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Sample records for american ceramic society

  1. Published by Blackwell Publishing for the American Ceramic Society www.ceramics.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    Published by Blackwell Publishing for the American Ceramic Society The American Ceramic Society www.ceramics.org Ceramic Product Development and Commercialization InternationalJournalofAppliedCeramicTechnologyIJACCP-Volume3·Issue3·pp.177­2582006 Topical Focus: Advanced Ceramics for Sensor Applications #12;Novel

  2. www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 91, No. 334 thermoelectric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 91, No. 334 Modeling thermoelectric. Thermoelectric devices have the advantage of containing no moving parts, making them quiet, durable and reliable that thermoelectric devic- es can compete with traditional refrigeration and power generation technologies.1

  3. www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 92, No. 118 By Paul G. Evans and Rebecca J. Sichel-Tissot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.

    www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 92, No. 118 By Paul G. Evans and Rebecca of piezoelectric ceramic thin films There has been rapid development in the precision with which ferroelectric mate,2 Ferroelectric thin-film materi- als belong to the broad category of electronic ceramics, and they find

  4. AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY e m e r g i n g c e r a m i c s & g l a s s t e c h n o l o g y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    bulletin AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY e m e r g i n g c e r a m i c s & g l a s s t e c h n o l o g y for papers · Preeminent Professionals ACerS Awards 2010 #12;1American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 89, No. 6 1American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 89, No. 6 contentsA u g u s t 2 0 1 0 · V o l . 8 9 N o

  5. AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY e m e r g i n g c e r a m i c s & g l a s s t e c h n o l o g y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    bulletin AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY e m e r g i n g c e r a m i c s & g l a s s t e c h n o l o g y MARCh 2009 New ACerS knowledge initiatives · NSF's ceramic CAREER awardees · Daytona Beach report policies and stimulus package, plus new materials recommendations for the DOE #12;1American Ceramic Society

  6. 12 American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 85, No. 7 Nanotube `Sandwiches' Could

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    to make larger materials, they say. (Contact: Pulickel Ajayan, E- mail ajayan@rpi.edu) Electrospinning composition was achieved by electrospinning polymer-ceramic (polycer) composite fibers from a 1:1 mixture to initiate the electrospinning. The transformation of polycer to ceramic was followed by a series of heat

  7. AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY e m e r g i n g c e r a m i c s & g l a s s t e c h n o l o g y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    bulletin AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY e m e r g i n g c e r a m i c s & g l a s s t e c h n o l o g y-meeting planner and new symposium · Ceramic education:Educators, students and employers discuss changes forced by jobs, enrollment and research Ceramic education:Educators, students and employers discuss changes

  8. American Nuclear Society Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Society Awards Established in 1999 by the Fusion Energy Division of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) and named after LLNL's co-founder, the Edward Teller Medal recognizes...

  9. Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lienert Named American Welding Society Fellow Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow Lienert was inducted into the American Welding Society's 2012 Class of Fellows during...

  10. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blink, J.; Farmer, J.; Choi, J.; Saw, C.

    2009-01-01

    16– 20, 2007, American Ceramic Society (ACerS), AssociationDetroit, MI, American Ceramic Society (ACerS), Associa- tionDetroit, MI, American Ceramic Society (ACerS), Association

  11. Characterization of Light Scattering in Transparent Polycrystalline Laser Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Saurabh

    2013-01-01

    A. Ikesue, J. American Ceramic Society 78 (1995) K. Ueda,and Photonics Japan, Ceramic Laser International Workshop (International Seminar on Ceramics (2007) M. Fujita, Advanced

  12. Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow November 29, 2012 Thomas J. Lienert of the Lab's Metallurgy group was inducted into the American Welding Society's 2012 Class of...

  13. Preparation and characterization of calcium phosphate ceramics and Composites as bone substitutes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xing

    2007-01-01

    Tricalcium Phosphate Ceramics. Poster in SFB conference,Westerville, OH: The American Ceramic Society. 351. MartinRusin and G.S. Fishman. Ceramic Transactions Vol.48. 1995:

  14. American Physical Society Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    professional societies for gauging the quality of R&D done at the Laboratory. The APS sponsors a number of awards including the John Dawson Award of Excellence in Plasma...

  15. American Chemical Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropane TexasAmbipolarXunamed as American

  16. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Exploration of Ceramic Dielectrics for Microscale Dielectric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 Exploration of Ceramic Dielectrics silicon dioxide for the dielectric barrier with thicknesses of 5 and 10 µm. Using a ceramic dielectric

  17. AmericanSociety of Civil Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AmericanSociety of Civil Engineers Civil Engineering Body of Knowledge for the 21st Century Preparing the Civil Engineer for the Future Second Edition Prepared by the Body of Knowledge Committee Engineers--Registered in U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. American Society of Civil Engineers 1801

  18. TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    of New York PSC-CUNY Research Award Program. The second author was partially supported by NSF Grant # DMS-9971833. c 2003 American Mathematical Society 1233 License or copyright restrictions may apply

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyu-Hwan J.

    PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY Volume 142, Number 7, July 2014, Pages 2291­2301.99.16.10. License or copyright restrictions may apply to redistribution; see http://www.ams

  20. Partial-Transient-Liquid-Phase Bonding of Advanced Ceramics Using Surface-Modified Interlayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Thomas Bither

    2012-01-01

    M. & Kingery, W. "Metal?Ceramic Interactions: III, SurfaceTension and Wettability of Metal?Ceramic Systems."Journal of the American Ceramic Society 37, 18–23 (1954).

  1. T N YORK, NEW YORKI AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HEATING, REFRIGERATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    lDC) r; T N YORK, NEW YORKI OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HEATING, REFRIGERATING /*s\\ TECHNICAL ANDITI

  2. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Journal of the European Ceramic Society 28 (2008) 15271534

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2008-01-01

    Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Journal of the European Ceramic Society 28 (2008) 1527J/mol) in pure YAG is lower than that of grain growth (946 kJ/mol) which is unusual in ceramic systems ceramics for armor, optical, and laser applications. Coble of General Electric (GE) reported "transparent

  3. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Journal of the European Ceramic Society 28 (2008) 24592462

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Jennifer M.

    2008-01-01

    Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Journal of the European Ceramic Society 28 (2008) 2459 29 April 2008 Abstract The mechanical properties of steatite ceramics after high of enstatite in quenched materials or at high temperature during the fabrication of the steatite-type ceramics

  4. Journal of the European Ceramic Society 26 (2006) 28612865 Correlation between infrared, THz and microwave dielectric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KuÂ?el, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Journal of the European Ceramic Society 26 (2006) 2861­2865 Correlation between infrared, THz and infrared (IR) reflectivity spectra of orthorhombic microwave (MW) ceramics Bi(Nb1-xVx)O4 (0.002 ) frequency region in the last decade. This tech- nique uses ceramic dielectric resonators and filters

  5. SLIDING MECHANISMS FOR GRAIN BOUNDARIES CONTAINING PRE-EXISTING CAVITIES IN Al2O3-SiO2 CERAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rana, Amar Pal Singh

    2013-01-01

    ~ ties of Engineering Ceramics, ed. , W. W. Kriegel andRegional Meeting of American Ceramic Society, Oct. 26-29,OBOUNDARIES CONTAINING 2 3-S CERAMICS Ran a r TWO-WffK LOAN

  6. METEOROLOGICAL Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science Foundation.36 37 #12;2 Capsule Summary1 The Community Earth System Model provides the research for earth system15 studies, making it a true community tool. Here we describe this earth system model, its16 at the above DOI once it is available. © 2013 American Meteorological Society #12;1 The Community Earth System

  7. Challenges in Ceramic Science: A Report from the Workshop on Emerging Research Areas in Ceramic Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    Challenges in Ceramic Science: A Report from the Workshop on Emerging Research Areas in Ceramic-mail: gr20@andrew.cmu.edu J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 95 [12] 3699­3712 (2012) DOI: 10.1111/jace.12033 © 2012 The American Ceramic Society Journal Feature #12;u Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace

  8. Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright 2001, American Society for Engineering Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roylance, David

    Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright 2001, American Society for Engineering Education Session 1464 Innovations in Teaching Mechanics," with structural engineering students wondering why they had to take it. #12;Proceedings of the 2001 American

  9. FCTO Announces Plenary Talk at American Society of Mechanical...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technologies Office at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Energy Sustainability and Fuel Cell Technology Conference in Boston, Massachusetts, between June 30 and...

  10. Sandia Energy - Sandians Published in American Chemical Society...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Published in American Chemical Society's Environmental Science & Technology Home Climate Energy Water Security News Global Climate & Energy News & Events Systems Analysis Analysis...

  11. Copyright 2014 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    © Copyright 2014 - Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison

  12. American Nuclear Society exchanges of information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du Temple, O.J.

    2000-07-01

    Many are familiar with the technical journals and other publications that American Nuclear Society (ANS) members receive. However, there is a whole series of documents that is helpful to any nuclear society group for a modest fee or no fee. The author is referring to documents such as the ANS Bylaws and Rules, which have been made available to almost every existing nuclear society in the world. He remembers working with groups from Russia, Europe, China, Japan, Brazil, France, Germany, and others when they sought the experience of ANS in establishing a society. Financial planning guides are available for meetings, international conferences, technical expositions, and teacher workshops. Periodically, the ANS publishes position papers on the uses and handling of fuel materials and other publications helpful to public relations and teacher training courses. A few have had distributions in the hundreds of thousands, and one went as high as 750,000. Some of these have been translated in part into Spanish, French, Portuguese, and Japanese. Nuclear Standards are developed by a series of ANS committees consisting of about 1000 experts--the largest technical operation of ANS. Buyers guides and directories are very helpful in promoting the commerce in the nuclear industry. The Utility Directory covers utilities all over the globe. Radwaste Solutions, the new name for the former Radwaste Magazine, covers the efforts made by all sectors--private, government, and utility--to deal with radioactive waste. In the author's opinion, the one area in which all societies are weak is in interfacing with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Since his retirement 9 yr ago, he has become much more aware of the IAEA as a news and technical information source. The ANS is trying to be more aware of what the IAEA is doing for everyone.

  13. Ceramics from the American steamboat Phoenix (1815-1819), and their role in understanding shipboard life 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddan, Lester James

    1995-01-01

    Ceramics recovered from the steamboat Phoenix are used to examine life aboard an early American passenger steam-driven vessel. The primary goal of the research is to establish what general type of surroundings passengers ...

  14. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Montana Kwa-Taq-Nuk Casino Resort 49708 US-93 Polson, MT 59860 The Native American Fish and Wildlife Society is hosting a two-day conference featuring tribal roundtables on...

  15. Special Supplement to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Special Supplement to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Vol. 95, No. 9, September, Martin P. Hoerling,Thomas C. Peterson, and Peter A. Stott Special Supplement to the Bulletin

  16. Computational Modeling for the American Chemical Society | GE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Modeling for the American Chemical Society Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new...

  17. American Society and Culture Since 1877 History 314

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    1 American Society and Culture Since 1877 History 314 Consider Resources Primary Resources: diaries (scholarly vs. popular), theses, the Web Check subject guide under: Research by Subject History by Region collection unless stated. Album of American History E178 .A2 A (5 volumes; Stauffer ­ Books) Columbia

  18. A Report by the American Society of Civil Engineers Hurricane Katrina External Review Panel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, J. Barry

    A Report by the American Society of Civil Engineers Hurricane Katrina External Review Panel wrong and why : a report / by the American Society of Civil Engineers Hurricane Katrina External Review, Stormproof. 3. Hurricane protection. I. American Society of Civil Engineers. Hurricane Katrina External

  19. AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY PATIENT HEALTH SERIES Lung Cancer Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY PATIENT HEALTH SERIES Lung Cancer Prevention What are the chances that I will develop lung cancer? The #1 cause of lung cancer is exposure to tobacco smoke. Your chances increase others (second-hand smoke), the greater your chances of developing lung cancer. People who have never

  20. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 135:6175, 2006 [Article]Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ]Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006 DOI: 10.1577/T04-215.1 Evaluation of a Lake Whitefish Bioenergetics Model Arbor, Michigan 48105, USA Abstract.--We evaluated the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake whitefish on a comparison of bioenergetics model predictions of lake whitefish food consumption and growth with observed

  1. Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright 2001, American Society for Engineering Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    engineering undergraduates with the knowledge and skills required in the workplace. Thus, while engineering programs must continue to cover as much content knowledge as possible, engineering programs must also takeProceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition

  2. Proceedings of the 2008 American Society of Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition. Copyright 2008 by the American Society of Engineering Education.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Home to Aerospace Education Through Concept Development Abstract Despite the harsh realitiesProceedings of the 2008 American Society of Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition. Copyright ©2008 by the American Society of Engineering Education. Dreams to Reality: Bringing "Far out" Back

  3. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2015 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting will be held in New Orleans, Louisiana on July 26–29, 2015, and will examine industry trends and innovations, with a focus on the focus on the economic, political and social factors influencing the industry. Bioenergy Technologies Office Director Jonathan Male, Program Manager Alison Goss Eng, and Technology Managers Sam Tagore, Mark Elless, and Steve Thomas will be in attendance.

  4. American Solar Energy Society | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name:AmbataSkiesPowerNetAmerican Solar

  5. Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N13, 2009Lienert named American

  6. Subscriber access provided by RICE UNIV Journal of the American Chemical Society is published by the American Chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Philip R.

    Subscriber access provided by RICE UNIV Journal of the American Chemical Society is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Threshold Effects in Electron` Rice Quantum Institute, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251 Received September 30, 1994@ Abstract

  7. Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998) 131.e., this is energy that does not have to #12;Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference PHOTOVOLTAICS AS AN ENERGY SERVICES TECHNOLOGY: A CASE STUDY OF PV SITED AT THE UNION OF CONCERNED SCIENTISTS

  8. Society for American Archaeology Raw-Material Availability and the Organization of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    Society for American Archaeology Raw-Material Availability and the Organization of Technology to American Antiquity. http://www.jstor.org #12;RAW-MATERIAL AVAILABILITY AND THE ORGANIZATION OF TECHNOLOGY such as abundance and quality oflithic raw materials condition the production offormal- vs. informal-tool types

  9. DECEMBER 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | 1733 AFFILIATIONS: HACKER, BERNER, AND MORSS--National Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Youmin

    DECEMBER 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | 1733 AFFILIATIONS: HACKER, BERNER, AND MORSS, Colorado CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Joshua Hacker, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 E-mail: hacker@ucar.edu DOI:10.1175/BAMS-86-12-1733 ©2005 American Meteorological

  10. Careers in Biochemistry and Genetics Adapted from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) Career

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Careers in Biochemistry and Genetics Adapted from the American Society for Biochemistry. Knowledge emerging from research in genetics and biochemistry will probably have a greater impact on our

  11. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Journal of the European Ceramic Society 28 (2008) 14431449

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aste, Tomaso

    2008-01-01

    - ulation Casting)5,6 was developed to process electrostatically stabilized suspensions to ceramic green, destabilization of the colloidal suspension by either changing the pH of the solution ( pH-method) resulting properties of wet ceramic green bodies and densely packed coagulated colloidal particle gels strongly depend

  12. Subscriber access provided by UNIV OF NEW HAMPSHIRE Journal of the American Chemical Society is published by the American Chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokmeci, Mehmet

    Subscriber access provided by UNIV OF NEW HAMPSHIRE Journal of the American Chemical SocietyGruer, and Glen P. Miller*, Department of Chemistry and Materials Science Program, UniVersity of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3598, and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern Uni

  13. Bulletin of the American Physical Society 53rd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    Bulletin of the American Physical Society 53rd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics © 2011 American Physical Society APS -53rd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Phys... http://meeting.aps their overall structures with modulations having frequency of the order of electron cyclotron frequency. APS -53

  14. Bulletin of the American Physical Society 53rd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    Bulletin of the American Physical Society 53rd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics Meetings | Join APS | Help | Contact APS Meetings © 2011 American Physical Society APS -53rd Annual Meeting to induce magnetic flux-tube sloshing. Results APS -53rd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Phys

  15. American Chemical Society podcast: Cotton is an eco-friendly way to clean up oil spills -American Chemical Society http://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/newsreleases/2013/july/acs-podcast-cotton-is-an-eco-friendly-way-to-clean-up-oil-spills.html[10/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    American Chemical Society podcast: Cotton is an eco-friendly way to clean up oil spills - American-an-eco-friendly-way-to-clean-up-oil-spills.html[10/30/2014 2:32:13 PM] American Chemical Society to clean up oil spills FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE | Tue Jul 30 13:07:48 EDT 2013 American Chemical Society

  16. Proceedings of the 10th International Conference of the European Ceramic Society, Berlin, 17 au 21 juin 2007, ISBN=3-87264-022-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ceramic Society, Berlin, 17 au 21 juin 2007" Abstract The concept of the fuel for the IVth generation reactors should consist of fuel pellets surrounded with a matrix that must contain fission products. Thanks to their interesting thermo-mechanical properties, carbides are sensed to become this matrix. Among the studied

  17. AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY CONSENSUS STATEMENT Vitamin D for Prevention of Falls and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY CONSENSUS STATEMENT Vitamin D for Prevention of Falls and their Consequences in Older Adults Developed by the Workgroup of the Consensus Conference on Vitamin D for the Prevention of Falls and their Consequences #12;CONSENSUS STATEMENT:Vitamin D for Prevention of Falls

  18. J. Parasitol., 87(4), 2001, p. 862869 American Society of Parasitologists 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Kevin P.

    862 J. Parasitol., 87(4), 2001, p. 862­869 American Society of Parasitologists 2001 MOLECULAR; Johnson and Clayton, 2001). Al- though these and other studies have produced phylogenetic trees for 1.) and Columbiformes (pigeons and doves). Based on 138 morpholog- ical characters, Smith (2001) provided evidence

  19. 8 THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR CELL BIOLOGY PRESS BOOK 2004 arkinson's disease (PD) was named

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jian

    as a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Parkinson's is caused by the selective death of neurons that produce-radical-damaged tubulin. In this fight, mutated parkin apparently arrives unarmed. Parkinson's Disease: Shootout8 THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR CELL BIOLOGY PRESS BOOK 2004 P arkinson's disease (PD) was named

  20. References R-3 ANS 1986. Glossary of Terms in Nuclear Science and Technology, American Nuclear Society.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of Environment and Conservation, Department of Energy, Oversight Division Status Report to the Public, NashvilleReferences #12;References R-3 REFERENCES ANS 1986. Glossary of Terms in Nuclear Science and Technology, American Nuclear Society. ANSI 1969. N13.1, Sampling Airborne Radioactive Materials in Nuclear

  1. 1471OCTOBER 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | T WORKSHOP ON VERTICAL PROFILES OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of changes in the energy of the system. This requires a holistic VERTICAL PROFILES OF TEMPERATURE TRENDS Kingdom; KARL--National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina; MURRAY--NOAA Office for Global1471OCTOBER 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | T WORKSHOP ON VERTICAL PROFILES OF TEMPERATURE

  2. 2415Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society FLUXNET: A New Tool to Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    that measure the exchanges of car- bon dioxide, water vapor, and energy between the biosphere and atmosphere2415Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society FLUXNET: A New Tool to Study the Temporal and Spatial Variability of Ecosystem-Scale Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Flux Densities Dennis

  3. The North American Operations Research Societies Each of the operations research societies that exist in North America has similar goals. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Karla

    The North American Operations Research Societies Each of the operations research societies of knowledge, interest and education in operations research by providing mechanisms for the exchange as the International Federation of Operations Research (IFORS) (see http://www.ifors.org). IFORS is divided

  4. Subscriber access provided by CORNELL UNIV Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    to electrical energy in solar cells that are based on organic or ceramic materials depends sensitively of Materials Science & Engineering, Cornell UniVersity, Ithaca, New York 14853, Department of Materials Science Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Letter A Bicontinuous Double Gyroid Hybrid Solar

  5. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 133:11501162, 2004 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisheries Society 2004 Development and Evaluation of a Western Mosquitofish Bioenergetics Model STEVEN R.--We developed a bioenergetics model for the western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis by combining data rates were observed at 32 C. Bioenergetics estimates of food consumption agreed well with laboratory mea

  6. Sandia Energy - American Physical Society Names Four Sandians as Fellows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULI ProgramPhysical Society Names Four Sandians as

  7. American Solar Energy Society ASES | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.EnergyWoodenDateSA JumpSolar PV JumpControlEnergy Society

  8. Kokes Awards for the 23rd North American Catalysis Society Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Gary

    2014-01-31

    The Tri-State Catalysis Society awarded 107 Kokes Travel Awards. The program was very successful and to date this was the most Kokes Travel Awards ever awarded at a North American Catalysis Society Meeting. It provided students who merited an award the opportunity to attend the meeting, present a paper in the form of either an oral presentation or a poster presentation, and to serve the North American Catalysis Society by participating in the organization of the meeting. Students worked very hard during the week of the meeting to make it a success. Financial support for the Kokes awards was provided by DOE, NSF, NACS, as well as the Tri-State Catalysis Society, the latter through fund raising activities, and other donations. AT the meeting, each student received over $1050 in kind to offset the costs of registration fees ($260), hotel accommodations ($295.7), transportation ($400 travel allowance), as well as T-shirts ($20), and banquet tickets ($95 provided by donations from society members). In addition, for the first time, students received certificates that were signed by the President of NACS, Professor Enrique Iglesia, and by the Kokes Awards Chair, Gary Jacobs (see last page). A list of meeting co-chairs (i.e., Uschi M. Graham, Umit S. Ozkan, and Madan Bhassin) and the honorary chair (Burtron H. Davis) was also included on the certificate, along with the name of the recipient. The awardees were chosen on a merit-based guideline which also included the requirements of having a presentation accepted at the meeting and being a student at a North American University. The Richard J. Kokes Student Travel Award Committee (Gary Jacobs, Rodney Andrews, and Peter Smirniotis) with help from the Organizing Committee were able to secure money from four sources as detailed in Table 1. As detailed by our Treasurer, Dr. Helge Toufar of Clariant, the total amount spent was $105,000.

