Sample records for ammunition depot hawthorne

  1. Basewide energy systems plan, Hawthorne Army Ammunition Plant, Hawthorne, Nevada; executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1983-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the Executive Summary of the Basewide Energy Systems Plan for the Hawthorne Army Ammunition Plant (HWAAP) at Hawthorne, Nevada. This project has been executed as a part of the Department of the Army`s Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP). The overall objective of the project is to develop a systematic plan of projects that will result in the reduction of energy consumption in compliance with the objectives set forth in the Army Facilities Energy Plan (AFEP), without decreasing the readiness posture of the Army. The Hawthorne Army Ammunition Plant is a Government Owned and Contractor Operator (GOCO) Army facility. Consequently, any reference made in this document to the Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) is directly analagous to Energy Conservation and Management (ECAM). The ECAM designation pertains specifically to GOCO Army installations. All Programming Documents for projects developed from this study reference ECAM wherever ECIP is called for.

  2. Hawthorne Army Depot Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridor |Information AbandonmentHawkinsArmy Depot

  3. United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Shallow And Intermediate-Deep Drilling At Hawthorne Ammunition Depot, Hawthorne, Nv Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Navy Ammunition Depot - NJ 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePA 3003A AECMexico -36

  5. Feasibility of white-rot fungi for biodegradation of PCP-treated ammunition boxes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholze, R.J.; Lamar, R.T.; Bolduc, J.; Dietrich, D.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Millions of pounds of wood ammunition boxes treated with the wood preservative pentachiorophenol (PCP) are being stockpiled at military installations, primarily depots, because cost-effective disposal is not readily available. The Army needs cost-effective and environmentally benign treatment methods for destruction and disposal of PCP-treated wood products. This research investigated the use of white-rot fungi to biodegrade PCP-treated wood. Results showed that white-rot fungi effectively decreased the PCP concentration in contaminated hardwood and softwood chips. Under ideal laboratory conditions the fungi reduced the PCP concentration by 80 percent; a field study showed only a 30 percent decrease in PCP concentration. Despite this disparity, this study demonstrated the feasibility of using white-rot fungi to reduce PCP in treated wood.

  6. Storage depot for radioactive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Szulinski, Milton J. (Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical drilling of cylindrical holes in the soil, and the lining of such holes, provides storage vaults called caissons. A guarded depot is provided with a plurality of such caissons covered by shielded closures preventing radiation from penetrating through any linear gap to the atmosphere. The heat generated by the radioactive material is dissipated through the vertical liner of the well into the adjacent soil and thus to the ground surface so that most of the heat from the radioactive material is dissipated into the atmosphere in a manner involving no significant amount of biologically harmful radiation. The passive cooling of the radioactive material without reliance upon pumps, personnel, or other factor which might fail, constitutes one of the most advantageous features of this system. Moreover this system is resistant to damage from tornadoes or earthquakes. Hermetically sealed containers of radioactive material may be positioned in the caissons. Loading vehicles can travel throughout the depot to permit great flexibility of loading and unloading radioactive materials. Radioactive material can be shifted to a more closely spaced caisson after ageing sufficiently to generate much less heat. The quantity of material stored in a caisson is restricted by the average capacity for heat dissipation of the soil adjacent such caisson.

  7. The Lockean Thesis and the Logic of Belief James Hawthorne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    The Lockean Thesis and the Logic of Belief James Hawthorne 1 Introduction In a penetrating) Richard Foley (1992) suggests the fol- lowing thesis: . . . it is epistemically rational for us to believe in it, sufficiently high to make our attitude towards it one of belief. Foley goes on to suggest

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - ammunition plant final Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory (CERC) Engineer Waterways Experiment Station Vicksburg, MS Collection: Engineering 2 Industrial Site Characterization: Federal Sector Summary: , ammunition...

  9. The glyceride structure of swine depot fat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, H. G. Ramakrishna

    2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    of glyceride structure 3 3* Current hypotheses governing glyceride structure 6 *+. Objective of this investigation 10 II EXPERIMENTAL WORK 1. Extraction of the depot fat 12 2. Fatty acid composition of the back fat 13 a* Fractional distillation 13 b... III DISCUSSION 1. Fatty acid composition 29 2* Disruptive oxidation technique 31 3. Crystallization technique 32 AD Status of the current hypotheses governing fatty acid distribution in natural fats 33 Results of current investigation 36 6...

  10. Letterkenny Army Depot: The Army Teaches Business a Lesson in Lean Six Sigma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Roger K.

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Letterkenny Army Depot: The Army Teaches Business a Lesson in Lean Six Sigma is a case study of Letterkenny Army Depot, one of five Army maintenance depots. Letterkenny recapitalizes missiles, HMMWV's, generators, and other ...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - ammunition Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or storage container. Ammunition will not be stored Source: Texas A&M University, Spatial Sciences Laboratory Collection: Geosciences 57 Imaging of the atmosphere with...

  12. Radiological Scoping Survey of the Scotia Depot, Scotia, NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, E. N.

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the radiological scoping survey were to collect adequate field data for use in evaluating the radiological condition of Scotia Depot land areas, warehouses, and support buildings.

  13. Radiological Final Status Survey of the Hammond Depot, Hammond, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.J. Vitkus

    2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ORISE conducted extensive scoping, characterization, and final status surveys of land areas and structures at the DNSC’s Hammond Depot located in Hammond, Indiana in multiple phases during 2005, 2006 and 2007.

  14. Computer-aided acquisition and logistics support (CALS): Concept of Operations for Depot Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourgeois, N.C.; Greer, D.K.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This CALS Concept of Operations for Depot Maintenance provides the foundation strategy and the near term tactical plan for CALS implementation in the depot maintenance environment. The user requirements enumerated and the overarching architecture outlined serve as the primary framework for implementation planning. The seamless integration of depot maintenance business processes and supporting information systems with the emerging global CALS environment will be critical to the efficient realization of depot user's information requirements, and as, such will be a fundamental theme in depot implementations.

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Marion Engineer Depot - OH 45

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer Depot - OH 45 FUSRAP

  16. Waste reduction for electroless nickel-plating solutions at U. S. Army depots. Final report, Oct 91-Apr 92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.S.

    1992-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste minimization is one of the most pressing environmental issues currently facing U.S. Army depots. The U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) conducts research and development to support Army depots in implementing technologies to reduce waste generation. The Joint Depot Environmental Panel (JDEP) identified electroless nickel (EN) plating, which is currently used at Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD), Red River Army Depot (RRAD), and Sacramento Army Depot (SAAD) as a target for waste minimization research. This report presents the results of an evaluation conducted by USA regarding minimizing waste from EN-plating operations. The objective of this evaluation was to formulate recommendations for depots regarding implementation of waste minimization technologies. This evaluation was performed through site visits, a literature search, and discussions with vendors of EN processes and decontamination technologies.

  17. "A strong mind in a sane body": the role of physical activity in the lives and writings of Sophia Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller, and Kate Chopin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willoughby, Leann Miller

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "A STRONG MIND IN A SANE BODY": THE ROLE OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN THE LIVES AND WRITINGS OF SOPHIA HAWTHORNE~ MARGARET FULLER, AND KATE CHOPIN A Thesis by LEANN MILLER WILLOUGHBY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM... University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August 1992 Major Subject: English ?A STRONG MIND IN A SANE BODY? . THE ROLE OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN THE LIVES AND WRITINGS OF SOPHIA HAWTHORNE, MARGARET FULLER...

  18. Artificial intelligence technology assessment for the US Army Depot System Command

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennock, K A

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment of artificial intelligence (AI) has been prepared for the US Army's Depot System Command (DESCOM) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The report describes several of the more promising AI technologies, focusing primarily on knowledge-based systems because they have been more successful in commercial applications than any other AI technique. The report also identifies potential Depot applications in the areas of procedural support, scheduling and planning, automated inspection, training, diagnostics, and robotic systems. One of the principal objectives of the report is to help decisionmakers within DESCOM to evaluate AI as a possible tool for solving individual depot problems. The report identifies a number of factors that should be considered in such evaluations. 22 refs.

  19. Energy Engineering Analysis (EEA) program for Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant, Texas. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1981-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Energy Engineering Analysis (EEA) for LSAAP is threefold: Develop a systematic plan of projects which will result in reducing energy consumption. Consider renewable energy sources with the objective of establishing an orderly procedure for reducing use of non-renewable energy sources. Determine the feasibility of Total Energy (TE), Selective Energy (SE), and Central Heating Plant (CHP) concepts using alternative fuels. In essence, an assessment of the entire energy picture at LSAAP was undertaken. This report is a summary of that effort. LSAAP was originally built during 1941 and 1942 as a shell loading plant for the Army. After World War II, the facility was deactivated until 1951 when it was reactivated as a Government Owned, Contractor Operated (GOCO) facility. Day and Zimmerman was selected as the operator in 1951 and has been the operating contractor ever since. Located just west of Texarkana, Texas, LSAAP encompasses an area of approximately 15,546 acres. The primary mission of LSAAP is to load, assemble and pack ammunition and ammunition components for the Army.

  20. Heurisic approaches for no-depot k-traveling salesmen problem with a minmax objective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Na, Byungsoo

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    approximation ratio is e+1 1=k, where e is the bound of approximation factor for the single traveling salesman problem. Franka et al. [1] proposed a tabu search heuristic and two exact algorithms for the minmax k-TSP with a single xed depot. They used randomly...

  1. BuildingDepot: An Extensible and Distributed Architecture for Building Data Storage, Access and Sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajesh

    to devise intelligent data-driven methods for energy efficient use of building systems. Most current a prototype of BuildingDepot, along with connectors to several standard energy management systems, showing how Introduction Improving energy efficiency in buildings has emerged as an important societal issue and research

  2. Crusader Automated Docking System: Technology support for the Crusader Resupply Team. Interim report, Ammunition Logistics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kring, C.T.; Varma, V.K.; Jatko, W.B.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army and Team Crusader (United Defense, Lockheed Martin Armament Systems, etc.) are developing the next generation howitzer, the Crusader. The development program includes an advanced, self-propelled liquid propellant howitzer and a companion resupply vehicle. The resupply vehicle is intended to rendezvous with the howitzer near the battlefront and replenish ammunition, fuel, and other material. The Army has recommended that Crusader incorporate new and innovative technologies to improve performance and safety. One conceptual design proposes a robotic resupply boom on the resupply vehicle to upload supplies to the howitzer. The resupply boom would normally be retracted inside the resupply vehicle during transit. When the two vehicles are within range of the resupply boom, the boom would be extended to a receiving port on the howitzer. In order to reduce exposure to small arms fire or nuclear, biological, and chemical hazards, the crew would remain inside the resupply vehicle during the resupply operation. The process of extending the boom and linking with the receiving port is called docking. A boom operator would be designated to maneuver the boom into contact with the receiving port using a mechanical joystick. The docking operation depends greatly upon the skill of the boom operator to manipulate the boom into docking position. Computer simulations at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have shown that computer-assisted or autonomous docking can improve the ability of the operator to dock safely and quickly. This document describes the present status of the Crusader Autonomous Docking System (CADS) implemented at Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of the CADS project is to determine the feasibility and performance limitations of vision systems to satisfy the autonomous docking requirements for Crusader and conduct a demonstration under controlled conditions.

  3. Application of (U-Th)/He thermochronometry as a geothermal exploration tool in extensional tectonic settings: the Wassuk Range, Hawthorne, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorynski, Kyle; Stockli, Daniel F.; Walker, J. Douglas; Sabin, Andrew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with hot geothermal fluids. Apatite cooling ages from the footwall of the Wassuk Range, Hawthorne, Nevada have identified the presence of a known geothermal anomaly and associated struc- tural complexities. The most recent pulse of exhumation along... helium ages from the central Wassuk Range front clearly identify the presence of a geothermal cell (Figure 3.). Range front apatite cooling ages range between 15.5 and 1.9 Ma where the youngest ages correspond to those samples flanking the geothermal...

  4. Beige differentiation of adipose depots in mice lacking prolactin receptor protects against high fat diet-induced obesity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Beige differentiation of adipose depots in mice lacking prolactin receptor protects against high fat diet-induced obesity Julien Auffret*, , Say Viengchareun*, , Nadčge Carré*, , Raphaël G. P. Denis containing 16; PGC1peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1FOXC2, forkhead box protein C2

  5. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

  6. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Miller, R.L.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Tolbert, V.R.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Rickert, L.W.; Rogers, G.O.; Staub, W.P.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Phase I report is to examined the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) in light of more detailed and more recent data than those included in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EPEIS). Two principal issues are addressed: (1) whether or not the new data would result in identification of on-site disposal at ANAD as the environmentally preferred alternative (using the same selection method and data analysis tools as in the FPEIS), and (2) whether or not the new data indicate the presence of significant environmental resources that could be affected by on-site disposal at ANAD. In addition, a status report is presented on the maturity of the disposal technology (and now it could affect on-site disposal at ANAD). Inclusion of these more recent data into the FPEIS decision method resulted in confirmation of on-site disposal for ANAD. No unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD have been identified. A review of the technology status identified four principal technology developments that have occurred since publication of the FPEIS and should be of value in the implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD: the disposal of nonlethal agent at Pine Bluff Arsenal, located near Pine Bluff, Arkansas; construction and testing of facilities for disposal of stored lethal agent at Johnston Atoll, located about 1300 km (800 miles) southwest of Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean; lethal agent disposal tests at the chemical agent pilot plant operations at Tooele Army Depot, located near Salt Lake City, Utah; and equipment advances. 18 references, 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Top 20 Ways to Go Green at Work (and Save the University Money!) Office Depot's three environmental aspirations are to "Buy Green," "Be Green" and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Top 20 Ways to Go Green at Work (and Save the University Money!) Office Depot's three environmental aspirations are to "Buy Green," "Be Green" and "Sell Green." · By "Buying Green," we have achieved the widest "green product assortment" in the office products industry - approximately 3,500 products with recycled

  8. Small arms ammunition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huerta, Joseph (399 Clover St., Aberdeen, MD 21001)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An elongate projectile for small arms use has a single unitary mass with a hollow nose cavity defined by a sharp rigid cutting edge adapted to make initial contact with the target surface and cut therethrough. The projectile then enters the target mass in an unstable flight mode. The projectile base is substantially solid such that the nose cavity, while relatively deep, does not extend entirely through the base and the projectile center of gravity is aft of its geometric center.

  9. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon. Final Phase 1 environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

  10. Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the use of two-meter temperature (2m) surveys to quickly and inexpensively reveal blind geothermal systems were documented at Dead Horse Wells, the Hawthorne Army Depot, and...

  11. Levelized cost-benefit analysis of proposed diagnostics for the Ammunition Transfer Arm of the US Army`s Future Armored Resupply Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkinson, V.K.; Young, J.M.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army`s Project Manager, Advanced Field Artillery System/Future Armored Resupply Vehicle (PM-AFAS/FARV) is sponsoring the development of technologies that can be applied to the resupply vehicle for the Advanced Field Artillery System. The Engineering Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has proposed adding diagnostics/prognostics systems to four components of the Ammunition Transfer Arm of this vehicle, and a cost-benefit analysis was performed on the diagnostics/prognostics to show the potential savings that may be gained by incorporating these systems onto the vehicle. Possible savings could be in the form of reduced downtime, less unexpected or unnecessary maintenance, fewer regular maintenance checks. and/or tower collateral damage or loss. The diagnostics/prognostics systems are used to (1) help determine component problems, (2) determine the condition of the components, and (3) estimate the remaining life of the monitored components. The four components on the arm that are targeted for diagnostics/prognostics are (1) the electromechanical brakes, (2) the linear actuators, (3) the wheel/roller bearings, and (4) the conveyor drive system. These would be monitored using electrical signature analysis, vibration analysis, or a combination of both. Annual failure rates for the four components were obtained along with specifications for vehicle costs, crews, number of missions, etc. Accident scenarios based on component failures were postulated, and event trees for these scenarios were constructed to estimate the annual loss of the resupply vehicle, crew, arm. or mission aborts. A levelized cost-benefit analysis was then performed to examine the costs of such failures, both with and without some level of failure reduction due to the diagnostics/prognostics systems. Any savings resulting from using diagnostics/prognostics were calculated.

