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Sample records for ammunition depot hawthorne

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Navy Ammunition Depot -...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Navy Ammunition Depot - NJ 15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVY AMMUNITION DEPOT (NJ.15) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not...

  2. Basewide energy systems plan, Hawthorne Army Ammunition Plant, Hawthorne, Nevada; executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1983-03-25

    This document is the Executive Summary of the Basewide Energy Systems Plan for the Hawthorne Army Ammunition Plant (HWAAP) at Hawthorne, Nevada. This project has been executed as a part of the Department of the Army`s Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP). The overall objective of the project is to develop a systematic plan of projects that will result in the reduction of energy consumption in compliance with the objectives set forth in the Army Facilities Energy Plan (AFEP), without decreasing the readiness posture of the Army. The Hawthorne Army Ammunition Plant is a Government Owned and Contractor Operator (GOCO) Army facility. Consequently, any reference made in this document to the Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) is directly analagous to Energy Conservation and Management (ECAM). The ECAM designation pertains specifically to GOCO Army installations. All Programming Documents for projects developed from this study reference ECAM wherever ECIP is called for.

  3. Hawthorne Army Depot Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ectangles":,"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":,"controls":"pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview","zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoi...

  4. Green Depot | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Depot Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Depot Address: P.O. Box 3096 Place: Santa Monica, California Zip: 90408 Region: Bay Area Website: www.greendepot.org Coordinates:...

  5. Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    will be installed at select sites in California and Nevada. Interim data from this campaign are already available for the Chocolate Mountains and Hawthorne. Results of these...

  6. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details...

  7. Water Sampling At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details...

  8. Home Depot: Order (2014-CE-32017)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered The Home Depot, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Home Depot had failed to certify that certain models of ceiling fans comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  9. Feasibility of white-rot fungi for biodegradation of PCP-treated ammunition boxes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholze, R.J.; Lamar, R.T.; Bolduc, J.; Dietrich, D.

    1995-01-01

    Millions of pounds of wood ammunition boxes treated with the wood preservative pentachiorophenol (PCP) are being stockpiled at military installations, primarily depots, because cost-effective disposal is not readily available. The Army needs cost-effective and environmentally benign treatment methods for destruction and disposal of PCP-treated wood products. This research investigated the use of white-rot fungi to biodegrade PCP-treated wood. Results showed that white-rot fungi effectively decreased the PCP concentration in contaminated hardwood and softwood chips. Under ideal laboratory conditions the fungi reduced the PCP concentration by 80 percent; a field study showed only a 30 percent decrease in PCP concentration. Despite this disparity, this study demonstrated the feasibility of using white-rot fungi to reduce PCP in treated wood.

  10. Solar Depot Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Petaluma, California Zip: 94954 Sector: Solar Product: US-based PV and solar passive system integrator and distributor. References: Solar Depot Inc1 This article is a...

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Supply Depot AEC Warehouse...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Supply Depot AEC Warehouse - NY 36 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL SUPPLY DEPOT, AEC WAREHOUSE (NY.36) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD...

  12. Storage depot for radioactive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Szulinski, Milton J.

    1983-01-01

    Vertical drilling of cylindrical holes in the soil, and the lining of such holes, provides storage vaults called caissons. A guarded depot is provided with a plurality of such caissons covered by shielded closures preventing radiation from penetrating through any linear gap to the atmosphere. The heat generated by the radioactive material is dissipated through the vertical liner of the well into the adjacent soil and thus to the ground surface so that most of the heat from the radioactive material is dissipated into the atmosphere in a manner involving no significant amount of biologically harmful radiation. The passive cooling of the radioactive material without reliance upon pumps, personnel, or other factor which might fail, constitutes one of the most advantageous features of this system. Moreover this system is resistant to damage from tornadoes or earthquakes. Hermetically sealed containers of radioactive material may be positioned in the caissons. Loading vehicles can travel throughout the depot to permit great flexibility of loading and unloading radioactive materials. Radioactive material can be shifted to a more closely spaced caisson after ageing sufficiently to generate much less heat. The quantity of material stored in a caisson is restricted by the average capacity for heat dissipation of the soil adjacent such caisson.

  13. Home Depot: Proposed Penalty (2014-CE-32017)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that The Home Depot, Inc. failed to certify a variety of ceiling fans as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  14. 2-M Probe At Hawthorne Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Hawthorne Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Marion Engineer Depot - OH 45

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Engineer Depot - OH 45 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MARION ENGINEER DEPOT (OH.45) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: South of Harding Highway (Route 309) at County Route 98, Marion County , Marion , Ohio OH.45-2 Evaluation Year: 1990 OH.45-2 Site Operations: The Engineer Depot was built in 1942 - at one time was the largest warehousing facilities of its kind in the U.S. AEC New York Operations Office provided radiation

  16. Suffield Depot, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Suffield Depot, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9812074, -72.6498129 Show Map Loading map......

  17. Application of powder metallurgy techniques for the development of non-toxic ammunition. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowden, R.; Kelly, R.

    1997-05-30

    The purpose of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and Delta Frangible Ammunition (DFA), was to identify and evaluate composite materials for the development of small arms ammunition. Currently available small arms ammunition utilizes lead as the major component of the projectile. The introduction of lead into the environment by these projectiles when they are expended is a rapidly increasing environmental problem. At certain levels, lead is a toxic metal to the environment and a continual health and safety concern for firearm users as well as those who must conduct lead recovery operations from the environment. DFA is a leading supplier of high-density mixtures, which will be used to replace lead-based ammunition in specific applications. Current non-lead ammunition has several limitations that prevent it from replacing lead-based ammunition in many applications (such as applications that require ballistics, weapon recoil, and weapon function identical to that of lead-based ammunition). The purpose of the CRADA was to perform the research and development to identify cost-effective materials to be used in small arms ammunition that eventually will be used in commercially viable, environmentally conscious, non-lead, frangible and/or non-frangible, ammunition.

  18. Radiological Scoping Survey of the Scotia Depot, Scotia, NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, E. N.

    2008-02-25

    The objectives of the radiological scoping survey were to collect adequate field data for use in evaluating the radiological condition of Scotia Depot land areas, warehouses, and support buildings.

  19. Radiological Final Status Survey of the Hammond Depot, Hammond, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.J. Vitkus

    2008-04-07

    ORISE conducted extensive scoping, characterization, and final status surveys of land areas and structures at the DNSC’s Hammond Depot located in Hammond, Indiana in multiple phases during 2005, 2006 and 2007.

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Iowa Army Ammunition Plant - IA 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Army Ammunition Plant - IA 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, IA Alternate Name(s): Burlington Ordnance Plant Iowa Ordnance Plant Silas Mason Company IA.02-3 Location: Located in Township 70 North, Range 3 West, Section 32, 5th Principal Meridian, Des Moines County, Burlington, Iowa IA.02-1 IA.02-5 Historical Operations: Assembled nuclear weapons, primarily high explosive components and conducted explosives testing using the high explosive components and depleted uranium. AEC

  1. Computer-aided acquisition and logistics support (CALS): Concept of Operations for Depot Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourgeois, N.C.; Greer, D.K.

    1993-04-01

    This CALS Concept of Operations for Depot Maintenance provides the foundation strategy and the near term tactical plan for CALS implementation in the depot maintenance environment. The user requirements enumerated and the overarching architecture outlined serve as the primary framework for implementation planning. The seamless integration of depot maintenance business processes and supporting information systems with the emerging global CALS environment will be critical to the efficient realization of depot user's information requirements, and as, such will be a fundamental theme in depot implementations.

  2. Master Environmental Plan: Fort Wingate Depot Activity, Gallup, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biang, C.A.; Yuen, C.R.; Biang, R.P.; Antonopoulos, A.A.; Ditmars, J.D.

    1990-12-01

    The master environmental plan is based on an environmental assessment of the areas requiring environmental evaluation (AREEs) at Fort Wingate Depot Activity near Gallup, New Mexico. The Fort Wingate Depot Activity is slated for closure under the Base Closure and Realignment Act, Public Law 100--526. The MEP assesses the current status, describes additional data requirements, recommends actions for the sites, and establishes a priority order for actions. The plan was developed so that actions comply with hazardous waste and water quality regulations of the State of New Mexico and applicable federal regulations. It contains a brief history of the site, relevant geological and hydrological information, and a description of the current status for each AREE along with a discussion of the available site-specific data that pertain to existing or potential contamination and the impact on the environment. 35 refs., 27 figs., 23 tabs.

  3. The Home Depot Upgrades its Corporate Building Prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-03-01

    The Home Depot partnered with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to build new, low-energy buildings that are at least 50% below Standard 90.1-2007 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  4. Cost analysis of paint-waste-incineration technology at U. S. Army depots. Final report, Nov 88-Oct 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, F.D.; McKibben, R.S.

    1991-10-01

    The U.S. Army Depot System Command (DESCOM) has 16 maintenance depots located throughout the U.S. Several army depots generate paint wastes that must be disposed of. These depots are located in different parts of the country, and a comprehensive strategy is required to manage the disposal of the paint wastes generated at the individual depots. Incineration is a candidate technology for disposal of such wastes. This report presents an economic analysis of developing an incineration strategy. The economic analysis of paint waste incineration was limited to six major maintenance depots: Anniston, Corpus Christi, Letterkenny, Red River, Tobyhanna, and Tooele. These particular depots are included in the analysis because they are responsible for the majority of all paint wastes generated annually be DESCOM. Three scenarios were evaluated: (1) locating an incinerator at each depot, (2) locating an incinerator at a single site and transporting waste from other depots to this location, and (3) using multiple units at two or more depots. The analysis considers the locations of the army depots, the types and quantities of the wastes they generate, and transportation of the wastes. It also assumes that the individual army depots are equally equipped for proper management of the paint waste by the incineration technology and that the waste can be transferred between the depots without any restrictions. It is further assumed that only incinerable paint wastes will be treated.

  5. A database system for characterization of munitions items in conventional ammunition demilitarization stockpiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun, K.C.; Chiu, S.Y.; Ditmars, J.D.; Huber, C.C.; Nortunen, L.; Sabb, R.

    1994-05-01

    The MIDAS (Munition Items Disposition Action System) database system is an electronic data management system capable of storage and retrieval of information on the detailed structures and material compositions of munitions items designated for demilitarization. The types of such munitions range from bulk propellants and small arms to projectiles and cluster bombs. The database system is also capable of processing data on the quantities of inert, PEP (propellant, explosives and pyrotechnics) and packaging materials associated with munitions, components, or parts, and the quantities of chemical compounds associated with parts made of PEP materials. Development of the MIDAS database system has been undertaken by the US Army to support disposition of unwanted ammunition stockpiles. The inventory of such stockpiles currently includes several thousand items, which total tens of thousands of tons, and is still growing. Providing systematic procedures for disposing of all unwanted conventional munitions is the mission of the MIDAS Demilitarization Program. To carry out this mission, all munitions listed in the Single Manager for Conventional Ammunition inventory must be characterized, and alternatives for resource recovery and recycling and/or disposal of munitions in the demilitarization inventory must be identified.

  6. Results of the Radiological Survey of the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Middletown, Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, M.E.

    2001-07-17

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an indoor radiological survey of property at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAAP), Middletown, Iowa in June 2000. The purpose of the survey was to determine if radioactive residuals resulting from previous Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) activities were present inside selected Line 1 buildings at the IAAAP and conduct sampling in those areas of previous AEC operations that utilized radioactive components at some point during the manufacturing process, in order to evaluate any possible immediate health hazards and to collect sufficient information to determine the next type of survey. The AEC occupied portions of IAAAP from 1947 to 1975 to assemble nuclear weapons. The surveyed areas were identified through interviews with current and former IAAAP employees who had worked at the plant during AEC's tenure, and from AEC records.

  7. Energy engineering analysis Iowa Army Ammunition Plant Burlington, Iowa. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1983-05-10

    This Energy Engineering Analysis consists of the main report, three appendices, and a summary of annual energy consumption on a `per building` basis. The main report identifies the purpose of the study, describes the existing and anticipated energy use trends, and defines and summarizes specific energy conservation projects recommended to achieve the goals stated in the Army Facilities Energy Plan. Appendices I, II and III, and the Annual Energy Consumption Summary include building information, weather data, cost data, and detailed computer-generated and manual calculations for each individual project. The analysis will enable ammunition plant personnel to identify energy conservation measures and meet Army energy reduction goals. The report includes: Energy consumption by fuel type Energy consumption trends ECAM projects other potential projects Quick-fix management form Description of analyzed buildings. In addition-, the Analysis is a detailed data base consisting of: An analysis of building energy use Energy Conservation Measures applied to each analyzed building to be improved A set of marked-up prints from the survey indicating the conditions when surveyed.

  8. Energy engineering analysis, Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Burlington, Iowa. Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonik, D.M.

    1982-06-22

    This Energy Engineering Analysis consists of the main report, three appendices, and a summary of annual energy consumption on a per-building basis. The main report identifies the purpose of the study, describes the existing and anticipated energy use trends, and defines and summarizes specific energy conservation projects recommended to achieve the goals stated in the Army Facilities Energy Plan. Appendices I, II and III, and the Annual Energy Consumption Summary include building information, weather data, cost data, and detailed computer-generated and manual calculations for each individual project. The analysis will enable ammunition plant personnel to identify energy conservation measures and meet Army energy reduction goals. The report includes: Energy consumption by fuel type Energy consumption trends ECAM projects Other potential projects Quick-fix management form Description of analyzed buildings In addition, the Analysis is a detailed data base consisting of: An analysis of building energy use Energy Conservation Measures applied to each analyzed building to be improved A set of marked-up prints from the survey indicating the conditions when surveyed.

  9. EIS-0423: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina;...

  10. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

    1993-02-01

    The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

  11. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Miller, R.L.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Tolbert, V.R.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Rickert, L.W.; Rogers, G.O.; Staub, W.P.