  9. Los Alamos scientists selected as American Chemical Society Fellows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion to local UnitedtoHOPENew mechanism forAmerican

  10. American Nuclear Society Annual Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDITLeslieAlgae BiomassServices »MoneyAmerican Nuclear

  11. American Nuclear Society MEMORANDUM OF EX PARTE COMMUNICATION | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDITLeslieAlgae BiomassServices »MoneyAmerican Nuclearof

  12. www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 93, No. 348 A common criticism of science and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    physics program at the University of Virginia, where I am a student, defies this criticism. Instead interdisciplinary work might seem like a new concept, many programs are surprisingly long estab- lished. University. Interdisciplinary students must either work to connect with their classmates or quickly develop good per- sonal

  13. Copyright 2014 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison

  14. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison

  15. Academic Genealogy of Malgorzata Peszynska The Mathematics Genealogy Project is a service of North Dakota State University and the American Mathematical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peszynska, Malgorzata

    Academic Genealogy of Malgorzata Peszynska The Mathematics Genealogy Project is a service of North Dakota State University and the American Mathematical Society http://www.genealogy

  16. 12 American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 87, No. 12 Padture heads Ohio State's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    Nanofibers by Electrospinning" ­ appeared in the fall edition of the AMMTIAC Quarterly and was cowritten that will eventually electrospin into nanofibers. (Credit:DanielMiller,Univ.ofToledo) #12;

  17. 14 American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 86, No. 11 research briefs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calyam, Prasad

    produce particle col- lisions with energy similar to those that occur in a fusion plasma or star. (Visit Source Illuminates Fusion-Power Diagnostics NIST physicists are helping to devel- op a "yardstick" to monitor conditions in the plasma of an experimental fusion reactor. Their efforts will benefit ITER

  18. Symposium for Alfred Wolf's 75th birthday at American Chemical Society meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-02

    This report contains abstracts from the symposium presented by the Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society. Sessions covered the following topics: Therapeutic radionuclides--Making the right choice; Aspects of nuclear science; Nuclear structure with large gamma-ray detector arrays and their auxiliary devices; Thirty years of research in nuclear dynamics--From fission to the quark-gluon plasma; Chelated metal ions for diagnosis and therapy; Radiochemistry--Basic and applied; and Applications of small accelerators in science and industry.

  19. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valicenti, Richard K., E-mail: Richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, California (United States); Thompson, Ian [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Albertsen, Peter [Division of Urology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Goldenberg, S. Larry [Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wolf, J. Stuart [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sartor, Oliver [Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Klein, Eric [Glickman Urological Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Faraday, Martha M. [Four Oaks, Inc (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

  20. American Nuclear Society 2013 Student Conference Massachusetts Institute of Technology Boston, Massachusetts, USA, April 4-6, 2013, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    2013-01-01

    of the total energy principle, shown to scale #12;McDermott et al. American Nuclear Society 2013 Student efficiency be proportional to the energy of the gamma ray (E) striking the detector: i = kEi (2) This then allows the capture detection efficiency to be directly proportional to the total excitation energy

  1. original article The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Molecular Therapy vol. 20 no. 4, 829839 apr. 2012 829

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Sang

    original article© The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Molecular Therapy vol. 20 no. 4, 829 that the intranasal delivery of HMGB1 siRNA offers an efficient means of gene knockdown-mediated therapy is released by necrotic cells into the extracellular milieu and is also actively secreted by macrophages

  2. Search Engines for Civil and Environmental Engineers: American Society of Civil Engineers http://www.asce.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Search Engines for Civil and Environmental Engineers: American Society of Civil Engineers http://www.buildingsmag.com/ BIX/AEC http://www.building.org/ Civil Engineering Jobs http://www.civilengineeringjobs.com Civil Net http://www.civilnet.com E Jobs: Environmental Jobs and Careers http://www.ejobs.org Engineering

  3. Limnol. Oceanogr., 44(3, part 2), 1999, 784794 1999, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Craig E.

    784 Limnol. Oceanogr., 44(3, part 2), 1999, 784­794 1999, by the American Society of Limnology these organismal changes are varied but cannot usually be tied to the direct effects of acidification. Overall, our Institute, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, the Wisconsin Acid Deposition Research Council

  4. Lake and Reservoir Management 21(1):24-29, 2005 Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    24 Lake and Reservoir Management 21(1):24-29, 2005 © Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2005 Influences of Lake Level Changes on Reservoir Water Clarity in Allatoona Lake of lake level changes on reservoir water clarity in Allatoona Lake, Georgia. Lake and Reserv. Manage. Vol

  5. Published in the Proceedings of ASES-2001, the American Solar Energy Society A DRAG-AND-DROP ENERGY DESIGN TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    this data, Solar-5's built-in expert system designs two different reference homes called "Scheme 1 MeetsPublished in the Proceedings of ASES-2001, the American Solar Energy Society A DRAG-AND-DROP ENERGY the program to more precisely predict the building's performance and the energy cost savings of the ratepayer

  6. DECEMBER 2001 579D E R Y A N D Y A U 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    ), there is renewed interest in examining hydrometeoro- logical processes in the Arctic. With its prevailing subDECEMBER 2001 579D E´ R Y A N D Y A U 2001 American Meteorological Society Simulation of an Arctic depression over the frozen Arctic Ocean. The event is first simulated at a horizontal grid size of 18 km

  7. J. N. Am. Benthol. Soc., 2005, 24(4):769783 2005 by The North American Benthological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis Jr., William M.

    769 J. N. Am. Benthol. Soc., 2005, 24(4):769­783 2005 by The North American Benthological Society@cires.colorado.edu 5 fns@sas.upenn.edu ing rapid growth of herbivores throughout the year could increase the influence

  8. J. Marshall Ash Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 108, No. 2. (Feb., 1990), p. 571.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ash, J. Marshall

    Erratum J. Marshall Ash Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 108, No. 2. (Feb, February 1990 ERRATUM J. MARSHALL ASH The paper "A new proof of uniqueness for multiple trigonometric series" by J. Marshall Ash, which appeared in 107(2) October 1989, should have been entitled "A new proof

  9. Preprint: Centennial Meeting of the American Physical Society Meeting, Atlanta, 1999, to be published in Computer Physics Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    Preprint: Centennial Meeting of the American Physical Society Meeting, Atlanta, 1999, to be published in Computer Physics Communication Teaching Physics in the Virtual University: The Mechanics and some basic physical objects implemented as Java classes. Students can extend these classes in order

  10. Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998): 231-237.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998 Letendre Department of Business/Economics Green Mountain College Poultney, VT 05701 and Center for Energy, CA 94596 John Byrne and Young-Doo Wang Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University

  11. Historical Perspective on the United States Fusion Program Invited paper presented at American Nuclear Society 16th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Society 16th Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy 14-16 September, 2004 in Madison controlled thermonuclear reactions, or nuclear fusion as it is now more commonly called, has remained elusiveHistorical Perspective on the United States Fusion Program Invited paper presented at American

  12. Copyright 2014 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison Sciences, National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY Coastal wetlands

  13. Materials science is the study of processing-structure-property relationships in materials that are important to society. Special attention is paid to "microstructure," i.e., how materials (polymers, ceramics, semiconductors, superalloys, and biomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Materials science is the study of processing-structure-property relationships in materials that are important to society. Special attention is paid to "microstructure," i.e., how materials (polymers, ceramics THAT THEY SPEND THEIR TIME UPPERLEVEL COURSES MSE 376 Nanomaterials MSE 382 Electrochemical energy materials

  14. Sixth American Nuclear Society International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface Technologies NPIC&HMIT 2009, Knoxville, Tennessee, April 5-9, 2009, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heljanko, Keijo

    , automation 1 INTRODUCTION In nuclear power plants (NPPs), novel digitalized I&C systems enable complicatedSixth American Nuclear Society International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2009) VERIFICATION OF SAFETY LOGIC DESIGNS

  15. Evaluation of American Indian Science and Engineering Society Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AISES, None

    2013-09-25

    The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) has been funded under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant (Grant Award No. DE-SC0004058) to host an Intertribal Middle-School Science and Math Bowl (IMSSMB) comprised of teams made up of a majority of American Indian students from Bureau of Indian Education-funded schools and public schools. The intent of the AISES middle school science and math bowl is to increase participation of American Indian students at the DOE-sponsored National Science Bowl. Although national in its recruitment scope, the AISES Intertribal Science and Math Bowl is considered a “regional” science bowl, equivalent to the other 50 regional science bowls which are geographically limited to states. Most regional bowls do not have American Indian student teams competing, hence the AISES bowl is meant to encourage American Indian student teams to increase their science knowledge in order to participate at the national level. The AISES competition brings together teams from various American Indian communities across the nation. Each team is provided with funds for travel to and from the event, as well as for lodging and meals. In 2011 and 2012, there were 10 teams participating; in 2013, the number of teams participating doubled to 20. Each Science and Math Bowl team is comprised of four middle school — grades 6 through 8 — students, one alternate, and a teacher who serves as advisor and coach — although in at least two cases, the coach was not a teacher, but was the Indian Education Coordinator. Each team member must have at least a 3.0 GPA. Furthermore, the majority of students in each team must be comprised of American Indian, Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian students. Under the current DOE grant, AISES sponsored three annual middle school science bowl competitions over the years 2011, 2012 and 2013. The science and math bowls have been held in late March concurrently with the National American Indian Science and Engineering Fair (NAISEF) and EXPO at the Albuquerque, NM Convention Center. Albuquerque is also the home of the AISES national office. The AISES staff also recruits volunteers to assist with implementation of the science and math bowl event. In 2011, there were 7 volunteers; in 2012, 15 volunteers, and in 2013, 19 volunteers. Volunteers are recruited from a variety of local sources, including Sandia Laboratories, Southwest Indian Polytechnic Institute students, Department of Defense, as well as family members of AISES staff. For AISES, the goals of the Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl project are to have more Native students learn science, for them to gain confidence in competing, and to reward their effort in order to motivate them to pursue studies in the sciences and engineering. For DOE, the goals of the project are to get more Native students to compete at the National Science Bowl, held in Washington, DC.

  16. pubs.acs.org/JAFCPublished on Web 06/23/2009 2009 American Chemical Society J. Agric. Food Chem. 2009, 57, 61716177 6171

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    pubs.acs.org/JAFCPublished on Web 06/23/2009© 2009 American Chemical Society J. Agric. Food Chem. In soil samples, strain LZ-1 could also remove these compounds successfully. Functional display

  17. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 516 : 335341, 1999 May 1 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Kenneth

    THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 516 : 335È341, 1999 May 1 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All at arbitrary inclina­ tions (Whitney & Hartmann 1992 ; Fischer, Henning, & Yorke 1994). While much e+ort has

  18. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 516:335341, 1999 May 1 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.(

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Kenneth

    THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 516:335È341, 1999 May 1 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All at arbitrary inclina- tions (Whitney & Hartmann 1992; Fischer, Henning, & Yorke 1994). While much eort has been

  19. Published: March 18, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 4734 dx.doi.org/10.1021/la200094x |Langmuir 2011, 27, 47344741

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    Published: March 18, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 4734 dx.doi.org/10.1021/la200094x |Langmuir 2011, 27, 4734­4741 ARTICLE pubs.acs.org/Langmuir Structural Transitions in MIL-53 (Cr): View from

  20. pubs.acs.org/BiochemistryPublished on Web 12/09/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Biochemistry 2010, 49, 249251 249

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    pubs.acs.org/BiochemistryPublished on Web 12/09/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Biochemistry Agbandje-McKenna,§ David N. Silverman,*,§, ) and Robert McKenna*,§ § Department of Biochemistry

  1. pubs.acs.org/Biochemistry Published on Web 08/21/2009 r 2009 American Chemical Society 9132 Biochemistry 2009, 48, 91329139

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pubs.acs.org/Biochemistry Published on Web 08/21/2009 r 2009 American Chemical Society 9132 Biochemistry 2009, 48, 9132­9139 DOI: 10.1021/bi901202m Cytochrome c4 Can Be Involved in the Photosynthetic

  2. 5. Wick, O. J. (ed.) Plutonium Handbook: a Guide to the Technology 3357 (American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL, 1980).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5. Wick, O. J. (ed.) Plutonium Handbook: a Guide to the Technology 33­57 (American Nuclear Society superconductors. Phys. Rev. Lett. 8, 250­253 (1962). 11. Wolfer, W. G. Radiation effects in plutonium. Los Alamos

  3. Published: July 29, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 17147 dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp203342j |J. Phys. Chem. C 2011, 115, 1714717153

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Published: July 29, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 17147 dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp203342j |J. Phys. Chem. C 2011, 115, 17147­17153 ARTICLE pubs.acs.org/JPCC Selective Contact Anneal Effects

  4. Academic Genealogy of Peh Hoon Ng The Mathematics Genealogy Project is a service of North Dakota State University and the American Mathematical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Peh H.

    Academic Genealogy of Peh Hoon Ng The Mathematics Genealogy Project is a service of North Dakota State University and the American Mathematical Society http://www.genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu Peh Hoon

  5. Copyright 2013 Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison, DE (2)Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Newark, DE (3)Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY

  6. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison AB, Level 1 Dalton B. Abdala, Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, Paul A

  7. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, China

  8. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison Center, Room 207, Level 2 Dalton B. Abdala, Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE

  9. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison. Magdi M. Selim, School of Plant, Environmental and Soil Science, Louisiana State University Agricultural

  10. Kokes Awards for the 22nd North American Catalysis Society Meeting, June 5-10, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabio H. Ribeiro

    2011-06-05

    The biennial North American Catalysis Society (NACS) Meetings are the premiere conferences in the area of catalysis, surface science, and reaction engineering. The 22nd meeting will be held the week of June 5-10, 2011 in Detroit, Michigan. The objective of the Meetings is to bring together leading researchers for intensive scientific exchange and interactions. Financial support that offsets some of the associated costs (specifically, registration fee, airline tickets, and hotel accommodations) would encourage graduate students, and for the first time undergraduate students, to attend and participate meaningfully in this conference. The funds sought in this proposal will help support the Richard J. Kokes Travel Award program. Graduate students eligible for these merit-based Awards are those who study at a North American university and who will present at the Meeting. We have currently 209 applications and we expect to be able to fund about half of them. The NACS has traditionally sought to encourage graduate student, and this year for the first time undergraduate studies, participation at the National Meetings and providing financial support is the most effective means to do so. Their attendance would contribute significantly to their scientific training and communication and presentation skills. They would be exposed to the leading researchers from the US and abroad; they would meet their peers from other universities; they would learn about cutting-edge results that could benefit their research projects; and they may become interested in becoming active participants in the catalysis community. These young investigators represent the next generation of scientists and engineers, and their proper training will lead to future scientific breakthroughs and technological innovations that benefit the US economy. Advances in catalysis can come in the form of more energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly chemical processes, improved fuel cell performance, efficient hydrogen production, and a cleaner environment.

  11. ELECTRONIC CERAMICS IN HIGH TEMPERATURE ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Searcy, A.W.

    2010-01-01

    o n on E l e c t r o n i c Ceramics i n Severe Environments,d i n t h e B u l l e t i n o f the American Ceramic S o c ie t y ELECTRONIC CERAMICS IN HIGH TEMPERATURE ENVIRONMENTS

  12. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Beth A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology , University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hayes, John K. [Gamma West Brachytherapy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hsu, I-Chow J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Morris, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Tward, Jonathan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2011-03-01

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  13. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Transperineal Permanent Brachytherapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, Seth A., E-mail: rosenthals@radiological.co [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bittner, Nathan H.J. [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Centers, Tacoma, WA (United States); Beyer, David C. [Arizona Oncology Services, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Goldsmith, Brian J. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Nag, Subir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaiser Permanante, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Suh, W. Warren [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Potters, Louis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachtherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric parameters, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program.

  14. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison Browse by Section/Division of Interest Author Index Share | 86-4 The Role of Critical Zone Science zone science is thus extremely multidisciplinary involving not only soil scientists but also

  15. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison & Environmental Quality See more from this Session: Future Frontiers in Soil Science Monday, October 22, 2012: 1 with soil biogeochemistry where the application of molecular environmental science, which employs a multi

  16. Copyright 2014 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison, exchangeable, nonexchangeable, and mineral. It has often been observed that crops do not respond, coupled with, lack of increases in crop yield. This presentation will present an historical perspective

  17. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blink, J.; Farmer, J.; Choi, J.; Saw, C.

    2009-01-01

    Science & Technology 2007, Detroit, MI, Sept. 16– 20, 2007,2007, Sept. 16–20, 2007, Detroit, MI, American CeramicExhib. , Sept. 16–20, 2007, Detroit, MI, American Ceramic

  18. September 2008AmerICAN meteOrOLOGICAL SOCIetY | 1275 AffiliAtions: Lyon--Department of Physical Geography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    September 2008AmerICAN meteOrOLOGICAL SOCIetY | 1275 AffiliAtions: Lyon--Department of Physical University, Boston, Massachusetts Corresponding Author: Steve W. Lyon, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden E-mail: steve.lyon@natgeo.su.se DOI: 10

  19. pubs.acs.org/ICPublished on Web 10/08/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Inorg. Chem. 2009, 48, 99719973 9971

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pubs.acs.org/ICPublished on Web 10/08/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Inorg. Chem. 2009, 48 dioxide from methane with high selectivity. Over the past decade, microporous metal-organic frame- work employ simple carbon-based spacer ele- ments (struts) that primarily serve to distance the metal nodes

  20. pubs.acs.org/cmPublished on Web 07/01/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Chem. Mater. 2009, 21, 30333035 3033

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Reflecting emerging energy challenges, catalysis,2 hydrogen and methane storage,3 and chemical separations4 of appropriate size and composition to capture CO2 from mixtures with methane. Based on condensation of cheappubs.acs.org/cmPublished on Web 07/01/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Chem. Mater. 2009, 21

  1. Published: March 29, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 2079 dx.doi.org/10.1021/om2002365 |Organometallics 2011, 30, 20792082

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    for methane hydroxylation are based on strongly electro- philic and oxidizing cations such as Hg(II),4 PtPublished: March 29, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 2079 dx.doi.org/10.1021/om2002365, Beckman Institute, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology

  2. pubs.acs.org/JAFC Published on Web 10/19/2009 2009 American Chemical Society 10004 J. Agric. Food Chem. 2009, 57, 1000410013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    pubs.acs.org/JAFC Published on Web 10/19/2009 © 2009 American Chemical Society 10004 J. Agric. Food, Yeungnam University, Gyongsan 712-749, Korea, Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Kyungpook National haptens with the functional group common to OP pesticides. To develop antigen-coated, indirect

  3. 4470r 2009 American Chemical Society pubs.acs.org/EF Energy Fuels 2009, 23, 44704478 : DOI:10.1021/ef900107b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ning

    4470r 2009 American Chemical Society pubs.acs.org/EF Energy Fuels 2009, 23, 4470­4478 : DOI:10 of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China, Earth and Environmental Sciences Division transfer and, thus, for energy conservation. In this paper, we investigated the influence of viscosity

  4. 6437r 2010 American Chemical Society pubs.acs.org/EF Energy Fuels 2010, 24, 64376441 : DOI:10.1021/ef1012837

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    6437r 2010 American Chemical Society pubs.acs.org/EF Energy Fuels 2010, 24, 6437­6441 : DOI:10.1021/ef1012837 Published on Web 11/16/2010 Spectroscopic Study of Aviation Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidative September 21, 2010 Aviation fuel is used as a coolant to remove waste heat loads from an aircraft

  5. The Plant Cell, Vol. 8, 1793-1807, October 1996O 1996 American Society of Plant Physiologists Death Don`t Have No Mercy: Cell Death Programs in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dangl, Jeff

    ; Schmelzer et al., 1989). Subse- quent biosynthesis of protective secondary metabolites and cell wallThe Plant Cell, Vol. 8, 1793-1807, October 1996O 1996 American Society of Plant Physiologists Death Don`t Have No Mercy: Cell Death Programs in Plant-Microbe lnteractions Jeffery L. Dangl,'lbi1 Robert A

  6. THE ASTRONOMICAL JOURNAL, 118:477487, 1999 July 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.(

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Testi, Leonardo

    THE ASTRONOMICAL JOURNAL, 118:477È487, 1999 July 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All,1 L. TESTI,2,3 Q. ZHANG,1 AND T. K. SRIDHARAN1,4 Received 1999 February 22; accepted 1999 April 5 and kinematic correspon- dence between these phenomena (Felli, Palagi, & Tofani 1992; Henning, Cesaroni

  7. Published: November 24, 2010 r 2010 American Chemical Society 2792 dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf1033569 |J. Agric. Food Chem. 2011, 59, 27922802

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Published: November 24, 2010 r 2010 American Chemical Society 2792 dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf1033569 |J, California 95616, United States ABSTRACT: This paper describes some of the early work on pyrethroid and chemical proper- ties not easily exploited by other instruments. The same immuno- chemical reagents can

  8. pubs.acs.org/Biochemistry Published on Web 08/02/2010 r 2010 American Chemical Society 7414 Biochemistry 2010, 49, 74147416

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Rhiju

    , 2010; Revised Manuscript Received July 30, 2010 ABSTRACT: We propose a rapid chemical strategypubs.acs.org/Biochemistry Published on Web 08/02/2010 r 2010 American Chemical Society 7414 chemical mapping ap- proaches by monitoring perturbations of each residue's chemical accessibility

  9. physical ChemistryThe Journalof 0 Copyright 1995 by the American Chemical Society VOLUME 99, NUMBER 39, SEPTEMBER 28,1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacoste, David

    physical ChemistryThe Journalof 0 Copyright 1995 by the American Chemical Society VOLUME 99, NUMBER 39, SEPTEMBER 28,1995 LETTERS Sonoluminescence from Single Bubbles in Nonaqueous Liquids: New Received: June 20, 1995; In Final Form: August IO,1995@ The emission of light by a single pulsating bubble

  10. Douglas M. Chapin, Ph.D., NAE, Fellow, American Nuclear Society is a Principal of MPR Associates, Inc. He holds a B.S. in Electrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    Douglas M. Chapin, Ph.D., NAE, Fellow, American Nuclear Society is a Principal of MPR Associates.D. in Nuclear Studies in Chemical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering from Princeton University. Dr. Chapin has worked in the nuclear industry since 1962, beginning with four years in the Naval Reactors design group

  11. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL SUPPLEMENT SERIES, 122 497501, 1999 June 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL SUPPLEMENT SERIES, 122 497È501, 1999 June 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. ( THE UL Y SSES SUPPLEMENT TO THE BATSE 4Br CATALOG present­ ed the Ulysses supplement to the BATSE 3B Catalog of Cosmic Gamma­Ray Bursts (hereafter referred

  12. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL SUPPLEMENT SERIES, 128 549560, 2000 June 2000. American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL SUPPLEMENT SERIES, 128 549È560, 2000 June 2000. American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. ( THE UL Y SSES SUPPLEMENT TO THE CATALOG OF GRANAT /WATCH for archival studies. This is the seventh in a series of catalogs of IPN localizations. The supplements

  13. The Plant Cell, Vol. 15, 7992, January 2003, www.plantcell.org 2002 American Society of Plant Biologists Altered Cell Cycle Distribution, Hyperplasia, and Inhibited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, J.A.H.