  12. Installation restoration program: Hydrologic measurements with an estimated hydrologic budget for the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant, Joliet, Illinois. [Contains maps of monitoring well locations, topography and hydrologic basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diodato, D.M.; Cho, H.E.; Sundell, R.C.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrologic data were gathered from the 36.8-mi{sup 2} Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) located in Joliet, Illinois. Surface water levels were measured continuously, and groundwater levels were measured monthly. The resulting information was entered into a database that could be used as part of numerical flow model validation for the site. Deep sandstone aquifers supply much of the water in the JAAP region. These aquifers are successively overlain by confining shales and a dolomite aquifer of Silurian age. This last unit is unconformably overlain by Pleistocene glacial tills and outwash sand and gravel. Groundwater levels in the shallow glacial system fluctuate widely, with one well completed in an upland fluctuating more than 17 ft during the study period. The response to groundwater recharge in the underlying Silurian dolomite is slower. In the upland recharge areas, increased groundwater levels were observed; in the lowland discharge areas, groundwater levels decreased during the study period. The decreases are postulated to be a lag effect related to a 1988 drought. These observations show that fluid at the JAAP is not steady-state, either on a monthly or an annual basis. Hydrologic budgets were estimated for the two principal surface water basins at the JAAP site. These basins account for 70% of the facility's total land area. Meteorological data collected at a nearby dam show that total measured precipitation was 31.45 in. and total calculated evapotranspiration was 23.09 in. for the study period. The change in surface water storage was assumed to be zero for the annual budget for each basin. The change in groundwater storage was calculated to be 0.12 in. for the Grant Creek basin and 0. 26 in. for the Prairie Creek basin. Runoff was 7.02 in. and 7.51 in. for the Grant Creek and Prairie Creek basins, respectively. The underflow to the deep hydrogeologic system in the Grant Creek basin was calculated to be negligible. 12 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Ogden Defense Depot, Operable Unit 1, Weber County, UT. (Second remedial action), June 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1941, the 1,100-acre Ogden Defense Depot (DDOU) site, located in Ogden, Weber County, Utah, has been a key installation in the Department of Defense supply system. Operable Unit 1, which is located in the southwest part of the DDOU, is composed of the backfill material in the Plain City Canal, Burial Site 1, and Burial Site 3-B. Burial Site 1 was reported to have been used for the disposal of riot control agent (chloroacetophenone) and white smoke (hexachloroethane) containers in the 1940's. In the early 1960's, Burial Site 3-B was reportedly the burying ground for over 1,000 arctic-style rubber boots. The ROD addresses a final remedy for OU1 that will reduce the principal threats posed by contaminated soil and shallow ground water at the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, debris, and ground water are VOCs, including TCE; other organics, including dioxins and pesticides; and metals, including arsenic and lead.

  14. Green Depot | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: EnergyGrasslands RenewableGreatwood, Texas:Open45. It is

  15. Hawthorne Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridor |Information AbandonmentHawkinsArmy

  16. Hawthorne, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridor |Information

  17. Hawthorne, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridor |InformationNevada: Energy Resources

  18. Hawthorne Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower Finance Jump737002°,HavanaEl Coop Inc Jump

  19. Hawthorne Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:Photon Place:NetHealth Division | OpenReleaseWindProject Jump to:

  20. Hawthorne, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:Photon Place:NetHealth Division | OpenReleaseWindProject Jump

  1. Hawthorne, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:Photon Place:NetHealth Division | OpenReleaseWindProject

  2. Home Depot Foundation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHi Gtel JumpHoard, Wisconsin:Holiday59.Holyoke, MA) JumpBuilders

  3. Solar Depot Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to:Information Silver Peak Area (Henkle, EtSolapurSolutions

  4. Hawthorne, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridor |InformationNevada: Energy Resources°,

  5. army ammunitions plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS. Engineering Computer Graphics Laboratory 1996 Engineering Computer Graphics Laboratory. 1996. AFastSEEP Automated Se Army...

  6. army ammunition plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS. Engineering Computer Graphics Laboratory 1996 Engineering Computer Graphics Laboratory. 1996. AFastSEEP Automated Se Army...

  7. ammunition plant baraboo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at planting time in 2009. Aboveground biomass production, coarse and fine roots, SOC Norton, Jay B. 184 THE PLANT BIOLOGY SEMINAR Molecular Plant Biology, Department of...

  8. ammunition plant milan: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at planting time in 2009. Aboveground biomass production, coarse and fine roots, SOC Norton, Jay B. 248 THE PLANT BIOLOGY SEMINAR Molecular Plant Biology, Department of...

  9. A resource allocation algorithm for wide area search ammunitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathinam, Sivakumar

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to design a decision algorithm to assign weapons (or vehicles) with the appropriate mode of operation to search, classify and attack as many targets as possible. This work also presents the benefits of cooperation...

  10. TEKreONK INC BVTN SVC CENTER BEAVERTON SERVICE DEPOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    . INSTRUMENT CONDHTON: IN TOLERANCE ISO 9001 Registered, KEMA cotificate number 50057.01 Page 1 of 2 #12 Printed: SAVANN CHEN 18-Mar-2002 18-Mar-2002 ISO 9001 Registered, KEMA certificate number 50057.01 Page 2 14-Dec-2006 Issued By: Zpi^ ^^^X-nyw^-K*^^-' Manager: Yin, Chun Quan TDS2014BC010394 ISO 9001

  11. Final Report Survey of Hazardous Trees on Marine Corps Depot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    in the mitigation of damages caused by tree failure to people, vehicles and infrastructure. This project and power infrastructure. For this survey, tree attributes, damages to the trees, potential targets

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Seneca Army Depot - NY 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborneSavannah River Swamp - SC

  13. Commander, Seneca Army Depot Attention: Thomas Stincic, Safety Officer

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r.x-L* d!9 1986

  14. Chester-Chester Depot, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy Information onChemithon842667°, -74.6968284° LoadingChester-Chester

  15. Suffield Depot, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen, Minnesota: EnergySublette County, Wyoming:

  16. JF\\H:\\data\\maps-library\\Hawthorn Library Map_2014_April.doc/11/04/2014 Hawthorn Campus Library Map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    on these computers: 002-015-FEIS, 016-027-LSS, 028-036-Design, 037-054-FBE, 055-072-ICT Computers 086-108 Computers on these computers: 001-008-FEIS, 009-016-LSS, 017-025-Design, 026-035-FBE, 036-044-ICT 10 min. Computers scanner

  17. Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    and Metallurgy Industries Group (AMIG) Ammunition and Metallurgy Industry Group Ammunition Industries Group

  18. Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    Republic of Iran Ammunition and Metallurgy Industries Group (AMIG) Ammunition and Metallurgy Industry Group

  19. Water Sampling At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDS dataIndiana:CoopWaspa Jump

  20. Outcasts of the universe: a study of the scientists in Hawthorne's short stories.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decker, Joseph Patrick

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scholars, None of tlzese men, however, explains what sox't 6 of sciez ce is practiced 'by EIar"thorns ' s scientists or what See Carl Bode, The American L rceum, Towza Ejecting of the Mind (New fork, 1)56+ TEris z. , the de:"'nimive study of thee mer...'can Lyceum movement, A short description of the movement can be found ir Bi "k J, S. ruilc, Ya~'ace Scier ce tt. ~li 1 '. . (B . too, 1BAB), o. 07 ( t o, Bt ta~rvziz 5 B Blitt t a, tl. . lt. . :t::AB~ooat. (New Haven, lc)48), p. O48. 6 The works...

  1. Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective Jump to:theEnergyEnergy Information Area

  2. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbHMilo, Maine:EnergyInformationDecker, 1983) | OpenOpen

  3. Slim Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation,PvtSouth Dakota) JumpSkyonic JumpOpenFacility |2003)

  4. Aerial Photography At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskeyEnergyAd-VentaAddison isInformation Lazaro, Et Al.,

  5. 2-M Probe At Hawthorne Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flatshydro Homepowering america Home1021 JumpArea

  6. Field Mapping At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 NoSanEnergy Information 4) Jump to:8)2010Information

  7. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump to:Taos County,Tees Valley BiofuelsEnergyInformation

  8. Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump Jump to:InformationTheInformationAl., 1993)OpenEnergy

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - ammunition supply point Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a 40-mm test projectile with a set of electronics that they hardened to withstand the heavy forces Source: Sherrill, David - School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - ammunition plant radford Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for STA 250, Radford M. Neal, 2000 3a.1 The Normal Distributions The distribution of data can... -2 0 2 4 0.0 0.2 0.4 -4 -2 0 2 4 0.0 0.2 0.4 -4 -2 0 2 4 0.0 0.2 0.4 12; Notes...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - ammunition plant joliet Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giordano Mion JEL Codes : C21, L11, R12, R30, R34 Keywords... : Concentration, spatial auto-correlation, plant size. CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE - COLE...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - ammunition logistics program Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Centers 54 Major... Program managers 467 Program managers Aircraft carriers Combat boots Combat ships ... Source: Papautsky, Ian - Department of Electrical and Computer...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - automated ammunition logistics Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mars and beyond... . I. Introduction ne of the major logistical challenges in human space exploration is asset management Source: de Weck, Olivier L. - Department of Aeronautics...

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Iowa Army Ammunition Plant - IA 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison- NY 38 Rare

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Twin Cities Ammunition - MN 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site - MOTracerlab Inc -Twin Cities

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - alabama army ammunition Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Source: US Army Corps of Engineers - Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory (CERC) Engineer Waterways Experiment Station Vicksburg, MS Collection: Engineering 4 U.S. ARMY CORPS...

  17. Ben-Gurion University (of the Negev) Nuclear Research Center Negev (NRCN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    of Technology M,N 9 Iran Ammunition and Metallurgy Industries Group (AMIG) Ammunition and Metallurgy Industry

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - army depot anniston Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page 2 Insights Prayer is communication with God USACE... Transition (WT) Com- plex at Fort Bliss, Texas, one of nine Army construction projects funded by the American... and...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - army depot activity Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page 2 Insights Prayer is communication with God USACE... Transition (WT) Com- plex at Fort Bliss, Texas, one of nine Army construction projects funded by the American... and...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - anniston army depot Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page 2 Insights Prayer is communication with God USACE... Transition (WT) Com- plex at Fort Bliss, Texas, one of nine Army construction projects funded by the American... and...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - air force depot Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Engineering 96 Discrete Optimization Arc routing problems with time-dependent service costs Summary: . These vehicles are...

  2. Approximation Algorithms and Heuristics for a 2-depot, Heterogeneous Hamiltonian Path Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doshi, Riddhi Rajeev

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Various civil and military applications of UAVs, or ground robots, require a set of vehicles to monitor a group of targets. Routing problems naturally arise in this setting where the operators of the vehicles have to plan the paths suitably in order...

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »HillNYEraGeneralGrand Junction

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Supply Depot AEC Warehouse - NY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePA 3003A AECMexico -36 Supply

  5. NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    East Greenbush, New York Renewable Energy Program- Hawthorne Ridge Solar Thermal Install solar hot water system on existing rooftop at the Hawthorne Ridge retirement community....

  6. 10 Facts to Know About Data Centers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    headquarters and data center at Home Depot. | Photo courtesy of the Home Depot. The headquarters and data center at Home Depot. | Photo courtesy of the Home Depot. The Lawrence...

  7. NCTC 2004 (1995/3/20)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    . N 7 Iran Amirkabir University of Technology M,N 8 Iran Ammunition and Metallurgy Industries Group (AMIG) Ammunition Industries Group Ammunition and Metallurgy Industry Group Sanaye Mohematsazi Ammunition Group Ammunition and Metallurgy Industries N #12;27 H20.11. () 11

  8. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Summary and Guide for Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  9. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  10. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723).DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations:Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho;Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  11. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pueblo Depot Activity, Colorado. Final, Phase 1: Environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, J.W.; Blasing, T.J.; Ensminger, J.T.; Johnson, R.O.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Shor, J.T.; Staub, W.P.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the US Army proposes to dispose of lethal chemical agents and munitions stored at eight existing Army installations in the continental United States. In 1988, the US Army issued the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP. The FPEIS and the subsequent Record of Decision (ROD) identified an on-site disposal process as the preferred method for destruction of the stockpile. That is, the FPEIS determined the environmentally preferred alternative to be on-site disposal in high-temperature incinerators, while the ROD selected this alternative for implementation as the preferred method for destruction of the stockpile. In this Phase I report, the overall CSDP decision regarding disposal of the PUDA Stockpile is subjected to further analyses, and its validity at PUDA is reviewed with newer, more detailed data than those providing the basis for the conclusions in the FPEIS. The findings of this Phase I report will be factored into the scope of a site-specific environmental impact statement to be prepared for the destruction of the PUDA stockpile. The focus of this Phase I report is on those data identified as having the potential to alter the Army`s previous decision regarding disposal of the PUDA stockpile; however, several other factors beyond the scope of this Phase I report must also be acknowledged to have the potential to change or modify the Army`s decisions regarding PUDA.

  12. CONFIRMATORY SURVEY OF THE DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY, DEFENSE NATIONAL STOCKPILE CENTER NEW HAVEN DEPOT, NEW HAVEN, INDIANA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.M. Harpenau

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the radiological confirmatory survey were to collect adequate radiological data for use in evaluating the radiological condition of NHD land areas, warehouses, and support buildings. The data generated from the confirmatory survey activities were used to evaluate the results of the Final Status Survey Report (FSSR) submitted by Cabrera Services (Cabrera 2009). Cabrera has stated that all radioactive materials have been removed and that remediation of the open land areas and structure surfaces was complete, and that the NHD meets the criteria for unrestricted use.