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this Phase I report is to examined the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) in light of more detailed and more recent data than those included in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EPEIS). Two principal issues are addressed: (1) whether or not the new data would result in identification of on-site disposal at ANAD as the environmentally preferred alternative (using the same selection method and data analysis tools as in the FPEIS), and (2) whether or not the new data indicate the presence of significant environmental resources that could be affected by on-site disposal at ANAD. In addition, a status report is presented on the maturity of the disposal technology (and now it could affect on-site disposal at ANAD). Inclusion of these more recent data into the FPEIS decision method resulted in confirmation of on-site disposal for ANAD. No unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD have been identified. A review of the technology status identified four principal technology developments that have occurred since publication of the FPEIS and should be of value in the implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD: the disposal of nonlethal agent at Pine Bluff Arsenal, located near Pine Bluff, Arkansas; construction and testing of facilities for disposal of stored lethal agent at Johnston Atoll, located about 1300 km (800 miles) southwest of Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean; lethal agent disposal tests at the chemical agent pilot plant operations at Tooele Army Depot, located near Salt Lake City, Utah; and equipment advances. 18 references, 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Tombs, tunnels, and terraces a cultural resources survey of a former ammunition supply point in Okinawa, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhaaren, B. T.; Levenson, J. B.; Komine, G.

    2000-02-09

    U.S. forces serving at military bases on foreign soil are obligated to act as good stewards of the cultural and natural resources under their control. However, cultural resources management presents special challenges at U.S. bases in other countries where cultural properties laws differ in emphasis and detail from those in the United States and issues of land ownership and occupancy are not always clear. Where status of forces agreements (SOFAs) exist, environmental governing standards bridge the gap between U.S. and host nation cultural priorities. In Japan, the Department of Defense Japan Environmental Governing Standards (JEGS) fill this function. Under Criteria 12-4.2 and 12-4.3 of the JEGS, U.S. Forces Japan commit themselves to inventory and protect cultural properties found on the lands they control or use. Cultural properties include archaeological sites, tombs, historic buildings, and shrines. Natural monuments, such as landscape features or plant and animal species, may also be designated as cultural properties. As part of this commitment, in February 1999 a cultural resources inventory was conducted in Area 1, part of Kadena Air Base (AB), Okinawa, Japan. Area 1, the former U.S. army Ammunition Supply Point 1, is currently used primarily for training exercises and recreational paint ball.

  13. Small arms ammunition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huerta, Joseph (399 Clover St., Aberdeen, MD 21001)

    1992-01-01

    An elongate projectile for small arms use has a single unitary mass with a hollow nose cavity defined by a sharp rigid cutting edge adapted to make initial contact with the target surface and cut therethrough. The projectile then enters the target mass in an unstable flight mode. The projectile base is substantially solid such that the nose cavity, while relatively deep, does not extend entirely through the base and the projectile center of gravity is aft of its geometric center.

  14. Engineering test report: paint waste reduction fluidized-bed process demonstration at Letterkenny Army Depot Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. Final report, May 90-Jul 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, J.P.; Parker, D.

    1991-07-01

    Degreasing and removal of paint from metal parts are processes performed at several Army depots across the country as part of vehicle and equipment rebuilding operations. These processes generate many tons of hazardous waste and release some hazardous materials into the workplace because most of them incorporate toxic chlorinated solvents or caustic soda. These substances also produce sludges that are classified as hazardous waste. U.S. Army Depot Support Command (DESCOM), as part of its hazardous waste minimization program, has established as a goal the elimination of hazardous waste generation from paint stripping operations. Through specific research and development projects, the U.S. Army's Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) assists Army Depots in developing and evaluating methods for minimizing the quantities of hazardous wastes that they generate.

  15. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon. Final Phase 1 environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

    1993-02-01

    The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

  16. The watershed-scale optimized and rearranged landscape design (WORLD) model and local biomass processing depots for sustainable biofuel production: Integrated life cycle assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eranki, Pragnya L.; Manowitz, David H.; Bals, Bryan D.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kim, Seungdo; Dale, Bruce E.

    2013-07-23

    An array of feedstock is being evaluated as potential raw material for cellulosic biofuel production. Thorough assessments are required in regional landscape settings before these feedstocks can be cultivated and sustainable management practices can be implemented. On the processing side, a potential solution to the logistical challenges of large biorefi neries is provided by a network of distributed processing facilities called local biomass processing depots. A large-scale cellulosic ethanol industry is likely to emerge soon in the United States. We have the opportunity to influence the sustainability of this emerging industry. The watershed-scale optimized and rearranged landscape design (WORLD) model estimates land allocations for different cellulosic feedstocks at biorefinery scale without displacing current animal nutrition requirements. This model also incorporates a network of the aforementioned depots. An integrated life cycle assessment is then conducted over the unified system of optimized feedstock production, processing, and associated transport operations to evaluate net energy yields (NEYs) and environmental impacts.

  17. Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the use of two-meter temperature (2m) surveys to quickly and inexpensively reveal blind geothermal systems were documented at Dead Horse Wells, the Hawthorne Army Depot, and...

  18. Installation restoration program: Hydrologic measurements with an estimated hydrologic budget for the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant, Joliet, Illinois. [Contains maps of monitoring well locations, topography and hydrologic basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diodato, D.M.; Cho, H.E.; Sundell, R.C.

    1991-07-01

    Hydrologic data were gathered from the 36.8-mi{sup 2} Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) located in Joliet, Illinois. Surface water levels were measured continuously, and groundwater levels were measured monthly. The resulting information was entered into a database that could be used as part of numerical flow model validation for the site. Deep sandstone aquifers supply much of the water in the JAAP region. These aquifers are successively overlain by confining shales and a dolomite aquifer of Silurian age. This last unit is unconformably overlain by Pleistocene glacial tills and outwash sand and gravel. Groundwater levels in the shallow glacial system fluctuate widely, with one well completed in an upland fluctuating more than 17 ft during the study period. The response to groundwater recharge in the underlying Silurian dolomite is slower. In the upland recharge areas, increased groundwater levels were observed; in the lowland discharge areas, groundwater levels decreased during the study period. The decreases are postulated to be a lag effect related to a 1988 drought. These observations show that fluid at the JAAP is not steady-state, either on a monthly or an annual basis. Hydrologic budgets were estimated for the two principal surface water basins at the JAAP site. These basins account for 70% of the facility's total land area. Meteorological data collected at a nearby dam show that total measured precipitation was 31.45 in. and total calculated evapotranspiration was 23.09 in. for the study period. The change in surface water storage was assumed to be zero for the annual budget for each basin. The change in groundwater storage was calculated to be 0.12 in. for the Grant Creek basin and 0. 26 in. for the Prairie Creek basin. Runoff was 7.02 in. and 7.51 in. for the Grant Creek and Prairie Creek basins, respectively. The underflow to the deep hydrogeologic system in the Grant Creek basin was calculated to be negligible. 12 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  19. Mr. Carl Schafer Director of Environmental Policy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OH ."" 7. Naval Ammunition Depot Red Bank,'NJ I' -ii;.. ,.'I 8. Naval Boiler and Turbine Lab. Philadelphia Navy Yard Philadelphia, PA ,j ,,,: i.% 9. Naval Gun Factory and...

  20. Hawthorne Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Coordinates: 38.53, -118.65...

  1. Hawthorne Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ectangles":,"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":,"controls":"pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview","zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoi...

  2. Home Depot Foundation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building...

  3. Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Unknown Notes The Navy recently completed a temperature gradient hole (TGH) drilling campaign. Results suggest multiple resources may exist on HAD lands. To further define the...

  4. Aerial Photography At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GPO has contracted the University of Nevada Reno Great Basin for Center for Geothermal Research to conduct additional field exploration at HAD. The tasks required by the Navy...

  5. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GPO has contracted the University of Nevada Reno Great Basin for Center for Geothermal Research to conduct additional field exploration at HAD. The tasks required by the Navy...

  6. Field Mapping At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GPO has contracted the University of Nevada Reno Great Basin for Center for Geothermal Research to conduct additional field exploration at HAD. The tasks required by the Navy...

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Twin Cities Ammunition ...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Brighton , Minnesota MN.0-01-1 Evaluation ...

  8. Commander, Seneca Army Depot Attention: Thomas Stincic, Safety...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Stincic: As you are aware, the Department of Energy is evaluating the radiological condition of sites formerly used by Department predecessors during the early years of nuclear ...

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite City Army Depot...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Site was used for storage of GSA thorium residues until circa 1964. IL.0-02-1 Site ... Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium IL.0-02-1 Radiological Survey(s): None ...

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Seneca Army Depot - NY 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NY.11-2 NY.11-3 Site Operations: Eleven bunkers were used to store approximately 2,000 drums of pitchblende ore in the early 1940's. The bunkers were returned to munitions storage...

  11. Slim Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    valley and immediately south and east, respectively, of the El Capitan well. The "El Cap" is a 1,000' well completed by an unsuccessful developer in 1980. The El Cap and...

  12. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    C. Harrison) - Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard University Hawthorne, M. Frederick (M. Frederick Hawthorne) - Department of Chemistry ...

  13. Lexington-Blue Grass Depot Activity, EEAP Project No. 208; volume 1 - executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1984-01-01

    This report is a product of the Army Facilities Energy Plan. The plan`s goals are: To reduce baseline FY 1975 total facilities energy consumption (BTU) 20 percent by FY 1985 and 40 percent by FY 2000. To develop the capabilities to use synthetic gases by FY 2000. To reduce heating oil consumption by 75 percent by FY 2000. Five programs have been established to help achieve the above goals. The programs are: (1) The Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP). (2) The Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP). (3) The Energy Conservation and Management Program (ECAM). (4) Solid Fuels Conversion Program. (5) The Boiler Efficiency Improvement Program (BEIP).

  14. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  15. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Summary and Guide for Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  16. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723).DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations:Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho;Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  17. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pueblo Depot Activity, Colorado. Final, Phase 1: Environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, J.W.; Blasing, T.J.; Ensminger, J.T.; Johnson, R.O.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Shor, J.T.; Staub, W.P.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1995-04-01

    Under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the US Army proposes to dispose of lethal chemical agents and munitions stored at eight existing Army installations in the continental United States. In 1988, the US Army issued the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP. The FPEIS and the subsequent Record of Decision (ROD) identified an on-site disposal process as the preferred method for destruction of the stockpile. That is, the FPEIS determined the environmentally preferred alternative to be on-site disposal in high-temperature incinerators, while the ROD selected this alternative for implementation as the preferred method for destruction of the stockpile. In this Phase I report, the overall CSDP decision regarding disposal of the PUDA Stockpile is subjected to further analyses, and its validity at PUDA is reviewed with newer, more detailed data than those providing the basis for the conclusions in the FPEIS. The findings of this Phase I report will be factored into the scope of a site-specific environmental impact statement to be prepared for the destruction of the PUDA stockpile. The focus of this Phase I report is on those data identified as having the potential to alter the Army`s previous decision regarding disposal of the PUDA stockpile; however, several other factors beyond the scope of this Phase I report must also be acknowledged to have the potential to change or modify the Army`s decisions regarding PUDA.

  18. Development of the Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory modeling package for the kinematic design and optimization of the Future Armor Rearm System robot. Ammunition Logistics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March-Leuba, S.; Jansen, J.F.; Kress, R.L.; Babcock, S.M.; Dubey, R.V.

    1992-08-01

    A new program package, Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory (SML), for the automatic generation of both kinematic and static manipulator models in symbolic form is presented. Critical design parameters may be identified and optimized using symbolic models as shown in the sample application presented for the Future Armor Rearm System (FARS) arm. The computer-aided development of the symbolic models yields equations with reduced numerical complexity. Important considerations have been placed on the closed form solutions simplification and on the user friendly operation. The main emphasis of this research is the development of a methodology which is implemented in a computer program capable of generating symbolic kinematic and static forces models of manipulators. The fact that the models are obtained trigonometrically reduced is among the most significant results of this work and the most difficult to implement. Mathematica, a commercial program that allows symbolic manipulation, is used to implement the program package. SML is written such that the user can change any of the subroutines or create new ones easily. To assist the user, an on-line help has been written to make of SML a user friendly package. Some sample applications are presented. The design and optimization of the 5-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) FARS manipulator using SML is discussed. Finally, the kinematic and static models of two different 7-DOF manipulators are calculated symbolically.

  19. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.23 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hawthorne Charging Station at Lady Bird Park Rest Area Award Number: DE-EE0006992 CX(s) ... Hawthorne Charging Station at Lady Bird Park Rest Area Award Number: DE-EE0006992 CX(s) ...

  20. Clarion County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Clarion County, Pennsylvania Callensburg, Pennsylvania Clarion, Pennsylvania East Brady, Pennsylvania Emlenton, Pennsylvania Foxburg, Pennsylvania Hawthorn, Pennsylvania...

  1. Chemical and toxicological characterization of slurry reactor biotreatment of explosives-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griest, W.H.; Stewart, A.J.; Vass, A.A.; Ho, C.H.

    1998-08-01

    Treatment of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT)-contaminated soil in the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) soil slurry bioreactor (SSBR) eliminated detectable TNT but left trace levels of residual monoamino and diamino metabolites under some reactor operating conditions. The reduction of solvent-extractable bacterial mutagenicity in the TNT-contaminated soil was substantial and was similar to that achieved by static pile composts at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity (UMDA) field demonstration. Aquatic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia from TNT in the leachates of TNT-contaminated soil was eliminated in the leachates of JAAP SSBR product soil. The toxicity of soil product leachates to Ceriodaphnia dubia was reasonably predicted using the specific toxicities of the components detected, weighted by their leachate concentrations. In samples where TNT metabolites were observed in the soil product and its leachates, this method determined that the contribution to predicted toxicity values was dominated by trace amounts of the diamino-metabolites, which are very toxic to ceriodaphnia dubia. When the SSBR operating conditions reduced the concentrations of TNT metabolites in the product soils and their leachates to undetectable concentrations, the main contributors to predicted aquatic toxicity values appeared to be molasses residues, potassium, and bicarbonate. Potassium and bicarbonate are beneficial or benign to the environment, and molasses residues are substantially degraded in the environment. Exotoxins, pathogenic bacteria, inorganic particles, ammonia, and dissolved metals did not appear to be important to soil product toxicity.

  2. Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX’ Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Logistics Challenge Visualized AFEX Depot Biorefinery * 100-200 tonsday of biomass * Draw from 5-10 mile radius * Densified, stable, shippable * Multi depots per biorefinery * ...