    The Plant Cell, Vol. 15, 79­92, January 2003, www.plantcell.org © 2002 American Society of Plant to striking alterations in development. Leaf architecture in overexpressing plants is altered radically the mitotic cell cycle, is inhibited strongly in CYCD3;1- overexpressing plants. Transcript analysis reveals

  14. pubs.acs.org/Biochemistry Published on Web 07/22/2009 r 2009 American Chemical Society 7856 Biochemistry 2009, 48, 78567866

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pubs.acs.org/Biochemistry Published on Web 07/22/2009 r 2009 American Chemical Society 7856 Biochemistry 2009, 48, 7856­7866 DOI: 10.1021/bi901067b Evidence that D1-His332 in Photosystem II from

  15. pubs.acs.org/Biochemistry Published on Web 09/11/2009 r 2009 American Chemical Society 9696 Biochemistry 2009, 48, 96969703

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    pubs.acs.org/Biochemistry Published on Web 09/11/2009 r 2009 American Chemical Society 9696 Biochemistry 2009, 48, 9696­9703 DOI: 10.1021/bi901283p Arginine, a Key Residue for the Enhancing Ability and Biochemistry, California State University Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90032, ) Department

  16. pubs.acs.org/ICPublished on Web 05/24/2010r 2010 American Chemical Society Inorg. Chem. 2010, 49, 53715376 5371

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Claudia

    pubs.acs.org/ICPublished on Web 05/24/2010r 2010 American Chemical Society Inorg. Chem. 2010, 49 DNA was also probed, along with their toxicity toward human skin cells in the dark and when irradiated with visible light than in the dark. In contrast to the DNA photocleavage results, 5 exhibits the largest

  17. 1352 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that qualitatively similar results apply to coupled atmosphere­ocean GCMs. The penetration of surface heat flux1352 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society The Deep-Ocean, Washington (Manuscript received 20 June 2002, in final form 3 November 2002) ABSTRACT The deep-ocean heat

  18. 3589r 2010 American Chemical Society pubs.acs.org/EF Energy Fuels 2010, 24, 35893594 : DOI:10.1021/ef100402g

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    3589r 2010 American Chemical Society pubs.acs.org/EF Energy Fuels 2010, 24, 3589­3594 : DOI:10 contain heteroatoms. An alternative proposed architecture is the "island" model,11,12 which consists/ionization experiments. Energy Fuels 2007, 21 (5), 2863­2868. (2) Hortal

  19. Reprinted from Analytical Chemistry, 1992,64. Copyright 0 1992by the American Chemical Society and reprinted by permission of the copyright owner.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    I Reprinted from Analytical Chemistry, 1992,64. Copyright 0 1992by the American Chemical Society on the Analytical Performance of a Glow Discharge Cell Mark van Straaten and Renaat Gijbels* University of Antwerp, Department of Chemistry, Universiteitsplein 1, B-261 0 Wilrijk, Belgium Akos Vertes George Washington

  20. 3510r 2010 American Chemical Society pubs.acs.org/EF Energy Fuels 2010, 24, 35103516 : DOI:10.1021/ef100249w

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    3510r 2010 American Chemical Society pubs.acs.org/EF Energy Fuels 2010, 24, 3510­3516 : DOI:10 the numerical optimization of a multi-step ignition model to predict the auto-ignition of dimethyl ether (DME of new oxygenated fuel blends, where detailed or reduced mechanisms are not available. Experimental data

  1. Subscriber access provided by HARVARD UNIV Analytical Chemistry is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subscriber access provided by HARVARD UNIV Analytical Chemistry is published by the American detection limit of 1 µg/cm3 (10 Hz bandwidth) and a dynamic range of 6 decades. Analytes with low UV on the volatility of the analytes and mobile phases.7 The refractive index detector (RID), which is the most widely

  2. Subscriber access provided by MIT Analytical Chemistry is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voldman, Joel

    Subscriber access provided by MIT Analytical Chemistry is published by the American Chemical of a sample from a complex mixture, or analytic, where the goal is to determine and quantify the contents, isodielectric sepa- ration (IDS), to a range of analytic separations involving cells and particles spanning

  3. Ceramic Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  4. Invited paper in: Risk-Based Decision Making in Water Resources. (Ed. Y.Y. Haimes and D.A. Moser), American Society of Civil Engineers and presented at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    ), American Society of Civil Engineers and presented at the Tenth Engineering Foundation Conference on Risk Engineers & Economists; 435-797-4010; David.Bowles@usu.edu. 3 Water Resources Engineer, GEI Consultants, Inc

  5. Nuclear criticality safety experiments, calculations, and analyses - 1958 to 1982. Volume 2. Summaries. Complilation of papers from the Transactions of the American Nuclear Society

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1982-10-21

    This compilation contains 688 complete summaries of papers on nuclear criticality safety as presented at meetings of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). The selected papers contain criticality parameters for fissile materials derived from experiments and calculations, as well as criticality safety analyses for fissile material processing, transport, and storage. The compilation was developed as a component of the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) now under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The compilation is presented in two volumes: Volume 1 contains a directory to the ANS Transaction volume and page number where each summary was originally published, the author concordance, and the subject concordance derived from the keyphrases in titles. Volume 2 contains-in chronological order-the full-text summaries, reproduced here by permission of the American Nuclear Society from their Transactions, volumes 1-41.

  6. Published: July 18, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 7388 dx.doi.org/10.1021/ic201396m |Inorg. Chem. 2011, 50, 73887390

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    and MOF-48 are found to have high catalytic activity and chemical stability. They convert methane selec the oxidation of methane directly to AA with 70% yield using K2S2O8 as an oxidant (yields based on K2S2O8), 175Published: July 18, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 7388 dx.doi.org/10.1021/ic201396m |Inorg

  7. HVEM IN CERAMICS RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, G.

    2010-01-01

    DOCUMENTS SECTION tnnaM IN CERAMICS RESEARCH Gareth Thomaswell to problems in ceramics. In previous conferencesproperties re- lationships in ceramic materials lags ,,'eU

  8. Nano-crystal growth in cordierite glass ceramics studied with X-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bras, Wim

    2010-01-01

    A. , Kinetics of phase formation in Jarosite glass ceramics.Journal of the European Ceramic Society 1999, 19, 527-533.of MgO- Al2O3-SiO2-TiO2 glass-ceramics. Journal of Inorganic

  9. American Physical Society

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Hou-Tong Chen was honored for contributions to the development of active metamaterials and devices, and the development and understanding of few-layer metamaterials and...

  10. American Society of Metals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    To investigate the turbulent boundary layer under graphics. shoaling and breaking waves, an existing numerical model was utilized, and in turn a comparison was made with laboratory measurements. The numerical solution to ...

  11. American Society of Metals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    The multi-scale modeling of ion-solid interactions presented can lead to a fundamentally new approach for understanding temperature evolution and damage formation. A coupling of the Monte Carlo code, SRIM, to a C FEM ...

  12. American Chemical Society Fellows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropane TexasAmbipolarXunamed as Americanselected

  13. American Physical Society

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropane TexasAmbipolarXunamedAdministrationby

  14. American Physical Society

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropane

  15. American Physical Society awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropaneand Los Alamos National Laboratory

  16. American Physical Society Fellows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWith PropaneNaturalTest YourProgram Alumniof

  17. TRANSFORMATION TOUGHENING IN CERAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    Preprint ~. Submitted to Advances in Ceramics TRANSFORMATIONTOUGHENING IN CERAMICS A.G. Evans, D.B. Marshall, and N.H.TRANSFORMATION TOUGHENING IN CERAMICS by Ao Go Evans, D. Be

  18. Subscriber access provided by TECHNICAL UNIV OF DELFT Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dekker, Nynke

    Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Letter Control of Shape and Material tomography, scanning transmission-electron microscopy (STEM), and high-resolution transmission

  19. Preprint of: H. Berghel, D. Berleant, T. Foy*, and M. McGuire*, "Cyberbrowsing: information customization on the Web," Journal of the American Society for Information Science (JASIS) 50

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berleant, Daniel

    customization on the Web," Journal of the American Society for Information Science (JASIS) 50 (10) (May, 1999Preprint of: H. Berghel, D. Berleant, T. Foy*, and M. McGuire*, "Cyberbrowsing: information), pp. 505-511. Cyberbrowsing: Information Customization on the Web Hal Berghel*, Daniel Berleant

  20. International Conference on Mathematics, Computational Methods & Reactor Physics (M&C 2009) Saratoga Springs, New York, May 3-7, 2009, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    2009-01-01

    International Conference on Mathematics, Computational Methods & Reactor Physics (M&C 2009) Saratoga Springs, New York, May 3-7, 2009, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2009.P. Barry Department of Mechanical Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 110 8

  1. International Conference on Mathematics, Computational Methods & Reactor Physics (M&C 2009) Saratoga Springs, New York, May 3-7, 2009, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    2009-01-01

    International Conference on Mathematics, Computational Methods & Reactor Physics (M&C 2009) Saratoga Springs, New York, May 3-7, 2009, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2009 and Nuclear Engineering Troy, New York, 12180 D.P. Barry, G. Leinweber, N.J. Drindak (ret.), J.G. Hoole Knolls

  2. This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published XXXX by the American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja201020c |J. Am. Chem. Soc. XXXX, XXX, 000000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clore, G. Marius

    This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published XXXX by the American Chemical Society A dx, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-5624, United States Laboratory of Chemical Physics of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-0520, United States bS Supporting Information ABSTRACT: 15 N R2/R1

  3. Published on the Web 03/18/2011 www.pubs.acs.org/accounts Vol. 45, No. 1 ' 2012 ' 314 ' ACCOUNTS OF CHEMICAL RESEARCH ' 3 10.1021/ar2000088 & 2011 American Chemical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    OF CHEMICAL RESEARCH ' 3 10.1021/ar2000088 & 2011 American Chemical Society Dynamics of Water Interacting component of many chemical processes, in fields as diverse as biology and geology. Water in chemical, biological, and other systems frequently occurs in very crowded situations: the confined water must interact

  4. The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 719:L45L49, 2010 August 10 doi:10.1088/2041-8205/719/1/L45 C 2010. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    in determining the distribution of water-rich planets by bulk composition and orbit. The catalog of observed 2010. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. WATER/ICY SUPER-EARTHS: GIANT IMPACTS AND MAXIMUM WATER CONTENT Robert A. Marcus1 , Dimitar Sasselov1 , Sarah T. Stewart2

  5. The Astrophysical Journal, 794:98 (4pp), 2014 October 20 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/794/2/98 C 2014. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

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    range may be produced by an atmospheric phenomenon known as ball lightning (BL). If BLs act is typically tens of milliseconds. ball lightning (BLs). Hence, we suggest that perytons are sig- natures. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. ARE PERYTONS SIGNATURES OF BALL

  6. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF POROUS PNZT POLYCRYSTALLINE CERAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswas, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical Properties of Ceramics," Proc. Brit. Ceram. S oon the Uniaxial Strength of Ceramics," J. Am. Ceram. Soc. ,Lead Zirconate-Titanate Ceramics," Ph.D. Thesi' , University

  7. SURFACES AND INTERFACES IN CERAMIC AND CERAMIC-METAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2013-01-01

    Phenomena in Electronic Ceramics", Chicago, April 1980. n. *Soc. 125, 355C (1978). "Ceramic, Glass, and MetalInterfacial Problems in Ceramic Chip Capacitors" by: M.J.

  8. Early Ceramics from Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drover, Christopher E.

    1975-01-01

    REPORTS Early Ceramics from Southern California CHRISTOPHERThis paper describes the ceramics and their chronologicalfor dating. To date, 10 ceramic specimens have been

  9. Subscriber access provided by UNIV HEIDELBERG Biochemistry is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olins, Ada L.

    Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Neutron scattering studies of nucleosome 1983, 22, 4916-4923 Neutron Scattering Studies of Nucleosome Structure at Low Ionic Strength? Edward C by small-angle neutron scattering. The transition seen by some investigators at between 2.9 and 7.5 m

  10. April 1, 2001 / Volume 35 , Issue 7 / pp. 148 A 153 A Copyright 2001 American Chemical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Society What Future for Carbon Capture and Sequestration? New technologies could reduce carbon dioxide Conference on Carbon Dioxide Removal (ICCDR-1). Researchers were surprised to learn how many greenhouse gas emissions now. A major target is CO2 from fossil energy use. One way to sequester carbon

  11. Subscriber access provided by Georgia Tech Library Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    consumption of nanodevices, typically in the nano- to microwatt range, harvesting energy from the environment studied solar5 and thermal energy,6 vibration energy and mechanical energy are probably the most popular Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Letter Converting Biomechanical Energy

  12. Subscriber access provided by Caltech Library Services Organometallics is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Article Transition State Energy;Transition State Energy Decomposition Study of Acetate-Assisted and Internal Electrophilic Substitution C amount of transition state stabilization. The energy penalty to deform reactants into their transition

  13. Lake and Reservoir Management 24:381-391, 2008 Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    carbon (DOC) in drinking-water reservoirs is an important manage- ment issue because DOC may form, dissolved organic carbon, fluorescence, multivariate analysis, sediment flux, Sweetwater Reservoir, water381 Lake and Reservoir Management 24:381-391, 2008 © Copyright by the North American Lake

  14. Subscriber access provided by UNIV OF VERMONT Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sansoz, Frederic

    Subscriber access provided by UNIV OF VERMONT Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical and Frederic Sansoz* School of Engineering and Materials Science Program, The UniVersity of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 Received November 24, 2008; Revised Manuscript Received February 3, 2009 ABSTRACT By using

  15. BIOMIMETIC PROCESSING OF CERAMICS AND CERAMIC-METAL COMPOSITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    625 BIOMIMETIC PROCESSING OF CERAMICS AND CERAMIC-METAL COMPOSITES M. YASREBI, G. H. KIM, K. E by a combination of tape casting of the ceramic and infiltration of the metal. The resultant cermets displayed a 40 such as metal-metal,' metal-ceramic,2 internietallic-intermetallic,1 metal-intermetallic,3 and ceramic-ceramic4

  16. Ceramic inspection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Werve, Michael E. (Modesto, CA)

    2006-05-16

    A system for inspecting a ceramic component. The ceramic component is positioned on a first rotary table. The first rotary table rotates the ceramic component. Light is directed toward the first rotary table and the rotating ceramic component. A detector is located on a second rotary table. The second rotary table is operably connected to the first rotary table and the rotating ceramic component. The second rotary table is used to move the detector at an angle to the first rotary table and the rotating ceramic component.

  17. Ceramic electrolyte coating methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2004-10-12

    Processes for preparing aqueous suspensions of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material such as yttrium-stabilized zirconia. The invention also includes a process for preparing an aqueous coating slurry of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material. The invention further includes a process for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material on pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  18. Fundamentals of Ceramic Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    in the manufacture of the each of the main classes of ceramic products from the initial raw materials through the composition-microstructure-property relationships for ceramic materials. 3. Understand the raw materials used to manufacture ceramic products, the chemical and physical material changes that take place when manufacturing

  19. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  20. Fibrous ceramic monoliths made from multi-phase ceramic filaments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Singh, Dileep (Naperville, IL); Polzin, Bryant J. (Mundelein, IL); Cruse, Terry (Lisle, IL); Picciolo, John J. (Lockport, IL)

    2008-11-18

    A method for producing composite ceramic material is provided wherein a core ceramic structure is produced and simultaneously enveloped with a sleeve of similar material.

  1. Local Control, Toxicity, and Cosmesis in Women >70 Years Enrolled in the American Society of Breast Surgeons Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Registry Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Atif J.; Vicini, Frank A.; Beitsch, Peter; Goyal, Sharad; Kuerer, Henry M.; Keisch, Martin; Quiet, Coral; Zannis, Victor; Keleher, Angela; Snyder, Howard; Gittleman, Mark; Whitworth, Pat; Fine, Richard; Lyden, Maureen; Haffty, Bruce G.; American Society of Breast Surgeons, Columbia, MD

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The American Society of Breast Surgeons enrolled women in a registry trial to prospectively study patients treated with the MammoSite Radiation Therapy System breast brachytherapy device. The present report examined the outcomes in women aged >70 years enrolled in the trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,449 primary early stage breast cancers were treated in 1,440 women. Of these, 537 occurred in women >70 years old. Fisher's exact test was performed to correlate age ({<=}70 vs. >70 years) with toxicity and with cosmesis. The association of age with local recurrence (LR) failure times was investigated by fitting a parametric model. Results: Older women were less likely to develop telangiectasias than younger women (7.9% vs. 12.4%, p = 0.0083). The incidence of other toxicities was similar. Cosmesis was good or excellent in 92% of the women >70 years old. No significant difference was found in LR as a function of age. The 5-year actuarial LR rate with invasive disease for the older vs. younger population was 2.79% and 2.92%, respectively (p = 0.5780). In women >70 years with hormone-sensitive tumors {<=}2 cm who received hormonal therapy (n = 195), the 5-year actuarial rate of LR, overall survival, disease-free survival, and cause-specific survival was 2.06%, 89.3%, 87%, and 97.5%, respectively. These outcomes were similar in women who did not receive hormonal therapy. Women with small, estrogen receptor-negative disease had worse LR, overall survival, and disease-free survival compared with receptor-positive patients. Conclusions: Accelerated partial breast irradiation with the MammoSite radiation therapy system resulted in low toxicity and produced similar cosmesis and local control at 5 years in women >70 years compared with younger women. This treatment should be considered as an alternative to omitting adjuvant radiotherapy for older women with small-volume, early-stage breast cancer.

  2. Ceramic tamper-revealing seals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kupperman, David S. (Oak Park, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL); Sheen, Shuh-Haw (Naperville, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A flexible metal or ceramic cable with composite ceramic ends, or a u-shaped ceramic connecting element attached to a binding element plate or block cast from alumina or zirconium, and connected to the connecting element by shrink fitting.

  3. Tailored Ceramics for Laser Applications /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollingsworth, Joel Philip

    2013-01-01

    1.1 Laser ceramic basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1.1 Advantages of laser ceramics . . . . . . . . . . .1.1.2 Challenges to laser ceramic green-body tailoring 1.2

  4. Ceramic Electron Multiplier

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Comby, G.

    1996-10-01

    The Ceramic Electron Multipliers (CEM) is a compact, robust, linear and fast multi-channel electron multiplier. The Multi Layer Ceramic Technique (MLCT) allows to build metallic dynodes inside a compact ceramic block. The activation of the metallic dynodes enhances their secondary electron emission (SEE). The CEM can be used in multi-channel photomultipliers, multi-channel light intensifiers, ion detection, spectroscopy, analysis of time of flight events, particle detection or Cherenkov imaging detectors. (auth)

  5. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1992-11-17

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density. 2 figs.

  6. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  7. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, Kathleen B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Becher, Paul F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Waters, Shirley B. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite.

  8. Ceramic Fuel Cells (SOFC)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Engineering Argonne National Laboratory Thursday, August 11, 2011 Ceramic Fuel Cells (SOFC) Manufacturing Fuel Cell Manhattan Project: * Joe Bonadies - Delphi * Rick...

  9. Method for fabricating ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Singh, Dileep (Naperville, IL); Polzin, Bryant J. (Downers Grove, IL); Cruse, Terry (Lisle, IL); Picciolo, John J. (Lockport, IL)

    2002-01-01

    A method for producing composite ceramic material is provided wherein a core ceramic structure is produced and simultaneously enveloped with a sleeve of similar material.

  10. Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  11. Method of making a modified ceramic-ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weaver, Billy L. (Eagan, MN); McLaughlin, Jerry C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of making a shaped ceramic-ceramic composite articles, such as gas-fired radiant heat burner tubes, heat exchangers, flame dispersers, and other furnace elements, having a formed-on ceramic-ceramic composite thereon.

  12. Mounting for ceramic scroll

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petty, Jack D. (Indianapolis, IN)

    1993-01-01

    A mounting for a ceramic scroll on a metal engine block of a gas turbine engine includes a first ceramic ring and a pair of cross key connections between the first ceramic ring, the ceramic scroll, and the engine block. The cross key connections support the scroll on the engine block independent of relative radial thermal growth and for bodily movement toward an annular mounting shoulder on the engine. The scroll has an uninterrupted annular shoulder facing the mounting shoulder on the engine block. A second ceramic ring is captured between mounting shoulder and the uninterrupted shoulder on the scroll when the latter is bodily shifted toward the mouting shoulder to define a gas seal between the scroll and the engine block.

  13. Ceramic heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaHaye, P.G.; Rahman, F.H.; Lebeau, T.P.; Severin, B.K.