  13. 300. Schwartz, D., B. Fischhoff, T. Krishnamurti, and F. Sowell, The Hawthorne Effect and Energy Awareness. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 2014. 61: 81-95. 297. Glier, J.C. and E.S. Rubin, Assessment of solid sorbents as a competitive post. Zhai, H. and E.S. Rubin, Comparative performance and cost assessments of coal and natural gas.M.L. Azevedo, Estimating direct and indirect rebound effects for U.S. households with input­output analysis

  14. Tuesday 1st 08,00 am 10,00 am

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucci, Sara

    Research, Hawthorne, USA) and Murray Campbell (IBM Research, Hawthorne, USA) - Event-based Constraints for Sensornet Programming Mert Akdere (Brown University, USA), Ugur Cetintemel (Brown University, USA), John Jannotti (Brown Universit

  15. Managing the historic environment in woodland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in woodland: the vital role of research Hawthorn roots growing across a roman floor Ancient coppice stool

  16. Low-to-moderate temperature geothermal resource assessment for Nevada, area specific studies. Final report, June 1, 1980-August 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, D.T.; Koenig, B.A.; Flynn, T.; Bruce, J.L.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hawthorne study area is located in Mineral County, Nevada and surrounds the municipality of the same name. It encompasses an area of approximately 310 sq. km (120 sq. mi), and most of the land belongs to the US Army Ammunition Plant. The energy needs of the military combined with those of the area population (over 5,000 residents) are substantial. The area is classified as having a high potential for direct applications using the evaluation scheme described in Texler and others (1979). A variety of scientific techniques was employed during area-wide resource assessment. General geologic studies demonstrate the lithologic diversity in the area; these studies also indicate possible sources for dissolved fluid constituents. Geophysical investigations include aero-magnetic and gravity surveys which aid in defining the nature of regional, and to a lesser extent, local variations in subsurface configurations. Surface and near-surface structural features are determined using various types of photo imagery including low sun-angle photography. An extensive shallow depth temperature probe survey indicates two zones of elevated temperature on opposite sides of the Walker Lake basin. Temperature-depth profiles from several wells in the study area indicate significant thermal fluid-bearing aquifers. Fluid chemical studies suggest a wide spatial distribution for the resource, and also suggest a meteoric recharge source in the Wassuk Range. Finally, a soil-mercury survey was not a useful technique in this study area. Two test holes were drilled to conclude the area resource assessment, and thermal fluids were encountered in both wells. The western well has measured temperatures as high as 90 C (194 F) within 150 meters (500 ft) of the surface. Temperature profiles in this well indicate a negative temperature gradient below 180 meters (590 ft). The eastern hole had a bottom hole temperature of 61 C (142 F) at a depth of only 120 meters (395 ft). A positive gradient is observed to a total depth in the well. Several conclusions are drawn from this study: the resource is distributed over a relatively large area; resource fluid temperatures can exceed 90 C (194 F), but are probably limited to a maximum of 125 C (257 F); recharge to the thermal system is meteoric, and flow of the fluids in the near surface (< 500 m) is not controlled by faults; heat supplied to the system may be related to a zone of partially melted crustal rocks in the area 25 km (15 mi) south of Hawthorne. Four papers and an introduction are included. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper. (MHR)

  17. Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of biomass to biorefineries annually Advanced supply system concepts, including depots Business models for advanced supply systems Siting and sizing considerations for depots...

  18. The Val ation of an Act alThe Valuation of an Actual C H D tCompany: Home Depot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubart, Christoph

    is 15%. Q h i f iQ: can the company earn a return in excess of its cost of capital indefinitely Chapter 13 1 #12;S i l i hSteps to estimate value using the Corporate Valuation Spreadsheet The valuation.( ) It then calculates Present Value (PV) of future expected FCF and finds estimated price per shareexpected FCF

  19. Updated 1-12 James F. Brice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Shipyard Apprentice Programs, and Consolidation of Intermediate and Depot Level Maintenance Activities. #12

  20. Energy Conservation in Army Industrial Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aveta, G. A.; Sliwinski, B. J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -tank ammunition, high explosive filled missile warheads, fuses, demolition blocks and detonators. The plant has four load, assemble, and pack (LAP) production lines, all of which are currently active, and an active ammunition renovation plant. lAAP consumes...

  1. Geothermal Site Assessment Using the National Geothermal Data...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a database user can identify Hawthorne-area thermal anomalies several ways: through spatial interpolation of database geothermometry, temperature gradient calculations, and...

  2. Faculty of Design L04810 Bachelor of Communication / Bachelor of Social Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    at the Faculty of Design (FoD) in Prahran, and the Faculty of Business (FBE) at the Hawthorn campus, the course

  3. Application of (U-Th)/He Thermochronometry as a Geothermal Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    areas have experienced the most recent, significant extension or have interacted with hot geothermal fluids. Apatite cooling ages from the footwall of the Wassuk Range, Hawthorne,...

  4. Amino Acid Biosignatures - Implications for the Detection of Extinct or Extant Microbial Communities on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubrey, Andrew D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Hawthorne, S.B. (2003) Subcritical water extraction ofand Grunthaner, F.J. (2007) Subcritical water extraction ofsuite consists of the subcritical water extractor (SCWE).

  5. Amino acid biosignatures : implications for the detection of extinct or extant microbial communities on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubrey, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Hawthorne, S.B. (2003) Subcritical water extraction ofand Grunthaner, F.J. (2007) Subcritical water extraction ofsuite consists of the subcritical water extractor (SCWE).

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - ancient woodland restoration Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the vital role of research Hawthorn roots growing across a roman floor Ancient coppice stool... or ancient woodland. To maintain and enhance such features through informed...

  7. Heredity 75 (1995) 4 16--424 Received22 March 1995 Genetic differentiation in Zeiraphera diniana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallet, James

    is that of the apple versus hawthorn races of Rhagoletis porno- nella (Feder et a!., 1988, 1994; McPheron et a!., 1988

  8. 40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    launcher, which utilizes high explosive ammunition to defeat adversary personnel and equipment. A number of Department sites have procured these weapons. 40 MM Grenade...

  9. New Studies Portray Unbalanced Perspective on Biofuels DOE Committed to Environmentally Sound Biofuels Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    New Studies Portray Unbalanced Perspective on Biofuels DOE Committed to Environmentally Sound Biofuels Development DOE Response based on contributions from Office of Biomass Program; Argonne National, Hill, Tilman, Polasky and Hawthorne study ("Land Clearing and the Biofuel Carbon Debt") claims

  10. CX-002909: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-002909: Categorical Exclusion Determination Renewable Energy Program- Hawthorne Ridge Solar Thermal CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B2.2, B5.1 Date: 07062010 Location(s): East...

  11. Rate of Water Evaporation in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karper, R. E. (Robert Earl)

    1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Winterhaven, Dimmit Count No. 8, Lubbock, Lubbock County: E. Mortensen, B. 5.. Superintende D. L. Jones. Superintendent **L. R. Hawthorn, M. S., Horticultu Frank Gaines. Irrig. and Forest Nure. Members of Teaching Staff Carrying Cooperative Projects...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - asuman korkusuz daniel Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2009 STUDENT COUNTRY SHOOL DATE TERM Summary: -09 Spring Melissa Sheldon Turkey Westwood Middle School 11-Dec-08 Fall Asuman Gordu Turkey Westwood... Hawthorne MidHigh 3-Apr-09...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - asuman korkusuz gnter Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2009 STUDENT COUNTRY SHOOL DATE TERM Summary: -09 Spring Melissa Sheldon Turkey Westwood Middle School 11-Dec-08 Fall Asuman Gordu Turkey Westwood... Hawthorne MidHigh 3-Apr-09...

  14. English Language and Study Skills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    English Language and Study Skills }2014 swinburne.edu.au Certificates #12;#12;Course information Bridging science }} Certificate IV in Science Campus: Hawthorn, Wantirna Duration: One year full

  15. English Language and Study Skills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    English Language and Study Skills }2015 swinburne.edu.au Certificates #12;#12;Course information Bridging science }} Certificate IV in Science Campus: Hawthorn, Wantirna Duration: One year full

  16. Further Tests of Vegetable Varieties for the Winter Garden Region.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawthorn, L. R. (Leslie Rushton)

    1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Watermelon 3 8 Summary of Promising Varieties 42 AcknowIedgments Literature Cited BULLETIN NO. 546 JULY , 1937 FURTHER TESTS OF VEGETABLE VARIETIES FOR THE WINTER GARDEN REGION By Leslie R. Hawthorn, Horticulturist, Substation No. 19, Winter Haven...

  17. Effects on growth and cost of production of Arizona ash, Indian hawthorn, Southern waxmyrtle, and live oak sequentially produced in combinations of Cu-treated and non-treated 0.24 L., 2.7 L and 10.4 L or 12.7 L containers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obst, Steven Paul

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have a greater number of marketable plants in 2.7 L containers prior to overwintering when combinations of copper treatments were used. Growth responses in the 12.7 L containers were variable, with beneficial effects from copper-treatment seen for live...

  18. Diversions of progress : popular culture and visions of modernity in the transpacific borderlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Lauren Chase

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coal depot in Matthew Bokovoy, The San Diego World’s Fairs and Southwestern Memory, 1880-1940 (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - animal grazing final Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USDA, Jornada Experimental Range Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 57 PUEBLO CHEMICAL DEPOT GRASSHOPPER MONITORING: 2000 RESULTS John R. Sovell Summary: disturbances...

  20. activates bmp-independent chondrogenesis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particles, which take energy from an internal replenishable energy depot or ambient medium and transduce it into useful work performed on the environment, in addition to...

  1. activated chey chey-n16-flim: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particles, which take energy from an internal replenishable energy depot or ambient medium and transduce it into useful work performed on the environment, in addition to...

  2. activities activity coefficients: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particles, which take energy from an internal replenishable energy depot or ambient medium and transduce it into useful work performed on the environment, in addition to...

  3. activated thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particles, which take energy from an internal replenishable energy depot or ambient medium and transduce it into useful work performed on the environment, in addition to...

  4. activities activity advanced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particles, which take energy from an internal replenishable energy depot or ambient medium and transduce it into useful work performed on the environment, in addition to...

  5. akt-dependent nf-kappab activation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particles, which take energy from an internal replenishable energy depot or ambient medium and transduce it into useful work performed on the environment, in addition to...

  6. activated paraterphenyl stsintillatory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particles, which take energy from an internal replenishable energy depot or ambient medium and transduce it into useful work performed on the environment, in addition to...

  7. activates kinesin-3 unc-104: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particles, which take energy from an internal replenishable energy depot or ambient medium and transduce it into useful work performed on the environment, in addition to...

  8. activities situacao atual: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particles, which take energy from an internal replenishable energy depot or ambient medium and transduce it into useful work performed on the environment, in addition to...

  9. activator inhibitor-1 activity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particles, which take energy from an internal replenishable energy depot or ambient medium and transduce it into useful work performed on the environment, in addition to...

  10. Comparison of Idealized and Real-World City Station Citing Models for Hydrogen Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, Joan M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    focus is on modeling of hydrogen production and distributionconvenience of hydrogen production, delivery and refuelinga hydrogen depot (i.e. hydrogen production facility or city-

  11. Technical and Economic Assessment of Regional Hydrogen Transition Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, Joan; Yang, Christopher; Nicholas, Michael

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system spatial layouts for hydrogen production and deliveryWe estimate costs for hydrogen production, delivery anda hydrogen depot (i.e. hydrogen production facility or city-

  12. EECBG Success Story: Grant Improves Comfort for Nevada City's...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    railroad depot. There was just one problem: it was built before central heating or air-conditioning. Learn more. Addthis Related Articles Metal halide light fixtures at...

  13. Comparison of Idealized and Real-World City Station Citing Models for Hydrogen Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, Joan M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the hydrogen delivery networks (trucks and pipelines) thattruck and pipeline network paths from hydrogen depot forlength of pipeline and truck-based hydrogen delivery modes,

  14. Improving Robust Rolling Stock Circulation in Rapid Transit Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 31, 2011 ... Constraints (5) ensure material flow balance in each depot station for ... in the network, RENFE planners always reserve some material and, ...

  15. Decentralization of Water Service Delivery in Mexico: The Effects of Party Politics, Intergovernmental Dynamics, and Municipal Capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastings, Cameron Jones

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000-2005. ” ”Guanajuato, Mexico: Sistema de InformacionSaneamiento 2008. ” Guanajuato, Mexico. Comisión Estatal dePotable y Alcantarillado. ” Mexico City, Mexico: Comisión

  16. The New Political Economy of Trade : : Heterogeneous Firms and Trade Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plouffe, Michael

    Bristol-Myers Squibb Hewlett-Packard Home Depot HSBC NorthAmerica HSBC-GR Corp Internet Security Sys Inc JPMorgan

  17. 392 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING, VOL. 7, NO. 2, APRIL 2010 [32] Y. H. Song, G. S. Wang, P. Y. Wang, and A. T. Johns, "Environmental/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Minge

    392 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING, VOL. 7, NO. 2, APRIL 2010 [32] Y. H. [33] S. Salhi and M. Sari, "A multi-level composite heuristic for the multi- depot vehicle fleet mix, "Heuristic algorithms for single and multiple depot vehicle routing problems with pickups and deliveries

  18. Mercredi 15 Dcembre 2010 En ce moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    ... Forum environnement : posez vos questions Biographies : portraits de personnalités Eco-gestes : cartes! Ship to Door Free www.MicroscopeNet.c The Microscope Depot Select The Right Microscope For You . Lowest Price. Free Shipping. Microscope-Depot.com Professional Microscopes Biological, Stereo, Digital, Hobby

  19. Slide 1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    12.1 Ammunition & Explosives 12.2 Fire Control 12.3 Guided Missiles 12.4 Guns 12.5 Nuclear Ordnance 12.6 Weapons 13. Electronic & Communication Equipment - 8.7B 13.1...

  20. D I G E S T Public Works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    for DLA in Europe, by Jennifer H. Aldridge 25 Iowa Army Ammunition Plant welcomes steam plant upgrades levels pose no threat to prescribed burn program, by Dana Finney 28 Net zero offers chance for updated Insights_________________________________________________________________________ 32 Improving power supply

  1. Bioaugmentation of TNT-contaminated soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bokelmann, Annamarie

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial transformation of trinitrotoluene (TNT) in phics. contaminated soil was investigated in this research. A Bacillus sp., isolated from soil obtained from an army ammunition facility, was used to enhance the rate of TNT removal over a 360 day...

  2. Synchronized Position Hold Engage & Reorient Experimental Satellites Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Space Systems Laboratory partnered with Payload Systems, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    multi-aperture telescope or interferometer ­ Space based fuel depot ­ Multi-vehicle Mars mission architectures · Routine and autonomous formation flight is essential to the operation of these missions · Long ranges Tethered Formation Flight Synchronized Wireless Autonomous Reconfigurable Modules (SWARM

  3. California's The state tries afirst-in-the-nationapproach to attackin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    . A Ijevy of bikes at the busy Southern l'.icific Depot in Davis, California--a city that's ahead reinforces good planning concepts." Intleed, the low-carbon lievelopment pattern is nearly identical

  4. Modeling the Mobile Oil Recovery Problem as a Multiobjective ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of the oil wells are pumped using artificial lift systems. One such ... system. The unit starts its tour at the depot, then it pumps several wells before returning to the

  5. Rafael Martinelli Pinto Exact Algorithms for Arc and Node Routing ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    vehicles K with capacity Q and a distinguished depot vertex labeled 0. Define. ER = {e ? E|de > 0} as the set of required edges. Let ? be a set of closed.

  6. CX-012015: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Enhanced Wind Resource Assessment with Sonic Ranging and Detection at Tooele Army Depot CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 04/24/2014 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  7. European Bulletin of Himalayan Research (EBHR) Volume 27, Autumn 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Asia Institute, Heidelberg University, Germany; (CNRS) Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France; (SOAS) School of Oriental and African Studies, UK

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Over the last decade the people of upper Mustang, including Lo Monthang, have borne witness to and helped to create micro-hydro electricity projects, schools, and eco-tourism ventures, to choreograph cultural shows, and build kerosene depots...

  8. Adipogenesis and angiogenesis : roles in tissue engineering and glucose metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Joshua

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adipose tissue serves two main functions in the body: (1) it is the body's primary energy depot; and (2) it also serves as an important endocrine organ, producing and secreting various enzymes, growth factors, cytokines, ...