  3. Microsoft Word - INS-O-07-02 - OST Final 071307rev.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CONTROLS OVER AMMUNITION WITHIN THE OFFICE OF SECURE TRANSPORTATION U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections and Special Inquiries Inspection Report Controls Over Ammunition Within the Office of Secure Transportation INS-O-07-02 July 2007 CONTROLS OVER AMMUNITION WITHIN THE OFFICE OF SECURE TRANSPORTATION TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW Introduction and Objective 1 Observations and Conclusions 1 DETAILS OF FINDINGS Background 3 Sensitive Property 3 Ammunition

  4. Microsoft Word - DRAFT SRSPM 250-1-1A.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (items that are prohibited from SRS include weapons, simulated weapons, firearms, stun guns, ammunition andor incendiaries, explosive materialsdevices, chemical irritants,...

  5. Westchester County, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elmsford, New York Fairview, New York Golden's Bridge, New York Greenburgh, New York Harrison, New York Hartsdale, New York Hastings-on-Hudson, New York Hawthorne, New York...

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    terahertz excitation Dakovski, Georgi L. ; Lee, Wei-Sheng ; Hawthorn, David G. ; Garner, Niklas ; Bonn, Doug ; Hardy, Walter ; Liang, Ruixing ; Hoffmann, Matthias C. ; ...

  7. Enhanced coherent oscillations in the superconducting state of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Dakovski, Georgi L. ; Lee, Wei-Sheng ; Hawthorn, David G. ; Garner, Niklas ; Bonn, Doug ; Hardy, Walter ; Liang, Ruixing ; Hoffmann, Matthias C. ; Turner, Joshua J. ...

  8. Thermal Gradient Holes At Chocolate Mountains Area (Sabin, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    will be installed at select sites in California and Nevada. Interim data from this campaign are already available for the Chocolate Mountains and Hawthorne. Results of these...

  9. Mr. William R. Augustine Deputy Chief Programs Management Division

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    These sites are the former Marion Engineer Depot and the former Scioto Ordnance Plant, ... monitoring for the Army at the Marion Engineer Depot in 1947 and 1949. This monitoring ...

  10. Los Alamos Employee Giving Campaign

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    safe, healthy start moving arts 2:30 Moving Arts: Inspiring, nurturing kids through the arts CASA NM 2:39 Espanola Valley Humane Society: food depot 2:35 Santa Fe Food Depot:...

  11. 10 Facts to Know About Data Centers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 Facts to Know About Data Centers 10 Facts to Know About Data Centers November 17, 2014 - 12:24pm Addthis The headquarters and data center at Home Depot. | Photo courtesy of the Home Depot. The headquarters and data center at Home Depot. | Photo courtesy of the Home Depot. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory headquarters and data center. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory headquarters and data center. | Photo courtesy of

  12. Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Milford, Pennsylvania Oakland, Pennsylvania Susquehanna Depot, Pennsylvania Thompson, Pennsylvania Union Dale, Pennsylvania Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  13. Insurance under M&O Contracts

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Documentation, Logistical Support Other * Web-Site Creation and Maintenance * Command ... & Property Management * Depot, Logistical, Web & Training Services * Vehicle Procurement * ...

  14. NNSA Saves More Than $519M Through Strategic Sourcing | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security ... They then combine their purchasing power to achieve savings ... laboratory supplies, ammunition and safety glasses. ...

  15. Inspection Report: IG-0806 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    launcher, which utilizes high explosive ammunition to defeat adversary personnel and equipment. A number of Department sites have procured these weapons. Topic: National...

  16. 40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    launcher, which utilizes high explosive ammunition to defeat adversary personnel and equipment. A number of Department sites have procured these weapons. PDF icon 40 MM...

  17. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Fact Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ammunition Plant Seaway Industrial Park Linde Air Products Tonawanda Landfill Niagara Falls Storage Site Guterl Specialty Steel Colonie Shallow Land Disposal Area Shpack...

  18. CX-003665: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High Performance Buildings Program - Hawthorne HotelCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 08/31/2010Location(s): Salem, MassachusettsOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11 projects still did not have executed contracts. Specifically, its United Teen Equality Center project valued at 1.9 million and its Hawthorne Hotel project valued at 1.4...

  20. Generalized thickness and configuration of the top of the intermediate aquifer, West-Central Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corral, M.A. Jr.; Wolansky, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The water-bearing units of the intermediate aquifer consist of discontinuous sand, gravel, shell, and limestone and dolomite beds in the Tamiami Formation of late Miocene age and the Hawthorn Formation of middle Miocene age. Within parts of Polk, Manatee, Hardee, De Soto, Sarasota, and Charlotte Counties, sand and clay beds within the Tampa Limestone that are hydraulically connected to the Hawthorn Formation are also included in the intermediate aquifer. 15 refs.

  1. The watershed-scale optimized and rearranged landscape design (WORLD) model

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and local biomass processing depots for sustainable biofuel production: Integrated life cycle assessments (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The watershed-scale optimized and rearranged landscape design (WORLD) model and local biomass processing depots for sustainable biofuel production: Integrated life cycle assessments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The watershed-scale optimized and rearranged landscape design (WORLD) model and local biomass processing depots for sustainable

  2. FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SENECA ARMY DEPOT ROMULUS, NEW YORK Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office ... INTRODUCTION The Department pf Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial ...

  3. Windsor County, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Vermont Andover, Vermont Baltimore, Vermont Barnard, Vermont Bethel, Vermont Bridgewater, Vermont Cavendish, Vermont Chester, Vermont Chester-Chester Depot, Vermont...

  4. LED Lighting Facts®

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NGLIA PG&E NEMA Efficiency Vermont Grainger Acuity Brands Home Depot Philips Lighting Lowes Cree Lighting Project Goal: To ensure accurate and consistent reporting of SSL product ...

  5. EECBG Success Story: Grant Improves Comfort for Nevada City's Employees

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Caliente, Nevada, has a unique city hall: a historic railroad depot. There was just one problem: it was built before central heating or air-conditioning. Learn more.

  6. Ohio and the Manhattan Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Industries, Inc., switched from making toys cars to making ammunition for anti-tank guns. In Dayton, National Cash Register started making magazines for anti-aircraft guns. In...

  7. Failure mode analysis for lime/limestone FGD system. Volume III. Plant profiles. Part 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenney, S.M.; Rosenberg, H.S.; Nilsson, L.I.O.; Oxley, J.H.

    1984-08-01

    This volume contains plant profiles for: Petersburg 3; Hawthorn 3, 4; La Cygne 1; Jeffry 1, 2; Lawrence 4, 5; Green River 1-3; Cane Run 4, 5; Mill Creek 1, 3; Paddy's Run 6; Clay Boswell 4; Milton R. Young 2; Pleasants 1, 2; and Colstrip 1, 2. (DLC)

  8. CX-002909: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable Energy Program- Hawthorne Ridge Solar ThermalCX(s) Applied: B1.24, B2.2, B5.1Date: 07/06/2010Location(s): East Greenbush, New YorkOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-100475 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hawthorne Charging Station at Lady Bird Park Rest Area Award Number: DE-EE0006992 CX(s) Applied: B5.23 Weatherization & Intergovernmental Programs Date: 02/11/2016 Location(s): NV Office(s): Golden Field Office

  10. EECBG Success Story: Training and Energy Efficiency - Aisle 4...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    workforce training center in Elkin, N.C. | Courtesy of Joe Seipel-Parks, West Depot Architecture A vacant grocery store was converted into The Elkin Center, a workforce training...

  11. CX-012015: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Enhanced Wind Resource Assessment with Sonic Ranging and Detection at Tooele Army Depot CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 04/24/2014 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  12. CX-002360: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Installing an Ammunition Storage Building and a Training Tower at the Central Training FacilityCX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 05/13/2010Location(s): Oak Ridge, TennesseeOffice(s): NNSA-Headquarters, Oak Ridge Office

  13. Investigation of separation, treatment, and recycling options for hazardous paint blast media waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boy, J.H.; Race, T.D.; Reinbold, K.A.

    1996-02-01

    U.S. Army depot depaint operations generate over 4 million kg per year of contaminated paint blast media wastes. The objective of this work was to investigate technologies that might significantly mitigate this Army hazardous waste disposal problem. Most of the technologies investigated either failed to meet acceptable TCLP levels for hazardous metals content, or failed to meet Army disposal requirements. However, based on a review of several commercially available services, it is recommended that Army depot depaint operations consider processing hazardous blast media waste through properly regulated contractors that offer safe, effective, and economical stabilization, fixation, and recycling technologies.

  14. CX-003538: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Green Fuels DepotCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.6, B5.1Date: 08/26/2010Location(s): Naperville, IllinoisOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Menxmmhmz 9 1 UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT i TO : ThcFFles . mx.f I A. B. Piccct, +3lation section : DATE: .@.eti 16, 1949 SUBJECT: VISIT To HAVY OFfDHAlfCE DEPOT, EARIZ, B.J. FmmlTo...

  16. NEVADA FIELD OFFICE PROHIBITED ARTICLES ON NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NEVADA FIELD OFFICE PROHIBITED ARTICLES ON NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE PUBLIC TOURS The following items are prohibited on the Nevada National Security Site public tours. If you have any of these items on your person, please return them to your vehicle. Tour escorts are required to do random checks. * Cameras/Camcorders * Cellular phones * Bluetooth enable devices * Portable Data Storage Devices * Computers * Recording Devices * Weapons * Explosives * Pets & Animals * Ammunition * PDA,

  17. U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Prohibited Items (per policy dated December 15, 2014) The following items/personnel are prohibited within the boundaries of the Nevada National Security Site: * NON-DRIVING PERSONNEL (team drivers acceptable in delivery vehicles) * PETS (police canine and service animals acceptable) * CHEMICAL IRRITANTS (including mace and pepper spray in excess of two [2] fluid ounces) * AMMUNITION, EXPLOSIVES

  18. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Thomas R. Wood

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to evaluate the opportunity for Letterkenny Army Depot (LEAD or the Depot) to utilize biogenic methane, which may be available in shale formations under the Depot, to provide a supplemental source of natural gas that could allow the Depot to increase energy independence. Both the Director and Deputy of Public Works at the Depot are supportive in general of a methane production project, but wanted to better understand the challenges prior to embarking on such a project. This report will cover many of these issues. A similar project has been successfully developed by the U. S. Army at Ft. Knox, KY, which will be explained and referred to throughout this report as a backdrop to discussing the challenges and opportunities at LEAD, because the geologic formations and possibilities at both sites are similar. Prior to discussing the opportunity at LEAD, it is important to briefly discuss the successful methane recovery operation at Ft. Knox, because it is applicable to the projected approach for the LEAD methane system. The Ft. Knox project is an excellent example of how the U. S. Army can use an onsite renewable resource to provide a secure energy source that is not dependent on regional energy networks and foreign oil. At Ft. Knox, the U. S. Army contracted (through a utility co-op) with an energy production company to drill wells, establish a distribution infrastructure, and provide the equipment needed to prepare and compress the produced methane gas for use by base operations. The energy production company agreed to conduct the exploratory investigation at Ft. Knox with no cost to the government, as long as they could be granted a long-term contract if a reliable energy resource was established. The Depot is located, in part, over an Ordovician Age shale formation that may have the potential for producing biogenic methane, similar to the Devonian Age shale found beneath Ft. Knox. However, the Ordovician Age Shale beneath the Letterkenny Depot is not known to have any currently producing gas wells.

  19. CX-100475 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    475 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100475 Categorical Exclusion Determination Hawthorne Charging Station at Lady Bird Park Rest Area Award Number: DE-EE0006992 CX(s) Applied: B5.23 Weatherization & Intergovernmental Programs Date: 02/11/2016 Location(s): NV Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide funding to the Nevada Department of Administration to construct an electric vehicle (EV) charging station. The proposed project is part of

  20. Enhanced coherent oscillations in the superconducting state of underdoped

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    YB a 2 C u 3 O 6 + x induced via ultrafast terahertz excitation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Enhanced coherent oscillations in the superconducting state of underdoped YB a 2 C u 3 O 6 + x induced via ultrafast terahertz excitation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced coherent oscillations in the superconducting state of underdoped YB a 2 C u 3 O 6 + x induced via ultrafast terahertz excitation Authors: Dakovski, Georgi L. ; Lee, Wei-Sheng ; Hawthorn, David G. ; Garner,

  1. Rate of H2S and CO2 attack on pozzolan-amended Class H well cement under

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    geologic sequestration conditions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Rate of H2S and CO2 attack on pozzolan-amended Class H well cement under geologic sequestration conditions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rate of H2S and CO2 attack on pozzolan-amended Class H well cement under geologic sequestration conditions Authors: Zhang, Liwei ; Dzombak, David A ; Nakles, David V ; Hawthorne, Steven B ; Miller, David J ; Kutchko, Barbara G ; Lopano, Christina L ; Strazisar, Brian R

  2. LONG-TERM DEMONSTRATION OF SORBENT ENHANCEMENT ADDITIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason D. Laumb; Dennis L. Laudal; Grant E. Dunham; John P. Kay; Christopher L. Martin; Jeffrey S. Thompson; Nicholas B. Lentz; Alexander Azenkeng; Kevin C. Galbreath; Lucinda L. Hamre

    2011-05-27

    Long-term demonstration tests of advanced sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) technologies have been completed at five coal-fired power plants. The targeted removal rate was 90% from baseline conditions at all five stations. The plants included Hawthorn Unit 5, Mill Creek Unit 4, San Miguel Unit 1, Centralia Unit 2, and Hoot Lake Unit 2. The materials tested included powdered activated carbon, treated carbon, scrubber additives, and SEAs. In only one case (San Miguel) was >90% removal not attainable. The reemission of mercury from the scrubber at this facility prevented >90% capture.

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Northrup Aircraft Co Inc - CA 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Northrup Aircraft Co Inc - CA 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NORTHRUP AIRCRAFT CO., INC (CA.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Hawthorne , California CA.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CA.0-02-1 CA.0-02-2 Site Operations: Participated in projects involving nuclear energy for the propulsion of aircraft. CA.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - NRC licensed CA.0-02-1 CA.0-02-2 Radioactive Materials

  4. NREL Uses Fuel Cells to Increase the Range of Battery Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL analysis identifies potential cost-effective scenarios for using small fuel cell power units to increase the range of medium-duty battery electric vehicles. Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) offer great potential for decreasing lifecycle costs in medium-duty applications, a market segment currently dominated by internal combustion technology. Charac- terized by frequent repetition of similar routes and daily return to a central depot, medium-duty vocations such as parcel delivery are well

  5. National Fuel Cell Bus Program: Accelerated Testing Evaluation Report #2, Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) and Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2010-06-01

    This is an evaluation of hydrogen fuel cell transit buses operating at AC Transit in revenue service since March 20, 2006, comparing similar diesel buses operating from the same depot. It covers November 2007 through February 2010. Results include implementation experience, fueling station operation, evaluation results at AC Transit (bus usage, availability, fuel economy, maintenance costs, and road calls), and a summary of achievements and challenges encountered during the demonstration.

