicon-rich silicon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have conducted a study of the optical properties of sputtered silicon-rich silicon dioxide (SRO) thin films with specific application for the fabrication of erbium-doped waveguide amplifiers and lasers, polarization ...

Stolfi, Michael Anthony

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond/Silicon...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide Nanocomposites for Drill Bits Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide...

328

Electronic Origin For The Phase Transition From Amorphous LixSi To Crystalline Li15Si4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon has been widely explored as an anode material for lithium ion battery. Upon lithiation, silicon transforms to amorphous LixSi (a-LixSi) via electrochemical driven solid state amorphization. With increasing lithium concentration, a-LixSi transforms to crystalline Li15Si4 (c-Li15Si4). The mechanism of this crystallization process is not known. In this paper, we report the fundamental characteristics of the phase transition of a-LixSi to c-Li15Si4 using in-situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and density function theory (DFT) calculation. We find that when the lithium concentration in a-LixSi reaches a critical value of x = 3.75, the a-Li3.75Si spontaneously and congruently transforms to c-Li15Si4 by a process that is solely controlled by the lithium concentration in the a-LixSi, involving neither large scale atomic migration nor phase separation. DFT calculations indicate that c-Li15Si4 formation is favored over other possible crystalline phases due to the similarity in electronic structure with a-Li3.75Si.

Gu, Meng; Wang, Zhiguo; Connell, Justin G.; Perea, Daniel E.; Lauhon, Lincoln J.; Gao, Fei; Wang, Chong M.

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

329

Crystalline Silicon Photovolatic Cell Basics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Crystalline silicon cells are made of silicon atoms connected to one another to form a crystal lattice. This lattice comprises the solid material that forms the photovoltaic (PV) cell's...

330

Structural Characteristics of Synthetic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is an important phase involved in calcification by a wide variety of invertebrate organisms and is of technological interest in the development of functional materials. Despite widespread scientific interest in this phase a full characterization of structure is lacking. This is mainly due to its metastability and difficulties in evaluating structure using conventional structure determination methods. Here we present new findings from the application of two techniques, pair distribution function analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which provide new insight to structural aspects of synthetic ACC. Several important results have emerged from this study of ACC formed in vitro using two common preparation methods: (1) ACC exhibits no structural coherence over distances > 15 {angstrom} and is truly amorphous; (2) most of the hydrogen in ACC is present as structural H{sub 2}O, about half of which undergoes restricted motion on the millisecond time scale near room temperature; (3) the short- and intermediate-range structure of ACC shows no distinct match to any known structure in the calcium carbonate system; and (4) most of the carbonate in ACC is monodentate making it distinctly different from monohydrocalcite. Although the structure of synthetic ACC is still not fully understood, the results presented provide an important baseline for future experiments evaluating biogenic ACC and samples containing certain additives that may play a role in stabilization of ACC, crystallization kinetics, and final polymorph selection.

Michel, F. Marc; MacDonald, Jason; Feng, Jian; Phillips, Brian L.; Ehm, Lars; Tarabrella, Cathy; Parise, John B.; Reeder, Richard J. (SBU)

2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

331

amorphous molecular materials: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

amorphous molecular materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 New amorphous forms of...

332

Pentagonal puckering in a sheet of amorphous graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pentagonal puckering in a sheet of amorphous graphene Y. Li 1 , F. Inam 2 , Avishek Kumar 3 , M. F 2011 Published online 13 July 2011 Keywords amorphous graphene, density functional theory, fullerenes Ordered graphene has been extensively studied. In this paper, we undertake a density functional study

Thorpe, Michael

333

Glutamate Surface Speciation on Amorphous Titanium Dioxide and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glutamate Surface Speciation on Amorphous Titanium Dioxide and Hydrous Ferric Oxide D I M I T R I (HFO) and titanium dioxide exhibit similar strong attachment of many adsorbates including biomolecules on amorphous titanium dioxide. The results indicate that glutamate adsorbs on HFO as a deprotonated divalent

Sverjensky, Dimitri A.

334

LOW-TEMPERATURE CRYSTALLIZATION OF AMORPHOUS SILICATE IN ASTROPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We construct a theoretical model for low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicate grains induced by exothermic chemical reactions. As a first step, the model is applied to the annealing experiments, in which the samples are (1) amorphous silicate grains and (2) amorphous silicate grains covered with an amorphous carbon layer. We derive the activation energies of crystallization for amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon from the analysis of the experiments. Furthermore, we apply the model to the experiment of low-temperature crystallization of an amorphous silicate core covered with an amorphous carbon layer containing reactive molecules. We clarify the conditions of low-temperature crystallization due to exothermic chemical reactions. Next, we formulate the crystallization conditions so as to be applicable to astrophysical environments. We show that the present crystallization mechanism is characterized by two quantities: the stored energy density Q in a grain and the duration of the chemical reactions {tau}. The crystallization conditions are given by Q>Q{sub min} and {tau} < {tau}{sub cool} regardless of details of the reactions and grain structure, where {tau}{sub cool} is the cooling timescale of the grains heated by exothermic reactions, and Q{sub min} is minimum stored energy density determined by the activation energy of crystallization. Our results suggest that silicate crystallization occurs in wider astrophysical conditions than hitherto considered.

Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Yamamoto, Tetsuo [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Kimura, Hiroshi [Center for Planetary Science, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

E-Print Network 3.0 - aldehyde-terminated amorphous carbon Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Computational Study of Structures of Amorphous Carbon A. Sorkin, J. Adler and R.Kalish Department... and graphite 15; Amorphous carbon 15; Tight-binding molecular...

336

E-Print Network 3.0 - al-based amorphous matrix Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(2000) 238250 www.elsevier.comlocatejallcom Summary: microscopic investigations of the formation of eutectic alloys in the systems: amorphous Siparticle Au... , amorphous Si...

337

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous si films Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

jallcom Summary: microscopic investigations of the formation of eutectic alloys in the systems: amorphous Siparticle Au... , amorphous Siparticle Al showed that the formation...

338

Use of additives to improve microstructures and fracture resistance of silicon nitride ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-strength, fracture-resistant silicon nitride ceramic material that includes about 5 to about 75 wt-% of elongated reinforcing grains of beta-silicon nitride, about 20 to about 95 wt-% of fine grains of beta-silicon nitride, wherein the fine grains have a major axis of less than about 1 micron; and about 1 to about 15 wt-% of an amorphous intergranular phase comprising Si, N, O, a rare earth element and a secondary densification element. The elongated reinforcing grains have an aspect ratio of 2:1 or greater and a major axis measuring about 1 micron or greater. The elongated reinforcing grains are essentially isotropically oriented within the ceramic microstructure. The silicon nitride ceramic exhibits a room temperature flexure strength of 1,000 MPa or greater and a fracture toughness of 9 MPa-m.sup.(1/2) or greater. The silicon nitride ceramic exhibits a peak strength of 800 MPa or greater at 1200 degrees C. Also included are methods of making silicon nitride ceramic materials which exhibit the described high flexure strength and fracture-resistant values.

Becher, Paul F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lin, Hua-Tay (Oak Ridge, TN)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Floating Silicon Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

Kellerman, Peter

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

340

Electrochemical thinning of silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR).

Medernach, John W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Electrochemical thinning of silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). 14 figures.

Medernach, J.W.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

342

A MODEL OF THE RECRYSTALLIZATION MECHANISM OF AMORPHOUS SILICON LAYERS CREATED BY ION IMPLANTATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Physical Metallurgy", p. 282, ASM Monogram, (1950). 35.Solid State Theory in Metallurgy (Cambridge Press, 1973), p.

Drosd, R.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous silicon pv Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 26 Solar Photovoltaics development -Status and perspectives Summary: in photovoltaic materi-...

344

amorphous silicon-carbon alloys: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: alloy of composition correspond- ing to the metallic components of the superconduct- ing oxides respectivement. Abstract. - Previous quenching experiments on 2212...

345

amorphous-silicon-based thin-film photovoltaic: Topics by E-print...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

devices have been obtained by a direct polymerization of undoped (or p-type doped) thin film (CH)x layer onto a polycrystalline cadmium sulfide film Paris-Sud XI, Universit...

346

In-situ TEM of Two-Phase Lithiation of Amorphous Silicon Nanospheres. |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348 270 300Aptamers andInSaturatedClimate

347

Atomistic modeling of amorphous silicon carbide using a bond-order  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,ArthurMaterialsRibonucleaseGalliumpotential. |

348

Application of Thin-Film Amorphous Silicon to Chemical Imaging Tatsuo Yoshinobu1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is a field-effect sensor with an electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) structure as shown in figure 1. A dc bias voltage is applied to the EIS system so that a depletion layer is induced at the insulator of the LAPS is similar to that of the EIS capacitance sensor [4,5], in which the capacitance of the EIS system

Moritz, Werner

349

Proximity Effect - Amorphous Sn-Fe, Amorphous Bi-Fe Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the transition temperature with resistance per square lnd inverse film thickness, an apparently universal characteristic of amorphous superconducting films, was also observed in these experiments. I. INTRODUCTION The proximity effect on a superconductor...- ters peculiar to both the normal-metal layer and the superconductor. Fortunately, the theory is not partic- ularly sensitive to the normal-metal parameters, at least in the thick-film limit; consequently, Lejeune and Naugle' have suggested...

CORT, G.; Naugle, Donald G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental results on the formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces are presented and analyzed using a rate equation model. The energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. They turn out to be significantly higher than those obtained for polycrystalline silicates, demonstrating the importance of grain morphology. Using these barriers we evaluate the efficiency of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate grains under interstellar conditions. It is found that unlike polycrystalline silicates, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H_2 formation in diffuse interstellar clouds.