  9. STAFF SENATE Minutes Smithfield Room at IVTSCC, Thursday, September 15, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    .M. Attending: Susan Archer, Jeff Burr, Sarah Castle, Joseph Goodman, Lori Greiner, Velva Groover, Jennifer-O'Brien, Amy Tunison, Beverly Williams, and Patricia Williams. Excused: Anna Hawthorne, Maxine Lyons, Allison, and portable "bleacher chairs" being banned from Lane Stadium. Patricia Williams, Staff Senate representative

  10. Failure mode analysis for lime/limestone FGD system. Volume III. Plant profiles. Part 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenney, S.M.; Rosenberg, H.S.; Nilsson, L.I.O.; Oxley, J.H.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains plant profiles for: Petersburg 3; Hawthorn 3, 4; La Cygne 1; Jeffry 1, 2; Lawrence 4, 5; Green River 1-3; Cane Run 4, 5; Mill Creek 1, 3; Paddy's Run 6; Clay Boswell 4; Milton R. Young 2; Pleasants 1, 2; and Colstrip 1, 2. (DLC)

  11. An Empirical Comparison of Field Defect Modeling Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management, Measurement, Reliability, Experimentation, Defect modeling, empirical research, COTS, maintenance of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh PA, 15213 *Center for Software Engineering IBM T.J. Watson Research Center Hawthorne, NY 10532 This research was supported by the National Science Foundation

  12. Empirical Evaluation of Defect Projection Models for Widely-deployed Production Software Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbsleb, James D.

    Ray, P.Santhanam Center for Software Engineering IBM T.J. Watson Research Center Hawthorne, NY 10532 Descriptors D.2.8 [Software Engineering]: Empirical Studies, Metrics, Reliability Engineering Keywords Defect modeling, empirical research, COTS, open source software, maintenance resource planning, software insurance

  13. SPC: A Distributed, Scalable Platform for Data Mining Lisa Amini, Henrique Andrade, Ranjita Bhagwan, Frank Eskesen, Richard King, Philippe Selo,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krintz, Chandra

    SPC: A Distributed, Scalable Platform for Data Mining Lisa Amini, Henrique Andrade, Ranjita Bhagwan Center 19 Skyline Drive Hawthorne, NY 10598 ABSTRACT The Stream Processing Core (SPC) is distributed number of digital data streams. In this paper, we describe the SPC programming model which, to the best

  14. Abington Abington Pediatrics* 360 Brockton Avenue, Suite 102, MA 02351 Yara Fernandez, MD 781-792-1999 781-792-1990 Laurie Massey, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    Andrea Reilly, MD Milton Pediatric Associates - MGH 10 Hawthorne Place, Suite 110, MA 02114 JonathanCullough, MD Rebecca Niloff, MD Cara O'Reilly, MD Scott Paul, MD Jonathon Brenner, MD John Robinson, MD Heidi-643-8120 Elizabeth Turnock, MD Pediatric Group Practice 55 Fruit Street, YAW 6D, MA 02114 Ronald Benz, MD 617

  15. Abercrombie, M. J. L. (1970), Aims and Techniques of Group Teaching. London: Society for Research into Higher Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradbeer, Robin Sarah

    , ON, Canada, (cited by Woods et al., 2000). Biggs, J (1987), Student Approaches to Learning and Studying Hawthorn, Vic: Australian Council for Educational Research Biggs, J (1993) "What do inventories of Educational Psychology, v83 pp3-19 Biggs, J. (2003), Teaching for Quality Learning at University, 2nd ed

  16. Edinburgh Research Explorer The Giant Gemini GMOS survey of zem > 4.4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    , University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 1A1, Canada 6Departamento de Astronom´ia, Universidad de Chile, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122, Australia 11Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE September 4. Received 2014 August 2; in original form 2014 February 17 ABSTRACT We have obtained spectra

  17. December 5, 2013 Contact: Shawn Uhlman, PDC NEWS RELEASE 503-823-7994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    the relationship between Portland's two major research universities and the city's entrepreneurial ecosystem. Both-affiliated companies are: · SweetSense, Inc. - low-cost remote monitoring solutions for water, energy and balance, to be used in rehabilitation, assisted living, neurology, and primary care · Hawthorne Materials

  18. Secure Transcoding of Internet Content Yuan-Chi Chang, Richard Han, Chung-Sheng Li, and John R. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    . Smith IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center 19 Skyline Drive Hawthorne, NY 10532 USA ABSTRACT the data. 1 INTRODUCTION Transcoding of media and Web content has received much attention recently because the download delay of media content over low-bandwidth access links such as modem links and wireless access

  19. Two-view Feature Generation Model for Semi-supervised Learning Rie Kubota Ando rie1@us.ibm.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tong

    T.J. Watson Research Center, Hawthorne, New York, USA Tong Zhang tzhang@yahoo-inc.com Yahoo Inc., New York, New York, USA Abstract We consider a setting for discriminative semi- supervised learning- ent from co-training. Experiments show that our approach is more robust than co-training and EM, under

  20. Two-view Feature Generation Model for Semi-supervised Learning Rie Kubota Ando rie1@us.ibm.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Rie

    T.J. Watson Research Center, Hawthorne, New York, USA Tong Zhang tzhang@yahoo-inc.com Yahoo Inc., New York, New York, USA Abstract We consider a setting for discriminative semi- supervised learning differ- ent from co-training. Experiments show that our approach is more robust than co-training and EM

  1. Easing the Generation of Predictive Human Performance Models from Legacy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Myra

    . Customer complaints and help- desk logs often provide clues about deficiencies in the current version Drive Hawthorne, NY 10532 {bejohn,rachel}@us.ibm.com ABSTRACT With the rise of tools for predictive of an application. We present CogTool-Helper, an exemplar of a tool that results from joining this HCI need

  2. Metrics for a Sustainable Produced By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Metrics for a Sustainable EcoVillage #12;2 Produced By: Nam Nguyen Master of Urban and Regional Project Manager Project for Pride in Living (PPL) Jeffrey Skrenes Housing Director Hawthorne Neighborhood Council Photo source: Unless otherwise noted, photos are provided by People for Pride in Living

  3. arXiv:1109.6328v2[astro-ph.CO]18Jun2012 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 114 (2012) Printed 19 June 2012 (MN LATEX style file v2.2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skibba, Ramin A.

    for Astrophysics & Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122, Australia, GiessenbachstraĂ?e, D-85748 Garching, Germany 14Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai. The differences between the two inhibit a clean comparison between analyses and leave open the possibility that

  4. Power-aware Routing in Wireless Packet Networks Javier Gomez, Andrew T. Campbell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Castellanos, Javier

    and energy consumption. Introduction Communication networks comprised of personal devices in close proximity will allow personal devices in a PAN to com- municate with each other via wireless links. A key.J. Watson Research Center Hawthorne, NY 10953, USA Abstract A key characteristic of Personal Area Networks

  5. The simulation and analysis of continuous single product manufacturing systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Theodore Robert

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    there was insufficient time to develop new methods or concepts in ammunition production, even though more ad- vanced techn1ques were being employed by private 1ndustry in similar fields. After the war the Government Owned Contractor Operated (GOCO) Plants were either...

  6. Demil planning and management system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, C.C.; Bormet, S.M.; Whitfield, R.G.; Bowen, M.; Chun, K.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Golden, R.E. [Army Pacific, Fort Shafter, HI (United States); Fuller, R. [Army Industrial Operations Command, Rock Island, IL (United States). National Maintenance Point Branch

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Maintenance Point (NMP) Branch of the US Army Industrial Operations Command (IOC) serves as the Single Manager for Conventional Ammunition (SMCA) agent for managing the renovation, modification, recycling, and disposal of conventional ammunition, thereby improving readiness. The mission of the NMP includes program management for demilitarization (demil) activities, ammunition maintenance, and ammunition peculiar equipment (APE) projects. Through an Interagency Agreement between the US Army and the US Department of Energy, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing an integrated data management system, called the Demil Planning and Management System (DPMS), for IOC. DPMS is intended to help NMP efficiently manage information on ongoing demil project activities and asset inventories, plan future projects, and allocate budgets. This system, when fully implemented, will also make it possible for the user community to interactively access the DPMS database; perform data entry and queries; and run reports through network, modem, and Internet access to the system. This paper describes the principal components of the DPMS, current capabilities, and planned enhancements.

  7. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    applications. However, lead is a potent, potentially deadly toxin that damages many organs in the body and can in the United States, such as paint and fuel, but it is still commonly used in ammunition for hunting upland for use in hunting, shooting sports, and fishing activities. Learn about "Ingestion of Spent Lead

  8. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE Full terms and conditions of use: http://www.informaworld.com/terms-and-conditions-of-access.pdf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    -7887 online DOI: 10.1080/10588330490519437 Corrosion of Depleted Uranium in an Arid Environment: Soil- ment. A site in the southwestern United States contains depleted uranium that has been weathering Mountain Nevada (USA), and the use of depleted uranium (DU) ammunition in recent international conflicts

  9. Cotton Root-Rot and Its Control.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taubenhaus, J. J. (Jacob Joseph); Ezekiel, (Walter Naphtali) Walter N.

    1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Nurseryman E. MORTENSEN, B. S., Superintendent No. 9, Balmorhea, Reeves County: L. R. HAWTHORN, M. S., Horficulfurist J. J. BAYLES, B. S., Superintendenf No. 20, . Superintendent . . Teachers in the School of Agriculture Carrying Cooperative Projects..., apparently from lack Fig. 2. Cotton plants with Phymatotrichum root-rot, showing dead, recently wilted. and healthy plants. of water. By the end of three weeks, most of the inoculated plants had succumbed. In the rotting of the roots,'the outer tissues...

  10. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque Cl, supplkment au no 4, Tome 38, Auril 1977, page Cl-303 MULTILAYER SINTERING OF MnZn FERRITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    SINTERING OF MnZn FERRITES IN CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERE M. I. ALAM, N. R. NAlR and T. V. RAMAMURTI Central dans la litterature que I'empilement depots de ferrites les uns sur les autres durant le traitement production des couches multiples d'echantillons de ferrite de Mn-Zn. On a utilise jusqu'a 10 couches d

  11. he U.S. Coast Guard expects all of its Sikorsky Aircraft MH-60T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Programmed Depot Maintenance at the Aviation Logistics Center (ALC) in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Like dynamic component wear and a path to condition-based maintenance (CBM). However, without the testing airframe. Despite the reliable performance, the Coast Guard sought HUMS technology to improve the robust

  12. Solving the Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem and the Split Delivery using GRASP Metaheuristic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    vehicles, where total cost is minimal, beginning and ending in a depot; such that each node is visited justSolving the Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem and the Split Delivery using GRASP Metaheuristic Joseph Gallart Suárez1 , Manuel Tupia Anticona1 1 Engineering department, Pontificia Universidad Católica

  13. Heuristic Solution Approaches to the Double TSP with Multiple Stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it is transferred onto a train or another truck, which then performs the long-haul transportation. Upon arrival to be uniform. The two regions are far apart, and thus some long-haul transport is required between the depots in each of the regions. This long-haul transport is not part of the problem. All pickups and deliveries

  14. State Contracting and Procurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State Contracting and Procurement Registration System (SCPRS) Illustrated User Manual #12;2 State Contracting and Procurement Registration System (SCPRS) Rev. 4/23/09 Copyright © 2008 RFP Depot, LLC dba Bid@bidsync.com Website: http://www.bidsync.com #12;3 State Contracting and Procurement Registration System (SCPRS) Rev. 4

  15. E N G I N E E R I N G C H A N G E Society's most pressing problems lie at the intersection of not only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Silvia

    of not only science and engineering, but also policy, business, human behavior and more. As a result problem solvers--is clearly at a crossroads. Whether the issues relate to energy and the environment as The Home Depot Smart Home, to teaching undergraduate classes in a state of the art cleanroom, to giving all

  16. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ESCHINGER-BRUCEVILLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION LAMBERT ESCHINGER-BRUCEVILLE FRANKLIN HOOD CLAY STATION TWIN CITIES ARMY DEPOT 88TH-FRUITRIDGE AIRCO BRIGHTON TEICHERT AGGREGATES MANLOVE- FOLSOM LAKE FOREST SUNCO ASHTON FILTRATION PLANT EAST CITY CSUS CAMPUS COMMONS ROSEVILLE ENERGY PARK SACRAMENTO MAIL ROCKLIN

  17. Table Set-up with equipment Target Audience: Parents of elementary school students (grades 3-6), Middle and High School Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    Compact Fluorescent Bulb 40 Lumen equivalent (GE) Lowe's or Home Depot Approx. $6.50 each Incandescent engineering measurement tool 2. Introduce the range of light bulb options available for home use. 3. Describe the specifications generally provided to the consumer to evaluate available bulbs for home use 4. Provide hands

  18. RPI students supporting education outreach Target Audience: Elementary school students (grades 3-6)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    ) Lowe's or Home Depot Approx. $22.00 each Compact Fluorescent Bulb 40 Lumen equivalent (GE) Lowe Introduction and Bulb Comparison; LED, Compact Fluorescent, Incandescent Bulb Comparison #12;Resistor Kit (incl (top position), compact fluorescent (middle position), LED Bulb (lower position). Computer set up

  19. Biomedical Engineering Department Petty Cash & Reimbursement Policies Effective 4/1/10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    recommended by the Dean's Office). Petty cash funds are only available when purchases cannot be charged activities must be made using a University Procard, via Office Depot, or through a standard purchase order does not exempt the university, its officers, or its employees from the purchasing laws, rules

  20. Ellen Griffith Spears Environmental Historian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and from the city's role as a storage depot for Cold War era chemical weapons marks the locale as an iconic In Anniston, Alabama, toxic pollution resulting from industrial production of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs significant in lifting the veil of secrecy that surrounded the city's industrial and military missions. Visit

  1. D I G E S T Public Works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    __________________________________________________ 14 Tobyhanna Army Depot excels at recycling, reuse, by Cathy Kropp 15 Fort Bliss preserves culture so scientists reduce air pollutants from coatings, by T'Jae Gibson 20 Fort Drum's natural resources conservation _____________________________________________________ 24 Fort Bragg celebrates 10 years of sustainability, by Jonelle Thompson 25 Schofield's School Age

  2. Subscribe / Give a Gift / Customer Service / Promotions / Blogs / Video / Digital Edition / JOIN FREE / SIGN IN TRY: Hottest Cars Ever / MINI Cooper / Best Gadgets Ever

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romps, David M.

    Protect. At The Home Depot. 1 2 3 Causes of Global Warming Best Survival Tools Best Rated SUVs / Science / Earth and the Environment / Climate Change / How Global Warming Could Create More Lightning And Wildfires How Global Warming Could Create More Lightning And Wildfires

  3. FELTONMATHEWAVENUE HOWARDHUNTERAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auckland, University of

    ' Association Te Kupenga Hauora Maori (Maori Health) Tumuaki Office Unisafe / Security UniSat (Satellite-722, 731-733 730 723 702 A .6 .4 National Institute for Health Innovation (NIHI) New Zealand Guidelines Services Grounds Depot Psychology, School of Ray Meyer Research Centre Security / Unisafe Simulation Centre

  4. Managing Product Variety through Postponement: Concept and Applications1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Jayashankar M.

    to this as the customization-responsiveness squeeze. Such an environment may hamper predictability in demand, supply influencing the successful implementation of postponement. 1 Invited book chapter in The Practice of Supply retail channels such as Wal-Mart, Best Buy, or Office Depot (Johnson and Anderson 2000). National

  5. THE MINIMIZATION OF THE NUMBER OF STOPS S. Deleplanque13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and to optimize the consumption, predicting the vehicle`s return to the depot. With energy manage- ment. The objective is to minimize the number of times the vehicles stop. Since those are autonomous vehicles (they of the number of served clients. Keywords: Autonomous Vehicle, Vehicle Scheduling, ILP, Reliability Introduction

  6. RESOURCE GUIDE RECYCLING ELECTRONICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    ://www.thesoftlanding.com/ AVOIDING BISPHENOL-A Eden Organics Beans http://www.edenfoods.com/ CD and DVD recycling httpRESOURCE GUIDE RECYCLING ELECTRONICS Batteries and Accessories Office Depot Cell Phones Any Verizon Plastics Call your local Solid Waste Management Facility eCycling resource (EPA) http

  7. LONG-TERM DEMONSTRATION OF SORBENT ENHANCEMENT ADDITIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason D. Laumb; Dennis L. Laudal; Grant E. Dunham; John P. Kay; Christopher L. Martin; Jeffrey S. Thompson; Nicholas B. Lentz; Alexander Azenkeng; Kevin C. Galbreath; Lucinda L. Hamre

    2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term demonstration tests of advanced sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) technologies have been completed at five coal-fired power plants. The targeted removal rate was 90% from baseline conditions at all five stations. The plants included Hawthorn Unit 5, Mill Creek Unit 4, San Miguel Unit 1, Centralia Unit 2, and Hoot Lake Unit 2. The materials tested included powdered activated carbon, treated carbon, scrubber additives, and SEAs. In only one case (San Miguel) was >90% removal not attainable. The reemission of mercury from the scrubber at this facility prevented >90% capture.