  6. National Fuel Cell Bus Program: Accelerated Testing Evaluation Report and Appendices, Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-01-01

    This is an evaluation of hydrogen fuel cell transit buses operating at AC Transit in revenue service since March 20, 2006 compared to similar diesel buses operating from the same depot. This evaluation report includes results from November 2007 through October 2008. Evaluation results include implementation experience, fueling station operation, fuel cell bus operations at Golden Gate Transit, and evaluation results at AC Transit (bus usage, availability, fuel economy, maintenance costs, and roadcalls).

  7. ORISE: Travelers' Health Campaign | How ORISE is Making a Difference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Travelers' Health Campaign Travelers' Health Campaign takes critical messages worldwide Travelers' Health Campaign poster Click image to enlarge Traveling can be a dangerous transmitter of germs, bacteria and viruses such as H1N1. That makes airports, ship docks, train stations and bus depots among the most important places to spread the word about healthy practices and precautions. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has played a key role in preparing to get the

  8. Shotgun cartridge rock breaker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruzzi, Peter L.; Morrell, Roger J.

    1995-01-01

    A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

  9. Investigation summary and proposed alternative for lead remediation at a small arms trainfire range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beekman, S.M.; Stemper, M.L. [Harding Lawson Associates, Novato, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The small arms trainfire ranges are part of the former Fort Ord Army Base Superfund site in Monterey County, California. Trainees fired small caliber weapons at targets near the leeward dune faces along Monterey Bay. Monterey Bay is a National Marine Sanctuary and the dunes contain endangered species and endangered species habitat. This paper summarizes results of the remedial investigation, human health risk assessment, ecological risk assessment, and feasibility study, and presents the results of bench-scale studies and proposed pilot studies for the site. Results of the RI showed that lead is the primary chemical of concern in soil (i.e., dune sands) and was detected at the highest concentrations where surface coverage of spent ammunition was greater than 10 percent (areas of heavy bullet distribution). A regulatory-approved health-based level of 1,860 mg/kg was developed as an acceptable level for lead-bearing soil in areas of heavy deposition to be protective of human health and the environment for planned reuse. Concentrations near or above 1,860 mg/kg correspond to areas of heavy distribution of spent ammunition. Plant and animal species were sampled and tested to evaluate the potential risk to ecological receptors.

  10. Strategic supply system design - a holistic evaluation of operational and production cost for a biorefinery supply chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamers, Patrick; Tan, Eric C.D.; Searcy, Erin M.; Scarlata, Christopher J.; Cafferty, Kara G.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

    2015-08-20

    Pioneer cellulosic biorefineries across the United States rely on a conventional feedstock supply system based on one-year contracts with local growers, who harvest, locally store, and deliver feed-stock in low-density format to the conversion facility. While the conventional system is designed for high biomass yield areas, pilot scale operations have experienced feedstock supply shortages and price volatilities due to reduced harvests and competition from other industries. Regional supply dependency and the inability to actively manage feedstock stability and quality, provide operational risks to the biorefinery, which translate into higher investment risk. The advanced feedstock supply system based on a network of depots can mitigate many of these risks and enable wider supply system benefits. This paper compares the two concepts from a system-level perspective beyond mere logistic costs. It shows that while processing operations at the depot increase feedstock supply costs initially, they enable wider system benefits including supply risk reduction (leading to lower interest rates on loans), industry scale-up, conversion yield improvements, and reduced handling equipment and storage costs at the biorefinery. When translating these benefits into cost reductions per liter of gasoline equivalent (LGE), we find that total cost reductions between -$0.46 to -$0.21 per LGE for biochemical and -$0.32 to -$0.12 per LGE for thermochemical conversion pathways are possible. Naturally, these system level benefits will differ between individual actors along the feedstock supply chain. Further research is required with respect to depot sizing, location, and ownership structures.

  11. Strategic supply system design - a holistic evaluation of operational and production cost for a biorefinery supply chain

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamers, Patrick; Tan, Eric C.D.; Searcy, Erin M.; Scarlata, Christopher J.; Cafferty, Kara G.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

    2015-08-20

    Pioneer cellulosic biorefineries across the United States rely on a conventional feedstock supply system based on one-year contracts with local growers, who harvest, locally store, and deliver feed-stock in low-density format to the conversion facility. While the conventional system is designed for high biomass yield areas, pilot scale operations have experienced feedstock supply shortages and price volatilities due to reduced harvests and competition from other industries. Regional supply dependency and the inability to actively manage feedstock stability and quality, provide operational risks to the biorefinery, which translate into higher investment risk. The advanced feedstock supply system based on a networkmore » of depots can mitigate many of these risks and enable wider supply system benefits. This paper compares the two concepts from a system-level perspective beyond mere logistic costs. It shows that while processing operations at the depot increase feedstock supply costs initially, they enable wider system benefits including supply risk reduction (leading to lower interest rates on loans), industry scale-up, conversion yield improvements, and reduced handling equipment and storage costs at the biorefinery. When translating these benefits into cost reductions per liter of gasoline equivalent (LGE), we find that total cost reductions between -$0.46 to -$0.21 per LGE for biochemical and -$0.32 to -$0.12 per LGE for thermochemical conversion pathways are possible. Naturally, these system level benefits will differ between individual actors along the feedstock supply chain. Further research is required with respect to depot sizing, location, and ownership structures.« less

  12. Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed preprocessing supply system designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muth, jr., David J.; Langholtz, Matthew H.; Tan, Eric; Jacobson, Jacob; Schwab, Amy; Wu, May; Argo, Andrew; Brandt, Craig C.; Cafferty, Kara; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Dutta, Abhijit; Eaton, Laurence M.; Searcy, Erin

    2014-03-31

    The 2011 US Billion-Ton Update estimates that by 2030 there will be enough agricultural and forest resources to sustainably provide at least one billion dry tons of biomass annually, enough to displace approximately 30% of the country's current petroleum consumption. A portion of these resources are inaccessible at current cost targets with conventional feedstock supply systems because of their remoteness or low yields. Reliable analyses and projections of US biofuels production depend on assumptions about the supply system and biorefinery capacity, which, in turn, depend upon economic value, feedstock logistics, and sustainability. A cross-functional team has examined combinations of advances in feedstock supply systems and biorefinery capacities with rigorous design information, improved crop yield and agronomic practices, and improved estimates of sustainable biomass availability. A previous report on biochemical refinery capacity noted that under advanced feedstock logistic supply systems that include depots and pre-processing operations there are cost advantages that support larger biorefineries up to 10 000 DMT/day facilities compared to the smaller 2000 DMT/day facilities. This report focuses on analyzing conventional versus advanced depot biomass supply systems for a thermochemical conversion and refinery sizing based on woody biomass. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the economies of scale enabled by advanced logistics offsets much of the added logistics costs from additional depot processing and transportation, resulting in a small overall increase to the minimum ethanol selling price compared to the conventional logistic supply system. While the overall costs do increase slightly for the advanced logistic supply systems, the ability to mitigate moisture and ash in the system will improve the storage and conversion processes. In addition, being able to draw on feedstocks from further distances will decrease the risk of biomass supply to the conversion facility.

  13. Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed pre-processing supply system designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Muth, Jr.; Matthew H. Langholtz; Eric C. D. Tan; Jacob J. Jacobson; Amy Schwab; May M. Wu; Andrew Argo; Craig C. Brandt; Kara G. Cafferty; Yi-Wen Chiu; Abhijit Dutta; Laurence M. Eaton; Erin M. Searcy

    2014-08-01

    The 2011 US Billion-Ton Update estimates that by 2030 there will be enough agricultural and forest resources to sustainably provide at least one billion dry tons of biomass annually, enough to displace approximately 30% of the country's current petroleum consumption. A portion of these resources are inaccessible at current cost targets with conventional feedstock supply systems because of their remoteness or low yields. Reliable analyses and projections of US biofuels production depend on assumptions about the supply system and biorefinery capacity, which, in turn, depend upon economic value, feedstock logistics, and sustainability. A cross-functional team has examined combinations of advances in feedstock supply systems and biorefinery capacities with rigorous design information, improved crop yield and agronomic practices, and improved estimates of sustainable biomass availability. A previous report on biochemical refinery capacity noted that under advanced feedstock logistic supply systems that include depots and pre-processing operations there are cost advantages that support larger biorefineries up to 10 000 DMT/day facilities compared to the smaller 2000 DMT/day facilities. This report focuses on analyzing conventional versus advanced depot biomass supply systems for a thermochemical conversion and refinery sizing based on woody biomass. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the economies of scale enabled by advanced logistics offsets much of the added logistics costs from additional depot processing and transportation, resulting in a small overall increase to the minimum ethanol selling price compared to the conventional logistic supply system. While the overall costs do increase slightly for the advanced logistic supply systems, the ability to mitigate moisture and ash in the system will improve the storage and conversion processes. In addition, being able to draw on feedstocks from further distances will decrease the risk of biomass supply to the conversion facility.

  14. Books Are Fun book fair

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Books Are Fun book fair Books Are Fun book fair WHEN: Sep 21, 2015 9:00 AM - Sep 24, 2015 4:00 PM WHERE: Otowi Building cafeteria side rooms CONTACT: Debbi Wersonick 665-4400 CATEGORY: Community INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Employees and the public can get an early start on their holiday shopping at the Books Are Fun book fair. Fifteen percent of the proceeds from the book fair benefit the Food Depot in Santa Fe, and the Laboratory's annual holiday food drive, which is scheduled to

  15. THE SCIOTO ORDNANCE PLANT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' 1 . \." _ j. .I > * .A; .i ,' / / ,/ ' , ( , ( 1: 1 i I l-1 5 ' / ,,' :A' ' , THE SCIOTO ORDNANCE PLANT . and THE MARION ENGINEER DEPOT of Marion, Ohio A Profile AFTER FORTY YEARS BY Charles D. Mosher and Delpha Ruth Mosher . . . 111 THE AUTHORS Charles D. Mosher was born on a farm located in Morrow County on Mosher Road near Mt. Gilead. He received his TH.B. from Malone College, B.A. from Baldwin-Wallace College and his B.Div. and M.Div. at the Nazarene Theological Seminary in Kansas

  16. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gash, A

    2005-12-21

    Many energetic systems can be activated via mechanical means. Percussion primers in small caliber ammunition and stab detonators used in medium caliber ammunition are just two examples. Current medium caliber (20-60mm) munitions are detonated through the use of impact sensitive stab detonators. Stab detonators are very sensitive and must be small, as to meet weight and size limitations. A mix of energetic powders, sensitive to mechanical stimulus, is typically used to ignite such devices. Stab detonators are mechanically activated by forcing a firing pin through the closure disc of the device and into the stab initiating mix. Rapid heating caused by mechanically driven compression and friction of the mixture results in its ignition. The rapid decomposition of these materials generates a pressure/temperature pulse that is sufficient to initiate a transfer charge, which has enough output energy to detonate the main charge. This general type of ignition mix is used in a large variety of primers, igniters, and detonators.[1] Common primer mixes, such as NOL-130, are made up of lead styphnate (basic) 40%, lead azide (dextrinated) 20%, barium nitrate 20%, antimony sulfide 15%, and tetrazene 5%.[1] These materials pose acute and chronic toxicity hazards during mixing of the composition and later in the item life cycle after the item has been field functioned. There is an established need to replace these mixes on toxicity, health, and environmental hazard grounds. This effort attempts to demonstrate that environmentally acceptable energetic solgel coated flash metal multilayer nanocomposites can be used to replace current impact initiated devices (IIDs), which have hazardous and toxic components. Successful completion of this project will result in IIDs that include innocuous compounds, have sufficient output energy for initiation, meet current military specifications, are small, cost competitive, and perform as well as or better than current devices. We expect flash metal multilayer and sol-gel to be generic technologies applicable to a wide range of devices, especially in small caliber ammunition and sub-munitions. We will replace the NOL-130 mixture with a nanocomposite that consists of a mechanically robust energetic multilayer foil that has been coated with a sol-gel energetic material. The exothermic reactions are activated in this nanocomposite are the transformation of the multilayer material to its respective intermetallic alloy and the thermite reaction, which is characterized by very high temperatures, a small pressure pulse, and hot particle ejection. The proposed materials and their reaction products consist of, but are not limited to aluminum, nickel, iron, aluminum oxide, titanium, iron oxide and boron. These materials have much more desirable environmental and health characteristics than the NOL-130 composition.

  17. Wastes and by-products - alternatives for agricultural use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boles, J.L.; Craft, D.J.; Parker, B.R.

    1994-10-01

    Top address a growing national problem with generation of wastes and by-products, TVA has been involved for several years with developing and commercializing environmentally responsible practices for eliminating, minimizing, or utilizing various wastes/by-products. In many cases, reducing waste generation is impractical, but the wastes/by-products can be converted into other environmentally sound products. In some instances, conversion of safe, value-added agricultural products in the best or only practical alternative. TVA is currently involved with a diversity of projects converting wastes/by-products into safe, economical, and agriculturally beneficial products. Environmental improvement projects have involved poultry litter, cellulosic wastes, used battery acid, ammonium sulfate fines, lead smelting effluents, deep-welled sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate solutions, wood ash, waste magnesium ammonium sulfate slurry from recording tape production, and ammunition plant waste sodium nitrate/ammonium nitrate streams.