Ling Li; Giulio Manico; Emanuele Congiu; Joe Roser; Sol Swords; Hagai B. Perets; Adina Lederhendler; Ofer Biham; John Robert Brucato; Valerio Pirronello; Gianfranco Vidali

2007-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

351

Advanced Design of Broadband Distributed Amplifier using a SiGe BiCMOS Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interfaces, it is essential that RF/microwave circuits be implemented in low-cost silicon technology. However.18 m CMOS distributed amplifier with Coplanar Strip (CPS) was designed with the unity gain

De Flaviis, Franco

352

Back channel etch chemistry of advanced a-Si:H TFTs , T.K. Won b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been reported in the etch- ing of silicon for various applications [15,16]. Fluorocarbon com- pounds organic etching by- product common in fluorocarbon dry etching process [18,19]. Hydrogen bromide (HBr) has

Kanicki, Jerzy

353

Hybrid Silicon Evanescent Lasers John E. Bowersa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[2]. Finally a 110 nm thick n-doped InP spacer is used as a bonding interface to silicon. The silicon factors of the silicon waveguide and the QWs can be manipulated by the silicon waveguide dimensions silicon waveguide. For the fabricated waveguide dimensions of a 0.7 µm height (H) and 0.6 µm rib

Bowers, John

354

amorphous carbon films: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

constants of both solid-state diamond and graphite and gas-phase hydro- carbon materials.19Atomistic simulations of the nanometer-scale indentation of amorphous-carbon thin...

355

amorphous carbon film: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

constants of both solid-state diamond and graphite and gas-phase hydro- carbon materials.19Atomistic simulations of the nanometer-scale indentation of amorphous-carbon thin...

356

Theory and simulation of amorphous organic electronic devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electronic properties of amorphous organic thin films are of great interest due to their application in devices such as light emitting devices, solar cells, photodetectors, and lasers. Compared to conventional inorganic ...

Madigan, Conor (Conor Francis), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Side-Jump Effect in Paramagnetic Amorphous Metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A systematic study of the resistivity (rho), the Hall coefficients (R(H)), and the magnetic susceptibilities (chi) of the Zr-based paramagnetic amorphous alloys suggests a self-consistent explanation for the frequently observed positive values of R...

RHIE, K.; Naugle, Donald G.; O, BH; MARKERT, JT.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Amorphous powders of Al-Hf prepared by mechanical alloying  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We synthesized amorphous Al/sub 50/Hf/sub 50/ alloy powder by mechanically alloying an equimolar mixture of crystalline powders of Al and Hf using hexane as a dispersant. We characterized the powder as a function of mechanical-alloying time by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry. Amorphous Al/sub 50/Hf/sub 50/ powder heated at 10 K s/sup /minus/1/ crystallizes polymorphously at 1003 K into orthorhombic AlHf (CrB-type structure). During mechanical alloying, some hexane decomposes and hydrogen and carbon are incorporated into the amorphous alloy powder. The hydrogen can be removed by annealing the powder by hot pressing at a temperature approximately 30 K below the crystallization temperature. The amorphous compacts have a diamond pyramidal hardness of 1025 DPH. 24 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Schwarz, R.B.; Hannigan, J.W.; Sheinberg, H.; Tiainen, T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Atomistic simulations of radiation damage in amorphous metal alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While numerous fundamental studies have characterized the atomic-level radiation response mechanisms in irradiated crystalline alloys, comparatively little is known regarding the mechanisms of radiation damage in amorphous ...

Baumer, Richard E. (Richard Edward)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Electrodeposition of amorphous matrix Ni-W/Wp̳ composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An amorphous Ni-W alloy matrix was incorporated with W particulate through two types of electrodeposition. The plating bath for the electrodeposition contained nickel sulfate, sodium tungstate, sodium citrate, ammonium ...

Jenket, Donald R. (Donald Robert)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Mechanical properties of amorphous Lix Si alloys: a reactive...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was downloaded on 08102013 at 15:46 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Mechanical properties of amorphous Li x Si alloys: a reactive force field study View the table...

362

Making silicon stronger.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon microfabrication has seen many decades of development, yet the structural reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is far from optimized. The fracture strength of Si MEMS is limited by a combination of poor toughness and nanoscale etch-induced defects. A MEMS-based microtensile technique has been used to characterize the fracture strength distributions of both standard and custom microfabrication processes. Recent improvements permit 1000's of test replicates, revealing subtle but important deviations from the commonly assumed 2-parameter Weibull statistical model. Subsequent failure analysis through a combination of microscopy and numerical simulation reveals salient aspects of nanoscale flaw control. Grain boundaries, for example, suffer from preferential attack during etch-release thereby forming failure-critical grain-boundary grooves. We will discuss ongoing efforts to quantify the various factors that affect the strength of polycrystalline silicon, and how weakest-link theory can be used to make worst-case estimates for design.

Boyce, Brad Lee

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Polymorphism of the glass former ethanol confined in mesoporous silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray diffraction patterns of ethanol confined in parallel-aligned channels of approx. 10 nm diameter and 50 micrometer length in mesoporous silicon have been recorded as a function of filling fraction, temperature and for varying cooling and heating rates. A sorption isotherm, recorded in the liquid state, indicates a three monolayer thick, strongly adsorbed wall layer and a capillary condensed fraction of molecules in the pore center. Though the strongly adsorbed film remains in an amorphous state for the entire temperature range investigated, the capillary condensed molecules reproduce the polymorphism of bulk solid ethanol, that is the formation of either crystalline or glass-like states as a function of cooling rate. The critical rate necessary to achieve a vitrification in the mesopores is, however, at least two orders of magnitude smaller than in the bulk state. This finding can be traced both to pure geometrical constraints and quenched disorder effects, characteristic of confinement in mesoporous sil...

Henschel, Anke; Huber, Patrick; 10.1080/09500831003766999

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Identifying electronic properties relevant to improving stability in a-Si:H-based cells and overall performance in a-Si,Ge:H-based cells. Annual subcontract report, 18 April 1995--17 April 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work done during this second phase of the University of Oregon`s NREL subcontract focused on degradation studies in both pure a-Si:H and a-Si,Ge:H alloys, as well as a detailed study of the interface between these two materials in a-Si:H/a-Si, Ge:H heterostructures. All samples discussed in this report were produced by the glow-discharge method and were obtained either in collaboration with United Solar Systems Corporation or with researchers at Lawrence Berkeley laboratory. First, the results from the a-Si, Ge:H degradation studies support the conclusion that considerable quantities of charged defects exist in nominally intrinsic material. Researchers found that on light-soaking, all the observed defect sub-bands increased; however, their ratios varied significantly. Second, researchers performed voltage pulse stimulated capacitance transient measurements on a-Si:H/a-Si, Ge:H heterostructure samples and found a clear signature of trapped hole emission extending over long times. Finally, researchers began comparison studies of the electronic properties of a-Si:H grown by glow discharge either with 100% silane, or with silane diluted in H{sub 2} or He gas. The results on these samples indicate that the films grown under high hydrogen dilution exhibit roughly a factor of 3 lower deep defect densities than those grown using pure silane.

Cohen, J.D. [Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Modified silicon carbide whiskers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

Tiegs, T.N.; Lindemer, T.B.

1991-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Modified silicon carbide whiskers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Lindemer, Terrence B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Variable-amplitude oscillatory shear response of amorphous materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variable-amplitude oscillatory shear tests are emerging as powerful tools to investigate and quantify the nonlinear rheology of amorphous solids, complex fluids and biological materials. Quite a few recent experimental and atomistic simulation studies demonstrated that at low shear amplitudes, an amorphous solid settles into an amplitude- and initial conditions-dependent dissipative limit cycle, in which back-and-forth localized particle rearrangements periodically bring the system to the same state. At sufficiently large shear amplitudes, the amorphous system loses memory of the initial conditions, exhibits chaotic particle motions accompanied by diffusive behavior and settles into a stochastic steady-state. The two regimes are separated by a transition amplitude, possibly characterized by some critical-like features. Here we argue that these observations support some of the physical assumptions embodied in the nonequilibrium thermodynamic, internal-variables based, Shear-Transformation-Zone model of amorphous visco-plasticity; most notably that "flow defects" in amorphous solids are characterized by internal states between which they can make transitions, and that structural evolution is driven by dissipation associated with plastic deformation. We present a rather extensive theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic Shear-Transformation-Zone model for a variable-amplitude oscillatory shear protocol, highlighting its success in accounting for various experimental and simulational observations, as well as its limitations. Our results offer a continuum-level theoretical framework for interpreting the variable-amplitude oscillatory shear response of amorphous solids and may promote additional developments.

Nathan Perchikov; Eran Bouchbinder

2014-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

368

Fabrication and properties of microporous silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microporous silicon layers were fabricated by electrochemical etching of single crystalline silicon wafers in HF-ethanol solutions. The pore properties of porous silicon were examined by physical adsorption of nitrogen and the relationship between...

Shao, Jianzhong

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE CoZZoque C4, suppZdment au nOIO, Tome 42, octobre 1981 page C4-463  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.- The possibility of low-cost thin film photovoltaic cells using amorphous silicon (a-Si) based alloys has generated EFFICIENCY, LARGE-AREA PHOTOVOLTAIC DEVICES USING AMORPHOUS Si:F:H ALLOY A. Madan, W. Czubatyj, J. Yang, J, U. S.A. Abstract.- Overall conversion efficiency of 6.6% has been obtained for a photovoltaic device

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

370

Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide....  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the...

371

Silicon on insulator with active buried regions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

372

Silicon on insulator with active buried regions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

McCarthy, A.M.

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

Silicon on insulator with active buried regions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Silicon on insulator with active buried regions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

McCarthy, A.M.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

375

Epitaxial ferromagnetic oxide thin films on silicon with atomically sharp interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bottleneck in the integration of functional oxides with silicon, either directly grown or using a buffer, is the usual formation of an amorphous interfacial layer. Here, we demonstrate that ferromagnetic CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} films can be grown epitaxially on Si(111) using a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer layer, and remarkably the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si(111) interface is stable and remains atomically sharp. CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} films present high crystal quality and high saturation magnetization.

Coux, P. de [Institut de Cincia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus de la UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); CEMES-CNRS, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, BP 94347, Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Bachelet, R.; Fontcuberta, J.; Snchez, F., E-mail: fsanchez@icmab.es [Institut de Cincia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus de la UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Warot-Fonrose, B. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, BP 94347, Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Skumryev, V. [Instituci Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avanats (ICREA), Barcelona, Spain and Dep. de Fsica, Univ. Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Lupina, L.; Niu, G.; Schroeder, T. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

Stress-induced patterns in ion-irradiated Silicon: a model based on anisotropic plastic flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a model for the effect of stress on thin amorphous films that develop atop ion-irradiated silicon, based on the mechanism of ion-induced anisotropic plastic flow. Using only parameters directly measured or known to high accuracy, the model exhibits remarkably good agreement with the wavelengths of experimentally-observed patterns, and agrees qualitatively with limited data on ripple propagation speed. The predictions of the model are discussed in the context of other mechanisms recently theorized to explain the wavelengths, including extensive comparison with an alternate model of stress.

