Sample records for american ceramic society

  1. www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 91, No. 334 thermoelectric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 91, No. 334 Modeling thermoelectric. Thermoelectric devices have the advantage of containing no moving parts, making them quiet, durable and reliable that thermoelectric devic- es can compete with traditional refrigeration and power generation technologies.1

  2. 12 American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 85, No. 7 Nanotube `Sandwiches' Could

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    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    12 American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 85, No. 7 Nanotube `Sandwiches' Could Lead to Better Composites Reinforced composite fabrics made from woven ceramic fibers have been used for decades. The fabric layers are infiltrated with a high-temperature epoxy matrix, and then several layers of cloth

  3. Reprinted from the Journal of the American Ceramic Society, Vol. 72, No. 3, March 1989 Copyright American Cerumic Society, Inc.

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    Eagar, Thomas W.

    in the harsh operating environment. Since brazing filler metals for ce- ramics generally contain reactive-Based Brazing Filler Metals for Silicon Nitride/Metal Joints Rakesh R. Kapoor* and Thomas W. Eagar* Department, oxidation, joints, silver, copper.] I. Introduction THE increased use of ceramics as structural components

  4. American Physical Society awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta Fe MetroWeinbergAmerican Physical Society

  5. American Physical Society Fellows

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni Alumni PARC/I-CARES CERTIFICATE INofNuclear SocietyAmerican

  6. TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

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    Willenbring, Jeb F.

    fellowship. c 2002 American Mathematical Society 4393 #12;4394 JEB F. WILLENBRING on V , under the usual

  7. American Nuclear Society Awards

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni Alumni PARC/I-CARES CERTIFICATE INofNuclear Society Awards

  8. American Physical Society Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni Alumni PARC/I-CARES CERTIFICATE INofNuclear Society

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: American Society of Mechanical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paper Presented at American Society of Mechanical Engineers' (ASME) 2012 Internal Combustion Engine Division (ICED) Conference On August 28, 2013, in CRF, Energy, Energy...

  10. Proceedings of the 2004 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition, Copyright 2004, American Society for Engineering Education

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    Roylance, David

    Proceedings of the 2004 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition between the two institutions. #12;Proceedings of the 2004 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition, Copyright © 2004, American Society for Engineering Education

  11. North American Society for Trenchless Technology

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    Moore, Paul A.

    North American Society for Trenchless Technology (NASTT) Bowling Green State University (BGSU Technology Seminar North American Society for Trenchless Technology (NASTT) & Bowling Green State University-Thompson Student Union Bowling Green State University (BGSU) Bowling Green, Ohio February 23-24, 2012 #12;Second

  12. Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright 2005, American Society for Engineering Education

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    Al-Juhani, Abdulhadi A.

    Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition on paper #12;Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference

  13. Society of American Indian Government Employees Annual National Training Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Event includes plenary session, American Indian law classes, Native American youth workshops, cultural presentations, and a veterans program. Sponsored by the Society of American Indian Government...

  14. TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, Gerald

    )0000-0 FRACTIONAL ITERATION OF SERIES AND TRANSSERIES G. A. EDGAR Abstract. We investigate; Secondary 41A60, 39B12, 30B10. c XXXX American Mathematical Society 1 #12;2 G. A. EDGAR Review

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: AIAA SciTech/American Society of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AIAA SciTechAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers Wind Energy Symposium National Rotor Testbed Functional Scaling Presented at American Institute of Aeronautics and...

  16. Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright 2001, American Society for Engineering Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roylance, David

    Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition," with structural engineering students wondering why they had to take it. #12;Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright 2001, American Society for Eng

  17. PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

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    Grimmett, Geoffrey

    )0000-0 EXPECTED DISCREPANCY FOR ZEROS OF RANDOM ALGEBRAIC POLYNOMIALS IGOR E. PRITSKER AND ALAN A. SOLA support from NSA under grant H98230-12-1-0227; Sola acknowl- edges support from the EPSRC under grant EP/103372X/1. c XXXX American Mathematical Society 1 #12;2 PRITSKER AND SOLA coefficients of Pn

  18. PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

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    Pritsker, Igor

    )0000-0 EXPECTED DISCREPANCY FOR ZEROS OF RANDOM ALGEBRAIC POLYNOMIALS IGOR E. PRITSKER AND ALAN A. SOLA support from NSA under grant H98230-12-1-0227; Sola acknowl- edges support from the EPSRC under grant EP/103372X/1. cXXXX American Mathematical Society 1 #12;2 PRITSKER AND SOLA coefficients of Pn

  19. METEOROLOGICAL Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

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    Science Foundation.36 37 #12;2 Capsule Summary1 The Community Earth System Model provides the research for earth system15 studies, making it a true community tool. Here we describe this earth system model, its16 at the above DOI once it is available. © 2013 American Meteorological Society #12;1 The Community Earth System

  20. AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY e m e r g i n g c e r a m i c s & g l a s s t e c h n o l o g y

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    Tullos, Desiree

    1 · V o l . 9 0 N o . 5 Ceramics in Energy Some U.S. battery companies responding to microhybrid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Victoria Knox Percolated ceramic composites: Characterization and optimization

  1. FCTO Announces Plenary Talk at American Society of Mechanical...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office announces a plenary talk by Dr. Sunita Satyapal, Director, Fuel Cell Technologies Office at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Energy...

  2. American Society of Mechanical Engineers/Savannah River National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary American Society of Mechanical EngineersSavannah River National Laboratory (ASMESRNL) Materials and Components for Hydrogen Infrastructure Codes and Standards Workshop...

  3. American Society of Mechanical Engineers/Savannah River National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meeting Attendee List American Society of Mechanical EngineersSavannah River National Laboratory (ASMESRNL) Materials and Components for Hydrogen Infrastructure Codes and...

  4. American Society of Mechanical Engineers/Savannah River National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agenda American Society of Mechanical EngineersSavannah River National Laboratory (ASMESRNL) Materials and Components for Hydrogen Infrastructure Codes and Standards Workshop and...

  5. american ophthalmolgical society: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eugene, OR 97403 Bothun, Gregory 443 THE ASTRONOMICAL JOURNAL, 118:16181634, 1999 October 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.(...

  6. Session 2480 Proceedings of the 2002 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larkin, Teresa L.

    Session 2480 Proceedings of the 2002 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference Proceedings of the 2002 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright

  7. Ceramics from the American steamboat Phoenix (1815-1819), and their role in understanding shipboard life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddan, Lester James

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramics recovered from the steamboat Phoenix are used to examine life aboard an early American passenger steam-driven vessel. The primary goal of the research is to establish what general type of surroundings passengers experienced on the ship...

  8. AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY e m e r g i n g c e r a m i c s & g l a s s t e c h n o l o g y

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    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    in the Environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 · Green energy from the slip - page 17 Ceramics in the Environment Green energy from greenhouse gases - page 15 cover story in the environment Green energy from greenhouse gases Abdul-Majeed Azad, University of Toledo The ultimate chemical

  9. American Indian Science and Engineering Society National Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Inidan Science and Engineering Society (AISES) National Conference is a one-of-a-kind, three day event convening graduate, undergraduate, and high school junior and senior students,...

  10. american astronomical society: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 533:106?112, 2000 April 10 2000. The American Astronomical Society. All that this uncertainty results in factors of D1.9 uncertainty in the predicted...

  11. American Society for Quality Procedures for Detecting Outlying Observations in Samples

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    Masci, Frank

    Statistical Association and American Society for Quality Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1266761@jstor.org. American Statistical Association and American Society for Quality are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, Committee E-ll on Statistical Methods, The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM). This work

  12. Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and industry with great distinction as an individual who contributed significantly to the knowledge, science, and application of welding," the society said in a statement. Research...

  13. Session 2480 "Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larkin, Teresa L.

    Session 2480 "Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference as the use of live, online chats #12;"Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2003, American Society for Engineering Education" using

  14. Session 3280 Proceedings of the 2002 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larkin, Teresa L.

    Session 3280 Proceedings of the 2002 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference that inhibit learning for some students. The #12;Session 3280 Proceedings of the 2002 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2002, American Society for Engineering

  15. 1931DECEMBER 2004AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | PROGRESS IN HEAT WATCH

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    Sheridan, Scott

    1931DECEMBER 2004AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | H PROGRESS IN HEAT WATCH­ WARNING SYSTEM climatology-based heat watch­warning systems have been implemented across the United States in circula- tion, in order to increase heat loss through radiation, as well as evaporative cooling by sweat

  16. american nuclear society: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    american nuclear society First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 References R-3 ANS 1986....

  17. AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY PATIENT HEALTH SERIES Lung Cancer Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY PATIENT HEALTH SERIES Lung Cancer Prevention What are the chances that I will develop lung cancer? The #1 cause of lung cancer is exposure to tobacco smoke. Your chances increase others (second-hand smoke), the greater your chances of developing lung cancer. People who have never

  18. PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

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    Shuai, Zhisheng

    TO THE METHOD OF GLOBAL LYAPUNOV FUNCTIONS HONGBIN GUO, MICHAEL Y. LI, AND ZHISHENG SHUAI (Communicated Mathematical Society Reverts to public domain 28 years from publication 2793 #12;2794 HONGBIN GUO, MICHAEL Y

  19. Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright 2001, American Society for Engineering Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    engineering undergraduates with the knowledge and skills required in the workplace. Thus, while engineering programs must continue to cover as much content knowledge as possible, engineering programs must also takeProceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition

  20. Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright 2005, American Society for Engineering Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, James R

    Copyright © 2005, American Society for Engineering Education Concurrent System Design: Applied Mathematics to offer to the engineering of quality software. Concurrency and FSP: Models to Implementations Concurrency being designed. At this basic level, students do not know how to engineer concurrent systems

  1. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 135:6175, 2006 [Article]Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ]Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006 DOI: 10.1577/T04-215.1 Evaluation of a Lake Whitefish Bioenergetics Model Arbor, Michigan 48105, USA Abstract.--We evaluated the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake whitefish on a comparison of bioenergetics model predictions of lake whitefish food consumption and growth with observed

  2. Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright 2003, American Society for Engineering Education

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    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition PROCEED, for Project-Centered Education, this curriculum reform is an attempt to bring real-world projects of PROCEED. This freshman course emphasizes the development of a 3-D geometric computer model and application

  3. "Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright 2003, American Society for Engineering Education"

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    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    "Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition PROCEED is dedicated towards providing more hands-on and project-centered classroom learning opportunities in the mechanical engineering department at The University of Texas at Austin. One of the challenges of PROCEED

  4. American Solar Energy Society | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwikiAgouraAlbatechFuelsdieselEnergy Society Jump to:

  5. Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us count theLienert named American Welding

  6. Moore named an American Statistical Society Fellow

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTIONES2008-54174 ThisBackground TheandAmericanMoore

  7. American Society for Quality Data Reconciliation and Gross Error Detection in Chemical Process Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    ), pp. 409-422 Published by: American Statistical Association and American Society for Quality Stable access to Technometrics. http://www.jstor.org #12;?1985 American Statistical Association of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. American Statistical

  8. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

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    Sparks, Donald L.

    © Copyright 2012 - Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison Browse by Section/Division of Interest Author Index Share | 86-4 The Role of Critical Zone Science

  9. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

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    Sparks, Donald L.

    © Copyright 2012 - Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison & Environmental Quality See more from this Session: Future Frontiers in Soil Science Monday, October 22, 2012: 1

  10. American Solar Energy Society Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Phoenix, AZ, May 2010 IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCE OF SATELLITE-TO-IRRADIANCE MODELS USING

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    Perez, Richard R.

    © American Solar Energy Society ­ Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Phoenix, AZ, May 2010 IMPROVING;© American Solar Energy Society ­ Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Phoenix, AZ, May 2010 between the snow

  11. Proceedings of the 2002 American Society for Engineering Education Zone I Conference United States Military Academy, West Point, New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roylance, David

    Session H Proceedings of the 2002 American Society for Engineering Education Zone I Conference;Proceedings of the 2002 American Society for Engineering Education Zone I Conference United States Military

  12. American Physical Society honors three from ORNL | ornl.gov

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta Fe MetroWeinbergAmerican Physical SocietySHARE

  13. American Nuclear Society Annual Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1Albuquerque, NM -Alicia MoultonPassEnergyAmerican Nuclear Society

  14. American Solar Energy Society Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Raleigh, NC, EVALUATION OF NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    © American Solar Energy Society ­ Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Raleigh, NC, EVALUATION;© American Solar Energy Society ­ Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Raleigh, NC, irradiance forecasts over OF NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION SOLAR IRRADIANCE FORECASTS IN THE US Richard Perez ASRC, Albany, NY, Perez

  15. American Solar Energy Society Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Raleigh, NC, 2011 SHORT-TERM IRRADIANCE VARIABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    © American Solar Energy Society ­ Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Raleigh, NC, 2011 SHORT, as hypothesized in Hoff and Perez's optimum point. #12;© American Solar Energy Society ­ Proc. ASES Annual is the factor that determines whether the combined relative fluctuations of two solar systems add up when

  16. Session 2480 Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larkin, Teresa L.

    Session 2480 Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference that follows, highlights of many of the workshop activities are outlined. #12;Session 2480 Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2001

  17. Subscriber access provided by Georgia Tech Library Journal of the American Chemical Society is published by the American Chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    (UV) lasers,1 light-emitting diodes,2 field emission devices,3,4 solar cells,5 and piezo is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Communication

  18. American Society for Quality Design of Experiments for Comparing Treatments with a Control: Tables of Optimal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    : Technometrics, Vol. 25, No. 1 (Feb., 1983), pp. 87-95 Published by: American Statistical Association of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. American Statistical Association and American Society for Quality are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend

  19. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 23:10151019, 2003 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1015 North American Journal of Fisheries Management 23:1015­1019, 2003 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2003 Mortality and Long-Term Retention of Passive Integrated Transponder Tags by Spring Chinook Salmon MATTHEW R. DARE*1 Biomark, Incorporated, 149 South Adkins Way, Suite 104, Meridian, Idaho

  20. www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 91, No. 226 The state of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    of the population has smart phones and every night we race home to charge them up because the batteries have limited, the market forecasts for LIBs look very promising (Figure 1). However, LIB technology faces many chal- lenges

  1. Final Report on Kokes Awards for the 20th North American Catalysis Society Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Michael S

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report describes how the Kokes Awards program was carried out for the 2007 meeting with regard to selection of students and disbursement of funds received from DOE and other sources. The objective of the Richard J. Kokes Travel Award program of the American Catalysis Society is to encourage graduate students to attend and participate meaningfully in the biennial North American Catalysis Society Meeting.

  2. Spring 2011 ODS Director Paul Coates Receives Award from American Society for Nutrition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Spring 2011 ODS Director Paul Coates Receives Award from American Society for Nutrition The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) Director Paul Coates is the 2011 recipient of the Conrad A. Elvehjem Award received the award at the annual meeting of the society on April 10. In addition to directing ODS, Dr

  3. Published in Conference Proceedings of THE AMERICAN SOLAR ENERGY SOCIETY (ASES) MADISON, WISCONSIN, USA, JUNE 16-21, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Arne

    Published in Conference Proceedings of THE AMERICAN SOLAR ENERGY SOCIETY (ASES) MADISON, WISCONSIN take 15 to 25 seconds each, #12;Published in Conference Proceedings of THE AMERICAN SOLAR ENERGY

  4. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 25:251255, 2005 [Article]Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    walleye mortality (Hoff- man et al. 1996; Flammang 1998). Other factors (e.g., wind and wave conditions]Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005 DOI: 10.1577/M04-106.1 Delayed Mortality of Tournament-Caught Walleyes.--We quantified the delayed mortality of walleyes Sander vitreus during three tourna- ments (April­June 2003

  5. Subscriber access provided by TULANE UNIV Journal of the American Chemical Society is published by the American Chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diebold, Ulrike

    by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Article Correlation between states in semiconductors are of particular interest due to the potential of increased light absorption-based dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC).3,4 Catechol adsorbed on TiO2 nanoparticles5 shows a band

  6. Subscriber access provided by Georgia Tech Library Journal of the American Chemical Society is published by the American Chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    . A solar cell works only under sufficient light illumination; a mechanical energy generator is applicable is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Article Nanowire Structured Hybrid Cell for Concurrently Scavenging Solar and Mechanical Energies Chen Xu, Xudong

  7. American Nuclear Society 2013 Student Conference Massachusetts Institute of Technology Boston, Massachusetts, USA, April 4-6, 2013, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    American Nuclear Society 2013 Student Conference ­ Massachusetts Institute of Technology Boston, Massachusetts, USA, April 4-6, 2013, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2013) A DETECTOR. Troy, NY 12180 mcderb@rpi.edu 1. INTRODUCTION Reactor design and criticality safety calculations

  8. J. Parasitol., 87(4), 2001, p. 862869 American Society of Parasitologists 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Kevin P.

    862 J. Parasitol., 87(4), 2001, p. 862­869 American Society of Parasitologists 2001 MOLECULAR; Johnson and Clayton, 2001). Al- though these and other studies have produced phylogenetic trees for 1.) and Columbiformes (pigeons and doves). Based on 138 morpholog- ical characters, Smith (2001) provided evidence

  9. Session 3280 Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larkin, Teresa L.

    of engineering, mathematics, and the sciences 8 - 15 . The use of writing in introductory physics classes for non & Exposition Copyright © 2001, American Society for Engineering Education Physics + Writing = A Match Made. The underlying questions involved the assessment of student learning in physics as well as in college writing

  10. Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998) 131 and Environmental Policy University of Delaware Newark, DE 19716 Steven Letendre Green Mountain College One College Circle Poultney, VT 05764 and Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University of Delaware Donald W

  11. Copyright 2011 American Chemical Society 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    Copyright © 2011 American Chemical Society 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 For Selected: Application of Highly Ordered TiO2 Nanotube Arrays in Flexible Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Daibin Light-Emitting Diodes on Solution-Processed Graphene Transparent Electrodes Junbo Wu, Mukul Agrawal, H

  12. Session 3566 Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holden, Joshua Brandon

    Session 3566 Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference For a recent student conference, the authors developed a day-long design problem and competition suitable. Introduction An annual student conference is sponsored by the Midwestern Undergraduate Private Engineering

  13. John Dos Passos' theme of individual freedom in American society in the novel Midcentury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rundt, Antoinette Hasselbach

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JOHN DOS PASSOS' THEME OF INDIVIDUAL P3EEDM IN AMERICAN SOCIETI IN THE NOVEL ~~~+ A Thesie by ANTOINETTE H, RUNDT Submitted to the graduate College of the Texas A&M University in Partial fulfillment of the rea . irements &or the degree...

  14. Anderson-Cook named American Society for Quality Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anderson-Cook has worked at LANL since 2004. She also is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and in 2011 was one of 20 women in New Mexico who received a Governor's...

  15. 1819Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catling, David C.

    reduc- tions in expenditures (and costs) for natural gas and heating oil, record seasonal sales their strategy for pur- chasing natural gas, leading to major savings to their customers. #12;1820 Vol. 80, No. 9 Meteorological Society ABSTRACT This paper assesses the major impacts on human lives and the economy

  16. original article The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy The continued spread of HIV underscores the need to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieberman, Judy

    original article© The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy The continued spread of HIV protection in mice from intravaginal (IVAG) challenge a week later with a lethal dose of herpes simplex virus

  17. Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998): 231-237.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998 technologies, like photovoltaics (PV), can offer additional benefits to electric utility companies utility company to defer investments in upgrading transmission and distribution facilities, among other

  18. Subscriber access provided by University of Delaware | Library Environmental Science & Technology is published by the American Chemical Society.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Subscriber access provided by University of Delaware | Library Environmental Science & Technology is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Article Arsenic

  19. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 133:11501162, 2004 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisheries Society 2004 Development and Evaluation of a Western Mosquitofish Bioenergetics Model STEVEN R.--We developed a bioenergetics model for the western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis by combining data rates were observed at 32 C. Bioenergetics estimates of food consumption agreed well with laboratory mea

  20. Enhanced personnel qualification requirements for ASME (American Society for Mechanical Engineers) Code Section 11 examinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.F.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important parts of a nondestructive examination (NDE) system, which consists of the equipment, procedure, and personnel for performing examinations, is the personnel who operate the equipment and analyze the examination results. Recent activity in Section 11 of the American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Committee to develop rules for personnel qualification for ultrasonic examinations is reviewed, and the proposed rules are compared with present day NDE personnel qualification practices.

  1. Researchers Speak at American Chemical Society Meeting | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronic Public ReadingResearch Nuclear PhysicsSpeak at American

  2. American Physical Society awards fellowships to Los Alamos scientists

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni Alumni PARC/I-CARES CERTIFICATE INofNuclearAmerican

  3. American Physical Society honors three from ORNL | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni Alumni PARC/I-CARES CERTIFICATE INofNuclearAmericanLeo

  4. Academic Genealogy of Malgorzata Peszynska The Mathematics Genealogy Project is a service of North Dakota State University and the American Mathematical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peszynska, Malgorzata

    Academic Genealogy of Malgorzata Peszynska The Mathematics Genealogy Project is a service of North Dakota State University and the American Mathematical Society http://www.genealogy

  5. American Society of Radiation Oncology Recommendations for Documenting Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Timothy [St. Agnes Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)], E-mail: tholmes@stagnes.org; Das, Rupak [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Low, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Yin Fangfang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Balter, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Palta, Jatinder [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Health Science Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Eifel, Patricia [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the widespread use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for approximately a decade, a lack of adequate guidelines for documenting these treatments persists. Proper IMRT treatment documentation is necessary for accurate reconstruction of prior treatments when a patient presents with a marginal recurrence. This is especially crucial when the follow-up care is managed at a second treatment facility not involved in the initial IMRT treatment. To address this issue, an American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) workgroup within the American ASTRO Radiation Physics Committee was formed at the request of the ASTRO Research Council to develop a set of recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments. This document provides a set of comprehensive recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments, as well as image-guidance procedures, with example forms provided.

  6. Symposium for Alfred Wolf's 75th birthday at American Chemical Society meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains abstracts from the symposium presented by the Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society. Sessions covered the following topics: Therapeutic radionuclides--Making the right choice; Aspects of nuclear science; Nuclear structure with large gamma-ray detector arrays and their auxiliary devices; Thirty years of research in nuclear dynamics--From fission to the quark-gluon plasma; Chelated metal ions for diagnosis and therapy; Radiochemistry--Basic and applied; and Applications of small accelerators in science and industry.

  7. Ceramics from the American steamboat Phoenix (1815-1819), and their role in understanding shipboard life 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddan, Lester James

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's bottom was rounded with a single mast stepped well forward (Davison, ed. 1981a:8). See Figure 1 for a profile view of the ship based on archaeological measurements of the hull and contemporary plans of similar steamers, PHOENIX HGURE 1. The American...'s on the Phoenix would have enjoyed, Travel on board such a steamboat in early 19th century America was often described as opulent especially in comparison to land travel. John Fowler, another 19th century British tourist, boarded the Hudson River steamer...