  18. Uncertainties in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Advanced Biomass Feedstock Logistics Supply Chains in Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cafferty, Kara G.; Searcy, Erin M.; Nguyen, Long; Spatari, Sabrina

    2014-11-01

    To meet Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) cellulosic biofuel mandates, the United States will require an annual domestic supply of about 242 million Mg of biomass by 2022. To improve the feedstock logistics of lignocellulosic biofuels and access available biomass resources from areas with varying yields, commodity systems have been proposed and designed to deliver on-spec biomass feedstocks at preprocessing “depots”, which densify and stabilize the biomass prior to long-distance transport and delivery to centralized biorefineries. The harvesting, preprocessing, and logistics (HPL) of biomass commodity supply chains thus could introduce spatially variable environmental impacts into the biofuel life cycle due to needing to harvest, move, and preprocess biomass from multiple distances that have variable spatial density. This study examines the uncertainty in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn stover logisticsHPL within a bio-ethanol supply chain in the state of Kansas, where sustainable biomass supply varies spatially. Two scenarios were evaluated each having a different number of depots of varying capacity and location within Kansas relative to a central commodity-receiving biorefinery to test GHG emissions uncertainty. Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the spatial uncertainty in the HPL gate-to-gate sequence. The results show that the transport of densified biomass introduces the highest variability and contribution to the carbon footprint of the logistics HPL supply chain (0.2-13 g CO2e/MJ). Moreover, depending upon the biomass availability and its spatial density and surrounding transportation infrastructure (road and rail), logistics HPL processes can increase the variability in life cycle environmental impacts for lignocellulosic biofuels. Within Kansas, life cycle GHG emissions could range from 24 to 41 g CO2e/MJ depending upon the location, size and number of preprocessing depots constructed. However, this range can be minimized through optimizing the siting of preprocessing depots where ample rail infrastructure exists to supply biomass commodity to a regional biorefinery supply system

  19. Taming the Wild World of Management, Performance and Communication - 13459

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Laurie

    2013-07-01

    Management has evolved a long way from its original meaning of 'governing a horse'. The industrial revolution fostered 'scientific management'; 1930's Hawthorne studies discovered that people's social interactions could alter productivity; and the dawn of the computer age in the post-war 1950's brought general systems theory into management thinking. Today, mobile wireless connectivity aims to transform ever-changing networks of players, mandates, and markets into something that can be 'managed'. So why is there no clear and simple recipe for how to practice management? We talk about financial management, safety management, and operations management, but surely the 'management' part of those endeavors will share the same set of practices. Instead, we are still arguing for 'management' to include everything from developing people to negotiating contracts. A manager's job may include many things, but one of them, the job of management, needs to be nailed down. Three standard practices for managing in a network are developed: (a) support the dialogues that connect people vital to accomplishing a goal or objective; (b) develop and sustain the scoreboards that serve as a road-map to reach the goal; and (c) control the feedback to 'govern the horse'. These three practices are useful for more than reaching goals, as they also support coordinating across boundaries and running productive meetings. The dialogues for productive relationships, scoreboards for goals and deliverables, and feedback for performance together constitute a recipe for managing in a networked world. (authors)

  20. Medium Duty Electric Vehicle Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackie, Robin J. D.

    2015-05-31

    The Smith Electric Vehicle Demonstration Project (SDP) was integral to the Smith business plan to establish a manufacturing base in the United States (US) and produce a portfolio of All Electric Vehicles (AEV’s) for the medium duty commercial truck market. Smith focused on the commercial depot based logistics market, as it represented the market that was most ready for the early adoption of AEV technology. The SDP enabled Smith to accelerate its introduction of vehicles and increase the size of its US supply chain to support early market adoption of AEV’s that were cost competitive, fully met the needs of a diverse set of end users and were compliant with Federal safety and emissions requirements. The SDP accelerated the development and production of various electric drive vehicle systems to substantially reduce petroleum consumption, reduce vehicular emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), and increase US jobs.

  1. Field investigation of effectiveness of soil vapor extraction technology (September 1994). Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    A research project was undertaken to study the effectiveness of soil vapor extraction (SVE), an emerging technology for remediation of soils contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). As part of the project, two soil vapor extraction systems, Site D and Site G at the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant, New Brighton, Minnesota were selected for evaluation. The approach of the project was to gather and compare site information regarding residual soil concentrations before and after treatment, and obtain operational data to evaluate the performance of the systems. The residual levels of volatile organics before and after treatment are compared for magnitude and distribution. Operational data are analyzed to present the performance of the systems and the progression of treatment with time. Capital, operating and maintenance costs are presented. Results of the evaluation indicate that SVE has been effective in reducing the residual concentrations, generally by several orders of magnitude. In most cases, residual concentrations were nondetectable. Samples taken in silty clays and waste materials showed the hightest residual concentrations.

  2. Inspection of the objects on the sea floor by using 14 MeV tagged neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J.; Matika, D.; Kollar, R.; Nad, K.; Orlic, Z.

    2011-07-01

    Variety of objects found on the sea floor needs to be inspected for the presence of materials which represent the threat to the environment and to the safety of humans. We have demonstrated that the sealed tube 14 MeV neutron generator with the detection of associated alpha particles can be used underwater when mounted inside ROV equipped with the hydraulic legs and variety of sensors for the inspection of such objects for the presence of threat materials. Such a system is performing the measurement by using the NaI gamma detector and an API-120 neutron generator which could be rotated in order to maximize the inspected target volume. The neutron beam intensity during the 10-30 min. measurements is usually 1 x 10{sup 7} n/s in 4{pi}. In this report the experimental results for some of commonly found objects containing TNT explosive or its simulant are presented. The measured gamma spectra are dominant by C, O and Fe peaks enabling the determination of the presence of explosives inside the ammunition shell. Parameters influencing the C/O ratio are discussed in some details. (authors)

  3. Analysis of the Production Cost for Various Grades of Biomass Thermal Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S Cherry; Rick A. Wood; Tyler L Westover

    2013-12-01

    Process flow sheets were developed for the thermal treatment of southern pine wood chips at four temperatures (150, 180, 230, and 270 degrees C) and two different scales (20 and 100 ton/hour). The larger capacity processes had as their primary heat source hot gas assumed to be available in quantity from an adjacent biorefinery. Mass and energy balances for these flow sheets were developed using Aspen Plus process simulation software. The hot gas demands in the larger processes, up to 1.9 million lb/hour, were of questionable feasibility because of the volume to be moved. This heat was of low utility because the torrefaction process, especially at higher temperatures, is a net heat producer if the organic byproduct gases are burned. A thermal treatment flow sheet using wood chips dried in the biorefinery to 10% moisture content (rather than 30% for green chips) with transfer of high temperature steam from the thermal treatment depot to the biorefinery was also examined. The equipment size information from all of these cases was used in several different equipment cost estimating methods to estimate the major equipment costs for each process. From these, factored estimates of other plant costs were determined, leading to estimates (+ / - 30% accuracy) of total plant capital cost. The 20 ton/hour processes were close to 25 million dollars except for the 230 degrees C case using dried wood chips which was only 15 million dollars because of its small furnace. The larger processes ranged from 64-120 million dollars. From these capital costs and projections of several categories of operating costs, the processing cost of thermally treated pine chips was found to be $28-33 per ton depending on the degree of treatment and without any credits for steam generation. If the excess energy output of the two 20 ton/hr depot cases at 270 degrees C can be sold for $10 per million BTU, the net processing cost dropped to $13/ton product starting with green wood chips or only $3 per ton if using dried chips from the biorefinery. Including a 12% return on invested capital raised all of the operating cost results by about $20/ton.

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 2010 Top Retail Companies, by Sales # Stores % Change over Chain ($billion) 2009 Revenues 2010 2009 Stores Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. 419.0 3.4% 8,970 6.0% The Kroger Co. 82.2 7.1% 3,605 -0.4% Costco 76.3 9.1% 572 1.1% The Home Depot 68.0 2.8% 2,248 0.2% Walgreen Co. 67.4 6.4% 8,046 7.3% Target Corp. 67.4 3.1% 1,750 0.6% CVS Caremark 57.3 3.6% 7,182 2.2% Best Buy 50.3 1.2% 4,172 3.7% Lowes Cos. 48.8 3.4% 1,749 2.3% Sears Holdings 43.3 -1.6% 4,038 2.2% Source(s): 2010 Revenues % Change over Chain

  5. Parris Island Wastewater Treatment Plant SCADA Upgrades Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meador, Richard J.; Hatley, Darrel D.

    2004-03-18

    Marine Corp Recruit Depot (MCRD), Parris Island, SC, home of the Easter Recruiting Region Marine Corp Boot Camp, found itself in a situation common to Department of Defense (DOD) facilities. It had to deal with several different types of installed energy-related control systems that could not talk to each other. This situation was being exacerbated by the installation of a new and/or unique type of control system for every new building being constructed or older facility that was being upgraded. The Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF) and lift station controls were badly in need of a thorough inspection and a new Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system upgrade to meet environmental, safety, manpower, and maintenance concerns. A project was recently completed to implement such a wastewater treatment SCADA upgrade, which is compatible with other upgrades to the energy monitoring and control systems for Parris Island buildings and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Decision Support for Operations and Maintenance (DSOM) system installed at the Central Energy Plant (CEP). This project included design, specification, procurement, installation, and testing an upgraded SCADA alarm, process monitoring, and display system; and training WWTF operators in its operation. The ultimate goal of this and the other PNNL projects at Parris Island is to allow monitoring and control of energy and environmental components from a central location.

  6. The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Revision 1, [Annual] report, October 1, 1990--April 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathren, R.L.

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes the history, organization, activities and recent scientific accomplishments of the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Through voluntary donations of tissue obtained at autopsies, the Registries carry out studies of the concentration, distribution and biokinetics of plutonium in occupationally exposed persons. Findings from tissue analyses from more than 200 autopsies include the following: a greater proportion of the americium intake, as compared with plutonium, was found in the skeleton; the half-time of americium in liver is significantly shorter than that of plutonium; the concentration of actinide in the skeleton is inversely proportional to the calcium and ash content of the bone; only a small percentage of the total skeletal deposition of plutonium is found in the marrow, implying a smaller risk from irradiation of the marrow relative to the bone surfaces; estimates of plutonium body burden made from urinalysis typically exceed those made from autopsy data; pathologists were unable to discriminate between a group of uranium workers and persons without known occupational exposure on the basis of evaluation of microscopic kidney slides; the skeleton is an important long term depot for uranium, and that the fractional uptake by both skeleton and kidney may be greater than indicated by current models. These and other findings and current studies are discussed in depth.

  7. Mounded LPG storage - Experience and developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, D.

    1988-01-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is stored after production, and for distribution and use, in pressure vessels which vary in size from a few kilogrammes to many thousands of tons. The types of LPG under consideration are commercial butane, commercial propane, or mixtures of the two gases in varying proportions. Mounded storage systems are becoming popular as an alternative to the better-known traditional systems. The most widely used and therefore best-known of the traditional systems are the above-ground pressure-vessel designs. These more commonly comprise factory-made cylinders which are installed horizontally, being supported on saddles at each end of the vessel. When such vessels are installed in an LPG terminal, depot, or filling plant, they are required in multiple units to facilitate the storage of more than one grade of product and to enable regular maintenance and inspection to be carried out. Today's safety regulations require such installations to be divided into sub-groups of six tanks, with all the tanks located at a safe distance from one another, and from other facilities in the immediate area. These safety distances are being increased as a result of experience, which means terminals now require large areas of land.

  8. Pilot-scale testing of paint-waste incineration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Operations at the U.S. Army depots generate large quantities of paint removal and application wastes. These wastes, many of which are hazardous, are currently disposed of off site. Off-site disposal of solids is often by landfilling, which will be banned or highly restricted in the future. Several research activities have been initiated by USATHAMA to evaluate alternative technologies for management of paint wastes. The project described in this report involved pilot-scale incineration testing of two paint wastes: spent plastic blast media and spent agricultural blast media (ground walnut shells). The objective of this task was to continue development of incineration as an alternative treatment technology for paint wastes through pilot-scale rotary-kiln incineration testing. The results of the pilot test were evaluated to assess how the paint waste characteristics and incinerator operating conditions affected the following: characteristics of ash residue volume reduction achieved, destruction and removal efficiencies (DRE's) for organic compound and characteristics of stack gases.

  9. Development of a new process for treatment of paint sludge wastes. Final report, May 1986-December 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balasco, A.A.; Bodek, I.; Goldman, M.E.; Mazrimas, M.J.; Rossetti, M.

    1987-12-31

    This report presents the results of laboratory tests performed on paint-waste samples obtained from the Letterkenny Army Depot (LEAD). The purpose of these tests was to determine if the ash residue from a thermal-treatment process such as combustion would be classified as hazardous according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). In addition, the feasibility of generating a glassified product from the ash which would be classified as non-hazardous was also tested. Finally, tests were also performed to determine if recovery of selected metals from the ash is feasible. The results of the laboratory program suggest that thermal treatment of paint waste under some conditions may be feasible for generation of non-hazardous ash residue. Further experiments on a pilot-scale are recommended, however, to investigate this approach to determine the need for subsequent treatment (e.g., glassification and/or recovery) of the ash product and the actual destruction efficiency of organic components.

  10. Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division at Warminster Environmental Materials Program. Phase 1. Interim report, October 1989-May 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spadafora, S.J.; Hegedus, C.R.; Clark, K.J.; Eng, A.T.; Pulley, D.F.

    1992-06-24

    With the recent increase in awareness about the environment, there is an expanding concern of the deleterious effects of current materials and processes. Federal, state and local environmental agencies such as the EPA, State Air Resource Boards and local Air Quality Management Districts (AQMD) have issued legislation that restrict or prohibit the use and disposal of hazardous materials. National and local laws like the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and AQMD regulations are examples of rules that govern the handling and disposal of hazardous materials and waste. The Department of Defense (DoD), in support of this effort, has identified the major generators of hazardous materials and hazardous waste to be maintenance depots and operations, particularly cleaning, pretreating, plating, painting and paint removal processes. Reductions of waste in these areas has been targeted as a primary goal in the DOD. The Navy is committed to significantly reducing its current hazardous waste generation and is working to attain a near zero discharge of hazardous waste by the year 2000. In order to attain these goals, the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division at Warminster has organized and is carrying out a comprehensive program in cooperation with the Naval Air Systems Command, the Air Force and the Department of Energy that deal with the elimination or reduction of hazardous materials. .... Environmental materials, Organic coatings, Inorganic pretreatments, Paint removal techniques, Cleaners, CFC'S.

  11. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume II. Literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    1984-11-01

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). This first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 references and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2.