  8. Final Report: 8th International Symposium on NCT for Cancer, May 15, 1998 - May 15, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, M.F.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 8th International Symposium on Neutron Capture Therapy for Cancer (8th ISNCTC) was held in La Jolla, CA on Sept. 13-18, 1998. This biennial meeting of the International Society for Neutron Capture Therapy (ISNCT) was hosted by Society President M.F. Hawthorne (UCLA Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry). The Symposium brought together scientists (300 registrants from 21 countries) from diverse fields to report the latest developments in NCT. Topics of the 275 papers presented (30 plenary lectures, 81 oral presentations, and 164 posters) included the physics of neutron sources, chemistry of tumor-targeting agents, dosimetry, radiobiological studies, and clinical applications.

  9. Use and Usability of a Discovery Tool in an Academic Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanrath, Scott; Kottman, Miloche

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    -of-the-box boosting of local resources in Primo. The prompt for Study 1 was to find the book, “Scarlet Letter” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Consequently, most participants entered their search term as “scarlet letter.” Unfortunately, the omission of the initial article... to compare facet use and search query formation and reformation in Primo and VuFind. They found that facets appeared to be helpful to users based on frequent use and that searches for non-electronic resources tended to include more terms and more query...

  10. Certification Status Search Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Certification Status Search Tool (SB/DVBE) Illustrated User Manual #12;2 Certification Status Search Tool (SB/DVBE) Rev. 5/14/09 Copyright © 2008 RFP Depot, LLC dba BidSync All Rights Reserved://www.bidsync.com #12;3 Certification Status Search Tool (SB/DVBE) Rev. 5/14/09 Introduction BidSync is a powerful e

  11. Improving the Flavor of Ground Beef by Selecting Trimmings from Specific Locations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbison, Amanda 1989-

    2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    point decreases. Smith, Yang, Larsen, and Tume, (1998), Wood et al. (2003), and Chung et al. (2006) demonstrated that fat hardness is dictated primarily by the concentration of stearic acid. Of the eight fat depots studied, brisket had the lowest slip... of grain-fed beef when compared to grass-fed beef (Cox et al., 2006). Therefore, fatty acid profiles can cause a distinct difference in acceptability of meat samples. Gas chromatography with mass spectrometry In recent years, flavor research has become...

  12. A linear induction motor conveyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solinsky, Kenneth Sheldon

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A LINEAR INCUCTION MOTOR CONVEYER A Thesis Kenneth Sheldon. Solinsky Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER 07 SCIENCE May 1973 Major Subject: Industrial.... Howie, USAMC-ITC-P/P, Red River Army Depot, Texarkana, Texas 75501. Approved owxe, xe , ro uc o uction Engineering For the Commander ne , grec or, I A LINEAR INDUCTION MOTOR CONVEYER A Thesis by Kenneth Sheldon Solinsky App ved as to style...

  13. National Fuel Cell Bus Program: Accelerated Testing Evaluation Report and Appendices, Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an evaluation of hydrogen fuel cell transit buses operating at AC Transit in revenue service since March 20, 2006 compared to similar diesel buses operating from the same depot. This evaluation report includes results from November 2007 through October 2008. Evaluation results include implementation experience, fueling station operation, fuel cell bus operations at Golden Gate Transit, and evaluation results at AC Transit (bus usage, availability, fuel economy, maintenance costs, and roadcalls).

  14. Stochastic Dynamic Demand Inventory Models with Explicit Transportation Costs and Decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Liqing

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is the policy where several small loads will be dispatched as a single, combined load. From an inventory-modeling perspec- tive, the integrated inventory-transportation problems add dispatch quantities as decision variables to the stochastic dynamic inventory...): The vendor makes the inventory replen- ishment decisions on how much to order from the outside supplier. 2. Pure Outbound Transportation Models (PO): The collection depot makes the delivery schedules of order dispatches to the buyer(s). 3. Integrated...

  15. Tripos Questions in Optimization IB (198598) Parts of some of these questions are no longer relevant to the syllabus. You should not be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Richard

    ; : : : ; S n g, and that the demands at the ports fD 1 ; : : : ; Dm g are given by d 1 ; : : : ; dm , where s 1 the rate of energy dissipation, given by I(f) = 1 2 X i;j2S a \\Gamma1 ij f 2 ij : Here S denotes the finite to m ports. Assume that there are quantities s 1 ; : : : ; s n of the goods at depots fS 1

  16. Uncertainties in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Advanced

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kara G. Cafferty; Erin M. Searcy; Long Nguyen; Sabrina Spatari

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) cellulosic biofuel mandates, the United States will require an annual domestic supply of about 242 million Mg of biomass by 2022. To improve the feedstock logistics of lignocellulosic biofuels and access available biomass resources from areas with varying yields, commodity systems have been proposed and designed to deliver on-spec biomass feedstocks at preprocessing “depots”, which densify and stabilize the biomass prior to long-distance transport and delivery to centralized biorefineries. The harvesting, preprocessing, and logistics (HPL) of biomass commodity supply chains thus could introduce spatially variable environmental impacts into the biofuel life cycle due to needing to harvest, move, and preprocess biomass from multiple distances that have variable spatial density. This study examines the uncertainty in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn stover logisticsHPL within a bio-ethanol supply chain in the state of Kansas, where sustainable biomass supply varies spatially. Two scenarios were evaluated each having a different number of depots of varying capacity and location within Kansas relative to a central commodity-receiving biorefinery to test GHG emissions uncertainty. Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the spatial uncertainty in the HPL gate-to-gate sequence. The results show that the transport of densified biomass introduces the highest variability and contribution to the carbon footprint of the logistics HPL supply chain (0.2-13 g CO2e/MJ). Moreover, depending upon the biomass availability and its spatial density and surrounding transportation infrastructure (road and rail), logistics HPL processes can increase the variability in life cycle environmental impacts for lignocellulosic biofuels. Within Kansas, life cycle GHG emissions could range from 24 to 41 g CO2e/MJ depending upon the location, size and number of preprocessing depots constructed. However, this range can be minimized through optimizing the siting of preprocessing depots where ample rail infrastructure exists to supply biomass commodity to a regional biorefinery supply system

  17. Crusader Automated Docking System Phase 3 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jatko, W.B.; Goddard, J.S.; Ferrell, R.K.; Gleason, S.S.; Hicks, J.S.; Varma, V.K.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army is developing the next generation of battlefield artillery vehicles, including an advanced, self-propelled howitzer and a companion resupply vehicle. The resupply vehicle is intended to rendezvous with the howitzer near the battlefront and to upload ammunition to the howitzer. The Army has recommended that the vehicles incorporate robotics to increase safety, by allowing the crew to remain inside their vehicles during resupply operations. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed an autonomous docking system for a 6-D.F. robotic, ammunition transfer arm. The docking system augments the operator`s abilities by determining the position and orientation (pose) of a docking port. The pose is the location of the x, y, and z reference axes in 3-D space; and the orientation is the rotations--roll, pitch, and yaw--about those axes. Bye precisely determining the pose of the docking port, the robot can be instructed to move to the docking position without operator intervention. The system uses a video camera and frame grabber to digitize images of the special docking port. Custom algorithms were developed to recognize the port in the camera image, to determine the pose from its image features, and to distribute the results to the robot control computer. The system is loosely coupled to the robot and can be easily adapted to different mechanical configurations. The system has successfully demonstrated autonomous docking on a 24-in. tabletop robot and a 12-ft ammunition resupply robot. The update rate, measurement accuracy, continuous operation, and accuracy with obstructed view have been determined experimentally.

  18. Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed pre-processing supply system designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Muth, Jr.; Matthew H. Langholtz; Eric C. D. Tan; Jacob J. Jacobson; Amy Schwab; May M. Wu; Andrew Argo; Craig C. Brandt; Kara G. Cafferty; Yi-Wen Chiu; Abhijit Dutta; Laurence M. Eaton; Erin M. Searcy

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 US Billion-Ton Update estimates that by 2030 there will be enough agricultural and forest resources to sustainably provide at least one billion dry tons of biomass annually, enough to displace approximately 30% of the country's current petroleum consumption. A portion of these resources are inaccessible at current cost targets with conventional feedstock supply systems because of their remoteness or low yields. Reliable analyses and projections of US biofuels production depend on assumptions about the supply system and biorefinery capacity, which, in turn, depend upon economic value, feedstock logistics, and sustainability. A cross-functional team has examined combinations of advances in feedstock supply systems and biorefinery capacities with rigorous design information, improved crop yield and agronomic practices, and improved estimates of sustainable biomass availability. A previous report on biochemical refinery capacity noted that under advanced feedstock logistic supply systems that include depots and pre-processing operations there are cost advantages that support larger biorefineries up to 10 000 DMT/day facilities compared to the smaller 2000 DMT/day facilities. This report focuses on analyzing conventional versus advanced depot biomass supply systems for a thermochemical conversion and refinery sizing based on woody biomass. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the economies of scale enabled by advanced logistics offsets much of the added logistics costs from additional depot processing and transportation, resulting in a small overall increase to the minimum ethanol selling price compared to the conventional logistic supply system. While the overall costs do increase slightly for the advanced logistic supply systems, the ability to mitigate moisture and ash in the system will improve the storage and conversion processes. In addition, being able to draw on feedstocks from further distances will decrease the risk of biomass supply to the conversion facility.

  19. Fort Smith, mother post of the southwest quartermaster supply and archeological patterning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bento, Sylvia Deborah

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 14 CHAPTER V FORT SMITH AS QUARTERMASTER DEPOT At the start of the nineteenth century& the American frontier began its westward push . There was little conce& n of the effects that the movement would have on Indians of the trans-Mississippi West... building foundations (Coleman 1986&. 1 985 Archeological testing to reveal bastion and wall f'oundations. Further testing at the sites of bastions ?4 and ?5 was conducted (Coleman n. d. ) . 1985-1986 Test excavation for construction of a pedestrzan...

  20. Copkiller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Teri

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ht? - . -- - ' . .. . .. -, - - , ? '- , . ? ? ? The bus from Minnesota arrived at six a.m. Louis, : C81Tying everything he owned in a brown shopping bag, was the first one down the steps. He walked into the depot and stood still for a moment, giving his cramped muscles a chance to loosen. Hunger... waiting for their favorite watering hole to open for the day, and a red-eyed patrolman ordering two coffees to go and wishing it were eight o'clock so that he could go home. Louis sat down at the far end of the counter, away from the drunks; he found...

  1. Interview of the John Simpson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, John

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was attacked by bandits; I was driving up a mountain pass and the bandits ran across the skyline firing guns at me; eventually they hit the truck and I stopped; I wondered what I could do, and decided there was nothing; I took my wristwatch off and hid it under... people who had managed to get hold of guns, so probably desperate themselves; I did make one or two Chinese friends who were working with the unit; all the workers in my depot were Chinese - there were about fifty people; I had a rather formal attitude...

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Marion Mill Site - CO 09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer Depot - OH 45

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Markite Co - NY 49

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer Depot - OH 45Markite

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maryland Disposal Site - MD 05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer Depot - OH

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Marysville AEC Ore Buying Station - UT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer Depot - OH05

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer Depot - OH05Hood

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Max Zuckerman and Sons - IL 30

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer Depot - OH05Hood-

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Max Zuckerman and Sons Inc - MD 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer Depot -

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maxey

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer Depot -Kentucky Maxey

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maybell

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer Depot -Kentucky

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maybell Mill Site - CO 0-07

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer Depot

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maybell_West(2)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer DepotMaybell West,

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- McKinney Tool and Manufacturing Co -

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer DepotMaybell West,OH

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Medart Co - MO 09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer DepotMaybell

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Meili and Worthington - PA 0-04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer DepotMaybellMeili and

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Memorial Hospital - NY 0-16

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer DepotMaybellMeili

  17. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gash, A

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Many energetic systems can be activated via mechanical means. Percussion primers in small caliber ammunition and stab detonators used in medium caliber ammunition are just two examples. Current medium caliber (20-60mm) munitions are detonated through the use of impact sensitive stab detonators. Stab detonators are very sensitive and must be small, as to meet weight and size limitations. A mix of energetic powders, sensitive to mechanical stimulus, is typically used to ignite such devices. Stab detonators are mechanically activated by forcing a firing pin through the closure disc of the device and into the stab initiating mix. Rapid heating caused by mechanically driven compression and friction of the mixture results in its ignition. The rapid decomposition of these materials generates a pressure/temperature pulse that is sufficient to initiate a transfer charge, which has enough output energy to detonate the main charge. This general type of ignition mix is used in a large variety of primers, igniters, and detonators.[1] Common primer mixes, such as NOL-130, are made up of lead styphnate (basic) 40%, lead azide (dextrinated) 20%, barium nitrate 20%, antimony sulfide 15%, and tetrazene 5%.[1] These materials pose acute and chronic toxicity hazards during mixing of the composition and later in the item life cycle after the item has been field functioned. There is an established need to replace these mixes on toxicity, health, and environmental hazard grounds. This effort attempts to demonstrate that environmentally acceptable energetic solgel coated flash metal multilayer nanocomposites can be used to replace current impact initiated devices (IIDs), which have hazardous and toxic components. Successful completion of this project will result in IIDs that include innocuous compounds, have sufficient output energy for initiation, meet current military specifications, are small, cost competitive, and perform as well as or better than current devices. We expect flash metal multilayer and sol-gel to be generic technologies applicable to a wide range of devices, especially in small caliber ammunition and sub-munitions. We will replace the NOL-130 mixture with a nanocomposite that consists of a mechanically robust energetic multilayer foil that has been coated with a sol-gel energetic material. The exothermic reactions are activated in this nanocomposite are the transformation of the multilayer material to its respective intermetallic alloy and the thermite reaction, which is characterized by very high temperatures, a small pressure pulse, and hot particle ejection. The proposed materials and their reaction products consist of, but are not limited to aluminum, nickel, iron, aluminum oxide, titanium, iron oxide and boron. These materials have much more desirable environmental and health characteristics than the NOL-130 composition.

  18. Solar concentration/destruction of pesticide rinsewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salladay, D.G.; Ash, D.H.; Sullivan, J.M.; Grinstead, J.H. Jr.; Hemmen, J.E.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To address a growing national problem with generation of wastes and by-products, TVA has been involved for several years with developing and commercializing environmentally responsible practices for eliminating, minimizing, or utilizing various wastes/by-products. In many cases, reducing waste generation is impractical, but the wastes/by-products can be converted into other environmentally sound products. In some instances, conversion to safe, value-added agricultural products is the best or only practical alternative. TVA is currently involved with a diversity of projects converting wastes/by-products into safe, economical, and agriculturally beneficial products. Environmental improvement projects have involved poultry litter, cellulosic wastes, used battery acid, ammonium sulfate fines, lead smelting effluents, deep-welled sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate solutions, wood ash, waste magnesium ammonium sulfate slurry from recording tape production, and ammunition plant waste sodium nitrate/ammonium nitrate streams.