  8. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valicenti, Richard K., E-mail: Richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, California (United States); Thompson, Ian [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Albertsen, Peter [Division of Urology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Goldenberg, S. Larry [Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wolf, J. Stuart [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sartor, Oliver [Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Klein, Eric [Glickman Urological Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Faraday, Martha M. [Four Oaks, Inc (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

  9. The American Society for Radiation Oncology's 2010 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); De Amorim Bernstein, Karen [Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Chetty, Indrin J. [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Eifel, Patricia [M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hughes, Lesley [Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ (United States); Klein, Eric E. [Washington University, Saint Louis, MO (United States); McDermott, Patrick [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Prisciandaro, Joann [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Paliwal, Bhudatt [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Price, Robert A. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In 2004, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) published its first physics education curriculum for residents, which was updated in 2007. A committee composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions was reconvened again to update the curriculum in 2009. Methods and Materials: Members of this committee have associations with ASTRO, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology. Members reviewed and updated assigned subjects from the last curriculum. The updated curriculum was carefully reviewed by a representative from the ABR and other physics and clinical experts. Results: The new curriculum resulted in a recommended 56-h course, excluding initial orientation. Learning objectives are provided for each subject area, and a detailed outline of material to be covered is given for each lecture hour. Some recent changes in the curriculum include the addition of Radiation Incidents and Bioterrorism Response Training as a subject and updates that reflect new treatment techniques and modalities in a number of core subjects. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in April 2010. We anticipate that physicists will use this curriculum for structuring their teaching programs, and subsequently the ABR will adopt this educational program for its written examination. Currently, the American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee updated suggested references and the glossary. Conclusions: The ASTRO physics education curriculum for radiation oncology residents has been updated. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, the subject matter will be updated again in 2 years.

  10. 15 MARCH 1999 829J I A N D W A N G 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Pao K.

    to the flux on a stationary crystal gives the ventilation coefficient. The local flow velocity profiles around15 MARCH 1999 829J I A N D W A N G 1999 American Meteorological Society Ventilation Coefficients (Manuscript received 20 November 1997, in final form 8 May 1998) ABSTRACT The ventilation coefficients

  11. B American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2012 DOI: 10.1007/s13361-012-0404-0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komives, Elizabeth A.

    pI, mobile phase pH) [12], ion suppression of co-eluting analytes [13], and mobile phase flow rateB American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2012 DOI: 10.1007/s13361-012-0404-0 J. Am. Soc. Mass Improves Peptide Identification by Tandem Mass Spectrometry Jesse G. Meyer, Elizabeth A. Komives Department

  12. ODS Update e-newsletter May 2010 American Society for Nutrition Honors ODS Nutrition Scientists Mary Frances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    ODS Update e-newsletter May 2010 American Society for Nutrition Honors ODS Nutrition Scientists) Annual Meeting in Anaheim, CA, ASN President Robert M. Russell, MD, presented two ODS scientists with distinguished service awards. Mary Frances Picciano, PhD, ODS Senior Nutrition Research Scientist, received

  13. J. Marshall Ash Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 108, No. 2. (Feb., 1990), p. 571.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ash, J. Marshall

    Erratum J. Marshall Ash Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 108, No. 2. (Feb, February 1990 ERRATUM J. MARSHALL ASH The paper "A new proof of uniqueness for multiple trigonometric series" by J. Marshall Ash, which appeared in 107(2) October 1989, should have been entitled "A new proof

  14. DOI: 10.1021/jo902358c J. Org. Chem. XXXX, XXX, 000000 A r XXXX American Chemical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Rainer

    DOI: 10.1021/jo902358c J. Org. Chem. XXXX, XXX, 000­000 A r XXXX American Chemical Society pubs-Formation in Monocyclic HCN-Pentamers. In Astrobiology 2007, 7, 455­470. #12;B J. Org. Chem. Vol. XXX, No. XX, XXXX

  15. Lake and Reservoir Management 24:381-391, 2008 Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    381 Lake and Reservoir Management 24:381-391, 2008 © Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2008 Assessing contribution of DOC from sediments to a drinking-water reservoir using.G. Evans and E. Boss. 2008. Estimating source-specific contributions of DOC into a drinking-water reservoir

  16. SEPTEMBER 2003 2071V A N L E E U W E N 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Leeuwen, Peter Jan

    SEPTEMBER 2003 2071V A N L E E U W E N 2003 American Meteorological Society A Variance and with a multilayer quasigeostrophic model of the ocean area around South Africa. It is recalled that Kalman after analysis, without extra computations. It is based on ensemble or Monte Carlo integrations

  17. The Plant Cell, Vol. 14, 7, January 2002, www.plantcell.org 2002 American Society of Plant Biologists MEETING REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, David

    The Plant Cell, Vol. 14, 7, January 2002, www.plantcell.org © 2002 American Society of Plant- velopment, to integrate physiological processes, and to coordinate pathogen defense responses Interna- tional Plasmodesma meeting in Cape Town, South Africa, in August 2001. STRUCTURE AND REGULATION

  18. Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 2000 Conference. 2000. Madison, WI (June): 81-85

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 2000 Conference. 2000. Madison, WI (June, Kyung-Jin Boo, Young-Doo Wang and Gerard Alleng Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University and Environmental Policy (CEEP), working with affiliated academic and research institutions in the U.S. and East

  19. Historical Perspective on the United States Fusion Program Invited paper presented at American Nuclear Society 16th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    controlled thermonuclear reactions, or nuclear fusion as it is now more commonly called, has remained elusiveHistorical Perspective on the United States Fusion Program Invited paper presented at American Nuclear Society 16th Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy 14-16 September, 2004 in Madison

  20. According to the American Cancer Society, one-third of all cancer deaths each year in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    body weight, you must balance the amount of energy you put into your body­ the food you eatAccording to the American Cancer Society, one-third of all cancer deaths each year in the United States are linked to the amount of food you eat, your body weight, and how much exercise you get. Another

  1. Transactions of the ASAE Vol. 45(5): xxxxxx E 2002 American Society of Agricultural Engineers ISSN 00012351 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel Jr., Frederick C.

    Transactions of the ASAE Vol. 45(5): xxx­xxx E 2002 American Society of Agricultural Engineers ISSN, 1988; Harkin, 1997). Most of these facilities typically manage manure and wastewater as a liquid, which, and Frederick C. Michel, Jr., ASAE Member Engineer, Assistant Professor, Department of Food, Agricultural

  2. 1 JUNE 2001 2443G U A N D L I O U 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    and in all seasons with a global cloud cover of about 20%­30% and more than 70% in the Tropics (Wylie et al. 1994). The effects of cirrus clouds on the radiation budget of the earth and the atmosphere, and hence1 JUNE 2001 2443G U A N D L I O U 2001 American Meteorological Society Radiation Parameterization

  3. Sixth American Nuclear Society International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface Technologies NPIC&HMIT 2009, Knoxville, Tennessee, April 5-9, 2009, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heljanko, Keijo

    Sixth American Nuclear Society International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, automation 1 INTRODUCTION In nuclear power plants (NPPs), novel digitalized I&C systems enable complicated, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2009) VERIFICATION OF SAFETY LOGIC DESIGNS

  4. Evaluation of American Indian Science and Engineering Society Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AISES, None

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) has been funded under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant (Grant Award No. DE-SC0004058) to host an Intertribal Middle-School Science and Math Bowl (IMSSMB) comprised of teams made up of a majority of American Indian students from Bureau of Indian Education-funded schools and public schools. The intent of the AISES middle school science and math bowl is to increase participation of American Indian students at the DOE-sponsored National Science Bowl. Although national in its recruitment scope, the AISES Intertribal Science and Math Bowl is considered a “regional” science bowl, equivalent to the other 50 regional science bowls which are geographically limited to states. Most regional bowls do not have American Indian student teams competing, hence the AISES bowl is meant to encourage American Indian student teams to increase their science knowledge in order to participate at the national level. The AISES competition brings together teams from various American Indian communities across the nation. Each team is provided with funds for travel to and from the event, as well as for lodging and meals. In 2011 and 2012, there were 10 teams participating; in 2013, the number of teams participating doubled to 20. Each Science and Math Bowl team is comprised of four middle school — grades 6 through 8 — students, one alternate, and a teacher who serves as advisor and coach — although in at least two cases, the coach was not a teacher, but was the Indian Education Coordinator. Each team member must have at least a 3.0 GPA. Furthermore, the majority of students in each team must be comprised of American Indian, Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian students. Under the current DOE grant, AISES sponsored three annual middle school science bowl competitions over the years 2011, 2012 and 2013. The science and math bowls have been held in late March concurrently with the National American Indian Science and Engineering Fair (NAISEF) and EXPO at the Albuquerque, NM Convention Center. Albuquerque is also the home of the AISES national office. The AISES staff also recruits volunteers to assist with implementation of the science and math bowl event. In 2011, there were 7 volunteers; in 2012, 15 volunteers, and in 2013, 19 volunteers. Volunteers are recruited from a variety of local sources, including Sandia Laboratories, Southwest Indian Polytechnic Institute students, Department of Defense, as well as family members of AISES staff. For AISES, the goals of the Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl project are to have more Native students learn science, for them to gain confidence in competing, and to reward their effort in order to motivate them to pursue studies in the sciences and engineering. For DOE, the goals of the project are to get more Native students to compete at the National Science Bowl, held in Washington, DC.

  5. Published: August 30, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 19104 dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp2068649 |J. Phys. Chem. C 2011, 115, 1910419109

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brolo, Alexandre G.

    Published: August 30, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 19104 dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp2068649 |J* Department of Chemistry, University of Victoria, Post Office Box 3065, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3V6

  6. r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl104227t |Nano Lett. XXXX, XXX, 000000 pubs.acs.org/NanoLett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Julia R.

    r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl104227t |Nano Lett. XXXX, XXX, 000.doi.org/10.1021/nl104227t |Nano Lett. XXXX, XXX, 000­00

  7. pubs.acs.org/Macromolecules Published on Web 04/07/2010 r 2010 American Chemical Society 4394 Macromolecules 2010, 43, 43944400

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirumalai, Devarajan

    pubs.acs.org/Macromolecules Published on Web 04/07/2010 r 2010 American Chemical Society 4394 Macromolecules 2010, 43, 4394­4400 DOI: 10.1021/ma902008y Theory of Biopolymer Stretching at High Forces Ngo Minh

  8. Academic Genealogy of Peh Hoon Ng The Mathematics Genealogy Project is a service of North Dakota State University and the American Mathematical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Peh H.

    Academic Genealogy of Peh Hoon Ng The Mathematics Genealogy Project is a service of North Dakota State University and the American Mathematical Society http://www.genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu Peh Hoon

  9. Subscriber access provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library Chemistry of Materials is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    -threshold lasers, waveguides, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and solar cells, however, progress has been limited due of Materials is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036

  10. B American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2011 DOI: 10.1007/s13361-011-0115-y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    @snu.ac.kr #12;ionization, (B) low-energy multiple CA in the plume, and (C) post-source high-energy CAB American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2011 DOI: 10.1007/s13361-011-0115-y J. Am. Soc. Mass-Recognized in MALDI Mass Spectrometry Yong Jin Bae,1 Jeong Hee Moon,2 Myung Soo Kim1 1 Department of Chemistry, Seoul

  11. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2012 Workforce Study: The Radiation Oncologists' and Residents' Perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohar, Surjeet, E-mail: spohar@iuhealth.org [Indiana University Health East, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Fung, Claire Y. [Commonwealth Newburyport Cancer Center, Newburyport, Massachusetts (United States); Hopkins, Shane [William R. Bliss Cancer Center, Ames, Iowa (United States); Miller, Robert [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Azawi, Samar [VA Veteran Hospital/University of California Irvine, Newport Beach, California (United States); Arnone, Anna; Patton, Caroline [ASTRO, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Olsen, Christine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) conducted the 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce Survey to obtain an up-to-date picture of the workforce, assess its needs and concerns, and identify quality and safety improvement opportunities. The results pertaining to radiation oncologists (ROs) and residents (RORs) are presented here. Methods: The ASTRO Workforce Subcommittee, in collaboration with allied radiation oncology professional societies, conducted a survey study in early 2012. An online survey questionnaire was sent to all segments of the radiation oncology workforce. Respondents who were actively working were included in the analysis. This manuscript describes the data for ROs and RORs. Results: A total of 3618 ROs and 568 RORs were surveyed. The response rate for both groups was 29%, with 1047 RO and 165 ROR responses. Among ROs, the 2 most common racial groups were white (80%) and Asian (15%), and the male-to-female ratio was 2.85 (74% male). The median age of ROs was 51. ROs averaged 253.4 new patient consults in a year and 22.9 on-treatment patients. More than 86% of ROs reported being satisfied or very satisfied overall with their career. Close to half of ROs reported having burnout feelings. There was a trend toward more frequent burnout feelings with increasing numbers of new patient consults. ROs' top concerns were related to documentation, reimbursement, and patients' health insurance coverage. Ninety-five percent of ROs felt confident when implementing new technology. Fifty-one percent of ROs thought that the supply of ROs was balanced with demand, and 33% perceived an oversupply. Conclusions: This study provides a current snapshot of the 2012 radiation oncology physician workforce. There was a predominance of whites and men. Job satisfaction level was high. However a substantial fraction of ROs reported burnout feelings. Perceptions about supply and demand balance were mixed. ROs top concerns reflect areas of attention for the healthcare sector as a whole.

  12. Kokes Awards for the 22nd North American Catalysis Society Meeting, June 5-10, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabio H. Ribeiro

    2011-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The biennial North American Catalysis Society (NACS) Meetings are the premiere conferences in the area of catalysis, surface science, and reaction engineering. The 22nd meeting will be held the week of June 5-10, 2011 in Detroit, Michigan. The objective of the Meetings is to bring together leading researchers for intensive scientific exchange and interactions. Financial support that offsets some of the associated costs (specifically, registration fee, airline tickets, and hotel accommodations) would encourage graduate students, and for the first time undergraduate students, to attend and participate meaningfully in this conference. The funds sought in this proposal will help support the Richard J. Kokes Travel Award program. Graduate students eligible for these merit-based Awards are those who study at a North American university and who will present at the Meeting. We have currently 209 applications and we expect to be able to fund about half of them. The NACS has traditionally sought to encourage graduate student, and this year for the first time undergraduate studies, participation at the National Meetings and providing financial support is the most effective means to do so. Their attendance would contribute significantly to their scientific training and communication and presentation skills. They would be exposed to the leading researchers from the US and abroad; they would meet their peers from other universities; they would learn about cutting-edge results that could benefit their research projects; and they may become interested in becoming active participants in the catalysis community. These young investigators represent the next generation of scientists and engineers, and their proper training will lead to future scientific breakthroughs and technological innovations that benefit the US economy. Advances in catalysis can come in the form of more energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly chemical processes, improved fuel cell performance, efficient hydrogen production, and a cleaner environment.

  13. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Beth A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Demanes, D. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology , University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Radiological Physics Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hayes, John K. [Gamma West Brachytherapy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hsu, I-Chow J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Morris, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Tward, Jonathan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  14. References R-3 ANS 1986. Glossary of Terms in Nuclear Science and Technology, American Nuclear Society.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Facilities, Guide for R (1993), American National Standards Institute. Baker, D. A., and J. K. Soldat 1993

  15. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 11:43-49, 1991 @ Copyright by the AmericanFisheries Society 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -P) largemouth bass (RSD-P = percentage of stock-length fish that are also preferred length). Yellow perch growth size, and big large- mouth bass at the expense of bluegill size. Fish- eries biologists commonlyattemptFisheries Society 1991 Evaluation of Largemouth Bass-Yellow Perch Communitiesin Small South Dakota Impoundments

  16. Oxidation of Polymer-derived SiAICN Ceramics. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    decrease in oxidation rate. Citation: Wang Y, L An, Y Fan, L Zhang, SD Burton, and Z Gan.2005."Oxidation of Polymer-derived SiAICN Ceramics."Journal of the American Ceramic...

  17. The Plant Cell, Vol. 14, 211236, January 2002, www.plantcell.org 2002 American Society of Plant Biologists Central Functions of the Lumenal and Peripheral Thylakoid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberles, David

    The Plant Cell, Vol. 14, 211­236, January 2002, www.plantcell.org © 2002 American Society of Plant by Experimentation and Genome-Wide Prediction Jean-Benoît Peltier,a Olof Emanuelsson,b,c Dário E. Kalume,d Jimmy of this organelle in the plant cell (Arabidopsis Genome Initiative, 2000). This prediction i

  18. Applied Engineering in Agriculture Vol. 25(1): 45 54 E 2009 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers ISSN 0883-8542 45

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Applied Engineering in Agriculture Vol. 25(1): 45 54 E 2009 American Society of Agricultural Northwest, SHAW. illage based, winter wheat summer fallow is the predominant agricultural system on 1 of Soils, Water and Agricultural Engineering, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman; Joan Q. Wu, ASABE Member

  19. r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr100290v |Chem. Rev. XXXX, XXX, 000000 pubs.acs.org/CR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr100290v |Chem. Rev. XXXX, XXX, 000 emission regulations Received: September 1, 2010 #12;B dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr100290v |Chem. Rev. XXXX, XXX

  20. Published: March 25, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 1208 dx.doi.org/10.1021/ct100738h |J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2011, 7, 12081219

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponder, Jay

    Published: March 25, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 1208 dx.doi.org/10.1021/ct100738h |J, Jay W. Ponder,|| and Bernard R. Brooks*, Department of Chemistry, University of South Florida, 4202 E. This new facility is fully integrated with free energy perturbation methods, Hessian-based methods

  1. MAY 1999 661M A T T H E W S A N D K I L A D I S 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Adrian

    MAY 1999 661M A T T H E W S A N D K I L A D I S 1999 American Meteorological Society The Tropical with enhanced convection over the East Indian Ocean and Indonesia, and suppressed convection over the South and forms an integral part of the slowly varying diabatic heating field of the MJO. In the opposite phase

  2. pubs.acs.org/Biochemistry Published on Web 05/25/2010 r 2010 American Chemical Society 5540 Biochemistry 2010, 49, 55405552

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    pubs.acs.org/Biochemistry Published on Web 05/25/2010 r 2010 American Chemical Society 5540, Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 Present address: Department-neomycin conjugates with poly(dA) 3 2poly(dT) were derived from an integrated van't Hoff equation using the Tm3f2

  3. Published: February 3, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 1172 dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp110523s |J. Phys. Chem. A 2011, 115, 11721185

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Scott L.

    Published: February 3, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 1172 dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp110523s |J, 315 South, 1400 East Room 2020, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, United States A. A. Viggiano Space, Massachusetts 01731-3010, United States ABSTRACT: Integral cross sections and product recoil velo- city

  4. 740 / Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions MPMI Vol. 20, No. 7, 2007, pp. 740750. doi:10.1094/MPMI-20-7-0740. 2007 The American Phytopathological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Citovsky, Vitaly

    -20-7-0740. © 2007 The American Phytopathological Society TECHNICAL ADVANCE pSITE Vectors for Stable Integration or Transient Expression of Autofluorescent Protein Fusions in Plants: Probing Nicotiana, University of Kentucky, Lexington 40546, U.S.A.; 2 Department of Life Science, Dongguk University, South

  5. r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/la104757g |Langmuir XXXX, XXX, 000000 pubs.acs.org/Langmuir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seung-Wuk

    r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/la104757g |Langmuir XXXX, XXX, 000 University, Jinju, 660-701 South Korea ^ Department of Orthopedics & Physical Rehabilitation and Department. INTRODUCTION Biomaterials composed of integrated inorganic and organic components possess unique properties

  6. The Plant Cell, Vol. 13, 16391651, July 2001, www.plantcell.org 2001 American Society of Plant Biologists Overexpression of the Heterotrimeric G-Protein -Subunit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xing-Wang

    The Plant Cell, Vol. 13, 1639­1651, July 2001, www.plantcell.org © 2001 American Society of Plant Science Center RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0001 Saitama, Japan Plant heterotrimeric G-proteins have G-proteins are conserved cell signaling molecules in various eukaryotic organisms such as yeast

  7. Published: August 19, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 7915 dx.doi.org/10.1021/es201084q |Environ. Sci. Technol. 2011, 45, 79157922

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    Published: August 19, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 7915 dx.doi.org/10.1021/es201084q and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg Virginia 24061, United States Department of Biological Mercury (Hg) is a contaminant of global concern due to its environmental ubiquity and toxicity to humans

  8. 2078 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    2078 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society Long-Term Ice,* ROGER COLONY,* MARK A. JOHNSON,# VALERII P. KARKLIN, DAVID WALSH,* AND ALEXANDER V. YULIN *International patterns manifested locally by SAT and wind variability (Walsh and Johnson 1979; Overland and Pease 1982

  9. American Society of Engineering Education April 1-2, 2005-Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois. 2005 IL/IN Sectional Conference.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    , and the subject of site planning belongs to both of the civil and architectural engineering professions. SometimesAmerican Society of Engineering Education April 1-2, 2005-Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois. 2005 IL/IN Sectional Conference. Session D-T1-2 OVERLAP BETWEEN MECHANICAL AND CIVIL ENGINEERING

  10. The Plant Cell, Vol. 10, 18471860, November 1998, www.plantcell.org 1998 American Society of Plant Physiologists Three Genes of the Arabidopsis RPP1 Complex Resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Málaga, Universidad de

    that have become vulnerable to detection by a "surveillance system" in plants specified by evolving R genes al., 1998) plant pathogens. It is crucial that the host plant is able to respond by generating novelThe Plant Cell, Vol. 10, 1847­1860, November 1998, www.plantcell.org © 1998 American Society

  11. Preprint version of paper published in Journal of the American Society for Information Science & Technology, 2012, DOI: 10.1002/asi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Preprint version of paper published in Journal of the American Society for Information Science & Technology, 2012, DOI: 10.1002/asi The French conception of Information Science: une exception française? Fidelia Ibekwe-SanJuan Department of Information & Communication Sciences Jean Moulin University - Lyon3 6

  12. The Plant Cell, Vol. 11, 14451456, August 1999, www.plantcell.org 1999 American Society of Plant Physiologists Light QualityDependent Nuclear Import of the Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schäfer, Eberhard

    Physiologists Light Quality­Dependent Nuclear Import of the Plant Photoreceptors Phytochrome A and B StefanThe Plant Cell, Vol. 11, 1445­1456, August 1999, www.plantcell.org © 1999 American Society of Plant Institute of Plant Biology, Biological Research Center, P.O. Box 521, H-6701 Szeged, Hungary The phytochrome