  12. Overcoming the Range Limitation of Medium-Duty Battery Electric Vehicles through the use of Hydrogen Fuel-Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, E.; Wang, L.; Gonder, J.; Ulsh, M.

    2013-10-01

    Battery electric vehicles possess great potential for decreasing lifecycle costs in medium-duty applications, a market segment currently dominated by internal combustion technology. Characterized by frequent repetition of similar routes and daily return to a central depot, medium-duty vocations are well positioned to leverage the low operating costs of battery electric vehicles. Unfortunately, the range limitation of commercially available battery electric vehicles acts as a barrier to widespread adoption. This paper describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy and industry partners to analyze the use of small hydrogen fuel-cell stacks to extend the range of battery electric vehicles as a means of improving utility, and presumably, increasing market adoption. This analysis employs real-world vocational data and near-term economic assumptions to (1) identify optimal component configurations for minimizing lifecycle costs, (2) benchmark economic performance relative to both battery electric and conventional powertrains, and (3) understand how the optimal design and its competitiveness change with respect to duty cycle and economic climate. It is found that small fuel-cell power units provide extended range at significantly lower capital and lifecycle costs than additional battery capacity alone. And while fuel-cell range-extended vehicles are not deemed economically competitive with conventional vehicles given present-day economic conditions, this paper identifies potential future scenarios where cost equivalency is achieved.

  13. Hearing Protection Evaluation for the Combat Arms Earplug at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Lovejoy

    2007-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is managed by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) for the Department of Energy. The INL Protective Security Forces (Pro Force) are involved in training exercises that generate impulse noise by small arms fire. Force-on-force (FOF) training exercises that simulate real world scenarios require the Pro Force to engage the opposition force (OPFOR) while maintaining situational awareness through verbal communications. The Combat Arms earplug was studied to determine if it provides adequate hearing protection in accordance with the requirements of MIL-STD-1474C/D. The Combat Arms earplug uses a design that allows continuous noise through a critical orifice while effectively attenuating high-energy impulse noise. The earplug attenuates noise on a non linear scale, as the sound increases the attenuation increases. The INL studied the effectiveness of the Combat Arms earplug with a Bruel & Kjaer (B&K) head and torso simulator used with a selection of small arms to create impulse sound pressures. The Combat Arms earplugs were inserted into the B&K head and torso ears, and small arms were then discharged to generate the impulse noise. The INL analysis of the data indicates that the Combat Arms earplug does provide adequate protection, in accordance with MIL-STD-1474C/D, when used to protect against impulse noise generated by small arms fire using blank ammunition. Impulse noise generated by small arms fire ranged from 135160 dB range unfiltered un-weighted. The Combat Arms earplug attenuated the sound pressure 1025 dB depending on the impulse noise pressure. This assessment is consistent with the results of previously published studies on the Combat Arms earplug (see Section 5, References). Based upon these result, the INL intends to use the Combat Arms earplug for FOF training exercises.

  14. Topical efficacy of dimercapto-chelating agents against lewisite-induced skin lesions in SKH-1 hairless mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mouret, Stéphane; Wartelle, Julien; Emorine, Sandy; Bertoni, Marine; Nguon, Nina; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Dorandeu, Frédéric; Boudry, Isabelle

    2013-10-15

    Lewisite is a potent chemical warfare arsenical vesicant that can cause severe skin lesions. Today, lewisite exposure remains possible during demilitarization of old ammunitions and as a result of deliberate use. Although its cutaneous toxicity is not fully elucidated, a specific antidote exists, the British anti-lewisite (BAL, dimercaprol) but it is not without untoward effects. Analogs of BAL, less toxic, have been developed such as meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and have been employed for the treatment of heavy metal poisoning. However, efficacy of DMSA against lewisite-induced skin lesions remains to be determined in comparison with BAL. We have thus evaluated in this study the therapeutic efficacy of BAL and DMSA in two administration modes against skin lesions induced by lewisite vapor on SKH-1 hairless mice. Our data demonstrate a strong protective efficacy of topical application of dimercapto-chelating agents in contrast to a subcutaneous administration 1 h after lewisite exposure, with attenuation of wound size, necrosis and impairment of skin barrier function. The histological evaluation also confirms the efficacy of topical application by showing that treatments were effective in reversing lewisite-induced neutrophil infiltration. This protective effect was associated with an epidermal hyperplasia. However, for all the parameters studied, BAL was more effective than DMSA in reducing lewisite-induced skin injury. Together, these findings support the use of a topical form of dimercaprol-chelating agent against lewisite-induced skin lesion within the first hour after exposure to increase the therapeutic management and that BAL, despite its side-effects, should not be abandoned. - Highlights: • Topically applied dimercapto-chelating agents reduce lewisite-induced skin damage. • One topical application of BAL or DMSA is sufficient to reverse lewisite effects. • Topical BAL is more effective than DMSA to counteract lewisite-induced skin damage.

  15. Matrix Characterization in Threat Material Detection Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obhodas, J.; Sudac, D.; Valkovic, V.

    2009-03-10

    Matrix characterization in the threat material detection is of utmost importance, it generates the background against which the threat material signal has to be identified. Threat materials (explosive, chemical warfare, ...) are usually contained within small volume inside large volumes of variable matrices. We have studied the influence of matrix materials on the capability of neutron systems to identify hidden threat material. Three specific scenarios are considered in some details: case 1--contraband material in the sea containers, case 2 - explosives in soil (landmines), case 3 - explosives and chemical warfare on the sea bottom. Effects of container cargo material on tagged neutron system are seen in the increase of gamma background and the decrease of neutron beam intensity. Detection of landmines is more complex because of variable soil properties. We have studied in detail space and time variations of soil elemental compositions and in particular hydrogen content (humidity). Of special interest are ammunitions and chemical warfare on the sea bottom, damping sites and leftovers from previous conflicts (WW-I, WW-II and local). In this case sea sediment is background source and its role is similar to the role of the soil in the landmine detection. In addition to geochemical cycling of chemical elements in semi-enclosed sea, like the Adriatic Sea, one has to consider also anthropogenic influence, especially when studying small scale variations in concentration levels. Some preliminary experimental results obtained with tagged neutron sensor inside an underwater vehicle are presented as well as data on sediment characterization by X-Ray Fluorescence.

  16. Development and validation of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2007-07-01

    A typical aircraft can experience over 2,000 fatigue cycles (cabin pressurizations) and even greater flight hours in a single year. An unavoidable by-product of aircraft use is that crack, impact, and corrosion flaws develop throughout the aircraft's skin and substructure elements. Economic barriers to the purchase of new aircraft have placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. The use of bonded composite doublers offers the airframe manufacturers and aircraft maintenance facilities a cost effective method to safely extend the lives of their aircraft. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is now possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance Center at Sandia National Labs (AANC), Boeing, and Federal Express completed a pilot program to validate and introduce composite doubler repair technology to the U.S. commercial aircraft industry. This project focused on repair of DC-10 fuselage structure and its primary goal was to demonstrate routine use of this repair technology using niche applications that streamline the design-to-installation process. As composite doubler repairs gradually appear in the commercial aircraft arena, successful flight operation data is being accumulated. These commercial aircraft repairs are not only demonstrating the engineering and economic advantages of composite doubler technology but they are also establishing the ability of commercial maintenance depots to safely adopt this repair technique. This report presents the array of engineering activities that were completed in order to make this technology available for widespread commercial aircraft use. Focused laboratory testing was conducted to compliment the field data and to address specific issues regarding damage tolerance and flaw growth in composite doubler repairs. Fatigue and strength tests were performed on a simulated wing repair using a substandard design and a flawed installation. In addition, the new Sol-Gel surface preparation technique was evaluated. Fatigue coupon tests produced Sol-Gel results that could be compared with a large performance database from conventional, riveted repairs. It was demonstrated that not only can composite doublers perform well in severe off-design conditions (low doubler stiffness and presence of defects in doubler installation) but that the Sol-Gel surface preparation technique is easier and quicker to carry out while still producing optimum bonding properties. Nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods were developed so that the potential for disbond and delamination growth could be monitored and crack growth mitigation could be quantified. The NDI methods were validated using full-scale test articles and the FedEx aircraft installations. It was demonstrated that specialized NDI techniques can detect flaws in composite doubler installations before they reach critical size. Probability of Detection studies were integrated into the FedEx training in order to quantify the ability of aircraft maintenance depots to properly monitor these repairs. In addition, Boeing Structural Repair and Nondestructive Testing Manuals were modified to include composite doubler repair and inspection procedures. This report presents the results from the FedEx Pilot Program that involved installation and surveillance of numerous repairs on operating aircraft. Results from critical NDI evaluations are reported in light of damage tolerance assessments for bonded composite doublers. This work has produced significant interest from airlines and aircraft manufacturers. The successful Pilot Program produced flight performance history to establish the durability of bonded composite patches as a permanent repair on commercial aircraft structures. This report discusses both the laboratory data and Pilot Program results from repair installations on operating aircraft to introduce composite doubler repairs into mainstream commercial aircraft use.

  17. Impact of Sequential Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) Pretreatment and Pelletization on the Moisture Sorption Properties of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonner, Ian J.; Thompson, David N.; Teymouri, Farzaneh; Campbell, Timothy; Bals, Bryan; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar

    2015-05-01

    Combining ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX™) pretreatment with a depot processing facility is a promising option for delivering high-value densified biomass to the emerging bioenergy industry. However, because the pretreatment process results in a high moisture material unsuitable for pelleting or storage (40% wet basis), the biomass must be immediately dried. If AFEX pretreatment results in a material that is difficult to dry, the economics of this already costly operation would be at risk. This work tests the nature of moisture sorption isotherms and thin-layer drying behavior of corn (Zea mays L.) stover at 20°C to 60°C before and after sequential AFEX pretreatment and pelletization to determine whether any negative impacts to material drying or storage may result from the AFEX process. The equilibrium moisture content to equilibrium relative humidity relationship for each of the materials was determined using dynamic vapor sorption isotherms and modeled with modified Chung-Pfost, modified Halsey, and modified Henderson temperature-dependent models as well as the Double Log Polynomial (DLP), Peleg, and Guggenheim Anderson de Boer (GAB) temperature-independent models. Drying kinetics were quantified under thin-layer laboratory testing and modeled using the Modified Page's equation. Water activity isotherms for non-pelleted biomass were best modeled with the Peleg temperature-independent equation while isotherms for the pelleted biomass were best modeled with the Double Log Polynomial equation. Thin-layer drying results were accurately modeled with the Modified Page's equation. The results of this work indicate that AFEX pretreatment results in drying properties more favorable than or equal to that of raw corn stover, and pellets of superior physical stability in storage.

  18. Renewable Energy Opportunities at the Kanto Installations, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solana, Amy E.; Horner, Jacob A.; Russo, Bryan J.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kora, Angela R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Hand, James R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.

    2010-09-24

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource development potential at the U.S. Army installations in the Kanto region in Japan, which includes Camp Zama, Yokohama North Dock, Sagamihara Family Housing Area (SFHA), Sagami General Depot, and Akasaka Press Center. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the Huntsville Army Corps of Engineers, and includes the development of a methodology for renewable resource assessment at Army installations located on foreign soil. The methodology is documented in Renewable Energy Assessment Methodology for Japanese OCONUS Army Installations. The site visit to the Kanto installations took place on April 5 and 6, 2010. At the current time, there are some renewable technologies that show economic potential. Because of siting restrictions and the small size of these installations, development of most renewable energy technologies will likely be limited to Camp Zama. Project feasibility is based on installation-specific resource availability and energy costs and projections based on accepted life-cycle cost methods. Development of any renewable energy project will be challenging, as it will require investigation into existing contractual obligations, new contracts that could be developed, the legality of certain partnerships, and available financing avenues, which involves the U.S. Forces Japan (USFJ), the Government of Japan (GOJ), and a number of other parties on both sides. The Army will not be able to implement a project without involvement and approval from the other services and multiple levels of Japanese government. However, implementation of renewable energy projects could be an attractive method for GOJ to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lower annual utility payments to USFJ. This report recommends projects to pursue and offers approaches to use. The most promising opportunities include waste-to-energy and ground source heat pumps. Solar photovoltaics (PV) may also prove successful. Other resources were found to be insufficient on the Kanto installations.

  19. Assessment of methane-related fuels for automotive fleet vehicles: technical, supply, and economic assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    The use of methane-related fuels, derived from a variety of sources, in highway vehicles is assessed. Methane, as used here, includes natural gas (NG) as well as synthetic natural gas (SNG). Methanol is included because it can be produced from NG or the same resources as SNG, and because it is a liquid fuel at normal ambient conditions. Technological, operational, efficiency, petroleum displacement, supply, safety, and economic issues are analyzed. In principle, both NG and methanol allow more efficient engine operation than gasoline. In practice, engines are at present rarely optimized for NG and methanol. On the basis of energy expended from resource extraction to end use, only optimized LNG vehicles are more efficient than their gasoline counterparts. By 1985, up to 16% of total petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel could be displaced by large fleets with central NG fueling depots. Excluding diesel vehicles, which need technology advances to use NG, savings of 8% are projected. Methanol use by large fleets could displace up to 8% of petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel from spark-ignition vehicles and another 9% from diesel vehicles with technology advances. The US NG supply appears adequate to accommodate fleet use. Supply projections, future price differential versus gasoline, and user economics are uncertain. In many cases, attractive paybacks can occur. Compressed NG now costs on average about $0.65 less than gasoline, per energy-equivalent gallon. Methanol supply projections, future prices, and user economics are even more uncertain. Current and projected near-term methanol supplies are far from adequate to support fleet use. Methanol presently costs more than gasoline on an equal-energy basis, but is projected to cost less if produced from coal instead of NG or petroleum.