    1998-06-16

    A tube containment system is disclosed. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture. 6 figs.

  14. Ceramic heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaHaye, Paul G. (Kennebunk, ME); Rahman, Faress H. (Portland, ME); Lebeau, Thomas P. E. (Portland, ME); Severin, Barbara K. (Biddeford, ME)

    1998-01-01

    A tube containment system. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture.

  15. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, Michael E. (Poway, CA); Harkins, Bruce D. (San Diego, CA)

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  16. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  17. Ceramic capillaries for use in microarray fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Reed A.; Woolley, John Patrick; Spellman, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Reed A. George, page 1 Ceramic Capillaries for Use inAbstract We have used ceramic capillary tips generally usedof DNA microarrays. The ceramic tips improve the morphology

  18. Porous ceramic scaffolds with complex architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munch, Etienne

    2008-01-01

    2002, “Novel Hydroxyapatite Ceramics with an InterconnectiveTricalcium Phosphate Ceramics,” Biomaterials, 19, pp. 2147-2004, “Development of Porous Ceramics with Well-Controlled

  19. Slow Food in a Fat Society: Satisfying Ethical Appetites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxson, Heather Anne

    Slow Food in a Fat Society Using historian Hillel Schwartz's utopian conception of a "fat society" as inspiration, this essay considers the potential contribution of the Slow Food movement to American notions of dietary ...

  20. NREL: Awards and Honors - Scientific and Technical Society Honors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kazmerski 1981 Peter Mark Memorial Research Award - Dr. Lawrence Kazmerski American Welding Society 2002 William Spraragen Memorial Certificate Award - R. D. Smith, for best...

  1. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  2. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

    1995-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  3. Light emitting ceramic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  4. Effective electromechanical moduli of ferroelectric ceramics with fiber Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials & Rheological Properties of Ministry of Education,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiangyu

    Effective electromechanical moduli of ferroelectric ceramics with fiber textures Y. C. Zhou Key and electromechanical coupling factors of ferroelectric ceramics BaTiO3 and Pb Mg1/3Nb2/3 O3­PbTiO3 PMN-PT with various higher electromechanical coupling factor k31 than that of 001 -oriented single crystals. © 2005 American

  5. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yahnke, Mark S. (Berkeley, CA); Shlomo, Golan (Haifa, IL); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

    1994-01-01

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range.

  6. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  7. Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seabaugh, Matthew M. (Columbus, OH); Swartz, Scott L. (Columbus, OH); Dawson, William J. (Dublin, OH); McCormick, Buddy E. (Dublin, OH)

    2007-08-28

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  8. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-07-23

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite. 5 figs.

  9. Evaluating the variability of ceramics with x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crown, P.L.; Schwalbe, L.A.; London, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Our assessment of prehistoric trade in ceramics depends on our ability to identify and distinguish different sources of manufacture. For the American Southwest, archaeologists have proposed various models of ceramic manufacture and exchange. Until recently, conflicting hypotheses were tested mainly on the basis of petrographic analysis of nonplastic tempering materials. We have extended these analyses to include x-ray fluorescence (XRF). XRF provides a fast and inexpensive means of analyzing large numbers of samples. Since 1982, approximately 500 prehistoric sherds and 40 prepared clay and mineral samples have been examined with XRF. Multivariate statistical techniques have been applied to help identify groupings of samples with possible archaeological significance.

  10. Matrix cracking of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites in shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajan, VP; Zok, FW

    2014-01-01

    laminated 0/90 ceramic/matrix composite. J. Am. Ceram. Soc.unidirectional ceramic matrix composites. J. Am. Ceram. Soc.properties of 2-D ceramic matrix composites. J. Am. Ceram.

  11. Science and Society Colloquium

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  12. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  13. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  14. Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program evaluated the application of advanced ceramic materials to an automotive Stirling engine. The objective of the program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of utilizing advanced ceramics to increase peak engine operating temperature, and to evaluate the performance benefits of such an increase. Manufacturing cost estimates were also developed for various ceramic engine components and compared with conventional metallic engine component costs.

  15. The Status and future of ground-based TeV gamma-ray astronomy. A White Paper prepared for the Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckley, J; Dingus, B; Falcone, A; Kaaret, Philip; Krawzcynski, H; Pohl, M; Vasilev, V; Williams, D A

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, ground-based TeV gamma-ray observatories have made spectacular discoveries including imaging spectroscopy observations of galactic sources of different classes, and the discovery of rapid gamma-ray flares from radio galaxies and active galactic nuclei containing supermassive black holes. These discoveries, and the fact that gamma-ray astronomy has the potential to map the radiation from dark matter annihilation in our Galaxy and in extragalactic systems, have attracted the attention of the wider scientific community. The Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society requested the preparation of a white paper on the status and future of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy to define the science goals of a future observatory, to determine the performance specifications, to identify the areas of necessary technology development, and to lay out a clear path for proceeding beyond the near term. The white paper was written with broad community input, including discussions on several dedicat...

  16. Ceramic vane drive joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smale, Charles H. (Indianapolis, IN)

    1981-01-01

    A variable geometry gas turbine has an array of ceramic composition vanes positioned by an actuating ring coupled through a plurality of circumferentially spaced turbine vane levers to the outer end of a metallic vane drive shaft at each of the ceramic vanes. Each of the ceramic vanes has an end slot of bow tie configuration including flared end segments and a center slot therebetween. Each of the vane drive shafts has a cross head with ends thereof spaced with respect to the sides of the end slot to define clearance for free expansion of the cross head with respect to the vane and the cross head being configured to uniformly distribute drive loads across bearing surfaces of the vane slot.

  17. Rare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors Hannah.phosphate glasses and glass-ceramics were investigated. Therare earth phosphate ceramics, glasses, and glass-ceramics

  18. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yahnke, M.S.; Shlomo, G.; Anderson, M.A.

    1994-08-30

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range. 2 figs.

  19. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webster, Elizabeth (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc (Madison, WI)

    1993-01-01

    A method for permformation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms.

  20. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webster, E.; Anderson, M.

    1993-12-14

    A method for the formation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms. 4 figures.

  1. Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Ryu, Shinsei Not Available American Physical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Stability of edge states in strained graphene Ghaemi, Pouyan; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Ryu, Shinsei Not Available American Physical Society None USDOE United States 2013-04-01...

  2. The Astrophysical Journal, 639:L107L110, 2006 March 10 2006. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    -optically through a reaction chamber, a double- pass system, and then detected by a helium-cooled, InSb hot Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. LABORATORY DETECTION AND PURE ROTATIONAL SPECTRUM OF Al isotopomer have been recorded as well. This study is the first laboratory detection of this molecule, which

  3. The Astrophysical Journal, 561:L211L214, 2001 November 10 2001. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    carries the most sensitive solar hard X-ray imager to date, and it has observed several coronal hard X Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. HARD X-RADIATION FROM A FAST CORONAL EJECTION H. S. Hudson Solar Physics Research Corporation/Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai

  4. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 504 : 9961001, 1998 September 10 1998. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, John

    Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. ( SCREENING IN THERMONUCLEAR REACTION RATES IN THE SUN+ect of electrostatic screening by ions and electrons on low­Z thermonuclear reac­ tions in the Sun. We use a mean Ðeld devoted to calculating more accurately the e+ects on the rates of solar fusion reactions of electrostatic

  5. "Proceedings of the 2004 ASEE/NCS Spring Conference, April 1-3, 2004 Copyright 2004, American Society for Engineering Education"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    to as Microelectromechanical Systems or MEMS. However, most services that offer such capabilities are limited in their scope Society for Engineering Education" Low Cost MEMS Processing Techniques Nathan A. Dotson, Peter T. Kim to etching of MEMS structures. Die-level post-CMOS processing has also been conducted on chips fabricated

  6. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasecki, John V. (Livonia, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

    1991-01-01

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  7. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

    1991-08-27

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

  8. 26 September/October 2013 SOLAR TODAY solartoday.org Copyright 2013 by the American Solar Energy Society Inc. All rights reserved. eat powers theworld econo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    26 September/October 2013 SOLAR TODAY solartoday.org Copyright © 2013 by the American Solar Energy, carbon-free production of energy -- in different and com- plementary ways. Photovoltaic solar collectors solarcollectors.Usingsolarheattogenerateelec- tricityhasbeenproventhrough30yearsofopera- tion of the Solar Energy

  9. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Sheng, Guangyao (Madison, WI)

    1993-01-01

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  10. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, M.A.; Guangyao Sheng.

    1993-05-04

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  11. Ceramic oxide powders and the formation thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Joseph L. (Baltimore, MD); Hung, Cheng-Hung (Baltimore, MD)

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic oxide powders and a method for their preparation. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby two or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein said precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders are determined by process conditions.

  12. Ceramic oxide powders and the formation thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, J.L.; Chenghung Hung.

    1993-12-07

    Ceramic oxide powders and a method for their preparation. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby two or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein said precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders are determined by process conditions. 14 figures.

  13. Characterizing in-plane geometrical variability in textile ceramic composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossol, MN; Fast, T; Marshall, DB; Cox, BN; Zok, FW

    2015-01-01

    3D woven ceramic matrix composite, the methods areof textile ceramic matrix composites, 1 this information,

  14. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Connolly, E.S.; Forsythe, G.D.; Domanski, D.M.; Chambers, J.A.; Rajendran, G.P.

    1999-05-11

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter is described having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during back pulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  15. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski (Wilmington, DE); Forsythe, George Daniel (Landenberg, PA); Domanski, Daniel Matthew (New Castle, DE); Chambers, Jeffrey Allen (Hockessin, DE); Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam (Boothwyn, PA)

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  16. Ceramic composite coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1997-01-01

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching etal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  17. Engineering macrostructure in ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whinnery, L.L.; Coutts, D.J.; Even, B.R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Loy, D.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) has been used to engineer the macrostructure of polysilane foams. Liquid-liquid phase separation during unidirectional solidification resulted in 10-60 {mu}m wide channels. Mesoporosity is also observed within the channel walls. Decreasing the polymer concentration resulted in incomplete formation of the channel walls. Several solvents were investigated yielding a variety of macrostructures. Faster cooling rates gave more narrow (10 {mu}m), less continuous channels. Due to the low melting point of the polysilanes a stabilization step was performed to prevent the foam from melting prior to decomposition during pyrolysis. Pyrolysis of these stabilized polysilane foams yields a porous ceramic. This porous ceramic contains the pore network originally induced into the polymer by the TIPS process.

  18. Prehistoric Ceramic Objects from Catalina Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drover, C. E

    1978-01-01

    ical association of the ceramics with the midden deposit atDrover, C. E. 1975 Early Ceramics from Southern CaUfor- nia.Determinations on Ceramic Material from Southern Cali-

  19. Surface micromachining of unfired ceramic sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheaume, Jonathan M.; Pisano, Albert P.

    2011-01-01

    Surface micromachining of un?red ceramic sheets Jonathan M.of yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic material. Reversiblefor af?xing un?red ceramic samples to silicon handle wafers

  20. ABRASIVE WEAR IN CERAMICS: AN ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    M. V. , Fracture mechanics of ceramics (Ed. Bradt, R. C. ,Fracture mechanics of ceramics, Evans, A. G. and Wi1shaw, T.ights. ABRASIVE WEAR IN CERAMICS: AN ASSESSMENT A. G. Evans

  1. Processing of Sodium-Potassium Niobate Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Jr., Bob R.

    1971-01-01

    SODIUM-POTASSIUM NIOBATE CERAMICS Bob R. Powell, Jr. (M.S.OF SODIUM-POTASSIUM NIOBATE CERAMICS Index Page ABSTRACT ofOF SODIUM-POTASSIUM NIOBATE CERAMICS Bob R. Powell, Jr.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Polycrystalline Semiconductors and Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhaojie

    2012-01-01

    Johnson, D. Advances in Ceramics 1987, 21, 3. Reed, J. S.Ganguli, D. ; Chatterjee, M. , Ceramic powder preparation: aRing, T. A. , Fundamentals of ceramic powder processing and

  3. Microprobes aluminosilicate ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (2114 Chadbourne Ave., Madison, WI 53705); Sheng, Guangyao (45 N. Orchard St., Madison, WI 53715)

    1993-01-01

    Methods have been developed to make mixed alumina-silicate and aluminosilicate particulate microporous ceramic membranes. One method involves the making of separate alumina and silica sols which are then mixed. Another method involves the creation of a combined sol with aluminosilicate particles. The resulting combined alumina and silica membranes have high surface area, a very small pore size, and a very good temperature stability.

  4. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panda, Prakash C. (Ithaca, NY); Seydel, Edgar R. (Ithaca, NY); Raj, Rishi (Ithaca, NY)

    1988-03-22

    The invention relates to producing relatively flaw free silicon nitride ceramic shapes requiring little or no machining by superplastic forging This invention herein was made in part under Department of Energy Grant DE-AC01-84ER80167, creating certain rights in the United States Government. The invention was also made in part under New York State Science and Technology Grant SB1R 1985-10.

  5. Miniature ceramic fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zuppero, Anthony C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-06-24

    A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

  6. Processing method for superconducting ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bloom, Ira D. (Bolingbrook, IL); Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL); Flandermeyer, Brian K. (Cincinnati, OH)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing a superconducting ceramic and particularly YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta., where .delta. is in the order of about 0.1-0.4, is carried out using a polymeric binder which decomposes below its ignition point to reduce carbon residue between the grains of the sintered ceramic and a nonhydroxylic organic solvent to limit the problems with water or certain alcohols on the ceramic composition.

  7. Original article Flat ceramic membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    with tubular ceramic membranes André GRANGEON, Philippe LESCOCHE* TAMI Industries, ZA les Laurons, 26110 Nyons membranes. The orig- inal intellectual concept is protected by two international patents. Strategically

  8. Tailored Ceramics for Laser Applications /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollingsworth, Joel Philip

    2013-01-01

    the casting of tailored parts. Variations in shrinkage havecasting of tailored ceramics. The rate of gelation and total degree of shrinkage

  9. Evaluation of Current Consensus Statement Recommendations for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Pooled Analysis of William Beaumont Hospital and American Society of Breast Surgeon MammoSite Registry Trial Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkinson, J. Ben; Beitsch, Peter D.; Shah, Chirag; Arthur, Doug; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wazer, David E.; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Lyden, Maureen; Chen, Peter Y.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Statement (CS) recommendations for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) are associated with significantly different outcomes in a pooled analysis from William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) and the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) MammoSite® Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: APBI was used to treat 2127 cases of early-stage breast cancer (WBH, n=678; ASBrS, n=1449). Three forms of APBI were used at WBH (interstitial, n=221; balloon-based, n=255; or 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, n=206), whereas all Registry Trial patients received balloon-based brachytherapy. Patients were divided according to the ASTRO CS into suitable (n=661, 36.5%), cautionary (n=850, 46.9%), and unsuitable (n=302, 16.7%) categories. Tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes were analyzed according to CS group. Results: The median age was 65 years (range, 32-94 years), and the median tumor size was 10.0 mm (range, 0-45 mm). The median follow-up time was 60.6 months. The WBH cohort had more node-positive disease (6.9% vs 2.6%, P<.01) and cautionary patients (49.5% vs 41.8%, P=.06). The 5-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), and distant metastasis (DM) for the whole cohort were 2.8%, 0.6%, 1.6%. The rate of IBTR was not statistically higher between suitable (2.5%), cautionary (3.3%), or unsuitable (4.6%) patients (P=.20). The nonsignificant increase in IBTR for the cautionary and unsuitable categories was due to increased elsewhere failures and new primaries (P=.04), not tumor bed recurrence (P=.93). Conclusions: Excellent outcomes after breast-conserving surgery and APBI were seen in our pooled analysis. The current ASTRO CS guidelines did not adequately differentiate patients at an increased risk of IBTR or tumor bed failure in this large patient cohort.

  10. High-temperature brazed ceramic joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarvinen, Philip O. (Amherst, NH)

    1986-01-01

    High-temperature joints formed from metallized ceramics are disclosed wherein the metal coatings on the ceramics are vacuum sputtered thereon.

  11. Ceramic composition for immobilization of actinides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbinghaus, Bartley B. (Livermore, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard A. (Livermore, CA); Vance, Eric R. (Kirrawee, AU); Stewart, Martin W. (Barden Ridge, AU); Jostsons, Adam (Eastwood, AU); Allender, Jeffrey S. (North Augusta, SC); Rankin, David Thomas (Aiken, SC)

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed is a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile.

  12. Pleated Ceramic Fiber Diesel Particulate Filter | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pleated Ceramic Fiber Diesel Particulate Filter Pleated Ceramic Fiber Diesel Particulate Filter 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters...

  13. chromatography tech note 2644 Ceramic Hydroxyapatite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    chromatography tech note 2644 CHTTM Ceramic Hydroxyapatite: Use in Expanded Bed Adsorption Mode ceramic nature of CHT overcomes the physical and chemical instability that limits traditional

  14. Powered by Translate Engineering and technical ceramics by Precision Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Back One Powered by Translate Engineering and technical ceramics by Precision Ceramics Carbon,Bonding Service Evaporation Materials,Request Quote www.plasmaterials.com However, manufacturing challenges, these devices have a tendency to stick shut, burn or fracture after only a few cycles," said Horacio Espinosa

  15. Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, T.K.; Novak, R.F.

    1991-05-07

    An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined. 3 figures.

  16. Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Thomas K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI)

    1991-01-01

    An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined.

  17. Characterization of the Deterioration of Low-Fired Ceramics in Varying Burial Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drolet, Elizabeth Johnson

    2012-01-01

    glass and ceramics." In Corrosion of glass, ceramics,and ceramic superconductors: principles, testing,Corrosion of glass, ceramics, and ceramic superconductors:

  18. The Status and future of ground-based TeV gamma-ray astronomy. A White Paper prepared for the Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Buckley; K. Byrum; B. Dingus; A. Falcone; P. Kaaret; H. Krawzcynski; M. Pohl; V. Vassiliev; D. A. Williams

    2008-10-02

    In recent years, ground-based TeV gamma-ray observatories have made spectacular discoveries including imaging spectroscopy observations of galactic sources of different classes, and the discovery of rapid gamma-ray flares from radio galaxies and active galactic nuclei containing supermassive black holes. These discoveries, and the fact that gamma-ray astronomy has the potential to map the radiation from dark matter annihilation in our Galaxy and in extragalactic systems, have attracted the attention of the wider scientific community. The Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society requested the preparation of a white paper on the status and future of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy to define the science goals of a future observatory, to determine the performance specifications, to identify the areas of necessary technology development, and to lay out a clear path for proceeding beyond the near term. The white paper was written with broad community input, including discussions on several dedicated open meetings, and a number of APS or other conferences. It contains an executive summary, detailed reports from the science working groups, and appendices with supplementary material including the full author lists for the different sections of the white paper and a glossary.

  19. Current Status and Recommendations for the Future of Research, Teaching, and Testing in the Biological Sciences of Radiation Oncology: Report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallner, Paul E., E-mail: pwallner@theabr.org [21st Century Oncology, LLC, and the American Board of Radiology, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Barker, Christopher A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bassetti, Michael [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bristow, Robert G. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Biophysics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cha, Yong I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Norton Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Formenti, Silvia C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States); Graves, Edward E. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania (United States); Hei, Tom K. [Center for Radiation Research, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); Kimmelman, Alec C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University, Oakland, California (United States); and others

    2014-01-01

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report.

  20. Lightweight high performance ceramic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nunn, Stephen D [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-02

    A sintered ceramic composition includes at least 50 wt. % boron carbide and at least 0.01 wt. % of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu, the sintered ceramic composition being characterized by a density of at least 90% of theoretical density.

  1. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL); Claar, Terry D. (Newark, DE); Silkowski, Peter (Urbana, IL)

    1988-01-01

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  2. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poeppel, R.B.; Claar, T.D.; Silkowski, P.

    1987-04-22

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  3. Design with Advanced Ceramics Course Outline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    MATS4002 Design with Advanced Ceramics Course Outline Session 1, 2015 School of Materials Science 11 March Ferroelectric Ceramics and their Applications (DW) 3 17 March 18 March Piezoelectric Ceramics (DW) 4 24 March 25 March Electro-optic Ceramics and Fibre-Optic Sensors (DW) 5 31 March 1 April

  4. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN); McLaughlin, Jerry C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowden, Richard A. (Powell, TN)

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  5. A German-American Icon: O, du schöne Schnitzelbank!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keel, William

    2003-09-01

    is open to membership from individuals, societies, libraries, and organizations. © 2004 by The Society for German-American Studies ISSN 0741-2827 Printed at the University of Kansas Printing Service, Lawrence, KS 66045 ( YEARBOOK OF GERMAN... Rapids, Michigan, and Jasper, Indiana. The classical German-American Schnitzelbank chart and song would seem to be something truly "made in America." Judging by the frequency with which the Schnitzelbank or some variation of it appears in American...

  6. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harkins, B.D.; Ward, M.E.

    1998-09-22

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

  7. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harkins, Bruce D. (San Diego, CA); Ward, Michael E. (Poway, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  8. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harkins, Bruce D. (San Diego, CA); Ward, Michael E. (Poway, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the reinforcing member and having a strengthening member wrapped around the refractory material. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  9. Low-Cost, Robust Ceramic Membranes for Gas Separation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ceramic membranes offer great potential for industrial gas separation. Without a ceramic membrane, gases must be cooled before separation. Unfortunately, even though ceramic membranes can improve...

  10. Characterizing in-plane geometrical variability in textile ceramic composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossol, MN; Fast, T; Marshall, DB; Cox, BN; Zok, FW

    2015-01-01

    Dimensional Textile Ceramic Composites Using Synchrotron x-Weave Geometry in Textile Ceramic Compos- ites Using DigitalB. N. Cox, “Integral Textile Ceramic Structures,” Annu. Rev.