  19. Application of life cycle analysis: The case of green bullets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogard, J.S.; Yuracko, K.L.; Murray, M.E.; Lowden, R.A.; Vaughn, N.L.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Life-cycle analysis (LCA) has been used to analyze the desirability of replacing lead with a composite of tungsten and tin in projectile slugs used in small arms ammunition at US Department of Energy (DOE) training facilities for security personnel. The analysis includes consideration of costs, performance, environmental and human health impacts, availability of raw materials, and stakeholder acceptance. The DOE expends approximately 10 million rounds of small-arms ammunition each year training security personnel. This deposits over 300,000 pounds of lead and copper annually into DOE firing ranges, contributing to lead migration in the surrounding environment. Human lead intake occurs by inhalation of contaminated indoor firing range air and air containing lead particles that are resuspended during regular maintenance and cleanup, and by skin absorption while cleaning weapons. Projectiles developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using a composite of tungsten and tin perform as well as, or better than, those fabricated using lead. A cost analysis shows that tungsten-tin is less costly to use than lead, since, for the current number of rounds used annually, the higher tungsten-tin purchase price is small compared with higher maintenance costs associated with lead. The tungsten-tin composite presents a much smaller potential for adverse human health and environmental impacts than lead. Only a small fraction of the world`s tungsten production occurs in the United States, however, and market-economy countries account for only around 15% of world tungsten production. Life cycle analysis clearly shows that advantages outweigh risks in replacing lead with tungsten-tin in small-caliber projectiles at DOE training facilities. Concerns about the availability of raw tungsten are mitigated by the ease of converting back to lead (if necessary) and the recyclability of tungsten-tin rounds.

  20. Application of life cycle analysis: The case of green bullets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogard, J.S.; Yuracko, K.L.; Lowden, R.A.; Murray, M.E.; Vaughn, N.L.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Life-cycle analysis (LCA) provides a general framework for assessing and summarizing all of the information important to a decision. LCA has been used to analyze the desirability of replacing lead (Pb) with a composite of tungsten (W) and tin (Sn) in projectile slugs used in small arms ammunition at US Department of Energy (DOE) training facilities for security personnel. The analysis includes consideration of costs, performance, environmental and human health impacts, availability of raw materials, and stakeholder acceptance. The DOE expends approximately 10 million rounds of small-arms ammunition each year training security personnel. This deposits over 300,000 pounds of lead and copper annually into DOE firing ranges, contributing to lead migration in the surrounding environment. Human lead intake occurs by inhalation of contaminated indoor firing range air and air containing lead particles that are resuspended during regular maintenance and cleanup, and by skin absorption while cleaning weapons. Projectiles developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) using a composite of tungsten and tin perform as well as, or better than, those fabricated using lead. A cost analysis shows that tungsten-tin is less costly to use than lead, since, for the current number of rounds used annually, the higher tungsten-tin purchase price is small compared with higher maintenance costs associated with lead. The tungsten-tin composite presents a much smaller potential for adverse human health and environmental impacts than lead. Only a small fraction of the world`s tungsten production occurs in the US, however, and market-economy countries account for only around 15% of world tungsten production. Stakeholders would prefer tungsten-tin on the basis of total cost, performance, reduced environmental impact and lower human toxicity. Lead is preferable on the basis of material availability.

  1. Solar Decathlon 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, C.; Nahan, R.; King, R.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Decathlon 2005 is a U.S. Department of Energy and National Renewable Energy Laboratory competition involving 19 colleges and universities from the United States, Canada, and Spain. These teams will compete to design, build, and demonstrate solar homes. In fall 2005, teams will transport their competition solar houses to Washington, D.C., where they will construct a solar village on the National Mall. When the houses are assembled, the teams will compete against each other in 10 contests (hence, a decathlon) for about a week. The contests range from design to comfort to energy performance. Each team must provide an aesthetically pleasing entry that produces sufficient solar energy for space conditioning, hot water, lighting, appliances, and an electric car. The Solar Decathlon is co-sponsored by BP, The Home Depot, the American Institute of Architects, the National Association of Home Builders, and the DIY Network. For more information, visit the Web site at www.solardecathlon.org.

  2. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES AT THE POWELL STAGE STATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollie K. Gilbert; Julie B. Braun; Brenda R. Pace; Gail Heath; Clark Scott

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the boundaries of the Idaho National Laboratory, an ongoing archaeological investigation of a late 19th century stage station was expanded with the use of Electro-Magnetic and Magnetic geophysical surveying. The station known as the Powell Stage Station was a primary transportation hub on the Snake River Plain, bridging the gap between railroad supply depots in Blackfoot, Idaho and booming mining camps throughout Central Idaho. Initial investigations have shown a strong magnetic signature from a buried road and previously unknown features that were not detected by visual surface surveys. Data gained from this project aids in federally directed cultural resource and land management and use requirements and has contributed additional information for archeological interpretation and cultural resource preservation.

  3. Taming the Wild World of Management, Performance and Communication - 13459

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Laurie [Critical Path Consultants, 3101 Splitrock Road, Columbus Ohio 43221 (United States)] [Critical Path Consultants, 3101 Splitrock Road, Columbus Ohio 43221 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management has evolved a long way from its original meaning of 'governing a horse'. The industrial revolution fostered 'scientific management'; 1930's Hawthorne studies discovered that people's social interactions could alter productivity; and the dawn of the computer age in the post-war 1950's brought general systems theory into management thinking. Today, mobile wireless connectivity aims to transform ever-changing networks of players, mandates, and markets into something that can be 'managed'. So why is there no clear and simple recipe for how to practice management? We talk about financial management, safety management, and operations management, but surely the 'management' part of those endeavors will share the same set of practices. Instead, we are still arguing for 'management' to include everything from developing people to negotiating contracts. A manager's job may include many things, but one of them, the job of management, needs to be nailed down. Three standard practices for managing in a network are developed: (a) support the dialogues that connect people vital to accomplishing a goal or objective; (b) develop and sustain the scoreboards that serve as a road-map to reach the goal; and (c) control the feedback to 'govern the horse'. These three practices are useful for more than reaching goals, as they also support coordinating across boundaries and running productive meetings. The dialogues for productive relationships, scoreboards for goals and deliverables, and feedback for performance together constitute a recipe for managing in a networked world. (authors)

  4. Potential for substitution of geothermal energy at domestic defense installations and White Sands Missile Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakewell, C.A.; Renner, J.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal resources that might provide substitute energy at any of 76 defense installations are identified and evaluated. The geologic characteristics and related economics of potential geothermal resources located at or near the 76 installations were estimated. The geologic assessment identified 18 installations with possible geothermal resources and 4 Atlantic Coastal Plain resource configurations that represented the alternatives available to East Coast bases. These 18 locations and 4 resource configurations, together with 2 possible resources at the White Sands Missile Range and a potential resource at Kings Bay, Georgia, were examined to determine the relative economics of substituting potential geothermal energy for part or all of the existing oil, gas, and electrical energy usage. Four of the military installations - Mountain Home, Norton, Hawthorne, and Sierra - appear to be co-located with possible geothermal resources which, if present, might provide substitute energy at or below current market prices for oil. Six additional locations - Ellsworth, Luke, Williams, Bliss, Fallon, and Twentynine Palms - could become economically attractive under certain conditions. No geothermal resource was found to be economically competitive with natural gas at current controlled prices. Generation of electric power at the locations studied is estimated to be uneconomic at present.

  5. Tools, objects, and chimeras: Connes on the role of hyperreals in mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Kanovei; Mikhail G. Katz; Thomas Mormann

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine some of Connes' criticisms of Robinson's infinitesimals starting in 1995. Connes sought to exploit the Solovay model S as ammunition against non-standard analysis, but the model tends to boomerang, undercutting Connes' own earlier work in functional analysis. Connes described the hyperreals as both a "virtual theory" and a "chimera", yet acknowledged that his argument relies on the transfer principle. We analyze Connes' "dart-throwing" thought experiment, but reach an opposite conclusion. In S, all definable sets of reals are Lebesgue measurable, suggesting that Connes views a theory as being "virtual" if it is not definable in a suitable model of ZFC. If so, Connes' claim that a theory of the hyperreals is "virtual" is refuted by the existence of a definable model of the hyperreal field due to Kanovei and Shelah. Free ultrafilters aren't definable, yet Connes exploited such ultrafilters both in his own earlier work on the classification of factors in the 1970s and 80s, and in his Noncommutative Geometry, raising the question whether the latter may not be vulnerable to Connes' criticism of virtuality. We analyze the philosophical underpinnings of Connes' argument based on Goedel's incompleteness theorem, and detect an apparent circularity in Connes' logic. We document the reliance on non-constructive foundational material, and specifically on the Dixmier trace (featured on the front cover of Connes' magnum opus) and the Hahn-Banach theorem, in Connes' own framework. We also note an inaccuracy in Machover's critique of infinitesimal-based pedagogy.

  6. Supplementary documentation for an Environmental Impact Statement regarding the Pantex Plant: long-term radiological risk assessment for postulated accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenzel, W.J.; Gallegos, A.F.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents work performed in support of preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement regarding the Department of Energy's (DOE) Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. The long-term health effects to people farming the areas studied by Wenzel in 1982 are calculated in this report by predicting plutonium transport in the Texas Panhandle, southeastern Iowa, and south central Washington using the BIOTRAN model. Inhalation and ingestion radiation doses are calculated for each hypothetical accident with releases of 120-, 30-, and 0.625-kg plutonium at the Pantex Plant and the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP). The greatest radiation dose for the Pantex Plant and IAAP accidents is the inhalation dose, which accounts for greater than 90% of the long-term effect. Only a 0.625-kg plutonium release is addressed for the Hanford site. Deposited PuO/sub 2/ at levels greater than 0.4 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/ dose not extend offsite. Therefore, health effects were not calculated for Hanford. The estimated number of health effects (cancer deaths) based on 1990 populations was higher for these accidents at the Pantex Plant than the IAAP; but the cancer mortality risk (chance/100,000) was found to be greater at the IAAP because of the larger population density closer to the IAAP.

  7. Inspection of the objects on the sea floor by using 14 MeV tagged neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valkovic, V. [A.C.T.d.o.o., Prilesje 4, Zagreb (Croatia); Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J. [Dept. of Experimental Physics, Inst. Ruder Boskovic, Zagreb (Croatia); Matika, D. [Inst. for Researches and Development of Defense Systems, Zagreb (Croatia); Kollar, R. [A.C.T.d.o.o., Prilesje 4, Zagreb (Croatia); Nad, K.; Orlic, Z. [Dept. of Experimental Physics, Inst. Ruder Boskovic, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variety of objects found on the sea floor needs to be inspected for the presence of materials which represent the threat to the environment and to the safety of humans. We have demonstrated that the sealed tube 14 MeV neutron generator with the detection of associated alpha particles can be used underwater when mounted inside ROV equipped with the hydraulic legs and variety of sensors for the inspection of such objects for the presence of threat materials. Such a system is performing the measurement by using the NaI gamma detector and an API-120 neutron generator which could be rotated in order to maximize the inspected target volume. The neutron beam intensity during the 10-30 min. measurements is usually 1 x 10{sup 7} n/s in 4{pi}. In this report the experimental results for some of commonly found objects containing TNT explosive or its simulant are presented. The measured gamma spectra are dominant by C, O and Fe peaks enabling the determination of the presence of explosives inside the ammunition shell. Parameters influencing the C/O ratio are discussed in some details. (authors)

  8. Preliminary report of the past and present uses, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreicer, M.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the findings of a records search performed to survey the past and present use, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials and wastes at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site. This report provides a point of departure for further planning of environmental protection activities at the site. This report was conducted using the LLNL archives and library, documents from the US Navy, old LLNL Plant Engineering blueprint files, published articles and reports, Environmental Protection Program records, employee interviews, and available aerial photographs. Sections I and II of this report provide an introduction to the LLNL site and its environmental characteristics. Several tenants have occupied the site prior to the establishment of LLNL, currently operated by the University of California for the US Department of Energy. Section III of this report contains information on environmentally related operations of early site users, the US Navy and California Research and Development. Section IV of this report contains information on the handling of hazardous materials and wastes by LLNL programs. The information is presented in 12 sub-sections, one for each currently operating LLNL program. General site areas, i.e., garbage trenches, the traffic circle landfill, the taxi strip, and old ammunition bunkers are discussed in Section V. 12 refs., 23 figs., 27 tabs.

  9. Study of the treatability of wastewater from a coal-gasification plant. Final report, July 15, 1978-July 14, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iglar, A. F.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focused on the coal gasification facility serving the Holston Army Ammunition Plant in Kingsport, Tennessee. Objectives were to characterize the wastewater produced by the gasification facility, and to evaluate technology for treating the waste in preparation for dischage to the environment. Most wastewater was recycled for scrubbing and cooling the product gas, with the excess requiring disposal found to be an average of only 1170 gallons per day (53 gallons per ton of coal, as received, and 366 gallons per million cubic feet of product gas). Analysis indicated that the waste was warm, high in alkaline material, especially ammonia, high in organic material, especially phenols, and also contaminated with other substances. Sulfides and thiocyanates were especially high in concentration. It was found that pretreatment could be accomplished by stripping (air injection) at high pH, removal of grease and oil (by pH suppression and light aeration) and neutralizatin. Equations were developed to describe the first two steps. Biological treatment through activated sludge was found to be successful, but effected only a moderate degree of treatment, and was troubled with frequent process upset. Attempts to improve treatment efficiency and stability are described. The data indicated the need to study aerated waste stabilization ponds as an alternative to activated sludge. Biological reaction kinetics were studied for activated sludge. Evaluation of the application of granular activated carbon suggested that this could be an effective practical tertiary treatment.