  13. The Plant Cell, Vol. 10, 16371647, October 1998, www.plantcell.org 1998 American Society of Plant Physiologists The Plant U1 Small Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, A.S.N

    of Plant Physiologists The Plant U1 Small Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein Particle 70K Protein Interacts with TwoThe Plant Cell, Vol. 10, 1637­1647, October 1998, www.plantcell.org © 1998 American Society small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U1 snRNP) 70K protein (U1-70K), one of the three U1 sn

  14. Transactions of the ASABE Vol. 49(1): 61-73 2006 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers ISSN 0001-2351 61

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transactions of the ASABE Vol. 49(1): 61-73 2006 American Society of Agricultural and Biological to feedlot facilities is known as the "zero-discharge standard" in which the release of processed wastewater Magre, Research Associate, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, USDA-ARS Blackland Research

  15. Transactions of the ASAE Vol. 47(4): 1113-1118 2004 American Society of Agricultural Engineers ISSN 0001-2351 1113

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaubey, Indrajeet

    Transactions of the ASAE Vol. 47(4): 1113-1118 2004 American Society of Agricultural Engineers ISSN municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. The objective of this study was to evaluate sediment Assistant, and Marty D. Matlock, ASAE Member, Associate Professor, Department of Biological and Agricultural

  16. 4470r 2009 American Chemical Society pubs.acs.org/EF Energy Fuels 2009, 23, 44704478 : DOI:10.1021/ef900107b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ning

    4470r 2009 American Chemical Society pubs.acs.org/EF Energy Fuels 2009, 23, 4470­4478 : DOI:10 of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China, Earth and Environmental Sciences Division transfer and, thus, for energy conservation. In this paper, we investigated the influence of viscosity

  17. pubs.acs.org/ICPublished on Web 10/08/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Inorg. Chem. 2009, 48, 99719973 9971

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pubs.acs.org/ICPublished on Web 10/08/2009r 2009 American Chemical Society Inorg. Chem. 2009, 48 dioxide from methane with high selectivity. Over the past decade, microporous metal-organic frame- work employ simple carbon-based spacer ele- ments (struts) that primarily serve to distance the metal nodes

  18. Published: March 29, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 2079 dx.doi.org/10.1021/om2002365 |Organometallics 2011, 30, 20792082

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    for methane hydroxylation are based on strongly electro- philic and oxidizing cations such as Hg(II),4 PtPublished: March 29, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 2079 dx.doi.org/10.1021/om2002365, Beckman Institute, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology

  19. 1352 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that qualitatively similar results apply to coupled atmosphere­ocean GCMs. The penetration of surface heat flux1352 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society The Deep-Ocean, Washington (Manuscript received 20 June 2002, in final form 3 November 2002) ABSTRACT The deep-ocean heat

  20. 264 VOLUME 13J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2000 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the relationship between the earth radiation budget or sur- face radiation budget and total cloud cover (see refer shortwave and longwave radiative flux- es as much as changes in total cloud cover and because264 VOLUME 13J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2000 American Meteorological Society Radiative Effects

  1. 3010 VOLUME 11J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 1998 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Junhong

    of the role of clouds in the climate is on the average cloud effects on the earth and surface radiation3010 VOLUME 11J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 1998 American Meteorological Society Effects of Cloud macroscale cloud vertical structures (CVS). The overall effect of clouds, the role of their geographic

  2. A reprint from American Scientistthe magazine of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    to have repeatedly published mate- rial written by others without attribu- tion is Edward Wegman, formerly interesting because Wegman has a distinguished record of public service and scholar- ship (he received at one point (see the appendix to this essay at American Scientist's website)--Wegman and his research

  3. IU SSCHOOL OOF LLIBERAL AARTS The diversity of American society and culture is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    of making sense of America. Some students may emphasize historical, sociological, or economic factors-American Center is dedicated to examining the experience of German immigrants in America and the German heritage broad ideas and understand oneself in a dynamic historical context would benefit from the intellectual

  4. Schwarz, T. and Wells, S. (1999) "Storm Water Particle Removal using Cross-Flow Filtration and Sedimentation," in Advances in Filtration and Separation Technology, Volume 12, ed. by W. Leung, American Filtrations and Separations Society, pp.219-226.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Scott A.

    and Sedimentation," in Advances in Filtration and Separation Technology, Volume 12, ed. by W. Leung, American Filtrations and Separations Society, pp.219-226. CONTINUOUS DEFLECTION SEPARATION OF STORMWATER PARTICULATES

  5. Report on the American Nuclear Society International Topical Meeting: {open_quotes}The safety, status, and future of non-commercial reactors and irradiation Facilities{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silver, E.G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Nuclear Society`s International Topical Meeting, The Safety, Status, and Future of Non-Commercial Reactors and Irradiation Facilities, also known as SAFOR 90, was held in Boise, Idaho, September 30 to October 4, 1990. In 19 half-day sessions, 102 papers were presented which covered operating research reactors, production reactors, the use of reactors for training and research, probabilistic risk assessments applied to research reactors, plans for new facilities, and new fuels and reactor types. A special session on space reactor safety was also presented. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  6. american students utilizing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PARTNERS American Institute of Chemical Engineers Alpha Omega Epsilon International Engineering & Technical Science Sorority American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and...

  7. Nuclear criticality safety experiments, calculations, and analyses - 1958 to 1982. Volume 2. Summaries. Complilation of papers from the Transactions of the American Nuclear Society

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This compilation contains 688 complete summaries of papers on nuclear criticality safety as presented at meetings of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). The selected papers contain criticality parameters for fissile materials derived from experiments and calculations, as well as criticality safety analyses for fissile material processing, transport, and storage. The compilation was developed as a component of the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) now under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The compilation is presented in two volumes: Volume 1 contains a directory to the ANS Transaction volume and page number where each summary was originally published, the author concordance, and the subject concordance derived from the keyphrases in titles. Volume 2 contains-in chronological order-the full-text summaries, reproduced here by permission of the American Nuclear Society from their Transactions, volumes 1-41.

  8. Published: July 18, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 7388 dx.doi.org/10.1021/ic201396m |Inorg. Chem. 2011, 50, 73887390

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    and MOF-48 are found to have high catalytic activity and chemical stability. They convert methane selec the oxidation of methane directly to AA with 70% yield using K2S2O8 as an oxidant (yields based on K2S2O8), 175Published: July 18, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 7388 dx.doi.org/10.1021/ic201396m |Inorg

  9. A. To promote African American faculty, staff and student success. B. To expand and share knowledge of African American contributions to society.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    of History and African American Studies, SJSU Barack Obama, President United States of America The African Records of Urgent Inventions of African American in the USA. Speaker: Dr. Steven Millner, Professor

  10. Development of ASTM standards in support of advanced ceramics -- continuing efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, C.R.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An update is presented of the activities of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Committee C-28 on Advanced Ceramics. Since its inception in 1986, this committee, which has five standard producing subcommittees, has written and published over 32 consensus standards. These standards are concerned with mechanical testing of monolithic and composite ceramics, nondestructive examination, statistical analysis and design, powder characterization, quantitative microscopy, fractography, and terminology. These standards ensure optimum material behavior with physical and mechanical property reproducibility, component reliability, and well-defined methods of data treatment and material analysis for both monolithic and composite materials. Committee C-28 continues to sponsor technical symposia and to cooperate in the development of international standards. An update of recent and current activities as well as possible new areas of standardization work will be presented.

  11. Published in Journal of the European Ceramic Society doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jeurceramsoc.2013.11.037

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigoni, Davide

    ; Zeuch et al., 2001; Zhang and Green, 2002), particularly for traditional ceramics. In this article); and the laws of increase of (iii.) density and (iv.) of cohesion, both with the forming pressure. The performed by Bigoni and Piccolroaz (2004; see also Bigoni, 2012) and the failure envelope with a curved Coulomb

  12. Institute for Materials Science and Engineering: Ceramics Division, technical activities 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, S.M.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current programs of the Ceramics Division are reviewed. In 1990, technology transfer was accomplished by the preparation and publication of 180 papers, the presentation of 150 talks and the submission of 6 invention disclosures. Leadership of national and international standards activities continued. The Structural Ceramics Database (SCD) Version 1.0 which contains evaluated thermomechanical data for industrial designers has been offered for public distribution by the Office of Standard Reference Data. Other database activities continued with the distribution of A Computerized Tribology Information System (ACTIS) and the completion of Volumes 7 and 8 of the NIST/American Ceramic Society Phase Diagrams for Ceramists. A new activity, an assessment of the New Diamond Technology in Japan was undertaken by division personnel in 1990. In the structural materials area, research on the chemistry of ceramic slurries and suspensions has led to identification of mechanisms for coating silicon nitride powders with discrete sintering aids. Significant advances in the ability to measure surface forces between dissimilar materials were achieved. Basic research on bridging effects in fracture have been extended to microstructural design and studies of cyclic fatigue. Phase diagram determinations and studies of the role of processing environments on microstructural features of high temperature superconductors continued. The role of rare earth substitutions on YBaCO properties were evaluated and provided insight into the effect of atomic size of substitutional atoms.

  13. American Chemical Society Fellows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta Fe MetroWeinberg SHAREEnergyselected as

  14. Cite as: Lundquist, J.K., F. K. Chow, J. D. Mirocha, and K.A. Lundquist, 2007: An Improved WRF for Urban-Scale and Complex-Terrain Applications. American Meteorological Society's 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Fotini Katopodes

    method (IBM) approach to account for the effects of urban geometries and complex terrain. Companion of flow and dispersion in complex geometries such as urban areas, as well as new simulation capabilities for Urban-Scale and Complex-Terrain Applications. American Meteorological Society's 7 th Symposium

  15. The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series, 183:142155, 2009 July doi:10.1088/0067-0049/183/1/142 C 2009. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Share, Gerald

    part of the gamma-ray emission results when flare-accelerated ions interact with the ambient solar.1088/0067-0049/183/1/142 C 2009. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. NUCLEAR GAMMA-RAY 20; published 2009 June 19 ABSTRACT Analyses of gamma-ray line emission in solar flares have provided

  16. The Plant Cell, Vol. 11, 19671979, October 1999, www.plantcell.org 1999 American Society of Plant Physiologists Arabidopsis cop8 and fus4 Mutations Define the Same Gene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xing-Wang

    The Plant Cell, Vol. 11, 1967­1979, October 1999, www.plantcell.org © 1999 American Society, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Saitama 351-01, Japan The pleiotropic constitutive is highly conserved among multicellular eukaryotes and is also similar to a subunit of the 19S regulatory

  17. The Astrophysical Journal, 747:109 (10pp), 2012 March 10 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/747/2/109 C 2012. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    numerical work has now been extended to 3D by means of large-scale numerical simulations. Random. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. HIGH-LUNDQUIST NUMBER SCALING by previous analysis as well as 2D simulations. In the same limit the average magnetic energy built up

  18. The Astrophysical Journal, 753:57 (11pp), 2012 July 1 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/753/1/57 C 2012. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savin, Daniel Wolf

    recombination (DR) resonances associated with 3s 3p and 3p 3d core excitations. At higher energies, we observe. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. ELECTRON­ION RECOMBINATION OF Fe-beam recombination rate coefficient (MBRRC) for collision energies from 0 to 1500 eV is presented. This work uses

  19. The Astrophysical Journal, 728:133 (15pp), 2011 February 20 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/728/2/133 C 2011. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reames, Donald V.

    . Consequently, within the Wind/3D Plasma and Energetic Particle Instrument/ Silicon Semiconductor Telescope. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. WHAT CAUSES SCATTER. The emphasis of our examination is on the energy dependence of electron angular distributions

  20. The Astrophysical Journal, 691:105114, 2009 January 20 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/691/1/105 c 2009. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Yingna

    -dimensional (3D) structure of the coronal magnetic field configuration prior to the flare. Therefore, modeling. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. OBSERVATIONS AND NONLINEAR FORCE coronal heating due to reconnection, and the energy transported down to the chromosphere may be too low

  1. The Astrophysical Journal, 755:33 (7pp), 2012 August 10 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/755/1/33 C 2012. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reames, Donald V.

    and therefore control the heat flow process. They are critical for establishing a host of other solar variables. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. COMPOSITION OF THE SOLAR CORONA, SOLAR WIND, AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES J. T. Schmelz1 , D. V. Reames2 , R. von Steiger3,4 , and S

  2. The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 726:L22 (6pp), 2011 January 10 doi:10.1088/2041-8205/726/2/L22 C 2011. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frayer, David

    2011. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. GREEN BANK, Green Bank, WV 24944, USA 2 Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA Padova, Italy 14 Instituto de Astrof´isica de Canarias, C/V´ia L´actea s Laguna, Spain 15 Physics

  3. Fonseca, F. (2007) "The Double Role of Ontologies in Information Science Research," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 58(6), pp. 786-793.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrick, Irene J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fonseca, F. (2007) "The Double Role of Ontologies in Information Science Research," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 58(6), pp. 786-793. Pre-print version The Double Role of Ontologies in Information Science Research Frederico Fonseca College of Information Sciences

  4. 2072 VOLUME 32J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monahan, Adam Hugh

    2072 VOLUME 32J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2002 American Meteorological Society Stabilization of Climate Regimes by Noise in a Simple Model of the Thermohaline hysteresis responses to steady changes in freshwater forcing, such that the transitions between regimes

  5. The Astrophysical Journal, 757:92 (6pp), 2012 September 20 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/757/1/92 C 2012. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    . INTRODUCTION Sporadic energy releases on the Sun can accelerate solar ener- getic particles (SEPs. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. OCCURRENCE OF EXTREME SOLAR-90014 Oulu, Finland; ilya.usoskin@oulu.fi 2 Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of RAS, 194021 St

  6. The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 793:L27 (6pp), 2014 October 1 doi:10.1088/2041-8205/793/2/L27 C 2014. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. A PRECISE WATER ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENT FOR THE HOT JUPITER WASP-43b Laura Kreidberg1,12 , Jacob L. Bean1,13 , Jean-Michel D ABSTRACT The water abundance in a planetary atmosphere provides a key constraint on the planet's primordial

  7. The Astrophysical Journal, 754:102 (10pp), 2012 August 1 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/754/2/102 C 2012. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Tim

    . The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. WHITE-LIGHT OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR. Reinard2 1 Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302, USA; howard-scale solar wind transients from the Sun out to 1 AU. This comparison was performed during a few weeks around

  8. Transactions of the ASABE Vol. 57(2): 355-362 2014 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers ISSN 2151-0032 DOI 10.13031/trans.57.10167 355

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transactions of the ASABE Vol. 57(2): 355-362 © 2014 American Society of Agricultural. Studies are also needed to extend the swathed-biomass volume sensing concept to corn stover, other energy productivity and low input requirements (Heaton et al., 2008). However, high biomass harvesting cost is one

  9. International Conference on Mathematics and Computational Methods Applied to Nuclear Science & Engineering (M&C 2013) Sun Valley, Idaho, USA, May 5-9, 2013, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, C. T. "Tim"

    International Conference on Mathematics and Computational Methods Applied to Nuclear Science & Engineering (M&C 2013) Sun Valley, Idaho, USA, May 5-9, 2013, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, La transport criticality problems. Traditional methods for computing this eigenvalue/eigenvector pair

  10. American Journal of Botany 99(5): 110. 2012. American Journal of Botany 99(5): 110, 2012; http://www.amjbot.org/ 2012 Botanical Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    ://www.amjbot.org/ © 2012 Botanical Society of America Waves crashing on shore impose extraordinary hydrodynamic forces to intertidal rocks must resist wave-induced hydrodynamic forces to survive, just as some terrestrial plants of seaweeds to reduce or resist hydrodynamic forces will help us predict patterns of dislodgement and shifts

  11. North American Journal of Aquaculture 64:248-256, 2UJ2 O Copyright by the American FisheriesSociety 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Iqbal

    of the main problems faced by hybrid striped bass producers is the different spawning times among fish that of the striped bass (Kerby 1984), producing hybrids can be logistically difficult. Spawning fish of differentSociety 2002 The demand for striped bass Morone soxatilis and its hybrids has made it one of the fastest

  12. 1 JUNE 2004 2213S T E P H E N S E T A L . 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Peter J.

    and reduced solar heating, with the radiative heating of the upper atmosphere by high clouds sustained by high hu- man society in the global change arena. The 1995 In- tergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

  13. Join us for the Third North American Congress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Oncology (ASPO) American Statistical Association-Epidemiology (ASA-EPI) Council of State and Territorial Society (AES) American Heart Association -Epidemiology Section(AHA-EPI) American Society for Preventive) International Society for Pharmacoepidemiology (ISPE) Mol Epi Group/American Association of Cancer Research (MEG

  14. Subscriber access provided by Stanford University Libraries ACS Nano is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Subscriber access provided by Stanford University Libraries ACS Nano is published by the American Research and Sustainable Technology, University of Bremen, Leobener Straße NW2, 28359 Bremen, Germany c

  15. American Statistical Association Names Fellows for 2010 ALEXANDRIA VA (PRWEB) MAY 20, 2010 The American Statistical Association (ASA), the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    American Statistical Association Names Fellows for 2010 ALEXANDRIA VA (PRWEB) MAY 20, 2010 ­ The American Statistical Association (ASA), the nation's preeminent professional statistical society, today the American Statistical Association The American Statistical Association (ASA), a scientific and educational

  16. Subscriber access provided by UNIV HEIDELBERG Biochemistry is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olins, Ada L.

    Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Neutron scattering studies of nucleosome 1983, 22, 4916-4923 Neutron Scattering Studies of Nucleosome Structure at Low Ionic Strength? Edward C by small-angle neutron scattering. The transition seen by some investigators at between 2.9 and 7.5 m

  17. Subscriber access provided by Caltech Library Services Organometallics is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Article Transition State Energy;Transition State Energy Decomposition Study of Acetate-Assisted and Internal Electrophilic Substitution C amount of transition state stabilization. The energy penalty to deform reactants into their transition

  18. April 1, 2001 / Volume 35 , Issue 7 / pp. 148 A 153 A Copyright 2001 American Chemical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Society What Future for Carbon Capture and Sequestration? New technologies could reduce carbon dioxide. There is no single solution, but the development of carbon capture and sequestration technologies, which has. This was not always the case. Ten years ago, the field of carbon capture and sequestration consisted of a handful

  19. Subscriber access provided by STANFORD UNIV GREEN LIBR Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    conductive electrodes are important components of thin-film solar cells, light-emitting diodes, and many-to-roll processed solar cells and large- area organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for lighting applications.1 When Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Letter Solution-Processed Metal Nanowire

  20. Subscriber access provided by TEL AVIV UNIV (AO) Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabani, Eran

    Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Letter Distribution of Multiexciton Generation photon in semiconductors.1 MEG is of potential significance for improving the efficiency of light harvesting devices, such as solar cells.2 Strict selection rules and competing processes in the bulk allow

  1. Subscriber access provided by STANFORD UNIV GREEN LIBR Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    for effective light absorption in a-Si:H thin film solar cells, which is 2 orders of magnitude thinner than Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Letter Optical Absorption Enhancement November 26, 2008 ABSTRACT Hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) is an important solar cell material. Here we

  2. Subscriber access provided by STANFORD UNIV GREEN LIBR Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    is around 1 µm for effective light absorption in a-Si:H thin film solar cells, which is 2 orders Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Letter Optical Absorption Enhancement-Si:H) is an important solar cell material. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of a-Si:H nanowires (NWs) and nanocones

  3. american science policy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Australia. January 2001. 12.American Society of Agronomy - Fellow Award. 2002 Jawitz, James W. 174 Roadmap: Political Science American Politics Bachelor of Arts AS-BA-POL-APOL...

  4. Lake and Reservoir Management, 25:364376, 2009 C Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Berthou, Emili

    Lake and Reservoir Management, 25:364­376, 2009 C Copyright by the North American Lake Management Quality (EQ) of the reservoirs was assessed by integrating values of total chlorophyll a, cyanophyta classification of a set of Mediterranean reservoirs applying the EU Water Framework Directive: A reasonable

  5. american higher education: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright ? 2001, American Society for Engineering Education" Session 2655 Training Future Professors with other near- by...

  6. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  7. American Society of Addiction Medicine Public Policy Statement on Healthcare and Other Licensed Professionals with Addictive Illness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Overview

    Healthcare professionals, like all individuals, are human, fallible and subject to medical illnesses, including addiction. The public—and too often the healthcare community itself—views addiction and its prognosis for remission in a negative light. This view represents an antiquated but long standing stigma about addiction, a lack of sufficient longitudinal addiction care, sparse treatment outcome data, and inadequate dissemination of evidence-based treatment into the healthcare community and the public at large. Healthcare professionals are a unique cohort, with distinctive characteristics that come into play in the development of the illness, the course of treatment, legal and ethical ramifications and eventual outcomes. Our best data regarding licensed professionals comes from research on over three decades of physician-specific addiction treatment and monitoring. These programs were initially recommended by the American Medical Association and the Federation of State Medical Boards. Nationally, the membership organization for the majority of Physicians Health Programs (PHPs) is the Federation of State Physician Health Programs (FSPHP). These programs have continued to evolve and mature; the majority of such programs now provide assistance for other licensed

  8. Fibrous ceramic monoliths made from multi-phase ceramic filaments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Singh, Dileep (Naperville, IL); Polzin, Bryant J. (Mundelein, IL); Cruse, Terry (Lisle, IL); Picciolo, John J. (Lockport, IL)

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing composite ceramic material is provided wherein a core ceramic structure is produced and simultaneously enveloped with a sleeve of similar material.

  9. SURFACES AND INTERFACES IN CERAMIC AND CERAMIC-METAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    contained within the ceramic matrix of a-Alz03 and (Fe,Mn,layers compared to the ceramic matrix. An additional O.OSpm

  10. Ceramic Electron Multiplier

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Comby, G.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ceramic Electron Multipliers (CEM) is a compact, robust, linear and fast multi-channel electron multiplier. The Multi Layer Ceramic Technique (MLCT) allows to build metallic dynodes inside a compact ceramic block. The activation of the metallic dynodes enhances their secondary electron emission (SEE). The CEM can be used in multi-channel photomultipliers, multi-channel light intensifiers, ion detection, spectroscopy, analysis of time of flight events, particle detection or Cherenkov imaging detectors. (auth)

  11. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  12. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  13. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density. 2 figs.

  14. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, Kathleen B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Becher, Paul F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Waters, Shirley B. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite.

  15. Method for fabricating ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Singh, Dileep (Naperville, IL); Polzin, Bryant J. (Downers Grove, IL); Cruse, Terry (Lisle, IL); Picciolo, John J. (Lockport, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing composite ceramic material is provided wherein a core ceramic structure is produced and simultaneously enveloped with a sleeve of similar material.

  16. Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  17. Method of making a modified ceramic-ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weaver, Billy L. (Eagan, MN); McLaughlin, Jerry C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of making a shaped ceramic-ceramic composite articles, such as gas-fired radiant heat burner tubes, heat exchangers, flame dispersers, and other furnace elements, having a formed-on ceramic-ceramic composite thereon.

  18. Mounting for ceramic scroll

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petty, Jack D. (Indianapolis, IN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mounting for a ceramic scroll on a metal engine block of a gas turbine engine includes a first ceramic ring and a pair of cross key connections between the first ceramic ring, the ceramic scroll, and the engine block. The cross key connections support the scroll on the engine block independent of relative radial thermal growth and for bodily movement toward an annular mounting shoulder on the engine. The scroll has an uninterrupted annular shoulder facing the mounting shoulder on the engine block. A second ceramic ring is captured between mounting shoulder and the uninterrupted shoulder on the scroll when the latter is bodily shifted toward the mouting shoulder to define a gas seal between the scroll and the engine block.

  19. Ceramic heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaHaye, P.G.; Rahman, F.H.; Lebeau, T.P.; Severin, B.K.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A tube containment system is disclosed. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture. 6 figs.

  20. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, Michael E. (Poway, CA); Harkins, Bruce D. (San Diego, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  1. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  2. ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance Print Thursday, 27 September 2012 00:00 ritchie ceramics...

  3. American Physical Society Honors Decker

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decker's fellowship recognizes his "outstanding contributions to the design, commissioning, and enhancement of synchrotron light sources, and for innovative developments in...

  4. VOL. 55, NO. 22 15 NOVEMBER 1998J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 1998 American Meteorological Society 3313

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takano, Yoshihide

    in the phase functions. The errors are reduced to 2% for ice when the assessment is constrained to only those American Meteorological Society 3313 Parameterizations of Reflectance and Effective Emittance for Satellite hexagonal ice crystals with effective diameters varying from 6 to 135 m. Cloud reflectance lookup tables

  5. ! During the American park movement in the romantic era, park proponents sought to use urban parks to reform corrupted city dwellers into the good society. Public health,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Terence

    of a good society: the first two virtues were related to material well-being; public health and prosperity toward sports and physical activity. Sports games in parks became more commonly organized, teaching youth

  6. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  7. Light emitting ceramic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  8. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  9. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  10. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yahnke, Mark S. (Berkeley, CA); Shlomo, Golan (Haifa, IL); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range.

  11. What can I do with this major? AMERICAN STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    and historical sites Historical associations and societies Cultural heritage organizations Historical projects Historical homes Special collections Historical societies Natural history museums Living history museums Art grant writing, budgeting, and legal is- sues surrounding historical artifacts. #12;(American Studies

  12. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite. 5 figs.

  13. Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seabaugh, Matthew M. (Columbus, OH); Swartz, Scott L. (Columbus, OH); Dawson, William J. (Dublin, OH); McCormick, Buddy E. (Dublin, OH)

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  14. american underground science: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    girls have underperformed relative to boys in science, technology, engineering, Brown, Christia Spears; Leaper, Campbell 2010-01-01 156 STUDENT SOCIETY American Institute...

  15. american crystal sugar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002 American Society of Plant Biologists Sugar Sensing and Signaling in Plants Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Biologists Sugar Sensing and Signaling in...

  16. The Status and future of ground-based TeV gamma-ray astronomy. A White Paper prepared for the Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckley, J; Dingus, B; Falcone, A; Kaaret, Philip; Krawzcynski, H; Pohl, M; Vasilev, V; Williams, D A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, ground-based TeV gamma-ray observatories have made spectacular discoveries including imaging spectroscopy observations of galactic sources of different classes, and the discovery of rapid gamma-ray flares from radio galaxies and active galactic nuclei containing supermassive black holes. These discoveries, and the fact that gamma-ray astronomy has the potential to map the radiation from dark matter annihilation in our Galaxy and in extragalactic systems, have attracted the attention of the wider scientific community. The Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society requested the preparation of a white paper on the status and future of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy to define the science goals of a future observatory, to determine the performance specifications, to identify the areas of necessary technology development, and to lay out a clear path for proceeding beyond the near term. The white paper was written with broad community input, including discussions on several dedicat...

  17. Science and Society Colloquium

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  18. Ceramic combustor mounting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Melvin G. (Speedway, IN); Janneck, Frank W. (Danville, IN)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine includes a metal engine block including a wall portion defining a housing for a combustor having ceramic liner components. A ceramic outlet duct is supported by a compliant seal on the metal block and a reaction chamber liner is stacked thereon and partly closed at one end by a ceramic bypass swirl plate which is spring loaded by a plurality of circumferentially spaced, spring loaded guide rods and wherein each of the guide rods has one end thereof directed exteriorly of a metal cover plate on the engine block to react against externally located biasing springs cooled by ambient air and wherein the rod spring support arrangement maintains the stacked ceramic components together so that a normal force is maintained on the seal between the outlet duct and the engine block under all operating conditions. The support arrangement also is operative to accommodate a substantial difference in thermal expansion between the ceramic liner components of the combustor and the metal material of the engine block.

  19. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  20. The Astrophysical Journal, 663: L109L112, 2007 July 10 2007. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    1 AU by the WIND 3D Plasma and Energetic Particle (3DP) instrument. For prompt events, where Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. SOLAR FLARE ELECTRON SPECTRA AT THE SUN AND NEAR THE EARTH source population escapes to 1 AU and the rest produce the HXRs while losing all their energy

  1. The Astrophysical Journal, 513:L135L138, 1999 March 10 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaowei

    Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. WATER ICE, SILICATE, AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON, bands from crystalline silicates longward of 18 mm, and the 43 and 62 mm bands of crystalline water ice hydrocarbons (PAHs; e.g., Allamandola, Tielens, & Barker 1989) were detected in ground-based 8­13 mm spectra

  2. The Astrophysical Journal, 492:L157L161, 1998 January 10 1998. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Glenn

    Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF THE ORION 114 426; published 1997 December 30 ABSTRACT We present the first high-resolution near-infrared images of the edge and evolution with wavelength consistent with predictions for reflection nebulae in a diffuse envelope

  3. The Astrophysical Journal, 669: L53L56, 2007 November 1 2007. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priest, Eric

    Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. FREE MAGNETIC ENERGY IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS ABOVE THE MINIMUM-ENERGY RELAXED STATE S. Re´gnier and E. R. Priest School of Mathematics, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS, UK Received 2007 August 3; accepted 2007 September 7; published 2007

  4. The Astrophysical Journal, 612:L81L84, 2004 September 1 2004. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priest, Eric

    a substantial amount of energy that may be associated with a whole host of physical processes in the solar Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. RECYCLING OF THE SOLAR CORONA'S MAGNETIC FIELD R. M. Close. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS, UK; robertc@mcs.st-and.ac.uk D. W. Longcope Department of Physics, Montana State

  5. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yahnke, M.S.; Shlomo, G.; Anderson, M.A.

    1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range. 2 figs.

  6. American Chemical Society 1155 Sixteenth Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20036 T [202] 872 6229 F [202] 872 4370 www.acs.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    . Stony Brook Univ. Univ. of Delaware Univ. of Tennessee Oklahoma State Univ. StormRider Technologies, Inc energy sources and cures for disease. But that's not all. They're also organizing scientific conferencesPeopleBeHappy Foundation. Dartmouth College Hofstra University Merck & Co., Inc. American University Delta College

  7. 26 September/October 2013 SOLAR TODAY solartoday.org Copyright 2013 by the American Solar Energy Society Inc. All rights reserved. eat powers theworld econo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    26 September/October 2013 SOLAR TODAY solartoday.org Copyright © 2013 by the American Solar Energy, carbon-free production of energy -- in different and com- plementary ways. Photovoltaic solar collectors solarcollectors.Usingsolarheattogenerateelec- tricityhasbeenproventhrough30yearsofopera- tion of the Solar Energy

  8. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasecki, John V. (Livonia, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  9. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

    1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

  10. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Grove, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  11. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, M.A.; Guangyao Sheng.

    1993-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  12. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 504 : 9961001, 1998 September 10 1998. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, John

    Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. ( SCREENING IN THERMONUCLEAR REACTION RATES IN THE SUN+ect of electrostatic screening by ions and electrons on low­Z thermonuclear reac­ tions in the Sun. We use a mean Ðeld devoted to calculating more accurately the e+ects on the rates of solar fusion reactions of electrostatic

  13. Evaluation of Current Consensus Statement Recommendations for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Pooled Analysis of William Beaumont Hospital and American Society of Breast Surgeon MammoSite Registry Trial Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkinson, J. Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Beitsch, Peter D. [Dallas Surgical Group, Dallas, Texas (United States)] [Dallas Surgical Group, Dallas, Texas (United States); Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Arthur, Doug [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massey Cancer Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massey Cancer Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Camden, New Jersey (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Camden, New Jersey (United States); Wazer, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts and Rhode Island Hospital/Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts and Rhode Island Hospital/Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Keisch, Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Healthcare Associates, Miami, Florida (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Healthcare Associates, Miami, Florida (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lyden, Maureen [Biostat International, Inc, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Biostat International, Inc, Tampa, Florida (United States); Chen, Peter Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@pol.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine whether the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Statement (CS) recommendations for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) are associated with significantly different outcomes in a pooled analysis from William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) and the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) MammoSite® Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: APBI was used to treat 2127 cases of early-stage breast cancer (WBH, n=678; ASBrS, n=1449). Three forms of APBI were used at WBH (interstitial, n=221; balloon-based, n=255; or 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, n=206), whereas all Registry Trial patients received balloon-based brachytherapy. Patients were divided according to the ASTRO CS into suitable (n=661, 36.5%), cautionary (n=850, 46.9%), and unsuitable (n=302, 16.7%) categories. Tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes were analyzed according to CS group. Results: The median age was 65 years (range, 32-94 years), and the median tumor size was 10.0 mm (range, 0-45 mm). The median follow-up time was 60.6 months. The WBH cohort had more node-positive disease (6.9% vs 2.6%, P<.01) and cautionary patients (49.5% vs 41.8%, P=.06). The 5-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), and distant metastasis (DM) for the whole cohort were 2.8%, 0.6%, 1.6%. The rate of IBTR was not statistically higher between suitable (2.5%), cautionary (3.3%), or unsuitable (4.6%) patients (P=.20). The nonsignificant increase in IBTR for the cautionary and unsuitable categories was due to increased elsewhere failures and new primaries (P=.04), not tumor bed recurrence (P=.93). Conclusions: Excellent outcomes after breast-conserving surgery and APBI were seen in our pooled analysis. The current ASTRO CS guidelines did not adequately differentiate patients at an increased risk of IBTR or tumor bed failure in this large patient cohort.

  14. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski (Wilmington, DE); Forsythe, George Daniel (Landenberg, PA); Domanski, Daniel Matthew (New Castle, DE); Chambers, Jeffrey Allen (Hockessin, DE); Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam (Boothwyn, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  15. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Connolly, E.S.; Forsythe, G.D.; Domanski, D.M.; Chambers, J.A.; Rajendran, G.P.

    1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter is described having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during back pulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  16. Ceramic composite coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching etal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  17. Ceramic composite coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, G.G.

    1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  18. Ceramic Component Development Process Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, D.; Sambasivan, S.; Kuehmann, C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Basic Industrial Research Lab.; Faber, K. [Northwestern University, MEAS Materials Science & Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of ceramic components and coatings is critical to the demonstration of advanced fossil energy systems. Ceramic components and coating will play critical role in hot-gas filtration, high- temperature heat exchangers, thermal barrier coatings, and the hot- section of turbines. Continuous-fiber composites (CFCC) are expected to play an increasing role in these applications. This program encompassed five technical areas related to ceramic component development for fossil energy systems.

  19. Microprobes aluminosilicate ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (2114 Chadbourne Ave., Madison, WI 53705); Sheng, Guangyao (45 N. Orchard St., Madison, WI 53715)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods have been developed to make mixed alumina-silicate and aluminosilicate particulate microporous ceramic membranes. One method involves the making of separate alumina and silica sols which are then mixed. Another method involves the creation of a combined sol with aluminosilicate particles. The resulting combined alumina and silica membranes have high surface area, a very small pore size, and a very good temperature stability.

  20. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panda, Prakash C. (Ithaca, NY); Seydel, Edgar R. (Ithaca, NY); Raj, Rishi (Ithaca, NY)

    1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to producing relatively flaw free silicon nitride ceramic shapes requiring little or no machining by superplastic forging This invention herein was made in part under Department of Energy Grant DE-AC01-84ER80167, creating certain rights in the United States Government. The invention was also made in part under New York State Science and Technology Grant SB1R 1985-10.

  1. Miniature ceramic fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zuppero, Anthony C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

  2. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roode, M. van

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  3. Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. Abstract: A review is presented of recent results on radiation damage production, defect...

  4. Ceramic composition for immobilization of actinides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbinghaus, Bartley B. (Livermore, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard A. (Livermore, CA); Vance, Eric R. (Kirrawee, AU); Stewart, Martin W. (Barden Ridge, AU); Jostsons, Adam (Eastwood, AU); Allender, Jeffrey S. (North Augusta, SC); Rankin, David Thomas (Aiken, SC)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile.

  5. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF POROUS PNZT POLYCRYSTALLINE CERAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswas, D.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Two-Phase Brittle-Matrix Ceramic Composites," Ibid. , R.ceramic. Spherical pores (110-150ym diameter) were introduced by using The matrix

  6. Current Status and Recommendations for the Future of Research, Teaching, and Testing in the Biological Sciences of Radiation Oncology: Report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallner, Paul E., E-mail: pwallner@theabr.org [21st Century Oncology, LLC, and the American Board of Radiology, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Barker, Christopher A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bassetti, Michael [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bristow, Robert G. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Biophysics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cha, Yong I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Norton Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Formenti, Silvia C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States); Graves, Edward E. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania (United States); Hei, Tom K. [Center for Radiation Research, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); Kimmelman, Alec C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University, Oakland, California (United States); and others

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report.

  7. The Status and future of ground-based TeV gamma-ray astronomy. A White Paper prepared for the Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Buckley; K. Byrum; B. Dingus; A. Falcone; P. Kaaret; H. Krawzcynski; M. Pohl; V. Vassiliev; D. A. Williams

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, ground-based TeV gamma-ray observatories have made spectacular discoveries including imaging spectroscopy observations of galactic sources of different classes, and the discovery of rapid gamma-ray flares from radio galaxies and active galactic nuclei containing supermassive black holes. These discoveries, and the fact that gamma-ray astronomy has the potential to map the radiation from dark matter annihilation in our Galaxy and in extragalactic systems, have attracted the attention of the wider scientific community. The Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society requested the preparation of a white paper on the status and future of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy to define the science goals of a future observatory, to determine the performance specifications, to identify the areas of necessary technology development, and to lay out a clear path for proceeding beyond the near term. The white paper was written with broad community input, including discussions on several dedicated open meetings, and a number of APS or other conferences. It contains an executive summary, detailed reports from the science working groups, and appendices with supplementary material including the full author lists for the different sections of the white paper and a glossary.

  8. BIOMIMETIC PROCESSING OF CERAMICS AND CERAMIC-METAL COMPOSITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    625 BIOMIMETIC PROCESSING OF CERAMICS AND CERAMIC-METAL COMPOSITES M. YASREBI, G. H. KIM, K. E of composite materials has become popular and frequently necessary to meet the requirements of technology. The employment of composites is well appreciated firom the fact that unique arrangements of constituent materials

  9. Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Thomas K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined.

  10. Latin american and caribbean StudieS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    209 Latin american and caribbean StudieS (LacS) cOre FacuLtY: Professor barnett AssociAte Professor MAyock AssistAnt Professors BottA, cArey, Dickovick, eAstwooD the Program in Latin american and caribbean, culture, and society as applied to the region of Latin America and the caribbean. the program's curriculum

  11. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poeppel, R.B.; Claar, T.D.; Silkowski, P.

    1987-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  12. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL); Claar, Terry D. (Newark, DE); Silkowski, Peter (Urbana, IL)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  13. AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY e m e r g i n g c e r a m i c s & g l a s s t e c h n o l o g y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    in nanomaterials Superabsorbent carbon nanotube sponges for oil spills ­ page 10 cover story Preeminent sequestration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Peter Wray If sequestration has find new uses for CO2 that may require less energy? Utilization not sequestration: A novel paradigm

  14. Silicon nitride ceramic comprising samaria and ytterbia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeckley, Russell L. (Oakham, MA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising samaria and ytterbia for enhanced toughness.

  15. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  16. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harkins, B.D.; Ward, M.E.

    1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

  17. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harkins, Bruce D. (San Diego, CA); Ward, Michael E. (Poway, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  18. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harkins, Bruce D. (San Diego, CA); Ward, Michael E. (Poway, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the reinforcing member and having a strengthening member wrapped around the refractory material. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  19. astronomical society astronomical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 533:106?112, 2000 April 10 2000. The American Astronomical Society. All that this uncertainty results in factors of D1.9 uncertainty in the predicted...

  20. Optimization Journals, Sites, Societies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online Links. Optimization related societies. Mathematical Optimization Society · SIAM · INFORMS. Optimization related journals. Mathematical ...

  1. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  2. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment, each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion, and each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component. 4 figs.

  3. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL); Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment. Each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion. Each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  4. Ceramic Cerami Turbine Nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (Alpine, CA)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of horizontally segmented vanes therebetween being positioned by a connecting member positioning segmented vanes in functional relationship one to another. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  5. Process for producing advanced ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwong, Kyei-Sing (Tuscaloosa, AL)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the synthesis of homogeneous advanced ceramics such as SiC+AlN, SiAlON, SiC+Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, and Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 +AlN from natural clays such as kaolin, halloysite and montmorillonite by an intercalation and heat treatment method. Included are the steps of refining clays, intercalating organic compounds into the layered structure of clays, drying the intercalated mixture, firing the treated atmospheres and grinding the loosely agglomerated structure. Advanced ceramics produced by this procedure have the advantages of homogeneity, cost effectiveness, simplicity of manufacture, ease of grind and a short process time. Advanced ceramics produced by this process can be used for refractory, wear part and structure ceramics.

  6. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulates and nickel aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m{sup 1/2}, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa. 5 figs.

  7. Heat distribution ceramic processing method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-layered heat distributor system is provided for use in a microwave process. The multi-layered heat distributors includes a first inner layer of a high thermal conductivity heat distributor material, a middle insulating layer and an optional third insulating outer layer. The multi-layered heat distributor system is placed around the ceramic composition or article to be processed and located in a microwave heating system. Sufficient microwave energy is applied to provide a high density, unflawed ceramic product.

  8. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, Kathleen B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Becher, Paul F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Waters, Shirley B. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 particulates and nickle aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m.sup.1/2, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa.

  9. Extruded ceramic honeycomb and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, J. Paul (Big Flats, NY)

    1995-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Extruded low-expansion ceramic honeycombs comprising beta-spodumene solid solution as the principal crystal phase and with less than 7 weight percent of included mullite are produced by compounding an extrusion batch comprising a lithium aluminosilicate glass powder and a clay additive, extruding a green honeycomb body from the batch, and drying and firing the green extruded cellular honeycomb to crystallize the glass and clay into a low-expansion spodumene ceramic honeycomb body.

  10. High-temperature ceramic receivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvinen, P. O.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced ceramic dome cavity receiver is discussed which heats pressurized gas to temperatures above 1800/sup 0/F (1000/sup 0/C) for use in solar Brayton power systems of the dispersed receiver/dish or central receiver type. Optical, heat transfer, structural, and ceramic material design aspects of the receiver are reported and the development and experimental demonstration of a high-temperature seal between the pressurized gas and the high-temperature silicon carbide dome material is described.

  11. Metal-ceramic joint assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Jian (New Milford, CT)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

  12. Failure Analysis of Ceramic Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.W. Morris

    2000-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramics are being considered for a wide range of structural applications due to their low density and their ability to retain strength at high temperatures. The inherent brittleness of monolithic ceramics requires a departure from the deterministic design philosophy utilized to analyze metallic structural components. The design program ''Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life'' (CARES/LIFE) developed by NASA Lewis Research Center uses a probabilistic approach to predict the reliability of monolithic components under operational loading. The objective of this study was to develop an understanding of the theories used by CARES/LIFE to predict the reliability of ceramic components and to assess the ability of CARES/LIFE to accurately predict the fast fracture behavior of monolithic ceramic components. A finite element analysis was performed to determine the temperature and stress distribution of a silicon carbide O-ring under diametral compression. The results of the finite element analysis were supplied as input into CARES/LIFE to determine the fast fracture reliability of the O-ring. Statistical material strength parameters were calculated from four-point flexure bar test data. The predicted reliability showed excellent correlation with O-ring compression test data indicating that the CARES/LIFE program can be used to predict the reliability of ceramic components subjected to complicated stress states using material properties determined from simple uniaxial tensile tests.

  13. Wedge edge ceramic combustor tile

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, J.E.; Holsapple, A.C.

    1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A multipiece combustor has a portion thereof being made of a plurality of ceramic segments. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have an outer surface and an inner surface. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have a generally cylindrical configuration and including a plurality of joints. The joints define joint portions, a first portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions have a second portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions further include a shoulder formed intermediate the first portion and the second portion. The joints provide a sealing interlocking joint between corresponding ones of the plurality of ceramic segments. Thus, the multipiece combustor having the plurality of ceramic segment with the plurality of joints reduces the physical size of the individual components and the degradation of the surface of the ceramic components in a tensile stress zone is generally eliminated reducing the possibility of catastrophic failures. 7 figs.

  14. Wedge edge ceramic combustor tile

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL); Holsapple, Allan C. (Poway, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multipiece combustor has a portion thereof being made of a plurality of ceramic segments. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have an outer surface and an inner surface. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have a generally cylindrical configuration and including a plurality of joints. The joints define joint portions, a first portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions have a second portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions further include a shoulder formed intermediate the first portion and the second portion. The joints provide a sealing interlocking joint between corresponding ones of the plurality of ceramic segments. Thus, the multipiece combustor having the plurality of ceramic segment with the plurality of joints reduces the physical size of the individual components and the degradation of the surface of the ceramic components in a tensile stress zone is generally eliminated reducing the possibility of catastrophic failures.

  15. Insulating Structural Ceramics Program, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, Mark J.; Tandon, Raj; Ott, Eric; Hind, Abi Akar; Long, Mike; Jensen, Robert; Wheat, Leonard; Cusac, Dave; Lin, H. T.; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Ferber, Mattison K.; Lee, Sun Kun; Yoon, Hyung K.; Moreti, James; Park, Paul; Rockwood, Jill; Boyer, Carrie; Ragle, Christie; Balmer-Millar, Marilou; Aardahl, Chris; Habeger, Craig; Rappe, Ken; Tran, Diana; Koshkarian, Kent; Readey, Michael; ,

    2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    New materials and corresponding manufacturing processes are likely candidates for diesel engine components as society and customers demand lower emission engines without sacrificing power and fuel efficiency. Strategies for improving thermal efficiency directly compete with methodologies for reducing emissions, and so the technical challenge becomes an optimization of controlling parameters to achieve both goals. Approaches being considered to increase overall thermal efficiency are to insulate certain diesel engine components in the combustion chamber, thereby increasing the brake mean effective pressure ratings (BMEP). Achieving higher BMEP rating by insulating the combustion chamber, in turn, requires advances in material technologies for engine components such as pistons, port liners, valves, and cylinder heads. A series of characterization tests were performed to establish the material properties of ceramic powder. Mechanical chacterizations were also obtained from the selected materials as a function of temperature utilizing ASTM standards: fast fracture strength, fatique resistance, corrosion resistance, thermal shock, and fracture toughness. All ceramic materials examined showed excellent wear properties and resistance to the corrosive diesel engine environments. The study concluded that the ceramics examined did not meet all of the cylinder head insert structural design requirements. Therefore we do not recommend at this time their use for this application. The potential for increased stresses and temperatures in the hot section of the diesel engine combined with the highly corrosive combustion products and residues has driven the need for expanded materials capability for hot section engine components. Corrosion and strength requirements necessitate the examination of more advanced high temperture alloys. Alloy developments and the understanding of processing, structure, and properties of supperalloy materials have been driven, in large part, by the gas turbine community over the last fifty years. Characterization of these high temperature materials has, consequently, concentrated heavily upon application conditions similiar to to that encountered in the turbine engine environment. Significantly less work has been performed on hot corrosion degradation of these materials in a diesel engine environment. This report examines both the current high temperature alloy capability and examines the capability of advanced nickle-based alloys and methods to improve production costs. Microstructures, mechanical properties, and the oxidation/corrosion behavior of commercially available silicon nitride ceramics were investigated for diesel engine valve train applications. Contact, sliding, and scratch damage mechanisms of commercially available silicon nitride ceramics were investigated as a function of microstructure. The silicon nitrides with a course microstructure showed a higher material removal rate that agrees with a higher wear volume in the sliding contact tests. The overall objective of this program is to develop catalyst materials systems for an advanced Lean-NOx aftertreatment system that will provide high NOx reduction with minimum engine fuel efficiency penalty. With Government regulations on diesel engine NOx emissions increasingly becoming more restrictive, engine manufacturers are finding it difficult to meet the regulations solely with engine design strategies (i.e. improved combustion, retarded timing, exhaust gas recirculation, etc.). Aftertreatment is the logical technical approach that will be necessary to achieve the required emission levels while at the same time minimally impacting the engine design and its associated reliability and durability concerns.

  16. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the waste form.

  17. American Statistical Association Announces 2011 Award Recipients Awards ceremony to be held at Joint Statistical Meetings in Miami Beach, FL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    American Statistical Association Announces 2011 Award Recipients Awards ceremony to be held at Joint Statistical Meetings in Miami Beach, FL MIAMI BEACH, FL (PRWEB) AUGUST 1, 2011 ­ The American Statistical Association (ASA), the nation's preeminent professional statistical society, today announced

  18. Electric charge trapping, residual stresses and properties of ceramics after metal/ceramics bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and diffusion of metallic species in the ceramics, during the bonding process. Keywords: Joining; ToughnessElectric charge trapping, residual stresses and properties of ceramics after metal/ceramics bonding applications is rapidly increasing. Most of these applications require the use of ceramics bonded with metal

  19. Bonding and Structure of Ceramic-Ceramic Interfaces Kohei Shimamura,1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    interfacial design of high-temperature ceramic composites for broad applications such as power generation [3,4]) play a deci- sive role in determining material properties of ceramics. An archetypal ceramic-ceramic service temperatures in their applications such as turbines in power generators [9]. Though structural

  20. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  1. african american donors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFST 515: African GEOG 323: Urban Geography HIST 437: Soldiers Fought: War and American Society HIST 525: Space, Place Papautsky, Ian 198 Donor Relations 2.0: Using Web 2.0 to...

  2. american oyster crassostrea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (more) Boudreaux, Michelle 2005-01-01 16 (:) Copyright by the American Fi.heries Society 1992 Evaluation of Oyster Sampling Efficiency of Patent Tongs and an Oyster Dredge...

  3. Ceramic Cross Flow Recuperator Design Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, J. M.; Rebello, W. J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the performance of the ceramic recuperator in various industrial furnaces. The ceramic cross flow recuperator core has multiple rectangular flow passages (perpendicular to each other) for the air and gas. Various flow passages are available contingent upon...

  4. Transient liquid phase ceramic bonding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glaeser, Andreas M. (Berkeley, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramics are joined to themselves or to metals using a transient liquid phase method employing three layers, one of which is a refractory metal, ceramic or alloy. The refractory layer is placed between two metal layers, each of which has a lower melting point than the refractory layer. The three layers are pressed between the two articles to be bonded to form an assembly. The assembly is heated to a bonding temperature at which the refractory layer remains solid, but the two metal layers melt to form a liquid. The refractory layer reacts with the surrounding liquid and a single solid bonding layer is eventually formed. The layers may be designed to react completely with each other and form refractory intermetallic bonding layers. Impurities incorporated into the refractory metal may react with the metal layers to form refractory compounds. Another method for joining ceramic articles employs a ceramic interlayer sandwiched between two metal layers. In alternative embodiments, the metal layers may include sublayers. A method is also provided for joining two ceramic articles using a single interlayer. An alternate bonding method provides a refractory-metal oxide interlayer placed adjacent to a strong oxide former. Aluminum or aluminum alloys are joined together using metal interlayers.

  5. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  6. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, B.

    1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow there between. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow. 8 figures.

  7. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Blake (4650 Almond Cir., Livermore, CA 94550)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow therebetween. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow.

  8. Process for strengthening silicon based ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A.J.

    1991-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for strengthening silicon based ceramic monolithic materials and composite materials that contain silicon based ceramic reinforcing phases that requires that the ceramic be exposed to a wet hydrogen atmosphere at about 1400{degrees}C. The process results in a dense, tightly adherent silicon containing oxide layer that heals, blunts, or otherwise negates the detrimental effect of strength limiting flaws on the surface of the ceramic body.

  9. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, Richard L. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  10. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, R.L.

    1993-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  11. Preparation of a dense, polycrystalline ceramic structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooley, Jason (Los Alamos, NM); Chen, Ching-Fong (Los Alamos, NM); Alexander, David (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic nanopowder was sealed inside a metal container under a vacuum. The sealed evacuated container was forced through a severe deformation channel at an elevated temperature below the melting point of the ceramic nanopowder. The result was a dense nanocrystalline ceramic structure inside the metal container.

  12. Process for making ceramic insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Akash, Akash (Salt Lake City, UT); Balakrishnan, G. Nair (Sandy, UT)

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for producing insulation materials and insulation for high temperature applications using novel castable and powder-based ceramics. The ceramic components produced using the proposed process offers (i) a fine porosity (from nano-to micro scale); (ii) a superior strength-to-weight ratio; and (iii) flexibility in designing multilayered features offering multifunctionality which will increase the service lifetime of insulation and refractory components used in the solid oxide fuel cell, direct carbon fuel cell, furnace, metal melting, glass, chemical, paper/pulp, automobile, industrial heating, coal, and power generation industries. Further, the ceramic components made using this method may have net-shape and/or net-size advantages with minimum post machining requirements.

  13. Surface treatment of ceramic articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, C.S.

    1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for producing an article with improved ceramic surface properties including providing an article having a ceramic surface, and placing the article onto a conductive substrate holder in a hermetic enclosure. Thereafter a low pressure ambient is provided in the hermetic enclosure. A plasma including ions of solid materials is produced the ceramic surface of the article being at least partially immersed in a macroparticle free region of the plasma. While the article is immersed in the macroparticle free region, a bias of the substrate holder is biased between a low voltage at which material from the plasma condenses on the surface of the article and a high negative voltage at which ions from the plasma are implanted into the article. 15 figs.

  14. High impact resistant ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derkacy, J.A.

    1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic material and a method of forming a ceramic material which possesses a high impact resistance are disclosed. The material comprises: (a) a first continuous phase of [beta]-SiC; and (b) a second phase of about 25-40 vol % TiB[sub 2]. Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] is preferably used as a densification aid. The material is formed by hot-pressing the mixture at a temperature from greater than about 1800 C to less than the transition temperature of [beta]-SiC to [alpha]-SiC. The hot-pressing is performed at a pressure of about 2000 psi to about 4000 psi in an inert atmosphere for several hours and results in the formation of a two phase sintered ceramic composite material. 6 figures.

  15. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

  16. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  17. Heat exchanger with ceramic elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John A. (North Troy, NY)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An annular heat exchanger assembly includes a plurality of low thermal growth ceramic heat exchange members with inlet and exit flow ports on distinct faces. A mounting member locates each ceramic member in a near-annular array and seals the flow ports on the distinct faces into the separate flow paths of the heat exchanger. The mounting member adjusts for the temperature gradient in the assembly and the different coefficients of thermal expansion of the members of the assembly during all operating temperatures.

  18. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, M.A.

    1990-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, where after the product may be sintered.

  19. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  20. The Cold War and American Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marden, David L.

    1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Historical Society curator Richard Morgan lost his post be­ cause of his presumed associations with Communists. A bela­ ted American Anthropology Association investigation deter­ mined that the dismissal in no way reflected upon Morgan's professional... competence. The Society's president explained: There are no charges on file against Mr. Morgan affecting his personal or professional, status.... He was not re-elected because his wife and stepson and their Communist associations were involved...

  1. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN)

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  2. Compliant sleeve for ceramic turbine blades

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Hongda (Chandler, AZ); Narasimhan, Dave (Flemington, NJ); Strangman, Thomas E. (Phoenix, AZ); Easley, Michael L. (Tempe, AZ); Schenk, Bjoern (Phoenix, AZ)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compliant sleeve for attaching a ceramic member to a metal member is comprised of a superalloy substrate having a metal contacting side and a ceramic contacting side. The ceramic contacting side is plated with a layer of nickel followed by a layer of platinum. The substrate is then oxidized to form nickel oxide scale on the ceramic contacting side and a cobalt oxide scale on the metal contacting side. A lubricious coating of boron nitride is then applied over the metal contacting side, and a shear-stress limiting gold coating is applied over the ceramic contacting side.

  3. BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uribe, Bernardo

    be a topological group. By a G-space X we mean a topological space X together with a left action of G on X. Under the assumption that G is a compact Lie group, a discrete group or an abelian locally compact group, we of all G-pairs and G-maps, which both satisfy all seven equivariant Eilenberg-Steenrod axioms and which

  4. METEOROLOGICAL Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL)38 deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April, distributed, and cited, but please be aware that there will be visual differences and possibly some content to Graciosa Island in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean is providing an unprecedented record of the clouds

  5. 24 Aug 2011 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    . Common data and product needs are the key to efficient and effective service. At stake are hundreds National Center for Atmospheric Research · Center Green Conference Center · Boulder, Colorado Get for discussion. Particular areas of interest include: weather, transportation, renewable energy with emphasis

  6. PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Przytycki, Piotr

    ­3004 S 0002-9939(2013)11568-6 Article electronically published on May 15, 2013 SQUARE COMPLEXES AND SIMPLICIAL fundamental group is not systolic or even virtually systolic. 2. Square complexes and simplex complexes First of a simplex complex in place of a simplicial complex. A simplex complex is essentially a complex built from

  7. METEOROLOGICAL Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    industry in particular, they are used in the regulation of energy companies (including natural gas of 50 participants representing energy load forecasters, state regulators, federal climate scientists using the most recent 15 years of observations and a forecast of the next 15 years.52 * Climate Model

  8. TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwapisz, Jaroslaw

    -dimensional Cartesian space Rd by translations; the translation by v Zd is denoted by Tv : Rd Rd . The quotient Td. Let Diff0(Td ) be the space of all such maps and Diff0(Rd ) be the space of their lifts to Rd . We -equivariant (i.e. ~f Tv = Tv ~f for all v Z2 ). The maps in Diff0(T2 ) are commonly used to study systems

  9. TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diacu, Florin

    -9947(04)03606-2 Article electronically published on November 4, 2004 SAARI'S CONJECTURE FOR THE COLLINEAR n-BODY PROBLEM FLORIN DIACU, ERNESTO P´EREZ-CHAVELA, AND MANUELE SANTOPRETE Abstract. In 1970 Don Saari conjectured In a series of papers published in the 1970s, Don Saari investigated the bound- edness of solutions

  10. TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diacu, Florin

    ­6473 S 0002-9947(08)04517-0 Article electronically published on May 29, 2008 SAARI'S HOMOGRAPHIC CONJECTURE Abstract. Saari's homographic conjecture, which extends a classical state- ment proposed by Donald Saari. Some of our results are true for n 3. 1. Introduction In 1970 Donald Saari proposed the following

  11. TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmah, Tanya

    ­4448 S 0002-9947(07)04330-9 Article electronically published on April 6, 2007 SAARI'S CONJECTURE IS TRUE of inertia of such a solution is constant. In 1970, D. Saari conjectured that the converse is also true a different kind of answer: proofs that several generalisations of Saari's conjecture are generically true

  12. PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEWTICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaconis, Persi

    in a statistical context. One common method for generating uniform random variables on groups involves factoring the speed of convergence of random walks to Haar measure. Let G be a finite group of cardinality [GI.For P a continuous homomorphism p of G into the group of invertible linear operators on a complex vector space V

  13. PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Frank

    DIMENSIONAL DISTRIBUTIONS RON BLEI, FUCHANG GAO, AND WENBO V. LI (Communicated by Richard C. Bradley) Abstract;4010 RON BLEI, FUCHANG GAO, AND WENBO V. LI Theorem 1.1. For d 2 there exist constants c1, c2 > 0

  14. TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenbud, David

    space and minimal doubly infinite free resolutions over its "Koszul dual" exterior algebra. Among the exterior algebra E = V and their relation to modules over S = sym W and sheaves on projective space P-9947(03)03291-4 Article electronically published on July 10, 2003 SHEAF COHOMOLOGY AND FREE RESOLUTIONS OVER EXTERIOR

  15. PROCEEDINCIS O F THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarov, Nikolai

    -developed selfadjointness techniques of such ODE's (see e.g. Weidman 1151). Our goal here is to prove Behncke's result using operator theoretic methods. Absorbing p/2m into V, (2) finally becomes In order to study (27, it turns out notice that by the spectral theorem, if C is self-adjoint, then C 2is densely defined and selfadjoint

  16. American Chemical Society Spring Meeting - EMSL presentations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EMSL presentations ENVR: Division of Environmental Chemistry 170 - Characterization of soil organic matter (SOM) using online supercritical fluid extraction (SCFE) techniques...

  17. Presented at the American Physical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    FACILITY phd01upf phd11upf phd03upf 8 phd11upf phd01upf phd03upf Magnetic Probe Density (1019 m­3) 99789

  18. BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur, James G.

    fbe a fixed K- conjugation invariant function in Cc(Z\\G(A)). Then R(f) is an integral operator whose

  19. South American Lowland moist Southern Cone societies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    -FOODS Cotton, sisal/hemp, rubber Tobacco, coca Indigo · ANIMALS Llama, alpaca (transport) Guinea pig, turkey

  20. American Astronomical Society January 5, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirianni, Marco

    Instrument Designs Complete and Qualification Underway #12;5 First Flight and EDU mirror on test stand metrology equipment Bonding started on flight backplane 12/10/2008 Structural Members Tuned to

  1. Hobart named American Chemical Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) HarmonicbetandEnergy Energy Department'sHobart named

  2. Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatest Newsbiomass to fuelLibraryTeaming UpLienert

  3. Hobart named American Chemical Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High SchoolBundlesHistory New BrunswickHitting aHobart

  4. Thomas selected as American Chemical Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis ofwas published inFebruaryHomeThomas

  5. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; Thomas W. Eagar; Harold R. Larson; Raymundo Arroyave; X.-D Zhou; Y.-W. Shin; H.U. Anderson; Nigel Browning; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present quarterly report describes some of the initial studies on newer compositions and also includes newer approaches to address various materials issues such as in metal-ceramic sealing. The current quarter's research has also focused on developing a comprehensive reliability model for predicting the structural behavior of the membranes in realistic conditions. In parallel to industry provided compositions, models membranes have been evaluated in varying environment. Of importance is the behavior of flaws and generation of new flaws aiding in fracture. Fracture mechanics parameters such as crack tip stresses are generated to characterize the influence of environment. Room temperature slow crack growth studies have also been initiated in industry provided compositions. The electrical conductivity and defect chemistry of an A site deficient compound (La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}) was studied. A higher conductivity was observed for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} than that of La{sub 0.60}Sr{sub 0.40}FeO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}FeO{sub 3}. Defect chemistry analysis showed that it was primarily contributed by a higher carrier concentration in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. Moreover, the ability for oxygen vacancy generation is much higher in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} as well, which indicates a lower bonding strength between Fe-O and a possible higher catalytic activity for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. The program continued to investigate the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previous report listed initial measurements on a sample of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-x} prepared in-house by Praxair. Subsequently, a second sample of powder from a larger batch of sample were characterized and compared with the results from the previous batch.

  6. Performance of ceramic membrane filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.; Geyer, H.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Shelleman, D.L.; Tressler, R.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CeraMem Corp.`s ceramic-membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters offer a promising alternative to ceramic candle filters providing long-term operational and reliability issues are resolved: regenerability of filter passages by back pulse cleaning, tolerance to alkali-containing combustion gas and thermal/chemical aging. ANL is responsible for analytical modeling of filtration and pulse cleaning operations, flow-through testing, and prediction of filter response to thermal cycling under realistic service conditions. A test apparatus was built to expose ceramic filter specimens to chemical environments simulating operation of pressurized fluidized bed and integrated gasification combined cycle plants. Four long-duration tests have been conducted in which 100-cpsi channel filters were exposed to ash collected downstream of the cyclone separator at the PFBC plant at Tidd. Results are discussed. Focus has now shifted to exposing the advanced candle filter specimens to reducing gas environments containing NaCl, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}O, and gasification ash.

  7. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  8. Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

  9. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was carried out on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} to investigate oxygen deficiency ({delta}) of the sample. The TGA was performed in a controlled atmosphere using oxygen, argon, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with adjustable gas flow rates. In this experiment, the weight loss and gain of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} was directly measured by TGA. The weight change of the sample was evaluated at between 600 and 1250 C in air or 1000 C as a function of oxygen partial pressure. The oxygen deficiencies calculated from TGA data as a function of oxygen activity and temperature will be estimated and compared with that from neutron diffraction measurement in air. The LSFT and LSFT/CGO membranes were fabricated from the powder obtained from Praxair Specialty Ceramics. The sintered membranes were subjected to microstructure analysis and hardness analysis. The LSFT membrane is composed of fine grains with two kinds of grain morphology. The grain size distribution was characterized using image analysis. In LSFT/CGO membrane a lot of grain pullout was observed from the less dense, porous phase. The hardness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes were studied at various loads. The hardness values obtained from the cross section of the membranes were also compared to that of the values obtained from the surface. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. Measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} as a function of temperature an oxygen partial pressure are reported. Further analysis of the dilatometry data obtained previously is presented. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  10. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  11. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  12. The Astrophysical Journal, 729:88 (18pp), 2011 March 10 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/729/2/88 C 2011. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draine, Bruce T.

    . L. Prieto17,18,28,29 , R. C. Smith6 , C. Stubbs1 , N. B. Suntzeff19 , A. R. Walker6 , W. M. Wood, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA 6 Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical

  13. ADVANCED SECOND GENERATION CERAMIC CANDLE FILTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Alvin

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Through sponsorship from the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), development and manufacture of advanced second generation candle filters was undertaken in the early 1990's. Efforts were primarily focused on the manufacture of fracture toughened, 1.5 m, continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) and filament wound candle filters by 3M, McDermott, DuPont Lanxide Composites, and Techniweave. In order to demonstrate long-term thermal, chemical, and mechanical stability of the advanced second generation candle filter materials, Siemens Westinghouse initiated high temperature, bench-scale, corrosion testing of 3M's CVI-SiC and DuPont's PRD-66 mini-candles, and DuPont's CFCC SiC-SiC and IF&P Fibrosic{sup TM} coupons under simulated, pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) conditions. This effort was followed by an evaluation of the mechanical and filtration performance of the advanced second generation filter elements in Siemens Westinghouse's bench-scale PFBC test facility in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Arrays of 1.4-1.5 m 3M CVI-SiC, DuPont PRD-66, DuPont SiC-SiC, and IF&P Fibrosic{sup TM} candles were subjected to steady state process operating conditions, increased severity thermal transients, and accelerated pulse cycling test campaigns which represented {approx}1760 hours of equivalent filter operating life. Siemens Westinghouse subsequently participated in early material surveillance programs which marked entry of the 3M CVI-SiC and DuPont PRD-66 candle filters in Siemens Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filtration (APF) system at the American Electric Power (AEP) Tidd Demonstration Plant in Brilliant, Ohio. Siemens Westinghouse then conducted an extended, accelerated life, qualification program, evaluating the performance of the 3M, McDermott, and Techniweave oxide-based CFCC filter elements, modified DuPont PRD-66 elements, and the Blasch, Scapa Cerafil{sup TM}, and Specific Surface monolithic candles for use in the APF system at the Foster Wheeler pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion (PCFBC), pilot-scale, test facility in Karhula, Finland. This report presents a summary of these efforts, defining the stability of the various porous ceramic filter materials, as well as component performance and extended life for use in advanced coal-based power systems.

  14. A Tribute to Anthony G. Evans: Materials Scientist and Engineer December; 4, 1942September 9, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, John W.

    leader par excellence heading major projects on ceramic matrix com- posites, toughening of ceramics-cracking and transformation toughening of ceramics, ceramic matrix composites and metal matrix composites, thin film mechanics John W. Hutchinson January 4, 2011 THIS special issue of the Journal of the American Ceramics Society

  15. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  16. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  17. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 C to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  18. Process for making ceramic hot gas filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski (Wilmington, DE); Forsythe, George Daniel (Landenberg, PA); Domanski, Daniel Matthew (New Castle, DE); Chambers, Jeffrey Allen (Hockessin, DE); Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam (Boothwyn, PA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  19. Thermodynamics and kinetics of ceramic/metal interfacial interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arróyave, Raymundo, 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic/metal interfaces occur in a great number of important applications, such as ceramic/metal composites, microelectronics packaging, ceramic/metal seals, and so forth. Understanding the formation and evolution of such ...

  20. Method for preparing Pb-. beta. ''-alumina ceramic

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hellstrom, E.E.

    1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for preparing impermeable, polycrystalline samples of Pb-..beta..''-alumina ceramic from Na-..beta..''-alumina ceramic by ion exchange. The process comprises two steps. The first step is a high-temperature vapor phase exchange of Na by K, followed by substitution of Pb for K by immersing the sample in a molten Pb salt bath. The result is a polycrystalline Pb-..beta..''-alumina ceramic that is substantially crack-free.

  1. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report. DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  2. Method for preparing superconductors ceramic composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Akinc, Mufit (Ames, IA); Celikkaya, Ahmet (Ames, IA)

    1990-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of forming superconductor ceramic oxides from a melt of barium hydroxide and a copper salt selected from copper nitrate and copper acetate.

  3. Directly susceptible, noncarbon metal ceramic composite crucible

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrow, S. Marvin (Kingston, TN); Rexford, Donald (Pattersonville, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sintered metal ceramic crucible suitable for high temperature induction melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon or silicon contamination of the melt. The crucible comprises a cast matrix of a thermally conductive ceramic material; a perforated metal sleeve, which serves as a susceptor for induction heating of the crucible, embedded within the ceramic cast matrix; and a thermal-shock-absorber barrier interposed between the metal sleeve and the ceramic cast matrix to allow for differential thermal expansions between the matrix and the metal sleeve and to act as a thermal-shock-absorber which moderates the effects of rapid changes of sleeve temperature on the matrix.

  4. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  5. Tough Ceramic Mimics Mother of Pearl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Ritchie

    2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab scientists have mimicked the structure of mother of pearl to create what may well be the toughest ceramic ever produced.

  6. Segmented ceramic liner for induction furnaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorin, A.H.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-fibrous ceramic liner for induction furnaces is provided by vertically stackable ring-shaped liner segments made of ceramic material in a light-weight cellular form. The liner segments can each be fabricated as a single unit or from a plurality of arcuate segments joined together by an interlocking mechanism. Also, the liner segments can be formed of a single ceramic material or can be constructed of multiple concentric layers with the layers being of different ceramic materials and/or cellular forms. Thermomechanically damaged liner segments are selectively replaceable in the furnace. 5 figs.

  7. Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  8. Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Parts (AMD-704) Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium...

  9. Terra Sigillata: Evolution of Roman Ceramics Reflect Changes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terra Sigillata: Evolution of Roman Ceramics Reflect Changes in Technology, Life Terra Sigillata: Evolution of Roman Ceramics Reflect Changes in Technology, Life Print Wednesday,...

  10. 1 American Studies AMERICAN STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    1 American Studies AMERICAN STUDIES An innovative department with 15 core faculty and 12 affiliated of culture, ideas and religious beliefs; the development and transformation of public cultures and spaces. Topics include the civil rights movement, the student movement, the Vietnam War, and the counterculture

  11. Research Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mechanisms of deformation and fracture of metals, ceramics and nanolayered composites." Achievements Hoagland received a doctorate from The Ohio State University. He...

  12. 1584 VOLUME 42J O U R N A L O F A P P L I E D M E T E O R O L O G Y 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    conditions. In the latter case, it might be able to provide the information on the ice component of mixed-phase Society Ice Cloud Optical Thickness and Extinction Estimates from Radar Measurements SERGEY Y. MATROSOV sensing method is proposed to derive vertical profiles of the visible extinction coefficients in ice

  13. 512 VOLUME 33J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    JO¨ RG IMBERGER Centre for Water Research, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia Society Energy Partitioning and Horizontal Dispersion in a Stratified Rotating Lake* ROMAN STOCKER of the dominant internal waves and when it is much smaller. Energy partitioning is studied as a function

  14. 312 VOLUME 43J O U R N A L O F A P P L I E D M E T E O R O L O G Y 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    Society Modeling the Surface Energy Balance of the Core of an Old Mediterranean City: Marseille A. LEMONSU (Manuscript received 10 February 2003, in final form 4 September 2003) ABSTRACT The Town Energy Balance (TEB is evaluated with observations of surface temperatures and surface energy balance fluxes collected during

  15. 226 VOLUME 31J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Jack

    Society The Hydraulics of an Evolving Upwelling Jet Flowing around a Cape ANDREW C. DALE AND JOHN A. BARTH received 7 June 1999, in final form 6 April 2000) ABSTRACT Upwelling jets flow alongshore in approximate geostrophic balance with the onshore pressure gradient induced by coastal upwelling. Observations of such jets

  16. VOLUME 30 1 AUGUST 2000J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2000 American Meteorological Society 1833

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    Meteorological Society 1833 Ocean Radiant Heating. Part I: Optical Influences J. CARTER OHLMANN Scripps ocean. Results indicate that net irradiance at 10 cm and 5 m can vary by 23 and 34 W m 2 , respectively transmission in the upper few meters as a greater portion of the irradiance exists in the deep-penetrating

  17. 3528 VOLUME 32J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    current breaks up into a series of plumes that penetrate downslope into the deeper ocean, producing strong Meteorological Society Instability of Abyssal Currents in a Continuously Stratified Ocean with Bottom Topography. The instability manifests itself in the overlying ocean as an amplifying topographic Rossby wave. Alternating

  18. 1036 VOLUME 34J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drijfhout, Sybren

    or deeper in the thermocline as well. Subsurface cooling in the wind-forcing region reduces the remote Meteorological Society Remote Wind-Driven Overturning in the Absence of the Drake Passage Effect BARRY A. KLINGER winds to drive strong remote meridional overturning. Here, idealized numerical experiments examine

  19. VOLUME 27 JULY 1997J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1997 American Meteorological Society 1181

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    Meteorological Society 1181 Sediment Resuspension and Mixing by Resonantly Generated Internal Solitary Waves D- erated in this way seem to be frequent in the record of a month-long experiment. Model results suggest and linear dispersion. They have been observed on the continental shelf (Ostrovsky and Stepanyants 1989

  20. 620 VOLUME 41J O U R N A L O F A P P L I E D M E T E O R O L O G Y 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    - craft or precipitation gauge measurements, for example, radars offer the potential for the probing over Society Cirrus Cloud Ice Water Content Radar Algorithm Evaluation Using an Explicit Cloud Microphysical retrieval algorithms based on millimeter-wave radar reflectivity measurements. The simulated ice particle

  1. 1016 VOLUME 43J O U R N A L O F A P P L I E D M E T E O R O L O G Y 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesbitt, Steve

    Society An Examination of Version-5 Rainfall Estimates from the TRMM Microwave Imager, Precipitation Radar, and Rain Gauges on Global, Regional, and Storm Scales STEPHEN W. NESBITT* AND EDWARD J. ZIPSER Department January 2004) ABSTRACT An evaluation of the version-5 precipitation radar (PR; algorithm 2A25

  2. 634 VOLUME 39J O U R N A L O F A P P L I E D M E T E O R O L O G Y 2000 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    -particle size and ice- water paths of cirrus so that the effect of these clouds on the earth radiation budget altitude during the Subsonic Aircraft Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS). 1. Introduction Society Model Calculations and Interferometer Measurements of Ice-Cloud Characteristics *SUNGGI CHUNG

  3. Method of making porous ceramic fluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reiner, Robert H. (Knoxville, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Farragut, TN)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making a porous ceramic composite where fumed silica particles are coated with a nitrate, preferably aluminum nitrate. Next the nitrate is converted to an oxide and formed into a desired configuration. This configuration is heated to convert the oxide to an oxide silicate which is then react with HF, resulting in the fluoride ceramic, preferably aluminum fluoride.

  4. Porous ceramics and method for making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiner, R.H.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1989-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The fabrication of a porous ceramic composite is described. Fumed silica particles are coated with a nitrate, preferably aluminum nitrate. Next the nitrate is converted to an oxide and formed into a desired configuration. This configuration is heated to convert the oxide to an oxide silicate which is then react with HF, resulting in the fluoride ceramic, preferably aluminum fluoride.

  5. Method of making porous ceramic fluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiner, R.H.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for making a porous ceramic composite where fumed silica particles are coated with a nitrate, preferably aluminum nitrate. Next the nitrate is converted to an oxide and formed into a desired configuration. This configuration is heated to convert the oxide to an oxide silicate which is then react with HF, resulting in the fluoride ceramic, preferably aluminum fluoride.

  6. Potential of innovative ceramics for turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potential of innovative ceramics for turbine applications. A. Jankowiak, R. Valle, M. Parlier ODAS ceramics for turbine applications. Potentiel de céramiques innovantes pour des applications turbines par A. Jankowiak, R. Valle, M. Parlier Résumé traduit : L'amélioration du rendement thermique des turbines à gaz d

  7. Tough Ceramic Mimics Mother of Pearl

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ritchie, Robert

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab scientists have mimicked the structure of mother of pearl to create what may well be the toughest ceramic ever produced. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/12/05/scientists-create-tough-ceramic-that-mimics-mother-of-pearl/

  8. IMPAIRED PHYSICIAN FOCUS ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE 1. American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Andrew

    IMPAIRED PHYSICIAN FOCUS ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE REFERENCES 1 1. American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV. 4th ed. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association; 1994. 2. American Society of Addiction Medicine. Patient Placement Criteria for the Treatment

  9. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    2001-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  10. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  11. Method and apparatus for ceramic analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowiak, Ryszard J. (Ames, IA); Schilling, Chris (Ames, IA); Small, Gerald J. (Ames, IA); Tomasik, Piotr (Cracow, PL)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for ceramic analysis, in particular, a method for analyzing density, density gradients and/or microcracks, including an apparatus with optical instrumentation for analysis of density, density gradients and/or microcracks in ceramics. The method provides analyzing density of a ceramic comprising exciting a component on a surface/subsurface of the ceramic by exposing the material to excitation energy. The method may further include the step of obtaining a measurement of an emitted energy from the component. The method may additionally include comparing the measurement of the emitted energy from the component with a predetermined reference measurement so as to obtain a density for said ceramic.

  12. Coors Ceramics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands Jump to: navigation,Coors Ceramics

  13. JULY 2006AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | 877JULY 2006AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | 877 MECHANISMS FOR LOOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    England, Matthew

    the mechanism of formation of these cyclones and their role in the separation of the LC ring from the LC itself attendant cyclone propagatewestwardasadipole.The cyclone north of the anticyclonic ring tends to separate the presence of several smaller cyclonic coherent structures, (cyclones; in blue in PAPERS OF NOTE the figure

  14. American Fisheries Society Symposium 45:557585, 2005 2005 by the American Fisheries Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bart Jr., Henry L. "Hank"

    * Corresponding author: mary_freeman@usgs.gov Status and Conservation of the Fish Fauna of the Alabama River System MARY C. FREEMAN* U.S. Geological Survey, Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, University of Georgia Chasse, Louisiana 70037, USA Abstract.--The Alabama River system, comprising the Alabama, Coosa

  15. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 141:14801491, 2012 C American Fisheries Society 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Feeding­Fasting Cycles on Oxygen Consumption and Bioenergetics of Female Yellow Perch Travis W. Schaeffer­fast cycles. Hyperphagia occurred in all treatments. Bioenergetics model simulations indicated, we found no evidence that respiration rates varied with CG, implying that yellow perch bioenergetics

  16. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 140:108122, 2011 C American Fisheries Society 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bycatch and water pollution, may be a concern. Our results also illustrate the utility of acoustic with acoustic transmitters on their spawning grounds and in known nonspawning aggregation sites and examined

  17. American Fisheries Society Symposium 25:211218, 2001 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kajiura, Stephen

    of the components (assumptions) of the model can be evaluated for their role in the goodness of fit (e.g., Sibert et al. 1999, in press; Hampton, in press). At the same time, a variety of increasingly so- phisticated

  18. American Fisheries Society Symposium 42:185-193,2004 @2004 by the American Fisheries Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    and otherextractiveuseswith limited exceptions for researchandeducationby permit(Ballantine1997). Becauseof the many different of the enclosedenvironment" (IUCN 1994; Kelleher 1999). In the USA, Presidential Executive Order 13158provided a similar

  19. Joining NZP ceramics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicklas, K.D.; Richey, M.W.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Santella, M.L.

    1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective was to assess techniques for joining NZP ceramics, a new family of ceramic materials that have low coefficient of thermal expansion, low thermal conductivity, and excellent thermal-shock resistance. Initially, the authors evaluated laser-beam welding over volatile fluxing agents (ferric oxide, copper oxide, boric acid, and boron nitride). They also examined other laser, arc-welding, brazing, and cold joining techniques. The NZP materials were capable of sustaining the thermal stresses associated with these joining processes without substantial cracking. Of the volatile fluxes, only the copper oxide promoted weld fusion. Efforts to accomplish fusion by laser-beam welding over copper, titanium, stainless steel, yttrium barium copper oxide, fused silica glass, and mullite/alumina were unsuccessful. Gas-tungsten arc welding accompanied by porosity, irregularities, and cracking was achieved on copper sheet sandwiched between NZP tiles. Attempts at conventional oxy-acetylene welding and torch brazing were unproductive. Silica-based oxide mixtures and copper oxide-based materials show potential for development into filler materials for furnace brazing, and phosphate-based cements show promise as a means of cold joining.

  20. Lab's Theory Group leader is one of two newly elected American...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rocco Schiavilla Interim Theory Group leader Rocco Schiavilla was elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2002 JLab's Theory Group leader is one of two newly elected...

  1. STS.011 American Science: Ethical Conflicts and Political Choices, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gusterson, Hugh

    Explores the changing roles, ethical conflicts, and public perceptions of science and scientists in American society from World War II to the present. Studies specific historical episodes focusing on debates between ...

  2. Free-electron laser scientist is one of two newly elected American...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Steve Benson Steve Benson of the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) group was recently selected as a 2002 Fellow of the American Physical Society Free-electron laser scientist is one of two...

  3. Brandeis University Latin American and Latino Studies current number of majors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraden, Seth

    , society and policy Website: brandeis.edu/programs/lals ABoUt the progrAm the Latin American and Latino Students have studied at universities in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa rica, Cuba, the Dominican

  4. 791 VOLUME 54J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 1997 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    791 VOLUME 54J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 1997 American in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey ISAAC M. HELD Geophysical Fluid-tropospheric baroclinicity (Hoskins and Valdes 1990), but also by zonal variations in the barotropic mean flow that control

  5. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, George T., II; Hansen; Jeffrey S.; Oden; Laurance L.; Turner; Paul C.; Ochs; Thomas L.

    1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  6. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, G.T. II; Hansen, J.S.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.; Ochs, T.L.

    1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body followed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet. 3 figs.

  7. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, II, George T. (Shedd, OR); Hansen, Jeffrey S. (Corvallis, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR); Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  8. Proceedings of the American power conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains papers and addresses presented at the 42nd Annual Meeting of the American Power Conference. The conference is an independent forum open to all persons interested in the generation, transmission, distribution or utilization of power, irrespective of society affiliations. It is sponsored by Illinois Institute of Technology with the cooperation of several universities and societies. Thirty-five of the policy-type or less-technical papers were processed for the Energy Data Base (EDB) and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 5 of these 35 abstracts will also appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). The technical papers will be processed for EDB later.

  9. CERAMIC WASTE FORM DATA PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this data package is to provide information about simulated crystalline waste forms that can be used to select an appropriate composition for a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) proof of principle demonstration. Melt processing, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and thermal analysis information was collected to assess the ability of two potential candidate ceramic compositions to be processed in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) CCIM and to guide processing parameters for the CCIM operation. Given uncertainties in the CCIM capabilities to reach certain temperatures throughout the system, one waste form designated 'Fe-MP' was designed towards enabling processing and another, designated 'CAF-5%TM-MP' was designed towards optimized microstructure. Melt processing studies confirmed both compositions could be poured from a crucible at 1600{degrees}C although the CAF-5%TM-MP composition froze before pouring was complete due to rapid crystallization (upon cooling). X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed the crystalline nature and phase assemblages of the compositions. The kinetics of melting and crystallization appeared to vary significantly between the compositions. Impedance spectroscopy results indicated the electrical conductivity is acceptable with respect to processing in the CCIM. The success of processing either ceramic composition will depend on the thermal profiles throughout the CCIM. In particular, the working temperature of the pour spout relative to the bulk melter which can approach 1700{degrees}C. The Fe-MP composition is recommended to demonstrate proof of principle for crystalline simulated waste forms considering the current configuration of INL's CCIM. If proposed modifications to the CCIM can maintain a nominal temperature of 1600{degrees}C throughout the melter, drain, and pour spout, then the CAF-5%TM-MP composition should be considered for a proof of principle demonstration.

  10. Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society Rock Varnish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society Rock Varnish Author(s): Ronald I. Dorn Source: American;Rock Varnish Over thousandsofyears,a thincoatingofclay,cementedtorocksbymanganese and iron that appeared "smooth, black, and as ifcoated with plumbago." Indian legends explained that these rocks had been

  11. Task 8.9 - Advanced ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced ceramic materials such as Continuous Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites (CFCCs) have had promising results on the companion program entitled ``Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine`` (CSGT). In particular, CFCCs have outperformed monolithic tiles in structural integrity as a combustor liner. Also, CFCCs have provided the higher temperature operation and improved emissions performance that is required for the ATS combustor. The demonstrated advantages on CSGT justified work to explore the use of advanced ceramic composite materials in other gas turbine components. Sub-tasks include development of a practical, cost effective component fabrication process, development of finite element stress analysis to assure 30,000 hours of component life, and fabrication of a demonstration article.

  12. Ceramics containing dispersants for improved fracture toughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nevitt, Michael V. (Wheaton, IL); Aldred, Anthony T. (Wheaton, IL); Chan, Sai-Kit (Darien, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a ceramic composition containing a new class of dispersant for hindering crack propagation by means of one or more energy-dissipative mechanisms. The composition is composed of a ceramic matrix with dispersed particles of a transformation-prone rare-earth niobate, tantalate or mixtures of these with each other and/or with a rare-earth vanadate. The dispersants, having a generic composition tRMO.sub.4, where R is a rare-earth element, B is Nb or Ta and O is oxygen, are mixed in powder form with a powder of the matrix ceramic and sintered to produce a ceramic form or body. The crack-hindering mechanisms operates to provide improved performance over a wide range of temperature and operating conditions.

  13. Metal stub and ceramic body electrode assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rolf, R.L.

    1984-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive ceramic electrode body having an opening therein is threadably engaged with a metal stub having at least a slot therein to provide space for expansion of the stub without damage to the electrode body. 3 figs.

  14. Metallic nut for use with ceramic threads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA); Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nozzle guide vane assembly has ceramic components therein having a conventional thread thereon including a preestablished pitch and having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion. The nozzle guide vane assembly has a metallic components therein having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater that the rate of thermal expansion of the ceramic components is positioned in a gas turbine engine. The metallic component, a nut, has a thread therein including a plurality of crests being spaced on a pitch equal to that of the ceramic component and has a pair of contacting surfaces extending from the plurality of crests. A notch spirally extends intermediate adjacent ones of the plurality of crests and has a preestablished depth which is at least twice the size of the conventional pitch. Furthermore, the pair of contacting surfaces are in contact with only a portion of the threaded surface of the ceramic components.

  15. Method for treating beta-spodumene ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, J. Paul (Big Flats, NY); Hickman, David L. (Big Flats, NY)

    1994-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A vapor-phase method for treating a beta-spodumene ceramic article to achieve a substitution of exchangeable hydrogen ions for the lithium present in the beta-spodumene crystals, wherein a barrier between the ceramic article and the source of exchangeable hydrogen ions is maintained in order to prevent lithium contamination of the hydrogen ion source and to generate highly recoverable lithium salts, is provided.

  16. The Ceramics of Kichpanha, Northern Belize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reese, Kathryn Victoria

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    :variety-mode study and a petrographic analysis of the ceramic assemblage from Kichpanha, a Maya settlement in Northern Belize, is herein presented. The objective of the type:variety-mode study is to provide a ceramic chronology for the site and a means of inter... identifiable sherds from the Preclassic complexes. The primary research focus of the petrographic analysis is to define quantifiable paste classification categories for the Preclassic. The paste classes and the type:variety-mode classes are compared...

  17. Expected radiation effects in plutonium immobilization ceramic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A., LLNL

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current formulation of the candidate ceramic for plutonium immobilization consists primarily of pyrochlore, with smaller amounts of hafnium-zirconolite, rutile, and brannerite or perovskite. At a plutonium loading of 10.5 weight %, this ceramic would be made metamict (amorphous) by radiation damage resulting from alpha decay in a time much less than 10,000 years, the actual time depending on the repository temperature as a function of time. Based on previous experimental radiation damage work by others, it seems clear that this process would also result in a bulk volume increase (swelling) of about 6% for ceramic that was mechanically unconfined. For the candidate ceramic, which is made by cold pressing and sintering and has porosity amounting to somewhat more than this amount, it seems likely that this swelling would be accommodated by filling in the porosity, if the material were tightly confined mechanically by the waste package. Some ceramics have been observed to undergo microcracking as a result of radiation-induced anisotropic or differential swelling. It is unlikely that the candidate ceramic will microcrack extensively, for three reasons: (1) its phase composition is dominated by a single matrix mineral phase, pyrochlore, which has a cubic crystal structure and is thus not subject to anisotropic swelling; (2) the proportion of minor phases is small, minimizing potential cracking due to differential swelling; and (3) there is some flexibility in sintering process parameters that will allow limitation of the grain size, which can further limit stresses resulting from either cause.

  18. A novel biomimetic approach to the design of high-performance ceramic/metal composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Launey, Maximilien E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rosso,  M.   2006  Ceramic  and  metal  matrix  composites: In  particular,  ceramic?matrix  composites  (CMCs)  are 

  19. Method for producing ceramic-glass-ceramic seals by microwave heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blake, Rodger D. (Santa Fe, NM); Meek, Thomas T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for producing a ceramic-glass-ceramic seal by the use of microwave energy, and a sealing mixture which comprises a glass sealing material, a coupling agent, and an oxidizer. The seal produced exhibits greater strength due to its different microstructure. Sodium nitrate is the most preferred oxidizer.

  20. Ceramic to metal attachment system. [Ceramic electrode to metal conductor in MHD generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marchant, D.D.

    1983-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition and method are described for attaching a ceramic electrode to a metal conductor. A layer of randomly interlocked metal fibers saturated with polyimide resin is sandwiched between the ceramic electrode and the metal conductor. The polyimide resin is then polymerized providing bonding.

  1. Rolling Contact Fatigue of Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Wang, W. [Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; Wang, Y. [Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; Hadfield, M. [Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; Kanematsu, W. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan; Kirkland, Timothy Philip [ORNL; Jadaan, Osama M. [University of Wisconsin, Platteville

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High hardness, low coefficient of thermal expansion and high temperature capability are properties also suited to rolling element materials. Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) has been found to have a good combination of properties suitable for these applications. However, much is still not known about rolling contact fatigue (RCF) behavior, which is fundamental information to assess the lifetime of the material. Additionally, there are several test techniques that are employed internationally whose measured RCF performances are often irreconcilable. Due to the lack of such information, some concern for the reliability of ceramic bearings still remains. This report surveys a variety of topics pertaining to RCF. Surface defects (cracks) in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and their propagation during RCF are discussed. Five methods to measure RCF are then briefly overviewed. Spalling, delamination, and rolling contact wear are discussed. Lastly, methods to destructively (e.g., C-sphere flexure strength testing) and non-destructively identify potential RCF-limiting flaws in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls are described.

  2. Development and Performance Testing of a New Ceramic Recuperator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleiner, R. N.

    metal units is the higher temperature capabilities of the ceramic which eliminate the need for costly over-temperature controls and dilution air systems. The problems encountered with ceramic heat exchangers to date have been variable leakage and lack...

  3. ancient ceramic kilns: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j and the magnetic field H in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 x ceramics. We provided in high-Tc superconduct- ing granular ceramics remain an intriguing subject of inten- sive investigations...

  4. ammonia ceramic nac: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j and the magnetic field H in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 x ceramics. We provided in high-Tc superconduct- ing granular ceramics remain an intriguing subject of inten- sive investigations...

  5. advanced metallic ceramic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j and the magnetic field H in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 x ceramics. We provided in high-Tc superconduct- ing granular ceramics remain an intriguing subject of inten- sive investigations...

  6. advanced structural ceramics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j and the magnetic field H in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 x ceramics. We provided in high-Tc superconduct- ing granular ceramics remain an intriguing subject of inten- sive investigations...

  7. antimicrobial ceramics kokinsei: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j and the magnetic field H in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 x ceramics. We provided in high-Tc superconduct- ing granular ceramics remain an intriguing subject of inten- sive investigations...

  8. applied hydroxylapatite ceramic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j and the magnetic field H in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 x ceramics. We provided in high-Tc superconduct- ing granular ceramics remain an intriguing subject of inten- sive investigations...

  9. aln ceramic substrates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j and the magnetic field H in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 x ceramics. We provided in high-Tc superconduct- ing granular ceramics remain an intriguing subject of inten- sive investigations...

  10. advanced ceramic reactors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j and the magnetic field H in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 x ceramics. We provided in high-Tc superconduct- ing granular ceramics remain an intriguing subject of inten- sive investigations...

  11. adherent ceramic coatings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j and the magnetic field H in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 x ceramics. We provided in high-Tc superconduct- ing granular ceramics remain an intriguing subject of inten- sive investigations...

  12. Finite element modeling of flow through ceramic pot filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Anna C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pure Home Water (PHW) is an organization based in Tamale, Ghana that manufactures and distributes ceramic water filters. While many ceramic filter factories manufacture flowerpot-shaped filters, PHW has transitioned from ...

  13. Survey of ceramic machining in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandyopadhyay, B.P. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering] [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Blau, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of four subcontract reports provided by B. P. Bandyopadhyay who, while a visiting professor at Toyohashi University in Japan, conducted a survey of ceramic machining technology in that country from January 1 through December 31, 1992. Various aspects of machining technology were surveyed: types of parts being produced, types of ceramic materials being used, the nature of current ceramic machining research and development, and types of machine tools. The four separate reports compiled here were originally provided in a narrative, chronological form, and some of the information has been reorganized into topical areas for this compilation. This report is organized into three sections: The first describes ten ceramic machining research and development organizations and provides a reference list of their current technical publications; the second, two major trade shows; and the third, several other products and commercial developments noted during the course of Bandyopadhyay`s stay in Japan. An Appendix lists key individuals who are currently conducting ceramic machining research in Japan.

  14. Ceramic turbine stator vane and shroud support

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glenn, Robert G. (Lower Moreland Township, Montgomery County, PA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A support system for supporting the stationary ceramic vanes and ceramic outer shrouds which define the motive fluid gas path in a gas turbine engine is shown. Each individual segment of the ceramic component whether a vane or shroud segment has an integral radially outwardly projecting stem portion. The stem is enclosed in a split collet member of a high-temperature alloy material having a cavity configured to interlock with the stem portion. The generally cylindrical external surface of the collet engages a mating internal cylindrical surface of an aperture through a supporting arcuate ring segment with mating camming surfaces on the two facing cylindrical surfaces such that radially outward movement of the collet relative to the ring causes the internal cavity of the collet to be reduced in diameter to tightly engage the ceramic stem disposed therein. A portion of the collet extends outwardly through the ring segment opposite the ceramic piece and is threaded for receiving a nut and a compression washer for retaining the collet in the ring segment under a continuous biasing force urging the collet radially outwardly.

  15. Ceramic corrosion/erosion project description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakaishi, C.V.; Carpenter, L.K.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of the United States Department of Energy's High Temperature Turbine Technology Program, the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is participating in a Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Materials Study. Objective is to create a technology base for ceramic materials which could be used by stationary gas power turbines operating with a high-temperature, coal-derived, low-Btu gas products of combustion environment. Two facilities are designed and installed to burn a varying low-Btu coal-derived gas in a controlled manner. This report contains the objectives and testing philosophy as well as the operating, specimen handling, and emergency procedures for the facilities. The facilities were checked out in August/September 1980. Testing is scheduled to begin in late 1980 with completion of 1000 hours of ceramic materials exposure to be completed by early 1981. Most of the enclosed is an update of two METC Information Releases (IR), i.e., IR 442 (1979) Test Plan for Ceramic Corrosion/Erosion Project, and IR 817 (1980) Ceramic Corrosion/Erosion Project Description.

  16. Degradation of organic chemicals with titanium ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Tunesi, Simonetta (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Madison, WI)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex organic molecules, such as polychlorinated biphenyls can be degraded on porous titanium ceramic membranes by photocatalysis under ultraviolet light.

  17. 21F.084J / 21A.224J / 17.55 Introduction to Latin American Studies, Spring 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawson, Chappell H., 1967-

    This HASS-D/CI course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and ...

  18. Strong, Tough Ceramics Containing Microscopic Reinforcements: Tailoring In-Situ Reinforced Silicon Nitride Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becher, P.F.

    1999-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramics with their hardness, chemical stability, and refractoriness could be used to design more efficient energy generation and conversion systems as well as numerous other applications. However, we have needed to develop a fundamental understanding of how to tailor ceramics to improve their performance, especially to overcome their brittle nature. One of the advances in this respect was the incorporation of very strong microscopic rod-like reinforcements in the form of whiskers that serve to hold the ceramic together making it tougher and resistant to fracture. This microscopic reinforcement approach has a number of features that are similar to continuous fiber-reinforced ceramics; however, some of the details are modified. For instance, the strengths of the microscopic reinforcements must be higher as they typically have much stronger interfaces. For instance, single crystal silicon carbide whiskers can have tensile strengths in excess of {ge}7 GPa or >2 times that of continuous fibers. Furthermore, reinforcement pullout is limited to lengths of a few microns in the case of microscopic reinforcement due as much to the higher interfacial shear resistance as to the limit of the reinforcement lengths. On the other hand, the microscopic reinforcement approach can be generated in-situ during the processing of ceramics. A remarkable example of this is found in silicon nitride ceramics where elongated rod-like shape grains can be formed when the ceramic is fired at elevated temperatures to form a dense component.

  19. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  20. Robust, high temperature-ceramic membranes for gas separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berchtold, Kathryn A.; Young, Jennifer S.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making ceramic membranes, and the ceramic membranes so formed, comprising combining a ceramic precursor with an organic or inorganic comonomer, forming the combination as a thin film on a substrate, photopolymerizing the thin film, and pyrolyzing the photopolymerized thin film.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Porous-Matrix Ceramic Composites**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zok, Frank

    REVIEWS Mechanical Properties of Porous- Matrix Ceramic Composites** By Frank W. Zok* and Carlos G/Mechanical Properties of Porous-Matrix Ceramic Composites REVIEWS The porous matrix concept has been developed primarily. Levi 1. Introduction Damage tolerance can be enabled in continuous fiber-rein- forced ceramic

  2. Process for making a ceramic composition for immobilization of actinides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbinghaus, Bartley B. (Livermore, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard A. (Livermore, CA); Vance, Eric R. (Kirrawee, AU); Stewart, Martin W. (Barden Ridge, AU); Walls, Philip A. (Cronulla, AU); Brummond, William Allen (Livermore, CA); Armantrout, Guy A. (Livermore, CA); Herman, Connie Cicero (Pleasanton, CA); Hobson, Beverly F. (Livermore, CA); Herman, David Thomas (Pleasanton, CA); Curtis, Paul G. (Tracy, CA); Farmer, Joseph (Tracy, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a process for making a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile. The process comprises oxidizing the actinides, milling the oxides to a powder, blending them with ceramic precursors, cold pressing the blend and sintering the pressed material.

  3. Social Research Center American University of Central Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Social Research Center American University of Central Asia KYRGYZSTAN TODAY Policy briefs on CIVIL Kyrgyzstan Today Policy Briefs on Civil Society, Migration, Islam and Corruption ­ B.: 2008. ­ 174 p. ISBN in the political and socio-economic aspects of development of Kyrgyzstan. The opinions of the authors may

  4. Rare Earth-Bearing Murataite Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanovsky, Sergey; Stefanovsky, Olga [SIA Radon, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation); Yudintsev, Sergey; Nikonov, Boris [IGEM RAS, Moscow, 119017 (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase composition of the murataite-based ceramics containing 10 wt.% lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, europium, gadolinium, yttrium, zirconium oxides was studied. The ceramics were prepared by melting of oxide mixtures in 20 mL glass-carbon crucibles in air at {approx}1500 deg. C. They are composed of predominant murataite-type phases and minor extra phases: rutile, crichtonite, perovskite, ilmenite/pyrophanite, and zirconolite (in the Zr-bearing sample only). Three murataite-related phases with five- (5C), eight- (8C), and three-fold (3C) elementary fluorite unit cell are normally present in all the ceramics. These phases form core, intermediate zone, and rim of the murataite grains, respectively. They are predominant host phases for the rare earth elements whose concentrations are reduced in a row: 5C>8C>3C. Appreciate fraction of La and Ce may enter the perovskite phase. (authors)

  5. Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elangovan, S. (South Jordan, UT); Nair, Balakrishnan G. (Sandy, UT); Small, Troy (Midvale, UT); Heck, Brian (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

  6. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, Gary B. (Monroeville, PA); Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composite comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of varios dimentions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substates are also provided.

  7. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, Gary B.; Morrison, Jay Alan

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  8. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, Gary B. (Monroeville, PA); Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  9. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTT's automotive technology programs. This project is managed by ORNL and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DoD, and industry. Research is discussed under the following topics; Turbomilling of SiC Whiskers; microwave sintering of silicon nitride; and milling characterization; processing of monolithics; silicon nitride matrix; oxide matrix; silicate matrix; thermal and wear coatings; joining; design; contact interfaces; time-dependent behavior; environmental effects; fracture mechanics; nondestructive evaluation; and technology transfer. References, figures, and tables are included with each topic.

  10. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  11. Hydrodynamic compressibility of high-strength ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grady, D.E.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we have developed the techniques to investigate the hydrodynamic response of high-strength ceramics by mixing these powders with copper powder, preparing compacts, and performing shock compression tests on these mixtures. Hydrodynamics properties of silicon carbide, titanium diboride, and boron carbide to 30 GPa were examined by this method, and hydrodynamic compression data for these ceramics have been determined. We have concluded, however, that the measurement method is sensitive to sample preparation and uncertainties in shock wave measurements. Application of the experimental technique is difficult and further efforts are needed.

  12. Pumpable/injectable phosphate-bonded ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Dileep (Naperville, IL); Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Perry, Lamar (Fontana, CA); Jeong, Seung-Young (Justice, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pumpable ceramic composition is provided comprising an inorganic oxide, potassium phosphate, and an oxide coating material. Also provided is a method for preparing pumpable ceramic-based waste forms comprising selecting inorganic oxides based on solubility, surface area and morphology criteria; mixing the selected oxides with phosphate solution and waste to form a first mixture; combining an additive to the first mixture to create a second mixture; adding water to the second mixture to create a reactive mixture; homogenizing the reactive mixture; and allowing the reactive mixture to cure.

  13. Fracture Toughness Prediction for MWCNT Reinforced Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the development of a micromechanics model to predict fracture toughness of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced ceramic composites to guide future experimental work for this project. The modeling work described in this report includes (i) prediction of elastic properties, (ii) development of a mechanistic damage model accounting for matrix cracking to predict the composite nonlinear stress/strain response to tensile loading to failure, and (iii) application of this damage model in a modified boundary layer (MBL) analysis using ABAQUS to predict fracture toughness and crack resistance behavior (R-curves) for ceramic materials containing MWCNTs at various volume fractions.

  14. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

  15. Materials Development Program, Ceramic Technology Project addendum to program plan: Cost effective ceramics for heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a new thrust in the Ceramic Technology project. This effort represents an expansion of the program and an extension through FY 1997. Moderate temperature applications in conventional automobile and truck engines will be included along with high-temp. gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The reliability goals are expected to be met on schedule by end of FY 1993. Ceramic turbine rotors have been run (in DOE`s ATTAP program) for 1000 h at 1370C and full speed. However, the cost of ceramic components is a deterrrent to near-term commercialization. A systematic approach to reducing this cost includes the following elements: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, and testing and data base development. A draft funding plan is outlined. 6 figs, 1 tab.

  16. Materials Development Program, Ceramic Technology Project addendum to program plan: Cost effective ceramics for heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a new thrust in the Ceramic Technology project. This effort represents an expansion of the program and an extension through FY 1997. Moderate temperature applications in conventional automobile and truck engines will be included along with high-temp. gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The reliability goals are expected to be met on schedule by end of FY 1993. Ceramic turbine rotors have been run (in DOE's ATTAP program) for 1000 h at 1370C and full speed. However, the cost of ceramic components is a deterrrent to near-term commercialization. A systematic approach to reducing this cost includes the following elements: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, and testing and data base development. A draft funding plan is outlined. 6 figs, 1 tab.

  17. Tailoring of unipolar strain in lead-free piezoelectrics using the ceramic/ceramic composite approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khansur, Neamul H.; Daniels, John E. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Groh, Claudia; Jo, Wook; Webber, Kyle G. [Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Reinhard, Christina [Diamond Light Source, Beamline I12 JEEP, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Kimpton, Justin A. [The Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The electric-field-induced strain response mechanism in a polycrystalline ceramic/ceramic composite of relaxor and ferroelectric materials has been studied using in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction. The addition of ferroelectric phase material in the relaxor matrix has produced a system where a small volume fraction behaves independently of the bulk under an applied electric field. Inter- and intra-grain models of the strain mechanism in the composite material consistent with the diffraction data have been proposed. The results show that such ceramic/ceramic composite microstructure has the potential for tailoring properties of future piezoelectric materials over a wider range than is possible in uniform compositions.

  18. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the DOE Office of Transportation Systems` automotive technology programs. Significant progress in fabricating ceramic components for DOE, NASA, and DOE advanced heat engine programs show that operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engines is feasible; however, addition research is needed in materials and processing, design, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base for producing reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A 5-yr project plan was developed, with focus on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  19. Culture against Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, F. Allan

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Culture and Society CULTURE AGAINST SOCIETY F. Allan Hanson Culture has turned sour. Originally a constructive force, it has now become disruptive to contemporary society. Such a claim may sound heretical, because in social scientific circles.... "Anthropology and Multiculturalism: What is Anthropology That Multiculturalists Should be Mindful of It?" Cultural Anthropology, 8:411-429. F. Allan Hanson is a professor of anthropology at the University of Kansas. His primary interests are social theory...

  20. Nano-ceramics and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alex (Livermore, CA); Simpson, Randall (Livermore, CA); Landingham, Richard (Livermore, CA); Reibold, Robert A. (Salida, CA)

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a method to produce ceramic materials utilizing the sol-gel process. The methods enable the preparation of intimate homogeneous dispersions of materials while offering the ability to control the size of one component within another. The method also enables the preparation of materials that will densify at reduced temperature.

  1. Economic Assessment of the NIST Ceramic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    98-3 Planning Report Economic Assessment of the NIST Ceramic Phase Diagram Program Prepared by and Economic Analysis Group February 1998 U.S Department of Commerce Technology Administration #12;#12;ECONOMIC of Standards and Technology Program Office Strategic Planning and Economic Analysis Group Prepared under

  2. Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elangovan, S.

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

  3. High temperature ceramic composition for hydrogen retention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, R.W.

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic coating for H retention in fuel elements is described. The coating has relatively low thermal neutron cross section, is not readily reduced by H at 1500 deg F, is adherent to the fuel element base metal, and is stable at reactor operating temperatures. (JRD)

  4. Ceramic Breeder Blanket for ARIES-CS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raffray, A.R. [University of California-San Diego (United States); Malang, S. [Fusion Nuclear Technology Consulting (United States); El-Guebaly, L. [University of Wisconsin (United States); Wang, X. [University of California-San Diego (United States)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the conceptual design of a ceramic breeder blanket considered as one of the candidate blankets in the first phase of the ARIES-CS study. The blanket is coupled to a Brayton power cycle to avoid the safety concern associated with the possibility of Be/steam reaction in case of accident.

  5. CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REFERENCE FORMULATION REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explain the design of ceramic host systems culminating in a reference ceramic formulation for use in subsequent studies on process optimization and melt property data assessment in support of FY13 melter demonstration testing. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. In addition to the combined CS/LN/TM High Mo waste stream, variants without Mo and without Mo and Zr were also evaluated. Based on the results of fabricating and characterizing several simulated ceramic waste forms, two reference ceramic waste form compositions are recommended in this report. The first composition targets the CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with and without Mo. The second composition targets with CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with Mo and Zr removed. Waste streams that contain Mo must be produced in reducing environments to avoid Cs-Mo oxide phase formation. Waste streams without Mo have the ability to be melt processed in air. A path forward for further optimizing the processing steps needed to form the targeted phase assemblages is outlined in this report. Processing modifications including melting in a reducing atmosphere, and controlled heat treatment schedules are anticipated to improve the targeted elemental partitioning.

  6. DoE Advanced Ceramic Microturbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IR Energy Systems

    2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In July 2001, Ingersoll-Rand began work on this program. Its objective was to introduce ceramic hot section components into the IR family of microturbines to permit higher operating temperatures and hence improved efficiency. The IR microturbine product line combines a novel application of industrial turbocharger equipment, our commercially successful recuperator, and proven industrial gas turbine design practices. The objective of the joint development program is to combine the high production success of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} turbocharger rotors, largely from Japan, with the IR turbocharger-based microturbines. The IR 'Ceramic Microturbine' (CMT) program has been configured to use the most practical ceramic rotor, considering size, geometry, proven manufacturing methods, and physical material limitations Performance predictions indicate that 36% LHV electric conversion efficiency could be attained at a Turbine Inlet Temperature (TIT) of nominally 1000 C. The initial 72kW engine is being designed to have comparable life and costs to our current product The package power rating is expandable to 100kW with this equipment by slightly increasing pressure ratio flow and TIT. This program was initially planned as five major tasks In Task 1 a comprehensive analysis of the state of the art ceramics and their applicability to microturbines was performed Milestone I was achieved with the joint DoE/IR decision to concentrate on our 70kW microturbine, with elevated turbine inlet temperature and pressure ratio,. This preserved the ability of the engine to utilize the standard IR recuperator and the majority of the microturbine subassemblies, A commercialization report, projecting the market size, was also completed as part of this task. Task 2's detailed design of the special hot-section components has been completed,. The two critical milestones, No.3 and No.4, associated with the detailed design of the monolithic silicon nitride turbine rotor and the release of the purchase order for this critical component were accomplished in Task 2. Task 3 focused on the design and release of the other non-ceramic components, including the gas generator turbine housing, the power turbine and housing, the combustor, and a new compressor section On September 4, 2002, Milestone No.4 was completed with a Detailed Design Review of the 72 kW 'Ceramic Microturbine'. The customer's concurrence at that design review triggered the release of critical components for manufacturing (Milestone 5). In Task 4, the principle components of the CMT were fabricated and delivered to our Portsmouth facility Manufacturing was mostly completed with the exception of the final machining of the GT and PT housings, the machining of the compressor diffuser, and the fabrication of the compressor cover.

  7. American Academy of Sleep Medicine American Academy of Sleep Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    © American Academy of Sleep Medicine American Academy of Sleep Medicine The following product has been developed by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine Copyright © 2003 American Academy of Sleep: (708) 492-0943 Visit Us at www.aasmnet.org #12;© American Academy of Sleep Medicine American Academy

  8. Method for adhesion of metal films to ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowndes, D.H.; Pedraza, A.J.; DeSilva, M.J.; Kumar, R.A.

    1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for making strongly bonded metal-ceramic materials are disclosed. The methods include irradiating a portion of the surface of the ceramic material with a pulsed ultraviolet laser having an energy density sufficient to effect activation of the irradiated surface of the ceramic material so that adhesion of metals subsequently deposited onto the irradiated surface is substantially increased. Advantages of the invention include (i) the need for only a small number of laser pulses at relatively low focused energy density, (ii) a smoother substrate surface, (iii) activation of the laser-treated surface which provides a chemical bond between the surface and a metal deposited thereon, (iv) only low temperature annealing is required to produce the strong metal-ceramic bond; (v) the ability to obtain strong adhesion between ceramic materials and oxidation resistant metals; (vi) ability to store the laser treated ceramic materials for later deposition of metals thereon. 7 figs.

  9. Method for adhesion of metal films to ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN); Pedraza, Anthony J. (Oak Ridge, TN); DeSilva, Melvin J. (Ithaca, NY); Kumar, Rajagopalan A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for making strongly bonded metal-ceramic materials. The methods include irradiating a portion of the surface of the ceramic material with a pulsed ultraviolet laser having an energy density sufficient to effect activation of the irradiated surface of the ceramic material so that adhesion of metals subsequently deposited onto the irradiated surface is substantially increased. Advantages of the invention include (i) the need for only a small number of laser pulses at relatively low focused energy density, (ii) a smoother substrate surface, (iii) activation of the laser-treated surface which provides a chemical bond between the surface and a metal deposited thereon, (iv) only low temperature annealing is required to produce the strong metal-ceramic bond; (v) the ability to obtain strong adhesion between ceramic materials and oxidation resistant metals; (vi) ability to store the laser treated ceramic materials for later deposition of metals thereon.

  10. NDE (nondestructive examination) development for ceramics for advanced heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClung, R.W. (McClung (R.W.), Powell, TN (USA)); Johnson, D.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) project was initiated in 1983 to meet the ceramic technology needs of DOE's advanced heat engines programs (i.e., advanced gas turbines and low heat rejection diesels). The objective is to establish an industrial ceramic technology base for reliable and cost-effective high-temperature components. Reliability of ceramics was recognized as the major technology need. To increase the material reliability of current and new ceramics, advances were needed in component design methodology, materials processing technology, and data base/life prediction. Nondestructive examination (NDE) was identified as one of the key elements in the approach to high-reliability components. An assessment was made of the current status of NDE for structural ceramics, and a report was prepared containing the results and recommendations for needed development. Based on these recommendations, a long-range NDE development program has been established in the CTAHE project to address these needs.

  11. Fabrication of low density ceramic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.; Sheinberg, H.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A precursor mixture and a method of making a low-density ceramic structural material are disclosed. The precursor mixture includes hollow microballoons, typically made of glass, together with a cementing agent capable of being cured by microwave irradiation. A preferred cementing agent is liquid hydrated potassium silicate, which is mixed with the glass microballoons to form a slurry. Upon irradiation the potassium silicate is dehydrated to form a solid porous matrix in which the microballoons are evenly distributed. Ground glass or other filling agents may be included in the slurry to enhance the properties of the final product. Low-density structural ceramics having densities on the order of 0.1 to 0.3 are obtained.

  12. Ceramic coating system or water oxidation environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hong, Glenn T. (Tewksbury, MA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for water oxidation of combustible materials in which during at least a part of the oxidation corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises titanium dioxide coated onto a titanium metal substrate. Such ceramic composites have been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of supercritical water oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases, and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 700.degree. C. The ceramic composites are also resistant to degradation mechanisms caused by thermal stresses.

  13. Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, M.A.

    1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques. 2 figures.

  14. Slip casting nano-particle powders for making transparent ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuntz, Joshua D. (Livermore, CA); Soules, Thomas F. (Livermore, CA); Landingham, Richard Lee (Livermore, CA); Hollingsworth, Joel P. (Oakland, CA)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a transparent ceramic including the steps of providing nano-ceramic powders in a processed or unprocessed form, mixing the powders with de-ionized water, the step of mixing the powders with de-ionized water producing a slurry, sonifing the slurry to completely wet the powder and suspend the powder in the de-ionized water, separating very fine particles from the slurry, molding the slurry, and curing the slurry to produce the transparent ceramic.

  15. Method for preparing corrosion-resistant ceramic shapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arons, Richard M. (Wheaton, IL); Dusek, Joseph T. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic shapes having impermeable tungsten coatings can be used for containing highly corrosive molten alloys and salts. The shapes are prepared by coating damp green ceramic shapes containing a small amount of yttria with a tungsten coating slip which has been adjusted to match the shrinkage rate of the green ceramic and which will fire to a theoretical density of at least 80% to provide a impermeable coating.

  16. Formation of chemically bonded ceramics with magnesium dihydrogen phosphate binder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young

    2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for combining magnesium oxide, MgO, and magnesium dihydrogen phosphate to form an inexpensive compactible ceramic to stabilize very low solubility metal oxides, ashes, swarfs, and other iron or metal-based additives, to create products and waste forms which can be poured or dye cast, and to reinforce and strengthen the ceramics formed by the addition of fibers to the initial ceramic mixture.

  17. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hnat, James G. (Collegeville, PA); Mathur, Akshay (Tampa, FL); Simpson, James C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

  18. Method of bonding metals to ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maroni, V.A.

    1991-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic or glass having a thin layer of silver, gold or alloys thereof at the surface thereof is disclosed. A first metal is bonded to the thin layer and a second metal is bonded to the first metal. The first metal is selected from the class consisting of In, Ga, Sn, Bi, Zn, Cd, Pb, Tl and alloys thereof, and the second metal is selected from the class consisting of Cu, Al, Pb, Au and alloys thereof. 3 figures.

  19. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

  20. Composite treatment of ceramic tile armor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, James G. R. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Frame, Barbara J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ceramic tile armor has a core of boron nitride and a polymer matrix composite (PMC) facing of carbon fibers fused directly to the impact face of the tile. A polyethylene fiber composite backing and spall cover are preferred. The carbon fiber layers are cured directly onto the tile, not adhered using a separate adhesive so that they are integral with the tile, not a separate layer.

  1. Composite treatment of ceramic tile armor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, James G. R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Frame, Barbara J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ceramic tile armor has a core of boron nitride and a polymer matrix composite (PMC) facing of carbon fibers fused directly to the impact face of the tile. A polyethylene fiber composite backing and spall cover are preferred. The carbon fiber layers are cured directly onto the tile, not adhered using a separate adhesive so that they are integral with the tile, not a separate layer.

  2. Preparation of titanium oxide ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, M.A.; Xu, Q.

    1992-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure is disclosed for the reliable production of either particulate or polymeric titanium ceramic membranes by a highly constrained sol-gel procedure. The critical constraints in the procedure include the choice of alkyl alcohol solvent, the amount of water and its rate of addition, the pH of the solution during hydrolysis, and the limit of sintering temperature applied to the resulting gels.

  3. BA War & Society Module Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    BA War & Society Module Information 2014-2015 www.swansea.ac.uk/artsandhumanities Arts Studies BA War & Society BA War & Society The scope and scale of the BA (Hons) War and Society degree Theories of War 1 (compulsory) HUA102 War and Warfare in the Modern World (compulsory) HIH118 World History

  4. Thermal control of ceramic breeder blankets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raffray, A.R.; Tillack, M.S.; Abdou, M.A. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal control is an important issue for ceramic breeder blankets since the breeder needs to operate within its temperature window for the tritium release and inventory to be acceptable. A thermal control region is applicable not only to situations where the coolant can be run at low temperature, such as for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) base blanket, but also to ITER test module and power reactor situations, where it would allow for ceramic breeder operation over a wide range of power densities in space and time. Four thermal control mechanisms applicable to ceramic breeder blanket designs are described: A helium gap, a beryllium sintered block region, a beryllium sintered block region with a metallic felt at the beryllium-cladding interface, and a beryllium packed-bed region. Key advantages and issues associated with each of these mechanisms are discussed. Experimental and modeling studies focusing on beryllium packed-bed thermal conductivity and wall conductance, and beryllium sintered block-stainless steel cladding contact resistance are then described. Finally, an assessment of the potential of the different mechanisms for both passive and active control is carried out based on example calculations for a given set of ITER-like conditions. 28 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Ceramic breeder materials : status and needs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.E.

    1998-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The tritium breeding blanket is one of the most important components of a fusion reactor because it directly involves both energy extraction and tritium production, both of which are critical to fusion power. Because of their overall desirable properties, lithium-containing ceramic solids are recognized as attractive tritium breeding materials for fusion reactor blankets. Indeed, their inherent thermal stability and chemical inertness are significant safety advantages. In numerous in-pile experiments, these materials have performed well, showing good thermal stability and good tritium release characteristics. Tritium release is particularly facile when an argon or helium purge gas containing hydrogen, typically at levels of about 0.1%, is used. However, the addition of hydrogen to the purge gas imposes a penalty when it comes to recovery of the tritium produced in the blanket. In particular, a large amount of hydrogen in the purge gas will necessitate a large multiple-stage tritium purification unit, which could translate into higher costs. Optimizing tritium release while minimizing the amount of hydrogen necessary in the purge gas requires a deeper understanding of the tritium release process, especially the interactions of hydrogen with the surface of the lithium ceramic. This paper reviews the status of ceramic breeder research and highlights several issues and data needs.

  6. POLING EFFECT ON PIEZOELECTRIC BEHAVIOR OF PZT CERAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Shu-Sheng

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solution Series Lead Titanate - Lead Zirconate Lead Oxide:Tin Oxide and Lead Titanate - Lead Hafnate," J. Res. Nat.Lead Titanate Piezoelectric Ceramics \\vith Iron Oxide

  7. Method and apparatus for radio frequency ceramic sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, D.J.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Radio frequency energy is used to sinter ceramic materials. A coaxial waveguide resonator produces a TEM mode wave which generates a high field capacitive region in which a sample of the ceramic material is located. Frequency of the power source is kept in the range of radio frequency, and preferably between 60-80 MHz. An alternative embodiment provides a tunable radio frequency circuit which includes a series input capacitor and a parallel capacitor, with the sintered ceramic connected by an inductive lead. This arrangement permits matching of impedance over a wide range of dielectric constants, ceramic volumes, and loss tangents. 6 figures.

  8. Method and apparatus for radio frequency ceramic sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Daniel J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kimrey, Jr., Harold D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radio frequency energy is used to sinter ceramic materials. A coaxial waveguide resonator produces a TEM mode wave which generates a high field capacitive region in which a sample of the ceramic material is located. Frequency of the power source is kept in the range of radio frequency, and preferably between 60-80 MHz. An alternative embodiment provides a tunable radio frequency circuit which includes a series input capacitor and a parallel capacitor, with the sintered ceramic connected by an inductive lead. This arrangement permits matching of impedance over a wide range of dielectric constants, ceramic volumes, and loss tangents.

  9. Simulation of collision cascades and thermal spikes in ceramics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    formed and mainly isolated Frenkel pairs are produced. Citation: Devanathan R, and WJ Weber.2010."Simulation of collision cascades and thermal spikes in ceramics."Nuclear...

  10. Radiation tolerance of ceramics—Insights from atomistic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    different radiation response as the damage accumulates. Citation: Devanathan R, WJ Weber, and JD Gale.2010."Radiation tolerance of ceramicsInsights from atomistic simulation...

  11. Advanced Ceramic Materials and Packaging Technologies for Realizing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Thermal Hydraulic Laboratory Project start date: November 15, 2012 Advanced Ceramic Materials and Packaging Technologies for Realizing Sensors for Concentrating Solar Power...

  12. Inexpensive Production of High Density Thin Ceramic Films on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inexpensive Production of High Density Thin Ceramic Films on Rigid or Porous Substrates Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing...

  13. Fabricating Dielectric Ceramic Films on Copper Foils | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    circuit boards Can be used to prepare ceramic materials consisting of various compounds, including lead, magnesium, barium, zirconium and, titanium dielectricceramicfilms...

  14. High Temperature Tolerant Ceramic Composites Having Porous Interphases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kriven, Waltraud M. (Champaign, IL); Lee, Sang-Jin (Chonnam, KR)

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In general, this invention relates to a ceramic composite exhibiting enhanced toughness and decreased brittleness, and to a process of preparing the ceramic composite. The ceramic composite comprises a first matrix that includes a first ceramic material, preferably selected from the group including alumina (Al2O3), mullite (3Al2O3.2SiO2), yttrium aluminate garnet (YAG), yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), celsian (BaAl2Si2O8) and nickel aluminate (NiAl2O4). The ceramic composite also includes a porous interphase region that includes a substantially non-sinterable material. The non-sinterable material can be selected to include, for example, alumina platelets. The platelets lie in random 3-D orientation and provide a debonding mechanism, which is independent of temperature in chemically compatible matrices. The non-sinterable material induces constrained sintering of a ceramic powder resulting in permanent porosity in the interphase region. For high temperature properties, addition of a sinterable ceramic powder to the non-sinterable material provides sufficiently weak debonding interphases. The ceramic composite can be provided in a variety of forms including a laminate, a fibrous monolith, and a fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix. In the laminated systems, intimate mixing of strong versus tough microstructures were tailored by alternating various matrix-to-interphase thickness ratios to provide the bimodal laminate.

  15. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, October 1992--March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Although progress has been made in developing reliable structural ceramics, further work is needed to reduce cost. The work described in this report is organized according to the following work breakdown structure project elements: Materials and processing (monolithics [Si nitride, carbide], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining, cost effective ceramic machining), materials design methodology (contact interfaces, new concepts), data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, nondestructive evaluation development), and technology transfer.

  16. Degradation of organic chemicals with titanium ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, M.A.; Tunesi, S.; Xu, Q.

    1991-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex organic molecules, such as polychlorinated biphenyls can be degraded on porous titanium ceramic membranes by photocatalysis under ultraviolet light. 3 figures.

  17. Process for strengthening aluminum based ceramics and material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moorhead, Arthur J. (Knoxville, TN); Kim, Hyoun-Ee (Seoul, KR)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for strengthening aluminum based ceramics is provided. A gaseous atmosphere consisting essentially of silicon monoxide gas is formed by exposing a source of silicon to an atmosphere consisting essentially of hydrogen and a sufficient amount of water vapor. The aluminum based ceramic is exposed to the gaseous silicon monoxide atmosphere for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to produce a continuous, stable silicon-containing film on the surface of the aluminum based ceramic that increases the strength of the ceramic.

  18. Ductile Ni.sub.3 Al alloys as bonding agents for ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); McDonald, Robert R. (Traverse City, MI)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ceramic-metal composite comprising a mixture of a ceramic material with a ductile intermetallic alloy, preferably Ni.sub.3 Al.

  19. Ductile Ni[sub 3]Al alloys as bonding agents for ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, T.N.; McDonald, R.R.

    1990-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ceramic-metal composite is described comprising a mixture of a ceramic material with a ductile intermetallic alloy, preferably Ni[sub 3]Al. 2 figs.

  20. Ductile Ni[sub 3]Al alloys as bonding agents for ceramic materials in cutting tools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, T.N.; McDonald, R.R.

    1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ceramic-metal composite comprising a mixture of a ceramic material with a ductile intermetallic alloy, preferably Ni[sub 3]Al is disclosed. 2 figures.

  1. NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION OF CERAMIC CANDLE FILTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roger H.L. Chen, Ph.D.; Alejandro Kiriakidis

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques have been used to reduce the potential mechanical failures and to improve the reliability of a structure. Failure of a structure is usually initiated at some type of flaw in the material. NDE techniques have been developed to determine the presence of flaws larger than an acceptable size and to estimate the remaining stiffness of a damaged structure (Chen, et. al, 1995). Ceramic candle filters have been tested for use in coal-fueled gas turbine systems. They protect gas turbine components from damage due to erosion. A total of one hundred and one candle filters were nondestructively evaluated in this study. Ninety-eight ceramic candle filters and three ceramic composite filters have been nondestructively inspected using dynamic characterization technique. These ceramic filters include twelve unused Coors alumina/mullite, twenty-four unused and fifteen used Schumacher-Dia-Schumalith TF-20, twenty-five unused and nine used Refractron 326, eight unused and three used Refractron 442T, one new Schumacher-T 10-20, and one used Schumacher-Dia-Schumalith F-40. All filters were subjected to a small excitation and the dynamic response was picked up by a piezoelectric accelerometer. The evaluation of experimental results was processed using digital signal analysis technique including various forms of data transformation. The modal parameters for damage assessment for the unexposed (unused) vs. exposed (used) specimen were based on two vibration parameters: natural frequencies and mode shapes. Finite Element models were built for each specimen type to understand its dynamic response. Linear elastic modal analysis was performed using eight nodes, three-dimensional isotropic solid elements. Conclusions based on our study indicate that dynamic characterization is a feasible NDE technique in studying structural properties of ceramic candle filters. It has been shown that the degradation of the filters due to long working hours (or excessive back pulsing conditions and high temperature transient) could be reflected from the shift of vibration frequencies. These shifts are due to changes in structural properties such as stiffness, which are directly related to the Young's modulus of the candle filters. Further studies are necessary in implementing and verifying the applicability of dynamic NDE characterization methods for actual in-situ conditions, and in establishing a systematic testing procedure for field applications. Also investigations on the filter's natural frequency due to the effect of dust cake or due to the change of boundary conditions may provide insight as to how the filter will perform in the field.

  2. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report, April 1991--September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  3. Thermally induced evolution of morphology on ceramic surfaces in a thermionic converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavadil, K.R. [Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico87185-0342 (United States); Olson, D.L. [Team Specialty Services 901 University Blvd. SE Albuquerque, New Mexico87106-4439 (United States); Klinkov, A.E. [JS INTERTEK 123182Moscow Kurchatov Sq. 1 (Russian Federation)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The morphology of alumina and scandia ceramics exposed to controlled vacuum and diffusion modes in a thermionic converter has been studied. Evidence for vaporization at a temperature of 1770 K is manifest in the resulting surface morphologies of both ceramics, consistent with reported sample mass loss. Alumina shows intergranular relief with the formation of terrace-step structure on the grain surfaces. Terrace formation is not directly observed on scandia, however the development of vertical structure and maintenance of voids indicates that vaporization is initiated by structure at the grain edges. Extensive Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3} re-deposition occurs on the scandia surface, possibly mediated by the presence of molybdenum and tungsten. Evidence exists for refractory metal secondary phase formation in this deposit in the form of Sc{sub 6}MO{sub 12} (M=W or Mo). Alumina also shows evidence for materials{close_quote} interactions in the form of tantalum assisted vaporization which significantly alters the terrace structure. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90[degree] shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45[degree] angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

  5. Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90{degree} shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45{degree} angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

  6. Welfare and Conversion: The Catholic Church in African American Communities in the South, 1884-1939

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collopy, William

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    : An Investigation of Catholic Activity in Behalf of the Negroes in the United States and a Survey of the Present Condition of the Colored Missions. Gillard dedicated his work, which countless students of the African American apostolate have referenced over...; Associated Archives of St. Mary?s Seminary and University; Archives of the Society of the Divine Word; Archives of the Sisters of the Holy Family; Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture; Archives of the Congregation...

  7. GEOSCIENCE INFORMATION: KEYS TO DISCOVERY - Proceedings of the 41st Meeting of the Geoscience Information Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GeoScience Information Society

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INFORMATION SOCIE1Y ISBN: 978-0-934485-68-5 ISSN: 0072-1409 For information about copies of this proceedings volume or earlier issues, contact: Publications Manager Geoscience Information Society C/0 American Geological Institute 4220 King Street... WHERE ARE GEOLOGIC FIELD TRIP GUIDEBOOKS WHEN YOU NEED THEM? Lura E. Joseph .............................................................................................................................................................. 23 INSTITUTIONAL...

  8. Ecology, 92(4), 2011, pp. 924937 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruna, Emilio M.

    Ecology, 92(4), 2011, pp. 924­937 � 2011 by the Ecological Society of America Disentangling 3 School of Renewable Resources, Louisiana State University, 227 RNR Building, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-6202 USA 4 Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation and Center for Latin American

  9. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments. Annual report, FY1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogt, G.J.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company. Continuous ceramic filaments are a principal component in many advanced high temperature materials like continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) and woven ceramic textiles. The use of continuous ceramic filaments in CFCC radiant burners, gas turbines, waste incineration, and hot gas filters in U.S. industry and power generation is estimated to save at least 2.16 quad/yr by year 2010 with energy cost savings of at least $8.1 billion. By year 2010, continuous ceramic filaments and CFCC`s have the potential to abate pollution emissions by 917,000 tons annually of nitrous oxide and 118 million tons annually of carbon dioxide (DOE Report OR-2002, February, 1994).

  10. High temperature, low expansion, corrosion resistant ceramic and gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauch, Sr., Harry W. (Lionville, PA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to ZrO.sub.2 -MgO-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -SiO.sub.2 ceramic materials having improved thermal stability and corrosion resistant properties. The utilization of these ceramic materials as heat exchangers for gas turbine engines is also disclosed.

  11. advanced ceramic materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ceramic materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Design with Advanced Ceramics Course...

  12. Electrolytic production of high purity aluminum using ceramic inert anodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Liu, Xinghua (Monroeville, PA); Weirauch, Douglas A. (Murrysville, PA); DiMilia, Robert A. (Baton Rouge, LA); Dynys, Joseph M. (New Kensington, PA); Phelps, Frankie E. (Apollo, PA); LaCamera, Alfred F. (Trafford, PA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing commercial purity aluminum in an electrolytic reduction cell comprising ceramic inert anodes is disclosed. The method produces aluminum having acceptable levels of Fe, Cu and Ni impurities. The ceramic inert anodes used in the process may comprise oxides containing Fe and Ni, as well as other oxides, metals and/or dopants.

  13. Structural Ceramic Composites for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Windes; P.A. Lessing; Y. Katoh; L. L. Snead; E. Lara-Curzio; J. Klett; C. Henager, Jr.; R. J. Shinavski

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program has been established to investigate fiber reinforced ceramic composites to be used as control rod components within a Very High Temperature Reactor. Two candidate systems have been identified, carbon fiber reinforced carbon (Cf/C) and silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites. Initial irradiation stability studies to determine the maximum dose for each composite type have been initiated within the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Test samples exposed to 10 dpa irradiation dose have been completed with future samples to dose levels of 20 and 30 dpa scheduled for completion in following years. Mechanical and environmental testing is being conducted concurrently at the Idaho National Laboratory and at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. High temperature test equipment, testing methodologies, and test samples for high temperature (up to 1600º C) tensile strength and long duration creep studies have been established. Specific attention was paid to the architectural fiber preform design as well as the materials used in construction of the composites. Actual testing of both tubular and flat, "dog-bone" shaped tensile composite specimens will begin next year. Since there is no precedence for using ceramic composites within a nuclear reactor, ASTM standard test procedures will be established from these mechanical and environmental tests. Close collaborations between the U.S. national laboratories and international collaborators (i.e. France and Japan) are being forged to establish both national and international test standards to be used to qualify ceramic composites for nuclear reactor applications.

  14. Emergent process methods for high-technology ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, R.F.; Palmour, H. III; Porter, R.L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present conference covers colloidal processing of advanced ceramics, novel power-forming and powder-processing methods, the derivation of ceramics by polymer processing, chemical vapor deposition techniques, ion beam deposition methods, the laser and ion beam modification of surfaces, hot isostatic pressing and dynamic compaction, shock conditioning and subsequent densification of ceramics, and very high pressure processing methods. Specific attention is given to the preparation of shaped glasses by the sol-gel method, the synthesis of powders and thin films by laser-induced gas phase reactions, the plasma sintering of ceramics, laser chemical vapor deposition, the microstructure and mechanical properties of ion-implanted ceramics, a computer simulation of dynamic compaction, shock-induced modification of inorganic powders, and diamond anvil technology.

  15. Conductive ceramic composition and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James L. (Lemont, IL); Kucera, Eugenia H. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic anode composition is formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The anode is prepared as a non-stoichiometric crystalline structure by reaction and conditioning in a hydrogen gas cover containing minor proportions of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The structure exhibits a single phase and substantially enhanced electrical conductivity over that of the corresponding stoichiometric structure. Unexpectedly, such oxides and oxygenates are found to be stable in the reducing anode fuel gas of a molten carbonate fuel cell.

  16. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

  17. Conductive ceramic composition and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, J.L.; Kucera, E.H.

    1991-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic anode composition is formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The anode is prepared as a non-stoichiometric crystalline structure by reaction and conditioning in a hydrogen gas cover containing minor proportions of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The structure exhibits a single phase and substantially enhanced electrical conductivity over that of the corresponding stoichiometric structure. Unexpectedly, such oxides and oxygenates are found to be stable in the reducing anode fuel gas of a molten carbonate fuel cell. 4 figures.

  18. ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS BeamlinesALSALSALSALS Ceramics

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof EnergyAdministration-Desertof Energy PresentationCeramic Particulate

  20. Ceramic Matrix Composites | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C oCNMSStaff HighlightGroundwater VadoseCeramic