  11. Middle Bronze Age Ceramic Vessels from Kamid el-Loz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantazariti, Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    and reconstruction of the ceramic vessel economic systemsis to investigate the ceramic economy of the site of Kamidstudied included mainly complete ceramic vessels and, more

  12. POLING EFFECT ON PIEZOELECTRIC BEHAVIOR OF PZT CERAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Shu-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Crystals: electric Ceramics, 1961," Proc. IRE, Measurementof Lead Zirconate Titanate Ceramics with Lead Partiallyof Lead Zirconate Titanate Ceramics Due to Minor Chemical

  13. ADVANCES IN CHARACTERIZATION OF MATERIALS: ALLOYS AND CERAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Gareth

    2011-01-01

    OF MATERIALS: ALLOYS AND CERAMICS Gareth Thomas May 1978OF MATERIALS : ALLOYS AND CERAMICS Gareth Thomas Departmentand alloys and many ceramics, point resolutions better than

  14. THE IMPACT OF TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY IN CERAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Gareth

    2010-01-01

    P. C. Smith, "Investigation of Ceramics for High TemperatureFracture Mechanics of Ceramics" volume 2, Plenum PublishingNitride", in "Nitrogen Ceramics", the proceedings of an

  15. HIGH RESOLUTION TECHNIQUES AND APPLICATION TO NON-OXIDE CERAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    Phase", in "Deformation of Ceramic Materials", edited Bradtwith Yttria Additions", in "Special Ceramics 6", editedp, Popper, British Ceramic Research Association, p 347-360 (

  16. NDE of advanced ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klima, S.J.

    1986-04-01

    Radiographic, ultrasonic, and scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) techniques were used to characterize silicon nitride and silicon carbide modulus-of-rupture test specimens in various stages of fabrication. Conventional and microfocus X-ray techniques were found capable of detecting minute high-density inclusions in as-received powders, green compacts, and fully densified specimens. Significant density gradients in sintered bars were observed by radiography, ultrasonic velocity, and SLAM. Ultrasonic attenuation was found sensitive to microstructural variations due to grain and void morphology and distribution. SLAM was capable also of detecting voids, inclusions, and cracks in finished test bars. Consideration is given to the potential for applying thermoacoustic microscopy techniques to green and densified ceramics. Some limitations and the detection probability statistics of the aforementioned nondestructive evaluation (NDE) processes are also discussed. 16 references.

  17. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1996-12-17

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment, each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion, and each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component. 4 figs.

  18. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL); Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment. Each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion. Each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  19. Ceramic Cerami Turbine Nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (Alpine, CA)

    1997-04-01

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of horizontally segmented vanes therebetween being positioned by a connecting member positioning segmented vanes in functional relationship one to another. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  20. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  1. Alone in the profession of arms: America's first three African American West Point graduates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, Jeremy Wayne

    2009-05-15

    Following Emancipation, many African Americans came to view military service as a crucial step toward the greater acceptance of blacks into American society and, potentially, toward complete citizenship. Military service ...

  2. Process for producing advanced ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwong, Kyei-Sing (Tuscaloosa, AL)

    1996-01-01

    A process for the synthesis of homogeneous advanced ceramics such as SiC+AlN, SiAlON, SiC+Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, and Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 +AlN from natural clays such as kaolin, halloysite and montmorillonite by an intercalation and heat treatment method. Included are the steps of refining clays, intercalating organic compounds into the layered structure of clays, drying the intercalated mixture, firing the treated atmospheres and grinding the loosely agglomerated structure. Advanced ceramics produced by this procedure have the advantages of homogeneity, cost effectiveness, simplicity of manufacture, ease of grind and a short process time. Advanced ceramics produced by this process can be used for refractory, wear part and structure ceramics.

  3. Five-Year Analysis of Treatment Efficacy and Cosmesis by the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial in Patients Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vicini, Frank; Beitsch, Peter; Quiet, Coral; Gittleman, Mark; Zannis, Vic; Fine, Ricky; Whitworth, Pat; Kuerer, Henry; Haffty, Bruce; Lyden, Maureen

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To present 5-year data on treatment efficacy, cosmetic results, and toxicities for patients enrolled on the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite breast brachytherapy registry trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients (1449 cases) with early-stage breast cancer receiving breast-conserving therapy were treated with the MammoSite device to deliver accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) (34 Gy in 3.4-Gy fractions). Of 1449 cases, 1255 (87%) had invasive breast cancer (IBC) (median size, 10 mm) and 194 (13%) had ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (median size, 8 mm). Median follow-up was 54 months. Results: Thirty-seven cases (2.6%) developed an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), for a 5-year actuarial rate of 3.80% (3.86% for IBC and 3.39% for DCIS). Negative estrogen receptor status (p = 0.0011) was the only clinical, pathologic, or treatment-related variable associated with IBTR for patients with IBC and young age (<50 years; p = 0.0096) and positive margin status (p = 0.0126) in those with DCIS. The percentage of breasts with good/excellent cosmetic results at 60 months (n = 371) was 90.6%. Symptomatic breast seromas were reported in 13.0% of cases, and 2.3% developed fat necrosis. A subset analysis of the first 400 consecutive cases enrolled was performed (352 with IBC, 48 DCIS). With a median follow-up of 60.5 months, the 5-year actuarial rate of IBTR was 3.04%. Conclusion: Treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity 5 years after treatment with APBI using the MammoSite device are good and similar to those reported with other forms of APBI with similar follow-up.

  4. Heat distribution ceramic processing method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A multi-layered heat distributor system is provided for use in a microwave process. The multi-layered heat distributors includes a first inner layer of a high thermal conductivity heat distributor material, a middle insulating layer and an optional third insulating outer layer. The multi-layered heat distributor system is placed around the ceramic composition or article to be processed and located in a microwave heating system. Sufficient microwave energy is applied to provide a high density, unflawed ceramic product.

  5. Extruded ceramic honeycomb and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, J. Paul (Big Flats, NY)

    1995-04-04

    Extruded low-expansion ceramic honeycombs comprising beta-spodumene solid solution as the principal crystal phase and with less than 7 weight percent of included mullite are produced by compounding an extrusion batch comprising a lithium aluminosilicate glass powder and a clay additive, extruding a green honeycomb body from the batch, and drying and firing the green extruded cellular honeycomb to crystallize the glass and clay into a low-expansion spodumene ceramic honeycomb body.

  6. Batch compositions for cordierite ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hickman, David L. (Big Flats, NY)

    1994-07-26

    Ceramic products consisting principally of cordierite and a method for making them are provided, the method employing batches comprising a mineral component and a chemical component, the mineral component comprising clay and talc and the chemical component consisting essentially of a combination of the powdered oxides, hydroxides, or hydrous oxides of magnesium, aluminum and silicon. Ceramics made by extrusion and firing of the batches can exhibit low porosity, high strength and low thermal expansion coefficients.

  7. Metal-ceramic joint assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Jian (New Milford, CT)

    2002-01-01

    A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

  8. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, Kathleen B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Becher, Paul F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Waters, Shirley B. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 particulates and nickle aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m.sup.1/2, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa.

  9. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-01-09

    A process is disclosed for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulates and nickel aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m{sup 1/2}, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa. 5 figs.

  10. Wedge edge ceramic combustor tile

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, J.E.; Holsapple, A.C.

    1997-06-10

    A multipiece combustor has a portion thereof being made of a plurality of ceramic segments. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have an outer surface and an inner surface. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have a generally cylindrical configuration and including a plurality of joints. The joints define joint portions, a first portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions have a second portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions further include a shoulder formed intermediate the first portion and the second portion. The joints provide a sealing interlocking joint between corresponding ones of the plurality of ceramic segments. Thus, the multipiece combustor having the plurality of ceramic segment with the plurality of joints reduces the physical size of the individual components and the degradation of the surface of the ceramic components in a tensile stress zone is generally eliminated reducing the possibility of catastrophic failures. 7 figs.

  11. Wedge edge ceramic combustor tile

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL); Holsapple, Allan C. (Poway, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A multipiece combustor has a portion thereof being made of a plurality of ceramic segments. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have an outer surface and an inner surface. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have a generally cylindrical configuration and including a plurality of joints. The joints define joint portions, a first portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions have a second portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions further include a shoulder formed intermediate the first portion and the second portion. The joints provide a sealing interlocking joint between corresponding ones of the plurality of ceramic segments. Thus, the multipiece combustor having the plurality of ceramic segment with the plurality of joints reduces the physical size of the individual components and the degradation of the surface of the ceramic components in a tensile stress zone is generally eliminated reducing the possibility of catastrophic failures.

  12. Insulating Structural Ceramics Program, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, Mark J.; Tandon, Raj; Ott, Eric; Hind, Abi Akar; Long, Mike; Jensen, Robert; Wheat, Leonard; Cusac, Dave; Lin, H. T.; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Ferber, Mattison K.; Lee, Sun Kun; Yoon, Hyung K.; Moreti, James; Park, Paul; Rockwood, Jill; Boyer, Carrie; Ragle, Christie; Balmer-Millar, Marilou; Aardahl, Chris; Habeger, Craig; Rappe, Ken; Tran, Diana; Koshkarian, Kent; Readey, Michael; ,

    2005-11-22

    New materials and corresponding manufacturing processes are likely candidates for diesel engine components as society and customers demand lower emission engines without sacrificing power and fuel efficiency. Strategies for improving thermal efficiency directly compete with methodologies for reducing emissions, and so the technical challenge becomes an optimization of controlling parameters to achieve both goals. Approaches being considered to increase overall thermal efficiency are to insulate certain diesel engine components in the combustion chamber, thereby increasing the brake mean effective pressure ratings (BMEP). Achieving higher BMEP rating by insulating the combustion chamber, in turn, requires advances in material technologies for engine components such as pistons, port liners, valves, and cylinder heads. A series of characterization tests were performed to establish the material properties of ceramic powder. Mechanical chacterizations were also obtained from the selected materials as a function of temperature utilizing ASTM standards: fast fracture strength, fatique resistance, corrosion resistance, thermal shock, and fracture toughness. All ceramic materials examined showed excellent wear properties and resistance to the corrosive diesel engine environments. The study concluded that the ceramics examined did not meet all of the cylinder head insert structural design requirements. Therefore we do not recommend at this time their use for this application. The potential for increased stresses and temperatures in the hot section of the diesel engine combined with the highly corrosive combustion products and residues has driven the need for expanded materials capability for hot section engine components. Corrosion and strength requirements necessitate the examination of more advanced high temperture alloys. Alloy developments and the understanding of processing, structure, and properties of supperalloy materials have been driven, in large part, by the gas turbine community over the last fifty years. Characterization of these high temperature materials has, consequently, concentrated heavily upon application conditions similiar to to that encountered in the turbine engine environment. Significantly less work has been performed on hot corrosion degradation of these materials in a diesel engine environment. This report examines both the current high temperature alloy capability and examines the capability of advanced nickle-based alloys and methods to improve production costs. Microstructures, mechanical properties, and the oxidation/corrosion behavior of commercially available silicon nitride ceramics were investigated for diesel engine valve train applications. Contact, sliding, and scratch damage mechanisms of commercially available silicon nitride ceramics were investigated as a function of microstructure. The silicon nitrides with a course microstructure showed a higher material removal rate that agrees with a higher wear volume in the sliding contact tests. The overall objective of this program is to develop catalyst materials systems for an advanced Lean-NOx aftertreatment system that will provide high NOx reduction with minimum engine fuel efficiency penalty. With Government regulations on diesel engine NOx emissions increasingly becoming more restrictive, engine manufacturers are finding it difficult to meet the regulations solely with engine design strategies (i.e. improved combustion, retarded timing, exhaust gas recirculation, etc.). Aftertreatment is the logical technical approach that will be necessary to achieve the required emission levels while at the same time minimally impacting the engine design and its associated reliability and durability concerns.

  13. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-06-17

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the waste form.

  14. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  15. Processing and Microstructural Engineering ofProcessing and Microstructural Engineering of Advanced CeramicsAdvanced Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messing, Gary L.

    CeramicsAdvanced Ceramics Dr. Gary L. MessingDr. Gary L. Messing (Top Row Left to Right): Mike Ruffin, Adam particles to make either highly textured piezoelectric ceramics or single crystals from a polycrystalline ceramic Grain oriented microstructure produced by templated grain growth (TGG) in a Sr2Nb2O7 matrix

  16. Bonding and Structure of Ceramic-Ceramic Interfaces Kohei Shimamura,1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    interfacial design of high-temperature ceramic composites for broad applications such as power generation [3,4]) play a deci- sive role in determining material properties of ceramics. An archetypal ceramic-ceramic service temperatures in their applications such as turbines in power generators [9]. Though structural

  17. ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Print Thursday, 27 September 2012 00:00 ritchie ceramics This 3D image of a ceramic composite specimen imaged under load at 1750C shows the detailed fracture patterns...

  18. Transient liquid phase ceramic bonding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glaeser, Andreas M. (Berkeley, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Ceramics are joined to themselves or to metals using a transient liquid phase method employing three layers, one of which is a refractory metal, ceramic or alloy. The refractory layer is placed between two metal layers, each of which has a lower melting point than the refractory layer. The three layers are pressed between the two articles to be bonded to form an assembly. The assembly is heated to a bonding temperature at which the refractory layer remains solid, but the two metal layers melt to form a liquid. The refractory layer reacts with the surrounding liquid and a single solid bonding layer is eventually formed. The layers may be designed to react completely with each other and form refractory intermetallic bonding layers. Impurities incorporated into the refractory metal may react with the metal layers to form refractory compounds. Another method for joining ceramic articles employs a ceramic interlayer sandwiched between two metal layers. In alternative embodiments, the metal layers may include sublayers. A method is also provided for joining two ceramic articles using a single interlayer. An alternate bonding method provides a refractory-metal oxide interlayer placed adjacent to a strong oxide former. Aluminum or aluminum alloys are joined together using metal interlayers.

  19. Process for strengthening silicon based ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A. J.

    1993-04-06

    A process for strengthening silicon based ceramic monolithic materials and omposite materials that contain silicon based ceramic reinforcing phases that requires that the ceramic be exposed to a wet hydrogen atmosphere at about 1400.degree. C. The process results in a dense, tightly adherent silicon containing oxide layer that heals, blunts , or otherwise negates the detrimental effect of strength limiting flaws on the surface of the ceramic body.

  20. Process for strengthening silicon based ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee (Oak Ridge, TN); Moorhead, A. J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1993-01-01

    A process for strengthening silicon based ceramic monolithic materials and omposite materials that contain silicon based ceramic reinforcing phases that requires that the ceramic be exposed to a wet hydrogen atmosphere at about 1400.degree. C. The process results in a dense, tightly adherent silicon containing oxide layer that heals, blunts , or otherwise negates the detrimental effect of strength limiting flaws on the surface of the ceramic body.

  1. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, R.L.

    1993-10-12

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  2. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, Richard L. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  3. Preparation of a dense, polycrystalline ceramic structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooley, Jason (Los Alamos, NM); Chen, Ching-Fong (Los Alamos, NM); Alexander, David (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-12-07

    Ceramic nanopowder was sealed inside a metal container under a vacuum. The sealed evacuated container was forced through a severe deformation channel at an elevated temperature below the melting point of the ceramic nanopowder. The result was a dense nanocrystalline ceramic structure inside the metal container.

  4. Preparation and characterization of transparent PZNPLZT ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Preparation and characterization of transparent PZN­PLZT ceramics Q.R Yin,a) A.L. Ding, X.S. Zheng, and P.S. Qiu The State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfire Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ding Xi Road, 200050, Shanghai, China M

  5. 4 YEAR FLIGHT PLAN: BFA in Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    4 YEAR FLIGHT PLAN: BFA in Ceramics FAU is committed to your success as a student. One way we Name: Z: Program: Date: Advisor: Contact: Flight Plan: BFA in Ceramics NOTE: Some students may from the college Student Advising Services (SAS). Students that are admitted to the BFA in Ceramics

  6. Domain switching in polycrystalline ferroelectric ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiangyu

    ARTICLES Domain switching in polycrystalline ferroelectric ceramics J. Y. LI1, R. C. ROGAN2,3, E:10.1038/nmat1485 Ferroelectric ceramics are widely used as sensors and actuators for their electro collective process in commercially used polycrystalline ceramics that are agglomerations of a very large

  7. High impact resistant ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derkacy, James A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1991-07-16

    A ceramic material and a method of forming a ceramic material which possesses a high impact resistance. The material comprises: (a) a first continuous phase of .beta.-SiC; and (b) a second phase of about 25-40 vol % TiB.sub.2. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is preferably used as a densification aid. The material is formed by hot-pressing the mixture at a temperature from greater than about 1800.degree. C. to less than the transition temperature of .beta.-SiC to .alpha.-SiC. The hot-pressing is performed at a pressure of about 2000 psi to about 4000 psi in an inert atmosphere for several hours and results in the formation of a two phase sintered ceramic composite material.

  8. High impact resistant ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derkacy, J.A.

    1991-07-16

    A ceramic material and a method of forming a ceramic material which possesses a high impact resistance are disclosed. The material comprises: (a) a first continuous phase of [beta]-SiC; and (b) a second phase of about 25-40 vol % TiB[sub 2]. Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] is preferably used as a densification aid. The material is formed by hot-pressing the mixture at a temperature from greater than about 1800 C to less than the transition temperature of [beta]-SiC to [alpha]-SiC. The hot-pressing is performed at a pressure of about 2000 psi to about 4000 psi in an inert atmosphere for several hours and results in the formation of a two phase sintered ceramic composite material. 6 figures.

  9. Process for making ceramic insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Akash, Akash (Salt Lake City, UT); Balakrishnan, G. Nair (Sandy, UT)

    2009-12-08

    A method is provided for producing insulation materials and insulation for high temperature applications using novel castable and powder-based ceramics. The ceramic components produced using the proposed process offers (i) a fine porosity (from nano-to micro scale); (ii) a superior strength-to-weight ratio; and (iii) flexibility in designing multilayered features offering multifunctionality which will increase the service lifetime of insulation and refractory components used in the solid oxide fuel cell, direct carbon fuel cell, furnace, metal melting, glass, chemical, paper/pulp, automobile, industrial heating, coal, and power generation industries. Further, the ceramic components made using this method may have net-shape and/or net-size advantages with minimum post machining requirements.

  10. Ceramic materials testing and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilfinger, K. R., LLNL

    1998-04-30

    Certain refractory ceramics (notably oxides) have desirable properties suitable for the construction of ceramic waste containers for long term use in nuclear waste disposal applications. In particular, they are far less prone to environmental corrosion than metals under realistic repository conditions. The aqueous corrosion rates of oxides such as magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl{sub 2}0{sub 4}) and alumina (Al{sub 2}0{sub 4}) fall in the range of a few millimeters per million years. Oxide ceramics are also not likely to be subject to microbiologically influenced corrosion, which apparently can attack most, if not all, of the available engineering metals. Ceramics have a reputation for poor mechanical performance and large, impermeable objects are not easily fabricated by most current fabrication methods. As a result, the most promising approach for incorporating ceramics in large waste packages appears to be to apply a high density ceramic coating to a supporting metallic structure. Ceramic coatings 2048 applied by a thermal spray technique can be made effectively seamless and provide a method for final closure of the waste package while maintaining low average temperatures for the entire assembly. The corrosion resistance of the ceramic should prevent or delay water penetration to the underlying metal, which will in turn provide most of the mechanical strength and toughness required by the application. In this way, the major concerns regarding the ceramic coating become ensuring it is impervious to moisture, its adherence and its resistance to mechanical stresses during handling or resulting from rock fall in the repository. Without water, electrochemical corrosion and microbiologically influenced corrosion processes are considered impossible, so a complete coating should protect the metal vessels for far longer than the current design requirements. Even an imperfect coating should extend the life of the package, delaying the onset and reducing the severity of corrosion by limiting the transport of water and oxygen to the ceramic-metal interface. Thermal spray techniques for ceramic coating metallic structures are currently being explored. The mechanics of thermal spray resembles spray painting in many respects, allowing large surfaces and contours to be covered smoothly. All of the relevant thermal spray processes use a high energy input to melt or partially melt a powdered oxide material, along with a high velocity gas to impinge the molten droplets onto a substrate where they conform, quench, solidify and adhere mechanically. The energy input can be an arc generated plasma, an oxy-fuel flame or an explosion. The appropriate feed material and the resulting coating morphologies vary with technique as well as with application parameters. To date on this project, several versions of arc plasma systems, a detonation coating system and two variations of high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) fired processes have been investigated, operating on several different ceramic materials.

  11. Surface treatment of ceramic articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Komvopoulos, Kyriakos (Orinda, CA); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA); Wei, Bo (Daly City, CA); Anders, Simone (Albany, CA); Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Bhatia, C. Singh (Morgan Hill, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A process for producing an article with improved ceramic surface properties including providing an article having a ceramic surface, and placing the article onto a conductive substrate holder in a hermetic enclosure. Thereafter a low pressure ambient is provided in the hermetic enclosure. A plasma including ions of solid materials is produced the ceramic surface of the article being at least partially immersed in a macroparticle free region of the plasma. While the article is immersed in the macroparticle free region, a bias of the substrate holder is biased between a low voltage at which material from the plasma condenses on the surface of the article and a high negative voltage at which ions from the plasma are implanted into the article.

  12. Surface treatment of ceramic articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, C.S.

    1998-12-22

    A process is disclosed for producing an article with improved ceramic surface properties including providing an article having a ceramic surface, and placing the article onto a conductive substrate holder in a hermetic enclosure. Thereafter a low pressure ambient is provided in the hermetic enclosure. A plasma including ions of solid materials is produced the ceramic surface of the article being at least partially immersed in a macroparticle free region of the plasma. While the article is immersed in the macroparticle free region, a bias of the substrate holder is biased between a low voltage at which material from the plasma condenses on the surface of the article and a high negative voltage at which ions from the plasma are implanted into the article. 15 figs.