  20. Prospective Study Evaluating Postoperative Radiotherapy Plus 2-Year Androgen Suppression for Post-Radical Prostatectomy Patients With Pathologic T3 Disease and/or Positive Surgical Margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)], E-mail: choo.c@mayo.edu; Danjoux, Cyril; Gardner, Sandra; Morton, Gerard; Szumacher, Ewa; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Cheung, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pearse, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a combined approach of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) plus 2-year androgen suppression (AS) for patients with pathologic T3 disease (pT3) and/or positive surgical margins (PSM) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients with pT3 and/or PSM after RP were treated with RT plus 2-year AS, as per a pilot, prospective study. Androgen suppression started within 1 month after the completion of RT and consisted of nilutamide for 4 weeks and buserelin acetate depot subcutaneously every 2 months for 2 years. Relapse-free rate, including freedom from prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse, was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression analysis was performed to evaluate prognostic factors for relapse. Prostate-specific antigen relapse was defined as a PSA rise above 0.2 ng/mL, with two consecutive increases over a minimum of 3 months. Results: The median age was 61 years at the time of RP. The median interval between RP and postoperative RT was 4.2 months. Forty-nine patients had undetectable PSA (<0.2 ng/mL), and 29 had persistently detectable postoperative PSA at the time of the protocol treatment. Median follow-up from RT was 6.4 years. Relapse-free rates at 5 and 7 years were 94.4% and 86.3%, respectively. Survival rates were 96% at 5 years and 93.1% at 7 years. On Cox regression analysis, persistently detectable postoperative PSA and pT3b-T4 were significant predictors for relapse. Conclusion: The combined treatment of postoperative RT plus 2-year AS yielded encouraging results for patients with pT3 and/or PSM and warrants a confirmatory study.

  1. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang Zhang, Yi

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients.

  2. Anaerobic U(IV) Bio-oxidation and the Resultant Remobilization of Uranium in Contaminated Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coates, John D.

    2005-06-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites is based on immobilizing U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Due to the use of nitric acid in the processing of nuclear fuels, nitrate is often a co-contaminant found in many of the environments contaminated with uranium. Recent studies indicate that nitrate inhibits U(VI) reduction in sediment slurries. However, the mechanism responsible for the apparent inhibition of U(VI) reduction is unknown, i.e. preferential utilization of nitrate as an electron acceptor, direct biological oxidation of U(IV) coupled to nitrate reduction, and/or abiotic oxidation by intermediates of nitrate reduction. Recent studies indicates that direct biological oxidation of U(IV) coupled to nitrate reduction may exist in situ, however, to date no organisms have been identified that can grow by this metabolism. In an effort to evaluate the potential for nitrate-dependent bio-oxidation of U(IV) in anaerobic sedimentary environments, we have initiated the enumeration of nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing bacteria. Sediments, soils, and groundwater from uranium (U) contaminated sites, including subsurface sediments from the NABIR Field Research Center (FRC), as well as uncontaminated sites, including subsurface sediments from the NABIR FRC and Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant, Texas, lake sediments, and agricultural field soil, sites served as the inoculum source. Enumeration of the nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing microbial population in sedimentary environments by most probable number technique have revealed sedimentary microbial populations ranging from 9.3 x 101 - 2.4 x 103 cells (g sediment)-1 in both contaminated and uncontaminated sites. Interestingly uncontaminated subsurface sediments (NABIR FRC Background core FB618 and Longhorn Texas Core BH2-18) both harbored the most numerous nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing population 2.4 x 103 cells (g sediment)-1. The nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing microbial population in groundwaters is less numerous ranging from 0 cells mL-1 (Well FW300, Uncontaminated Background NABIR FRC) to 4.3 x 102 cells mL-1 (Well TPB16, Contaminated Area 2 NABIR FRC). The presence of nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing bacteria supports our hypothesis that bacteria capable of anaerobic U(IV) oxidation are ubiquitous and indigenous to sedimentary and groundwater environments.

  3. Analytical Characterization of the Thorium Nitrate Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattus, CH

    2003-12-30

    For several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been supporting the Defense Logistics Agency-Defense National Stockpile Center with stewardship of a thorium nitrate (ThN) stockpile. The effort for fiscal year 2002 was to prepare a sampling and analysis plan and to use the activities developed in the plan to characterize the ThN stockpile. The sampling was performed in June and July 2002 by RWE NUKEM with oversight by ORNL personnel. The analysis was performed by Southwest Research Institute of San Antonio, Texas, and data validation was performed by NFT, Inc., of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Of the {approx} 21,000 drums in the stockpile, 99 were sampled and 53 were analyzed for total metals composition, radiological constituents (using alpha and gamma spectrometry), and oxidizing characteristics. Each lot at the Curtis Bay Depot was sampled. Several of the samples were also analyzed for density. The average density of the domestic ThN was found to be 1.89 {+-} 0.08 g/cm{sup 3}. The oxidizer test was performed following procedures issued by the United Nations in 1999. Test results indicated that none of the samples tested was a Division 5.1 oxidizer per Department of Transportation definition. The samples were analyzed for total metals following the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency methods SW-846-6010B and 6020 (EPA 2003) using a combination of inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma--mass spectroscopy techniques. The results were used to compare the composition of the eight Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals present in the sample (arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, and silver) to regulatory limits. None of the samples was found to be hazardous for toxicity characteristics. The radiological analyses confirmed, when possible, the results obtained by the inductively coupled plasma analyses. These results--combined with the historical process knowledge acquired on the material and the results of previous tests--classified the ThN as low-level radioactive waste for disposal purposes. This characterization was necessary to continue the efforts associated with disposition of the material at the Nevada Test Site, Mercury, Nevada. With the current work presented in this report, the analytical characterization phase is completed for this source material stockpile.

  4. Enclosure Requirements to Protect Personnel from Spinning Rotor Frailures at the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, John W

    2007-08-01

    Performance evaluation of electric motors is a major function of the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC). Normally these motors have a fixed wire-wound stator and a rotating rotor, which may have conductors embedded in a ferromagnetic core (induction motors), magnets mounted on the surface of the ferromagnetic core with a thin metal or composite cylinder or ring to hold them in place, or magnets embedded in the ferromagnetic core. Most of the work currently involves the last two permanent magnet (PM) configurations. Although the stator of a radial-gap motor can absorb energy from many of the fragments ejected from the rotor during operation, the stator of an axial-gap motor is not positioned to provide significant protection. The housing of each motor can also absorb some of the energy. The most conservative approach, however, is to assume that all fragments from the rotor must be contained by a protective enclosure. An ideal enclosure is transparent. Manufacturers of such plastics as Lexan, Tuffak, and Cyrolon sell different variations of transparent enclosure material. Lexan is a polycarbonate sheet. Lexgard{reg_sign} is a penetration resistant material made by layering polycarbonate material between pieces of ordinary glass. A fragment striking a sheet of enclosure material will pierce the surface layer, but the layered polycarbonate-glass material is able to absorb the fragment's energy before it completes penetration. Tuffak{reg_sign} is Lexan polycarbonate. Cyrolon{reg_sign} bullet resistant material is acrylic sheet. The ability of the enclosure to stop a fragment depends on its thickness as well as the penetration capability of the fragment; for example, a lead fragment has much less penetrating capability than a steel fragment. Enclosure thicknesses are commercially available to provide several levels of protection. These levels depend on the momentum of the fragments and have been evaluated for some common types of ammunition. This summary quantifies four typical worst-case fragments which have maximum translational kinetic energy when ejected from a rotating annulus. (1) The first fragment is released from a rotating annular titanium ring. (2) The second fragment is a magnet released from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) 30-kW axial-gap PM motor. Analysis of the second fragment which is like a segment of half-angle, {alpha}, from a thin annular ring is similar to that of the titanium ring segment except that the angle is 10{sup o} instead of 133{sup o}. (3) The third fragment is a magnet from the radial-gap 6-kW fractional-slot surface-mounted PM (SPM) motor with concentrated windings. Analysis of the third fragment is similar to the analysis of the second fragment. (4) The fourth fragment is a 133{sup o} segment of an entire rotor which assumes that the laminates and magnets in the rotor fail as a single fragment, truly a worst case assumption.

  5. Bio-Oil Separation and Stabilization by Supercritical Fluid Fractionation. 2014 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agblevor, Foster; Petkovic, Lucia; Bennion, Edward; Quinn, Jason; Moses, John; Newby, Deborah; Ginosar, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this project is to use supercritical fluids to separate and fractionate algal-based bio-oils into stable products that can be subsequently upgraded to produce drop-in renewable fuels. To accomplish this objective, algae was grown and thermochemically converted to bio-oils using hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), pyrolysis, and catalytic pyrolysis. The bio-oils were separated into an extract and a raffinate using near-critical propane or carbon dioxide. The fractions were then subjected to thermal aging studies to determine if the extraction process had stabilized the products. It was found that the propane extract fraction was twice as stable as the parent catalytic pyrolysis bio-oils as measured by the change in viscosity after two weeks of accelerated aging at 80°C. Further, in-situ NMR aging studies found that the propane extract was chemically more stable than the parent bio-oil. Thus the milestone of stabilizing the product was met. A preliminary design of the extraction plant was prepared. The design was based on a depot scale plant processing 20,000,000 gallons per year of bio-oil. It was estimated that the capital costs for such a plant would be $8,700,000 with an operating cost of $3,500,000 per year. On a per gallon of product cost and a 10% annual rate of return, capital costs would represent $0.06 per gallon and operating costs would amount to $0.20 per gallon. Further, it was found that the energy required to run the process represented 6.2% of the energy available in the bio-oil, meeting the milestone of less than 20%. Life cycle analysis and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission analysis found that the energy for running the critical fluid separation process and the GHG emissions were minor compared to all the inputs to the overall well to pump system. For the well to pump system boundary, energetics in biofuel conversion are typically dominated by energy demands in the growth, dewater, and thermochemical process. Bio-oil stabilization by near critical propane extraction had minimal impact in the overall energetics of the process with NER contributions of 0.03. Based on the LCA, the overall conversion pathways were found to be energy intensive with a NER of about 2.3 and 1.2 for catalytic pyrolysis and HTL, respectively. GHG emissions for the catalytic pyrolysis process were greater than that of petroleum diesel at 210 g CO2 eq compared to 18.9 g CO2 eq. Microalgae bio-oil based diesel with thermochemical conversion through HTL meets renewable fuel standards with favorable emission reductions of -10.8 g CO2 eq. The importance of the outcomes is that the critical fluid extraction and stabilization process improved product stability and did so with minimal energy inputs and processing costs. The LCA and GHG emission calculations point toward the HTL pathway as the more favorable thermochemical route towards upgrading algae to bio-fuels. Since the quality of the HTL oil was significantly lower than that of the catalytic pyrolysis bio-oil, the next steps point toward improving the quality of the HTL oils from algae biomass and focusing the critical fluid stabilization on that bio-oil product.

  6. Biomass Feedstock and Conversion Supply System Design and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Mohammad S. Roni; Patrick Lamers; Kara G. Cafferty

    2014-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) supports the U.S. Department of Energy’s bioenergy research program. As part of the research program INL investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. A series of reports were published between 2000 and 2013 to demonstrate the feedstock logistics cost. Those reports were tailored to specific feedstock and conversion process. Although those reports are different in terms of conversion, some of the process in the feedstock logistic are same for each conversion process. As a result, each report has similar information. A single report can be designed that could bring all commonality occurred in the feedstock logistics process while discussing the feedstock logistics cost for different conversion process. Therefore, this report is designed in such a way that it can capture different feedstock logistics cost while eliminating the need of writing a conversion specific design report. Previous work established the current costs based on conventional equipment and processes. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a delivered biomass logistics cost of $55/dry ton for woody biomass delivered to fast pyrolysis conversion facility. The goal was achieved by applying field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model. The goal of the 2017 Design Case is to enable expansion of biofuels production beyond highly productive resource areas by breaking the reliance of cost-competitive biofuel production on a single, low-cost feedstock. The 2017 programmatic target is to supply feedstock to the conversion facility that meets the in-feed conversion process quality specifications at a total logistics cost of $80/dry T. The $80/dry T. target encompasses total delivered feedstock cost, including both grower payment and logistics costs, while meeting all conversion in-feed quality targets. The 2012 $55/dry T. programmatic target included only logistics costs with a limited focus on biomass quantity, quality and did not include a grower payment. The 2017 Design Case explores two approaches to addressing the logistics challenge: one is an agronomic solution based on blending and integrated landscape management and the second is a logistics solution based on distributed biomass preprocessing depots. The concept behind blended feedstocks and integrated landscape management is to gain access to more regional feedstock at lower access fees (i.e., grower payment) and to reduce preprocessing costs by blending high quality feedstocks with marginal quality feedstocks. Blending has been used in the grain industry for a long time; however, the concept of blended feedstocks in the biofuel industry is a relatively new concept. The blended feedstock strategy relies on the availability of multiple feedstock sources that are blended using a least-cost formulation within an economical supply radius, which, in turn, decreases the grower payment by reducing the amount of any single biomass. This report will introduce the concepts of blending and integrated landscape management and justify their importance in meeting the 2017 programmatic goals.

  7. Worksheet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    UTILITY_ID","UTILITY_NAME","TRANSLINE_NO","TERMINAL_LOC_FROM","TERMINAL_LOC_TO","PERCENT_OWNED","LINE_LENGTH","LINE_TYPE","VOLTAGE_TYPE","VOLTAGE_OPERATING","VOLTAGE_DESIGN","CONDUCTOR_SIZE","CONDUCTOR_MAT_TYPE","CONDUCTOR_CONFIG","CIRCUIT_PERSTRUCT_PRES","CIRCUIT_PERSTRUCT_ULT","POLE_TOWER_TYPE","RATED_CAPACITY","LAND_LANDRIGHT_COSTS","POLE_TOWER_FIXTURE_COSTS","CONDUCTOR_DEVICE_COSTS","CONSTRUCTION_ETC_COSTS","TOTAL_LINE_COSTS","IN_SERVICE_DATE" 2003,1015,"Austin City of",1,"Northland","Magnesium Plant",100,4.11,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR Drake/ACSS Rail","Single",1,2,"Steel & Wood Poles",215,0,17500,8000,19500,45000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1015,"Austin City of",2,"Grove","Met Center",100,3.1,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ASCR Drake","Double",1,1,"Steel Pole",430,0,30000,10000,35000,75000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1015,"Austin City of",3,"Dessau","Daffin Gin",100,6.01,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ASCR Drake","Single",1,1,"Steel Pole",215,0,60000,15000,40000,115000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1015,"Austin City of",4,"Burleson","AMD",100,2.2,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACR Drake","Double",2,2,"Steel Pole",430,0,75000,55000,120000,250000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1015,"Austin City of",5,"Bergstrom","Kingsberry",100,4.2,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ASCR Drake/AAAC","Single",1,2,"Steel & Wood Poles",215,0,75000,35000,340000,450000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1015,"Austin City of",6,"Mcneil","Magnesium Plant",100,3.24,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR Drake","Double",1,2,"Steel Pole & Steel Tower",430,0,380000,76000,644000,1100000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1015,"Austin City of",7,"Summit","Magnesium Plant",100,2.18,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR Drake","Double",1,2,"Steel Pole & Steel Tower",430,0,265000,125000,410000,800000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1307,"Basin Electric Power Coop",1,"Rapid City","New Underwood",65,18.55,"OH","AC",230,230,1272,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Single Pole, Steel",460,0,0,0,5300000,5300000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1586,"Bentonville City of",1,"AEP/SWEPCO","City Substation F",100,1,"OH","AC",161,161,477,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood and Steel Single Pole",199,18000,81522,28082,214516,342120,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,2172,"Brazos Electric Power Coop",1,"Coppell","Lewisville",100,7.03,"OH","AC",138,138,1033,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Concrete/Steel Single Pole",485,17577.55,2527717,537265.96,956475.39,4039035.9,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,2172,"Brazos Electric Power Coop",2,"Boyd","Newark",100,1.8,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",2,2,"Concrete/Steel Single Pole",215,133929.08,538282.3,131112.75,246577.6,1049901.73,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,2172,"Brazos Electric Power Coop",3,"Cedar Hill","Sardis",100,5.1,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Concrete Si ngle Ploe",215,24515.26,652910.22,246676.96,560582.43,1484684.87,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,5580,"East Kentucky Power Coop Inc",1,"Jamestown Tap","Jamestown Tap",100,0.47,"OH","AC",161,161,556.5,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Single Pole",292,43326,160508,68789,0,272623,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,5580,"East Kentucky Power Coop Inc",2,"Pulaski Co. Tap","Pulaski Co. Tap",100,5.88,"OH","AC",161,161,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood H-Frame Structure",367,494183,1092462,468198,0,2054843,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,7197,"Georgia Transmission Corp",1,"Shoal Creek","Spout Spring",100,10.83,"OH","AC",230,230,1351,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Concrete, Single Pole & Steel",602,1277945,1685271,444690,6047603,9455509,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,7197,"Georgia Transmission Corp",2,"Dresden","Yellowdirt",100,9.5,"OH","AC",230,230,795,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Concrete, Single Pole",866,870826,772876,375515,3649376,5668593,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,7197,"Georgia Transmission Corp",3,"East Moultrie","West Valdosta",100,38.46,"OH","AC",230,230,1622,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Concrete, Single Pole",596,1191168,2829632,1476802,10279078,15776680,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,7490,"Grand River Dam Authority",1,"Cowskin","Grove PSO",100,4.5,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single/Twisted",1,1,"Wood Pole",223,287671,135402,156769,880890,1460732,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",1,"BASTROP","AUSTIN",100,0.32,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,9155828,155817297,37044659,47228709,249246493,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",2,"BASTROP","AUSTROP",100,0.32,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",3,"BASTROP","AUSTROP",100,0.32,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",4,"BASTROP","AUSTROP",100,0.32,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",5,"CANYON","SAN MARCOS/LOCKHART",100,0.31,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",6,"CANYON","SAN MARCOS/LOCKHART",100,0.31,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",7,"CANYON","SAN MARCOS/LOCKHART",100,0.31,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",8,"CANYON","SAN MARCOS/LOCKHART",100,0.31,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",9,"CANYON","SAN MARCOS/LOCKHART",100,0.31,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",10,"CICO","HELOTES",100,4,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",11,"CICO","HELOTES",100,4,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",12,"CICO","HELOTES",100,4,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",13,"CICO","HELOTES",100,4,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",14,"CICO","HELOTES",100,4,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",15,"CICO","HELOTES",100,4,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",16,"LOCKHART","DUMP HILL",100,1.6,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Concrete Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",17,"HILL POWER STATION","NUECES BAY",100,17.3,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",18,"NORTH OAK PARK","LON HILL",100,14.9,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",19,"STATE HIGHTWAY 80",,100,0.38,"OH","AC",138,138,211.5,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood H-Frame Structure",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",20,"STATE HIGHWAY 80",,100,0.38,"OH","AC",138,138,211.5,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood H-Frame Structure",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",21,"STERLING/MITCHELL LINE","TWINN BUTTES",100,135.08,"OH","AC",345,345,1590,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",22,"VERDE CREEK","KERRVILLE STADIUM",100,0.1,"OH","AC",138,138,336,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",23,"VERDE CREEK","KERRVILLE STADIUM",100,0.1,"OH","AC",138,138,336,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",24,"VERDE CREEK","KERRVILLE STADIUM",100,0.1,"OH","AC",138,138,336,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",25,"VERDE CREEK","KERRVILLE STADIUM",100,0.1,"OH","AC",138,138,336,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",26,"ZORN","MCCARTY LANE",100,4.2,"OH","AC",138,138,1433.6,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",27,"ZORN","MCCARTY LANE",100,4.2,"OH","AC",138,138,1433.6,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",28,"ZORN","MCCARTY LANE",100,4.2,"OH","AC",138,138,1433.6,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",29,"ZORN","MCCARTY LANE",100,4.2,"OH","AC",138,138,1433.6,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",30,"ZORN","MCCARTY LANE",100,4.2,"OH","AC",138,138,1433.6,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",31,"ZORN","MCCARTY LANE",100,4.2,"OH","AC",138,138,1433.6,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,15143,"Platte River Power Authority",1,"Rawhide","Timberline West",100,31.63,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"ACSR","Single",2,2,"Steel/Tower & Pole",378,5553,1928767,2385430,251850,4571600,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,15159,"Plymouth City of",1,"Mullet River Sub","Sub # 1",100,0.8,"OH","AC",138,138,336.4,"ACSR","SINGLE",1,1,"Steel Double Pole",33,0,0,0,1492139,1492139,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,16534,"Sacramento Municipal Util Dist",1,"Natomas","Elverta",100,4.3,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"Aluminum","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",316,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,17543,"South Carolina Pub Serv Auth",1,"Rainey - Anderson (Duke) #1","Rainey - Anderson (Duke) #1",100,9.51,"OH","AC",230,230,1272,"ACSR","Double",2,2,"Steel / Tower",956,840152,1230361,1207282,22364,3300159,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,17543,"South Carolina Pub Serv Auth",2,"Rainey - Anderson (Duke) #2","Rainey - Anderson (Duke) #2",100,9.51,"OH","AC",230,230,1272,"ACSR","Double",2,2,"Steel / Tower",956,840152,1230361,1207282,22364,3300159,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",1,"West Ringgold","Center Point",100,7.94,"OH","AC",115,230,954,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,2086252,5658529,1502763,3053959,12301503,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",2,"NE Johnson City--Erwin 161kV T","Jonesborough 161 kV SS",100,0.28,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,11050,191917,894933,714987,1812887,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",3,"Elizabethton","Pandara-Shouns",100,15.12,"OH","AC",161,161,636,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,282232,1797686,537733,2057572,4675223,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",4,"Sullivan","Blountville",100,0.63,"OH","AC",161,161,1590,"ASCR","Single",2,2,"Steel Tower",,547521,1134556,788061,1224067,3694205,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",5,"Pin Hook","Structure E 104A (NES)",100,1.74,"OH","DC",161,161,2034.5,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,179775,881877,641976,270782,1974410,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",6,"Dug Gap 115 kV SS","Center Point 230 kV SS",100,4.49,"OH","AC",115,230,954,"ASCR","Single",2,2,"Steel Tower",,3939251,3451555,545558,1026021,8962385,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",7,"Chickamauga-Ridgedale","Hawthorne 161 kV SS",100,2.82,"OH","AC",161,161,1590,"ASCR","Single",2,2,"Steel Tower",,87206,533582,342640,584799,1548227,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",8,"Ft. Loudoun-Elza 161 kV TL","Spallation Neutron Source 161",100,3.92,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,2972,639541,373150,469765,1485428,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",9,"Leake","Sebastapol SW STA 161 kV",100,0.77,"OH","AC",161,161,636,"ASCR","Single",2,2,"Steel Tower",,36158,236368,103374,167311,543211,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",10,"Sebasatpol 161 kV Switching St","Five Point 161 kV Substation",100,0.13,"OH","AC",161,230,954,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,917304,1772761,931352,1477668,5099085,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",11,"Structure 170A","Structure 174",100,0.73,"OH","AC",161,161,636,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,445863,79638,194574,720075,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",12,"Ramer-Hickory Valley 161 kV TL","Middleton 46 kV SS",100,6.81,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,566805,1162854,447607,787813,2965079,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",13,"Lowndes-Miller","Valley View",100,0.46,"OH","AC",500,500,954,"ASCR","Triple",1,2,"Steel Tower",,0,688737,255237,341129,1285103,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",14,"Sweetwater 161 kV SS","Madisonville 161 kV SS",100,8.95,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,1066219,1474937,466681,797814,3805651,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",15,"East Point 500 kV SS","Hanceville 161 kV TL",100,11.25,"OH","AC",161,161,1351.5,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,1416513,1442382,606534,1427424,4892853,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",16,"W Cookeville-Crossville 161 kV","W. Crossville SS",100,4.37,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,267463,1112667,651963,964407,2996500,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",17,"East Shelbyville-Unionville","Deason 161 kV SS",100,5.09,"OH","AC",161,161,636,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,1071199,931797,430714,320721,2754431,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",18,"Kentucky Hydro","Barkley Hydro",100,2,"OH","AC",161,161,2034.5,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,2845,406947,90111,155401,655304,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",19,"MEC Sw Station","Trinity Substation",100,2.9,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ACSS","Single",2,2,"Steel Tower",,0,604526,474640,608702,1687868,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",20,"Hickory Valley Selmer 161 kV T","North Selmer 161 kV SS",100,4.88,"OH","AC",161,161,636,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,357578,632244,368993,899046,2257861,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",21,"Trinity","Morgan Energy Center",100,2.98,"OH","AC",161,161,1590,"ASCR","Single",2,2,"Steel Tower",,7155,647789,386671,513831,1555446,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",22,"MEC","Finley",100,0.61,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,9879,303540,156165,181613,651197,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",23,"Pickwick-South Jackson","Magic Valley",100,1.38,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Pole",,78377,284367,113237,237716,713697,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",24,"Wolf Creek-Choctaw 500 kV TL","Reliant French Camp Gener Plt",100,0.11,"OH","AC",500,500,954,"ASCR","Triple",1,2,"Steel Tower",,0,863770,411493,891161,2166424,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",25,"Widows Creek Ft. Payne 161 kV","Flat Rock 161 kV SS",100,2.05,"OH","AC",161,161,397.5,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,130460,443384,182965,410228,1167037,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",26,"Volunteer-Cherokee HP 161 kV T","Oakland 161 kV SS",100,0.5,"OH","AC",161,161,1351,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,0,159020,71787,133784,364591,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",27,"Cordell-Hull-Carthage 161 kV","South Carthage 161 kV SS",100,1.68,"OH","AC",161,161,636,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,0,209664,102390,256537,568591,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,20447,"Western Farmers Elec Coop Inc",1,"Arco","Sprectrum",100,5.89,"OH","AC",138,138,336.4,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",91,37547.56,399750.8,416067.16,0,853365.52,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,20447,"Western Farmers Elec Coop Inc",2,"Hazel Dell Jct","Hazel Dell",100,3.12,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",158,72967.09,417464.37,285659.16,0,776090.62,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,20447,"Western Farmers Elec Coop Inc",3,"Red River","Tenaska Kiowa Sw",100,75.75,"OH","AC",345,345,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Combination Pole",158,0,0,0,47569327.23,47569327.23,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,20447,"Western Farmers Elec Coop Inc",4,"Washita Sw","Blue Canyon",100,23.96,"OH","AC",138,138,1590,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",239,0,0,0,5092171.22,5092171.22,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,20447,"Western Farmers Elec Coop Inc",5,"Limestone Jct","Limestone",100,0.5,"OH","AC",138,138,336.4,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",91,25673.08,159253.08,77468.07,0,262394.23,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,20447,"Western Farmers Elec Coop Inc",6,"OGE Sunset Jct","Sunset Corner",100,0.15,"OH","AC",161,161,336.4,"ACSR","Singel",1,1,"Wood Pole",91,0,29315.87,35224.01,0,64539.88,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",1,"Shiprock","Four Corners",100,8.2,"OH","AC",345,345,,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",2,"Coolidge","Sundance 1 and 2",100,9.8,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"ASCR",,2,2,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",3,"Structure 96/4","O/Banion 1",100,38,"OH","AC",230,230,,"ASCR",,2,2,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",4,"Mead","Market Place",100,12.9,"OH","AC",525,525,,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",5,"Bears Ears","Craig",100,1,"OH","AC",345,345,,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",6,"Glen Canyon Pumping Plant","Glen Canyon SW Yard",100,1,"OH","AC",345,345,,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",7,"Baker","Bowman",22.96,53.96,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"ASCR",,1,1,"Wood H",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",8,"Basin Tap #2","Washburn",100,2.23,"OH","AC",230,230,795,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",9,"Craig","Rifle",100,96,"OH","AC",230,230,1272,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",10,"Garrison","Basin Tap #1",100,20.97,"OH","AC",230,230,795,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",11,"Everta","Roseville",100,13.3,"OH","AC",230,230,,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",12,"Griffith","McConnico",100,8,"OH","AC",230,230,1272,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",13,"McConnico","Peacock",100,29.4,"OH","AC",230,230,795,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",14,"Liberty","Buckeye",100,6.7,"OH","AC",230,230,1272,"ASCR",,2,2,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",15,"Liberty","Parker",100,118.7,"OH","AC",230,230,1272,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",16,"Liberty","Estrella",100,10.8,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"ASCR",,2,2,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",17,"Liberty","Lone Batte",100,38.2,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",18,"Lone Butte","Sundance",100,38.4,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",19,"New Waddell","West Wing",100,10.1,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",20,"South Point","Topock #1",100,6.46,"OH","AC",230,230,1590,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",21,"South Point","Topock #2",100,6.34,"OH","AC",230,230,1590,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0