  10. Aster jessicae Jessica's aster Status: State Endangered, USFWS Species of Concern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rank Gss; General Description Robust

    creeping rhizomes that tends to grow in large clumps. Plants grow to be 5 feet tall, but average about 3 feet. The herbage, particularly the upper portion, is covered with a dense, uniform, soft pubescence. Leaves are abundant, broadly lance-shaped and entire. Middle stem leaves generally partially clasp the stem and lower leaves tend to dry up and wither as the season progresses. Flowers are generally numerous, lavender in color, 1-1.5 inches in diameter, and form a broad cluster at the top of the plant. Identification Tips: A. jessicae is distinct in its unusually robust nature, dense pubescence, and cordate leaf bases. The only other aster found in the vicinity of Jessica’s aster is A. occidentalis var. intermedius. This species generally inhabits more mesic microhabitats, has smaller flowers, is less robust, possesses few to no hairs, and lacks cordate leaf bases. Phenology: Flowering occurs in late summer and early fall (from late July through mid September). Fruit and seed maturation occurs in September and early October, with seed dispersal likely in mid to late October. Range: Local endemic; southeastern WA (Whitman Co.) and adjacent ID. Occurs in the Columbia Basin physiographic province. Habitat: The species occurs in Palouse grasslands and prairie/ forest transition zones, often in association with small drainages, but above water level on dry ground, 2500-2800 feet in elevation. It occurs primarily in the following habitat types (Daubenmire 1970): ponderosa pine/snowberry, Idaho fescue/snowberry, black hawthorn/snowberry, Idaho fescue/Nootka rosa, and Douglas fir/ ninebark. Other associated species include bluebunch wheatgrass, balsamroot, and yarrow. ©1955 University of Washington Press. Illustration by John H. Rumely. Known distribution of

  11. Analysis of the Production Cost for Various Grades of Biomass Thermal Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S Cherry; Rick A. Wood; Tyler L Westover

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process flow sheets were developed for the thermal treatment of southern pine wood chips at four temperatures (150, 180, 230, and 270 degrees C) and two different scales (20 and 100 ton/hour). The larger capacity processes had as their primary heat source hot gas assumed to be available in quantity from an adjacent biorefinery. Mass and energy balances for these flow sheets were developed using Aspen Plus process simulation software. The hot gas demands in the larger processes, up to 1.9 million lb/hour, were of questionable feasibility because of the volume to be moved. This heat was of low utility because the torrefaction process, especially at higher temperatures, is a net heat producer if the organic byproduct gases are burned. A thermal treatment flow sheet using wood chips dried in the biorefinery to 10% moisture content (rather than 30% for green chips) with transfer of high temperature steam from the thermal treatment depot to the biorefinery was also examined. The equipment size information from all of these cases was used in several different equipment cost estimating methods to estimate the major equipment costs for each process. From these, factored estimates of other plant costs were determined, leading to estimates (+ / - 30% accuracy) of total plant capital cost. The 20 ton/hour processes were close to 25 million dollars except for the 230 degrees C case using dried wood chips which was only 15 million dollars because of its small furnace. The larger processes ranged from 64-120 million dollars. From these capital costs and projections of several categories of operating costs, the processing cost of thermally treated pine chips was found to be $28-33 per ton depending on the degree of treatment and without any credits for steam generation. If the excess energy output of the two 20 ton/hr depot cases at 270 degrees C can be sold for $10 per million BTU, the net processing cost dropped to $13/ton product starting with green wood chips or only $3 per ton if using dried chips from the biorefinery. Including a 12% return on invested capital raised all of the operating cost results by about $20/ton.

  12. Levels of organochlorine insecticides in human blood from Ahmedabad (rural), India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatnagar, V.K.; Patel, J.S.; Variya, M.R.; Venkaiah, K.; Shah, M.P.; Kashyap, S.K. (National Inst. of Occupational Health, Gujarat (India))

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments of human exposure to persistent organochlorine insecticides (OCI) through biological monitoring offers a profound criteria to evaluate the magnitude of potential health risk, if any, due to use of these chemicals. Residues of these chemicals especially DDT and HCH have been identified and reviewed in man and his environment from different parts of the world however, by comparison very high levels of DDT and its metabolites have been reported in human body fat, blood and milk samples in India. Since there is a definite relationship between the amount of DDT and its residues in blood and those present in human fat depot, blood can be easily be used for assessing the total body burden of persistent OCI in various populations. In view of fragmentary reports on the levels of DDT and HCH in human blood samples from India which categorically pertain to the general population of urban areas like Delhi and Lucknow. The authors attempted to provide a database on residues of DDT and HCH including other cyclodiene compounds, e.g. heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, aldrin, oxygchlordane, HCB and dieldrin in blood samples collected from general population of Ahmedabad (rural) area.

  13. The Never Ending Gale: its Role in Captain Robert F. Scott and his Companions' Deaths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sienicki, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polar historians and enthusiasts are aware that toward the end of March 1912, Captain Robert F. Scott reported in his journal a meteorological event, which was extraordinary as far as its length and strength was concerned. This event was the gale which according to Captain Scott, lasted nine/ten days. Were the laws of physics suspended at the end of March 1912 in the Antarctic? I have shown that the near surface winds in the Antarctic are self-organized critically and that the winds over the continent form an ergodic system. I have presented an analysis of wind events in the proximity of Captain Scott's camp and at Ross Island. By comparing wind events at these locations, and performing an analysis of a gale's wind duration and strength at One Ton Dep\\^ot, I concluded that Captain Scott's wind record was highly inaccurate. I concluded that the nine/ten day gale described by Captain Scott, that lasted from March 21 to 29, did not take place. This result combined with my previous analysis of Captain Scott's tem...

  14. The influence of oscillating electromagnetic fields on membrane structure and function: Synthetic liposome and natural membrane bilayer systems with direct application to the controlled delivery of chemical agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liburdy, R.P.; de Manincor, D.; Fingado, B.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations have been conducted to determine if an imposed electromagnetic field can influence membrane transport, and ion and drug permeability in both synthetic and natural cell membrane systems. Microwave fields enhance accumulation of sodium in the lymphocyte and induce protein shedding at Tc. Microwaves also trigger membrane permeability of liposome systems under specific field exposure conditions. Sensitivity varies in a defined way in bilayers displaying a membrane structural phase transition temperature, Tc; maximal release was observed at or near Tc. Significantly, liposome systems without a membrane phase transition were also found to experience permeability increases but, in contrast, this response was temperature independent. The above results indicate that field-enhanced drug release occurs in liposome vesicles that possess a Tc as well as non-Tc liposomes. Additional studies extend non-Tc liposome responses to the in vivo case in which microwaves trigger Gentamicin release from a liposome depot'' placed subcutaneously in the rat hind leg. In addition, evidence is provided that cell surface sequestered liposomes can be triggered by microwave fields to release drugs directly into target cells. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, February--May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon the laboratory treatment of six wastes with three by-products and the evaluation of the stability of the resulting eighteen materials. Other efforts during the third quarter have been directed toward completion of the collection and analysis of by-products, the identification of a suitable fourth by-product, and the definition of the approach to the solidification tests. The activity on the project during the third quarter of Phase One has fallen into three major areas: acquiring and analyzing by-products; treating hazardous wastes with by-products in the laboratory and analyzing the results; and conducting administrative activities, including public relations and personnel additions. The hazardous wastes that are used include industrial wastewater treatment residue from battery manufacturing plant; contaminated soil from a remediation project conducted at a munitions depot; contaminated soil from a remediation project conducted at an abandoned industrial site; contaminated soil from a remediation project conducted at a former sewage treatment plant; air pollution control dust from basic oxygen furnace steel production; and air pollution control ash from municipal waste incineration.

  16. The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Revision 1, [Annual] report, October 1, 1990--April 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathren, R.L.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the history, organization, activities and recent scientific accomplishments of the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Through voluntary donations of tissue obtained at autopsies, the Registries carry out studies of the concentration, distribution and biokinetics of plutonium in occupationally exposed persons. Findings from tissue analyses from more than 200 autopsies include the following: a greater proportion of the americium intake, as compared with plutonium, was found in the skeleton; the half-time of americium in liver is significantly shorter than that of plutonium; the concentration of actinide in the skeleton is inversely proportional to the calcium and ash content of the bone; only a small percentage of the total skeletal deposition of plutonium is found in the marrow, implying a smaller risk from irradiation of the marrow relative to the bone surfaces; estimates of plutonium body burden made from urinalysis typically exceed those made from autopsy data; pathologists were unable to discriminate between a group of uranium workers and persons without known occupational exposure on the basis of evaluation of microscopic kidney slides; the skeleton is an important long term depot for uranium, and that the fractional uptake by both skeleton and kidney may be greater than indicated by current models. These and other findings and current studies are discussed in depth.

  17. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume II. Literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). This first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 references and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2.

  18. Advanced oxidation treatment of high strength bilge and aqueous petroleum waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulsey, R.A.; Kobylinski, E.A. [Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States); Leach, B. [EEC, Inc., Virginia Beach, VA (United States); Pearce, L. [TRITECH, Greensboro, NC (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Craney Island Fuel Depot is the largest US Navy fuel terminal in the continental US. Services provided at this facility include fuel storage (current capacity is 1.5 million barrels), fuel reclamation (recovery of oil from oily wastewater), and physical/chemical treatment for the removal of residual oil from bilge water and from aqueous petroleum waste. Current wastewater treatment consists of storage/equalization, oil/water separation, dissolved air flotation, sand filtration, and carbon adsorption. The Navy initiated this study to comply with the State requirement that its existing physical/chemical oily wastewater treatment plant be upgraded to remove soluble organics and produce an effluent which would meet acute toxicity limits. The pilot tests conducted during the study included several variations of chemical and biological wastewater treatment processes. While biological treatment alone was capable of meeting the proposed BOD limit of 26 mg/L, the study showed that the effluent of the biological process contained a high concentration of refractory (nonbiodegradable) organics and could not consistently meet the proposed limits for COD and TOC when treating high-strength wastewater. Additional tests were conducted with advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). AOPs were evaluated for use as independent treatment processes as well as polishing processes following biological treatment. The AOP processes used for this study included combinations of ozone (O{sub 3}) ultraviolet radiation (UV), and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}).

  19. ©Wilolud Online Journals, 2008. THE NIGERIAN FUEL ENERGY SUPPLY CRISIS AND THE PROPOSED PRIVATE REFINERIES – PROSPECTS AND PROBLEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agwom Sani Z

    Dynamism of the world economy has compelled Nigerians to accept the liberalization of its economy to encourage private sector participation and induce managerial efficiency. This has become very imperative most especially, in the downstream sub-sector of the Nigerian oil and gas industry by the establishment and management of private refineries in view of the persistent fuel energy crisis. An attempt is made here at analyzing the prospects and problems of such refineries that are expected to end the fuel energy crisis which started in the 1970s due to increased demand for petroleum products for rehabilitation and reconstruction after the civil war but later metamorphosed into a hydraheaded monster in the 1980s to date. Efforts towards arresting this crisis by the government through the establishment of more refineries, storage depots and network of distribution pipelines etc achieved a short-term solution due to the abysmal low performance of the refineries and facilities in contrast to increasing demand for petroleum products. It is deduced that the low performance resulted from bad and corrupt management by indigenous technocrats and political leaders as well as vandalization of facilities. Prospects for such investments were identified, as well as some of the problems to content with. This is in order to understand the pros and cons of such investments in view of their capital intensiveness and the need to achieve economic goals that must incorporate environmental and social objectives.

  20. Overcoming the Range Limitation of Medium-Duty Battery Electric Vehicles through the use of Hydrogen Fuel-Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, E.; Wang, L.; Gonder, J.; Ulsh, M.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Battery electric vehicles possess great potential for decreasing lifecycle costs in medium-duty applications, a market segment currently dominated by internal combustion technology. Characterized by frequent repetition of similar routes and daily return to a central depot, medium-duty vocations are well positioned to leverage the low operating costs of battery electric vehicles. Unfortunately, the range limitation of commercially available battery electric vehicles acts as a barrier to widespread adoption. This paper describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy and industry partners to analyze the use of small hydrogen fuel-cell stacks to extend the range of battery electric vehicles as a means of improving utility, and presumably, increasing market adoption. This analysis employs real-world vocational data and near-term economic assumptions to (1) identify optimal component configurations for minimizing lifecycle costs, (2) benchmark economic performance relative to both battery electric and conventional powertrains, and (3) understand how the optimal design and its competitiveness change with respect to duty cycle and economic climate. It is found that small fuel-cell power units provide extended range at significantly lower capital and lifecycle costs than additional battery capacity alone. And while fuel-cell range-extended vehicles are not deemed economically competitive with conventional vehicles given present-day economic conditions, this paper identifies potential future scenarios where cost equivalency is achieved.

  1. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume I. Technical discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). The first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 referenvces and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2. 18 figures, 4 tables.

  2. Development and validation of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A typical aircraft can experience over 2,000 fatigue cycles (cabin pressurizations) and even greater flight hours in a single year. An unavoidable by-product of aircraft use is that crack, impact, and corrosion flaws develop throughout the aircraft's skin and substructure elements. Economic barriers to the purchase of new aircraft have placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. The use of bonded composite doublers offers the airframe manufacturers and aircraft maintenance facilities a cost effective method to safely extend the lives of their aircraft. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is now possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance Center at Sandia National Labs (AANC), Boeing, and Federal Express completed a pilot program to validate and introduce composite doubler repair technology to the U.S. commercial aircraft industry. This project focused on repair of DC-10 fuselage structure and its primary goal was to demonstrate routine use of this repair technology using niche applications that streamline the design-to-installation process. As composite doubler repairs gradually appear in the commercial aircraft arena, successful flight operation data is being accumulated. These commercial aircraft repairs are not only demonstrating the engineering and economic advantages of composite doubler technology but they are also establishing the ability of commercial maintenance depots to safely adopt this repair technique. This report presents the array of engineering activities that were completed in order to make this technology available for widespread commercial aircraft use. Focused laboratory testing was conducted to compliment the field data and to address specific issues regarding damage tolerance and flaw growth in composite doubler repairs. Fatigue and strength tests were performed on a simulated wing repair using a substandard design and a flawed installation. In addition, the new Sol-Gel surface preparation technique was evaluated. Fatigue coupon tests produced Sol-Gel results that could be compared with a large performance database from conventional, riveted repairs. It was demonstrated that not only can composite doublers perform well in severe off-design conditions (low doubler stiffness and presence of defects in doubler installation) but that the Sol-Gel surface preparation technique is easier and quicker to carry out while still producing optimum bonding properties. Nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods were developed so that the potential for disbond and delamination growth could be monitored and crack growth mitigation could be quantified. The NDI methods were validated using full-scale test articles and the FedEx aircraft installations. It was demonstrated that specialized NDI techniques can detect flaws in composite doubler installations before they reach critical size. Probability of Detection studies were integrated into the FedEx training in order to quantify the ability of aircraft maintenance depots to properly monitor these repairs. In addition, Boeing Structural Repair and Nondestructive Testing Manuals were modified to include composite doubler repair and inspection procedures. This report presents the results from the FedEx Pilot Program that involved installation and surveillance of numerous repairs on operating aircraft. Results from critical NDI evaluations are reported in light of damage tolerance assessments for bonded composite doublers. This work has produced significant interest from airlines and aircraft manufacturers. The successful Pilot Program produced flight performance history to establish the durability of bonded composite patches as a permanent repair on commercial aircraft structures. This report discusses both the laboratory data and Pilot Program results from repair installations on operating aircraft to introduce composite doubler repairs into mainstream commercial aircraft use.

  3. Renewable Energy Opportunities at the Kanto Installations, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solana, Amy E.; Horner, Jacob A.; Russo, Bryan J.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kora, Angela R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Hand, James R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.

    2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource development potential at the U.S. Army installations in the Kanto region in Japan, which includes Camp Zama, Yokohama North Dock, Sagamihara Family Housing Area (SFHA), Sagami General Depot, and Akasaka Press Center. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the Huntsville Army Corps of Engineers, and includes the development of a methodology for renewable resource assessment at Army installations located on foreign soil. The methodology is documented in Renewable Energy Assessment Methodology for Japanese OCONUS Army Installations. The site visit to the Kanto installations took place on April 5 and 6, 2010. At the current time, there are some renewable technologies that show economic potential. Because of siting restrictions and the small size of these installations, development of most renewable energy technologies will likely be limited to Camp Zama. Project feasibility is based on installation-specific resource availability and energy costs and projections based on accepted life-cycle cost methods. Development of any renewable energy project will be challenging, as it will require investigation into existing contractual obligations, new contracts that could be developed, the legality of certain partnerships, and available financing avenues, which involves the U.S. Forces Japan (USFJ), the Government of Japan (GOJ), and a number of other parties on both sides. The Army will not be able to implement a project without involvement and approval from the other services and multiple levels of Japanese government. However, implementation of renewable energy projects could be an attractive method for GOJ to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lower annual utility payments to USFJ. This report recommends projects to pursue and offers approaches to use. The most promising opportunities include waste-to-energy and ground source heat pumps. Solar photovoltaics (PV) may also prove successful. Other resources were found to be insufficient on the Kanto installations.

  4. Assessment of methane-related fuels for automotive fleet vehicles: technical, supply, and economic assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of methane-related fuels, derived from a variety of sources, in highway vehicles is assessed. Methane, as used here, includes natural gas (NG) as well as synthetic natural gas (SNG). Methanol is included because it can be produced from NG or the same resources as SNG, and because it is a liquid fuel at normal ambient conditions. Technological, operational, efficiency, petroleum displacement, supply, safety, and economic issues are analyzed. In principle, both NG and methanol allow more efficient engine operation than gasoline. In practice, engines are at present rarely optimized for NG and methanol. On the basis of energy expended from resource extraction to end use, only optimized LNG vehicles are more efficient than their gasoline counterparts. By 1985, up to 16% of total petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel could be displaced by large fleets with central NG fueling depots. Excluding diesel vehicles, which need technology advances to use NG, savings of 8% are projected. Methanol use by large fleets could displace up to 8% of petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel from spark-ignition vehicles and another 9% from diesel vehicles with technology advances. The US NG supply appears adequate to accommodate fleet use. Supply projections, future price differential versus gasoline, and user economics are uncertain. In many cases, attractive paybacks can occur. Compressed NG now costs on average about $0.65 less than gasoline, per energy-equivalent gallon. Methanol supply projections, future prices, and user economics are even more uncertain. Current and projected near-term methanol supplies are far from adequate to support fleet use. Methanol presently costs more than gasoline on an equal-energy basis, but is projected to cost less if produced from coal instead of NG or petroleum.

  5. COMPARISON OF CLEAN DIESEL BUSES TO CNG BUSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowell, D.; Parsley, W.; Bush,C; Zupo, D.

    2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Using previously published data on regulated and unregulated emissions, this paper will compare the environmental performance of current generation transit buses operated on compressed natural gas (CNG) to current generation transit buses operated on ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) and incorporating diesel particulate filters (DPF). Unregulated emissions evaluated include toxic compounds associated with adverse health effects (carbonyl, PAH, NPAH, benzene) as well as PM particle count and size distribution. For all regulated and unregulated emissions, both technologies are shown to be comparable. DPF equipped diesel buses and CNG buses have virtually identical levels of PM mass emissions and particle number emissions. DPF-equipped diesel buses have lower HC and CO emissions and lower emissions of toxic substances such as benzene, carbonyls and PAHs than CNG buses. CNG buses have lower NOx emissions than DPF-equipped buses, though CNG bus NOx emissions are shown to be much more variable. In addition, this paper will compare the capital and operating costs of CNG and DPF-equipped buses. The cost comparison is primarily based on the experience of MTA New York City Transit in operating CNG buses since 1995 and DPF-equipped buses fueled with ULSD since 2001. Published data on the experience of other large transit agencies in operating CNG buses is used to validate the NYCT experience. The incremental cost (compared to ''baseline'' diesel) of operating a typical 200-bus depot is shown to be six times higher for CNG buses than for ''clean diesel'' buses. The contributors to this increased cost for CNG buses are almost equally split between increased capital costs for purchase of buses and installation of fueling infrastructure, and increased operating costs for purchase of fuel, bus maintenance, and fuel station maintenance.

  6. A Review of the Reflector Compact Fluorescent Lights Technology Procurement Program: Conclusions and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandahl, Linda J.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and implemented by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), from 2000 to 2007 to improve the performance of reflector type (R-lamp) compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and increase their availability throughout the United States by means of a technology development and procurement strategy. In 2000, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Emerging Technologies Program and its predecessors, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory undertook a technology procurement seeking R-CFLs that were specifically designed for use in ICAT recessed can fixtures and that met other minimum performance criteria including minimum light output and size restrictions (to ensure they fit in standard residential recessed cans). The technology procurement included two phases. In Phase I, requests for proposals (RFPs) were issued in October 2002 and five manufacturers responded with 12 lamp models. Eight of these models met the minimum requirements and passed the 6-hour short-term test in a simulated ICAT environment. These eight models were subjected to long-term tests of 6,000 or more hours in a simulated ICAT environment. Three of these models passed the short- and long-term tests and were promoted through the program website (www.pnl.gov/rlamps), press releases, and fliers. To increase the number of qualifying models, a second RFP was issued in June 2005. In April 2007, DOE announced that 16 reflector CFL (R-CFL) models by four manufacturers had met all the minimum requirements of Phase 2 of the R-CFL Technology Innovation Competition. PNNL developed both the criteria and the test apparatus design for Elevated Temperature Life Testing (ETLT), which has been included by DOE in its draft ENERGY STAR specifications for the reflector category of CFLs. PNNL promoted the winning lamps through a program website, press releases, and fliers as well as through program partners. PNNL also helped engage distributors including Costco, the Home Depot, Bonneville Power Administration, and utility organizations.

  7. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris), Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with ROTC 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris), Nevada Test Site, Nevada, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The general purpose of the investigation is to ensure adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select viable corrective actions. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details for CAU 511, whereas programmatic aspects of this project are discussed in the ''Project Management Plan'' (DOE/NV, 1994). General field and laboratory quality assurance and quality control issues are presented in the ''Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan'' (NNSA/NV, 2002). Health and safety aspects of the project are documented in the current version of the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor's Health and Safety Plan and will be supplemented with a site-specific safety basis document. Corrective Action Unit 511 is comprised of the following nine corrective action sites in Nevada Test Site Areas 3, 4, 6, 7, 18, and 19: (1) 03-08-02, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (2) 03-99-11, Waste Dump (Piles); (3) 03-99-12, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (4) 04-99-04, Contaminated Trench/Berm; (5) 06-16-01, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (6) 06-17-02, Scattered Ordnance/Automatic Weapons Range; (7) 07-08-01, Contaminated Mound; (8) 18-99-10, Ammunition Dump; and (9) 19-19-03, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris). Corrective Action Sites 18-99-10 and 19-19-03 were identified after a review of the ''1992 RCRA Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Volume IV, Section L Potential Solid Waste Management Unit'' (DOE/NV, 1992). The remaining seven sites were first identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. document entitled, ''Nevada Test Site Inventory of Inactive and Abandoned Facilities and Waste Sites''. The seven-step data quality objectives (DQO) process was used to identify and define the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the corrective action process. The DQOs address the primary problem that sufficient information is not available to determine the appropriate corrective action for the CASs. Corrective action closure alternatives (i.e., no further action, close in place, or clean closure) will be recommended for CAU 511 based on an evaluation of all the DQO required data. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', the Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

  8. Audit Report on "Management Controls over the Department's Excess Weapons Inventories and Selected Sensitive Equipment used by Protective Forces"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since September 11, 2001, the Department of Energy has, on several occasions, revised its security posture based on identified threats and adversaries. These revisions in security posture have driven Departmental sites to upgrade their defensive and tactical equipment. Subsequent changes in the perceived threats have, in some cases, led to a reduction in the need for certain types of weapons, thus creating a pool of surplus equipment. These surplus weapons could potentially be used by other Department sites and Federal law enforcement agencies. Recent Office of Inspector General reports have raised concerns with the adequacy of controls related to defensive and tactical equipment. For example, our report on Management Controls Over Defense Related High Risk Property (OAS-M-08-06, April 2008) found that administrative controls over certain defense related high risk property were not sufficient for providing accountability over these items. Because of prior reported weaknesses in controls over defensive and tactical equipment, we initiated this audit to determine whether the Department and its contractors were properly managing excess weapons inventories and selected sensitive equipment used by protective forces. Our review disclosed that the Department was not always properly managing its inventories of excess weapons and selected sensitive equipment. We identified issues with the retention of unneeded weapons at many locations and with the identification and tracking of sensitive items. More specifically: Sites maintained large inventories of weapons that were no longer needed but had not been made available for use by either other Departmental sites or other Federal law enforcement agencies. For instance, at six of the locations included in our review we identified a total of 2,635 unneeded weapons with a total acquisition value of over $2.8 million that had not been officially declared as excess - an action that would have made them available for others to use. In addition; Sites were not always identifying, tracking and properly disposing of potentially high risk and sensitive equipment. In particular, we identified control weaknesses in this area related to weapons sights and scopes. These issues occurred because the Department did not have processes in place to properly manage excess inventories of weapons. In particular, the Department does not have requirements for ensuring timely declaration of excess weapons. Additionally, certain sites indicated that they were unwilling to give up excess weapons because of the possibility that they may be needed in the future. However, other sites had a need for some of these weapons and could have avoided purchasing them had they been made available through the excess screening process. Also, we found that the Department lacks clear guidance on the identification of high risk/sensitive equipment. Except for immaterial differences, we were able to locate and verify accountability over the items of defensive and tactical equipment we selected for review. Specifically, we took statistical samples of weapons, ammunition, and other related equipment and were able to verify their existence. While these accountability measures were noteworthy, additional action is necessary to strengthen controls over weapon and sensitive equipment management. Untimely declaration of excess weapons may result in an inefficient use of scarce Government resources. Similarly, if selected high risk/sensitive equipment is not properly categorized and tracked, accountability issues may occur. To address these issues, we made recommendations aimed at improving the management of these categories of defensive and tactical equipment.

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles and Debris) Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Laura

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 511, Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris). The CAU is comprised of nine corrective action sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 4, 6, 7, 18, and 19 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 511 is comprised of nine CASs: (1) 03-08-02, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (2) 03-99-11, Waste Dump (Piles); (3) 03-99-12, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (4) 04-99-04, Contaminated Trench/Berm; (5) 06-16-01, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (6) 06-17-02, Scattered Ordnance/Automatic Weapons Range; (7) 07-08-01, Contaminated Mound; (8) 18-99-10, Ammunition Dump; and (9) 19-19-03, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris). The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 511 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) and closure activities were performed from January 2005 through August 2005, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris)'' (NNSA/NSO, 2004) and Record of Technical Change No. 1. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 511 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the data quality objective data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify the COCs for each CAS. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 511 revealed the following: (1) Two CASs contained COCs. The extent of the contamination was determined at each site, and the contaminant was removed during the CAI. (2) Debris located at the CASs was removed during the CAI as a best management practice. (3) Materials presenting a potentially explosive hazard at two of the CASs were disposed of appropriately by explosive ordnance disposal/unexploded ordnance personnel. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the nine CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective action for CAU 511. (2) No Corrective Action Plan. (3) A Notice of Completion to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 511. (4) Corrective Action Unit 511 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''.

  10. Biomass Feedstock and Conversion Supply System Design and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Mohammad S. Roni; Patrick Lamers; Kara G. Cafferty

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) supports the U.S. Department of Energy’s bioenergy research program. As part of the research program INL investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. A series of reports were published between 2000 and 2013 to demonstrate the feedstock logistics cost. Those reports were tailored to specific feedstock and conversion process. Although those reports are different in terms of conversion, some of the process in the feedstock logistic are same for each conversion process. As a result, each report has similar information. A single report can be designed that could bring all commonality occurred in the feedstock logistics process while discussing the feedstock logistics cost for different conversion process. Therefore, this report is designed in such a way that it can capture different feedstock logistics cost while eliminating the need of writing a conversion specific design report. Previous work established the current costs based on conventional equipment and processes. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a delivered biomass logistics cost of $55/dry ton for woody biomass delivered to fast pyrolysis conversion facility. The goal was achieved by applying field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model. The goal of the 2017 Design Case is to enable expansion of biofuels production beyond highly productive resource areas by breaking the reliance of cost-competitive biofuel production on a single, low-cost feedstock. The 2017 programmatic target is to supply feedstock to the conversion facility that meets the in-feed conversion process quality specifications at a total logistics cost of $80/dry T. The $80/dry T. target encompasses total delivered feedstock cost, including both grower payment and logistics costs, while meeting all conversion in-feed quality targets. The 2012 $55/dry T. programmatic target included only logistics costs with a limited focus on biomass quantity, quality and did not include a grower payment. The 2017 Design Case explores two approaches to addressing the logistics challenge: one is an agronomic solution based on blending and integrated landscape management and the second is a logistics solution based on distributed biomass preprocessing depots. The concept behind blended feedstocks and integrated landscape management is to gain access to more regional feedstock at lower access fees (i.e., grower payment) and to reduce preprocessing costs by blending high quality feedstocks with marginal quality feedstocks. Blending has been used in the grain industry for a long time; however, the concept of blended feedstocks in the biofuel industry is a relatively new concept. The blended feedstock strategy relies on the availability of multiple feedstock sources that are blended using a least-cost formulation within an economical supply radius, which, in turn, decreases the grower payment by reducing the amount of any single biomass. This report will introduce the concepts of blending and integrated landscape management and justify their importance in meeting the 2017 programmatic goals.

  11. Bio-Oil Separation and Stabilization by Supercritical Fluid Fractionation – 2014 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster Agblevor; Lucia Petkovic; Edward Bennion; Jason Quinn; John Moses; Deborah Newby; Daniel Ginosar

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to use supercritical fluids to separate and fractionate algal-based bio-oils into stable products that can be subsequently upgraded to produce drop-in renewable fuels. To accomplish this objective, algae was grown and thermochemically converted to bio-oils using hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), pyrolysis, and catalytic pyrolysis. The bio-oils were separated into an extract and a raffinate using near-critical propane or carbon dioxide. The fractions were then subjected to thermal aging studies to determine if the extraction process had stabilized the products. It was found that the propane extract fraction was twice as stable as the parent catalytic pyrolysis bio-oils as measured by the change in viscosity after two weeks of accelerated aging at 80°C. Further, in-situ NMR aging studies found that the propane extract was chemically more stable than the parent bio-oil. Thus the milestone of stabilizing the product was met. A preliminary design of the extraction plant was prepared. The design was based on a depot scale plant processing 20,000,000 gallons per year of bio-oil. It was estimated that the capital costs for such a plant would be $8,700,000 with an operating cost of $3,500,000 per year. On a per gallon of product cost and a 10% annual rate of return, capital costs would represent $0.06 per gallon and operating costs would amount to $0.20 per gallon. Further, it was found that the energy required to run the process represented 6.2% of the energy available in the bio-oil, meeting the milestone of less than 20%. Life cycle analysis and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission analysis found that the energy for running the critical fluid separation process and the GHG emissions were minor compared to all the inputs to the overall well to pump system. For the well to pump system boundary, energetics in biofuel conversion are typically dominated by energy demands in the growth, dewater, and thermochemical process. Bio-oil stabilization by near critical propane extraction had minimal impact in the overall energetics of the process with NER contributions of 0.03. Based on the LCA, the overall conversion pathways were found to be energy intensive with a NER of about 2.3 and 1.2 for catalytic pyrolysis and HTL, respectively. GHG emissions for the catalytic pyrolysis process were greater than that of petroleum diesel at 210 g CO2 eq compared to 18.9 g CO2 eq. Microalgae bio-oil based diesel with thermochemical conversion through HTL meets renewable fuel standards with favorable emission reductions of -10.8 g CO2 eq. The importance of the outcomes is that the critical fluid extraction and stabilization process improved product stability and did so with minimal energy inputs and processing costs. The LCA and GHG emission calculations point toward the HTL pathway as the more favorable thermochemical route towards upgrading algae to bio-fuels. Since the quality of the HTL oil was significantly lower than that of the catalytic pyrolysis bio-oil, the next steps point toward improving the quality of the HTL oils from algae biomass and focusing the critical fluid stabilization on that bio-oil product.