  13. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  14. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  15. A novel biomimetic approach to the design of high-performance ceramic/metal composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Launey, Maximilien E.

    2010-01-01

    freeze casting for ceramics with  nonaqueous sublimable design  of  toughened  ceramics.   J.   Am.   Ceram.  simple  way to make tough ceramics.  Nature 347, 455?457.  (

  16. In situ TEM Nanomechanical Testing of Ceramics: Room-Temperature Plastic Deformation Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiani, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Handbook of advanced ceramics: materials, applications,UHTCs: Ultra-high temperature ceramic materials for extremeultra-high temperature ceramic materials,” J. Eur. Ceram.

  17. Heat exchanger with ceramic elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John A. (North Troy, NY)

    1986-01-01

    An annular heat exchanger assembly includes a plurality of low thermal growth ceramic heat exchange members with inlet and exit flow ports on distinct faces. A mounting member locates each ceramic member in a near-annular array and seals the flow ports on the distinct faces into the separate flow paths of the heat exchanger. The mounting member adjusts for the temperature gradient in the assembly and the different coefficients of thermal expansion of the members of the assembly during all operating temperatures.

  18. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  19. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, M.A.

    1990-01-16

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, where after the product may be sintered.

  20. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN)

    2009-11-24

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  1. Compliant sleeve for ceramic turbine blades

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Hongda (Chandler, AZ); Narasimhan, Dave (Flemington, NJ); Strangman, Thomas E. (Phoenix, AZ); Easley, Michael L. (Tempe, AZ); Schenk, Bjoern (Phoenix, AZ)

    2000-01-01

    A compliant sleeve for attaching a ceramic member to a metal member is comprised of a superalloy substrate having a metal contacting side and a ceramic contacting side. The ceramic contacting side is plated with a layer of nickel followed by a layer of platinum. The substrate is then oxidized to form nickel oxide scale on the ceramic contacting side and a cobalt oxide scale on the metal contacting side. A lubricious coating of boron nitride is then applied over the metal contacting side, and a shear-stress limiting gold coating is applied over the ceramic contacting side.

  2. Login | Become a Member | Contact Us Journals of the American Physical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahar, Sultana Nurun

    Login | Become a Member | Contact Us Journals of the American Physical Society APS News Issue Archives Features Archives Announcements Contact APS News Physics Physics Today Capitol Hill Quarterly Huang, Roger Stuewer, and Blas Cabrera. American Physical Society Sites | APS | Journals | Physics

  3. The Path to the Table: Cooking in Postwar American Suburbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Timothy

    2008-08-08

    This work examines the foods eaten by postwar (1946 to 1965) American suburbanites to see how those foods were affected by larger trends in society. The work is divided into chapters which look the effects of, respectively, suburbanization...

  4. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  5. Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

  6. TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Sze-Bi

    and periodic points by either directly constructing a shift sequence or by applying results of M.I. Malkin [17 graphics. Received by the editors July 20, 1995 and, in revised form, October 16, 1996. 1991 Mathematics author's work was supported in part by Grant NSC 83-0208-M-007-003 from the National Council of Science

  7. TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddyn, Luis

    to be stated here. By default all graphs are finite directed 1991 Mathematics Subject Classification. 05C10, 05 VERTIGAN 3 , AND XUDING ZHU 4 Abstract. Let G be a directed graph embedded in a surface. A map # : E(G) # R Research Council of Canada, and the Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences. 2 Supported in part

  8. TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddyn, Luis

    description needs to be stated here. By default all graphs are finite directed 1991 Mathematics Subject, AND XUDING ZHU4 Abstract. Let G be a directed graph embedded in a surface. A map : E(G) R is a tension Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and the Pacific Institute for the Mathematical

  9. TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi, Changchang

    the Volkswagen Foundation (Research in Pairs Pro- gramme of the Mathematical Research Institute Oberwolfach). S

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simiæ, Slobodan N.

    distributions is Lipschitz, admits a global cross section. The main purpose of this paper is to generalize of the theorem to the question of existence of global cross sections to Anosov flows. Accordingly, the paper words and phrases. Distribution, foliation, Anosov flow, cross section. Part of this research

  11. PROCEEDINCIS O F THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarov, Nikolai

    -developed selfadjointness techniques of such ODE's (see e.g. Weidman 1151). Our goal here is to prove Behncke's result using operator theoretic methods. Absorbing p/2m into V, (2) finally becomes In order to study (27, it turns out notice that by the spectral theorem, if C is self-adjoint, then C 2is densely defined and selfadjoint

  12. BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharpley, Robert

    and for M spaces, but these topics will be reported on elsewhere. The Banach space A^ [1, p. 65 £ >(s)ds/sn^(Mn)(0, where Cw=min,=1.2(0,(0/^(0)- For each in A^., Tn belongs to Av. and rw has operator

  13. TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippas, Stathis

    in the study of the stability of solutions of semilinear elliptic and parabolic equations [PV], [BV], [V, 1 k N. In the case k = N we adopt the convention that K is a point. In our approach the following

  14. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dormy, Emmanuel

    ) n(x), where (, n) is the Fr´enet frame. It is then natural to consider an approximation of the type

  15. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Saugata

    ­0347(99)00311­2 Article electronically published on July 20, 1999 COMPUTING ROADMAPS OF SEMI­ALGEBRAIC SETS ON A VARIETY of semi­algebraically connected components ([5], page 34). A roadmap of S, which we denote R(S); is a semi­algebraic set of dimension at most one contained in S which satisfies the roadmap conditions: RM1 For every semi

  16. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollack, Richard

    -0347(99)00311-2 Article electronically published on July 20, 1999 COMPUTING ROADMAPS OF SEMI-ALGEBRAIC SETS ON A VARIETY 34). A roadmap of S, which we denote R(S); is a semi-algebraic set of dimensionat most one contained in S which satis es the roadmap conditions: RM1 For every semi-algebraically connected component C of S, C \\R

  17. BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uribe, Bernardo

    be a topological group. By a G-space X we mean a topological space X together with a left action of G on X. Under the assumption that G is a compact Lie group, a discrete group or an abelian locally compact group, we of all G-pairs and G-maps, which both satisfy all seven equivariant Eilenberg-Steenrod axioms and which

  18. American Chemical Society Webinar August 8, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Taekjip

    and Invention," Founders Award Lecture, National Academy of Engineering, Washington, D.C., Sept. 1992 Documentation License, Version 1.2. Copyright © 2013 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois August

  19. of the American Physical Society Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    a number of opportunities for APS members to become involved in activities related to physics and education the 2005 World Year of Physics. · Honor an APS member who has made a significant con- tribution to the inter-relation of physics, physicists, and education by submitting a nomination for APS Fellow

  20. PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and @u @#23; = 1. AMS Subject Classi#12;cation. 35K55,35K65,80A25 Key Words and Phrases. Free boundary

  1. AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY (ACS) PROJECT SEED 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turc, Catalin

    not be that of dishwasher or observer. The program implies no employee/employer relationship. 2. Student Pre

  2. The Role of Food in American Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballard, Hannah; Heiman, Kelly; Kimmel, Wes; Barnard, Julia; Holmes, Tyler

    2010-06-11

    Potawatomi managed to resist missionization and a subsequent loss of identity. Additionally, by behav- ing in this manner, the Potawatomi men preserved their culturally sanctioned role in food production. The male food responsibility was centered on hunting... stream_size 170307 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name The Role of Food.pdf.txt stream_source_info The Role of Food.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 The Role of Food...

  3. Thomas selected as American Chemical Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnologyTel:February 25, 2015 |7 D I S C L APrincipalThomas

  4. Hobart named American Chemical Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D. Title:HighlightsPhysicsEnergyArgonne'sofHobart

  5. Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidentialLensless Imaging ofLibSciTeaming

  6. Hobart named American Chemical Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHigh energyHighland View school4-TP59.01 C5;44Meeting of the

  7. Moore named an American Statistical Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7ModificationsMonitoring

  8. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  9. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  10. Method of forming a ceramic to ceramic joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cutler, Raymond Ashton; Hutchings, Kent Neal; Kleinlein, Brian Paul; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2010-04-13

    A method of joining at least two sintered bodies to form a composite structure, includes: providing a joint material between joining surfaces of first and second sintered bodies; applying pressure from 1 kP to less than 5 MPa to provide an assembly; heating the assembly to a conforming temperature sufficient to allow the joint material to conform to the joining surfaces; and further heating the assembly to a joining temperature below a minimum sintering temperature of the first and second sintered bodies. The joint material includes organic component(s) and ceramic particles. The ceramic particles constitute 40-75 vol. % of the joint material, and include at least one element of the first and/or second sintered bodies. Composite structures produced by the method are also disclosed.

  11. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-07-13

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 C to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  12. Synthesis of Micro/Nano Crystalline Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Philip; Isac, Jayakumari [Centre for Condensed Matter, Department of Physics, CMS College, Kottayam, Kerala, India Department of Physics, CMS College, Kottayam, Kerala (India); Isac, Sheelakumari [Department of Chemistry, UC College, Aluva, Kerala (India); Abraham, Rosalin [Department of Physics, St. Dominics College, Kanjirappally, Kottayam, Kerala (India)

    2008-04-23

    As a matter of fact almost every industrial production line, office and home is dependant on ceramic materials. Newly designed devices incorporate ceramic materials because of their useful chemical, electrical, mechanical, thermal and structural properties. The effectiveness of a large system depends critically on its ceramic components. That is ceramics are important, first because they comprise a large basic industry and second because their properties are essential for many applications. Ceramics are more stable than metals both in chemical and thermal environments. In this work the authors describes a method for the preparation of PBT ceramics material from lead oxide (PbO), barium carbonate and titanium oxide based on pre-calcinations of oxides. The results were analyzed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) and TGA. XRD and SEM studies revealed that its particle size is in nanometer range. Dielectric studies were conducted at a frequency range of 100 KHz to 13 MHz. Mechanical properties were calculated.

  13. Process for making ceramic hot gas filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski (Wilmington, DE); Forsythe, George Daniel (Landenberg, PA); Domanski, Daniel Matthew (New Castle, DE); Chambers, Jeffrey Allen (Hockessin, DE); Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam (Boothwyn, PA)

    2001-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  14. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-01-12

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  15. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    1999-07-13

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  16. Metal-to-ceramic attachment device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pavelka, Edwin A. (Bartlesville, OK); Grindstaff, Quirinus G. (Bartlesville, OK); Scheppele, Stuart E. (Bartlesville, OK)

    1985-01-01

    A metal-to-ceramic fastening device is disclosed for securing a metal member to a ceramic member with respective confronting surfaces thereon clamped together, comprising a threaded bolt adapted to extend through a bolt hole in the metal member and into an aligned opening in the ceramic member, a rod nut threadedly receiving the bolt and adapted to span the opening in the ceramic member, and a pressure limiting member received on the bolt between the nut and the confronting surface of the metal member for limiting the movement of the nut toward the metal member when the bolt is tightened, so as to limit the pressure applied by the nut to the ceramic member to avoid damage thereto. The fastening device also prevents damage to the ceramic member due to thermal stresses. The pressure limiting member may have a shallow dish-shaped depression facing the rod nut to assist in accommodating thermal stresses.

  17. Ceramic membranes having macroscopic channels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Peterson, Reid A. (Madison, WI)

    1996-01-01

    Methods have been developed to make porous ceramic membranes having macroscopic channels therethrough. The novel membranes are formed by temporarily supporting the sol-gel membrane precursor on an organic support which is ultimately removed from the interior of the membrane, preferably by pyrolysis or by chemical destruction. The organic support may also include an inorganic metal portion that remains on destruction of the organic portion, providing structural support and/or chemical reactivity to the membrane. The channels formed when the organic support is destroyed provide the ability to withdraw small catalytic products or size-separated molecules from the metal oxide membrane. In addition, the channel-containing membranes retain all of the advantages of existing porous ceramic membranes.

  18. Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Clinton Gregory

    2010-01-01

    et al. , Trilayered Ceramic-Metal-Polymer MicrocantileversPolymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors byLin Spring 2010 Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal

  19. FUNDAMENTALS OF WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pask, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS Jo s eph A.OF WETTING AND BONDING BETWEEN CERAMICS AND METALS Joseph A.and glass-to-metal or ceramic-to-metal seals. Both physical

  20. Identification of the Charge Carriers in Cerium Phosphate Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Hannah L.

    2010-01-01

    R. Jurado, G. C. Mather, Ceramics International, 35, 1481-Carriers in Cerium Phosphate Ceramics Hannah L. Ray a,b , L.When the density of a ceramic is this low, it is possible

  1. Post-Formative Ceramics in the Eastern Grat Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Donald W

    1986-01-01

    Great Salt Lake Fremont Ceramics. In: The Levee Site and the1986). Post-Formative Ceramics in the Eastern Great Basin: A1977 Prehistoric Ceramics of the Fremont. Museiun of

  2. Suppression of Cavity Formation in Ceramics: Prospects for Superplasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suppression of Cavity Formation in Ceramics: Prospects for Superplasticity A. G. EVANS* Materials, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 Ceramics exhibit macroscopic stressistrain rate relations- tive surface diffusivities must be selected. I. Introduction HEN polycrystalline ceramic materials

  3. Processing and Applications of Nanostructured Ceramics Wednesday September 16, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Processing and Applications of Nanostructured Ceramics Wednesday September 16, 2009 Burchard 118 Methods will be described for the production and consolidation of metastable ceramic powders to yield fully dense nanostructured ceramics, including single- and multi-phase systems. Metastable powders

  4. Thermodynamics and kinetics of ceramic/metal interfacial interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arróyave, Raymundo, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic/metal interfaces occur in a great number of important applications, such as ceramic/metal composites, microelectronics packaging, ceramic/metal seals, and so forth. Understanding the formation and evolution of such ...

  5. Method for preparing Pb-. beta. ''-alumina ceramic

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hellstrom, E.E.

    1984-08-30

    A process is disclosed for preparing impermeable, polycrystalline samples of Pb-..beta..''-alumina ceramic from Na-..beta..''-alumina ceramic by ion exchange. The process comprises two steps. The first step is a high-temperature vapor phase exchange of Na by K, followed by substitution of Pb for K by immersing the sample in a molten Pb salt bath. The result is a polycrystalline Pb-..beta..''-alumina ceramic that is substantially crack-free.

  6. Low Cost Ceramics:Low Cost Ceramics: Applications in Water FiltrationApplications in Water Filtration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Low Cost Ceramics:Low Cost Ceramics: Applications in Water FiltrationApplications in Water as a SolutionCeramics as a Solution Low Materials CostLow Materials Cost Worldwide Availability ­ Variable change in head of water Qcw = (k/)(2R/lcw) 0 hw (hw)d (RR1)L = (R1R2)1 (approx.) R = R

  7. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report. DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  8. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF POROUS PNZT POLYCRYSTALLINE CERAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswas, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    F. P. Knudsen, "Dependence of Mechanical Strength of BrittleMicrostruc- ture on the Mechanical Properties of Ceramics,"of Porosity on the Mechanical Properties of Lead Zirconate-

  9. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  10. ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and hence has industry players heavily interested and invested. Termed ceramic-matrix composites, the materials that Ritchie (on right in photo), specifically with his...

  11. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalatur, Ekaterina Narikovich, Anton; Buyakova, Svetlana E-mail: kulkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Kulkov, Sergey E-mail: kulkov@ispms.tsc.ru

    2014-11-14

    The article studies the porous ceramics consisting of ultra-fine ZrO{sub 2} powders. The porosity of ceramic samples varied from 15% to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials had a cellular configuration. The distinctive feature of all experimentally obtained strain diagrams is their nonlinearity at low deformations characterized by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformations shown in strain diagrams is due to the mechanical instability of cellular elements of the ceramic framework.

  12. Segmented ceramic liner for induction furnaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorin, A.H.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1994-07-26

    A non-fibrous ceramic liner for induction furnaces is provided by vertically stackable ring-shaped liner segments made of ceramic material in a light-weight cellular form. The liner segments can each be fabricated as a single unit or from a plurality of arcuate segments joined together by an interlocking mechanism. Also, the liner segments can be formed of a single ceramic material or can be constructed of multiple concentric layers with the layers being of different ceramic materials and/or cellular forms. Thermomechanically damaged liner segments are selectively replaceable in the furnace. 5 figs.

  13. Segmented ceramic liner for induction furnaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorin, Andrew H. (Knoxville, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A non-fibrous ceramic liner for induction furnaces is provided by vertically stackable ring-shaped liner segments made of ceramic material in a light-weight cellular form. The liner segments can each be fabricated as a single unit or from a plurality of arcuate segments joined together by an interlocking mechanism. Also, the liner segments can be formed of a single ceramic material or can be constructed of multiple concentric layers with the layers being of different ceramic materials and/or cellular forms. Thermomechanically damaged liner segments are selectively replaceable in the furnace.

  14. Surface micromachining of unfired ceramic sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheaume, Jonathan M.; Pisano, Albert P.

    2011-01-01

    of yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic material. ReversibleYSZ yttria-stabilized zirconia 1 Introduction Since theand yttria-stabilized zirconia are not semicon- ducting.

  15. Tough Ceramic Mimics Mother of Pearl

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Robert Ritchie

    2010-01-08

    Berkeley Lab scientists have mimicked the structure of mother of pearl to create what may well be the toughest ceramic ever produced.

  16. Tough Ceramic Mimics Mother of Pearl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Ritchie

    2008-12-05

    Berkeley Lab scientists have mimicked the structure of mother of pearl to create what may well be the toughest ceramic ever produced.

  17. A Tribute to Anthony G. Evans: Materials Scientist and Engineer December; 4, 1942September 9, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, John W.

    -cracking and transformation toughening of ceramics, ceramic matrix composites and metal matrix composites, thin film mechanics leader par excellence heading major projects on ceramic matrix com- posites, toughening of ceramics John W. Hutchinson January 4, 2011 THIS special issue of the Journal of the American Ceramics Society

  18. Microstructural Characterization of Hard Ceramics Rohrer, G. S. (2014). Microstructural Characterization of Hard Ceramics. In V.K.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Microstructural Characterization of Hard Ceramics Rohrer, G. S. (2014). Microstructural Characterization of Hard Ceramics. In V.K. Sarin (Editor-in-Chief) & L #12;Microstructural Characterization of Hard Ceramics p. 2 4. Summary

  19. Advanced High Porosity Ceramic Honeycomb Wall Flow Filters |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Porosity Ceramic Honeycomb Wall Flow Filters Advanced High Porosity Ceramic Honeycomb Wall Flow Filters 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007)....

  20. Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Print Tuesday, 11 December 2012 14:54 Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh operational temperatures projected for...

  1. Middle Bronze Age Ceramic Vessels from Kamid el-Loz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantazariti, Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    and reconstruction of the ceramic vessel economic systemsmainly complete ceramic vessels and, more specifically,chemical composition of the vessel. This was particularly

  2. Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Parts (AMD-704) Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium...

  3. Advanced Ceramic Filter For Diesel Emission Control | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ceramic Filter For Diesel Emission Control Advanced Ceramic Filter For Diesel Emission Control 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Dow Automotive...

  4. Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Print Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh operational temperatures projected for hypersonic jet and next-generation...

  5. Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  6. Tough Ceramic Mimics Mother of Pearl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Berkeley Lab scientists have mimicked the structure of mother of pearl to create what may well be the toughest ceramic ever produced. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/12/05/scientists-create-tough-ceramic-that-mimics-mother-of-pearl/

  7. Tough Ceramic Mimics Mother of Pearl

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ritchie, Robert

    2013-05-29

    Berkeley Lab scientists have mimicked the structure of mother of pearl to create what may well be the toughest ceramic ever produced. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/12/05/scientists-create-tough-ceramic-that-mimics-mother-of-pearl/

  8. High temperature ceramic/metal joint structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  9. 1038 VOLUME 43J O U R N A L O F A P P L I E D M E T E O R O L O G Y 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Society Quantifying Precipitation Suppression Due to Air Pollution AMIR GIVATI AND DANIEL ROSENFELD January 2004) ABSTRACT Urban air pollution and industrial air pollution have been shown qualitatively. The evidence suggests that air-pollution aerosols that are incorporated in orographic clouds slow down cloud

  10. MAY 2004 1103G U T I E R R E Z D E V E L A S C O A N D W I N A N T 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winant, Clinton D.

    Society Wind- and Density-Driven Circulation in a Well-Mixed Inverse Estuary GUILLERMO GUTIE´ RREZ DE, Mexico CLINTON D. WINANT Integrative Oceanography Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography on the Pacific coast of Baja California in Mexico, has been shown to be driven by tides. Here the subtidal

  11. 1394 VOLUME 59J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, M. Joan

    knowledge of wave sources and our understanding of the mechanisms for wave generation would be com- plete Meteorological Society Latitudinal Variations Observed in Gravity Waves with Short Vertical Wavelengths M. JOAN TOSHITAKA TSUDA Radio Science Center for Space and Atmosphere, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan ROBERT A

  12. VOLUME 27 JULY 1997J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1997 American Meteorological Society 1181

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    Meteorological Society 1181 Sediment Resuspension and Mixing by Resonantly Generated Internal Solitary Waves D leading ISW. The leading ISW gave rise to reversed flow in an 8-m layer above the bottom. It is argued 1991). This situation reinforces the importance of resuspension and mixing processes at the present

  13. VOLUME 29 MARCH 1999J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1999 American Meteorological Society 313

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Rui Xin

    jet stream. 1. Introduction Sea surface height (SSH), as measured by a radar altimeter, contains Meteorological Society 313 Seasonal Variations of Sea Surface Height in the Gulf Stream Region* KATHRYN A. KELLY Based on more than four years of altimetric sea surface height (SSH) data, the Gulf Stream shows

  14. 1910 VOLUME 29J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Meteorological Society Jet Streaks in the Gulf Stream STEPHAN D. HOWDEN* AND D. RANDOLPH WATTS Graduate School. The presence of the jet streaks can be explained kinematically as a superposition of the Gulf Stream differs from the canonical picture of jet streak/baroclinic wave development in the atmospheric jet stream

  15. 1488 VOLUME 29J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCreary Jr., Julian P.