Scott A. Norris

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

377

Low temperature production of large-grain polycrystalline semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxide or nitride layer is provided on an amorphous semiconductor layer prior to performing metal-induced crystallization of the semiconductor layer. The oxide or nitride layer facilitates conversion of the amorphous material into large grain polycrystalline material. Hence, a native silicon dioxide layer provided on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), followed by deposited Al permits induced crystallization at temperatures far below the solid phase crystallization temperature of a-Si. Solar cells and thin film transistors can be prepared using this method.

Naseem, Hameed A. (Fayetteville, AR); Albarghouti, Marwan (Loudonville, NY)

2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

Photovoltaic Crystalline Silicon Cell Basics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To separate electrical charges, crystalline silicon cells must have a built-in electric field. Light shining on crystalline silicon may free electrons within the crystal lattice, but for these electrons to do useful worksuch as provide electricity to a light bulbthey must be separated and directed into an electrical circuit.

379

Recent developments in silicon calorimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a survey of some of the recent calorimeter applications of silicon detectors. The numerous attractive features of silicon detectors are summarized, with an emphasis on those aspects important to calorimetry. Several of the uses of this technology are summarized and referenced. We consider applications for electromagnetic calorimetry, hadronic calorimetry, and proposals for the SSC.

Brau, J.E.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Ultraviolet selective silicon photodiode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(' silicon surfa&(& that n&ost of t h&) phologeneraied hole-el( & tron pairs are k&st by surface rccornbinai ion before being nolle&. trxl hy a pr). jun?i, ion. The major cause of surl'a&. e re?omhination is probably due Io lifetim(. shortening ol' Lhe... drpth corresponded to a high& r shor4wav? length rcsponsiv- ity tlirough liis ( xperimcnial diodes with junction dcpl ha ol'0. -'I to 2 0 pm. I indmayer and Allison [4I] I'abri&. ated n+-p solar cells with junction &lcpths of approximately 0. 1, 0. 15...

Chintapalli, Koteswara Rao

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Core-Shell Nanopillar Array Solar Cells using Cadmium Sulfide Coating on Indium Phosphide Nanopillars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monocrystalline silicon solar cells, polycrystalline silicon solar cells, and amorphous silicon (thin-film)

Tu, Bor-An Clayton

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Core-Shell Nanopillar Array Solar Cells using Cadmium Sulfide Coating on Indium Phosphide Nanopillars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monocrystalline silicon solar cells, polycrystalline silicon solar cells, and amorphous silicon (thin-film) solar

Tu, Bor-An Clayton

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A silicon photomultiplier readout for time of flight neutron spectroscopy with {gamma}-ray detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a recently developed photosensor used in particle physics, e.g., for detection of minimum ionizing particles and/or Cherenkov radiation. Its performance is comparable to that of photomultiplier tubes, but with advantages in terms of reduced volume and magnetic field insensitivity. In the present study, the performance of a gamma ray detector made of an yttrium aluminum perovskite scintillation crystal and a SiPM-based readout is assessed for use in time of flight neutron spectroscopy. Measurements performed at the ISIS pulsed neutron source demonstrate the feasibility of {gamma}-detection based on the new device.

Pietropaolo, A.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica ''G. Occhialini'' and CNISM, Universita Degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Festa, G.; Andreani, C.; De Pascale, M. P.; Reali, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Centro NAST, Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133, Roma (Italy); Grazzi, F. [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Madonna del Piano n.10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Schooneveld, E. M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite densified materials prepared using composite powders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

Dunmead, S.D.; Weimer, A.W.; Carroll, D.F.; Eisman, G.A.; Cochran, G.A.; Susnitzky, D.W.; Beaman, D.R.; Nilsen, K.J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Schenectady, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber-reinforced silicon-silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon-silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Schenectady, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Silicon nitride ceramic comprising samaria and ytterbia  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising samaria and ytterbia for enhanced toughness.

Yeckley, Russell L. (Oakham, MA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Synthesis and Analysis of Alpha Silicon Carbide Components for Encapsulation of Fuel Rods and Pellets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of silicon carbide (SiC) along with its low neutron activation and stability in a radiation field make it an attractive material for encapsulating fuel rods and fuel pellets. The alpha phase (6H) is particularly stable. Unfortunately, it requires very high temperature processing and is not readily available in fibers or near-net shapes. This paper describes an investigation to fabricate a-SiC as thin films, fibers and near-net-shape products by direct conversion of carbon using silicon monoxide vapor at temperatures less than 1700 C. In addition, experiments to nucleate the alpha phase during pyrolysis of polysilazane, are also described. Structure and composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Preliminary tensile property analysis of fibers was also performed.

Kevin M. McHugh; John E. Garnier; George W. Griffith

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

Weiner, Kurt H. (San Jose, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Phoenix, AZ)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Amorphous Alloy Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the beginning of this project, thin film amorphous alloy membranes were considered a nascent but promising new technology for industrial-scale hydrogen gas separations from coal- derived syngas. This project used a combination of theoretical modeling, advanced physical vapor deposition fabricating, and laboratory and gasifier testing to develop amorphous alloy membranes that had the potential to meet Department of Energy (DOE) targets in the testing strategies outlined in the NETL Membrane Test Protocol. The project is complete with Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), and Western Research Institute (WRI) having all operated independently and concurrently. GT studied the hydrogen transport properties of several amorphous alloys and found that ZrCu and ZrCuTi were the most promising candidates. GT also evaluated the hydrogen transport properties of V, Nb and Ta membranes coated with different transition-metal carbides (TMCs) (TM = Ti, Hf, Zr) catalytic layers by employing first-principles calculations together with statistical mechanics methods and determined that TiC was the most promising material to provide catalytic hydrogen dissociation. SwRI developed magnetron coating techniques to deposit a range of amorphous alloys onto both porous discs and tubular substrates. Unfortunately none of the amorphous alloys could be deposited without pinhole defects that undermined the selectivity of the membranes. WRI tested the thermal properties of the ZrCu and ZrNi alloys and found that under reducing environments the upper temperature limit of operation without recrystallization is ~250 C. There were four publications generated from this project with two additional manuscripts in progress and six presentations were made at national and international technical conferences. The combination of the pinhole defects and the lack of high temperature stability make the theoretically identified most promising candidate amorphous alloys unsuitable for application as hydrogen separation membranes in coal fire systems.

Coulter, K

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

Properties of electroless Ni-W-P amorphous alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes work performed to determine some of the properties of the electroless Ni-W-P amorphous deposits. Phosphorus contents were varied up to 32 at.%, and the amorphous structure was found to be present at phosphorus contents above 5 at.%. Irrespective of P content, all the deposits exhibits excellent adhesion to metallic substrates. The addition of even small amounts of W provided greatly increased hardness compared with the plain Ni-P deposits. The wettability properties of the Ni-W-P deposits were found to be comparable to those of Ni-P and N-B-P deposits but inferior to those of Ni-B deposits.

Zhang Bangwei [Academia Sinica, Shenyang (China). International Centre of Materials Physics] [Academia Sinica, Shenyang (China). International Centre of Materials Physics; [Hunan Univ., Changsha (China). Dept. of Applied Physics; Hu Wangyu; Zhang Qinglong; Qu Xuanyuan [Hunan Univ., Changsha (China). Dept. of Applied Physics] [Hunan Univ., Changsha (China). Dept. of Applied Physics

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

E-Print Network 3.0 - as-doped buried amorphous Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Amorphous Si A.J. Dent, G. Derst, G.N. Greaves, S. Kalbitzer* and C... Heidelberg, Germany Abstract. Our previous work has concentrated on the recrystallisation of amorphous...

393

Chemical Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes For Li ion Batteries: A XANES Study. Chemical Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes For Li ion...

394

Amorphous Metallic Glass as New High Power and Energy Density Anodes For Lithium Ion Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have investigated the use of aluminum based amorphous metallic glass as the anode in lithium ion rechargeable batteries. Amorphous metallic glasses have no long-range ordered microstructure; the atoms are less closely ...

Meng, Shirley Y.

395

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous bodies dover Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in temperature dependent amorphization. The H2O-ice's phase was determined using the near infrared... ) band is strong while it is nearly absent in the amorphous spectrum...

396

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous kei kohinshitsu Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

amorphous solid 3, 4 . Colloidal TiO2 particles obtained by addition of polymer or salt... to determine the initial structure of the amorphous as-synthesized TiO2 particles...

397

A forward bias method for lag correction of an a-Si flat panel detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Digital a-Si flat panel (FP) x-ray detectors can exhibit detector lag, or residual signal, of several percent that can cause ghosting in projection images or severe shading artifacts, known as the radar artifact, in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructions. A major contributor to detector lag is believed to be defect states, or traps, in the a-Si layer of the FP. Software methods to characterize and correct for the detector lag exist, but they may make assumptions such as system linearity and time invariance, which may not be true. The purpose of this work is to investigate a new hardware based method to reduce lag in an a-Si FP and to evaluate its effectiveness at removing shading artifacts in CBCT reconstructions. The feasibility of a novel, partially hardware based solution is also examined. Methods: The proposed hardware solution for lag reduction requires only a minor change to the FP. For pulsed irradiation, the proposed method inserts a new operation step between the readout and data collection stages. During this new stage the photodiode is operated in a forward bias mode, which fills the defect states with charge. A Varian 4030CB panel was modified to allow for operation in the forward bias mode. The contrast of residual lag ghosts was measured for lag frames 2 and 100 after irradiation ceased for standard and forward bias modes. Detector step response, lag, SNR, modulation transfer function (MTF), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) measurements were made with standard and forward bias firmware. CBCT data of pelvic and head phantoms were also collected. Results: Overall, the 2nd and 100th detector lag frame residual signals were reduced 70%-88% using the new method. SNR, MTF, and DQE measurements show a small decrease in collected signal and a small increase in noise. The forward bias hardware successfully reduced the radar artifact in the CBCT reconstruction of the pelvic and head phantoms by 48%-81%. Conclusions: Overall, the forward bias method has been found to greatly reduce detector lag ghosts in projection data and the radar artifact in CBCT reconstructions. The method is limited to improvements of the a-Si photodiode response only. A future hybrid mode may overcome any limitations of this method.

Starman, Jared; Tognina, Carlo; Partain, Larry; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Silicone plesiotherapy molds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plesiotherapy, the treatment of superficial lesions by radioactive molds has largely been replaced by teletherapy techniques involving high energy photon and electron beams. There are, however, situations for which a short distance type treatment, in one form or another, is superior to any other presently available. Traditionally, molds have taken the form of rigid devices incorporating clamps to attach them to the patient. This ensures a reproducible geometry about a localized region since the molds are applied on a daily basis. To make such devices requires considerable skill and patience. This article describes an alternative method that eliminates the use of cumbersome devices in many situations. Silicone molds made from a plaster cast model have been found suitable for the treatment of surface lesions and especially for lesions in the oral and nasal cavities. With the use of radioactive gold seeds the molds may be left in place for a few days without fear of them moving.

Karolis, C.; Reay-Young, P.S.; Walsh, W.; Velautham, G.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Concentrator silicon cell research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). Solar Photovoltaic Lab.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Lithium Ion Battery Performance of Silicon Nanowires With Carbon...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ion Battery Performance of Silicon Nanowires With Carbon Skin . Lithium Ion Battery Performance of Silicon Nanowires With Carbon Skin . Abstract: Silicon (Si) nanomaterials have...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Rheology of silicon carbide/vinyl ester nanocomposites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New York, 1999. SILICON CARBIDE/VINYL ESTER NANOCOMPOSITESRheology of Silicon Carbide/Vinyl Ester NanocompositesABSTRACT: Silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles with no

Yong, Virginia; Hahn, H. Thomas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Study of a-SiGe:H films and nip devices used in high efficiency triple junction solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of a-SiGe:H films and n­i­p devices used in high efficiency triple junction solar cells-Si:H films). This allows the capture of the full range of the solar spectra in different layers and thus, North Guwahati, Guwahati 781 039, India Abstract We report our systematic studies on a-SiGe:H thin films

Deng, Xunming

403

Amorphous and nanocrystalline phase formation in highly-driven Al-based binary alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Remarkable advances have been made since rapid solidification was first introduced to the field of materials science and technology. New types of materials such as amorphous alloys and nanostructure materials have been developed as a result of rapid solidification techniques. While these advances are, in many respects, ground breaking, much remains to be discerned concerning the fundamental relationships that exist between a liquid and a rapidly solidified solid. The scope of the current dissertation involves an extensive set of experimental, analytical, and computational studies designed to increase the overall understanding of morphological selection, phase competition, and structural hierarchy that occurs under far-from equilibrium conditions. High pressure gas atomization and Cu-block melt-spinning are the two different rapid solidification techniques applied in this study. The research is mainly focused on Al-Si and Al-Sm alloy systems. Silicon and samarium produce different, yet favorable, systems for exploration when alloyed with aluminum under far-from equilibrium conditions. One of the main differences comes from the positions of their respective T{sub 0} curves, which makes Al-Si a good candidate for solubility extension while the plunging T{sub 0} line in Al-Sm promotes glass formation. The rapidly solidified gas-atomized Al-Si powders within a composition range of 15 to 50 wt% Si are examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The non-equilibrium partitioning and morphological selection observed by examining powders at different size classes are described via a microstructure map. The interface velocities and the amount of undercooling present in the powders are estimated from measured eutectic spacings based on Jackson-Hunt (JH) and Trivedi-Magnin-Kurz (TMK) models, which permit a direct comparison of theoretical predictions. For an average particle size of 10 {micro}m with a Peclet number of {approx}0.2, JH and TMK deviate from each other. This deviation indicates an adiabatic type solidification path where heat of fusion is reabsorbed. It is interesting that this particle size range is also consistent with the appearance of a microcellular growth. While no glass formation is observed within this system, the smallest size powders appear to consist of a mixture of nanocrystalline Si and Al. Al-Sm alloys have been investigated within a composition range of 34 to 42 wt% Sm. Gas atomized powders of Al-Sm are investigated to explore the morphological and structural hierarchy that correlates with different degrees of departure from full equilibrium conditions. The resultant powders show a variety of structural selection with respect to amount of undercooling, with an amorphous structure appearing at the highest cooling rates. Because of the chaotic nature of gas atomization, Cu-block melt-spinning is used to produce a homogeneous amorphous structure. The as-quenched structure within Al-34 to 42 wt% Sm consists of nanocrystalline fcc-Al (on the order of 5 nm) embedded in an amorphous matrix. The nucleation density of fcc-Al after initial crystallization is on the order of 10{sup 22}-10{sup 23} m{sup -3}, which is 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} orders of magnitude higher than what classical nucleation theory predicts. Detailed analysis of liquid and as-quenched structures using high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction, high energy transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography techniques revealed an Al-Sm network similar in appearance to a medium range order (MRO) structure. A model whereby these MRO clusters promote the observed high nucleation density of fcc-Al nanocrystals is proposed. The devitrification path was identified using high temperature, in-situ, high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques and the crystallization kinetics were described using an analytical Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach.

Kalay, Yunus Eren

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Phosphate and Organic Acids as Competing Sorbates on Amorphous Aluminum Oxide. (3791)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phosphate and Organic Acids as Competing Sorbates on Amorphous Aluminum Oxide. (3791) Authors: K sorption of P to amorphous aluminum oxides. Alum initially decreases litter pH, so the stability of P was employed to investigate the adsorption of phosphate and oxalate, to synthetic amorphous aluminum hydroxide

Sparks, Donald L.

405

Electrochemical characteristics of plasma-etched black silicon as anodes for Li-ion batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanostructured silicon as an anode material for Li-ion batteries is produced for the first time by inductively coupled plasmaplasma etching of Si wafers in the black silicon regime. The microscopic structure strongly resembles other types of nanostructured silicon, with a well-arranged nanostructure possessing a sufficient porosity for accommodating large volume expansion. Despite these features, however, a high first-cycle irreversible capacity loss and a poor cycle life are observed. The main reason for these poor features is the formation of a thick solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer related to the surface condition of the pristine nanostructured black silicon (b-Si) electrode. Therefore, the cycle life of the b-Si electrode is heavily influenced by the constant reformation of the SEI layer depending upon the surface composition in spite of the presence of nanostructured Si. In the fast lithiation experiments, the nanostructure region of the b-Si electrode is detached from the Si substrate owing to the kinetics difference between the lithium ion diffusion and the electron injection and phase transformation in the nanostructured Si region. This means that more Si substrate is involved in lithiation at high current rates. It is therefore important to maintain balance in the chemical kinetics during the lithiation of nanostructured Si electrodes with a Si substrate.

Lee, Gibaek; Wehrspohn, Ralf B., E-mail: ralf.b.wehrspohn@iwmh.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM, Halle (Saale) 06120, Germany and Department of Physics, Martin-Luther University, Halle (Saale) 06099 (Germany); Schweizer, Stefan L. [Department of Physics, Martin-Luther University, Halle (Saale) 06099 (Germany)

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Atmospheric Oxygen Binding and Hole Doping in Deformed Graphene on a SiO2 Substrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy, we study the relationship between structural distortion and electrical hole doping of graphene on a silicon dioxide substrate. The observed upshift of the Raman G band represents charge doping and not compressive strain. Two independent factors control the doping: (1) the degree of graphene coupling to the substrate, and (2) exposure to oxygen and moisture. Thermal annealing induces a pronounced structural distortion due to close coupling to SiO2 and activates the ability of diatomic oxygen to accept charge from graphene. Gas flow experiments show that dry oxygen reversibly dopes graphene; doping becomes stronger and more irreversible in the presence of moisture and over long periods of time. We propose that oxygen molecular anions are stabilized by water solvation and electrostatic binding to the silicon dioxide surface.

Sunmin Ryu; Li Liu; Stephane Berciaud; Young-Jun Yu; Haitao Liu; Philip Kim; George W. Flynn; Louis E. Brus

2010-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

407

Mechanical Dissipation in Silicon Flexures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thermo-mechanical properties of silicon make it of significant interest as a possible material for mirror substrates and suspension elements for future long-baseline gravitational wave detectors. The mechanical dissipation in 92um thick single-crystal silicon cantilevers has been observed over the temperature range 85 K to 300 K, with dissipation approaching levels down to phi = 4.4E-7.

S. Reid; G. Cagnoli; D. R. M. Crooks; J. Hough; P. Murray; S. Rowan; M. M. Fejer; R. Route; S. Zappe

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

408

In situ Study of the Formation of Silicide Phases in Amorphous Ni-Si Mixed Layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigated Ni silicide phase formation when Si is added within an as deposited 50 nm Ni film. A series of 22 samples with a Si content varying from 0 to 50 at.% was prepared and systematically investigated with in situ x-ray diffraction. The inert oxide substrate was used to identify the phases which first crystallize in an amorphous Ni-Si mixture of a given concentration. The noncongruent silicides Ni{sub 3}Si and Ni{sub 3}Si{sub 2} are never observed to crystallize readily out of the mixture. A remarkable observation is the initial crystallization at low temperature of a hexagonal Ni-silicide, observed over a broad mixed layer composition [35-49%Si]; this hexagonal phase nucleates readily as a single phase [39-47%Si] or together with Ni{sub 2}Si [35-38%Si] or NiSi [49%Si]. This low-temperature phase is related to the high temperature {theta}-phase, but covers a wide composition range up to 47%Si. For the same Ni-Si films deposited on Si(100), the initial nucleation of the Ni(Si) mixture is similar as for the samples deposited on SiO{sub 2}, such that the complex sequence of metal-rich Ni-silicide phases typically observed during Ni/Si reactions is modified. For samples containing more than 21%Si, a simpler sequential phase formation was observed upon annealing. From pole figures, the phase formation sequence was observed to have a significant influence on the texture of the technologically relevant NiSi phase. For mixture composition ranging from 38% to 43%Si, the initial transient {theta}-phase appears extremely textured on Si(100). The observed transient appearance of a hexagonal phase is of importance in understanding the phase formation mechanisms in the Ni-Si system.

Van Bockstael, C.; Detavernier, C; Van Meirhaeghe, R; Jordan-Sweet, J; Lavoie, C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Torque magnetometry of an amorphous-alumina/strontium-titanate interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report torque magnetometry measurements of an oxide heterostructure consisting of an amorphous Al[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] thin film grown on a crystalline SrTiO[subscript 3] substrate (a-AO/STO) by atomic layer ...

Lee, S. W.

410

Quasi-Reversible Oxygen Exchange of Amorphous IGZO Thin Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MRSEC Quasi-Reversible Oxygen Exchange of Amorphous IGZO Thin Films NSF Grant # 1121262 A. U. Adler of varying oxygen partial pressure. Oxygen exchange was confirmed by 18O tracer diffusion (time of carrier content vs. pO2) analysis should be applicable for studying the underlying carrier generation

Shahriar, Selim

411

amorphous peroxotitanate materials: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

amorphous peroxotitanate materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Two-dimensional...

412

Reversible plasticity in amorphous materials Micah Lundberg1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reversible plasticity in amorphous materials Micah Lundberg1 , Kapilanjan Krishan1 , Ning Xu2 to external loads. Plasticity, i.e. dis- sipative and irreversible macroscopic changes in a material for reversible plastic events at the microscopic scale in both experiments and simulations of two

Dennin, Michael

413

Amorphous metal formulations and structured coatings for corrosion and wear resistance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements and applying the amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements to the surface by a spray. Also a coating comprising a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements. An apparatus for producing a corrosion-resistant amorphous-metal coating on a structure comprises a deposition chamber, a deposition source in the deposition chamber that produces a deposition spray, the deposition source containing a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements, and a system that directs the deposition spray onto the structure.

Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

414

Amorphous metal formulations and structured coatings for corrosion and wear resistance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements and applying the amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements to the surface by a spray. Also a coating comprising a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements. An apparatus for producing a corrosion-resistant amorphous-metal coating on a structure comprises a deposition chamber, a deposition source in the deposition chamber that produces a deposition spray, the deposition source containing a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements, and a system that directs the deposition spray onto the structure.

Farmer, Joseph C.

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

The novel usage of spectroscopic ellipsometry for the development of amorphous Si solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 2010 Keywords: a-Si:H Thin film Si solar cell Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) a b s t r a c t We analyzed with relation to structural and electrical properties of a-Si:H thin film for solar cell and faster methodology to develop a-Si:H thin film for thin film Si solar cells using SE measurements

Park, Byungwoo

416

Correlation of atomic packing with the boson peak in amorphous alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boson peaks (BP) have been observed from phonon specific heats in 10 studied amorphous alloys. Two Einstein-type vibration modes were proposed in this work and all data can be fitted well. By measuring and analyzing local atomic structures of studied amorphous alloys and 56 reported amorphous alloys, it is found that (a) the BP originates from local harmonic vibration modes associated with the lengths of short-range order (SRO) and medium-range order (MRO) in amorphous alloys, and (b) the atomic packing in amorphous alloys follows a universal scaling law, i.e., the ratios of SRO and MRO lengths to solvent atomic diameter are 3 and 7, respectively, which exact match with length ratios of BP vibration frequencies to Debye frequency for the studied amorphous alloys. This finding provides a new perspective for atomic packing in amorphous materials, and has significant implications for quantitative description of the local atomic orders and understanding the structure-property relationship.

Yang, W. M. [State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, School of Mechanics and Civil Engineering, School of Sciences, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Liu, H. S., E-mail: liuhaishun@126.com, E-mail: blshen@seu.edu.cn, E-mail: runweili@nimte.ac.cn, E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn; Zhao, Y. C. [State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, School of Mechanics and Civil Engineering, School of Sciences, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Liu, X. J. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen, G. X.; Man, Q. K.; Chang, C. T.; Li, R. W., E-mail: liuhaishun@126.com, E-mail: blshen@seu.edu.cn, E-mail: runweili@nimte.ac.cn, E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Dun, C. C. [Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 (United States); Shen, B. L., E-mail: liuhaishun@126.com, E-mail: blshen@seu.edu.cn, E-mail: runweili@nimte.ac.cn, E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Inoue, A. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); and others

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

417

Fabrication of a single layer graphene by copper intercalation on a SiC(0001) surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cu atoms deposited on a zero layer graphene grown on a SiC(0001) substrate, intercalate between the zero layer graphene and the SiC substrate after the thermal annealing above 600?C, forming a Cu-intercalated single layer graphene. On the Cu-intercalated single layer graphene, a graphene lattice with superstructure due to moir pattern is observed by scanning tunneling microscopy, and specific linear dispersion at the K{sup } point as well as a characteristic peak in a C{sub 1s} core level spectrum, which is originated from a free-standing graphene, is confirmed by photoemission spectroscopy. The Cu-intercalated single layer graphene is found to be n-doped.

Yagyu, Kazuma; Tochihara, Hiroshi; Tomokage, Hajime; Suzuki, Takayuki [Department of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Tajiri, Takayuki; Kohno, Atsushi [Department of Applied Physics, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Takahashi, Kazutoshi [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, 1 Honjo, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

418

Nucleation and solidification of silicon for photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The majority of solar cells produced today are made with crystalline silicon wafers, which are typically manufactured by growing a large piece of silicon and then sawing it into ~200 pm wafers, a process which converts ...

Appapillai, Anjuli T. (Anjuli Tara)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The electroluminescence mechanism of Er{sup 3+} in different silicon oxide and silicon nitride environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rare earth doped metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures are of great interest for Si-based light emission. However, several physical limitations make it difficult to achieve the performance of light emitters based on compound semiconductors. To address this point, in this work the electroluminescence (EL) excitation and quenching mechanism of Er-implanted MOS structures with different designs of the dielectric stack are investigated. The devices usually consist of an injection layer made of SiO{sub 2} and an Er-implanted layer made of SiO{sub 2}, Si-rich SiO{sub 2}, silicon nitride, or Si-rich silicon nitride. All structures implanted with Er show intense EL around 1540?nm with EL power efficiencies in the order of 2??10{sup ?3} (for SiO{sub 2}:Er) or 2??10{sup ?4} (all other matrices) for lower current densities. The EL is excited by the impact of hot electrons with an excitation cross section in the range of 0.51.5??10{sup ?15?}cm{sup ?2}. Whereas the fraction of potentially excitable Er ions in SiO{sub 2} can reach values up to 50%, five times lower values were observed for other matrices. The decrease of the EL decay time for devices with Si-rich SiO{sub 2} or Si nitride compared to SiO{sub 2} as host matrix implies an increase of the number of defects adding additional non-radiative de-excitation paths for Er{sup 3+}. For all investigated devices, EL quenching cross sections in the 10{sup ?20} cm{sup 2} range and charge-to-breakdown values in the range of 110 C cm{sup ?2} were measured. For the present design with a SiO{sub 2} acceleration layer, thickness reduction and the use of different host matrices did not improve the EL power efficiency or the operation lifetime, but strongly lowered the operation voltage needed to achieve intense EL.

Rebohle, L., E-mail: l.rebohle@hzdr.de; Wutzler, R.; Braun, M.; Helm, M.; Skorupa, W. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstrae 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Berencn, Y.; Ramrez, J. M.; Garrido, B. [Dept. Electrnica, Mart i Franqus 1, Universitat de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hiller, D. [IMTEK, Faculty of Engineering, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Georges-Khler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

420

System and method for liquid silicon containment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a system and a method for liquid silicon containment, such as during the casting of high purity silicon used in solar cells or solar modules. The containment apparatus includes a shielding member adapted to prevent breaching molten silicon from contacting structural elements or cooling elements of a casting device, and a volume adapted to hold a quantity of breaching molten silicon with the volume formed by a bottom and one or more sides.

Cliber, James A; Clark, Roger F; Stoddard, Nathan G; Von Dollen, Paul

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact for Mesoscale...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact for Mesoscale Measurement Machines 1 Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact for Mesoscale Measurement Machines 2...

422

System and method for liquid silicon containment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This invention relates to a system and a method for liquid silicon containment, such as during the casting of high purity silicon used in solar cells or solar modules. The containment apparatus includes a shielding ember adapted to prevent breaching molten silicon from contacting structural elements or cooling elements of a casting device, and a volume adapted to hold a quantity of breaching molten silicon with the volume formed by a bottom and one or more sides.

Cliber, James A; Clark, Roger F; Stoddard, Nathan G; Von Dollen, Paul

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

423

Copper doped polycrystalline silicon solar cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Photovoltaic cells having improved performance are fabricated from polycrystalline silicon containing copper segregated at the grain boundaries.

Lovelace, Alan M. Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space (La Canada, CA); Koliwad, Krishna M. (La Canada, CA); Daud, Taher (La Crescenta, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Silicon crystal growing by oscillating crucible technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for growing silicon crystals from a molten melt comprising oscillating the container during crystal growth is disclosed.

Schwuttke, G.H.; Kim, K.M.; Smetana, P.

1983-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

425

Amorphous tin-cadmium oxide films and the production thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tin-cadmium oxide film having an amorphous structure and a ratio of tin atoms to cadmium atoms of between 1:1 and 3:1. The tin-cadmium oxide film may have an optical band gap of between 2.7 eV and 3.35 eV. The film may also have a charge carrier concentration of between 1.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3 and 2.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3. The tin cadmium oxide film may also exhibit a Hall mobility of between 40 cm.sup.2V.sup.-1 s.sup.-1 and 60 cm.sup.2V.sup.-1 s.sup.-1. Also disclosed is a method of producing an amorphous tin-cadmium oxide film as described and devices using same.

Li, Xiaonan; Gessert, Timothy A

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

426

The Anatomy of Plastic Events in Magnetic Amorphous Solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plastic events in amorphous solids can be much more than just "shear transformation zones" when the positional degrees of freedom are coupled non-trivially to other degrees of freedom. Here we consider magnetic amorphous solids where mechanical and magnetic degrees of freedom interact, leading to rather complex plastic events whose nature must be disentangled. In this paper we uncover the anatomy of the various contributions to some typical plastic events. These plastic events are seen as Barkhausen Noise or other "serrated noises". Using theoretical considerations we explain the observed statistics of the various contributions to the considered plastic events. The richness of contributions and their different characteristics imply that in general the statistics of these "serrated noises" cannot be universal, but rather highly dependent on the state of the system and on its microscopic interactions.

H. George E. Hentschel; Itamar Procaccia; Bhaskar Sen Gupta

2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

427

Absorption of ac fields in amorphous indium-oxide films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Absorption data from applied ac fields in Anderson-localized amorphous indium-oxide (In{sub x}O) films are shown to be frequency and disorder dependent. The absorption shows a roll-off at a frequency which is much lower than the electron-electron scattering rate of the material when it is in the diffusive regime. This is interpreted as evidence for discreteness of the energy spectrum of the deeply localized regime. This is consistent with recent many-body localization scenarios. As the metal-insulator transition is approached, the absorption shifts to higher frequencies. Comparing with the previously obtained results on the crystalline version of indium-oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3?x}) implies a considerably higher inelastic electron-phonon scattering rate in the amorphous material. The range over which the absorption versus frequency decreases may indicate that a wide distribution of localization length is a common feature in these systems.

Ovadyahu, Z. [Racah Institute of Physics, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

428

Laser wafering for silicon solar.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Prealloyed catalyst for growing silicon carbide whiskers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A prealloyed metal catalyst is used to grow silicon carbide whiskers, especially in the .beta. form. Pretreating the metal particles to increase the weight percentages of carbon or silicon or both carbon and silicon allows whisker growth to begin immediately upon reaching growth temperature.

Shalek, Peter D. (Los Alamos, NM); Katz, Joel D. (Niagara Falls, NY); Hurley, George F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon is described in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T{sub 2} gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon. 1 fig.

Tam, S.W.

1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

431

Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T.sub.2 gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon.

Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

Mullendore, Arthur W. (Sandia Park, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Observation of the photodielectric effect in an amorphous semiconductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBSERVATION OF THE PHOTODIELECTRIC EFFECT IN AN AHGRPBGUS SFNICONDUCTOR A THESIS by STEPHEN ANTHONY COLLINS Subqitted tu the Graduate College of Texas A&M University iu Partial fulfillment of. the requirement for the. degree of 1IASTER OI...' SCIFNCE August 1971 Hajcr Suhjec '. Fleqtricel magic. earing OBSERVATION OF THE PHOTODIELECTRIC EFFECT IN AN AMORPHOUS SEMICONDUCTOR A THESIS by STEPHEN ANTHONY COLLINS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of epartm...

Collins, Stephen Anthony

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Electrodeposition of amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloys are electrodeposited from a bath comprising a nickel salt, a chromium salt, a phosphorus source such as sodium hypophosphite, a complexing agent for the nickel ions, supporting salts to increase conductivity, and a buffering agent. The process is carried out at about room temperature and requires a current density between about 20 to 40 A/dm.sup.2.

Guilinger, Terry R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Black Silicon Enhanced Thin Film Silicon Photovoltaic Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SiOnyx has developed an enhanced thin film silicon photovoltaic device with improved efficiency. Thin film silicon solar cells suffer from low material absorption characteristics resulting in poor cell efficiencies. SiOnyxs approach leverages Black Silicon, an advanced material fabricated using ultrafast lasers. The laser treated films show dramatic enhancement in optical absorption with measured values in excess of 90% in the visible spectrum and well over 50% in the near infrared spectrum. Thin film Black Silicon solar cells demonstrate 25% higher current generation with almost no impact on open circuit voltage as compared with representative control samples. The initial prototypes demonstrated an improvement of nearly 2 percentage points in the suns Voc efficiency measurement. In addition we validated the capability to scale this processing technology to the throughputs (< 5 min/m2) required for volume production using state of the art commercially available high power industrial lasers. With these results we clearly demonstrate feasibility for the enhancement of thin film solar cells with this laser processing technique.

Martin U. Pralle; James E. Carey

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Reciprocal space analysis of the microstructure of luminescent and nonluminescent porous silicon films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructure of anodically prepared porous silicon films was determined using a novel X-ray diffraction technique. This technique uses double-crystal diffractometry combined with position-sensitive X- ray detection to efficiently and quantitatively image the reciprocal space structure of crystalline materials. Reciprocal space analysis of newly prepared, as well as aged, p{sup {minus}} porous silicon films showed that these films exhibit a very broad range of crystallinity. This material appears to range in structure from a strained, single-crystal, sponge-like material exhibiting long-range coherency to isolated, dilated nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. Reciprocal space analysis of n{sup +} and p{sup +} porous silicon showed these materials are strained single-crystals with a spatially-correlated array of vertical pores. The vertical pores in these crystals may be surrounded by nanoporous or nanocrystalline domains as small as a few nm in size which produce diffuse diffraction indicating their presence. The photoluminescence of these films was examined using 488 nm Ar laser excitation in order to search for possible correlations between photoluminescent intensity and crystalline microstructure.

Lee, S.R.; Barbour, J.C.; Medernach, J.W.; Stevenson, J.O.; Custer, J.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photovoltaic appli- cations and their unique properties as amorphous materials. The amorphous silicon hydrogen

Cairns, E.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Microelectromechanical pump utilizing porous silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microelectromechanical (MEM) pump is disclosed which includes a porous silicon region sandwiched between an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber. The porous silicon region is formed in a silicon substrate and contains a number of pores extending between the inlet and outlet chambers, with each pore having a cross-section dimension about equal to or smaller than a mean free path of a gas being pumped. A thermal gradient is provided along the length of each pore by a heat source which can be an electrical resistance heater or an integrated circuit (IC). A channel can be formed through the silicon substrate so that inlet and outlet ports can be formed on the same side of the substrate, or so that multiple MEM pumps can be connected in series to form a multi-stage MEM pump. The MEM pump has applications for use in gas-phase MEM chemical analysis systems, and can also be used for passive cooling of ICs.

Lantz, Jeffrey W. (Albuquerque, NM); Stalford, Harold L. (Norman, OK)

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

439

Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

Wei, G.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Method for fabricating silicon cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon.

Ruby, Douglas S. (Albuquerque, NM); Basore, Paul A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schubert, W. Kent (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Method for fabricating silicon cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon. 9 figs.

Ruby, D.S.; Basore, P.A.; Schubert, W.K.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

442

Control of morphology for enhanced electronic transport in PECVD-grown a-Si : H Thin Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar cells have become an increasingly viable alternative to traditional, pollution causing power generation methods. Although crystalline silicon (c-Si) modules make up most of the market, thin films such as hydrogenated ...

Castro Galnares, Sebastin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Response of a SiC Photodiode to Extreme Ultraviolet through Visible Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The responsivity of a type 6H-SiC photodiode in the 1.5-400 nm wavelength range was measured using synchrotron radiation. The responsivity was 0.20 A/W at 270 nm and was less than 0.10 A/W in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region. The responsivity was calculated using a proven optical model that accounted for the reflection and absorption of the incident radiation and the variation of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) with depth into the device. The CCE was determined from the responsivity measured in the 200-400 nm wavelength range. By use of this CCE and the effective pair creation energy (7.2 eV) determined from x-ray absorption measurements, the EUV responsivity was accurately modeled with no free parameters. The measured visible-light sensitivity, although low compared with that of a silicon photodiode, was surprisingly high for this wide bandgap semiconductor.

Seely,J.; Kjornrattanawanich, B.; Holland, G.; Korde, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

A SiC MOSFET Based Inverter for Wireless Power Transfer Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a wireless power transfer (WPT) system, efficiency of the power conversion stages is crucial so that the WPT technology can compete with the conventional conductive charging systems. Since there are 5 or 6 power conversion stages, each stage needs to be as efficient as possible. SiC inverters are crucial in this case; they can handle high frequency operation and they can operate at relatively higher temperatures resulting in reduces cost and size for the cooling components. This study presents the detailed power module design, development, and fabrication of a SiC inverter. The proposed inverter has been tested at three center frequencies that are considered for the WPT standardization. Performance of the inverter at the same target power transfer level is analyzed along with the other system components. In addition, another SiC inverter has been built in authors laboratory by using the ORNL designed and developed SiC modules. It is shown that the inverter with ORNL packaged SiC modules performs simular to that of the inverter having commercially available SiC modules.

Onar, Omer C [ORNL] [ORNL; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL] [ORNL; Campbell, Steven L [ORNL] [ORNL; Ning, Puqi [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)] [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS); White, Cliff P [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller (JNJ), John M. [JNJ-Miller PLC] [JNJ-Miller PLC

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

MODELING OF TRIPLE JUNCTION A-SI SOLAR CELLS USING ASA: ANALYSIS OF DEVICE PERFORMANCE UNDER VARIOUS FAILURE SCENARIOS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have experienced a significant increase in the recent years. Solar panels with triple- junction found. To assist the optimization of solar cell fabrication and cost-effective industrial photovoltaicMODELING OF TRIPLE JUNCTION A-SI SOLAR CELLS USING ASA: ANALYSIS OF DEVICE PERFORMANCE UNDER

Deng, Xunming

446

Wavelength Invariant Bi/In Thermal Resist As A Si Anisotropic Etch Masking Layer And Direct Write Photomask Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wavelength Invariant Bi/In Thermal Resist As A Si Anisotropic Etch Masking Layer And Direct Write University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada ABSTRACT Bilayer Bi/In thin film thermal resists are Bi and In films which form an etch resistant material at ~7 mJ/cm2 laser exposures with near wavelength invariance from

Chapman, Glenn H.

447

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous carbon thin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at 20 K as thin films, films that subsequently have... of an amorphous iron thin film at 20 K. As discussed ... Source: Suslick, Kenneth S. - Department of Chemistry,...

448

amorphous carbon-nitride films: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated H NMR spectroscopy Materials Science Websites Summary: Received 14 February 2003; published 5 November 2003 The...

449

Semiconductor device PN junction fabrication using optical processing of amorphous semiconductor material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods for semiconductor device PN junction fabrication are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating an electrical device having a P-N junction comprises: depositing a layer of amorphous semiconductor material onto a crystalline semiconductor base, wherein the crystalline semiconductor base comprises a crystalline phase of a same semiconductor as the amorphous layer; and growing the layer of amorphous semiconductor material into a layer of crystalline semiconductor material that is epitaxially matched to the lattice structure of the crystalline semiconductor base by applying an optical energy that penetrates at least the amorphous semiconductor material.

Sopori, Bhushan; Rangappan, Anikara

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

450

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous phase formation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Fe3B phase is metastable in a wide temperature range, and suppresses the formation... -132 IOSSBAUERSPECTROSCOPY OF AMORPHOUS Fe-B ALLOYS R. Oshima, F. E. ......

451

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous layer formation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tin Anode Material for Lithium Secondary Battery Summary: , indicating the formation of an amorphous phase. The XRD pattern of Sn nanoparticles showed no impurity...

452

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous metals high-performance Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mathematics 4 Licensable Technologies Summary: and low-performance, low-cost amorphous film solar cells. n Potential for high efficiency, high-performance... Benefits: n...

453

HCI Adsorption and Ionization on Amorphous and Crystalline H2O...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

65, 2014041 using synchrotron-based electron spectroscopy Citation: Ayotte P, P Marchand, JL Daschbach, RS Smith, and BD Kay.2011."HCI Adsorption and Ionization on Amorphous...

454

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous carbon particles Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Renewable Energy 3 High-Purity Catalytic CVD Generation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes from Alcohol Summary: SWNTs with negligible amount of amorphous carbon, multi-walled...

455

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous carbon coatings Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science 2 High Purity and Low-Temperature Generation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by a Catalytic CVD Method Summary: ) is demonstrated. Pure SWNTs without amorphous...

456

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous polyethylene terephthalate Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

polyethylene terephthalate Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: amorphous polyethylene terephthalate Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1...

457

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous solid dispersions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

phase, crystallization can be achieved by a relatively small voltage pulse... electric field is applied across the amorphous region, resulting in conductive filaments that...

458

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous fe-b particles Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: -rich particles in an amorphous matrix that presumably consists of melted aerogel. An HRTEM lattice image of one... -C nanoparticles (Cabot, unpublished data; van...

459

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous boron coatings Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

behavior of the amorphous boron nanowires was ... Source: Ruoff, Rodney S.- Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin Collection: Engineering ; Materials...

460

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous selenium flat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science ; Physics 87 A technique optimization protocol and the potential for dose reduction in digital mammography Summary: to evaluate a direct-conversion amorphous selenium...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous polymer solution Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

interfacial effects to polymer film... . This requirement proves challenging for low thermal conductivity materials like amorphous polymers. The effective... in thicker...

462

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous selenium digital Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology 55 Structural Organization of Arsenic Selenide Liquids: New Results from Liquid State NMR Summary: of pure amorphous selenium and is...

463

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous intergranular phase Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condens. Matter 18 (2006) 45534566 doi:10.10880953-89841819010 Summary: in this regime are isolated and separated by thin inter-granular regions of an amorphous phase...

464

Developing a High Thermal Conductivity Fuel with Silicon Carbide Additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to increase the thermal conductivity of uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) without significantly impacting its neutronic properties. The concept is to incorporate another high thermal conductivity material, silicon carbide (SiC), in the form of whiskers or from nanoparticles of SiC and a SiC polymeric precursor into UO{sub 2}. This is expected to form a percolation pathway lattice for conductive heat transfer out of the fuel pellet. The thermal conductivity of SiC would control the overall fuel pellet thermal conductivity. The challenge is to show the effectiveness of a low temperature sintering process, because of a UO{sub 2}-SiC reaction at 1,377C, a temperature far below the normal sintering temperature. Researchers will study three strategies to overcome the processing difficulties associated with pore clogging and the chemical reaction of SiC and UO{sub 2} at temperatures above 1,300C:

Ronald baney; James Tulenko

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

465

Heat Transfer between Graphene and Amorphous SiO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the heat transfer between graphene and amorphous SiO2. We include both the heat transfer from the area of real contact, and between the surfaces in the non-contact region. We consider the radiative heat transfer associated with the evanescent electromagnetic waves which exist outside of all bodies, and the heat transfer by the gas in the non-contact region. We find that the dominant contribution to the heat transfer result from the area of real contact, and the calculated value of the heat transfer coefficient is in good agreement with the value deduced from experimental data.

B. N. J. Persson; H. Ueba

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

466

Sputter deposition of lithium silicate - lithium phosphate amorphous electrolytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin films of an amorphous lithium-conducting electrolyte were deposited by rf magnetron sputtering of ceramic targets containing Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} and Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. The lithium content of the films was found to depend more strongly on the nature and composition of the targets than on many other sputtering parameters. For targets containing Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, most of the lithium was found to segregate away from the sputtered area of the target. Codeposition using two sputter sources achieves a high lithium content in a controlled and reproducible film growth. 10 refs., 4 figs.

Dudney, N.J.; Bates, J.B.; Luck, C.F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Robertson, J.D. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Electrodeposition of amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of forming amorphous ternary nickel-phosphorus-chromium alloy deposits by electrodeposition on an electrically conductive substrate. It comprises: subjecting the substrate to an applied current density between about 20 and 40 A/dm{sup 2} at a temperature from the range of about 20{degrees} to 30{degrees} C. in a bath comprising: a chromium salt and a nickel salt in a weight ratio of about 3:1, a phosphorus source of about 0.3 M P concentration; about 0.3 M of a complexing agent; about 0.1 M of a supporting salt; and about 0.1 M of buffer.

Guilinger, T.R.

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

468

The CDF silicon vertex trigger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CDF experiment's Silicon Vertex Trigger is a system of 150 custom 9U VME boards that reconstructs axial tracks in the CDF silicon strip detector in a 15 {mu}sec pipeline. SVT's 35 {mu}m impact parameter resolution enables CDF's Level 2 trigger to distinguish primary and secondary particles, and hence to collect large samples of hadronic bottom and charm decays. We review some of SVT's key design features. Speed is achieved with custom VLSI pattern recognition, linearized track fitting, pipelining, and parallel processing. Testing and reliability are aided by built-in logic state analysis and test-data sourcing at each board's input and output, a common inter-board data link, and a universal ''Merger'' board for data fan-in/fan-out. Speed and adaptability are enhanced by use of modern FPGAs.

B. Ashmanskas; A. Barchiesi; A. Bardi

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

469

Spectral Reflectance of Silicon Photodiodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Silicon photodiodes are among the most popular photodetectors that combine high performance over a wide wavelength range with unparalleled ease of use. High-quality photodiodes, in the form of a trap detector, 1,2 have many significant applications in precision radiometry. Their predictable responsivity in visible and near-infrared ~NIR! wavelengths allows the realization of high-accuracy spectral responsivity scales. 3,4 The spectral responsivity scales can be utilized in, for example, realization of luminous intensity 5,6 and spectral irradiance scales. 7,8 The spectral responsivity of a silicon photodiode is determined by the reflectance of the diode surface r~l! and the internal quantum deficiency d~l!. The values of d~l! and r~l! can be extrapolated 4 by mathematical models. To extrapolate the val

Atte Haapalinna; Petri Krh; Erkki Ikonen

470

Photoresist-free printing of amorphous silicon thin-film transistors Scott M. Miller and Sandra M. Troiana)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

growth in the number of nonconventional techniques for the fabrication of electronic devices geared substrate is spin coated with a PS15 and toluene solution. In these studies, the PS thickness was chosen . Studies indicate that rapid separa- tion of liquid coated surfaces distributes the coating evenly between

Troian, Sandra M.

471

Innovative Characterization of Amorphous and Thin-Film Silicon for Improved Module Performance: 28 April 2005 - 15 September 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report focuses on (1) characterizing nc-Si:H from United Solar; (2) studying Si,Ge:H alloys deposited by HWCVD; and (3) characterizing CIGS films and relating to cell performance parameters.

Cohen, J. D.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Formation of multiple levels of porous silicon for buried insulators and conductors in silicon device technologies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of forming a multiple level porous silicon substrate for semiconductor integrated circuits including anodizing non-porous silicon layers of a multi-layer silicon substrate to form multiple levels of porous silicon. At least one porous silicon layer is then oxidized to form an insulating layer and at least one other layer of porous silicon beneath the insulating layer is metallized to form a buried conductive layer. Preferably the insulating layer and conductive layer are separated by an anodization barrier formed of non-porous silicon. By etching through the anodization barrier and subsequently forming a metallized conductive layer, a fully or partially insulated buried conductor may be fabricated under single crystal silicon.

Blewer, Robert S. (Albuquerque, NM); Gullinger, Terry R. (Albuquerque, NM); Kelly, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Sylvia S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Nonlinear absorption in silicon nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nonlinear absorption of light in silicon nanocrystals suspended in glycerol is studied by the Z-scan method. The experimental data are used for calculating the nonlinear absorption coefficient {beta}{sub Si-gl} for silicon nanocrystals in glycerol (with a volume filling factor f=2x10{sup -4}), and the coefficient {beta}{sub Si} for pure silicon with a hypothetical volume filling factor f{approx}1. For the laser radiation wavelength {lambda}=497 nm and the pulse duration {tau}=0.5 ns, these coefficients are {beta}{sub Si-gl}=1.2x10{sup -8} cm W{sup -1} and {beta}{sub Si} =7.36x10{sup -5} cm W{sup -1}, while the corresponding values for {lambda}=532 nm and {tau}=10 ns are {beta}{sub Si-gl}=5.36x10{sup -5} cm W{sup -1} and {beta}{sub Si} =0.25 cm W{sup -1}. Experiments with 540-nm, 20-ps laser pulses performed for two different filling factors equal to 2x10{sup -4} and 3x10{sup -3} gave nonlinear absorption coefficients {beta}{sub Si-gl}=2x10{sup -7} and 3.6x10{sup -6} cm W{sup -1}, respectively. Optical absorption and Raman scattering spectra of silicon nanocrystals are also studied. A theoretical analysis of the experimental results shows that optical absorption can be related to the localisation of photoexcited carriers in the conduction band. The localisation is caused by the action of strong static electric fields on an electron in a nanoparticle. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

Korovin, S B; Orlov, A N; Prokhorov, A M; Pustovoi, V I [Natural Science Center, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Konstantaki, M; Couris, S; Koudoumas, E [Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (IESL-FORTH), Institute of Electronic Structure and Lasers, Crete (Greece)

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

474

Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 609 2000 Materials Research Society Comparison of Structural Properties and Solar Cell Performance of a-Si:H Films Prepared  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Structural Properties and Solar Cell Performance of a-Si:H Films Prepared at Various Deposition Rates using be made. EXPERIMENT The a-Si:H films and nip solar cells were fabricated using a research-scale, multi (above 5 ?/s) for intrinsic layers (i-layer) of solar cells has been well documented. In an effort

Deng, Xunming

475

Silicon Sheets By Redox Assisted Chemical Exfoliation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we report the direct chemical synthesis of silicon sheets in gram-scale quantities by chemical exfoliation of pre-processed calcium di-silicide (CaSi2). We have used a combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to characterize the obtained silicon sheets. We found that the clean and crystalline silicon sheets show a 2-dimensional hexagonal graphitic structure.

Tchalala, Mohamed Rachid; Enriquez, Hanna; Kara, Abdelkader; Lachgar, Abdessadek; Yagoubi, Said; Foy, Eddy; Vega, Enrique; Bendounan, Azzedine; Silly, Mathieu G; Sirotti, Fausto; Nitshe, Serge; Chaudanson, Damien; Jamgotchian, Haik; Aufray, Bernard; Mayne, Andrew J; Dujardin, Grald; Oughaddou, Hamid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Process for strengthening silicon based ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for strengthening silicon based ceramic monolithic materials and composite materials that contain silicon based ceramic reinforcing phases that requires that the ceramic be exposed to a wet hydrogen atmosphere at about 1400{degrees}C. The process results in a dense, tightly adherent silicon containing oxide layer that heals, blunts, or otherwise negates the detrimental effect of strength limiting flaws on the surface of the ceramic body.

Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A.J.

1991-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

477

A wide bandgap silicon carbide (SiC) gate driver for high-temperature and high-voltage applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limitations of silicon (Si) based power electronic devices can be overcome with Silicon Carbide (SiC) because of its remarkable material properties. SiC is a wide bandgap semiconductor material with larger bandgap, lower leakage currents, higher breakdown electric field, and higher thermal conductivity, which promotes higher switching frequencies for high power applications, higher temperature operation, and results in higher power density devices relative to Si [1]. The proposed work is focused on design of a SiC gate driver to drive a SiC power MOSFET, on a Cree SiC process, with rise/fall times (less than 100 ns) suitable for 500 kHz to 1 MHz switching frequency applications. A process optimized gate driver topology design which is significantly different from generic Si circuit design is proposed. The ultimate goal of the project is to integrate this gate driver into a Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) charger module. The application of this high frequency charger will result in lighter, smaller, cheaper, and a more efficient power electronics system.

Lamichhane, Ranjan [University of Arkansas; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL; Frank, Steven Shane [ORNL; BRITTONJr., CHARLES L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Marlino, Laura D [ORNL; Mantooth, Alan [University of Arkansas; Francis, Matt [APEI, Inc.; Shepherd, Dr. Paul [University of Arkansas; Glover, Dr. Michael [University of Arkansas; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Perez, M [University of Arkansas; Mcnutt, Tyler [APEI, Inc.; Whitaker, Mr. Bret [APEI, Inc.; Cole, Mr. Zach [APEI, Inc.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Surface tension of amorphous polymer lms Thorsten Hapke, Gerald Patzold, and Dieter W. Heermann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface tension of amorphous polymer lms Thorsten Hapke, Gerald Patzold, and Dieter W. Heermann study the surface tension for thin, amorphous polymer lms by means of computer simulation. In the framework of molecular dynamics, we present surface tension measurements via the uctuation spectrum

Heermann, Dieter W.

479

Upconversion emission from amorphous Y2O3:Tm3+ prepared by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Upconversion emission from amorphous Y2O3:Tm3+ , Yb3+ prepared by nanosecond pulsed laser that the material produced by laser irradiation is amorphous, which presents strong blue upcon- version emission under the excitation of 976 nm diode laser. The relative intensity of the blue emission to the infrared

Cao, Wenwu

480

Stress-corrosion fatiguecrack growth in a Zr-based bulk amorphous metal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stress-corrosion fatigue­crack growth in a Zr-based bulk amorphous metal V. Schroeder 1 , R metallic glass; Amorphous metal; Fatigue; Stress corrosion; Crack growth 1. Introduction In recent years­crack growth resistance [1­5], its corresponding properties in the presence of a corrosive environment have

Ritchie, Robert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amorphous silicon a-si" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

The evaporation rate, free energy, and entropy of amorphous water Robin J. Speedy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The evaporation rate, free energy, and entropy of amorphous water at 150 K Robin J. Speedy can be interpreted as giving a measure of their free energy difference, i a G 150 K 1100 100 J of amorphous water (a) and ice (i) near 150 K and suppose that their ratio gives a measure of their free energy

482

Atomic hydrogen interactions with amorphous carbon thin films Bhavin N. Jariwala,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomic hydrogen interactions with amorphous carbon thin films Bhavin N. Jariwala,1 Cristian V-scale interactions of H atoms with hydrogenated amorphous carbon a-C:H films were identified using molecular dynamics through a detailed analysis of the MD trajectories. The MD simulations showed that hydrogenation occurs

Ciobanu, Cristian

483

Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is comprised of an iron-based alloy containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100{degrees}C.

Natesan, K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Enhancing the Lithiation Rate of Silicon Nanowires by the Inclusion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhancing the Lithiation Rate of Silicon Nanowires by the Inclusion of Tin. Enhancing the Lithiation Rate of Silicon Nanowires by the Inclusion of Tin. Abstract: Silicon (Si) has a...

485

Microstructure and properties of IN SITU toughened silicon carbide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN SITU TOUGHENED SILICON CARBIDE LUTGARD C. DE JONGHE 1,2 ,In Situ Toughened Silicon Carbide Lutgard C. De Jonghe 1,2 ,USA ABSTRACT A silicon carbide with a fracture toughness as

De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Zhang, Xiao Feng

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Efficient light trapping structure in thin film silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin film silicon solar cells are believed to be promising candidates for continuing cost reduction in photovoltaic panels because silicon usage could be greatly reduced. Since silicon is an indirect bandgap semiconductor, ...

Sheng, Xing

487

Advanced crystallization techniques of ''solar grade'' silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural, electrical and photovoltaic characteristics of polycristalline silicon solar cells fabricated with silicon ingots containing 5, 100 and 500 ppmw iron are reported and discussed. All silicon ingots were grown by the directional solidification technique in graphite or special quartz molds and doped intentionally with iron, in order to evaluate the potentiality of the D.S. technique when employed with solar silicon feedstocks. Results indicate that structural breakdown limits the amount of the ingot which is usable for solar cells fabrication, but also that efficiencies in excess of 10% are obtained using the ''good'' region of the ingot.

Gasparini, M.; Alessandri, M.; Calligarich, C.; Pizzini, S.; Rava, P.; Redaelli, F.; Sardi, L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Innovation and Social Capital in Silicon Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Innovation and Social Capital in Silicon Valley * BRIEpath from social capital to innovation has been identified.social capital has for economic development and innovation.

Kenney, Martin; Patton, Donald

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Silicon Materials and Devices (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This National Center for Photovoltaics sheet describes the capabilities of its silicon materials and devices research. The scope and core competencies and capabilities are discussed.

Not Available

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Silicon Materials and Devices (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Silicon Materials and Devices that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ceramic body comprising at least about 80 w/o silicon nitride and having a mean tensile strength of at least about 800 MPa.

Pujari, Vimal K. (Northboro, MA); Tracey, Dennis M. (Medfield, MA); Foley, Michael R. (Oxford, MA); Paille, Norman I. (Oxford, MA); Pelletier, Paul J. (Sutton, MA); Sales, Lenny C. (Grafton, MA); Willkens, Craig A. (Worcester, MA); Yeckley, Russell L. (Latrobe, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Ultralow-Power Silicon Microphotonic Communications Platform  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

second). These peta-scale machines are critical for advanced scientific modelling of climate change, biological simulations, advanced materials, and our Ultralow-Power Silicon...

493

Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from inexpensive low-grade silicon. Artist's impression of an intense beam of synchrotron light striking a solar cell and the resulting fluorescence image of the distribution of...

494

Enabling Thin Silicon Solar Cell Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cracking problem in silicon cell technology," says Budiman. "The ALS provides us with a light that allows us to measure and characterize molecular stress in a very quantitative...

495

A SiC-Based Converter as a Utility Interface for a Battery System , Leon M. Tolbert1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, simulations of a SiC- based converter working as an interface between a battery bank and a utility were of a battery bank and a converter. The battery bank is to be charged and discharged from the utility via voltage is for M = 1. For Vll = 480 V, Vdc (min) = 783.8 V. 3 2 2 dc ll V V M= (1) B. Battery Bank

Tolbert, Leon M.

496

Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (< 200C) to produce high purity (5-6 Ns) feedstock for production of Sipv using furnaces similar to those used to produce Simet. During the course of this project we partnered with Wadham Energy LP (Wadham), who burns 220k ton of rice hulls (RH)/yr generating 200 GWh of electricity/yr and >30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

Richard M. Laine

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

497

Characterization of nitrided silicon-silicon dioxide interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A newly-developed technique for the simultaneous characterization of the oxide-silicon interface properties and of bulk impurities was used for a systematic study of the nitridation process of thin oxides. This technique is based upon surface recombination velocity measurements, and does not require the formation of a capacitor structure, so it is very suitable for the characterization of as-grown interfaces. Oxides grown both in dry and in wet environments were considered, and nitridation processes in N{sub 2}O and in NO were compared to N{sub 2} annealing processes. The effect of nitridation temperature and duration were also studied, and RTO/RTN processes were compared to conventional furnace nitridation processes. Surface recombination velocity was correlated with nitrogen concentration at the oxide-silicon interface obtained by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) measurements. Surface recombination velocity (hence surface state density) decreases with increasing nitrogen pile-up at the oxide-silicon interface, indicating that in nitrided interfaces surface state density is limited by nitridation. NO treatments are much more effective than N{sub 2}O treatments in the formation of nitrogen-rich interface layer and, as a consequence, in surface state reduction. Surface state density was measured in fully processed wafers before and after constant current stress. After a complete device process surface states are annealed out by hydrogen passivation, however they are reactivated by the electrical stress, and surface state results after stress were compared with data of surface recombination velocity in as-processed wafers.

Polignano, M.L.; Alessandri, M.; Brazzelli, D. [and others

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

In vitro corrosion and cytotoxicity on microcrystalline, nanocrystalline and amorphous NiTi alloy fabricated by high pressure torsion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In vitro corrosion and cytotoxicity on microcrystalline, nanocrystalline and amorphous NiTi alloy Amorphous Metals and alloys Corrosion and ion release Cytotoxicity Bulk nanocrystalline and amorphous Ni50 discs by high pressure torsion (HPT) technique. Then their corrosion resistance, surface wettability

Zheng, Yufeng

499

Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

500

Synthesis and Characterization of Silicon Clathrates for Anode...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Silicon Clathrates for Anode Applications in Lithium-Ion Batteries Synthesis and Characterization of Silicon Clathrates for Anode Applications in Lithium-Ion Batteries 2012 DOE...