    Meteorological Society A Climatology of the Circulation and Water Mass Distribution near the Philippine Coast by using historical data combined with observations from dozens of recent cruises near the Philippine coast the Philippine coast. 1. Introduction Recent studies of decadal climate variability have fo- cused on the water

  16. VOLUME 30 1 AUGUST 2000J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2000 American Meteorological Society 1833

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    Meteorological Society 1833 Ocean Radiant Heating. Part I: Optical Influences J. CARTER OHLMANN Scripps ocean. Results indicate that net irradiance at 10 cm and 5 m can vary by 23 and 34 W m 2 , respectively transmission in the upper few meters as a greater portion of the irradiance exists in the deep-penetrating

  17. 3528 VOLUME 32J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    current breaks up into a series of plumes that penetrate downslope into the deeper ocean, producing strong Meteorological Society Instability of Abyssal Currents in a Continuously Stratified Ocean with Bottom Topography. The instability manifests itself in the overlying ocean as an amplifying topographic Rossby wave. Alternating

  18. 1036 VOLUME 34J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drijfhout, Sybren

    energy. This increase in the energy conversion is absent in the wind-driven case, indicating an important Meteorological Society Remote Wind-Driven Overturning in the Absence of the Drake Passage Effect BARRY A. KLINGER Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany JEFFERY R. SCOTT Massachusetts Institute

  19. 140 VOLUME 59J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauluis, Olivier M.

    Meteorological Society Entropy Budget of an Atmosphere in Radiative­Convective Equilibrium. Part II: Latent Heat to the regions where condensation occurs. This transport is associated with three other aspects of convection, providing a quantitative relationship between these three aspects of moist convection. The water vapor

  20. 2320 VOLUME 33J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huck, Thierry

    Meteorological Society Basin-Mode Interactions and Selection by the Mean Flow in a Reduced´ Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France THIERRY HUCK Laboratoire de Physique des Oce´ans, CNRS, Brest of Rossby basin modes are investigated in the reduced-gravity quasigeostrophic framework. The linear

  1. Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kramer, D.P.

    1984-04-19

    A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

  2. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    2001-04-10

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  3. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    1999-01-12

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  4. Method and apparatus for ceramic analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowiak, Ryszard J. (Ames, IA); Schilling, Chris (Ames, IA); Small, Gerald J. (Ames, IA); Tomasik, Piotr (Cracow, PL)

    2003-04-01

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for ceramic analysis, in particular, a method for analyzing density, density gradients and/or microcracks, including an apparatus with optical instrumentation for analysis of density, density gradients and/or microcracks in ceramics. The method provides analyzing density of a ceramic comprising exciting a component on a surface/subsurface of the ceramic by exposing the material to excitation energy. The method may further include the step of obtaining a measurement of an emitted energy from the component. The method may additionally include comparing the measurement of the emitted energy from the component with a predetermined reference measurement so as to obtain a density for said ceramic.

  5. Book Reviews: Indigenous Peoples, Civil Society, and the Neo-Liberal State in Latin America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Jean E.

    “Civil society”: what’s in it for Latin American indigenous peoples? Ten essays penned by anthropologists, historians and activists grapple with this question in this very welcome volume. The value of ethnographic research ...

  6. Coors Ceramics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercialRenewableGlobal L P JumpFarm ToolCoors Ceramics

  7. Material Properties of Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramic/Wood Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Material Properties of Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramic/Wood Interfaces M.J. Benjamin, K Chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs) are man made inorganic solids that lie in between hydraulic cements and ceramics . Normally, ceramics are sintered at temperatures ranging from 700-2000C

  8. The effective pyroelectric and thermal expansion coefficients of ferroelectric ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiangyu

    The effective pyroelectric and thermal expansion coefficients of ferroelectric ceramics JiangYu Li ceramics in terms of their microstructural information. The overall behaviors of ferroelectric ceramics be induced in an originally isotropic, thus non-pyroelectric ceramic composed of randomly oriented

  9. Air Brazing: A New Method of Ceramic-Ceramic and Ceramic-Metal Joining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weil, K. Scott; Darsell, Jens T.; Kim, Jin Yong

    2011-10-01

    A new method of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal joining has emerged over the past several years. Referred to as air brazing, the technique was originally designed and developed for use in fabricating high-temperature solid-state electrochemical devices such as planar SOFCs and oxygen and hydrogen concentrators. The primary advantage of air brazing is that a predominantly metallic joint can be formed directly in air without need of an inert cover gas or the use of surface reactive fluxes. The resulting bond is hermetic, offers excellent room temperature strength, and is inherently resistant to oxidation at high temperature. The key to developing a successful filler metal composition for air brazing is to identify a metal oxide wetting agent that is mutually soluble in a molten noble metal solvent. One particular oxide-metal combination that appears readily suited for this purpose is CuOx-Ag, a system originally of interest in the development of silver clad cuprate-based superconductors. Studies of the equilibrium phases studies in this system indicate that there are two invariant points in the pseudobinary CuOx-Ag phase diagram around which new braze compositions can be developed: 1) a monotectic reaction at 969±1°C, where CuO and a Ag-rich liquid L1 coexist with a second CuOx-rich liquid phase L2 at a composition of xAg/(xAg + xCu) = 0.10±0.03 Ag and 2) a eutectic reaction at 942±1°C, where CuO and Ag coexist with L1 at a composition of xAg/(xAg + xCu) = 0.99±0.005. Specifically, near-eutectic Ag-CuO filler metal compositions have shown good promise in joining electrochemically active ceramics such as yttria-stabilized zirconia, lanthanum strontium manganite, and barium strontium cobalt ferrite, as well as alumina and magnesia. More recently it has been found that various ternary additions can further improve the wetting characteristics of these filler metals, increase their potential operating temperatures, and/or increase the resulting strength of the joint strength. Here we review the basic concept of air brazing and illustrate filler metal selection and design using the Ag-CuO system as an example.

  10. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 141:14801491, 2012 C American Fisheries Society 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Feeding­Fasting Cycles on Oxygen Consumption and Bioenergetics of Female Yellow Perch Travis W. Schaeffer­fast cycles. Hyperphagia occurred in all treatments. Bioenergetics model simulations indicated, we found no evidence that respiration rates varied with CG, implying that yellow perch bioenergetics

  11. American Fisheries Society Symposium 79:185203, 2012 2012 by the American Fisheries Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, David W.

    of Oceanography Post Office Box 1006, 1 Challenger Drive, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia B2Y 4A2, Canada Neal r. Pettigrew of Oceanography Post Office Box 1006, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia B2Y 4A2, Canada DaviD w. towNSeND School of Marine Sciences, University of Maine Orono, Maine 04469, USA guoqi haN Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Center Post

  12. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 131:698717, 2002 American Fisheries Society 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwak, Thomas J.

    AND THOMAS J. KWAK*2 Arkansas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit,3 U.S. Geological Survey period typically occurs that results in survival to the yearling stage as low as 3% (Mills 1971; Elliott

  13. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 141:907918, 2012 C American Fisheries Society 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Bryan D.

    salmon) Oncorhynchus masou, and Sakhalin taimen (also known as Japanese huchen) Hucho perryi, either

  14. American Fisheries Society Symposium 45:249291, 2005 2005 by the American Fisheries Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), Catostomidae (13), Centrarchidae (12), and Salmonidae (10), the five most specious. Native fishes compose 79

  15. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 124 :285-296 . 1995 American Fisheries Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - dition to the growing list of salmonid fishes con- sidered under the Endangered Species Act (Office by fishing, or dams and diversions that influence migratory cor- ridors . Fishery managers are attempting

  16. A novel biomimetic approach to the design of high-performance ceramic/metal composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Launey, Maximilien E.

    2010-01-01

    temperature freeze casting for ceramics with  nonaqueous X)  Deville, S.  2008 Freeze?casting of porous ceramics: A spacing  during  freeze  casting  of  ceramics  using 

  17. An Investigation into the Chemistry and Removal of Unrefined Shellac from Ceramic Substrates via Hydrolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Cindy Lee

    2012-01-01

    and Restoration of Ceramics. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann.Shellac Adhesive from Ceramics. ” Studies in ConservationDye Staining on White Ground Ceramics. University of Texas.

  18. Social boundaries and state formation in ancient Edom : a comparative ceramic approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Neil G.

    2009-01-01

    A. L. N. 1992. "Factors Affecting Ceramic Standardization,"in Ceramic Production and Distribution: An IntegratedTypology and Classification of Ceramics Based on Curvature

  19. ADVANCED ELECTRON BEAM TECHNIQUES FOR METALLIC AND CERAMIC PROTECTIVE COATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    78848, 1978, ( 3) R. Kamo, 11 Ceramics for Diesel Engines,"Proceedings of Workshop on Ceramics for Advanced HeatBEAM TECHNIQUES FOR METALLIC AND CERAMIC PROTECTIVE COATING

  20. Fatigue of ceramics at elevated temperatures: Microstructural design for optimal performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, R.O.; Chen, D.; Zhang, X.F.

    2000-01-01

    D IVISION FATIGUE OF CERAMICS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES:76SF00098. FATIGUE OF CERAMICS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES:silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics offer many advantages,

  1. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, II, George T. (Shedd, OR); Hansen, Jeffrey S. (Corvallis, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR); Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR)

    1998-01-01

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  2. Porous ceramic scaffolds with complex architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saiz, Eduardo; Munch, Etienne; Franco, Jaime; Deville, Sylvain; Hunger, Phillip; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2008-03-15

    This work compares two novel techniques for the fabrication of ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering with complex porosity: robocasting and freeze casting. Both techniques are based on the preparation of concentrated ceramic suspensions with suitable properties for the process. In robocasting, the computer-guided deposition of the suspensions is used to build porous materials with designed three dimensional (3-D) geometries and microstructures. Freeze casting uses ice crystals as a template to form porous lamellar ceramic materials. Preliminary results on the compressive strengths of the materials are also reported.

  3. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, George T., II; Hansen; Jeffrey S.; Oden; Laurance L.; Turner; Paul C.; Ochs; Thomas L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  4. CERAMIC WASTE FORM DATA PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

    2014-06-13

    The purpose of this data package is to provide information about simulated crystalline waste forms that can be used to select an appropriate composition for a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) proof of principle demonstration. Melt processing, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and thermal analysis information was collected to assess the ability of two potential candidate ceramic compositions to be processed in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) CCIM and to guide processing parameters for the CCIM operation. Given uncertainties in the CCIM capabilities to reach certain temperatures throughout the system, one waste form designated 'Fe-MP' was designed towards enabling processing and another, designated 'CAF-5%TM-MP' was designed towards optimized microstructure. Melt processing studies confirmed both compositions could be poured from a crucible at 1600{degrees}C although the CAF-5%TM-MP composition froze before pouring was complete due to rapid crystallization (upon cooling). X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed the crystalline nature and phase assemblages of the compositions. The kinetics of melting and crystallization appeared to vary significantly between the compositions. Impedance spectroscopy results indicated the electrical conductivity is acceptable with respect to processing in the CCIM. The success of processing either ceramic composition will depend on the thermal profiles throughout the CCIM. In particular, the working temperature of the pour spout relative to the bulk melter which can approach 1700{degrees}C. The Fe-MP composition is recommended to demonstrate proof of principle for crystalline simulated waste forms considering the current configuration of INL's CCIM. If proposed modifications to the CCIM can maintain a nominal temperature of 1600{degrees}C throughout the melter, drain, and pour spout, then the CAF-5%TM-MP composition should be considered for a proof of principle demonstration.

  5. Composite metal foil and ceramic fabric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, B.J.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Prater, J.T.; DeSteese, J.G.

    1992-03-24

    The invention comprises new materials useful in a wide variety of terrestrial and space applications. In one aspect, the invention comprises a flexible cloth-like material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of metallic foil. In another aspect, the invention includes a flexible fluid impermeable barrier comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric layer having metal wire woven therein. A metallic foil layer is incontinuously welded to the woven metal wire. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of an organic polymer. In still another aspect, the invention includes a rigid fabric structure comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric and a resinous support material which has been hardened as the direct result of exposure to ultraviolet light. Inventive methods for producing such material are also disclosed. 11 figs.

  6. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Helble, Joseph J. (Andover, MA); Moniz, Gary A. (Windham, NH); Morse, Theodore F. (Little Compton, RI)

    1997-02-04

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

  7. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Helble, Joseph J. (Andover, MA); Moniz, Gary A. (Windham, NH); Morse, Theodore F. (Little Compton, RI)

    1995-09-05

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

  8. Metallic nut for use with ceramic threads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA); Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

    1996-01-01

    A nozzle guide vane assembly has ceramic components therein having a conventional thread thereon including a preestablished pitch and having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion. The nozzle guide vane assembly has a metallic components therein having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater that the rate of thermal expansion of the ceramic components is positioned in a gas turbine engine. The metallic component, a nut, has a thread therein including a plurality of crests being spaced on a pitch equal to that of the ceramic component and has a pair of contacting surfaces extending from the plurality of crests. A notch spirally extends intermediate adjacent ones of the plurality of crests and has a preestablished depth which is at least twice the size of the conventional pitch. Furthermore, the pair of contacting surfaces are in contact with only a portion of the threaded surface of the ceramic components.

  9. Tile for Ceramic Cooling Tower Test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    In this study ceramics are used to study acculturation at two Spanish colonial sites in Texas. The sites are the Mission Nuestra Senora del Espiritu Santo de Zuniga and the Presidio Nuestra Senora de Loreto. Spanish sites provide us...

  10. Ceramics containing dispersants for improved fracture toughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nevitt, Michael V. (Wheaton, IL); Aldred, Anthony T. (Wheaton, IL); Chan, Sai-Kit (Darien, IL)

    1987-01-01

    The invention is a ceramic composition containing a new class of dispersant for hindering crack propagation by means of one or more energy-dissipative mechanisms. The composition is composed of a ceramic matrix with dispersed particles of a transformation-prone rare-earth niobate, tantalate or mixtures of these with each other and/or with a rare-earth vanadate. The dispersants, having a generic composition tRMO.sub.4, where R is a rare-earth element, B is Nb or Ta and O is oxygen, are mixed in powder form with a powder of the matrix ceramic and sintered to produce a ceramic form or body. The crack-hindering mechanisms operates to provide improved performance over a wide range of temperature and operating conditions.

  11. Method for treating beta-spodumene ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, J. Paul (Big Flats, NY); Hickman, David L. (Big Flats, NY)

    1994-09-27

    A vapor-phase method for treating a beta-spodumene ceramic article to achieve a substitution of exchangeable hydrogen ions for the lithium present in the beta-spodumene crystals, wherein a barrier between the ceramic article and the source of exchangeable hydrogen ions is maintained in order to prevent lithium contamination of the hydrogen ion source and to generate highly recoverable lithium salts, is provided.

  12. Auto-America: The Automobile and American Art, Circa 1900-1950

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerry N.

    2012-05-31

    technological novelty owned and operated by wealthy individuals to become a ubiquitous part of American society that stretched across the nation and touched all economic classes. When present in art, the automobile serves as a pregnant image of modernity...

  13. Free-electron laser scientist is one of two newly elected American...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Steve Benson Steve Benson of the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) group was recently selected as a 2002 Fellow of the American Physical Society Free-electron laser scientist is one of two...

  14. The perceived power: government and taxation during the American Civil War 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flaherty, Jane

    2006-04-12

    This dissertation examines how the internal revenue legislation enacted during the American Civil War fostered a new role for government in society. The delegates to the 1787 Constitutional Convention constructed a system ...

  15. Long Ways from Home: The Rhetoric and Performance of the American Folk Outlaw 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Damian

    2014-01-13

    This study traverses the unsettled outlaw territory that is simultaneously a part of and apart from settled American society by examining outlaw myth, performance, and perception over time. In this study the outlaw figure is de...

  16. STS.011 American Science: Ethical Conflicts and Political Choices, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gusterson, Hugh

    Explores the changing roles, ethical conflicts, and public perceptions of science and scientists in American society from World War II to the present. Studies specific historical episodes focusing on debates between ...

  17. Management -Professional Associations American Management Association (AMA) : The AMA provides trainings and valuable resources to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management - Professional Associations American Management Association (AMA) : The AMA provides and experience. The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM): SHRM is the world's largest association, dedicated to serving the needs of Human Resource Management Professionals. National Human Resources

  18. Development of a Templated Grain Growth System for Texturing Piezoelectric Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    Development of a Templated Grain Growth System for Texturing Piezoelectric Ceramics MATTHEW M be obtained from crystallographically textured piezoelectric ceramics. Single crystal piezoelectrics orientation. Single crystals actuate better than typical ceramics, but are expensive. Highly textured ceramics

  19. QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF THERMAL SHOCK IN CERAMICS BASED ON A NOVEL TEST TECHNIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faber, K.T.

    2013-01-01

    11 Biaxial Flexure Tests of Ceramic J. Mat. L [2] 188-194 (Crack Propagation in Brittle Ceramics, 11 Jnl. Amer. Ceram.1 Shock Resistance of Ceramics: Size and Geometry Effects in

  20. Counterflow diffusion flame synthesis of ceramic oxide powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, J.L.; Miquel, P.F.

    1997-07-22

    Ceramic oxide powders and methods for their preparation are revealed. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby one or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein the precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The nature of the ceramic oxide powder produced is determined by process conditions. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders may be varied by the temperature of the flame, the precursor concentration ratio, the gas stream and the gas velocity. 24 figs.

  1. Counterflow diffusion flame synthesis of ceramic oxide powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Joseph L. (Baltimore, MD); Miquel, Philippe F. (Towson, MD)

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic oxide powders and methods for their preparation are revealed. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby one or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein the precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The nature of the ceramic oxide powder produced is determined by process conditions. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders may be varied by the temperature of the flame, the precursor concentration ratio, the gas stream and the gas velocity.

  2. Method for producing ceramic-glass-ceramic seals by microwave heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blake, Rodger D. (Santa Fe, NM); Meek, Thomas T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01

    Method for producing a ceramic-glass-ceramic seal by the use of microwave energy, and a sealing mixture which comprises a glass sealing material, a coupling agent, and an oxidizer. The seal produced exhibits greater strength due to its different microstructure. Sodium nitrate is the most preferred oxidizer.

  3. Ceramic to metal attachment system. [Ceramic electrode to metal conductor in MHD generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marchant, D.D.

    1983-06-10

    A composition and method are described for attaching a ceramic electrode to a metal conductor. A layer of randomly interlocked metal fibers saturated with polyimide resin is sandwiched between the ceramic electrode and the metal conductor. The polyimide resin is then polymerized providing bonding.

  4. A novel biomimetic approach to the design of high-performance ceramic/metal composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Launey, Maximilien E.

    2010-01-01

    In  particular,  ceramic?matrix  composites  (CMCs)  are M.   2006  Ceramic  and  metal  matrix  composites:  Routes 

  5. September 14-16, 2004/ARR CERAMIC BREEDER BLANKET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    -CS engineering plan of action · Ceramic breeder modular design layout · Power cycle selection: Brayton cycle 4 Considerations on Choice of Module Design and Power Cycle for a Ceramic Breeder Concept

  6. A Mesoscopic Electromechanical Theory of Ferroelectric Films and Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik

    A Mesoscopic Electromechanical Theory of Ferroelectric Films and Ceramics Jiangyu Li and Kaushik the effective electromechanical behavior of ferroelectric ceramics and thin films. This paper specifically, saturation strain and the electromechanical moduli. We demonstrate remarkable agreement with experimental

  7. Finite element modeling of flow through ceramic pot filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Anna C

    2013-01-01

    Pure Home Water (PHW) is an organization based in Tamale, Ghana that manufactures and distributes ceramic water filters. While many ceramic filter factories manufacture flowerpot-shaped filters, PHW has transitioned from ...

  8. Dissolution Kinetics of Pyrochlore Ceramics for the Disposition of Plutonium.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Strachan, Denis M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Scheele, Randall D.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Steele, Jackie L.; Legore, Virginia L.

    2006-01-30

    This is an article in which the dissolution kinetics of titanate ceramics are reported and discussed. These ceramics are made with non-radioactive elements as analogues to those made with Pu.

  9. Performance study of the ceramic THGEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Jia-Qing; Hu, Tao; Lu, Jun-Guang; Zhou, Li; Qu, Guo-Pu; Cai, Xiao; Niu, Shun-Li; Chen, Hai-Tao

    2014-01-01

    The THGEMs based on ceramic substrate were developed successfully for neutron and single photon detection. The influences on thermal neutron scattering and the internal radioactivity of both ceramic and FR-4 substrates were studied and compared. The ceramic THGEMs are homemade of 200 um hole diameter, 600 um pitch, 200 um thickness, 80 um rim, and 50 mm*50 mm sensitive area. The FR-4 THGEMs with the same geometry were used for the reference. The gas gain, energy resolution and gain stability were measured in different gas mixtures by using the 5.9 keV X-rays. The maximum gain of single layer ceramic THGEM reaches 6*104 and 1.5*104 at Ne+CH4 = 95:5 and Ar+i-C4H10 = 97:3, respectively. The energy resolution is better than 24%. The good gain stability was obtained during more than 100 hour continuous test at Ar+CO2 = 80:20. By using the 239Pu source, the alpha deposited energy spectrum and gain curve of ceramic THGEM were measured.

  10. Degradation of organic chemicals with titanium ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Tunesi, Simonetta (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Madison, WI)

    1991-01-01

    Complex organic molecules, such as polychlorinated biphenyls can be degraded on porous titanium ceramic membranes by photocatalysis under ultraviolet light.

  11. Robust, high temperature-ceramic membranes for gas separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berchtold, Kathryn A.; Young, Jennifer S.

    2014-07-29

    A method of making ceramic membranes, and the ceramic membranes so formed, comprising combining a ceramic precursor with an organic or inorganic comonomer, forming the combination as a thin film on a substrate, photopolymerizing the thin film, and pyrolyzing the photopolymerized thin film.

  12. Process for making a ceramic composition for immobilization of actinides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbinghaus, Bartley B. (Livermore, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard A. (Livermore, CA); Vance, Eric R. (Kirrawee, AU); Stewart, Martin W. (Barden Ridge, AU); Walls, Philip A. (Cronulla, AU); Brummond, William Allen (Livermore, CA); Armantrout, Guy A. (Livermore, CA); Herman, Connie Cicero (Pleasanton, CA); Hobson, Beverly F. (Livermore, CA); Herman, David Thomas (Pleasanton, CA); Curtis, Paul G. (Tracy, CA); Farmer, Joseph (Tracy, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for making a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile. The process comprises oxidizing the actinides, milling the oxides to a powder, blending them with ceramic precursors, cold pressing the blend and sintering the pressed material.

  13. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  14. Elastic and Conductive Properties of Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevostianov, Igor

    Elastic and Conductive Properties of Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings in Relation and conductive properties of plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings in terms of relevant microstructural parameters sprayed 1. Introduction The present review discusses the elastic stiffness of plasma-sprayed ceramic

  15. September 14-16, 2004/ARR CERAMIC BREEDER BLANKET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    September 14-16, 2004/ARR 1 CERAMIC BREEDER BLANKET FOR ARIES-CS A. R. Raffray (University-CS engineering plan of action · Ceramic breeder modular design layout · Power cycle selection: Brayton cycle) 4. Helium cooled ceramic breeder blanket with ferritic steel structure #12;September 14-16, 2004/ARR

  16. Transformation toughening in an antiferroelectric ceramic *, S.E. Younga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Wei

    1 Transformation toughening in an antiferroelectric ceramic X. Tana, *, S.E. Younga , Y.H. Seob , J of the crystal symmetry, dielectric constant, field-induced polarization, and Raman spectrum on ceramic Pb0.99Nb0 is demonstrated in the antiferroelectric ceramic with both indentation fracture and R-curve experiments

  17. Small internal ceramic chip antenna for IMT-2000 handsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Seong-Ook

    Small internal ceramic chip antenna for IMT-2000 handsets D.S. Yim and S.O. Park A small internal ceramic chip antenna for IMT-2000 handsets is investigated experimentally and numerically. It has), meander-line antenna (MLA) and ceramic chip antenna (CCA), have been introduced [1­3]. The antenna

  18. Numerical simulation of ceramic breeder pebble bed thermal creep behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Numerical simulation of ceramic breeder pebble bed thermal creep behavior Alice Ying *, Hulin Huang Abstract The evolution of ceramic breeder pebble bed thermal creep deformation subjected to an external of ceramic breeder pebble beds under thermomechanical loads is necessary to ensure that the integrity of beds

  19. Simulating Microstructural Evolution and Electrical Transport in Ceramic Gas Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciobanu, Cristian

    Simulating Microstructural Evolution and Electrical Transport in Ceramic Gas Sensors Yunzhi Wang in ceramic gas sensors has been proposed. First, the particle-flow model and the continuum-phase-field method and temperature, could facilitate the development and optimization of novel microstructures for advanced ceramic

  20. Ancient Ceramics: Computer aided Classification Dorrit Porter1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    Ancient Ceramics: Computer aided Classification Dorrit Porter1 , Peter Werner2 und Sven Utcke1 1 Objekte 1 #12;Ancient Ceramics: Computer aided Classification Dorrit Porter1 , Peter Werner2 , and Sven; rotationally symmetric objects 1 Introduction Ceramics usually have a short period of life, while at the same

  1. Homogenized Maxwell's Equations; a Model for Varistor Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birnir, Björn

    Homogenized Maxwell's Equations; a Model for Varistor Ceramics Bj¨orn Birnir Niklas Wellander for a semiconducting ceramic material used in devices to pro- tect electrical equipment against overvoltages are associated with two types of failures in varistor ceramics. The upper bound corresponds two thermal heating

  2. Mg2SnO4 ceramics I. Synthesisprocessingmicrostructure correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    Mg2SnO4 ceramics I. Synthesis±processing±microstructure correlation Abdul-Majeed Azad *, Liew Jing- mical formula MSnO3 (M=Ca, Sr and Ba), have recently been studied as potential electronic ceramics-8842(00)00085-7 Ceramics International 27 (2001) 325±334 www.elsevier.com/locate/ceramint * Corresponding author at current

  3. Oxide materials for electronics Inorganic Materials and Ceramics Research Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxide materials for electronics Inorganic Materials and Ceramics Research Group Sverre M. Selbach annually #12;Inorganic and ceramic materials research group Professor Mari-Ann Einarsrud (1988) Professor docs 10 master students http://www.ntnu.edu/mse/research/ceramics NTNU Faculty of Natural Sciences

  4. nLOCKHEED MARTIN/ Metals and Ceramics Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY nLOCKHEED MARTIN/ ORNUM-6589 Metals and Ceramics Division History 1946-l 996 #12;#12;contributors The story of the Metals and Ceramics Division is the story of its E Craig, Director Metals and Ceramics Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Thanks to each

  5. THZ TRANSMISSION SPECTROSCOPY APPLIED TO DIELECTRICS AND MICROWAVE CERAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KuÂ?el, Petr

    THZ TRANSMISSION SPECTROSCOPY APPLIED TO DIELECTRICS AND MICROWAVE CERAMICS ALEXEJ PASHKIN, ELENA of Ba(Mg1/3Ta2/3)O3 (BMT) high-permittivity microwave ceramics was measured in the sub; time-resolved spectroscopy; microwave ceramics INTRODUCTION The method of time-domain terahertz

  6. Homogenized Maxwell's Equations; a Model for Varistor Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birnir, Björn

    Homogenized Maxwell's Equations; a Model for Varistor Ceramics BjË? orn Birnir Niklas Wellander for a semiconducting ceramic material used in devices to pro­ tect electrical equipment against overvoltages are associated with two types of failures in varistor ceramics. The upper bound corresponds two thermal heating

  7. Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elangovan, S. (South Jordan, UT); Nair, Balakrishnan G. (Sandy, UT); Small, Troy (Midvale, UT); Heck, Brian (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2011-09-06

    A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

  8. Ceramic pressure housing with metal endcaps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Downing, J.P. Jr.; DeRoos, B.G.; Hackman, D.J.

    1995-06-27

    A housing is disclosed for the containment of instrumentation in a high pressure fluid environment that consists of a metallic endcap and ceramic cylinder bonded together. The improvement comprises a structure which results in the improved sealing of said housing as the fluid pressure increases. The cylindrical ceramic tube and endcap are dimensioned such that mechanical failure does not occur when exposed to the desired external operating pressures which includes up to 36,000 feet of water. The housing is designed to withstand the external operating pressures without being subject to mechanical failure or excessive deformation which results in the loss of pressure housing integrity via cracking or deformation of the ceramic tube, deformation of the endcap, or from failure of the bonding agent. 9 figs.

  9. Glass ceramic toughened with tetragonal zirconia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keefer, K.D.

    1984-02-10

    A phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic and a process for making it are disclosed. A mixture of particulate network-forming oxide, network-modifying oxide, and zirconium oxide is heated to yield a homogeneous melt, and this melt is then heat treated to precipitate an appreciable quantity of tetragonal zirconia, which is retained at ambient temperature to form a phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic. Nuclearing agents and stabilizing agents may be added to the mixture to facilitate processing and improve the ceramic's properties. Preferably, the mixture is first melted at a temperature from 1200 to 1700/sup 0/C and is then heat-treated at a temperature within the range of 800 to 1200/sup 0/C in order to precipitate tetragonal ZrO/sub 2/. The composition, as well as the length and temperature of the heat treatment, must be carefully controlled to prevent solution of the precipitated tetragonal zirconia and subsequent conversion to the monoclinic phase.

  10. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, Gary B. (Monroeville, PA); Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  11. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, Gary B.; Morrison, Jay Alan

    2004-01-13

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  12. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, Gary B. (Monroeville, PA); Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL)

    2000-01-01

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composite comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of varios dimentions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substates are also provided.

  13. Ceramic membranes with enhanced thermal stability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Plainsboro, NJ); Bischoff, Brian L. (Madison, WI)

    1993-01-01

    A method of creating a ceramic membrane with enhanced thermal stability is disclosed. The method involves combining quantities of a first metal alkoxide with a second metal, the quantities selected to give a preselected metal ratio in the resultant membrane. A limited amount of water and acid is added to the combination and stirred until a colloidal suspension is formed. The colloid is dried to a gel, and the gel is fired at a temperature greater than approximately 400.degree. C. The porosity and surface area of ceramic membranes formed by this method are not adversely affected by this high temperature firing.

  14. Fracture Toughness Prediction for MWCNT Reinforced Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the development of a micromechanics model to predict fracture toughness of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced ceramic composites to guide future experimental work for this project. The modeling work described in this report includes (i) prediction of elastic properties, (ii) development of a mechanistic damage model accounting for matrix cracking to predict the composite nonlinear stress/strain response to tensile loading to failure, and (iii) application of this damage model in a modified boundary layer (MBL) analysis using ABAQUS to predict fracture toughness and crack resistance behavior (R-curves) for ceramic materials containing MWCNTs at various volume fractions.

  15. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  16. Pumpable/injectable phosphate-bonded ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Dileep (Naperville, IL); Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Perry, Lamar (Fontana, CA); Jeong, Seung-Young (Justice, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A pumpable ceramic composition is provided comprising an inorganic oxide, potassium phosphate, and an oxide coating material. Also provided is a method for preparing pumpable ceramic-based waste forms comprising selecting inorganic oxides based on solubility, surface area and morphology criteria; mixing the selected oxides with phosphate solution and waste to form a first mixture; combining an additive to the first mixture to create a second mixture; adding water to the second mixture to create a reactive mixture; homogenizing the reactive mixture; and allowing the reactive mixture to cure.

  17. Structural Analysis of LargeStructural Analysis of Large Caliber Hybrid Ceramic/SteelCaliber Hybrid Ceramic/Steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Structural Analysis of LargeStructural Analysis of Large Caliber Hybrid Ceramic/SteelCaliber Hybrid Ceramic/Steel Gun BarrelsGun Barrels MS ThesisMS Thesis Jon DeLongJon DeLong Department of Mechanical ·Merger of ceramics into the conventional steel gun barrel design ·Use of a probabilistic structural

  18. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

  19. Tailoring of unipolar strain in lead-free piezoelectrics using the ceramic/ceramic composite approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khansur, Neamul H.; Daniels, John E.; Groh, Claudia; Jo, Wook; Webber, Kyle G.; Reinhard, Christina; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-03-28

    The electric-field-induced strain response mechanism in a polycrystalline ceramic/ceramic composite of relaxor and ferroelectric materials has been studied using in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction. The addition of ferroelectric phase material in the relaxor matrix has produced a system where a small volume fraction behaves independently of the bulk under an applied electric field. Inter- and intra-grain models of the strain mechanism in the composite material consistent with the diffraction data have been proposed. The results show that such ceramic/ceramic composite microstructure has the potential for tailoring properties of future piezoelectric materials over a wider range than is possible in uniform compositions.

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Polycrystalline Semiconductors and Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhaojie

    2012-01-01

    35, (3-6), Dames, C. ; Chen, G. , Thermal Conductivity ofProperties of Matter: Thermal conductivity: nonmetallicSociety), Dames, C. ; Chen, G. , Thermal Conductivity of

  1. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-07-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the DOE Office of Transportation Systems` automotive technology programs. Significant progress in fabricating ceramic components for DOE, NASA, and DOE advanced heat engine programs show that operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engines is feasible; however, addition research is needed in materials and processing, design, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base for producing reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A 5-yr project plan was developed, with focus on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  2. 21F.084J / 21A.224J / 17.55 Introduction to Latin American Studies, Spring 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawson, Chappell H., 1967-

    This HASS-D/CI course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and ...

  3. Research Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Society (MRS). Hoagland is cited for "outstanding contributions in fracture mechanics and atomistic modeling of dislocation mechanisms of deformation and fracture of...

  4. Glass ceramics for explosive device headers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballard, C. P.; Eagan, R. J.; Kjeldgaard, E. A.

    1980-01-01

    The desired features of a header for our advanced explosive devices include small size; 700 Mpa static burst strength; corrosion resistant alloys for electrodes, bridgewire, and housing; integral charge holder; high thermal conductivity (approaching that of alumina ceramic); no braze around the electrodes; design flexibility and quick turnaround time for fabrication of development prototypes; and low cost.

  5. Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elangovan, S.

    2012-12-31

    Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

  6. Fiber metal interlayer improves ceramic coating performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarrabet, G.P.

    1994-11-01

    This article is a review of the use of a compliant fiber metal inner layer between a ceramic coating and metal. The material used is Zirconia with phase stabilizers of magnesium oxide, calcium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Design, fabrication, and testing of the stabilized zirconia is discussed.

  7. Nano-ceramics and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alex (Livermore, CA); Simpson, Randall (Livermore, CA); Landingham, Richard (Livermore, CA); Reibold, Robert A. (Salida, CA)

    2006-08-08

    Disclosed herein is a method to produce ceramic materials utilizing the sol-gel process. The methods enable the preparation of intimate homogeneous dispersions of materials while offering the ability to control the size of one component within another. The method also enables the preparation of materials that will densify at reduced temperature.

  8. Patayan Ceramic Variability: Using Trace Element and Petrographic Analysis to Study Brown and Buff Wares in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hildebrand, John A

    2002-01-01

    analytical data on Aegean ceramics. Archaeometry Bishop, R.Chemical characterization of ceramic pastes in archaeology ,Lake City. (editor). 1986b Ceramic artifacts. In Excavations

  9. Fluxless Bonding of Large Silicon Chips to Ceramic Packages Using Electroplated Eutectic Au/Sn/Au Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Pin J.; Kim, Jong S.; Lee, Chin C.

    2009-01-01

    Large Silicon Chips to Ceramic Packages Using Electroplatedlarge silicon chips to ceramic packages has been developedworking chip attached to a ceramic package. (c) g h Fig. 3.

  10. Reitveld refinement study of PLZT ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bavbande, D. V.; Bafna, V. H.; Mohan, D.; Kothiyal, G. P.; Mishra, R.

    2013-02-05

    PLZT ceramics of composition Pb{sub 0.93}La{sub 0.07}(Zr{sub 0.60}Ti{sub 0.40})O{sub 3}, have been milled for 6hrs and 24hrs were prepared by solid state synthesis route. The 6hrs milled and 24hrs milled samples are represented as PLZT-6 and PLZT-24 ceramics respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern was recorded at room temperature. The XRD pattern has been analyzed by employing Rietveld refinement method. Phase identification shows that all the peaks observed in PLZT-6 and PLZT-24 ceramics could be indexed to P4mm space group with tetragonal symmetry. The unit cell parameters of 6hrs milled PLZT ceramics are found to be a=b=4.0781(5)A and c=4.0938(7)A and for 24hrs milled PLZT ceramics unit cell parameters are a=b=4.0679(4)A and c=4.1010(5)A . The axial ratio c/a and unit cell volume of PLZT-6 are 1.0038 and 68.09(2)A{sup 3} respectively. In PLZT-24 samples, the axial ratio c/a value is 1.0080 which is little more than that of the 6hr milled PLZT sample whereas the unit cell volume decrease to 67.88 (1) A{sup 3}. An average crystallite size was estimated by using Scherrer's formula. Dielectric properties were obtained by measuring the capacitance and tand loss using Stanford LCR meter.

  11. Optimization Journals, Sites, Societies - Optimization Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization related societies. Mathematical Optimization Society · SIAM · INFORMS. Optimization related journals. Mathematical Programming and ...

  12. Bachelor of Fine Arts, Visual Art, Ceramics Emphasis, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Fine Arts, Visual Art, Ceramics Emphasis, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date General Degree Introduction to Creative Photography 9 ART 221 Art Metals: Intro to Metalsmithing 3 ART 225 Ceramics 3 ART 226 Ceramics 3 ART 231 Beginning Sculpture 3 ART 325 Studio in Ceramics 6 ART 425 Studio in Ceramics 6 ART

  13. Bachelor of Fine Arts, Visual Art, Ceramics Emphasis, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Fine Arts, Visual Art, Ceramics Emphasis, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date General Degree area of emphasis requirements for any specific course recommendations 6 Ceramics Emphasis Three 2 Ceramics 3 ART 226 Ceramics 3 ART 231 Beginning Sculpture 3 ART 325 Studio in Ceramics 6 ART 425 Studio

  14. Tallahassee Scientific Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Tallahassee Scientific Society HORIZONS 2015 THE TALLAHASSEE SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY PRESENTS A SPRING intriguing questions about the world's most feared marine predator from George "Dr. Shark" Burgess, director of the International Shark Attack File, the world's largest collection of information on shark attacks in the world

  15. DoE Advanced Ceramic Microturbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IR Energy Systems

    2004-05-31

    In July 2001, Ingersoll-Rand began work on this program. Its objective was to introduce ceramic hot section components into the IR family of microturbines to permit higher operating temperatures and hence improved efficiency. The IR microturbine product line combines a novel application of industrial turbocharger equipment, our commercially successful recuperator, and proven industrial gas turbine design practices. The objective of the joint development program is to combine the high production success of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} turbocharger rotors, largely from Japan, with the IR turbocharger-based microturbines. The IR 'Ceramic Microturbine' (CMT) program has been configured to use the most practical ceramic rotor, considering size, geometry, proven manufacturing methods, and physical material limitations Performance predictions indicate that 36% LHV electric conversion efficiency could be attained at a Turbine Inlet Temperature (TIT) of nominally 1000 C. The initial 72kW engine is being designed to have comparable life and costs to our current product The package power rating is expandable to 100kW with this equipment by slightly increasing pressure ratio flow and TIT. This program was initially planned as five major tasks In Task 1 a comprehensive analysis of the state of the art ceramics and their applicability to microturbines was performed Milestone I was achieved with the joint DoE/IR decision to concentrate on our 70kW microturbine, with elevated turbine inlet temperature and pressure ratio,. This preserved the ability of the engine to utilize the standard IR recuperator and the majority of the microturbine subassemblies, A commercialization report, projecting the market size, was also completed as part of this task. Task 2's detailed design of the special hot-section components has been completed,. The two critical milestones, No.3 and No.4, associated with the detailed design of the monolithic silicon nitride turbine rotor and the release of the purchase order for this critical component were accomplished in Task 2. Task 3 focused on the design and release of the other non-ceramic components, including the gas generator turbine housing, the power turbine and housing, the combustor, and a new compressor section On September 4, 2002, Milestone No.4 was completed with a Detailed Design Review of the 72 kW 'Ceramic Microturbine'. The customer's concurrence at that design review triggered the release of critical components for manufacturing (Milestone 5). In Task 4, the principle components of the CMT were fabricated and delivered to our Portsmouth facility Manufacturing was mostly completed with the exception of the final machining of the GT and PT housings, the machining of the compressor diffuser, and the fabrication of the compressor cover.

  16. CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REFERENCE FORMULATION REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2012-05-15

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explain the design of ceramic host systems culminating in a reference ceramic formulation for use in subsequent studies on process optimization and melt property data assessment in support of FY13 melter demonstration testing. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. In addition to the combined CS/LN/TM High Mo waste stream, variants without Mo and without Mo and Zr were also evaluated. Based on the results of fabricating and characterizing several simulated ceramic waste forms, two reference ceramic waste form compositions are recommended in this report. The first composition targets the CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with and without Mo. The second composition targets with CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with Mo and Zr removed. Waste streams that contain Mo must be produced in reducing environments to avoid Cs-Mo oxide phase formation. Waste streams without Mo have the ability to be melt processed in air. A path forward for further optimizing the processing steps needed to form the targeted phase assemblages is outlined in this report. Processing modifications including melting in a reducing atmosphere, and controlled heat treatment schedules are anticipated to improve the targeted elemental partitioning.

  17. Method for adhesion of metal films to ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowndes, D.H.; Pedraza, A.J.; DeSilva, M.J.; Kumar, R.A.

    1997-12-30

    Methods for making strongly bonded metal-ceramic materials are disclosed. The methods include irradiating a portion of the surface of the ceramic material with a pulsed ultraviolet laser having an energy density sufficient to effect activation of the irradiated surface of the ceramic material so that adhesion of metals subsequently deposited onto the irradiated surface is substantially increased. Advantages of the invention include (i) the need for only a small number of laser pulses at relatively low focused energy density, (ii) a smoother substrate surface, (iii) activation of the laser-treated surface which provides a chemical bond between the surface and a metal deposited thereon, (iv) only low temperature annealing is required to produce the strong metal-ceramic bond; (v) the ability to obtain strong adhesion between ceramic materials and oxidation resistant metals; (vi) ability to store the laser treated ceramic materials for later deposition of metals thereon. 7 figs.

  18. Method for adhesion of metal films to ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN); Pedraza, Anthony J. (Oak Ridge, TN); DeSilva, Melvin J. (Ithaca, NY); Kumar, Rajagopalan A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01

    Methods for making strongly bonded metal-ceramic materials. The methods include irradiating a portion of the surface of the ceramic material with a pulsed ultraviolet laser having an energy density sufficient to effect activation of the irradiated surface of the ceramic material so that adhesion of metals subsequently deposited onto the irradiated surface is substantially increased. Advantages of the invention include (i) the need for only a small number of laser pulses at relatively low focused energy density, (ii) a smoother substrate surface, (iii) activation of the laser-treated surface which provides a chemical bond between the surface and a metal deposited thereon, (iv) only low temperature annealing is required to produce the strong metal-ceramic bond; (v) the ability to obtain strong adhesion between ceramic materials and oxidation resistant metals; (vi) ability to store the laser treated ceramic materials for later deposition of metals thereon.

  19. Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, M.A.

    1994-05-03

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques. 2 figures.

  20. Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

    1994-01-01

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques.