Sample records for ameren iii case

  1. Ameren Illinois (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ameren Illinois Utilities (AmerenIP, AmerenCIPS, and AmerenCILCO) offer residential customers incentives for certain energy efficiency upgrades and improvements. Incentives are currently available...

  2. Ameren Missouri- Photovoltaic Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ameren Missouri offers rebates to its customers for the installation of net metered photovoltaic (PV) systems on their properties. The rebate is set at $2.00 per DC watt with a maximum rebate of ...

  3. Ameren Missouri (Electric)- Business Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ameren Missouri offers cash incentives to non-residential customers for virtually any cost-effective energy efficiency project. Standard incentives are available for lighting, controls, HVAC,...

  4. Ameren Illinois- Lighting Rebates for Businesses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ameren Illinois offers their non-residential Illinois customers a wide range of incentives for the installation of lighting improvements. Customers must review all equipment requirements to ensure...

  5. Ameren Illinois (Gas)- Cooking and Heating Business Efficiency Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ameren Illinois offers several incentive programs that include efficient natural gas technologies. The programs are available only to non-residential customers that receive natural gas service from...

  6. Ameren Energy Marketing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan Blanch Green FuelsEnergyAmandusAmecoAmenia,Ameren

  7. Ameren Illinois Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan Blanch GreenAmeren Illinois Company Jump to:

  8. Ameren Energy Marketing (Illinois) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwikiAgouraAlbatechFuels JumpKineticsAmdaAmeren

  9. NWCC Transmission Case Study III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Allison, Steve Wiese

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 Transmission System Improvements for Wind Energy Development in the Upper Midwest and Great Plains: Opportunities and Obstacles. This case study set out to ascertain the validity of three assumptions from the perspectives of stakeholders involved in wind energy and transmission issues in the Upper Midwest and Great Plains. The assumptions, and the stakeholders' reactions to each, are summarized below: Assumption 1--Transmission system improvements would provide significant benefits to the electricity network and its customers. Respondents acknowledge the potential for overall system benefits in the form of reduced line losses, improved grid stability and reliability, and enhanced ability to conduct spot market transactions. They also agree that these benefits relate to specific regional needs. However, there is disagreement over the extent of other benefits such as efficiency gains and cost savings from reduced line losses. Further, environmental and community interest groups point out that none of these benefits are realized without significant financial, environmental and social costs. Assumption 2--The benefits of transmission improvements would be helpful, but not confined, to wind power. All respondents agree that wind energy could benefit from transmission system improvements. But they also acknowledge, reluctantly, in the case of environmental stakeholders, that the benefits of an improved transmission system cannot be limited to environmentally preferable forms of generation. Some environmental and community advocate respondents also feel that transmission system improvement projects can be avoided altogether through energy conservation and efficiency measures, and by substituting wind energy for fossil generation. Assumption 3--Transmission alliances among stakeholders within and external to the wind community can provide benefits in the public interest. The fractured, multi-jurisdictional governance of the regional transmission system, and the distrust and diversity of perspectives among affected stakeholders, may make the formation of multi-stakeholder alliances necessary to accomplishing transmission goals. If the wind industry and utilities want to partner with environmental and community advocate groups in supporting a transmission project, they may have to convince these groups that the project would result in a net environmental benefit. The project proponents would have to make the case that the benefits of the additional wind energy will at least offset the emissions of any additional fossil generation made possible by the transmission project, as well as offset the environmental impact of the transmission project itself.

  10. Appropriate Technology Small Grants Program evaluation: case studies. Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-random sample of the Appropriate Technology Program grantees was selected to ensure that the basic goals of the evaluation study were met. Case studies of selected outstanding projects could provide with respect to the Program dynamics associated with success. It was believed that the non-random case study approach would assist us in assessing which approaches have the potential to impact a reduction in our nation's use of non-renewal energy. From this group of projects, 20 projects were selected to highlight in a case study format which illustrates the various types of projects approaches the Program supported.

  11. CORPORATE OVERVIEW AMEREN CORPORATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    regional), distribution · Natural gas: sales, transmission & distribution · Sources: Hydro, Ultra-low-sulfur

  12. Scalar-Scalar Ladder Model in the Unequal-Mass Case. III - Numerical Studies of the P-Wave Case -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ichio Fukui; Noriaki Setoh

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The eigenvalue problem for the p-wave bound states formed by two unequal-mass scalar particles through the massive scalar particle exchange is analyzed numerically in the framework of the Bethe-Salpeter ladder model. As in the s-wave case, the eigenvalues of the coupling constant are found to become complex for some mass configurations in some range of the bound state mass. The Bethe-Salpeter amplitudes of the low-lying bound states are also investigated.

  13. Recent regulatory experience of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume III. Supporting case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, E.; Hart, D.; Lethi, M.; Park, W.; Rifkin, S.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MITRE Corporation conducted a five-month study for the Office of Resource Applications in the Department of Energy on the regulatory requirements of low-Btu coal gasification. During this study, MITRE interviewed representatives of five current low-Btu coal gasification projects and regulatory agencies in five states. From these interviews, MITRE has sought the experience of current low-Btu coal gasification users in order to recommend actions to improve the regulatory process. This report is the third of three volumes. It contains the results of interviews conducted for each of the case studies. Volume 1 of the report contains the analysis of the case studies and recommendations to potential industrial users of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume 2 contains recommendations to regulatory agencies.

  14. Ameren Illinois (Gas)- Business Efficiency Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Specialty Equipment Application offers incentives on steamers, griddles, fryers, and other commercial kitchen equipment. The Steam Trap /Process Steam Incentive Program offers incentives on s...

  15. Ameren Illinois Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan Blanch Green

  16. Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part III: Comparison with 3DVAR in a Real-Data Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part III 8 May 2007) ABSTRACT The feasibility of using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for mesoscale application of an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF; Evensen 1994) in the atmospheric sci- ences field (Houtekamer

  17. Curvature invariants in type-III spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Pravda

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of paper [1] are generalized for vacuum type-III solutions with, in general, a non-vanishing cosmological constant Lambda. It is shown that all curvature invariants containing derivatives of the Weyl tensor vanish if a type-III spacetime admits a non-expanding and non-twisting null geodesic congruence. A non-vanishing curvature invariant containing first derivatives of the Weyl tensor is found in the case of type-III spacetime with expansion or twist.

  18. Wang Feng (2006). Comparison of languages in contact: The distillation method and the case of Bai. Language and linguistics monograph series B, Frontiers in linguistics III.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wang Feng (2006). Comparison of languages in contact: The distillation method and the case of Bai; Zhengzhang 2003). Wang Feng's Comparison of languages in contact: The distillation method and the case of Bai 2001). In Comparison of languages in contact: The distillation method and the case of Bai, Wang

  19. Ameren Illinois (Electric)- Custom, HVAC, and Motor Business Efficiency Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prescriptive rebates are available for many HVAC and motor efficiency improvements. Pre-approval is required for all rebates. The programs are available only to non-residential customers that...

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - 3_FG2 scoping_Ameren

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals fromprocess usedGELustre File Systemi7/2011 FutureGen

  1. LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

  2. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.D. (ed.)

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  3. III. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Gas transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kai

    (Gas Capture)(Gas Capture)( p )( p ) 10-3 - 10-4 torr10 10 torr Oil free, no moving parts Drawback: Oil Diffusion PumpB. High Vacuum: Oil Diffusion Pump (Wet, Gas Transfer)(Wet, Gas TransferIII. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Mechanism Gas transfer Gas capture FunctionFunction Roughing

  4. ALGEBRA 1 PB-Z III. 23 III 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piazza, Paolo

    di X. I. Si mostri che entrambi (A, ) e (A, ) sono dei monoidi commutativi. Sia CX : A A l'applicazione che a B A associa il suo complementare in X: A B CX(B) = X \\ B A II. Tenendo presenti le leggi di de Morgan, si mostri che CX : (A, ) (A, ) e CX : (A, ) (A, ) sono isomorfismi di monoidi (1 ). III

  5. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  6. Tripodal aminophenolate ligand complexes of aluminum(III), gallium(III), and indium(III) in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caravan, P.; Orvig, C. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    1997-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article focuses on the development of radiopharmaceuticals using new chelators of gallium and indium. The radionuclide kinetics and demetalation kinetics are of great consideration. This work explored the effects of ligand backbone variations on the selectivity of multidentate aminophenolate ligands among the trivalent metal ions Al(III), Ga(III) and In(III) in water. 54 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Redes III Tema 0 1 Introduccin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    instalación y mantenimiento. #12;Redes III Tema 0 13 Calidad de una red ­ Transparencia semántica: La calidad transparencia en el tiempo. #12;Redes III Tema 0 14 Diseńo de la red · Debe satisfacer la calidad de servicio

  8. WINDExchange Webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges III:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III: Public Acceptance and Land Use WINDExchange Webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges III: Public Acceptance and Land Use June 17, 2015 3:00PM to 4:00PM EDT As a follow-up to...

  9. Automated Purge Valve Joseph Edward Farrell, III.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Automated Purge Valve by Joseph Edward Farrell, III. Bachelor of Science Marine Engineering the undersigned committee hereby approve the attached thesis Automated Purge Valve by Joseph Edward Farrell, III.D. Department Head Department of Marine and Environmental Systems #12;iii Abstract Title: Automated Purge Valve

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government Savings Category: Photovoltaics Ameren Missouri- Solar Renewable Energy Credits Ameren Missouri offers a Standard...

  11. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  12. Ameren Illinois (Electric & Gas)- Multi-Family Properties Energy Efficiency Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The shell measure segment offers incentives for air sealing the shell of multifamily buildings. Incentives will be paid based on the total CFM reduction. Insulation incentives will be based on sq...

  13. Ameren Illinois (Electric)- Multi-Family Properties Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Multi-Family Properties Energy Efficiency Rebate Program aims to increase the energy efficiency of multi-family properties by implementing simple measures. There are two programs within this...

  14. III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 18, 2014 ... 7801, Springer, 2013, pp. 62–. 73, ISBN 978-3-642-36693-2. The authors gratefully acknowledge partial support from the National Science ...

  15. III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen andHypernuclei in Hall link toall2, Issue,

  16. Alta III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAlta I JumpIII

  17. PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest andOptimize832 2.860 2.864 2.867039 J - 1 PART III -

  18. WCI-III Workshop Recap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilize AvailableMedia1.1 TheVolkerEvents)WCI-III Recap

  19. Shiloh III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPower Partners WindSherbino 2ShikunIII Jump

  20. Ashtabula III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy ResourcesInformation Arizona'sinCalifornia:II Wind FarmIII

  1. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  2. When Less Liability May Mean More Precaution: The Case of Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dana, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More Precaution: The Case of Nanotechnology David Dana* I.II. FRAMING THE NANOTECHNOLOGY PROBLEM A. TheApproach to Nanotechnology 1. Mandatory

  3. Target Space Duality III: Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orlando Alvarez; Blazej Ruszczycki

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We generalize previous results on target space duality to the case where there are background fields and the sigma model lagrangian has a potential function.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: III-nitride materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III-nitride materials SSLS Scientist Andy Armstrong Receives 2013 Employee Recognition Award On September 9, 2013, in EC, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Events, News, News & Events,...

  5. Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra ........................................................................................... 3-13 3.4.8 Ocean & Estuary Conditions................................................................................................................. 3-14 #12;PACIFIC LAMPREY III, 3-1 May 2004 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) The anadromous

  6. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  7. Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 11 Dusky Canada Goose #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 11.0 DUSKY CANADA GOOSE (BRANTA............................................................................................................... 11-20 #12;DUSKY CANADA GOOSE III, 11-1 May 2004 11.0 Dusky Canada Goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis, Baird) 11.1 Introduction The dusky Canada goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis) is a distinctive

  8. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul (Berkeley, CA); Olshavsky, Michael A. (Brunswick, OH)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

  9. Edward W. Wild III Computer Sciences Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Edward W. Wild III Computer Sciences Department University of Wisconsin-Madison 1210 West Dayton languages. #12;Edward W. Wild III 2 Honors Dean's Honored Graduate 2002 · College of Natural Sciences Articles (1) O. L. Mangasarian, J. W. Shavlik and E. W. Wild. Knowledge-Based Kernel Approximation. Journal

  10. Thermodynamic and Structural Features of Aqueous Ce(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adriana Dinescu; Aurora E. Clark

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With a single f-electron, Ce(III) is the simplest test case for benchmarking the thermodynamic and structural properties of hydrated Ln(III) against varying density functionals and reaction field models, in addition to determining the importance of multiconfigurational character in their wave functions. Here, the electronic structure of Ce(H2O)x(H2O)y3+ (x = 8, 9; y = 0, 12-14) has been examined using DFT and CASSCF calculations. The latter confirmed that the wave function of octa- and nona-aqua Ce(III) is well-described by a single configuration. Benchmarking was performed for density functionals, reaction field cavity types, and solvation reactions against the experimental free energy of hydration, ?Ghyd(Ce3+). The UA0, UAKS, Pauling, and UFF polarized continuum model cavities displayed different performance, depending on whether one or two hydration shells were examined, and as a function of the size of the metal basis set. These results were essentially independent of the density functional employed. Using these benchmarks, the free energy for water exchange between CN = 8 and CN = 9, for which no experimental data are available, was estimated to be approximately -4 kcal/mol.

  11. Thermodynamic and Structural Features of Aqueous Ce(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinescu, Adriana; Clark, Aurora E.

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    With a single f-electron, Ce(III) is the simplest test case for benchmarking the thermodynamic and structural properties of hydrated Ln(III) against varying density functionals and reaction field models, in addition to determining the importance of multiconfigurational character in their wave functions. Here, the electronic structure of Ce(H?O)x(H?O)y 3+ (x =8, 9; y= 0, 12-14) has been examined using DFT and CASSCF calculations. The latter confirmed that the wave function of octa- and nona-aqua Ce(III) is well-described by a single configuration. Benchmarking was performed for density functionals, reaction field cavity types, and solvation reactions against the experimental free energy of hydration, ?Ghyd(Ce3+). The UA0, UAKS, Pauling, and UFF polarized continuum model cavities displayed different performance, depending on whether one or two hydration shells were examined, and as a function of the size of the metal basis set. These results were essentially independent of the density functional employed. Using these benchmarks, the free energy for water exchange between CN = 8 and CN = 9, for which no experimental data are available, was estimated to be approximately -4 kcal/mol.

  12. Case Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Case Studies Case Studies The following case studies will be included in the HEP report. Final case studies are due January 7, 2013. Lattice Gauge Theories - Lead: Doug Toussaint...

  13. aspectos atuais iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    form of energy Minnesota, University of 9 Speicherring DORIS III DORIS III Betrieb 1999 Physics Websites Summary: -basierte Kontrollsystem inte- griert. Wegen der...

  14. anticarcinogenesis mechanisms iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III Engineering Websites Summary: Needle-Membrane Puncture Mechanics Ray Lathrop, Randy Smith, and Robert J. Webster III Medical for quasistatic cutting Damped, second order...

  15. 23 6 12 8:00 III-V/Ge CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    23 6 12 8:00 - 1 - 1. : III-V/Ge CMOS ~ 200%~ 2. : III-V (Ge) III-V/Ge CMOS (Si) 200% III-V/Ge CMOS 200% III-V/Ge CMOS () () () () III-V III-V/Ge CMOS (1) III-V Ge III-V/Ge CMOS (2) III-V-OI MOSFET (3) III-V/Ge CMOS "2011 Symposia on VLSI

  16. Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    Waveguide Filter Tutorial Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics was adapted from the conference paper "Waveguide Filter Tutorial," by J.O. Smith, Proceedings

  17. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES APRIL 3, 2014 Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith

  18. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith, Deputy Assistant

  19. Chapter Six TITANIUM(III) CHLORIDE*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    , and purged with dry nitrogen gas. The flask is charged with 1.6 mL (2.8 g, 15 mmol) of titanium tetrachlorideChapter Six TITANIUM(III) CHLORIDE* 50. AN ACTIVE FORM OF TITANIUM(III) CHLORIDE Me3SiSiMe3 + 2Ti. ANDERSEN The reduction of TiCl4 with hexamethyldisilane does not afford titanium(II) chloride as reported

  20. On the structure of blue phase III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Henrich; K. Stratford; M. E. Cates; D. Marenduzzo

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report large scale simulations of the blue phases of cholesteric liquid crystals. Our results suggest a structure for blue phase III, the blue fog, which has been the subject of a long debate in liquid crystal physics. We propose that blue phase III is an amorphous network of disclination lines, which is thermodynamically and kinetically stabilised over crystalline blue phases at intermediate chiralities}. This amorphous network becomes ordered under an applied electric field, as seen in experiments.

  1. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrip, Karen E. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Jeffrey Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Kerley, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  2. Gamma-ray burst radio afterglows from Population III stars: Simulation methods and detection prospects with SKA precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macpherson, Damien

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the prospects of detecting radio afterglows from long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) from Population III (Pop III) progenitors using the SKA precursor instruments WMA (Murchison Widefield Array) and ASKAP (Australian SKA Pathfinder). We derive a realistic model of GRB afterglows that encompasses the widest range of plausible physical parameters and observation angles. We define the best case scenario of Pop III GRB energy and redshift distributions. Using probability distribution functions fitted to the observed microphysical parameters of long GRBs, we simulate a large number of Pop III GRB afterglows to find the global probability of detection. We find that ASKAP may be able to detect 35% of Pop III GRB afterglows in the optimistic case, and 27% in the pessimistic case. A negligible number will be detectable by MWA in either case. Detections per image for ASKAP, found by incorporating intrinsic rates with detectable timescales, are as high as $\\sim$ 6000 and as low as $\\sim$ 11, which shows the opti...

  3. Case Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following case studies are examples of integrating renewable energy into Federal new construction and major renovation projects. Additional renewable energy case studies are also available.

  4. III-V Nanowire Growth Mechanism: V/III Ratio and Temperature Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    ,17,18 The growth experiments reported in this paper were performed in a horizontal OMVPE growth tube using to be determined by the local V/III ratio, which is dependent on the input precursor flow rates, growth temperature to favor vapor-solid (VS) surface growth over VLS NW growth. By tuning both the group III flow rate

  5. The endoplasmic reticulum is a target organelle for trivalent dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup III})-induced cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naranmandura, Hua, E-mail: narenman@zju.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Xu, Shi [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Koike, Shota [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Pan, Li Qiang [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Bin [Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030 (China)] [Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030 (China); Wang, Yan Wei; Rehman, Kanwal; Wu, Bin [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Zhe [Zhejiang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou (China)] [Zhejiang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou (China); Suzuki, Noriyuki, E-mail: n-suzuki@p.chiba-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of present study was to characterize the endoplasmic reticulum stress and generation of ROS in rat liver RLC-16 cells by exposing to trivalent dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) and compared with that of trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}). Protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) phosphorylation was significantly induced in cells exposed to DMA{sup III}, while there was no change in phosphorylated PERK (P-PERK) detected in cells after exposure to iAs{sup III} or MMA{sup III}. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after DMA{sup III} exposure was found to take place specifically in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), while previous reports showed that ROS was generated in mitochondria following exposure to MMA{sup III}. Meanwhile, cycloheximide (CHX) which is an inhibitor of protein biosynthesis strongly inhibited the DMA{sup III}-induced intracellular ROS generation in the ER and the phosphorylation of PERK, suggesting the induction of ER stress probably occurs through the inhibition of the protein folding process. Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) mRNA were induced by all three arsenic species, however, evidence suggested that they might be induced by different pathways in the case of iAs{sup III} and MMA{sup III}. In addition, ER resident molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein78 (GRP78) was not affected by trivalent arsenicals, while it was induced in positive control only at high concentration (Thapsigargin;Tg), suggesting the GRP78 is less sensitive to low levels of ER stress. In summary, our findings demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum is a target organelle for DMA{sup III}-induced cytotoxicity. Highlights: ?ER is a target organelle for trivalent DMA{sup III}-induced cytotoxicity. ?Generation of ROS in ER can be induced specially by trivalent DMA{sup III}. ?ER-stress and generation of ROS are caused by the increase in unfolded proteins.

  6. Estimation of Sorption Behavior of Europium(III) Using Biotite Flakes - 13272

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, Go; Niibori, Yuichi; Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)] [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kirishima, Akira [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials Tohoku University 2-1-1 Katahira, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)] [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials Tohoku University 2-1-1 Katahira, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of biotite and Eu(III) (europium (III)) was examined by using secondary ion-microprobe mass spectrometer (SIMS), fluorescence emission spectrum and decay behavior of fluorescence emission spectrum in addition to the time-changes of Eu(III) and potassium ions concentrations in a solution, using the flake form samples. The results of SIMS showed that the intensity of Eu was gradually decreasing with depth, while the intensity of Eu in the case shaken for 30 days exceeded that in the case for 1 day. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of Eu(III) and potassium ions in the flake of biotite suggested that Eu ions diffuse mainly from the edges of biotite flake, while Eu ions can slightly diffuse through some small cracks existing on the flake surface far from the edges. Besides, the elution amount of potassium from the biotite flakes into a solution was proportional to the sorption amount of Eu(III). The changes nearly revealed ion exchange between these ions, while muscovite flake sample did not show such ion exchange reaction. In addition, from the time-change of Eu(III) concentration, an apparent diffusion coefficient was estimated to be 8.0x10{sup -12} m{sup 2}/s, by using two-dimensional diffusion model coupled with a film between the solid phase and the liquid phase. Furthermore, the fluorescent intensity decreased with the shaking (contacting) time. This means that Eu(III) gradually diffuses into the inside of biotite edges of the biotite flakes, after the sorption of Eu(III) in the edges. This tendency was observed also in the powder samples. The observed fluorescence decay (at 592 nm in wave length) showed almost similar curve in any samples, indicating a certain sorption form of Eu(III) onto the edges of the biotite flakes. These results mentioned above suggest that the diffusion processes through internal layer in biotite mainly control the sorption behavior of multivalent ions. Such diffusion processes affect the retardation-effects on fracture surfaces in the rock matrix, depending on the fluid flow velocity of groundwater. That is, a more reliable model considering the mass transfer in the internal layer of biotite may be required to estimate the sorption behavior of RNs with biotite which controls the whole sorption behavior of granite. (authors)

  7. Quantum Refrigerator and the III-law of Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amikam Levy; Robert Alicki; Ronnie Kosloff

    2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of temperature decrease of a cooled quantum bath is studied as its temperature is reduced to the absolute zero. The III-law of thermodynamics is then quantified dynamically by evaluating the characteristic exponent {\\zeta} of the cooling process dT(t)/dt \\sim -T^{\\zeta} when approaching the absolute zero, T \\rightarrow 0. A continuous model of a quantum refrigerator is employed consisting of a working medium composed either by two coupled harmonic oscillators or two coupled 2-level systems. The refrigerator is a nonlinear device merging three currents from three heat baths: a cold bath to be cooled, a hot bath as an entropy sink, and a driving bath which is the source of cooling power. A heat driven refrigerator (absorption refrigerator) is compared to a power driven refrigerator. When optimized both cases lead to the same exponent {\\zeta}, showing a lack of dependence on the form of the working medium and the characteristics of the drivers. The characteristic exponent is therefore determined by the properties of the cold reservoir and its interaction with the system. Two generic heat baths models are considered, a bath composed of harmonic oscillators and a bath composed from ideal Bose/Fermi gas. The restrictions on the interaction Hamiltonian imposed by the III-law are discussed. In the appendix the theory of periodicaly driven open systems and its implication to thermodynamics is outlined.

  8. Magnetic dipole discharges. III. Instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States); Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R. [Institute for Ion Physics and Applied Physics, University of Innsbruck A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)] [Institute for Ion Physics and Applied Physics, University of Innsbruck A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Instabilities in a cross-field discharge around a permanent magnet have been investigated. The permanent magnet serves as a cold cathode and the chamber wall as an anode. The magnet is biased strongly negative and emits secondary electrons due to impact of energetic ions. The electrons outside the sheath are confined by the strong dipolar magnetic field and by the ion-rich sheath surrounding the magnet. The electron energy peaks in the equatorial plane where most ionization occurs and the ions are trapped in a negative potential well. The discharge mechanism is the same as that of cylindrical and planar magnetrons, but here extended to a 3-D cathode geometry using a single dipole magnet. While the basic properties of the discharge are presented in a companion paper, the present focus is on various observed instabilities. The first is an ion sheath instability which oscillates the plasma potential outside the sheath below the ion plasma frequency. It arises in ion-rich sheaths with low electron supply, which is the case for low secondary emission yields. Sheath oscillations modulate the discharge current creating oscillating magnetic fields. The second instability is current-driven ion sound turbulence due to counter-streaming electrons and ions. The fluctuations have a broad spectrum and short correlation lengths in all directions. The third type of fluctuations is spiky potential and current oscillations in high density discharges. These appear to be due to unstable emission properties of the magnetron cathode.

  9. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, T.D.

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal. 24 figs.

  10. UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III de MADRID Madrid, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III de MADRID Madrid, Spain College of Charleston Bilateral Exchange Program Spain and around the world. It programs in Business Ad- ministration, Economics and Law are ranked among the best in Spain. While studying at UC3M, students are able to partake of the vibrant culture of Madrid

  11. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

  12. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and other electron acceptors by a Thermus isolate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieft, T.L. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Biology; Fredrickson, J.K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Onstott, T.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Geosciences] [and others

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermophilic bacterium that can use O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, Fe(III), and S{sup 0} as terminal electron acceptors for growth was isolated from groundwater sampled at a 3.2-km depth in a South African gold mine. This organism, designated SA-01, clustered most closely with members of the genus Thermus, as determined by 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequence analysis. The 16S rDNA sequence of SA-01 was >98% similar to that of Thermus strain NMX2 A.1, which was previously isolated by other investigators from a thermal spring in New Mexico. Strain NMX2 A.1 was also able to reduce Fe(III) and other electron acceptors. Neither SA-01 nor NMX2 A.1 grew fermentatively, i.e., addition of an external electron acceptor was required for anaerobic growth. Thermus strain SA-01 reduced soluble Fe(III) complexed with citrate or nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA); however, it could reduce only relatively small quantities of hydrous ferric oxide except when the humic acid analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate was added as an electron shuttle, in which case 10 mM Fe(III) was reduced. Fe(III)-NTA was reduced quantitatively to Fe(II); reduction of Fe(III)-NTA was coupled to the oxidation of lactate and supported growth through three consecutive transfers. Suspensions of Thermus strain SA-01 cells also reduced Mn(IV), Co(III)-EDTA, Cr(VI), and U(VI). Mn(IV)-oxide was reduce in the presence of either lactate or H{sub 2}. Both strains were also able to mineralize NTA to CO{sub 2} and to couple its oxidation to Fe(III) reduction and growth. The optimum temperature for growth and Fe(III) reduction by Thermus strains SA-01 and NMX2 A.1 is approximately 65 C; their optimum pH is 6.5 to 7.0. This is the first report of a Thermus sp. being able to couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe, Mn, or S.

  13. Dust in the Ionized Medium of the Galaxy: GHRS Measurements of Al III and S III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Christopher Howk; Blair D. Savage

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present interstellar absorption line measurements of the ions S III and Al III towards six stars using archival Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph data. The ions Al III and S III trace heavily depleted and non-depleted elements, respectively, in ionized gas. We use the photoionization code CLOUDY to derive the ionization correction relating N(Al III)/N(S III) to the gas-phase abundance [Al/S]_i in the ionized gas. For spectral types considered here, the corrections are small and independent of the assumed ionization parameter. Using the results of these photoionization models, we find [Al/S]_i = -1.0 in the ionized gas towards three disk stars. These values of [Al/S]_i (=[Al/H]_i) imply that Al-bearing grains are present in the ionized nebulae around these stars. If the WIM of the Galaxy is photoionized by OB stars, our data for two halo stars imply [Al/S]_i = -0.4 to -0.5 in the WIM and thus the presence of dust grains containing Al in this important phase of the ISM. While photoionization appears to be the most likely origin of the ionization for Al III and S III, we cannot rule out confusion from the presence of hot, collisionally ionized gas along two sightlines. We find that [Al/S]_i in the ionized gas along the six sightlines is anti-correlated with the electron density and average sightline neutral density. The degree of grain destruction in the ionized medium of the Galaxy is not much higher than in the warm neutral medium. The existence of grains in the ionized regions studied here has important implications for the thermal balance of these regions. (Abstract Abridged)

  14. Red-luminescent europium (III) doped silica nanoshells: synthesis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Red-luminescent europium (III) doped silica nanoshells: synthesis, characterization(6), 066012 (June 2011) Red-luminescent europium (III) doped silica nanoshells: synthesis, characterization (SPIE). [DOI: 10.1117/1.3593003] Keywords: europium; silica; luminescent; nanoshells; endocytosis. Paper

  15. Aurora Organic Dairy Phase III: Corporate Sustainability Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    Aurora Organic Dairy Phase III: Corporate Sustainability Report Rosemary Lapka, Neesha Modi, Lauren Start and David Weinglass Report No. CSS11-07 April 19, 2011 #12;Aurora Organic Dairy Phase III Keoleian, Professor #12;Document Description AURORA ORGANIC DAIRY PHASE III: CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY

  16. III. PRATIQUES D'HYGIENE ET DE HYGIENE DES MAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    III. PRATIQUES D'HYGIENE ET DE PREVENTION HYGIENE DES MAINS HYGIENE ALIMENTAIRE HYGIENE - IRD - MNHN - Cemagref 24/88 III.1. HYGIENE DES MAINS Elle est fondamentale et ŕ renouveler plusieurs, on peut utiliser un gel ou une solution hydro alcoolique. III.2. HYGIENE ALIMENTAIRE Un certain nombre de

  17. Removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions by La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasay, Syed Abdul; Tokunaga, Shuzo [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Ibaraka (Japan); Park, S.W. [Keimyung Univ., Daegu City (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New adsorbents, La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina, were prepared for the removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions. A commercially available alumina was impregnated with La(III) or Y(III) ions by the adsorption process. The change in the surface charge due to the impregnation was measured by acid/base titration. The adsorption rate and the capacity of the alumina for La(III) and Y(III) ions were determined. The adsorption characteristics of the La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina and the original alumina for fluoride, phosphate, arsenate and selenite ions were analyzed under various conditions. The pH effect, dose effect, and kinetics were studied. The removal selectivity by the impregnated alumina was in the order fluoride > phosphate > arsenate > selenite. The impregnated alumina has been successfully applied for the removal of hazardous anions from synthetic and high-tech industrial wastewaters.

  18. Solar Neutrino Measurement at SK-III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; B. S. Yang

    2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The full Super-Kamiokande-III data-taking period, which ran from August of 2006 through August of 2008, yielded 298 live days worth of solar neutrino data with a lower total energy threshold of 4.5 MeV. During this period we made many improvements to the experiment's hardware and software, with particular emphasis on its water purification system and Monte Carlo simulations. As a result of these efforts, we have significantly reduced the low energy backgrounds as compared to earlier periods of detector operation, cut the systematic errors by nearly a factor of two, and achieved a 4.5 MeV energy threshold for the solar neutrino analysis. In this presentation, I will present the preliminary SK-III solar neutrino measurement results.

  19. MAVIS III -- A Windows 95/NT Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardwick, M.F. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). GTS Engineering Dept.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MAVIS (Modeling and Analysis of Explosive Valve Interactions) is a computer program that simulates operation of explosively actuated valve. MAVIS was originally written in Fortran in the mid 1970`s and was primarily run on the Sandia Vax computers in use through the early 1990`s. During the mid to late 1980`s MAVIS was upgraded to include the effects of plastic deformation and it became MAVIS II. When the Vax computers were retired, the Gas Transfer System (GTS) Development Department ported the code to the Macintosh and PC platforms, where it ran as a simple console application. All graphical output was lost during these ports. GTS code developers recently completed an upgrade that provides a Windows 95/NT MAVIS application and restores all of the original graphical output. This upgrade is called MAVIS III version 1.0. This report serves both as a user`s manual for MAVIS III v 1.0 and as a general software development reference.

  20. Analisis Numerico III Curso Codigo 525442

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    An´alisis Num´erico III Apuntes Curso C´odigo 525442 Segundo Semestre 2011 Dr. Raimund B.3.1. M´etodos de disparo para problemas lineales 52 3.3.2. M´etodo de disparo num´erico para problemas´isticas num´ericos 74 5.2.1. M´etodo de caracter´isticas aproximado 74 5.2.2. M´etodo predictor-corrector 75 5

  1. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuya Saigo; Tomoaki Matsumoto; Masayuki Umemura

    2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they are quite massive or less massive. The cosmological implications of Population III binaries are briefly discussed.

  2. A study of the reaction between bismuth (III) iodide and organic amine hydriodides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jack Clinton

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (ill) 5. tr is- di- ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 6. tris-tri-ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 7. tr is-n-propylammoniumhexaiodobismuthate (III) 8. tris-di-n-propylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 9. di-iso...-propylammoniumtetraiodobismuthate (III) IO. tris-di-iso-propylammoniumhexaiodobismuthate (111) 11. tri-n-pr opylammoniumt~etr iodobismuthate (III) 12. tris-n-butylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 13. tris-iso-butylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 14. tris...

  3. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously unidentified proteins were found with significant abundance in the cells grown under conditions of Fe(III) oxide reduction.

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Credits Ameren Missouri offers a Standard Offer Contract to customers that generate solar power. The customer must meet Ameren's net metering requirements and submit an...

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_FG2 scoping_DOE NEPA [Compatibility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy AGENDA Welcome - Cliff Whyte (DOE-NETL) Background and DOE's Role - Jeff Hoffmann (DOE-NETL) Ameren Project Overview - Mike Long (Ameren) FG Alliance Project Overview...

  6. III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaraba-Pardo, E.

    1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPRING 1978 111 III Festival del Siglo de Oro (Chamizal) E. JARABA-PARDO El Siglo de Oro fue, por la fecundidad de los autores y por las influencias trascendentales de sus obras en el posterior desarrollo de la dramaturgia universal, uno de los... todos los actos de los hombres son guiados por Dios, quien se muestra como supremo hacedor de todo cuanto acontece a las criaturas. Se encuentran, pues, en síntesis en el teatro del Siglo de Oro unos valores particularmente antagónicos de la sociedad...

  7. Glenrock III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) |GigaCrete IncIGlenrock III Wind

  8. Altech III (a) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAltaAltechIII

  9. Pomeroy III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, searchPocatelloIII Wind Farm Jump to:

  10. Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II Jump to: navigation,MeadIII Jump to:

  11. Altech III (b) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: Energy ResourcesAltaAltechIII(b)

  12. Stoney Corners III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCityInformation GlassOpen(Redirected(NorthernIII

  13. RSF Workshop Session III: Cost Considerations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITYResponses:December562 RevisionI: Energy GoalsIII:

  14. Case Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Case Study M2M Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 An irrigation pump connected to a web---to---wireless controller designed by M2M Communications. Agricultural Demand Response Program...

  15. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  16. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saigo, K; Umemura, M; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Umemura, Masayuki

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they ar...

  17. Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to conditions similar to that in the pristine sediment. The extent of microbial (Geobacter sulfurreducens) reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates isolated by CDB extraction (ca....

  18. John Hale III Awarded Minority Federal Government Public Servant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    awarded John Hale III, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Small Business and disadvantage Utilization, the National Minority Federal Government Public Servant...

  19. Total synthesis of Class II and Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tjandra, Meiliana

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. Total Synthesis of All Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids We describe the total synthesis of (+)- and (-)-galbulimima alkaloid 13, (-)-himgaline anad (-)-himbadine. The absolute stereochemistry of natural (-)-galbulimima ...

  20. AVTA: Toyota Prius Gen III HEV 2010 Testing Results | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Toyota Prius III hybrid-electric vehicle. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison...

  1. Toyota Gen III Prius Hybrid Electric Vehicle Accelerated Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    HEV Accelerated Testing - September 2011 Two model year 2010 Toyota Generation III Prius hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July 2009 in a fleet in...

  2. Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alteration, and Fluid Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Chena Hot Springs GRED III Project: Final Report Geology, Petrology,...

  3. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that require Hfq. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq. Abstract: effector proteins from the bacterium to a host cell; however, the secretion signal is poorly...

  4. III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    building blocks in LEDs, lasers, sensors, photovoltaics, and high power and high speed electronics. Compared to planar films, III-nitride nanowires have several potential...

  5. MCNP6 Results for the Phase III Sensitivity Benchmark of the OCED/NEA Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the last decade, there has been increasing interest in the calculation of cross section sensitivity coefficients of k{sub eff} for integral experiment design and uncertainty analysis. The OECD/NEA has an Expert Group devoted to Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis within the Working Party for Nuclear Criticality Safety. This expert group has developed benchmarks to assess code capabilities and performance for doing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Phase III of a set of sensitivity benchmarks evaluates capabilities for computing sensitivity coefficients. MCNP6 has the capability to compute cross section sensitivities for k{sub eff} using continuous-energy physics. To help verify this capability, results for the Phase III benchmark cases are generated and submitted to the Expert Group for comparison. The Phase III benchmark has three cases: III.1, an array of MOX fuel pins, III.2, a series of infinite lattices of MOX fuel pins with varying pitches, and III.3 two spheres with homogeneous mixtures of UF{sub 4} and polyethylene with different enrichments.

  6. A representative sample of Be stars III: H band spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Steele; J. S. Clark

    2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present H band (1.53 - 1.69 micron) spectra of 57 isolated Be stars of spectral types O9-B9 and luminosity classes III,IV & V. The HI Brackett (n-4) series is seen in emission from Br 11-18, and FeII emission is also apparent for a subset of those stars with HI emission. No emission from species with a higher excitation temperature, such as He II or CIII is seen, and no forbidden line emission is present. A subset of 12 stars show no evidence for emission from any species; these stars appear indistinguishable from normal B stars of a comparable spectral type. In general the line ratios constructed from the transitions in the range Br 11-18 do not fit case B recombination theory particularly well. Strong correlations between the line ratios with Br-gamma and spectral type are found. These results most likely represent systematic variations in the temperature and ionization of the circumstellar disc with spectral type. Weak correlations between the line widths and projected rotational velocity of the stars are observed; however no systematic trend for increasing line width through the Brackett series is observed.

  7. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  8. On Energy and Entropy Influxes in the Green-Naghdi Type III Theory of Heat Conduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swantje Bargmann; Antonino Favata; Paolo Podio-Guidugli

    2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy-influx/entropy-influx relation in the Green-Naghdi Type III theory of heat conduction is examined within a thermodynamical framework \\`a la Mueller-Liu, where that relation is not specified a priori irrespectively of the constitutive class under attention. It is shown that the classical assumption, i.e., that the entropy influx and the energy influx are proportional via the absolute temperature, holds true if heat conduction is, in a sense that is made precise, isotropic. In addition, it is proven that the standard assumption does not hold in case of transversely isotropic conduction.

  9. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL...

  10. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  11. What controls the [O III] 5007 line strength in AGN?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Baskin; Ari Laor

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    AGN display an extreme range in the narrow emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, in the PG quasar sample the equivalent width of the narrow [O III] 5007 line has a range of >300, while the broad Hb line, for example, has a range of 10 only. The strength of [O III] 5007 is modulated by the covering factor, CF, of the narrow line region (NLR) gas, its density n_e, and ionization parameter U. To explore which of these factors produces the observed large range in [O III] 5007 strength, we measure the strength of the matching narrow Hb and [O III] 4363 lines, detected in 40 out of the 87 z<0.5 PG quasars in the Boroson & Green sample. The photoionization code CLOUDY is then used to infer CF, n_e, and U in each object, assuming a single uniform emitting zone. We find that the range of CF (~0.02-0.2) contributes about twice as much as the range in both n_e and U towards modulating the strength of the [O III] 5007 line. The CF is inversely correlated with luminosity, but it is not correlated with L_Edd as previously speculated. The single zone [O III] 5007 emitting region is rather compact, having R=40L_44^0.45 pc. These emission lines can also be fit with an extreme two zone model, where [O III] 4363 is mostly emitted by a dense (n_e=10^7) inner zone at R=L_44^0.5 pc, and [O III] 5007 by a low density (n_e=10^3) extended outer zone at R=750L_44^0.34 pc. Such an extended [O III] 5007 emission should be well resolved by HST imaging of luminous AGN. Further constraints on the radial gas distribution in the NLR can be obtained from the spectral shape of the IR continuum emitted by the associated dust.

  12. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting Extents and Rates of Bioreduction. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in the Fithian and Muloorina Illites : Contrasting...

  13. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Laser Induced Flourescence Studies. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics...

  14. United States Fuel Resiliency Volume III U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mr. Christopher Dean, Mr. Steven Shapiro, and Mr. Matthew Gilstrap. United States Fuel Resiliency: Volume III - Regional Vulnerability and Resilience iii Table of Contents I....

  15. III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

  16. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  17. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  18. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  19. Case Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJuneWaste To Wisdom:EnergyJoshua DeLung What does thisCase

  20. Case Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess StoriesFebruary 26,ComputersTrinitytheOptimizationCase Studies

  1. Security Cases

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015ParentsMiddle| DepartmentAchievementEnergyWide Areasecurity-cases

  2. TRUPACT-III Content Codes (TRUCON-III), Revision 2, July 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE'sSummaryDepartmentEnergyonWIPP 11-3458 Rev. 2 TRUPACT-III

  3. Multi-fluid Modeling of Transient a Case Study in the Generation and Guiding of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    Multi-fluid Modeling of Transient Plasmas: a Case Study in the Generation and Guiding of Light, B.H.P. Multi-fluid Modeling of Transient Plasmas: a Case Study in the Generation and Guid- ing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 2.3.1 The multi-fluid description in PLASIMO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 iii #12;iv

  4. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)Hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial “Solid Solution”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Michel, F.M.; Harrington, R.; Parise, J.B.; Reeder, R.J.

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of {approx}27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of {approx}10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  5. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial "Solid Solution"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, Y.; Michel, F; Zhang, L; Harrington, R; Parise, J; Reeder, R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of 27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of 10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  6. Antimony Based III-V Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CA Wang

    2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Antimony-based III-V thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells are attractive converters for systems with low radiator temperature around 1100 to 1700 K, since these cells potentially can be spectrally matched to the thermal source. Cells under development include GaSb and the lattice-matched GaInAsSb/GaSb and InPAsSb/InAs quaternary systems. GaSb cell technology is the most mature, owing in part to the relative ease in preparation of the binary alloy compared to quaternary GaInAsSb and InPAsSb alloys. Device performance of 0.7-eV GaSb cells exceeds 90% of the practical limit. GaInAsSb TPV cells have been the primary focus of recent research, and cells with energy gap E{sub g} ranging from {approx}0.6 to 0.49 eV have been demonstrated. Quantum efficiency and fill factor approach theoretical limits. Open-circuit voltage factor is as high as 87% of the practical limit for the higher-E{sub g} cells, but degrades to below 80% with decreasing E{sub g} of the alloy, which might be due to Auger recombination. InPAsSb cells are the least studied, and a cell with E{sub g} = 0.45-eV has extended spectral response out to 4.3 {micro}m. This paper briefly reviews the main contributions that have been made for antimonide-based TPV cells, and suggests additional studies for further performance enhancements.

  7. COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    1 COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA Professors: BAILEY, DANYLUK, LENHART, MURTAGH*. Associate Professors: ALBRECHT*, FREUND**, HEERINGA, MCGUIRE. Computers and computation, business, and the arts. Understanding the nature of computation and exploring the great potential

  8. Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music. They model wave propagation in distributed media such as strings, bores, horns, plates, and acoustic spaces

  9. aging tests iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    94720 (Received 2 February 2006; accepted 2 March Ritchie, Robert 6 The CLEO-III RICH Detector and Beam Test Results HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: We are constructing a Ring...

  10. Synthesis and characterization of Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parmar, K.; Pramanik, A.K. [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)] [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Bandyopadhya, N.R. [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)] [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Bhattacharjee, S., E-mail: santanu@nmlindia.org [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes synthesized through 'silica garden' route have been characterized using a number of analytical techniques including X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These tubes are brittle and amorphous and are hierarchically built from smaller tubes of 5-10 nm diameters. They remain amorphous at least up to 650 {sup o}C. Crystobalite and hematite are the major phases present in Fe(III)-silicate tubes heated at 850 {sup o}C. Morphology and chemical compositions at the external and internal walls of these tubes are remarkably different. These tubes are porous with high BET surface area of 291.2 m{sup 2}/g. Fe(III)-silicate tubes contain significant amount of physically and chemically bound moisture. They show promise as an adsorbent for Pb(II), Zn(II), and Cr(III) in aqueous medium.

  11. III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  12. ap theory iii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AP Theory III: Cone-like Graded SUSY, Dynamic Dark Energy and the YM Millenium Problem Math Preprints (arXiv) Summary: Artin...

  13. Guidance for Environmental Background Analysis Volume III: Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance for Environmental Background Analysis Volume III: Groundwater Prepared for: Naval This guidance document provides instructions for characterizing groundwater background conditions and comparing datasets representing groundwater impacted by an actual or potential chemical release to appropriate

  14. Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Programmatic and Phase III Early

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Programmatic and Phase III Early Restoration Plan of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The restoration alternatives are comprised of early restoration project types Addressing Injuries Resulting from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (Framework Agreement). Criteria

  15. Incised marks on Late Helladic and Late Minoan III pottery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, Nicolle Elise

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INICISED MARKS ON LATE HELLADIC AND LATE MINOAN III POTTERY A Thesis by NICOLLE ELISE HIRSCHFELD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the dey'ee of MASTER OF ARTS... December 1990 Major Subject: Anthropology INCISED MARKS ON LATE HELLADIC AND LATE MINOAN III POTTERY A Thesis by NICOLLE ELISE HIRSCHFELD Approved as to style and content by: George F, Bass (Chair of Committee) c~) Frederick H. van Doorninck, Jr...

  16. QER- Comment of William Smith III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello DOE, Thanks for accepting my comments on the Quadrennial Energy Review by e-mail. There will be those who wish to promote nuclear energy as a source of electricity for future use in the USA. I speak against this form of energy. Because it creates long-lived radioactive wastes, nuclear power is incompatible with the biological world in which we live and from which we evolved. The lasting nature of these wastes creates a moral quandry for us in this generation, as we leave behind such biological poisons for our descents to manage, in ways which we do not yet know. A further problem with nucler energy is that any fission reaction creates plutonium, the stuff of nuclear weapons. If nuclear power reactors were to be spread around the world, inevitably the proliferation of nuclear weapons would follow. So-called '4th generation' or 'thorium' reactors suffer from a similar problem, for although they may generate less plutonium, their fuel cycle involves creation of large amounts of U-233 which carries a similar proliferation risk to plutonium-239. I advocate crafting an energy future for our nation bsed on the natural flows of renewable energy, coupled with a diversified structure which generates electricity at many smaller sources. Implicit in any modern energy system is the increased efficiency of energy usage which will continue to lower the bulk amounts of energy, particularly electricity, which our society uses to satisfy our industrial, military, commercial, and personal needs. Clearly as a nation we must participate in the worldwide effort to control the buildup of carbon dioxide gases and other pollutants which threaten the stability of the earth's climate. I would like to bring to your attention these papers from the Rocky Mountain Institute which touch on the above issues: http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2009-09_FourNuclearMyths and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2012-01_FarewellToFossilFuels and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E05-14_NuclearPowerEconomics.... If you have not yet done so, I strongly urge you to contact the Rocky Mountain Institute and contract with them for their advice in consulting on the Quadrennial Energy Review. Sincerely, William Wharton Smith III

  17. NP Case Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HPC Requirements Reviews Requirements Reviews: Target 2014 Nuclear Physics (NP) Case Studies Case Studies The core of the NERSC requirements workshops are the case...

  18. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 8 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Texas continues to rise, and may top 60 this year, our po- tential young farmers are not lack- ing in desire, but opportunity. Even with all the pitfalls and incentives to pursue other careers outside of agriculture, there are many young people... that are will- ing and eager to farm. In most cases, their parents insist on either college or trade school first. Of the ten young adults inter- viewed for this story, ranging in age from 11 to 29 years old, some have already been farming a de- cade, while...

  19. A Study of the Reaction Between Antimony (III) Iodide and Organic Amine Hydriodides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackstock, Joseph Beauford

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -isopropylammoniumnonaiododianti- montate(III) Tris-4 -picoliniumnonaiododiantimonate(III) Tris-$-picoliniumnonaiOdodiantimonate(III) Di-isobutylamine-antimony( III) iodide reaction product Triethanolam&ne-antimony(III) iodide reaction product Flelting Point, 'C Decomposed 193... to the starch end point . Antimony was determined on eacn compound in dupli- cate. The results of these analyses are tabulated in Table II. II. Determination of' Iodine in the Reaction Products: Iodine was determined potentiometrically using a silver...

  20. Local and Global Radiative Feedback from Population III Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Shea, Brian W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of recent work that focuses on understanding the radiative feedback processes that are potentially important during Population III star formation. Specifically, we examine the effect of the Lyman-Werner (photodissociating) background on the early stages of primordial star formation, which serves to delay the onset of star formation in a given halo but never suppresses it entirely. We also examine the effect that both photodissociating and ionizing radiation in I-fronts from nearby stellar systems have on the formation of primordial protostellar clouds. Depending on the strength of the incoming radiation field and the central density of the halos, Pop III star formation can be suppressed, unaffected, or even enhanced. Understanding these and other effects is crucial to modeling Population III star formation and to building the earliest generations of galaxies in the Universe.

  1. Results of long term ground surface measurements at the Hoe Creek III site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganow, H.C.

    1984-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground surface subsidence was first observed over the Hoe Creek III burn cavity 21 days after gasification ceased. It manifested itself as a small circular depression or sink and was followed five days later by the formation of a second collapse structure. Concurrently, a single large elliptically shaped depression, whose major axis parallels the experimental axis, slowly formed over the burn cavity. These features appear to represent two distinctly different deformation modes. The first mode includes discrete voids that propagate rapidly upward. The second mode is represented by the elliptically shaped classical subsidence depression that forms slowly by a strata bending. Seventeen isolation type survey monuments have been used to track both the horizontal (one dimensional) and vertical motion components intermittently over a 54 month span. The resulting data set is combined with ground surface sketches and post-burn core drilling results and provides an important case study against which numerical and centrifugation model results can be compared. 5 references, 13 figures.

  2. Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    , 2005. Energy Information Agency, Annual Energy Outlook 2006, Regional Tables, 2007. WECC/CA WECC/RM 29Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory First Western Forum on Energy & Water on Energy & Water, March 22, 2007 Outline · Background on issue · Thermoelectric withdrawal and consumption

  3. Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Iqbal

    Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III* Department of Animal, and American Fisheries Society (AFS) Fish Culture Section, was held February 26 through March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. At this meeting, the AFS Fish Culture and Fish Physiol- ogy Sections co

  4. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  5. The Family of "Circle Limit III" Escher Patterns Douglas Dunham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Doug

    consider the third one of this sequence, Circle Limit III -- a pattern of fish, to be the most beautiful. In this woodcut, four fish meet at right fin tips, three fish meet at left fin tips, and three fish meet at their noses. The backbones of the fish are aligned along white circular arcs. Fish on one arc are the same

  6. CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

  7. Officers and Editors for 2011 JOSEPH R. MENDELSON III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galán, Pedro

    Officers and Editors for 2011 President JOSEPH R. MENDELSON III Zoo Atlanta Atlanta, GA 30315, USA) Smithsonian Institution, USA TIFFANY DOAN (2014 R) Central Connecticut State Univ., USA PATRICK GREGORY (2012 PATERSON (2012 R) Williams Baptist College, USA JENNIFER PRAMUK (2014 Cons) Woodland Park Zoo, USA CAROL

  8. GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Vol. III. Doctor of Engineering Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candidate 7 3.16 Doctoral Project Work 7 3.17 Application for Graduation 8 3.18 Doctoral Project Defense 8 3.19 Doctoral Project Report Submission 8 3.20 Graduate Assessment 8 APPENDIX 10 Department Forms (CEE) CollegeGRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Vol. III. Doctor of Engineering Program Department of Civil

  9. Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal 21st August - 2nd September 2011 2011 will provide students with a solid foundation in renewable energies (especially photovoltaics of renewable energies. Accommodation is arranged in fully-equipped cosy holiday flats with fellow students

  10. Evaluation of Non-intrusive Traffic Detection Technologies Phase III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    TPF-5(171) Evaluation of Non-intrusive Traffic Detection Technologies Đ Phase III #12 not intrude into pavement for installation. ·! Sensors above, below or to the side of the roadway qualify;Miovision #12;Miovision #12;Laser-based sensors #12;PEEK AxleLight #12;TIRTL #12;TIRTL #12;#12;#12;#12;

  11. Analise Matematica III semestre de 1999/2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, Joăo Pimentel

    An´alise Matem´atica III 2o semestre de 1999/2000 Exerc´icio resolvido 11 O funcionamento de uma co resultados deste exerc´icio na constru¸c~ao (eventual) de co-inceneradoras reais. 1 #12;

  12. Analise Matematica III semestre de 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, Joăo Pimentel

    An´alise Matem´atica III 1o semestre de 2001/02 Exerc´icio teste 5 (Entregar na aula pr´atica da descrito por S = {(x, y, z) R3 : 1 x2 + y2 + 2z2 4, z 0}. Ap´os t^e-los resolvido com alegria, a menina

  13. Analise Matematica III semestre de 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira dos Santos, Pedro

    An´alise Matem´atica III 1o semestre de 2001/02 Exerc´icio teste 5 (Entregar na aula pr´atica da descrito por S = {(x, y, z) R3 : 1 x2 + y2 + 2z2 4, z 0}. Ap´os t^e-los resolvido de cabe¸ca, com

  14. III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    29 III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27 The previous chapters focused on first generation biofuels. In this chapter we focus on second generation biofuels, specifically biofuels derived from cellulosic or lignocellulosic conversion. Advocates for the development of cellulosic

  15. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field was quantized: photons. Now that we have gone through quantization of a classical field (Schr¨odinger field so far), we can proceed to quantize the Maxwell field. The basic idea is pretty much the same, except

  16. TI 2013-055/III Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    TI 2013-055/III Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper Parallel Sequential Monte Carlo for Efficient Density Combination: The Deco Matlab Toolbox Roberto Casarin1 Stefano Grassi2 Francesco Ravazzolo3 Herman Mahlerplein 117 1082 MS Amsterdam The Netherlands Tel.: +31(0)20 525 8579 #12;PARALLEL SEQUENTIAL MONTE CARLO

  17. MOST POPULATION III SUPERNOVAE ARE DUDS Robert L. Kurucz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    the ``dark matter'' halo. Subject headings: supernovae --- dark matter Introduction Most of the physics predictions about dud supernovae and about ``dark matter''. Population III stars, dud supernovae, supernovae and primordial gas into a globular cluster. Model atmosphere calculations for oxygen dwarfs show that water

  18. Electrical properties of dislocations in III-Nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavalcoli, D.; Minj, A.; Pandey, S.; Cavallini, A. [Physics and Astronomy Dept. University of Bologna, Italy viale C Berti Pichat 6/II, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on GaN, AlN, InN (III-N) and their alloys is achieving new heights due their high potential applications in photonics and electronics. III-N semiconductors are mostly grown epitaxially on sapphire, and due to the large lattice mismatch and the differences in the thermal expansion coefficients, the structures usually contain many threading dislocations (TDs). While their structural properties have been widely investigated, their electrical characteristics and their role in the transport properties of the devices are still debated. In the present contribution we will show conductive AFM studies of TDs in GaN and Al/In GaN ternary alloys to evidence the role of strain, different surface polarity and composition on their electrical properties. Local I-V curves measured at TDs allowed us to clarify their role in the macroscopic electrical properties (leakage current, mobilities) of III-N based devices. Samples obtained by different growers (AIXTRON, III-V Lab) were studied. The comparison between the results obtained in the different alloys allowed us to understand the role of In and Al on the TDs electrical properties.

  19. Predicting Efficient Antenna Ligands for Tb(III) Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of highly luminescent Tb(III) complexes of para-substituted 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (5LI-IAM-X) has been prepared (X = H, CH{sub 3}, (C=O)NHCH{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, OCH{sub 3}, F, Cl, Br) to probe the effect of substituting the isophthalamide ring on ligand and Tb(III) emission in order to establish a method for predicting the effects of chromophore modification on Tb(III) luminescence. The energies of the ligand singlet and triplet excited states are found to increase linearly with the {pi}-withdrawing ability of the substituent. The experimental results are supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations performed on model systems, which predict ligand singlet and triplet energies within {approx}5% of the experimental values. The quantum yield ({Phi}) values of the Tb(III) complex increases with the triplet energy of the ligand, which is in part due to the decreased non-radiative deactivation caused by thermal repopulation of the triplet. Together, the experimental and theoretical results serve as a predictive tool that can be used to guide the synthesis of ligands used to sensitize lanthanide luminescence.

  20. Fe(III) Oxide Reactivity Toward Biological versus Chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    amorphous materials, such as ferrihydrite, to well-crystallized minerals such as goethite and hematite (5 assemblages. Experimental Section Oxide Synthesis and Characterization.A variety of synthetic Fe(III) oxides included a series of goethites with differing crystallinity and surface area, synthesized from Fe(NO3

  1. Reproducing kernel element method Part III: Generalized enrichment and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shaofan

    Reproducing kernel element method Part III: Generalized enrichment and applications Hongsheng Lu enrichment is proposed to construct the global partition polynomials or to enrich global partition polynomial. This is accomplished by either multiplying enrichment functions with the original global partition poly- nomials

  2. Intermolecular CH bond activation of benzene and pyridines by a vanadium(III) alkylidene including a stepwise conversion of benzene to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Intermolecular C­H bond activation of benzene and pyridines by a vanadium(III) alkylidene including a stepwise conversion of benzene to a vanadium-benzyne complex Jose G. Andino,a Uriah J. Kilgore,a Maren Pink of benzene and pyridine is observed with (PNP)V(CH2tBu)2 (1), and in the case of benzene, the formation

  3. Comparing directed efficiency of III-nitride nanowire light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gradecak, Silvija

    III-nitride-based nanowires are a promising platform for solid-state lighting. III-nitride nanowires that act as natural waveguides to enhance directed extraction have previously been shown to be free of extended defects ...

  4. Investigation of the Structure and Function of Type III Secretion Needle and Tip Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Lingling

    2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Gram-negative pathogens possess type III secretion systems as part of their required virulence factor repertoire. The type III secretion apparatus (TTSA) spans the bacterial inner and outer membranes and resembles a ...

  5. Ti(III) Doped Titanium Dioxide: an Effective Strategy to Improve the Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Fan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    types of surface titanium and oxygen atoms present. PageRIVERSIDE Ti(III) Doped Titanium Dioxide: an EffectiveDISSERTATION Ti(III) Doped Titanium Dioxide: an Effective

  6. Atomic and electronic structures of oxides on III-V semiconductors :

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and passivation of a compound semiconductor surface duringIn 2 O and SiO/III-V Semiconductor Interface, in press with2 O and SiO/III-V Semiconductor Interface, ECS Transaction (

  7. Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofSystems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofthrough 2009. Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of

  8. Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of PhotovoltaicsSystem Size Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of PhotovoltaicsSystems >10 kW Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics

  9. Nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth of non-polar group III nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T. (Albuquerque, NM); Li, Qiming (Albuquerque, NM); Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for growing high quality, nonpolar Group III nitrides using lateral growth from Group III nitride nanowires. The method of nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth (NTLEG) employs crystallographically aligned, substantially vertical Group III nitride nanowire arrays grown by metal-catalyzed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) as templates for the lateral growth and coalescence of virtually crack-free Group III nitride films. This method requires no patterning or separate nitride growth step.

  10. A Case-Based Conceptual Design Information Server for Concurrent Engineering1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    1 A Case-Based Conceptual Design Information Server for Concurrent Engineering1 William H. Wood III been focused on the functionality of an artifact to be provided to a customer. Concurrent engineering i n concurrent engineering are indexed to provide access through multiple interfaces, allowing

  11. A Refined Ethical Impact Assessment Tool and a Case Study of its Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    A Refined Ethical Impact Assessment Tool and a Case Study of its Application Michael Bailey1 , Erin? What impact does the immediacy of an event (e.g., DDoS) have on our response to the event? [4 understanding, and (iii) retrospectively apply this EIA to an ethically challenging, original study in ICTR. 1

  12. Can Population III Stars at High Redshifts produce GRB's?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma ray bursts are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe, consisting of flashes of gamma rays that last from seconds to hours. There have been attempts to observe gamma ray bursts, for example, from population III stars of about 500 solar mass at high redshifts. Here we argue that collapse of such high mass stars does not lead to gamma ray burst as their core collapse temperatures are not sufficient to produce gamma rays, leading to GRBs.

  13. Method of fabricating vertically aligned group III-V nanowires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A top-down method of fabricating vertically aligned Group III-V micro- and nanowires uses a two-step etch process that adds a selective anisotropic wet etch after an initial plasma etch to remove the dry etch damage while enabling micro/nanowires with straight and smooth faceted sidewalls and controllable diameters independent of pitch. The method enables the fabrication of nanowire lasers, LEDs, and solar cells.

  14. Analise Matematica III semestre de 1999/2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granja, Gustavo

    An´alise Matem´atica III 1o semestre de 1999/2000 Exerc´icio teste 7 Mostre que existe uma vizinhan resolvido para u e v como fun¸c~oes de x e y. Calcule a derivada u x (1, 1). Solu¸c~ao: Consideremos a fun teorema da fun¸c~ao impl´icita, em alguma vizinhan¸ca de (1, 1, 1, 1), o sistema pode ser resolvido em

  15. Regular Type III and Type N Approximate Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Downes; Paul MacAllevey; Bogdan Nita; Ivor Robinson

    2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    New type III and type N approximate solutions which are regular in the linear approximation are shown to exist. For that, we use complex transformations on self-dual Robinson-Trautman metrics rather then the classical approach. The regularity criterion is the boundedness and vanishing at infinity of a scalar obtained by saturating the Bel-Robinson tensor of the first approximation by a time-like vector which is constant with respect to the zeroth approximation.

  16. Early cavity growth during forward burn. [Hoe Creek III problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon, M.J.; Thorsness, C.B.; Hill, R.W.

    1980-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    During the early portion of the forward burn phase of the Hoe Creek III field experiment, the cavity progagated rapidly down the deviated borehole and to the top of the coal seam. As a first step to understanding this phenomena we have conducted small scale coal block experiments. Drying as well as combustion tests were performed. This paper describes the test hardware and the experimental results.

  17. A study of the reaction between bismuth (III) iodide and organic amine hydriodides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jack Clinton

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -iso-propylammonium- sp I. tetraiodobismuthate(III) 62. 00 62. 19 + 0. 10 10. tris-di-iso-propylammonium- hexaiodob is muthate ( III) 59. 63 60. 80 0. 19 1 1. tr i= n-pr opylammonium- tetraiodobismuthate(III) 58. 97 58. 87 + 0. 02 12. tris... 6. 8 tris - di-iso-pr opylammouium- hexa iodobi s mutba(III) 10 8 6 4 7. 74 7. 72 7. 85 7. 83 7. 8 tr i - n-pr opylammonium- tetraiodobis muthate(111) 10 8 6 4 7. 80 7. 78 7. 95 7. 88 7. 8 TABLE III (Contd) Compound...

  18. Nature in Play: Measuring the Relationship of Nature and Unstructured Play through Case Studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCleary, Lisa Christine

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    fulfillment of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR April 2009 Major: Landscape Architecture ii NATURE IN PLAY: MEASURING THE RELATIONSHIP OF NATURE AND UNSTRUCTURED PLAY THROUGH CASE STUDIES A... Advisor: Jody Rosenblatt Naderi Associate Dean for Undergraduate Research: Robert C. Webb April 2009 Major: Landscape Architecture iii ABSTRACT Nature in Play: Measuring the Relationship of Nature and Unstructured Play through Case Studies...

  19. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III results of all other international participants in 2014, while the remaining Phase II transient case results will be reported in 2015.

  20. Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - September 2013...

  1. Return to Privacy Module III FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamos, Michael I.

    . Before Justices MORRIS, WHITTINGTON, and ROACH OPINION ROACH. *1 In this case, appellant Bill McLaren, Jr

  2. Case No. VWZ-0020

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Case: Lucy B. Smith Date of Filing: October 14, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0020 This determination will...

  3. CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronen, Y.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume III: Control Rods and Burnable Absorber Calculations. Perturbation Theory for Nuclear Reactor Analysis. Thermal Reactors Calculations. Fast Reactor Calculations. Seed-Blanket Reactors. Index.

  4. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

  5. Grand Ridge III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation,III

  6. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report III, Volume 2. Specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report III, Volume 2 contains those specifications numbered K through Y, as follows: Specifications for Compressors (K); Specifications for Piping (L); Specifications for Structures (M); Specifications for Insulation (N); Specifications for Electrical (P); Specifications for Concrete (Q); Specifications for Civil (S); Specifications for Welding (W); Specifications for Painting (X); and Specifications for Special (Y). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available for the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors.

  7. Microsoft Word - TRUPACT-III Quick Facts.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake Your NextHow EM AcronymsIQATRUPACT---III Q uick F acts

  8. Ponnequin phase III (EUI) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, searchPocatelloIII Wind FarmEUI) Wind Farm

  9. Ponnequin phase III (PSCo) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, searchPocatelloIII Wind FarmEUI) Wind

  10. Pyron (Roscoe III) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to:ID8/OrganizationTechProbSolutionsPublic ArtTexasUnst,Pyron (Roscoe III)

  11. Title III of the Omnibus Appropriations Act | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 - JanuaryTank 48HPublicforManagementUnconventionalTitle ITitle III

  12. Lamar Wind Energy Project III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,Lakefront Tow Tank Jump to:Wind Farm Jump to:I JumpIII

  13. Panther Creek III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompanyPCN Technology Jump2011) |Panasonic HomePantexIII Wind

  14. Ridgetop Energy Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | RoadmapRenewableGeothermalsourceOhio: EnergyRidgeIII Jump

  15. McNeilus Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II Jump to: navigation, search NameIII

  16. Olkaria III Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOffice ofInformation Olkaria I -II GeothermalIII

  17. Sweetwater Phase III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained By FaultSunpodsSweetwater 4a Jump to: navigation,III Wind

  18. Black Rock III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 | OpenEIBixby, Oklahoma: EnergyBlackHawkBlackIII

  19. Raft River III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformationeNevadaRadioactiveRadiometricsRaftIII

  20. Methods for fabricating thin film III-V compound solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pan, Noren; Hillier, Glen; Vu, Duy Phach; Tatavarti, Rao; Youtsey, Christopher; McCallum, David; Martin, Genevieve

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention utilizes epitaxial lift-off in which a sacrificial layer is included in the epitaxial growth between the substrate and a thin film III-V compound solar cell. To provide support for the thin film III-V compound solar cell in absence of the substrate, a backing layer is applied to a surface of the thin film III-V compound solar cell before it is separated from the substrate. To separate the thin film III-V compound solar cell from the substrate, the sacrificial layer is removed as part of the epitaxial lift-off. Once the substrate is separated from the thin film III-V compound solar cell, the substrate may then be reused in the formation of another thin film III-V compound solar cell.

  1. CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Institute Rockefeller Institute.for Medical Research University of Rochester -Case School of Applied Science, Ohio State University University of Cincinnati University of...

  2. A Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards a Low Carbon Economy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies...

  3. The High Energy Materials Science Beamline (HEMS) at PETRA III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, Norbert; King, Andrew; Beckmann, Felix; Ruhnau, Hans-Ulrich; Kirchhof, Rene; Kiehn, Ruediger; Mueller, Martin; Schreyer, Andreas [GKSS Research Center Geesthacht GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The HEMS Beamline at the German high-brilliance synchrotron radiation storage ring PETRA III is fully tunable between 30 and 250 keV and optimized for sub-micrometer focusing. Approximately 70 % of the beamtime will be dedicated to Materials Research. Fundamental research will encompass metallurgy, physics and chemistry with first experiments planned for the investigation of the relationship between macroscopic and micro-structural properties of polycrystalline materials, grain-grain-interactions, and the development of smart materials or processes. For this purpose a 3D-microsctructure-mapper has been designed. Applied research for manufacturing process optimization will benefit from high flux in combination with ultra-fast detector systems allowing complex and highly dynamic in-situ studies of micro-structural transformations, e.g. during welding processes. The beamline infrastructure allows accommodation of large and heavy user provided equipment. Experiments targeting the industrial user community will be based on well established techniques with standardized evaluation, allowing full service measurements, e.g. for tomography and texture determination. The beamline consists of a five meter in-vacuum undulator, a general optics hutch, an in-house test facility and three independent experimental hutches working alternately, plus additional set-up and storage space for long-term experiments. HEMS is under commissioning as one of the first beamlines running at PETRA III.

  4. Yunnan-III models for Evolutionary population synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, F; Han, Z; Zhuang, Y; Kang, X

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We build the Yunnan-III evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models by using the MESA stellar evolution code, BaSeL stellar spectra library and the initial mass functions (IMFs) of Kroupa and Salpeter, and present colours and integrated spectral energy distributions (ISEDs) of solar-metallicity stellar populations (SPs) in the range of 1Myr-15 Gyr. The main characteristic of the Yunnan-III EPS models is the usage of a set of self-consistent solar-metallicity stellar evolutionary tracks (the masses of stars are from 0.1 to 100Msun). This set of tracks is obtained by using the state-of-the-art MESA code. MESA code can evolve stellar models through thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase for low- and intermediate-mass stars. By comparisons, we confirm that the inclusion of TP-AGB stars make the V-K, V-J and V-R colours of SPs redder and the infrared flux larger at ages log(t/yr)>7.6 (the differences reach the maximum at log(t/yr)~8.6, ~0.5-0.2mag for colours, ~2 times for K-band flux). The st...

  5. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); MacDowall, R. J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  6. Mono- and bis-tolylterpyridine iridium(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinkle, Lindsay M.; Young, Jr., Victor G.; Mann, Kent R. (UMM)

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The first structure report of trichlorido[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) dimethyl sulfoxide solvate, [IrCl{sub 3}(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})] {center_dot} C{sub 2}H{sub 6}OS, (I), is presented, along with a higher-symmetry setting of previously reported bis[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) tris(hexafluoridophosphate) acetonitrile disolvate, [Ir(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})2](PF{sub 6}){sub 3} {center_dot} 2C{sub 2}H{sub 3}N, (II) [Yoshikawa, Yamabe, Kanehisa, Kai, Takashima & Tsukahara (2007). Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. pp. 1911-1919]. For (I), the data were collected with synchrotron radiation and the dimethyl sulfoxide solvent molecule is disordered over three positions, one of which is an inversion center. The previously reported structure of (II) is presented in the more appropriate C2/c space group. The iridium complex and one PF{sub 6}{sup -} anion lie on twofold axes in this structure, making half of the molecule unique.

  7. Method and apparatus for use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors in optical communications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hui, Rongqing (Lenexa, KS); Jiang,Hong-Xing (Manhattan, KS); Lin, Jing-Yu (Manhattan, KS)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure relates to the use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductor materials for optical communications. In one embodiment, an optical device includes an optical waveguide device fabricated using a III-nitride semiconductor material. The III-nitride semiconductor material provides for an electrically controllable refractive index. The optical waveguide device provides for high speed optical communications in an infrared wavelength region. In one embodiment, an optical amplifier is provided using optical coatings at the facet ends of a waveguide formed of erbium-doped III-nitride semiconductor materials.

  8. CALCUL QUANTIQUE DE L'ANISOTROPIE DIAMAGNTIQUE DES MOLCULES ORGANIQUES III. HYDROCARBURES AROMATIQUES COMPLEXES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    15. CALCUL QUANTIQUE DE L'ANISOTROPIE DIAMAGNÉTIQUE DES MOLÉCULES ORGANIQUES III. HYDROCARBURES orbitales moléculaires est étendue au cas des hydrocarbures conjugués contenant au moins quatre noyaux

  9. PopIII signatures in the spectra of PopII/I GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Q; Ciardi, B; Salvaterra, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate signatures of population III (PopIII) stars in the metal-enriched environment of GRBs originating from population II-I (PopII/I) stars by using abundance ratios derived from numerical simulations that follow stellar evolution and chemical enrichment. We find that at $z>10$ more than $10%$ of PopII/I GRBs explode in a medium previously enriched by PopIII stars (we refer to them as GRBII$\\rightarrow$III). Although the formation of GRBII$\\rightarrow$III is more frequent than that of pristine PopIII GRBs (GRBIIIs), we find that the expected GRBII$\\rightarrow$III observed rate is comparable to that of GRBIIIs, due to the usually larger luminosities of these latter. GRBII$\\rightarrow$III events take place preferentially in small proto-galaxies with stellar masses $\\rm M_\\star \\sim 10^{4.5} - 10^7\\,\\rm M_\\odot$, star formation rates $\\rm SFR \\sim 10^{-3}-10^{-1}\\,\\rm M_\\odot/yr$ and metallicities $Z \\sim 10^{-4}-10^{-2}\\,\\rm Z_\\odot$. On the other hand, galaxies with $Z < 10^{-2.8}\\,\\rm Z_\\odot$ ar...

  10. Enhancing SMM properties via axial distortion of Mn-3(III) clusters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons S.; Brechin, E.K.; Collins A.; Karotsis G.; Jones L.F.; Inglis R.; Wernsdorfer W.; Perlepes S.P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Replacement of carboxylate and solvent with facially capping tripodal ligands enhances the single-molecule magnet (SMM) properties of [Mn-3(III)] triangles.

  11. Technical Session III Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home 2011 Accelerator Detector RD PI Meeting files Technical Session III Talks Print Text Size: A...

  12. NASA-TM-III642 Design of Inielligent Mesoscale Periodic Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asher, Sanford A.

    i" /} , NASA-TM-III642 Design of Inielligent Mesoscale Periodic Array Structures Utilizing Smart *National Research Council hitrodoetion Mesoscale Periodic Arlay Structures (MPAS, also known as crystalline

  13. Eu(III) Complexes of Octadentate 1-Hydroxy-2-pyridinones: Stability and Improved Photophysical Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Evan G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1,2-HOPO) 2 ] ? , which lack a water molecule in the innerEu(III) complexes that lack a water molecule in their inner

  14. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Characterization of III–V Semiconductor Thin Films by Oxide Bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-Temperature Thermoelectric Characterization of III–Vfor high-temperature thermoelectric charac- terization ofdiffusion barrier. A thermoelectric material, thin-?lm ErAs:

  15. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 9, including the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) has issued Data Release 9 (DR9), the first public release of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). In this release BOSS, the largest of SDSS-III’s four surveys, provides spectra for 535,995 newly observed galaxies, 102,100 quasars, and 116,474 stars, plus new information about objects in previous Sloan surveys (SDSS-I and II). Spectroscopy yields a wealth of information about astronomical objects including their motion (called redshift and written z), their composition, and sometimes also the density of the gas and other material that lies between them and observers on Earth. The new release lists spectra for galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.8 (roughly 7 billion light years away) and quasars with redshifts between z = 2.1 and 3.5 (from 10 to 11.5 billion light years away). When BOSS is complete it will have measured 1.5 million galaxies and at least 150,000 quasars, as well as many thousands of stars and other ancillary objects for scientific projects other than BOSS’s main goal. [extracts copied from LBL news release of August 8, 2012

  16. Abundance anomalies in metal-poor stars from Population III supernova ejecta hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sluder, Alan; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simulation of the long-term evolution of a Population III supernova remnant in a cosmological minihalo. Employing passive Lagrangian tracer particles, we investigate how chemical stratification and anisotropy in the explosion can affect the abundances of the first low-mass, metal-enriched stars. We find that reverse shock heating can leave the inner mass shells at entropies too high to cool, leading to carbon-enhancement in the re-collapsing gas. This hydrodynamic selection effect could explain the observed incidence of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars at low metallicity. We further explore how anisotropic ejecta distributions, recently seen in direct numerical simulations of core-collapse explosions, may translate to abundances in metal-poor stars. We find that some of the observed scatter in the Population II abundance ratios can be explained by an incomplete mixing of supernova ejecta, even in the case of only one contributing enrichment event. We demonstrate that the customary hypothes...

  17. Can very massive Population III stars produce a super-collapsar?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Sung-Chul; Kozyreva, Alexandra

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fraction of the first generation of stars in the early Universe may be very massive ($\\gtrsim 300~\\mathrm{M_\\odot}$) as they form in metal-free environments. Formation of black holes from these stars can be accompanied by supermassive collapsars to produce long gamma-ray bursts of a unique type having a very high total energy ($\\sim 10^{54}~\\mathrm{erg}$) as recently suggested by several authors. We present new stellar evolution models of very massive Population III stars including the effect of rotation to provide theoretical constraints on super-collapsar progenitors. We find that the angular momentum condition for super-collapsar can be fulfilled if magnetic torques are ignored, in which case Eddington-Sweet circulations play the dominant role for the transport of angular momentum. We further find that the initial mass range for super-collapsar progenitors would be limited to $300~\\mathrm{M_\\odot} \\lesssim M \\lesssim 700~\\mathrm{M_\\odot}$. However, all of our very massive star models of this mass range e...

  18. Phases Energy Services County Electric Power Assn A N Electric...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alpena Power Co Alt amaha Electric Member Corp Amana Society Service Co Ambit Energy L P Ambit Energy L P Maryland Ambit Energy L P New York Ameren Energy Marketing Ameren Energy...

  19. Project Finance Case Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Project Finance Case Studies and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

  20. Chemical constraints on the contribution of population III stars to cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rollinde, Emmanuel; Vangioni, Elisabeth, E-mail: girish@mpia-hd.mpg.de [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, UPMC, Paris VI, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have highlighted that galaxies at z = 6-8 fall short of producing enough ionizing photons to reionize the intergalactic medium, and suggest that Population III stars could resolve this tension, because their harder spectra can produce ?10 × more ionizing photons than Population II. We use a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, which tracks galactic chemical evolution, to gauge the impact of Population III stars on reionization. Population III supernovae produce distinct metal abundances, and we argue that the duration of the Population III era can be constrained by precise relative abundance measurements in high-z damped Ly? absorbers (DLAs), which provide a chemical record of past star formation. We find that a single generation of Population III stars can self-enrich galaxies above the critical metallicity Z {sub crit} = 10{sup –4} Z {sub ?} for the Population III-to-II transition, on a very short timescale t {sub self-enrich} ? 10{sup 6} yr, owing to the large metal yields and short lifetimes of Population III stars. This subsequently terminates the Population III era, so they contribute ? 50% of the ionizing photons only for z ? 30, and at z = 10 contribute <1%. The Population III contribution can be increased by delaying metal mixing into the interstellar medium. However, comparing the resulting metal abundance pattern to existing measurements in z ? 6 DLAs, we show that the observed [O/Si] ratios of absorbers rule out Population III stars being a major contributor to reionization. Future abundance measurements of z ? 7-8 QSOs and gamma-ray bursts should probe the era when the chemical vestiges of Population III star formation become detectable.

  1. Validation of the U.S. NRC coupled code system TRITON/TRACE/PARCS with the special power excursion reactor test III (SPERT III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, R. C.; Xu, Y.; Downar, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); Hudson, N. [RES Div., U.S. NRC, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III) was a series of reactivity insertion experiments conducted in the 1950's. This paper describes the validation of the U.S. NRC Coupled Code system TRITON/PARCS/TRACE to simulate reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) by using several of the SPERT III tests. The work here used the SPERT III E-core configuration tests in which the RIA was initiated by ejecting a control rod. The resulting super-prompt reactivity excursion and negative reactivity feedback produced the familiar bell shaped power increase and decrease. The energy deposition during such a power peak has important safety consequences and provides validation basis for core coupled multi-physics codes. The transients of five separate tests are used to benchmark the PARCS/TRACE coupled code. The models were thoroughly validated using the original experiment documentation. (authors)

  2. Manufacturing Cost Analysis Relevant to Single-and Dual-Junction Photovoltaic Cells Fabricated with III-Vs and III-Vs Grown on Czochralski Silicon (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodhouse, M.; Goodrich, A.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this analysis we examine the current, mid-term, and long-term manufacturing costs for III-Vs deposited by traditional Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE).

  3. Section III, Division 5 - Development and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. K. Morton; R I Jetter; James E Nestell; T. D. Burchell; T L (Sam) Sham

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development. Portions of this paper were based on Chapter 17 of the Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Fourth Edition, © ASME, 2012, Reference.

  4. Role of defects in III-nitride based electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAN,JUNG; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; SHUL,RANDY J.; BACA,ALBERT G.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LDRD entitled ``Role of Defects in III-Nitride Based Devices'' is aimed to place Sandia National Laboratory at the forefront of the field of GaN materials and devices by establishing a scientific foundation in areas such as material growth, defect characterization/modeling, and processing (metalization and etching) chemistry. In this SAND report the authors summarize their studies such as (1) the MOCVD growth and doping of GaN and AlGaN, (2) the characterization and modeling of hydrogen in GaN, including its bonding, diffusion, and activation behaviors, (3) the calculation of energetic of various defects including planar stacking faults, threading dislocations, and point defects in GaN, and (4) dry etching (plasma etching) of GaN (n- and p-types) and AlGaN. The result of the first AlGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar transistor is also presented.

  5. OM Code Requirements For MOVs -- OMN-1 and Appendix III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin G. DeWall

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose or scope of the ASME OM Code is to establish the requirements for pre-service and in-service testing of nuclear power plant components to assess their operational readiness. For MOVs this includes those that perform a specific function in shutting down a reactor to the safe shutdown condition, maintaining the safe shutdown condition, and mitigating the consequences of an accident. This paper will present a brief history of industry and regulatory activities related to MOVs and the development of Code requirements to address weaknesses in earlier versions of the OM Code. The paper will discuss the MOV requirements contained in the 2009 version of ASME OM Code, specifically Mandatory Appendix III and OMN-1, Revision 1.

  6. Bronze Age Representations of Aegean Bull-Games, III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younger, John G.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Provenance and Identification", BSA 60 (1965),58-98; KZ = sealing from Kato Zakros (no in D.G. HOGARTH, "The Zakro Sealings", JHS 22 U902),76-93 and./or in D. LEVI, "Le cretule diZakro",ASAtene 8-9 [925-6], 157-201); M as t e rs/G roup s III = J.G. YOUNGER... irn{, anrl rincc tlrr: bull sect}1s 1r; l*uk ov*r its t*;r attrl intu it, iltr: lr*r l}t*trlil hr irgllr.rw i"rnd r"l{rl t s*lid ltlirltirrrn lihe rlie *rre built irtt{} th*, ltr}rlh"wsst {:{l!-t1rr rf Phaillt}s's r-'gfltral r6urt., Alrn t*o. il ix...

  7. Pair Instability Supernovae of Very Massive Population III Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan; Almgren, Ann; Whalen, Daniel

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical studies of primordial star formation suggest that the first stars in the universe may have been very massive. Stellar models indicate that non-rotating Population III stars with initial masses of 140-260 Msun die as highly energetic pair-instability supernovae. We present new two-dimensional simulations of primordial pair-instability supernovae done with the CASTRO code. Our simulations begin at earlier times than previous multidimensional models, at the onset of core collapse, to capture any dynamical instabilities that may be seeded by collapse and explosive burning. Such instabilities could enhance explosive yields by mixing hot ash with fuel, thereby accelerating nuclear burning, and affect the spectra of the supernova by dredging up heavy elements from greater depths in the star at early times. Our grid of models includes both blue supergiants and red supergiants over the range in progenitor mass expected for these events. We find that fluid instabilities driven by oxygen and helium burning ari...

  8. AVTA: 2010 Toyota Prius Gen III HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Toyota Prius III hybrid-electric vehicle. Baseline data, which provides a point of comparison for the other test results, was collected at two different research laboratories. Baseline and other data collected at Idaho National Laboratory is in the attached documents. Baseline and battery testing data collected at Argonne National Laboratory is available in summary and CSV form on the Argonne Downloadable Dynometer Database site (http://www.anl.gov/energy-systems/group/downloadable-dynamometer-databas...). Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing.

  9. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ({approximately}55{degrees}C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  10. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ([approximately]55[degrees]C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  11. Automated case reporting, administrative statistics, and epidemiological data collection for a full-service veterinary diagnostic laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Craig Nash

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEDICATION. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS. Page V1 V1 1 LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES. . Xii CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION. CHAPTER II. REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE. . CHAPTER III. FEASIBILITY STUDY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Materials and Methods... review screen Customer data base report. 182 184 188 15 16 17 Zip code data base report (by city). . . . System flowchart ? accession subsystem. Case history screen (page 1) . . . . . . . . . . . 118 112 113 18 Case summary screen. 115 19...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Incentives are currently available... Eligibility: Residential Savings Category: Heat Pumps, Lighting Ameren Illinois (Gas)- Cooking and Heating Business Efficiency...

  13. Infocom 2001 VIP -Magda El Zarki III.1 Tutorial T5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Zarki, Magda

    Infocom 2001 VIP - Magda El Zarki III.1 Tutorial T5 Video Over IP Magda El-Zarki (University of California at Irvine) Monday, 23 April, 2001 - Morning #12;MPEG-4 over IP - Part 3 Magda El Zarki Dept. of ICS UC, Irvine elzarki@uci.edu #12;Infocom 2001 VIP - Magda El Zarki III.3 Outline of Tutorial 1. Part

  14. Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates from subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Tao; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

    2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates can be important sources of Fe(III) for dissimilatory microbial iron reduction in clay-rich anoxic soils and sediments. The goal of this research was to isolate Fe(III) phyllosilicate phases, and if possible, Fe(III) oxide phases, from a weathered shale saprolite sediment in order to permit experimentation with each phase in isolation. Physical partitioning by density gradient centrifugation did not adequately separate phyllosilicate and Fe(III) oxide phases (primarily nanoparticulate goethite). Hence we examined the ability of chemical extraction methods to remove Fe(III) oxides without significantly altering the properties of the phyllosilicates. XRD analysis showed that extraction with oxalate alone or oxalate in the presence of added Fe(II) altered the structure of Fe-bearing phyllosilicates in the saprolite. In contrast, citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) extraction at room temperature and 80C led to minimal alteration of phyllosilicate structures. Reoxidation of CDB-extracted sediment with H2O2 restored phyllosilicate structure (i.e. d-spacing) and redox speciation to conditions similar to that in the pristine sediment. The extent of microbial (Geobacter sulfurreducens) reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates isolated by CDB extraction (ca. 16 %) was comparable to what took place in pristine sediments as determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy (ca. 18 % reduction). These results suggest that materials isolated by CDB extraction and H2O2 reoxidation are appropriate targets for detailed studies of natural soil/sediment Fe(III) phyllosilicate reduction.

  15. COMPASS III: Teaching L2 grammar graphically on a tablet computer Karin Harbusch1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbusch, Karin

    COMPASS III: Teaching L2 grammar graphically on a tablet computer Karin Harbusch1 , Johannes Härtel2 grammar teaching system COMPASS III. COMPASS stands for COMbina- torial and Paraphrastic Assembly]. COMPASS invites the student to construct sentences by composing syntactic trees out of lexically anchored

  16. J. Phys. III France 2 (1992) 1925-1941 OCTOBER 1992, PAGE 1925 Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    J. Phys. III France 2 (1992) 1925-1941 OCTOBER 1992, PAGE 1925 Classification Physics Abstracts 05) a thermally radiative or non-radiative ambient sink and (iii) two energy converters. The first converter (RH) transforms the energy of the black-body radiation into heat, while the second one (HW) (which has a non

  17. Fusing Statecharts and Java MARIA-CRISTINA MARINESCU, Computer Science Dept., Universidad Carlos III, Leganes, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez, César

    III, Legan´es, Spain C ´ESAR S ´ANCHEZ, IMDEA Software Institute, Spain and Institute for Applied Physics, CSIC, Spain This paper presents FUSE, an approach for modeling and implementing embedded software-Cristina Marinescu, Computer Science Dept., Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganes, Spain; C´esar S´anchez IMDEA

  18. MOVPE growth of semipolar III-nitride semiconductors on CVD graphene Priti Gupta n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh, Mandar M.

    MOVPE growth of semipolar III-nitride semiconductors on CVD graphene Priti Gupta n , A.A. Rahman pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy B1. Graphene B1. Nitrides B2. Semiconducting III­V materials a b on graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition. GaN, AlGaN alloys, and InN layers are grown using an Al

  19. Universite Paul Sabatier Toulouse III Formation Doctorale Ocean, Atmosph`ere et Environnement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Universit´e Paul Sabatier ­ Toulouse III Formation Doctorale Oc´ean, Atmosph`ere et Environnement Ecole Doctorale de Sciences de l'Univers de l'Environnement et de l'Espace Assimilation de donn´ees de t-27Jun2007 #12;Universit´e Paul Sabatier ­ Toulouse III Formation Doctorale Oc´ean, Atmosph`ere et

  20. UMBC Policy # III-1.11.02 Page 1 of 4 UMBC INTERIM POLICY ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    UMBC Policy # III-1.11.02 Page 1 of 4 UMBC INTERIM POLICY ON INDIVIDUAL FINANCIAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST IN PHS RESEARCH UMBC # III-1.11.02 I. POLICY STATEMENT Externally sponsored research is a vital FOR POLICY UMBC strives for excellence and academic integrity in its research enterprise while also promoting

  1. Method for Improving Mg Doping During Group-III Nitride MOCVD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM); Wang, George T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for improving Mg doping of Group III-N materials grown by MOCVD preventing condensation in the gas phase or on reactor surfaces of adducts of magnesocene and ammonia by suitably heating reactor surfaces between the location of mixing of the magnesocene and ammonia reactants and the Group III-nitride surface whereon growth is to occur.

  2. UNIVERSIT TOULOUSE III -PAUL SABATIER U.F.R. Sciences et Vie de la Terre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    grade de DOCTEUR DE L'UNIVERSIT� TOULOUSE III Discipline : Sismo-tectonique présentée et soutenue par de la Terre TH�SE pour obtenir le grade de DOCTEUR DE L'UNIVERSIT� TOULOUSE III Discipline : Sismo

  3. Universit Paul Czanne -Aix-Marseille III pour obtenir le grade de Docteur en Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Université Paul Cézanne - Aix-Marseille III THČSE pour obtenir le grade de Docteur en Sciences de l'Université Paul Cézanne - Aix-Marseille III n 2007AIX30060 Discipline : Optique électromagnétique et image Chat Perdu. Ŕ Robert Mi(t)chou(m). Aux Special Ca's (Frčres)...et ŕ leur Moitié (Relax). Aux Morbai

  4. Thermodynamic Features of the Complexation of Neodymium(III) and Americium(III) by Lactate in Trifluoromethanesulfonate Media.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter R. Zalupski; Leigh R. Martin; Kenneth L. Nash

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The protonation of lactate has been studied in a variety of electrolyte solutions using microcalorimetry to reveal a distinct medium influence imposed on the thermochemistry of the investigated equilibrium. The thermochemistry of lactate protonation, when studied directly in 1.0 M sodium lactate, agreed well with the studies performed in trifluoromethanesulfonate (triflate). This thermodynamic agreement suggests that the physical chemistry of lactate in the solutions applicable to the TALSPEAK process – a solvent extraction method for separating trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides within the scope of used nuclear fuel processing efforts – may be simulated in triflate solutions. Potentiometry, spectrophotometry and microcalorimetry have been subsequently used to study the thermodynamic features of neodymium and americium complexation by lactate using triflate as a strong background electrolyte. Three successive mononuclear lactate complexes were identified for Nd(III) and Am(III). The stability constants for neodymium, log ß1 = 2.60 ± 0.01, log ß2 = 4.66 ± 0.02 and log ß3 = 5.6 ± 0.1, and for americium, log ß1 = 2.60 ± 0.06, log ß2 = 4.7 ± 0.1 and log ß3 = 6.2 ± 0.2, were found to closely agree with the thermodynamic studies reported in sodium perchlorate solutions. Consequently, the thermodynamic medium effect, imposed on the TALSPEAK-related solution equilibria by the presence of strong background electrolytes such as NaClO4 and NaNO3, do not significantly impact the speciation in solution.

  5. ELECTRONIC SOLUTION SPECTRA FOR URANIUM AND NEPTUNIUM IN OXIDATION STATES (III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baluka, M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE M. Baluka, N.III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE M. Baluka(t), N.solutions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) of uranium

  6. Biosensors and Bioelectronics 21 (2006) 10771085 Application of europium(III) chelate-dyed nanoparticle labels in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biosensors and Bioelectronics 21 (2006) 1077­1085 Application of europium(III) chelate for immunosensors with fluorescent europium(III) chelate nanoparticle labels (Seradyn) in a competitive atrazine

  7. 3,2-HOPO Complexes of Near-Infra-Red (NIR) Emitting Lanthanides: Sensitization of Ho(III) and Pr(III) in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Evan G.; Szigethy, Geza; Xu, Jide; Palsson, Lars-Olof; Beeby, Andrew; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing interest in Near Infra-Red (NIR) emission originating from organic complexes of Ln{sup III} cations. As a major impetus, biological tissues are considerably more transparent at these low energy wavelengths when compared to visible radiation, which facilitates deeper penetration of incident and emitted light. Furthermore, the long luminescence lifetimes of Ln{sup III} complexes (eg. Yb{sup III}, {tau}{sub rad} {approx} 1 ms) when compared to typical organic molecules can be utilized to vastly improve signal to noise ratios by employing time-gating techniques. While the improved quantum yield of Yb{sub III} complexes when compared to other NIR emitters favors their use for bioimaging applications, there has also been significant interest in the sensitized emission from other 4f metals such as Ln = Nd, Ho, Pr and Er which have well recognized applications as solid state laser materials (eg. Nd {approx} 1.06 {micro}m, Ho {approx} 2.09 {micro}m), and in telecommunications (eg. Er {approx} 1.54 {micro}m) where they can be used for amplification of optical signals. As a result of their weak (Laporte forbidden) f-f absorptions, the direct excitation of Ln{sup III} cations is inefficient, and sensitization of the metal emission is more effectively achieved using the so-called antenna effect. We have previously examined the properties of several Eu{sup III} complexes which feature 1-hydroxypyridin-2-one (Fig. 1) as the light harvesting chromophore. While the 1,2-HOPO isomer was found to strongly sensitize Eu{sup III}, we noted the analogous Me-3,2-HOPO isomer does not, which prompted further investigation of the properties of this chromophore with other metals.

  8. Case No. VBA-0032

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Protection Act of 1989 (5 U.S.C. 2302(b)(8))." 63 Fed. Reg. 733, 734 (January 5, 1998). Furthermore, under established case law preexisting the revision, a disclosure...

  9. WTO Case Review 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhala, Raj; Gantz, David A.

    2009-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This WTO Case Review is the ninth in the authors' annual series on the substantive international trade adjudications issued by the Appellate Body of the World Trade Organization. This Review explains and comments on the Appellate Body reports...

  10. Case No. VWA-0041

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Lucy B. Smith Date of Filing: May 5, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0041 This Decision involves a...

  11. Case No. VBA-0055

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Lucy Smith Date of Filing: July 20, 2000 Case Number: VBA-0055 This Decision considers an Appeal...

  12. Case No. VWD-0006

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Name of Petitioner:Lucy B. Smith Date of Filing: August 2, 1999 Case Number: VWD-0006 This determination will consider...

  13. Case No. VBH-0056

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    already submitted into the record of the case. (1) See Letter from Jean G. Rouse to Ann S. Augustyn, Hearing Officer (January 4, 2001)(January 4, 2001 Letter). WSRC agreed to...

  14. Philosophia Mathematica (III) 17 (2009), 341362. doi:10.1093/philmat/nkn032 Advance Access publication November 6, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia. easwaran@gmail.com Philosophia Mathematica (III) Vol. 17 No. 3 C

  15. Promoting Rural Development from a Territorial Perspective: The Case of The Yeguare Region, Honduras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borja Borja, Ivan M.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , Theresa P. Murphrey Timothy H. Murphy Gary W. Williams Head of Department, David W. Reed May 2009 Major Subject: Agricultural Education iii ABSTRACT Promoting Rural Development from a Territorial Perspective: The Case of the Yeguare Region... the classroom. I would like to thank Dr. Gary Williams. He motivated me to continue with my doctoral program. He was a teacher, a mentor and a true friend for me. I would like to thank Drs. Theresa Murphrey and Tim Murphy. They were advisors, teachers...

  16. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaisi, Deb P.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Dong, Hailiang

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative study was performed to understand how Fe(III) site occupancy controls Fe(III) bioreduction in nontronite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. NAu-1 and NAu-2 were nontronites and contained Fe(III) in different structure sites with 16% and 23% total iron (w/w), respectively, with almost all iron as Fe(III). Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that Fe(III) was present in the octahedral site in NAu-1 (with a small amount of goethite), but in both the tetrahedral and the octahedral sites in NAu-2. Moessbauer data further showed that the octahedral Fe(III) in NAu-2 existed in at least two environments- trans (M1) and cis (M2) sites. The microbial Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 and NAu-2 was studied in batch cultures at a nontronite concentration of 5mg/mL in bicarbonate buffer with lactate as the electron donor. Fe(II) production in inoculated treatments was determined by extraction with 0.5 N HCl and compared to uninoculated controls to establish the extent of biological reduction. The resulting solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the presence of an electron shuttle, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the extent of bioreduction was 11-16% for NAu-1 but 28-32% for NAu-2. The extent of reduction in the absence of AQDS was only 5-7% in NAu-1 but 14-18% in NAu-2. The reduction rate was also faster in NAu-2 than that in NAu-1. Moessbauer data of the bioreduced nontronite materials indicated that the Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 was mostly from the presence of goethite, whereas the reduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and trans-octahedral Fe(III) in the structure. The measured aqueous Fe(II) was negligible [< 2.5% of the total biogenic Fe(II)]. As a result of bioreduction, the average nontronite particle thickness remained nearly the same (from 2.1 to 2.5 nm) for NAu-1, but decreased significantly from 6 to 3.5 nm for NAu-2 with a concomitant change in crystal size distribution. The decrease in crystal size suggests reductive dissolution of nontronite NAu-2, which was supported by aqueous solution chemistry (i.e., aqueous Si). These data suggest that the more extensive Fe(III) bioreduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and the trans-octahedral Fe(III), which was presumed to be more reducible. The biogenic Fe(II) was not associated with biogenic solids such as siderite or green rust or in the aqueous solution. We infer that it may be either adsorbed onto surfaces of nontronite particles/bacteria and in the structure of nontronite. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that natural nontronite clays were capable of supporting cell growth even in non-growth medium, possibly due to presence of naturally existing nutrients in the nontronite clays. These results suggest that crystal chemical environment of Fe(III) is an important determinant in controlling the rate and extent of microbial reduction of Fe(III) in nontronite.

  17. Sinks of Light Elements in Stars - Part III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corinne Charbonnel; Constantine P. Deliyannis; Marc H. Pinsonneault

    2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The fragile light elements lithium, beryllium, and boron are easily destroyed in stellar interiors, and are thus superb probes of physical processes occuring in the outer stellar layers. The light elements are also excellent tracers of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, and can test big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). These inter-related topics are reviewed with an emphasis on stellar physics. In Part I (presented by CPD), an overview is given of the physical processes which can modify the surface abundances of the light elements, with emphasis on Population I dwarfs - convection; gravitational settling, thermal diffusion, and radiative levitation; slow mixing induced by gravity waves or rotation. We will discuss the increasingly large body of data which begin to enable us to discern the relative importance of these mechanisms in Population I main sequence stars. In Part II (presented by MHP), discussion is extended to the issue of whether or not the halo Li plateau is depleted, and includes the following topics: Li dispersion in field and globular cluster stars, Li production vs. destruction in Li-rich halo stars, and constraints from 6Li. Also discussed are trends with metal abundance and Teff and implications for chemical evolution and BBN. In Part III (presented by CC), evidence is reviewed that suggests that in situ mixing occurs in evolved low mass Population I and Population II stars. Theoretical mechanisms that can create such mixing are discussed, as well as their implications in stellar yields.

  18. Evaluate fundamental approaches to longwall dust control. Phase III report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babbitt, C.; Bartlett, P.; Kelly, J.; Ludlow, J.; Mangolds, A.; Rajan, S.; Ruggieri, S.; Varga, E.

    1984-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the contract is to evaluate the effectiveness of available dust control technology for double-drum shearer longwall sections in a coordinated, systematic program at a few longwall test sections and to make the results available to the entire coal mining industry. This program is investigating nine different dust control techniques. These nine subprograms encompass a broad range of dust control measures ranging from administrative controls to new hardware. They span not only presently employed methods but also those recently adopted in the United States and those proposed for the future. This report documents the Phase III effort on each of the subprograms. For clarity, the report is divided in sections by subprogram as follows: Section 2, Subprogram A - passive barriers/spray air movers for dust control; Section 3, Subprogram B - practical aspects of deep cutting; Section 4, Subprogram C - stage loader dust control; Section 5, Subprogram D - longwall automation technology; Section 6, Subprogram E - longwall application of ventilation curtains; Section 7, Subprogram F - reversed drum rotation; Section 8, Subprogram G - reduction of shield generated dust; Section 9, Subprogram H - air canopies for longwalls; and Section 10, Subprogram I - mining practices. 43 figures, 11 tables.

  19. Phase III ResonantSonic{reg_sign} report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomer, D.R. [comp.; Last, G.V.; Friley, J.R.; Strope, L.A.; Johnston, B.V.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ResonantSonic drilling system was tested at the hanford Site in the fiscal year 1991-1992 under the auspices of the Drilling Technology Development Program and the Environmental Restoration Program. The purpose of that program was to develop, test, and demonstrate drilling methods that are environmentally acceptable, safe, efficient, and cost effective when drilling and sampling in hazardous and radioactive waste sites. The cable-tool method has historically been the primary drilling method employed for characterization and remediation projects at the Hanford site. The cable-tool method can be used reliably in a wide variety of geologic conditions and yields continuous, relatively intact core samples. however, the disadvantages of this method are that the penetration rates are slow relative to most other drilling techniques. This report represents the completion of the ResonantSonic drilling program test activities. A brief description of the ResonantSonic drilling program is given. Phases I and II activities are also presented. Phase III activities are outlined. The conclusions drawn from the results and recommendations for further work to improve the drilling technology are discussed.

  20. Level III baseline risk evaluation for Building 3505 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mostella, W.B. Jr.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Level III Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) for Building 3505, the ORNL Metal Recovery Facility, provides an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects, current or future, associated with the presence of hazardous substances in the building. The Metal Recovery Facility was used from 1952 through 1960 to process large quantities of radioactive material using the PUREX process for the recovery of uranium-238, plutonium-239, neptunium-237, and americium-241. The facility consists of seven process cells (A through G), a canal, a dissolver room, a dissolver pit, an office, locker room, storage area, control room, electrical gallery, shop, and makeup area. The cells were used to house the nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment, and the canal was constructed to be used as a water-shielded transfer canal. Currently, there are no known releases of radioactive contaminants from Building 3505. To perform the BRE, historical radiological survey data were used to estimate the concentration of alpha- and beta/gamma emitting radionuclides in the various cells, rooms, and other areas in Building 3505. Data from smear surveys were used to estimate the amount of transferable contamination (to which receptors can be exposed via inhalation and ingestion), and data from probe surveys were used to estimate the amount of both fixed and transferable contamination (from which receptors can receive external exposure). Two land use scenarios, current and future, and their subsequent exposure scenarios were explored in the BRE. Under the current land use scenario, two exposure scenarios were evaluated. The first was a worst-case industrial exposure scenario in which the receptor is a maintenance worker who works 8 hours/day, 350 days/year in the building for 25 years. In the second, more realistic exposure scenario, the receptor is a surveillance and maintenance (S&M) worker who spends two 8-hour days/year in the building for 25 years.

  1. The Case for Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    land Press, 1995 TESTING ELECTRIC VEHICLE DEMAND IN " HYBRIDThe Case for Electric Vehicles DanieI Sperlmg Reprint UCTCor The Case for Electric Vehicles Darnel Sperling Institute

  2. Final report : Phase III targeted investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated grain storage facilities at two different locations at Everest, Kansas (Figure 1.1). One facility (referred to in this report as the Everest facility) was at the western edge of the city. The second facility (referred to in this report as Everest East) was about 0.5 mi northeast of the town. The CCC/USDA operated these facilities from the early 1950s until the early 1970s, at a time when commercial fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the CCC/USDA and private industry for the preservation of grain in storage. In 1997 the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled several domestic drinking water and non-drinking water wells in the Everest area as part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program. All of the sampled wells were outside the Everest city limits. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was identified at a single domestic drinking water well (the Nigh well, DW06; Figure 1.1) approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Subsequent KDHE investigations suggested that the contamination in DW06 could be linked to the former use of grain fumigants at the CCC/USDA facility. For this reason, the CCC/USDA is conducting a phased environmental study to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at Everest and to identify potential remedial options. The studies are being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Two phases of investigation were completed previously; this report presents the findings of the targeted Phase III investigation at Everest.

  3. Nano-scale metal contacts for future III-V CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Alex

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As modem transistors continue to scale down in size, conventional Si CMOS is reaching its physical limits and alternative technologies are needed to extend Moore's law. Among different candidates, MOSFETs with a III-V ...

  4. Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Loess Sediments: An Important Source...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fe(III) in loess as the sole electron acceptor in the presence and absence of anthraquinone-2, 6-disulfonate (AQDS) as an electron shuttle. Experiments were performed in...

  5. XAFS Study of the Local Structure of Some Lanthanoid(III) Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudoh, Susumu; Miyamoto, Ryo [Department of Frontier Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan); Miyanaga, Takafumi [Department of Advanced Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Two types of lanthanoid(III) complexes were synthesized: type I complexes - Ln(III) (Ln = Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy) anthrarufinate complexes using anthrarufin (1,5-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone) as the ligands, and type II complexes - Ln(III)-transition(d-bloch) metal(II) bi-nuclear complexes. The local structures of these complexes were studied by EXAFS spectroscopy. We found that there is a good linear correlation between the ionic radii of Ln(III) and the Ln-O distances for the type I complexes, and for type II complexes the interatomic distances between Gd and coordinated oxygen atoms of the bi-nuclear complex are shorter than those of the Gd mononuclear complex.

  6. Synthesis of III-V nitride nanowires with controlled structure, morphology, and composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Samuel Curtis

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The III-V nitride materials system offers tunable electronic and optical properties that can be tailored for specific electronic and optoelectronic applications by varying the (In,Ga,Al)N alloy composition. While nitride ...

  7. Quantitative analysis of the EGFRvIII mutant receptor signaling networks in Glioblastoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Hua Ming Paul

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive adult brain tumor and remains incurable despite multimodal intensive treatment regimens. EGFRvIII is a truncated extracellular mutant of the EGF receptor (EGFR) that is ...

  8. Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Appropriations Act, 2014,Pub. L. No. 113-76. (AL) 2014-04 and (FAL) 2014-01 revised Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title...

  9. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-III-002-2012_Modeling the Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling the Performance of Large- Scale CO 2 Storage Systems: A Comparison of Different Sensitivity Analysis Methods 24 October 2012 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-002-2012...

  10. Transitioning to a Lean Enterprise: A Guide for Leaders, Volume III, Roadmap Explorations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozdogan, Kirk

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III of this guide may be used as an in-depth reference source for acquiring deep knowledge about many of the aspects of transitioning to lean. Lean change agents and lean implementation leaders should find this ...

  11. Needle-Membrane Puncture Mechanics Ray Lathrop, Randy Smith, and Robert J. Webster III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster III, Robert James

    Needle-Membrane Puncture Mechanics Ray Lathrop, Randy Smith, and Robert J. Webster III Medical for quasistatic cutting Damped, second order response evident for SimTest media. Steerable Needle Application Nano

  12. Impact of Fe (III) on the Performance of Viscoelastic Surfactant-Based Acids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, Yi

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Viscoelastic surfactant (VES)-based acid systems have been used successfully in matrix and acid fracturing treatments. However, the existence of Fe (III) as a contaminant in such systems may lead to many problems, due to interactions between VES...

  13. Policy Flash 2014-27 Implementation of Division D, Titles III...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Implementation of Division D, Titles III and V, and Division E, Title VII of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014,Pub. L. No. 113-76. (AL) 2014-04 and (FAL) 2014-01 revised...

  14. AL 2015-04 - Implementation of Division D, Title III and Title...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AL 2015-04 - Implementation of Division D, Title III and Title V, and Division E, Title Title VII of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015, Pub. L....

  15. Microsoft Word - NRAP_TRS_III_Mobilization_and_Transport_of_Organic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Reservoirs 21 May 2015 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-002-2015 Disclaimer This report was...

  16. Appendix III to OMB Circular No. A-130 -Security of Federal Automated Information Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix III to OMB Circular No. A-130 - Security of Federal Automated Information Resources A automated information security programs; assigns Federal agency responsibilities for the security of automated information; and links agency automated information security programs and agency management

  17. CREATING A MULTIVALENT SUBUNIT VACCINE USING TYPE III SECRETION SYSTEM TIP PROTEINS AS ANTIGENS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markham, Aaron Paul

    2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Many gram-negative bacterial pathogens employ type III secretion systems (TTSS) to transport effector proteins into eukaryotic host cell membranes and cytoplasms to subvert normal cellular functions. TTSSs contain a basal ...

  18. National Geoscience Data Repository System -- Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keane, Christopher M.

    2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III was an operational project focused on coordinating and facilitating transfers of at-risk geoscience data from the private sector to the public domain.

  19. Iron (III) Chloride doping of large-area chemical vapor deposition graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Yi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical doping is an effective method of reducing the sheet resistance of graphene. This thesis aims to develop an effective method of doping large area Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) graphene using Iron (III) Chloride ...

  20. A high-throughput, near-saturating screen for type III effector genes from Pseudomonas syringae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dangl, Jeff

    criteria defined 29 type III proteins from P. syringae pv. tomato, and 19 from P. syringae pv. phaseolicola [disease resistance (R) pro- teins], a battery of host responses is triggered, including localized

  1. Policy and procedures for classification of Class III groundwater at UMTRA Project sites. Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently proposed groundwater regulations for the US Department of Energy`s )DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. These regulations allow the application of supplemental standards at UMTRA Project sites in specific situations. The designation of groundwater as Class III permits the application of supplemental standards. This document discusses a final UMTRA Project policy and procedures for identifying Class III groundwater, including identification of a review area, definition of water quality, quantification of aquifer yield, and identification of methods reasonably employed for public water supply systems. These items, either individually or collectively, need to be investigated in order to determine if groundwaters at UMTRA Project sites are Class III. This document provides a framework for the DOE to determine Class III groundwaters.

  2. Development of X-ray lithography and nanofabrication techniques for III-V optical devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Michael H. (Michael Hong)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation covers the development of fabrication techniques for Bragg-grating-based integrated optical devices in III-V materials. Work on this rich family of devices has largely been limited to numerical analysis ...

  3. Spectroscopic and Computational Studies of the Physical Properties and Reactivities of Peroxomanganese(III) Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Robert Alan

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide range of MnIII intermediates were generated and studied using various spectroscopic techniques, including electronic absorption, magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), variable-temperature, variable-field (VTVH) MCD, ...

  4. The HST Spectrum of I Zw 1: Implications of the C III^* ?1176 Emission Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor; Buell T. Jannuzi; Richard F. Green; Todd A. Boroson

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    I Zw 1 is a well known narrow line quasar with very strong Fe II emission. High S/N spectra obtained with the HST FOS show a remarkably rich emission line spectrum. The C III$^* \\lambda 1176$ line is clearly detected in emission for the first time in AGNs. This line arises from radiative decay to the $2s2p^3P^o_{0,1,2}$ metastable levels of C III. The observed flux is 50 larger than expected from collisional excitation, or dielectronic recombination, in photoionized gas. The most plausible mechanism for the large enhancement in the C III^* \\lambda 1176 flux is resonance scattering of continuum photons by C III^* ions. This mechanism requires large velocity gradients 1000 km/s within each emitting cloud in the BLR. Such large velocity gradients can be induced by forces external to the gas in the BLR clouds, such as tidal disruption, or radiation pressure.

  5. Platform for monolithic integration of III-V devices with Si CMOS technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacella, Nan Yang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monolithic integration of III-V compound semiconductors and Si complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor (CMOS) enables the creation of advanced circuits with new functionalities. In order to merge the two technologies, ...

  6. Substrate engineering for monolithic integration of III-V semiconductors with Si CMOS technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dohrman, Carl Lawrence

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ge virtual substrates, fabricated using Si1-xGex-.Ge, compositionally graded buffers, enable the epitaxial growth of device-quality GaAs on Si substrates, but monolithic integration of III-V semiconductors with Si CMOS ...

  7. Impact of Fe (III) on the Performance of Viscoelastic Surfactant-Based Acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, Yi

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Viscoelastic surfactant (VES)-based acid systems have been used successfully in matrix and acid fracturing treatments. However, the existence of Fe (III) as a contaminant in such systems may lead to many problems, due to interactions between VES...

  8. Characterization of a synthetic peroxodiiron(III) protein model complex by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Loi Hung

    The vibrational spectrum of an ?[superscript 1],?[superscript 1]-1,2-peroxodiiron(III) complex was measured by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy and fit using an empirical force field analysis. Isotopic 18O2 ...

  9. The class III ribonucleotide reductase from Neisseria bacilliformis can utilize thioredoxin as a reductant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Yifeng

    The class III anaerobic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) studied to date couple the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxynucleotides with the oxidation of formate to CO[subscript 2]. Here we report the cloning and heterologous ...

  10. Case History Acoustic signatures of crossflow behind casing in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    Case History Acoustic signatures of crossflow behind casing in commingled reservoirs: A case study create unwanted con- duits behind casing that lead to crossflow between different producing zones. Crossflow results in lost production or aquifer contamination because fluid flows from a higher- pressure

  11. Reactivity of Pb(II) at the Mn(III,IV) (Oxyhydr)Oxide-Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    , the reactivity of lead (Pb(II)) on naturally occurring Mn(III,IV) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals was evaluated using to suggest oxidation as an operative sorption mechanism. Lead appeared to coordinate to vacancy sitesReactivity of Pb(II) at the Mn(III,IV) (Oxyhydr)Oxide-Water Interface C H R I S T O P H E R J . M

  12. Impurity-induced disorder in III-nitride materials and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J; Allerman, Andrew A

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for impurity-induced disordering in III-nitride materials comprises growing a III-nitride heterostructure at a growth temperature and doping the heterostructure layers with a dopant during or after the growth of the heterostructure and post-growth annealing of the heterostructure. The post-growth annealing temperature can be sufficiently high to induce disorder of the heterostructure layer interfaces.

  13. Method for making graded I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductors and solar cell obtained thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Devaney, Walter E. (Seattle, WA)

    1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved cell photovoltaic conversion efficiencies are obtained by the simultaneous elemental reactive evaporation process of Mickelsen and Chen for making semiconductors by closer control of the evaporation rates and substrate temperature during formation of the near contact, bulk, and near junction regions of a graded I-III-VI.sub.2, thin film, semiconductor, such as CuInSe.sub.2 /(Zn,Cd)S or another I-III-VI.sub.2 /II-VI heterojunction.

  14. The iron(III)-catalyzed oxidation of DTPA in an aqueous solution / longy Steven Harry Christiansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christiansen, Steven Harry

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    decomposition rate, the monohydroxo form of Fe(III)-DTPA is suggested as the reactive intermediate. If the air source of the above system was eliminated, the decomposition reaction continued until the oxygen was depleted. The reaction products... Preparation of Fe(III) -DTPA Run Procedures Analytical RESULTS 32 33 34 38 Kinetics Identification of Decomposition Products 38 57 DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS 80 LITERATURE CITED VITA 83 87 vi LIST OF TABLES Table 1. Typical coordination...

  15. Geothermal Case Studies

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Young, Katherine

    database.) In fiscal year 2015, NREL is working with universities to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough dataset to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

  16. Geothermal Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Katherine

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessment (Williams et al., 2009) outlined a mean 30GWe of undiscovered hydrothermal resource in the western US. One goal of the Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) is to accelerate the development of this undiscovered resource. The Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) Blue Ribbon Panel (GTO, 2011) recommended that DOE focus efforts on helping industry identify hidden geothermal resources to increase geothermal capacity in the near term. Increased exploration activity will produce more prospects, more discoveries, and more readily developable resources. Detailed exploration case studies akin to those found in oil and gas (e.g. Beaumont, et al, 1990) will give operators a single point of information to gather clean, unbiased information on which to build geothermal drilling prospects. To support this effort, the National Renewable Energy laboratory (NREL) has been working with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a template for geothermal case studies on the Geothermal Gateway on OpenEI. In fiscal year 2013, the template was developed and tested with two case studies: Raft River Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Raft_River_Geothermal_Area) and Coso Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Coso_Geothermal_Area). In fiscal year 2014, ten additional case studies were completed, and additional features were added to the template to allow for more data and the direct citations of data. The template allows for: Data - a variety of data can be collected for each area, including power production information, well field information, geologic information, reservoir information, and geochemistry information. Narratives ? general (e.g. area overview, history and infrastructure), technical (e.g. exploration history, well field description, R&D activities) and geologic narratives (e.g. area geology, hydrothermal system, heat source, geochemistry.) Exploration Activity Catalog - catalog of exploration activities conducted in the area (with dates and references.) NEPA Analysis ? a query of NEPA analyses conducted in the area (that have been catalogued in the OpenEI NEPA database.) In fiscal year 2015, NREL is working with universities to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough dataset to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

  17. Subsurface Uranium Fate and Transport: Integrated Experiments and Modeling of Coupled Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Nanocrystalline Uraninite Oxidation by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides - Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peyton, Brent M. [Montana State University; Timothy, Ginn R. [University of California Davis; Sani, Rajesh K. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface bacteria including sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO2. We have shown that SRB reduce U(VI) to nanometer-sized UO2 particles (1-5 nm) which are both intra- and extracellular, with UO2 inside the cell likely physically shielded from subsequent oxidation processes. We evaluated the UO2 nanoparticles produced by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 under growth and non-growth conditions in the presence of lactate or pyruvate and sulfate, thiosulfate, or fumarate, using ultrafiltration and HR-TEM. Results showed that a significant mass fraction of bioreduced U (35-60%) existed as a mobile phase when the initial concentration of U(VI) was 160 µM. Further experiments with different initial U(VI) concentrations (25 - 900 ?M) in MTM with PIPES or bicarbonate buffers indicated that aggregation of uraninite depended on the initial concentrations of U(VI) and type of buffer. It is known that under some conditions SRB-mediated UO2 nanocrystals can be reoxidized (and thus remobilized) by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides, common constituents of soils and sediments. To elucidate the mechanism of UO2 reoxidation by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, we studied the impact of Fe and U chelating compounds (citrate, NTA, and EDTA) on reoxidation rates. Experiments were conducted in anaerobic batch systems in PIPES buffer. Results showed EDTA significantly accelerated UO2 reoxidation with an initial rate of 9.5?M day-1 for ferrihydrite. In all cases, bicarbonate increased the rate and extent of UO2 reoxidation with ferrihydrite. The highest rate of UO2 reoxidation occurred when the chelator promoted UO2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxide dissolution as demonstrated with EDTA. When UO2 dissolution did not occur, UO2 reoxidation likely proceeded through an aqueous Fe(III) intermediate as observed for both NTA and citrate. To complement to these laboratory studies, we collected U-bearing samples from a surface seep at the Rifle field site and have measured elevated U concentrations in oxic iron-rich sediments. To translate experimental results into numerical analysis of U fate and transport, a reaction network was developed based on Sani et al. (2004) to simulate U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant UO2 reoxidation in the presence of hematite or ferrihydrite. The reduction phase considers SRB reduction (using lactate) with the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) solids, which is set to be microbially mediated as well as abiotically driven by sulfide. Model results show the oxidation of HS– by Fe(III) directly competes with UO2 reoxidation as Fe(III) oxidizes HS– preferentially over UO2. The majority of Fe reduction is predicted to be abiotic, with ferrihydrite becoming fully consumed by reaction with sulfide. Predicted total dissolved carbonate concentrations from the degradation of lactate are elevated (log(pCO2) ~ –1) and, in the hematite system, yield close to two orders-of-magnitude higher U(VI) concentrations than under initial carbonate concentrations of 3 mM. Modeling of U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant reoxidation of UO2 in the presence of ferrihydrite was also extended to a two-dimensional field-scale groundwater flow and biogeochemically reactive transport model for the South Oyster site in eastern Virginia. This model was developed to simulate the field-scale immobilization and subsequent reoxidation of U by a biologically mediated reaction network.

  18. Impact of Consolidation Radiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma With Negative Post-Chemotherapy Radiologic Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorth, Jennifer A., E-mail: jennifer.dorth@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Diehl, Louis F.; Beaven, Anne W. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Coleman, R. Edward [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: While consolidation radiation therapy (i.e., RT administered after chemotherapy) is routine treatment for patients with early-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the role of consolidation RT in stage III-IV DLBCL is controversial. Methods and Materials: Cases of patients with stage III-IV DLBCL treated from 1991 to 2009 at Duke University, who achieved a complete response to chemotherapy were reviewed. Clinical outcomes were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared between patients who did and did not receive RT, using the log-rank test. A multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Seventy-nine patients were identified. Chemotherapy (median, 6 cycles) consisted of anti-CD20 antibody rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP; 65%); cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP; 22%); or other (13%). Post-chemotherapy imaging consisted of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (73%); gallium with CT (14%); or CT only (13%). Consolidation RT (median, 25 Gy) was given to involved sites of disease in 38 (48%) patients. Receipt of consolidation RT was associated with improved in-field control (92% vs. 69%, respectively, p = 0.028) and event-free survival (85% vs. 65%, respectively, p = 0.014) but no difference in overall survival (85% vs. 78%, respectively, p = 0.15) when compared to patients who did not receive consolidation RT. On multivariate analysis, no RT was predictive of increased risk of in-field failure (hazard ratio [HR], 8.01, p = 0.014) and worse event-free survival (HR, 4.3, p = 0.014). Conclusions: Patients with stage III-IV DLBCL who achieve negative post-chemotherapy imaging have improved in-field control and event-free survival with low-dose consolidation RT.

  19. Reductive Biotransformation of Fe in Shale-Limestone Saprolite Containing Fe(III) Oxides and Fe(II)/Fe(III) Phyllosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Smith, Steven C.; Dong, Hailiang

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A <2.0-mm fraction of a mineralogically complex subsurface sediment containing goethite and Fe(II)/Fe(III) phyllosilicates was incubated with Shewanella putrefaciens (strain CN32) and lactate at circumneutral pH under anoxic conditions to investigate electron acceptor preference and the nature of the resulting biogenic Fe(II) fraction. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttle, was included in select treatments to enhance bioreduction and subsequent biomineralization. The sediment was highly aggregated and contained two distinct clast populations: i) a highly weathered one with “sponge-like” internal porosity, large mineral crystallites, and Fe-containing micas, and ii) a dense, compact one with fine-textured Fe-containing illite and nano-sized goethite, as revealed by various forms of electron microscopic analyses. Approximately 10 to 15% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 over 60 d in media without AQDS, whereas 24% and 35% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 after 40 and 95 d in media with AQDS. Little or no Fe2+, Mn, Si, Al, and Mg were evident in aqueous filtrates after reductive incubation. Mössbauer measurements on the bioreduced sediments indicated that both goethite and phyllosilicate Fe(III) were partly reduced without bacterial preference. Goethite was more extensively reduced in the presence of AQDS whereas phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction was not influenced by AQDS. Biogenic Fe(II) resulting from phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction remained in a layer-silicate environment that displayed enhanced solubility in weak acid. The mineralogic nature of the goethite biotransformation product was not determined. Chemical and cryogenic Mössbauer measurements, however, indicated that the transformation product was not siderite, green rust, magnetite, Fe(OH)2, or Fe(II) adsorbed on phyllosilicate or bacterial surfaces. Several lines of evidence suggested that biogenic Fe(II) existed as surface associated phase on the residual goethite, and/or as a Fe(II)-Al coprecipitate. Sediment aggregation and mineral physical and/or chemical factors were demonstrated to play a major role on the nature and location of the biotransformation reaction and its products.

  20. Case No. VWA-0039

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJuneWaste To Wisdom:EnergyJoshua DeLung What does thisCaseNo.

  1. Science DMZ Case Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principalfuel cells" Find Science DMZ Case Studies

  2. CaseStudyTemplate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C lKieling , ActingOrficePENNELCNGPropaneCase.

  3. Case in Uyghur and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asarina, Alevtina

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this dissertation is the syntax and morphology of case, and how case interacts with A-movement and agreement. In chapter 1, I argue on the basis of novel data from Uyghur that noun phrases bearing structural ...

  4. The "Pinch Analysis": Special Cases 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitowft, B.; Tripathi, P.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the efficiency and scope for improvement of a process plant's energy consumption, based on pinch technology, is reviewed. While this is a generic approach that applies in most cases, there are certain cases where the results...

  5. CASE CRITICAL Keystone XL Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    CASE CRITICAL Keystone XL Pipeline: A Line in the Sand? Case Critical is presented by ASU's Global Professor, ASU's School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning The Keystone XL Pipeline, a large

  6. Predicted band structures of III-V semiconductors in wurtzite phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amrit De; Craig E. Pryor

    2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    While non-nitride III-V semiconductors typically have a zincblende structure, they may also form wurtzite crystals under pressure or when grown as nanowhiskers. This makes electronic structure calculation difficult since the band structures of wurtzite III-V semiconductors are poorly characterized. We have calculated the electronic band structure for nine III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase using transferable empirical pseudopotentials including spin-orbit coupling. We find that all the materials have direct gaps. Our results differ significantly from earlier {\\it ab initio} calculations, and where experimental results are available (InP, InAs and GaAs) our calculated band gaps are in good agreement. We tabulate energies, effective masses, and linear and cubic Dresselhaus zero-field spin-splitting coefficients for the zone-center states. The large zero-field spin-splitting coefficients we find may lead to new functionalities for designing devices that manipulate spin degrees of freedom.

  7. Accreting White Dwarfs among the Planetary Nebulae Most Luminous in [O III]5007 Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noam Soker

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose that some of the most luminous planetary nebulae (PNs) are actually proto-PNs, where a companion white dwarf (WD) accretes mass at a relatively high rate from the post-asymptotic giant branch star that blew the nebula. The WD sustains a continuous nuclear burning and ionizes the nebula. The WD is luminous enough to make the dense nebula luminous in the [O III]5007 line, In young stellar populations these WD accreting systems account for a small fraction of [O III]-luminous PNs, but in old stellar populations these binaries might account for most, or even all, of the [OIII]-luminous PNs. This might explain the puzzling constant cutoff (maximum) [O III]5007 luminosity of the planetary nebula luminosity function across different galaxy types.

  8. Modification and benchmarking of SKYSHINE-III for use with ISFSI cask arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertel, N.E. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Napolitano, D.G. [NAC International, Norcross, GA (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry cask storage arrays are becoming more and more common at nuclear power plants in the United States. Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 72, limits doses at the controlled area boundary of these independent spent-fuel storage installations (ISFSI) to 0.25 mSv (25 mrem)/yr. The minimum controlled area boundaries of such a facility are determined by cask array dose calculations, which include direct radiation and radiation scattered by the atmosphere, also known as skyshine. NAC International (NAC) uses SKYSHINE-III to calculate the gamma-ray and neutron dose rates as a function of distance from ISFSI arrays. In this paper, we present modifications to the SKYSHINE-III that more explicitly model cask arrays. In addition, we have benchmarked the radiation transport methods used in SKYSHINE-III against {sup 60}Co gamma-ray experiments and MCNP neutron calculations.

  9. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  10. Total Gross Tumor Volume Is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Patients Treated With Selective Nodal Irradiation for Stage I to III Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reymen, Bart, E-mail: bart.reymen@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Van Loon, Judith; Baardwijk, Angela van; Wanders, Rinus; Borger, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bootsma, Gerben [Department of Pulmonology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen (Netherlands); Pitz, Cordula [Department of Pulmonology, Laurentius Hospital, Roermond (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, Laurentius Hospital, Roermond (Netherlands); Lunde, Ragnar [Department of Pulmonology, St Jansgasthuis, Weert (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, St Jansgasthuis, Weert (Netherlands); Geraedts, Wiel [Department of Pulmonology, Orbis Medical Centre, Sittard (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, Orbis Medical Centre, Sittard (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands) [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital Leuven/ KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In non-small cell lung cancer, gross tumor volume (GTV) influences survival more than other risk factors. This could also apply to small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Analysis of our prospective database with stage I to III SCLC patients referred for concurrent chemo radiation therapy. Standard treatment was 45 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions twice daily concurrently with carboplatin-etoposide, followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in case of non-progression. Only fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)-positive or pathologically proven nodal sites were included in the target volume. Total GTV consisted of post chemotherapy tumor volume and pre chemotherapy nodal volume. Survival was calculated from diagnosis (Kaplan-Meier ). Results: A total of 119 patients were included between May 2004 and June 2009. Median total GTV was 93 ± 152 cc (7.5-895 cc). Isolated elective nodal failure occurred in 2 patients (1.7%). Median follow-up was 38 months, median overall survival 20 months (95% confidence interval = 17.8-22.1 months), and 2-year survival 38.4%. In multivariate analysis, only total GTV (P=.026) and performance status (P=.016) significantly influenced survival. Conclusions: In this series of stage I to III small cell lung cancer patients treated with FDG-PET-based selective nodal irradiation total GTV is an independent risk factor for survival.

  11. Analysis of stimulated Raman backscatter and stimulated Brillouin backscatter in experiments performed on SG-III prototype facility with a spectral analysis code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Liang; Zhao, Yiqing; Hu, Xiaoyan; Zou, Shiyang [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Yang, Dong; Wang, Feng; Peng, Xiaoshi; Li, Zhichao; Li, Sanwei; Xu, Tao; Wei, Huiyue [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Liu, Zhanjun; Zheng, Chunyang, E-mail: zheng-chunyang@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Key Laboratory of HEDP of the Ministry of Education, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments about the observations of stimulated Raman backscatter (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) in Hohlraum were performed on Shenguang-III (SG-III) prototype facility for the first time in 2011. In this paper, relevant experimental results are analyzed for the first time with a one-dimension spectral analysis code, which is developed to study the coexistent process of SRS and SBS in Hohlraum plasma condition. Spectral features of the backscattered light are discussed with different plasma parameters. In the case of empty Hohlraum experiments, simulation results indicate that SBS, which grows fast at the energy deposition region near the Hohlraum wall, is the dominant instability process. The time resolved spectra of SRS and SBS are numerically obtained, which agree with the experimental observations. For the gas-filled Hohlraum experiments, simulation results show that SBS grows fastest in Au plasma and amplifies convectively in C{sub 5}H{sub 12} gas, whereas SRS mainly grows in the high density region of the C{sub 5}H{sub 12} gas. Gain spectra and the spectra of backscattered light are simulated along the ray path, which clearly show the location where the intensity of scattered light with a certain wavelength increases. This work is helpful to comprehend the observed spectral features of SRS and SBS. The experiments and relevant analysis provide references for the ignition target design in future.

  12. The collision of Title III and Title V: A potential permitting and enforcement nightmare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Facca, G.; Faler, M.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 (CAA) mandated that all facilities classified as major were to obtain a Federal Title V operating permit. In addition, any facility, either major or minor, which emits certain chemicals or compounds above a specific single quantity limit or a total aggregate limit are subject to Title III requirements and are required to obtain a Title V permit as well. The problem with obtaining a Title V permit for Title III substances is there is limited data, at least for the utilities sources, on emission factors and emission rates for many of the Title III listed chemical compounds. In addition, the emission data that exists is very conservative, and if used, would show the facilities to be significant emitters of hazardous air emissions, while actual emissions are significantly less. This could lead a facility to applying for a Title V permit unnecessarily, a time consuming process at best. In Iowa, facilities submitted the first Title V permit applications in 1994. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources is currently in the process of reviewing the submittals prior to issuing operating permits. Title III has not been addressed at all in the submittals and therefore will not be included in this round of finished permits that are to be issued. The outcome of this is that the Title V permits will have to be opened and amended to include the applicable Title III operating conditions and constraints. This paper will examine the areas where Title III and Title V collide and the potential permitting and enforcement issues that will have to be faced by the facilities that operate under these permits. This paper is based on the opinions of two of the three responsible parties (facilities and consultants) that are dealing with the potential permitting and enforcement wreckage before the collision occurs.

  13. A preparative study of the reaction between bismuth (III) bromide and amine hydrobromides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, James Ferrell

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A PREPARATIVE STUDY OF THE REACTIOB BETWEEN BISMUTH ( III) BROMIDE AND AMIBE HYDROBROMIDES A Thesis JAMES FERRELL OSBORNE Submitted to the Graduate School ef the ASriculture and Mechanical CelleSe of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the deSree of MASTER OF SCIENCE AuSust, 1960 MaJor Sub]ect: Chemistry A PREPARATIVE STUDY OF THE REACTION BETWEEN BISMUTH (III) BROMIDE AND AMINE HYDRQBRGMIDES A Thesis JAMES FEREKLL OSBORNE Approved as to style and content by...

  14. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from rubber production and compounding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Facilities engaged in rubber production and compounding may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those who produce rubber in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  15. Complete characterization of the water dimer vibrational ground state and testing the VRT(ASP-W)III,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Complete characterization of the water dimer vibrational ground state and testing the VRT(ASP-W)III, SAPT-5st, and VRT(MCY-5f) surfaces FRANK N. KEUTSCH1 , NIR GOLDMAN2 , HEATHER A. HARKER3 , CLAUDE of the water dimer very well. The VRT(MCY-5f) and especially the VRT(ASP-W)III potentials show larger

  16. Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use -Part III -U.S. Backlash | Climate Science & Politics Climate Science & Politics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use - Part III - U.S. Backlash | Climate Science & Politics Climate Science & Politics Home About the Site Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use - Part III - U.S. Backlash Posted in May 24th, 2008 by Climate Patrol in Biofuel, Food Crisis, Sustainability In the last few

  17. Molecular Cell, Vol. 11, 12791289, May, 2003, Copyright 2003 by Cell Press RNAse III-Mediated Degradation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanfreau, Guillaume

    -Mediated Degradation of Unspliced Pre-mRNAs and Lariat Introns While most RNase III-like enzymes cleave ds to bacteria, where RNase III processes and degrades a large number of mRNAs (Bardwell etRPS22B and RPL18A transcripts trigger degradation of unspliced pre-mRNAs and lariat introns and can al., 1989; Court, 1993

  18. EA-1898: Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase III Gordon Creek Project near Price, Utah in Carbon County

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for Phase III field deployment to demonstrate commercial-scale carbon storage technologies.This Phase III large-scale carbon dioxide injection project will combine science and engineering from many disciplines to successfully sequester and monitor carbon storage. [NOTE: This EA has been cancelled].

  19. Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Trigonal Prismatic Uranium(III) Complex Jeffrey D. Rinehart and Jeffrey R. Long*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Trigonal Prismatic Uranium(III) Complex Jeffrey D. Rinehart and Jeffrey R. Long* Department of Chemistry, UniVersity of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Herein, we show that a simple trigonal prismatic uranium(III) complex can indeed display slow magnetic

  20. UMBC Policy # III 7.01.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON APPROVAL OF WRITTEN ACADEMIC AGREEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    UMBC Policy # III 7.01.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON APPROVAL OF WRITTEN ACADEMIC AGREEMENTS UMBC Policy # III 7.01.01 I. POLICY STATEMENT The policy on approval of written academic agreements delineates. There are separate policies and procedures for approval of research agreements, both sponsored and unsponsored, which

  1. Calcolo 2B -Analisi III (corso 2003-2004) 14 luglio 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catenacci, Roberto

    globali iii) Sul quadrato chiuso ci sono i massimi globali sui lati paralleli all'asse y dove la funzione vale 5 e i minimi globali sui lati paralleli all'asse x dove la funzione vale -1/4. 2 #12;

  2. ROTSE-III Performance in the Swift Era Yost, S. A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley, Michael C. B.

    436, Los Alamos, NM 87545 Abstract. We report the successful performance of the Robotic Optical network of 4 unfiltered 0.45m optical telescopes. The telescopes operate robotically, automatically response the the small, accurate Swift error boxes. We report ROTSE-III's general results, including OTs

  3. III. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS FACULTY RULES THAT GOVERN DEGREES AND DEGREE PROGRAMS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    18 III. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS FACULTY RULES THAT GOVERN DEGREES AND DEGREE PROGRAMS) 3335-5-14 Powers for a graduate degree 3335-9-32 Requirements for a professional degree DEGREES AND DEGREE PROGRAMS NOTE: If you PROGRAM PROPOSALS Completion of this form serves as a degree program proposal and provides information

  4. Identification and Characterization of Bovine Pol III Promoters to Express a Short-Hairpin RNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peoples, Michael D 1978-

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Each bPol III promoter was able to express a functional shRNA resulting in a reduction of luciferase activity greater than 68 percent. The bH1 and bU6-2 Luc shRNA vectors were the most effective vectors when transfected with >76 percent (p-value <0...

  5. Light Extraction Efficiency and Radiation Patterns of III-Nitride Light-Emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant NETL, DE-PS26-08NT00290, the National Science]­[7], thermoelectric [8]­[11], photovoltaics and solar energy conversion [12]­[14], and terahertz photonics [15], III

  6. POPULATION III GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND BREAKOUT CRITERIA FOR ACCRETION-POWERED JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagakura, Hiroki; Suwa, Yudai [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ioka, Kunihito, E-mail: hiroki@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [KEK Theory Center, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the propagation of accretion-powered jets in various types of massive stars such as Wolf-Rayet stars, light Population III (Pop III) stars, and massive Pop III stars, all of which are the progenitor candidates of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We perform two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations of relativistic hydrodynamics, taking into account both the envelope collapse and the jet propagation (i.e., the negative feedback of the jet on the accretion). Based on our hydrodynamic simulations, we show for the first time that the accretion-powered jet can potentially break out relativistically from the outer layers of Pop III progenitors. In our simulations, the accretion rate is estimated by the mass flux going through the inner boundary, and the jet is injected with a fixed accretion-to-jet conversion efficiency {eta}. By varying the efficiency {eta} and opening angle {theta}{sub op} for more than 40 models, we find that the jet can make a relativistic breakout from all types of progenitors for GRBs if a simple condition {eta} {approx}> 10{sup -4}({theta}{sub op}/8 Degree-Sign ){sup 2} is satisfied, which is consistent with analytical estimates. Otherwise no explosion or some failed spherical explosions occur.

  7. A fixed point formula of Lefschetz type in Arakelov geometry III: representations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köhler, Kai

    A fixed point formula of Lefschetz type in Arakelov geometry III: representations We give a new proof of the Jantzen sum formula for integral repre- sentations of Chevalley formula of Lefschetz type in Arakelov geometry to generalized flag varieties. Our proof involves

  8. Study of Celestial Objects with Very High Energy Gamma Rays CANGAROO III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    ), the doppler boosting of secondary gamma-rays is sufficient to produce TeV gamma-rays. Gamma-ray bursts: Fireballs expanding with relativistic speed explain gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distancesStudy of Celestial Objects with Very High Energy Gamma Rays CANGAROO III Project Description

  9. Master of Architecture Check Sheet Professional M.Arch. II & III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Master of Architecture Check Sheet Professional M.Arch. II & III Apply on-line at: https in architecture (not to exceed 500 words). _____ One unofficial copy of the transcript where the undergraduate results. KU's Institution Code is 6871 and the Department Code for Architecture is 4401. International

  10. Design Considerations for Robotic Needle Steering Robert J. Webster III, Jasenka Memisevic, and Allison M. Okamura

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster III, Robert James

    and steer around obstacles to reach previously inaccessible locations. Control and planning based on a steering model can compensate for targeting disturbances due to needle bending, error in insertion angleDesign Considerations for Robotic Needle Steering Robert J. Webster III, Jasenka Memisevic

  11. Sorption of Eu(III) on Attapulgite Studied by Batch, XPS and EXAFS Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , the sorption of Eu(III) at the solid-water interface is important for the performance assessment of nuclear and absence of fulvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA). The results indicated that the sorption of Eu. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of Eu-HA complexes indicated that the distances

  12. Erwin Schroedinger and the rise of wave mechanics. III. Early response and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehra, J.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article (Part III) deals with the early applications of wave mechanics to atomic problems - including the demonstration of the formal mathematical equivalence of wave mechanics with the quantum mechanics of Born, Heisenberg, and Jordan, and that of Dirac - by Schroedinger himself and others. The new theory was immediately accepted by the scientific community.

  13. Practical Issues for Atom Probe Tomography Analysis of III-Nitride Semiconductor Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanga, Fengzai; Moodya, Michael P.; Martina, Tomas L.; Bagota, Paul A. J.; Kappersa, Menno J.; Oliver, Rachel A.

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    study of Cu grains 385 (Kempshall, et al., 2001). In terms of binary III-nitrides, the metal–N bond length in the 386 wurtzite structure increases from AlN, to GaN and to InN (Ambacher, 1998), being 387 associated with corresponding bond energy of 2...

  14. Method for Suppression of Stacking Faults in Wurtzite III-V Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiblum, Mordehai "Moty"

    Method for Suppression of Stacking Faults in Wurtzite III-V Nanowires Hadas Shtrikman,*, Ronit, 2008; Revised Manuscript Received January 13, 2009 ABSTRACT The growth of wurtzite GaAs and In wurtzite structure and are observed to thicken (via lateral growth) once the axial growth exceeds a certain

  15. Efficiency of pump absorption in double-clad fiber amplifiers. III. Calculation of modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouznetsov, Dmitrii

    Efficiency of pump absorption in double-clad fiber amplifiers. III. Calculation of modes Dmitrii us to calculate the efficiency of an incoherent pump in general-geometry double-clad fibers. This approach yields accurate estimates of the absorption rate of each mode of the pump in the first order

  16. Status of ASME Section III Task Group on Graphite Support Core Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert L. Bratton; Tim D. Burchell

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the roadmap that the ASME Project Team on Graphite Core Supports is pursuing to establish design codes for unirradiated and irradiated graphite core components during its first year of operation. It discusses the deficiencies in the proposed Section III, Division 2, Subsection CE graphite design code and the different approaches the Project Team has taken to address those deficiencies.

  17. IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotationalvibrational spectra of water vapor, Part III: Energy levels and transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    rotational­ vibrational line positions, transition intensities, and energy levels, with associated critically. These transitions give rise to 18 486 validated energy levels, of which 10 446 and 8040 belong to o-H2 16 O and p-H2IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotational­vibrational spectra of water vapor, Part III: Energy

  18. The Sun as an X-ray Star: III. Flares F. Reale, G. Peres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    distribution vs. temperature and its evolution during some selected solar ares, representative of the wideThe Sun as an X-ray Star: III. Flares F. Reale, G. Peres Dip. di Scienze Fisiche & Astronomiche class C5.8) to very intense ones (X9) are selected as representative of the aring Sun. The emission

  19. 412 Part III: Articles of the limb, simplifying the process of control. However, there is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bressler, Steven L.

    - formed through this manipulation because it somehow simplifies the process of control appears Geometry, Neural Control; Muscle Models; Optimization Principles in Motor Control References Bennett, D. J412 Part III: Articles of the limb, simplifying the process of control. However, there is now

  20. Analise Matematica III Turma Especial Ficha Extra 2 Termodinamica dos Gases Ideais

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natário, José

    Anâ??alise Matemâ??atica III ­ Turma Especial Ficha Extra 2 ­ Termodinâ??amica dos Gases Ideais N Termodinâ??amica afirma que existe uma funâ?şcâ?ťao E : M # R, dita a energia interna do gâ??as, cuja derivadaâ??amicos gerais pela Segunda Lei da Termodinâ??amica. 2 #12;

  1. Inclusive distributions at the LHC as predicted from the DPMJET-III model with chain fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ranft; F. W. Bopp; R. Engel; S. Roesler

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    DPMJET-III with chain fusion is used to calculate inclusive distributions of Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies. We present rapidity distributions as well as scaled multiplicities at mid-rapidity as function of the collision energy and the number of participants.

  2. Development of Light Guides for the Camera of CANGAROO-III , A. Maeshiro1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    the energy threshold of CANGAROO-III tele- scope, good light collection efficiency is very important-ku, Kyoto 606-8502, Kyoto, Japan 3 MSSSO, Australian National University, ACT 2611, Australia 4 Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics, University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia 5 Institute

  3. Laboratory "Behavioral and Social Sciences" (Lab III) General Rules for Using the Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at or in the building are to be reported immediately to the Laboratory Manager. 3. In order to save energy electrical. Concerning the general philosophy and the rules for booking rooms, please check the Memorandum and Memorandum for Room Booking at the Lab III website. The laboratory guidelines are meant to enable researchers to make

  4. JACQUES H. C. DELABlh REVISTA, DE BIOLOGIA DEI. URUGUAY, VOL. III, N 1, 1975 73

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villemant, Claire

    " REVISTA, DE BIOLOGIA DEI. URUGUAY, VOL. III, N° 1, 1975 73 ;. ESTUDIO COMPARATIVO DE LA GENITALIA DEL MACHO DE LAS ESPECIES DE ACROMYRMEX DEL URUGUAY * Lucrecia Covelo de ZoIessi, YoIanda Petrone de Abenan1 Acrumyrmex de Ias especies encontradas hasta el momento, en el Uruguay. Queremos destacar que Ia placa

  5. Nuclear magnetic ordering in Ca(OH)2. III. Experimental determination of the critical temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1479 Nuclear magnetic ordering in Ca(OH)2. III. Experimental determination of the critical(OH)2 is presented. The ordered phase is reached via dynamic nuclear polarization followed to the effective magnetic field are used to determine the magnetic phase of the nuclear spin system. From

  6. PART III DIVISION 13 PAGE 1 RUTGERS DESIGN STANDARDS MANUAL NOV 2008 DIVISION 13 SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    operating condition. The system #12;PART III DIVISION 13 PAGE 2 RUTGERS DESIGN STANDARDS MANUAL NOV 2008 detail battery calculations per NFPA 72. 4. Indicate all A/C, fans, Dampers to be monitored by fire alarm detailed battery calculations per the

  7. Structure and Mechanistic Implications of a Uroporphyrinogen III Synthase-Product Complex,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Chris

    synthesis in mammals, nitrite and sulfite assimilation, and methane production in methanogens. Tet of two ALA molecules to form the basic pyrrole structure (porphobilinogen, PBG), and assembly of four PBG pyrroles into a linear tetraypyrrole (hydroxymethylbilane, HMB). Subsequently, uroporphyrino- gen III

  8. CSE 5500 Advanced Sequential and Parallel Algorithms Exam III; December 11, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    Name: CSE 5500 Advanced Sequential and Parallel Algorithms Exam III; December 11, 2012 Note: You, . . . , rn of real numbers and an integer k. The problem is to output s1, s2, . . . , sn where si = k-1 q=0 ri+q, for i = 1, 2, . . . , (n - k + 1) and si = ri for i = (n - k + 2), (n - k + 3), . . . , n

  9. Ekaterina Tkatchouk and William A. Goddard III Materials and Process Simulation Center,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Ekaterina Tkatchouk and William A. Goddard III Materials and Process Simulation Center, Division designed quantum mechanical simulation tools that have been shown to accurately predict dynamic processes. We also performed calculations on Cu phenatroline with a bidentate stator. DFT is able to accurately

  10. Solid waste operations complex W-113: Specifications. Preliminary design report. Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is Volume III of the Preliminary Design report for the Solid Waste Retrieval Facility at Hanford. The report was prepared by Raytheon and BNFL Inc. and submitted to Westinghouse Hanford Company in January 1995. This volume is a complete listing of the specifications for construction and the required material and equipment.

  11. Electrochemical Lithium Harvesting from Waste Li-ion Batteries Byron M. Wolfe III1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Electrochemical Lithium Harvesting from Waste Li-ion Batteries Byron M. Wolfe III1 , Wen Chao Lee1 This study demonstrates the feasibility of using water and the contents of waste Li-ion batteries for the electrodes in a Li-liquid battery system. Li metal was collected electrochemically from a waste Li

  12. Production of 3D Structures in Printing Veronika Chovancova*, Alexandra Pekarovicova* and Paul D. Fleming III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Paul D. "Dan"

    Production of 3D Structures in Printing Veronika Chovancova*, Alexandra Pekarovicova* and Paul D from our laboratory show a modified formula of hot melt ink that can be used in 3D thermal wax printing. Fleming III* Keywords: 3D Structure, Hot Melt, Blowing Agents, Calorimetry Abstract The ability to form

  13. High temperature thermoelectric characterization of III-V semiconductor thin films by oxide bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    bonding Je-Hyeong Bahka) , Gehong Zenga) , Joshua M. O. Zide b) , Hong Luc) , Rajeev Singhd) , Di Lianga bonding technique is developed for high temperature thermoelectric characterization of the thin film III-W-N diffusion barrier. A thermoelectric material, thin film ErAs:InGaAlAs metal/semiconductor nanocomposite

  14. Hot Melt Inks for 3D Printing Veronika Chovancova*, Alexandra Pekarovicova* and Paul D. Fleming III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Paul D. "Dan"

    Hot Melt Inks for 3D Printing Veronika Chovancova*, Alexandra Pekarovicova* and Paul D. Fleming III for 3D printing comprises different waxes, tackifier and plasticizer resins, rheology modifiers, and UV rheological (or flow) behavior. 1 3D printing, direct ink-jet printing, and related approaches such as hot

  15. METR 4133, Atmospheric Dynamics III: Mid-Latitude Synoptic-Scale Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4133, Atmospheric Dynamics III: Mid-Latitude Synoptic- Scale Dynamics Fall 2012 Instructor Dr and Thurs, 11:30 am ­ 12:45 pm Required Texts Bluestein, H., 1992: Synoptic-Dynamic Meteorology in Mid-Latitudes, Volume I: Principles of Kinematics and Dynamics. Oxford Univ. Press, 431pp. Bluestein, H., 1993: Synoptic-Dynamic

  16. III.C. 3. A Delphi on the Future of the Steel and Ferroalloy Industries*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    204 III.C. 3. A Delphi on the Future of the Steel and Ferroalloy Industries* NANCY H. GOLDSTEIN for policy issues affecting the use of ferroalloys in steel making and certain other alloy production of the Delphi. The Steel and Ferroalloy Delphi included three rounds. The questions and exercises presented

  17. REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EFFECTS OF POPULATION III STARS ON THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Gnedin, Nickolay Y., E-mail: muratov@umich.edu [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H{sub 2} formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 10{sup 8} years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  18. Anaerobic Benzene Oxidation in the Fe(III) Reduction Zone of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Anaerobic Benzene Oxidation in the Fe(III) Reduction Zone of Petroleum-Contaminated Aquifers R O B North, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 The potential for anaerobic benzene. [14C]Benzene was not oxidized to 14CO2 at most sites examined, which is consistent with previous

  19. III.C. 2. Plastics and Competing Materials by 1985: A Delphi Forecasting Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    189 III.C. 2. Plastics and Competing Materials by 1985: A Delphi Forecasting Study SELWYN ENZER The application of Delphi to the identification and assessment of possible developments in plastics and competing. The ability to tailor-make plastics for various applications, enhanced by growth in understanding of organic

  20. Cover: Apollo 12 astronaut on the lunar surface removing parts of Surveyor III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    #12;Cover: Apollo 12 astronaut on the lunar surface removing parts of Surveyor III spacecraft on a note of high achieve- ment: the dramatic missions of Apollo XI and XII, the scientifically productive planetary operations, contrib- uted to the successful culmination of the Apollo program, and engaged

  1. Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Loess Sediments: An Important Source of Electron Acceptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Jaisi, Deb P.; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Ji, Junfeng

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative study was conducted to understand if Fe (III) in loess sediments is available for microbial respiration by using a common metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens, CN32. The loess samples were collected from three different sites: St. Louis (Peoria), Missouri, USA; Huanxia (HX) and Yanchang (YCH), Shanxi Province of China. Wet chemical analyses indicated that the total Fe concentration for the three samples was 1.69%, 2.76%, and 3.29%, respectively, of which 0.48%, 0.67%, and 1.27% was Fe(III). All unreduced loess sediments contained iron oxides and phyllosilicates (smectite, illite, chlorite, vermiculite), in addition to common minerals such as quartz, feldspar, plagioclase, calcite, and dolomite. Bioreduction experiments were performed at a loess concentration of 20 mg/mL using lactate as the sole electron donor, Fe(III) in loess as the sole electron acceptor in the presence and absence of anthraquinone-2, 6-disulfonate (AQDS) as an electron shuttle. Experiments were performed in non-growth (bicarbonate buffer) and growth (M1) media with a cell concentration of ~2.8 x 107 and 2.1 x 107 cells/mL, respectively. The unreduced and bioreduced solids were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mössbauer spectroscopy, diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS), and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) methods. Despite many similarities among the three loess samples, the extent and rate of Fe (III) reduction varied significantly. For example, in presence of AQDS the extent of reduction in the non-growth experiment was 25% in HX, 34% in Peoria, and 38% in YCH. The extent of reduction in the growth experiment was 72% in HX, 94% in Peoria, and 56% in YCH. The extent of bioreduction was lower in absence of AQDS. Overall, AQDS and the M1 growth medium significantly enhanced the rate and extent of bioreduction. Fe(III) in iron oxides and Fe(III)-containing phyllosilicates was bioreduced. Biogenic illite, siderite, and vivianite formed. The results of this study suggest that Fe (III) in loess sediments represents a potentially important source of electron acceptors to support microbial activity in dry environments.

  2. Overview of the effect of Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments on the natural gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Child, C.J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The regulation of hazardous air pollutants by Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 has a potential wide-ranging impact for the natural gas industry. Title III includes a list of 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) which are targeted for reduction. Under Title III, HAP emissions from major sources will be reduced by the implementation of maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards. If the source is defined as a major source, it must also comply with Title V (operating permit) and Title VII (enhanced monitoring) requirements. This presentation will review Title III`s effect on the natural gas industry by discussing the regulatory requirements and schedules associated with MACT as well as the control technology options available for affected sources.

  3. Water Efficiency Case Studies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Efficiency Water Efficiency Case Studies Water Efficiency Case Studies These case studies feature examples of water-efficiency projects implemented by Federal agencies. They are...

  4. Renewable Energy Case Studies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Case Studies Renewable Energy Case Studies These case studies and feature examples of renewable energy projects at Federal facilities. Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows...

  5. Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Network Case Study: Partnerships Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships, from the U.S....

  6. Blake Case | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blake Case Blake Case Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case...

  7. Larry Case | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Larry Case Larry Case Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case...

  8. Case Study: Transcritical Carbon Dioxide Supermarket Refrigeration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Case Study: Transcritical Carbon Dioxide Supermarket Refrigeration Systems Case Study: Transcritical Carbon Dioxide Supermarket Refrigeration Systems This case study documents one...

  9. Early chemical enrichment of the universe and the role of very massive pop III stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Matteucci; F. Calura

    2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the role of very massive pop III stars in the chemical enrichment of the early universe is discussed. We first compare our predictions with the abundance ratios measured in the high redshift Lyman-alpha forest to check whether they are compatible with the values predicted by assuming that the early universe was enriched by massive pop III stars. We conclude that to explain the observed C/Si ratio in the intergalactic medium, a contribution from pop II stars to carbon enrichment is necessary, already at redshift z=5. We then evaluate the number of Pair-Instability Supernovae (SN_(gamma gamma)) required to enrich the universe to the critical metallicity Z_cr, i.e. the metallicity value which causes the transition from a very massive star regime (m > 100 M_sun) to a lower mass regime, similar to the one characteristic of the present time (m enrich a cubic megaparsec of the intergalactic medium at high redshift for a variety of initial mass functions. The number of ionizing photons provided by these SN_(gamma gamma) and also by the pop III stars ending as black holes was computed and we conclude that there are not enough photons to reionize the universe, being down by at least a factor of ~ 3. Finally, we calculate the abundance ratios generated by pop III stars and compare it with the ones observed in low metallicity Damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs). We suggest that pop III stars alone cannot be responsible for the abundance ratios in these objects and that intermediate mass pop II stars must have played an important role especially in enriching DLAs in nitrogen.

  10. Non-ferromagnetic overburden casing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX)

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one system for electrically insulating an overburden portion of a heater wellbore is described. The system may include a heater wellbore located in a subsurface formation and an electrically insulating casing located in the overburden portion of the heater wellbore. The casing may include at least one non-ferromagnetic material such that ferromagnetic effects are inhibited in the casing.

  11. Human Retroviruses and AIDS. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences: I--II; III--V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, G.; Korber, B. [eds.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [eds.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wain-Hobson, S. [ed.] [Laboratory of Molecular Retrovirology, Pasteur Inst.] [ed.; Laboratory of Molecular Retrovirology, Pasteur Inst.; Smith, R.F. [ed.] [Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology] [ed.; Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology; Pavlakis, G.N. [ed.] [National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States). Cancer Research Facility] [ed.; National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States). Cancer Research Facility

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (I) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  12. Cooperative Research Between NREL and Ampulse on III-V PV: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-464

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ptak, A.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL and Ampulse will engage in cooperative research to develop III-V photovoltaics on alternative substrates.

  13. Business Case for Technical Qualification Program Accreditation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Business Case for Technical Qualification Program Accreditation Incentives Business Case for Technical Qualification Program Accreditation Incentives TQP Accreditation standardize...

  14. PHYS 390 Lecture 20 -Reactions III -Thermonuclear processes 20 -1 2001 by David Boal, Simon Fraser University. All rights reserved; further resale or copying is strictly prohibited.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boal, David

    PHYS 390 Lecture 20 - Reactions III - Thermonuclear processes 20 - 1 © 2001 by David Boal, Simon - Reactions III - Thermonuclear processes What's Important: · energy-dependent cross sections · complete rate 20 - Reactions III - Thermonuclear processes 20 - 2 © 2001 by David Boal, Simon Fraser University

  15. Clean Air Act Title III accidental emission release risk management program, and how it applies to landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbard, C.S.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On June 20, 1996, EPA promulgated regulations pursuant to Title III of the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990 (Section 112(r)(7) of the CAA). The rule, contained in 40 CFR Part 68, is called Accidental Release Prevention Requirements: Risk Management Programs, and is intended to improve accident prevention and emergency response practices at facilities that store and/or use hazardous substances. Methane is a designated highly hazardous chemical (HHC) under the rule. The rule applies to facilities that have 10,000 pounds of methane or more in any process, roughly equivalent to about 244,000 cubic feet of methane. The US EPA has interpreted this threshold quantity as applying to landfill gas within landfills. This paper presents an overview of the Accidental Release Prevention regulations, and how landfills are affected by the requirements. This paper describes methodologies for calculating the threshold quantity of landfill gas in a landfill. Methane is in landfill gas as a mixture. Because landfill gas can burn readily, down to concentrations of about five percent methane, the entire landfill gas mixture must be treated as the regulated substance, and counts toward the 10,000-pound threshold. It is reasonable to assume that the entire landfill gas collection system, active or passive, is filled with landfill gas, and that a calculation of the volume of the system would be a calculation of the landfill gas present in the process on the site. However, the US EPA has indicated that there are some instances in which pore space gas should be included in this calculation. This paper presents methods available to calculate the amount of pore space gas in a landfill, and how to determine how much of that gas might be available for an explosion. The paper goes through how to conduct the release assessment to determine the worst-case hazard zone around the landfill.

  16. Physical picture of immersed diode experiments on HERMES III and SABRE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, C.L.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Menge, P.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A needle-like, high-current, electron beam has been produced on the Hermes III and SABRE accelerators at SNL using inductive voltage adder (IVA) technology, and a diode consisting of a needle cathode and a planar anode/bremmstrahlung converter which are both fully immersed in a strong solenoidal magnetic field (12--50 T). Desired nominal parameters are 10 MV, 40 kA, 0.5 mm radius cathode, and 5--35 cm anode-cathode gaps. High dose and small x-ray spot size are required for radiography applications. Results are presented of initial experiments on Hermes III and SABRE, which have produced doses up to 1 kRad {at} 1 meter, and at lower doses, spot sizes as small as 1.7 mm diameter.

  17. The Role of Basis Set Superposition Error in Water Addition Reactions to Ln(III) Cations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kvamme, Brandon; Wander, Matthew C F.; Clark, Aurora E.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our goal in this work was to characterize the importance of basis set superposition error (BSSE) in the reaction energetics of water addition to highly charged metal ions that exhibit strong ion-dipole interactions with water. The gas phase water addition reactions, M(H?O)ł+N + H?O ? M(H?O)ł+N ? ? [M = La(III), Lu(III); N = 0–8] have been studied, with a particular emphasis on a posteriori methods for calculating BSSE and its constituent energetic components as a function of M(H?O) ł+N cluster size and water basis set. Because of accumulation of BSSE within the subclusters in the reaction series, the successive reaction counterpoise method for determining the BSSE correction interaction energies is advocated.

  18. TITLE III EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE MATERIAL AND PERSONNEL HANDLING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. A. Misiak

    1998-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This Title III Evaluation Report (TER) provides the results of an evaluation that was conducted on the Material and Personnel Handling System. This TER has been written in accordance with the ''Technical Document Preparation Plan for the Mined Geologic Disposal System Title III Evaluation Reports'' (BA0000000-01717-4600-00005 REV 03). The objective of this evaluation is to provide recommendations to ensure consistency between the technical baseline requirements, baseline design, and the as-constructed Material and Personnel Handling System. Recommendations for resolving discrepancies between the as-constructed system, the technical baseline requirements, and the baseline design are included in this report. Cost and Schedule estimates are provided for all recommended modifications.

  19. Type III Dyson Sphere of Highly Advanced Civilizations around a Super Massive Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makoto Inoue; Hiromitsu Yokoo

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new system for a society of highly advanced civilizations around a super massive black hole (SMBH), as an advanced Type III "Dyson Sphere", pointing out an efficient usage of energy for the advanced civilizations. SMBH also works as a sink for waste materials. Here we assume that Type III civilisations of Kardashev classification [1] form a galactic club [2] in a galaxy, and the energy from the SMBH will be delivered to the club members, forming an energy control system similar to power grids in our present society. The energy is probably transmitted by a sharp beam with coherent electro-magnetic waves, which provide a new concept for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) via detection of such energy transmission signals. This expands the search window for other intelligences within the Universe.

  20. Type III Dyson Sphere of Highly Advanced Civilizations around a Super Massive Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inoue, Makoto

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new system for a society of highly advanced civilizations around a super massive black hole (SMBH), as an advanced Type III "Dyson Sphere", pointing out an efficient usage of energy for the advanced civilizations. SMBH also works as a sink for waste materials. Here we assume that Type III civilisations of Kardashev classification [1] form a galactic club [2] in a galaxy, and the energy from the SMBH will be delivered to the club members, forming an energy control system similar to power grids in our present society. The energy is probably transmitted by a sharp beam with coherent electro-magnetic waves, which provide a new concept for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) via detection of such energy transmission signals. This expands the search window for other intelligences within the Universe.

  1. Polarization doping and the efficiency of III-nitride optoelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kivisaari, Pyry; Oksanen, Jani; Tulkki, Jukka [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The intrinsic polarization is generally considered a nuisance in III-nitride devices, but recent studies have shown that it can be used to enhance p- and n-type conductivity and even to replace impurity doping. We show by numerical simulations that polarization-doped light-emitting diode (LED) structures have a significant performance advantage over conventional impurity-doped LED structures. Our results indicate that polarization doping decreases electric fields inside the active region and potential barriers in the depletion region, as well as the magnitude of the quantum-confined Stark effect. The simulations also predict at least an order of magnitude increase in the current density corresponding to the maximum efficiency (i.e., smaller droop) as compared to impurity-doped structures. The obtained high doping concentrations could also enable, e.g., fabrication of III-N resonant tunneling diodes and improved ohmic contacts.

  2. Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project; Record of Decision, October 25, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to implement the Proposed Action identified in the Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (DOE/EIS-0374, September 2006). Under the Proposed Action, BPA will offer PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) contract terms for interconnection of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project, located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). BPA will also offer Portland General Electric (PGE)1 contract terms for interconnection of its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, also located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the FCRTS, as proposed in the FEIS. To interconnect these wind projects, BPA will build and operate a 12-mile long, 230-kilovolt (kV) double-circuit transmission line between the wind projects and BPA's new 230-kV John Day Substation in Sherman County, Oregon. BPA will also expand its existing 500-kV John Day Substation.

  3. Structure and electrical characterization of gallium arsenide nanowires with different V/III ratio growth parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhammad, R.; Ahamad, R. [Sustainability Research Alliance, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Ibrahim, Z.; Othaman, Z. [Physic Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowires were grown vertically on GaAs(111)B substrate by gold-assisted using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and conductivity atomic force microscopy (CAFM) analysis were carried out to investigate the effects of V/III ratio on structural properties and current-voltage changes in the wires. Results show that GaAs NWs grow preferably in the wurtzite crystal structure than zinc blende crystal structure with increasing V/III ratio. Additionally, CAFM studies have revealed that zincblende nanowires indicate ohmic characteristic compared to oscillation current occurred for wurtzite structures. The GaAs NWs with high quality structures are needed in solar cells technology for trapping energy that directly converts of sunlight into electricity with maximum capacity.

  4. Sixty years from discovery to solution: crystal structure of bovine liver catalase form III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foroughi, Leila M.; Kang, You-Na; Matzger, Adam J. (Michigan)

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystallization and structural characterization of bovine liver catalase (BLC) has been intensively studied for decades. Forms I and II of BLC have previously been fully characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Form III has previously been analyzed by electron microscopy, but owing to the thinness of this crystal form an X-ray crystal structure had not been determined. Here, the crystal structure of form III of BLC is presented in space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.7, b = 173.7, c = 186.3 {angstrom}. The asymmetric unit is composed of the biological tetramer, which is packed in a tetrahedron motif with three other BLC tetramers. This higher resolution structure has allowed an assessment of the previously published electron-microscopy studies.

  5. Fluid-rock interactions between xanthan-chromium(III) gel systems and dolomite core material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCool, C.S.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gelation of chromium(III)-xanthan systems in dolomite core material was investigated. Compositional changes in the gelant caused by interactions with the dolomite core material resulted in low permeability reductions for gelants prepared with chromium chloride, chromium acetate and a chromium diamine salt. The primary cause of incomplete gelation in the dolomite material was the increase in gelant pH that resulted in precipitation of chromium.

  6. Amber light-emitting diode comprising a group III-nitride nanowire active region

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Koleske, Daniel

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature stable (color and efficiency) III-nitride based amber (585 nm) light-emitting diode is based on a novel hybrid nanowire-planar structure. The arrays of GaN nanowires enable radial InGaN/GaN quantum well LED structures with high indium content and high material quality. The high efficiency and temperature stable direct yellow and red phosphor-free emitters enable high efficiency white LEDs based on the RGYB color-mixing approach.

  7. Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co(III) mediator in a neutral electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balazs, G.B.; Lewis, P.R.

    1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and neutral pH anolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the cobalt mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble radioactive species and is regenerated at the anode until all organics are converted to carbon dioxide and destroyed. The neutral electrolyte is non-corrosive, and thus extends the lifetime of the cell and its components. 2 figs.

  8. Electron g-factor Engineering in III-V Semiconductors for Quantum Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideo Kosaka; Andrey A. Kiselev; Filipp A. Baron; Ki Wook Kim; Eli Yablonovitch

    2001-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An entanglement-preserving photo-detector converts photon polarization to electron spin. Up and down spin must respond equally to oppositely polarized photons, creating a requirement for degenerate spin energies, ge=0 for electrons. We present a plot of ge-factor versus lattice constant, analogous to bandgap versus lattice constant, that can be used for g-factor engineering of III-V alloys and quantum wells

  9. Proceedings of the sixth international conference on fluidized bed combustion. Volume III. Technical sessions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held April 9-11, 1980, at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. Forty-five papers from Vol. III of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. Two papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  10. Interactions of Silicate Ions with Zinc(II) and Aluminum(III) in Alkaline Aqueous Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahai, Nita

    Interactions of Silicate Ions with Zinc(II) and Aluminum(III) in Alkaline Aqueous Solution Michel R 16, 2005 We present 29 Si, 27 Al, and 67 Zn NMR evidence to show that silicate ions in alkaline, with aluminate (Al(OH)4 - ). Zincate reacts with monomeric silicate at pH 14-15 to form [(HO)O2Si-O-Zn(OH)3

  11. Characterization of Co(III) EDTA-Reducing Bacteria in Metal- and Radionuclide-Contaminated Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Weimin [Arizona State University; Gentry, Terry J [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Area Grouping 5 (WAG5) site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a potential to be a field site for evaluating the effectiveness of various bioremediation approaches and strategies. The site has been well studied in terms of its geological and geochemical properties over the past decade. However, despite the importance of microorganisms in bioremediation processes, the microbiological populations at the WAG5 site and their potential in bioremediation have not been similarly evaluated. In this study, we initiated research to characterize the microbial populations in WAG5 groundwater. Approximately 100 isolates from WAG5 groundwater were isolated and selected based on colony morphology. Fifty-five unique isolates were identified by BOX-PCR and subjected to further characterization. 16S rRNA sequences indicated that these isolates belong to seventeen bacterial genera including Alcaligenes (1 isolate), Aquamonas (1), Aquaspirillum (1), Bacillus (10), Brevundimonas (5), Caulobacter (7), Dechloromonas (2), Janibacter (1), Janthinobacterium (2), Lactobacillus (1), Paenibacillus (4), Pseudomonas (9), Rhodoferax (1), Sphingomonas (1), Stenotrophomonas (6), Variovorax (2), and Zoogloea (1). Metal respiration assays identified several isolates, which phylogenically belong or are close to Caulobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Pseudomonas, capable of reducing Co(III)EDTA- to Co(II)EDTA{sup 2-} using the defined M1 medium under anaerobic conditions. In addition, using WAG5 groundwater directly as the inoculants, we found that organisms associated with WAG5 groundwater can reduce both Fe(III) and Co(III) under anaerobic conditions. Further assays were then performed to determine the optimal conditions for Co(III) reduction. These assays indicated that addition of various electron donors including ethanol, lactate, methanol, pyruvate, and acetate resulted in metal reduction. These experiments will provide useful background information for future bioremediation field experiments at the WAG5 site.

  12. XAFS of Synthetic Iron(III)-Arsenate Co-Precipitates and Uranium Mill Neutralized Raffinate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, N. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Jiang, D. T. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); COGEMA Resources Inc., Saskatoon, SK S7K 3X5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Cutler, J. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Demopoulos, G. P. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Rowson, J. W. [Department of Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2B2 (Canada)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    XAFS studies were carried out for chemical speciation of arsenic species in uranium mill neutralized raffinate solids. To aid the structural characterization, synthetic iron(III)-arsenate co-precipitates were prepared to mimic the actual uranium mill tailings neutralization products. The principle components analysis method was used to validate the synthetic amorphous scorodite as a primary model compound for arsenate species in the raffinate samples under the specific precipitation conditions.

  13. Uraniumhydrogen interactions: synthesis and crystal structures of tris(N,N-dimethylaminodiboranato)uranium(III)w

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    Uranium­hydrogen interactions: synthesis and crystal structures of tris(N,N-dimethylaminodiboranato)uranium919490h The reaction of UCl4 with Na(H3BNMe2BH3) in diethyl ether affords the uranium(III) product U(H3 in the two forms. Uranium hydride, UH3, has been proposed to be an ideal material for the generation of safe

  14. Process for forming shaped group III-V semiconductor nanocrystals, and product formed using process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul (Oakland, CA); Peng, Xiaogang (Fayetteville, AR); Manna, Liberato (Palo del Colle, IT)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the formation of shaped Group III-V semiconductor nanocrystals comprises contacting the semiconductor nanocrystal precursors with a liquid media comprising a binary mixture of phosphorus-containing organic surfactants capable of promoting the growth of either spherical semiconductor nanocrystals or rod-like semiconductor nanocrystals, whereby the shape of the semiconductor nanocrystals formed in said binary mixture of surfactants is controlled by adjusting the ratio of the surfactants in the binary mixture.

  15. Recent advances in III-V on Si integration for high-efficiency,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Recent advances in III-V on Si integration for high-efficiency, low cost MJ cells Minjoo Larry Lee for concentrator photovoltaics · Metamorphic mid-infrared (2-3 µm) materials and devices(w/ D.Wasserman, UIUC · Conclusions 4 300 mm Si Low-cost, high- efficiency MJ cells on 300 mm Si 50 mm GaP 150 mm GaAs #12;Challenge

  16. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The mineral respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes brought together inside a transmembrane porin to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system that contains methyl viologen as an internalised electron carrier has been used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally-located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, direct electron transfer from the interior through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The observed rates of conduction through the protein complex were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that observed in whole cells, demonstrating that direct electron exchange between MtrCAB and Fe(III) oxides is efficient enough to support in-vivo, anaerobic, solid phase iron respiration.

  17. Coal quality trends and distribution of Title III trace elements in Eastern Kentucky coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eble, C.F. [Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States); Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The quality characteristics of eastern Kentucky coal beds vary both spatially and stratigraphically. Average total sulfur contents are lowest, and calorific values highest, in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Reserve Districts. Average coal thickness is greatest in these two districts as well. Conversely, the thinnest coal with the highest total sulfur content, and lowest calorific value, on average, occurs in the Princess and Southwest Reserve Districts. Several Title III trace elements, notably arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, and nickel, mirror this distribution (lower average concentrations in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Districts, higher average concentrations in the Princess and Southwest Districts), probably because these elements are primarily associated with sulfide minerals in coal. Ash yields and total sulfur contents are observed to increase in a stratigraphically older to younger direction. Several Title III elements, notably cadmium, chromium, lead, and selenium follow this trend, with average concentrations being higher in younger coals. Average chlorine concentration shows a reciprocal distribution, being more abundant in older coals. Some elements, such as arsenic, manganese, mercury, cobalt, and, to a lesser extent, phosphorus show concentration spikes in coal beds directly above, or below, major marine zones. With a few exceptions, average Title III trace element concentrations for eastern Kentucky coals are comparable with element distributions in other Appalachian coal-producing states.

  18. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation Phase III Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel, Donna

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project integrated state-of-the-art exploration technologies with a geologic framework and reservoir modeling to ultimately determine the efficacy of future geothermal production within the PLPT reservation. The information gained during this study should help the PLPT to make informed decisions regarding construction of a geothermal power plant. Additional benefits included the transfer of new technologies and geothermal data to the geothermal industry and it created and/or preserved nearly three dozen jobs accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. A variety of tasks were conducted to achieve the above stated objectives. The following are the tasks completed within the project: 1. Permitting 2. Shallow temperature survey 3. Seismic data collection and analysis 4. Fracture stress analysis 5. Phase I reporting Permitting 7. Shallow temperature survey 8. Seismic data collection and analysis 9. Fracture stress analysis 10. Phase I reporting 11. Drilling two new wells 12. Borehole geophysics 13. Phase II reporting 14. Well testing and geochemical analysis 15. Three-dimensional geologic model 16. Three-dimensional reservoir analysis 17. Reservation wide geothermal potential analysis 18. Phase III reporting Phase I consisted of tasks 1 – 5, Phase II tasks 6 – 8, and Phase III tasks 9 – 13. This report details the results of Phase III tasks. Reports are available for Phase I, and II as separate documents.

  19. Optical Dielectric Functions of III-V Semiconductors in Wurtzite Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amrit De; Craig E. Pryor

    2010-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical properties of semiconductors can exhibit strong polarization dependence due to crystalline anisotropy. A number of recent experiments have shown that the photoluminescence intensity in free standing nanowires is polarization dependent. One contribution to this effect is the anisotropy of the dielectric function due to the fact that most nanowires crystalize in the wurtzite form. While little is known experimentally about the band structures wurtzite phase III-V semiconductors, we have previously predicted the bulk band structure of nine III-V semiconductors in wurtzite phase.Here, we predict the frequency dependent dielectric functions for nine non-Nitride wurtzite phase III-V semiconductors (AlP, AlAs, AlSb, GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InP, InAs and InSb). Their complex dielectric functions are calculated in the dipole approximation by evaluating the momentum matrix elements on a dense grid of special k-points using empirical pseudopotential wave functions. Corrections to the momentum matrix elements accounting for the missing core states are made using a scaling factor which is determined by using the optical sum rules on the calculated dielectric functions for the zincblende polytypes. The dielectric function is calculated for polarizations perpendicular and parallel to the c-axis of the crystal.

  20. MOCVD synthesis of group III-nitride heterostructure nanowires for solid-state lighting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, George T.; Creighton, James Randall; Talin, Albert Alec

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state lighting (SSL) technologies, based on semiconductor light emitting devices, have the potential to reduce worldwide electricity consumption by more than 10%, which could significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported energy and improve energy security. The III-nitride (AlGaInN) materials system forms the foundation for white SSL and could cover a wide spectral range from the deep UV to the infrared. For this LDRD program, we have investigated the synthesis of single-crystalline III-nitride nanowires and heterostructure nanowires, which may possess unique optoelectronic properties. These novel structures could ultimately lead to the development of novel and highly efficient SSL nanodevice applications. GaN and III-nitride core-shell heterostructure nanowires were successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on two-inch wafer substrates. The effect of process conditions on nanowire growth was investigated, and characterization of the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the nanowires was also performed.

  1. New H-band Stellar Spectral Libraries for the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamora, O; Prieto, C Allende; Carrera, R; Koesterke, L; Edvardsson, B; Castelli, F; Plez, B; Bizyaev, D; Cunha, K; Perez, A E Garcia; Gustafsson, B; Holtzman, J A; Lawler, J E; Majewski, S R; Manchado, A; Meszaros, Sz; Shane, N; Shetrone, M; Smith, V V; Zasowski, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey--III (SDSS--III) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has obtained high resolution (R $\\sim$ 22,500), high signal-to-noise ($>$ 100) spectra in the H$-$band spectral region ($\\sim$1.5$-$1.7 $\\mu$m) for about 146,000 stars in the Milky Way galaxy. We have computed specific spectral libraries with effective temperature ($T\\rm{_{eff}}$) ranging from 3500 to 8000 K for the automated chemical analysis of the survey data. The spectral libraries, used to derive stellar parameters and abundances from the APOGEE spectra in the SDSS--III data release 12 (DR12), are based on ATLAS9 model atmospheres and the ASS$\\epsilon$T spectral synthesis code. We present a second set of stellar spectral libraries based on MARCS model atmospheres and the spectral synthesis code Turbospectrum. The ATLAS9/ASS$\\epsilon$T ($T\\rm{_{eff}}$ = 3500$-$8000 K) and MARCS/Turbospectrum ($T\\rm{_{eff}}$ = 3500$-$5500 K) grids of synthetic spectra cover a wide range of metallicity ($-$2.5 $\\leq...

  2. Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

  3. Broadband and omnidirectional anti-reflection layer for III/V multi-junction solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diedenhofen, Silke L; Haverkamp, Erik; Bauhuis, Gerard; Schermer, John; Rivas, Jaime Gómez; 10.1016/j.solmat.2012.02.022

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a novel graded refractive index antireflection coating for III/V quadruple solar cells based on bottom-up grown tapered GaP nanowires. We have calculated the photocurrent density of an InGaP-GaAs-InGaAsP-InGaAs solar cell with a MgF2/ZnS double layer antireflection coating and with a graded refractive index coating. The photocurrent density can be increased by 5.9 % when the solar cell is coated with a graded refractive index layer with a thickness of 1\\mu m. We propose to realize such a graded refractive index layer by growing tapered GaP nanowires on III/V solar cells. For a first demonstration of the feasibility of the growth of tapered nanowires on III/V solar cells, we have grown tapered GaP nanowires on AlInP/GaAs substrates. We show experimentally that the reflection from the nanowire coated substrate is reduced and that the transmission into the substrate is increased for a broad spectral and angular range.

  4. FAQ for Case Study Authors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review 2015 ASCR Requirements Review 2015 Previous Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638...

  5. Andrew Case "American Environmental History"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Andrew Case History "American Environmental History" Spring 2008 Advisor: William Cronon Classics, Richard. "It's Your Misfortune and None of My Own": A New History of the American West. (Norman

  6. West Virginia: A Compelling Case

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    West Virginia: A Compelling Case Rich energy history; solid energy expertise West Virginia is an energy state. With a population of just 1.8 million, the state contributes...

  7. Policy and procedures for classification of Class III groundwater at UMTRA Project sites. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently proposed groundwater regulations for the US Department of Energy's )DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. These regulations allow the application of supplemental standards at UMTRA Project sites in specific situations. The designation of groundwater as Class III permits the application of supplemental standards. This document discusses a final UMTRA Project policy and procedures for identifying Class III groundwater, including identification of a review area, definition of water quality, quantification of aquifer yield, and identification of methods reasonably employed for public water supply systems. These items, either individually or collectively, need to be investigated in order to determine if groundwaters at UMTRA Project sites are Class III. This document provides a framework for the DOE to determine Class III groundwaters.

  8. User's guide for the BNW-III optimization code for modular dry/wet-cooled power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, D.J.; Faletti, D.W.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This user's guide describes BNW-III, a computer code developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Dry Cooling Enhancement Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The BNW-III code models a modular dry/wet cooling system for a nuclear or fossil fuel power plant. The purpose of this guide is to give the code user a brief description of what the BNW-III code is and how to use it. It describes the cooling system being modeled and the various models used. A detailed description of code input and code output is also included. The BNW-III code was developed to analyze a specific cooling system layout. However, there is a large degree of freedom in the type of cooling modules that can be selected and in the performance of those modules. The costs of the modules are input to the code, giving the user a great deal of flexibility.

  9. Structural Studies of Chaperones and Chaperone-Tip interactions from the type III secretion systems of Yersinia and Pseudomonas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhury, Sukanya

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Gram-negative bacteria assemble a complex nanomachine, the type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject virulence proteins directly into eukaryotic cells to initiate infection. The T3SS is composed of structural and ...

  10. MODULATION OF THE NF-KAPPA B SIGNALING PATHWAY BY THE BACTERIAL TYPE III SECRETION SYSTEM EFFECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Xiaofei

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a bacterial injection system expressed by many Gram-negative bacteria. During the last two decades, the repertoire of T3SS effectors has been greatly explored, and several mechanisms ...

  11. Case Study: Goose Creek CISD 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GOOSE CREEK CISD FINANCIALS • $4,866,124 project • $600k annual savings • 5,954,383 kWh annual savings IMPROVEMENTS • Lighting and water efficiency, computer power management, HVAC, controls redesign case study McKinstry first worked with Goose... • $693,866 project • $87k annual savings • 682,228 kWh annual savings IMPROVEMENTS • HVAC, lighting and water efficiency, computer power management case study Lake Dallas ISD was interested in improving the energy efficiency and aging infrastructure...

  12. Synthesis and Electrochemical Studies of Cobalt(III) Monohydride Complexes Containing Pendant Amines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedner, Eric S.; Roberts, John A.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new tetraphosphine ligands, PnC-PPh22NPh2 (1,5-diphenyl-3,7-bis((diphenylphosphino)alkyl)-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane; alkyl = (CH2)2, n = 2 (L2); (CH2)3, n = 3 (L3)), have been synthesized. Coordination of these ligands to cobalt affords the complexes [CoII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+ and [CoII(L3)(CH3CN)]2+, which are reduced with KC8 to afford [CoI(L2)(CH3CN)]1+ and [CoI(L3)(CH3CN)]1+. Protonation of the CoI complexes affords [HCoIII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+ and [HCoIII(L3)(CH3CN)]2+. Reduction of HCoIII results in formation of the analogous CoI complex through H-Co bond cleavage. Under voltammetric conditions, the reduced cobalt hydride reacts rapidly with a protic solvent impurity to generate H2 in a monometallic process involving two electrons per cobalt. In contrast, under bulk electrolysis conditions, H2 formation requires only one reducing equivalent per [HCoIII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+, indicating a bimetallic route wherein two cobalt hydride complexes react to form two equiv [CoI(L2)(CH3CN)]1+ and one equiv H2. The cyclic voltammetry of [HCoIII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+, analyzed using digital simulation, is consistent with an ErCrEr reduction mechanism involving reversible acetonitrile dissociation from [HCoII(L2)(CH3CN)]1+. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, for support of the initial parts of this study. Current work is supported by the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Heterogeneous Reduction of PuO2 with Fe(II): Importance of the Fe(III) Reaction Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Qafoku, Odeta; Rai, Dhanpat; Buck, Edgar C.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Heterogeneous reduction of actinides in higher and more soluble oxidation states to lower more insoluble oxidation states by reductants such as Fe(II) has been the subject of intensive study for more than two decades. However, Fe(II)-induced reduction of sparingly soluble Pu(IV) to the more soluble lower oxidation state Pu(III) has been much less studied even though such reactions can potentially increase the mobility of Pu in the subsurface. Thermodynamic calculations are presented that show how differences in the free energy of various possible solid-phase Fe(III) reaction products can greatly influence aqueous Pu(III) concentrations resulting from reduction of PuO2(am) by Fe(II). We present the first experimental evidence that reduction of PuO2(am) to Pu(III) by Fe(II) was enhanced when the Fe(III) mineral goethite was spiked into the reaction. The effect of goethite on reduction of Pu(IV) was demonstrated by measuring the time-dependence of total aqueous Pu concentration, its oxidation state, and system pe/pH. We also re-evaluated established protocols for determining Pu(III) [(Pu(III) + Pu(IV)) - Pu(IV)] by using thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) in toluene extractions; the study showed that it is important to eliminate dissolved oxygen from the TTA solutions for accurate determinations. More broadly, this study highlights the importance of the Fe(III) reaction product in actinide reduction rate and extent by Fe(II).

  14. Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippert, Peter Gregory

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ! ! Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah By Peter Gregory Lippert Submitted to the graduate degree program in Geology and the Graduate Faculty... i Acceptance Page ii Abstract iii-iv Table of contents v-viii List of figures and tables ix-x Chapter 1. Introduction 11-16 Chapter 2. Geologic History...

  15. The potential for detecting gamma-ray burst afterglows from population III stars with the next generation of infrared telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macpherson, D. [ICRAR, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Coward, D. M. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Zadnik, M. G., E-mail: damien.macpherson@icrar.org [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the detectability of a proposed population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from the collapse of Population III (Pop III) stars. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will be able to observe the late time infrared afterglows. We have developed a new method to calculate their detectability, which takes into account the fundamental initial mass function and formation rates of Pop III stars, from which we find the temporal variability of the afterglows and ultimately the length of time JWST and SPICA can detect them. In the range of plausible Pop III GRB parameters, the afterglows are always detectable by these instruments during the isotropic emission, for a minimum of 55 days and a maximum of 3.7 yr. The average number of detectable afterglows will be 2.96× 10{sup –5} per SPICA field of view (FOV) and 2.78× 10{sup –6} per JWST FOV. These are lower limits, using a pessimistic estimate of Pop III star formation. An optimal observing strategy with SPICA could identify a candidate orphan afterglow in ?1.3 yr, with a 90% probability of confirmation with further detailed observations. A beamed GRB will align with the FOV of the planned GRB detector Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope once every 9 yr. Pop III GRBs will be more easily detected by their isotropic emissions (i.e., orphan afterglows) rather than by their prompt emissions.

  16. SECTION III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electricity using wind, photovoltaics (PV), hydropower, biomass, landfill gas, or fuel cells. The generated electricity in excess of demand can be applied as a kilowatt-hour (kWh)...

  17. Part III

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for inflation using the Consumer Price Index for all urban consumers, except the Construction Wage Rate Requirements statute (Davis-Bacon Act), Service Contract Labor Standards...

  18. RADTRAN III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madsen, M.M.; Taylor, J.M.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Reardon, P.C.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A revised and updated version of the RADTRAN computer code is presented. This code has the capability to predict the radiological impacts associated with specific radioactive material shipment schemes and mode specific transport variables.

  19. Part III

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM5Parabolic Trough Parabolic Trough DOE funds2,80 Thursday,

  20. PART III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest andOptimize832 2.860 2.864 2.867

  1. SECTION III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O INTERACTIONSII.LightWest

  2. Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz is Taking OverEvaluating ' M M t .9

  3. PART III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and BiofuelsOversightandCenter PARC2012)I, TheJ TOC PART

  4. Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. O’Donnell; Donald S. Griffin

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

  5. Curriculum Integration Case Studies 1 Moving Beyond Marketing Study Abroad: Comparative Case Studies of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Curriculum Integration Case Studies 1 Moving Beyond Marketing Study Abroad: Comparative Case Integration Case Studies 2 Contents Acknowledgements....................................................................16 5.) Case Study #1 (University of Minnesota, 2006): Oregon State University 1a.) Impetus & Goals

  6. Appurtenance Influence on Type III Hanford Single-Shell Tank Structural Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanborn, Scott E.; Larsen, Brian M.; Julyk, Larry J.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The interim stabilized Hanford Single Shell Tanks (SSTs) are currently undergoing a state of the art analysis to assess the structural integrity of the waste storage tanks, for cleanup and closure operations, considering their adverse thermal histories and an updated seismic hazard for the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The SSTs contain a variety of ancillary pits, piping, piping supports, risers, equipment, and penetrations known as appurtenances. These appurtenances may alter the structural response and ultimately could affect the structural integrity of the SSTs. An important challenge to the structural analysis of the SSTs is determining the impact of these appurtenances on structural integrity. To achieve this, the various appurtenances were reviewed and bounding appurtenance configurations for SST Types II and III tank designs were analyzed using finite element software. The bounding configurations for the Type II tanks considered four heavy offset pits with a central pit with and without a 36-inch diameter central post-construction penetration and four 42-inch diameter offset penetrations. The bounding configuration for the Type III tanks is a tank with two heavy offset pits and one heavy central pit. For each bounding configuration two finite element models are developed: a seismic analysis model and a thermal and operating loads analysis (TOLA) model. The TOLA models include a Type II or III thermal history, concrete cracking and thermal degradation, reinforcement yielding, and soil plasticity. Additionally, operating loads such as internal waste pressure and concentrated and distributed soil surface loads are applied to the TOLA model. The seismic model treats the tank concrete as linear elastic based on the present day degraded concrete properties. Also, in the seismic model the soil is treated as linear elastic while special techniques are used in the soil above the tank dome and along the tank wall to avoid soil arching and achieve the proper soil pressure on the tank walls. Seismic time histories (in the horizontal and vertical directions) are applied to the seismic model. The American Concrete Institute (ACI) has code requirements for nuclear safety-related concrete structures (ACI-349-06) that are used to evaluate the structural integrity of the SSTs. ACI-349-06 recommends evaluating factored load combinations against reduced tank section capacities to account for both loading and material uncertainties. From both the TOLA and seismic models the structural demands (forces and moments) are extracted from sections throughout the tank under the appropriate load combinations. These demands are compared against the ACI-349-06 capacities at each of the sections. This ratio of demand to capacity is reported as a measure of structural integrity. The Type II and Type III appurtenances configurations are found to increase the demand to capacity ratios in local regions near the appurtenances. Away from the appurtenances the influence on structural integrity is minor. A comparison of the Type II and III results show that even though the Type II offset pits weight less, they have a larger impact on the structural integrity of the tanks due to their locations. Finally, lessons learned from the Type II and Type III appurtenance analysis, and their application to the more complex Type IV structural integrity analysis, will be discussed.

  7. Software Certification: Is There a Case against Safety Cases?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawford, Mark

    claims. We believe that the safety case methodology is useful for the soft- ware certification domain in domains like aviation, military applications, and the nuclear industry. Argument based methodologies by the developments above, we have become interested in pro- moting the concept of licensing for software and systems

  8. CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT OF DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEMS AS A DIRECT CONSTRAINT ON POPULATION III STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rollinde, Emmanuel; Vangioni, Elisabeth, E-mail: girish@mpia-hd.mpg.de [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, UPMC, Paris VI, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of damped Ly{alpha} absorbers (DLAs) can be used to measure gas-phase metallicities at large cosmological look-back times with high precision. Furthermore, relative abundances can still be measured accurately deep into the reionization epoch (z > 6) using transitions redward of Ly{alpha}, even though Gunn-Peterson absorption precludes measurement of neutral hydrogen. In this paper, we study the chemical evolution of DLAs using a model for the coupled evolution of galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM), which is constrained by a variety of observations. Our goal is to explore the influence of Population III stars on the abundance patterns of DLAs to determine the degree to which abundance measurements can discriminate between different Population III stellar initial mass functions (IMFs). We include effects, such as inflows onto galaxies due to cosmological accretion and outflows from galaxies due to supernova feedback. A distinct feature of our model is that it self-consistently calculates the effect of Population III star formation on the reionization of an inhomogeneous IGM, thus allowing us to calculate the thermal evolution of the IGM and implement photoionization feedback on low-mass galaxy formation. We find that if the critical metallicity of Population III to II/I transition is {approx}< 10{sup -4} Z{sub Sun }, then the cosmic Population III star formation rate drops to zero for z < 8. Nevertheless, at high redshift (z {approx} 6), chemical signatures of Population III stars remain in low-mass galaxies (halo mass {approx}< 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }). This is because photoionization feedback suppresses star formation in these galaxies until relatively low redshift (z {approx} 10), and the chemical record of their initial generation of Population III stars is retained. We model DLAs as these low-mass galaxies, and assign to them a mass-dependent H I absorption cross-section in order to predict the expected distribution of DLA abundance ratios. We find that these distributions are anchored toward abundance ratios set by Population II supernova yields, but they exhibit a tail which depends significantly on the Population III IMF for z > 5. Thus, a sample of DLA metallicity and relative abundance measurements at high redshift holds the promise to constrain Population III enrichment and the Population III IMF. We find that a sample of just 10 DLAs with relative abundances measured to an accuracy of 0.1 dex is sufficient to constrain the Population III IMF at 4{sigma}. These constraints may prove stronger than other probes of Population III enrichment, such as metal-poor stars and individual metal-poor DLAs. Our results provide a global picture of the thermal, ionization, and chemical evolution of the universe, and have the potential to rule out certain Population III scenarios.

  9. Patrick Case | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Patrick Case Patrick Case Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake...

  10. CALIBRATIONS OF ATMOSPHERIC PARAMETERS OBTAINED FROM THE FIRST YEAR OF SDSS-III APOGEE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mészáros, Sz.; Allende Prieto, C. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Holtzman, J. [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); García Pérez, A. E.; Chojnowski, S. D.; Hearty, F. R.; Majewski, S. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Schiavon, R. P. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead, Wirral CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Basu, S. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Bizyaev, D. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349-0059 (United States); Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Cunha, K. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Epstein, C.; Johnson, J. A. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Frinchaboy, P. M. [Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); García, R. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Hekker, S. [Astronomical Institute ''Anton Pannekoek'', University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kallinger, T. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Koesterke, L. [Texas Advanced Computing Center, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78759 (United States); and others

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a three-year survey that is collecting 10{sup 5} high-resolution spectra in the near-IR across multiple Galactic populations. To derive stellar parameters and chemical compositions from this massive data set, the APOGEE Stellar Parameters and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP) has been developed. Here, we describe empirical calibrations of stellar parameters presented in the first SDSS-III APOGEE data release (DR10). These calibrations were enabled by observations of 559 stars in 20 globular and open clusters. The cluster observations were supplemented by observations of stars in NASA's Kepler field that have well determined surface gravities from asteroseismic analysis. We discuss the accuracy and precision of the derived stellar parameters, considering especially effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity; we also briefly discuss the derived results for the abundances of the ?-elements, carbon, and nitrogen. Overall, we find that ASPCAP achieves reasonably accurate results for temperature and metallicity, but suffers from systematic errors in surface gravity. We derive calibration relations that bring the raw ASPCAP results into better agreement with independently determined stellar parameters. The internal scatter of ASPCAP parameters within clusters suggests that metallicities are measured with a precision better than 0.1 dex, effective temperatures better than 150 K, and surface gravities better than 0.2 dex. The understanding provided by the clusters and Kepler giants on the current accuracy and precision will be invaluable for future improvements of the pipeline.

  11. CONFINED POPULATION III ENRICHMENT AND THE PROSPECTS FOR PROMPT SECOND-GENERATION STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, Jeremy S.; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gnat, Orly [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely recognized that nucleosynthetic output of the first Population III supernovae was a catalyst defining the character of subsequent stellar generations. Most of the work on the earliest enrichment was carried out assuming that the first stars were extremely massive and that the associated supernovae were unusually energetic, enough to completely unbind the baryons in the host cosmic minihalo and disperse the synthesized metals into the intergalactic medium. Recent work, however, suggests that the first stars may in fact have been somewhat less massive, with a characteristic mass scale of a few tens of solar masses. We present a cosmological simulation following the transport of the metals synthesized in a Population III supernova assuming that it had an energy of 10{sup 51} erg, compatible with standard Type II supernovae. A young supernova remnant is inserted in the first star's relic H II region in the free expansion phase and is followed for 40 Myr employing adaptive mesh refinement and Lagrangian tracer particle techniques. The supernova remnant remains partially trapped within the minihalo, and the thin snowplow shell develops pronounced instability and fingering. Roughly half of the ejecta turn around and fall back toward the center of the halo, with 1% of the ejecta reaching the center in {approx}30 kyr and 10% in {approx}10 Myr. The average metallicity of the combined returning ejecta and the pristine filaments feeding into the halo center from the cosmic web is {approx}0.001-0.01 Z{sub Sun }, but the two remain unmixed until accreting onto the central hydrostatic core that is unresolved at the end of the simulation. We conclude that if Population III stars had less extreme masses, they promptly enriched the host minihalos with metals and triggered Population II star formation.

  12. Current Affiliates | JCESR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    include: 4D Energetics Inc. 24M Technologies, Inc. Albemarle AllCell Technologies Ameren Battery Innovation Center Besstech California Clean Energy Fund Carnegie Mellon University...

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - Till.ppt

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Utilities (E.ON)* TVA Big Rivers Electric Coop Ameren* AECI Batesville Balancing Authority NPCC MRO RFC SPP SERC FRCC Central TVA & CPPP - Central to the Eastern...

  14. Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership--Validation Phase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Technology Futures ALLETE Ameren Corporation American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity American Lignite Energy Apache Canada Ltd. Baker Hughes Incorporated Basin Electric...

  15. Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Laser Induced Flourescence Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuta, Jadwiga; Wander, Matthew C F.; Wang, Zheming; Jiang, Siduo; Wall, Nathalie; Clark, Aurora E.

    2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to examine trends in trivalent lanthanide [Ln(III)] sorption to quartz surface SiOH0 and SiO- sites across the 4f period. Complementary laser induced fluorescence studies examined Eu(III) sorption to quartz at varying ionic strength such that the surface sorbed species could be extrapolated at zero ionic strength, the conditions under which the simulations are performed. This allowed for direct comparison of the data, enabling a molecular understanding of the surface sorbed species and the role of the ion surface charge density upon the interfacial reactivity. Thus, this combined theoretical and experimental approach aids in the prediction of the fate of trivalent radioactive contaminants at temporary and permanent nuclear waste storage sites. Potential of mean force molecular dynamics, as well as simulations of pre-sorbed Ln(III) species agrees with the spectroscopic study of Eu(III) sorption, indicating that strongly bound inner-sphere complexes are formed upon sorption to an SiO- site. The coordination shell of the ion contains 6-7 waters of hydration and it is predicted that surface OH groups dissociate from the quartz and bind within the inner coordination shell of Eu(III). Molecular simulations predict less-strongly bound inner2 sphere species in early lanthanides and more strongly bound species in late lanthanides, following trends in the ionic radius of the 4f ions. The participation of surface dissociated OHgroups within the inner coordination shell of the Ln(III) ion is, however, consistent across the series studied. Sorption to a fully protonated quartz surface is not predicted to be favorable by any Ln(III), except perhaps Lu.

  16. Note: Neutron bang time diagnostic system on Shenguang-III prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Qi; Chen, Jiabin; Liu, Zhongjie; Zhan, Xiayu; Song, Zifeng, E-mail: mphyszf@qq.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P. O. Box 919-986, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P. O. Box 919-986, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron bang time (NBT) diagnostic system has been implemented on Shenguang-III prototype. The bang time diagnostic system is based on a sensitive fusion neutron detector, which consists of a plastic scintillator and a micro-channel plate photomultiplier tube (PMT). An optical fiber bundle is used to couple the scintillator and the PMT. The bang time system is able to measure bang time above a neutron yield of 10{sup 7}. Bang times and start time of laser were related by probing x-ray pulses produced by 200 ps laser irradiating golden targets. Timing accuracy of the NBT is better than 60 ps.

  17. Lattice-Mismatched Approaches for High-Performance, III-V Photovoltaic Energy Converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Ahrenkiel, S. P.; Ahrenkiel, R. K.; Albin, D. S.; Carapella, J. J.; Duda, A.; Geisz, J. F.; Kurtz, S.; Moriarty, T.; Wehrer, R. J.; Wernsman, B.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss lattice-mismatched (LMM) approaches using compositionally step-graded layers and buffer layers that yield III-V photovoltaic devices with performance parameters equaling those of similar lattice-matched (LM) devices. Our progress in developing high-performance, LMM, InP-based GaInAs/InAsP materials and devices for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion is highlighted. A novel, monolithic, multi-bandgap, tandem device for solar PV (SPV) conversion involving LMM materials is also presented, along with promising preliminary performance results.

  18. 22c-MS&PMS-III AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitko, Michael L.

    22c-MS&PMS-III DREDGE-UP AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups Pre-AGB Dredge-ups 1st ­ on the RGB;Pre-Dredge-up C:N:O ~ 1 2 : 1 6 :1 After 1st C:N:O~ 1 3 : 1 3 :1 After 2nd C:N:O~0 to the surface. This is the 3rd Dredge-up phase that can bring C-rich material to the surface, changing the star

  19. 25c-MS&PMS-III AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitko, Michael L.

    25c-MS&PMS-III DREDGE-UP AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups Pre-AGB Dredge-ups 1st ­ on the RGB;Pre-Dredge-up C:N:O ~ 1 2 : 1 6 :1 After 1 st C:N:O~ 1 3 : 1 3 :1 After 2 nd C:N:O~0. This is the 3rd Dredge-up phase that can bring C-rich material to the surface, changing the star from an M

  20. The diplomatic corps in Paris and Napoleon III: his role in foreign policy, 1848-1859 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Ronald Gordon

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    observers were Baron Eugene Beyens of Belg1um, Alexander von Hubner of Austr1a, Lord Cowley of England, and Paul Dmi tri evi tch Ki ssel ef f of Russia. Elected president of the Second Republic in 1848, Louis Napoleon immediately attracted diplomatic..., "lorny, I'lapoleon III's il- legitimate half-brother, supported Russia's interests. "Their vani ti es, thei r convi cti ons, thei r i nterests, were always clashing, always compromising, keeping French foreign policy forever in confusion. " (p. 114...

  1. The Food Nutrition Link--Level III Nutrition for the Health of It

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielamowicz, Mary K.; Cooksey, Dymple C.; Hall, Charles R.

    1995-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    F&N 4.325 Texas Agricultural Extension Service ? Zerle L. Carpenter, Director ? The Texas A&M University System ? College Station, Texas LEVEL 3 4-H LEADER GUIDE NUTRITION FOR THE HEALTH OF IT Dear Leader: Nutrition for the Health of It is designed.... Laine Associate Professor and 4-H Youth Development Specialist Nutrition for the Health of It Nutrition for the Health of It Level III Leader Guide* Nutrients Through the Ages and Stages Lesson 1: Nutrients, the RDA and You...

  2. Design optimization analysis of the new SPR III-M reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.D.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the finite element method analysis which was used to refine the SPR III-M reactor fuel assembly mechanical design to withstand the stresses and strains of pulse-mode operation, which induces thermal shock loading in the fuel assembly components. The original reactor design was analyzed for its structural response to separate pulses at increasingly severe levels. Subsequent calculations at one consistent pulse level examined several design modifications, which will result in a significant reduction in stress in the final design.

  3. Guidance for implementation of DOE Order 5820. 2 Chapter III management of low-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide detailed guidance for managing low-level waste (LLW) generated by Department of Energy (DOE) operations, and support the policies and guidelines of Chapter III of DOE Order 5820.2, ''Radioactive Waste Management.'' LLW generated by DOE operations shall be disposed of, where practical, by shallow land burial or greater-confinement disposal. Site-specific requirements for waste acceptance and disposal, site selection, site design, site operation, and site closure/postclosure shall be developed by field organizations. The guidance set forth in this document is provided to assist field organizations in establishing site specific procedures.

  4. Solid-state lighting : the III-V Epi Killer App.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout its history, lighting technology has made tremendous progress: the efficiency with which power is converted into usable light has increased 2.8 orders of magnitude over three centuries. This progress has, in turn, fueled large increases in the consumption of light and productivity of human society. In this talk, we review an emerging new technology, solid-state lighting: its frontier performance potential; the underlying advances in physics and materials that might enable this performance potential; the resulting energy consumption and human productivity benefits; and the impact on worldwide III-V epi manufacture.

  5. Affect of Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments on military facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trembly, L.A. [Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, Port Hueneme, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    EPA has promulgated a number of NESHAPs in accordance with Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) that have affected military installations. This paper provides a survey of NESHAP applicability on military installations and where feasible outlines compliance efforts and quantifies the emission reductions achieved. This paper focuses on NESHAPs promulgated since CAAA90. Specific NESHAPs that will be discussed include Halogenated Solvent Cleaners, Perchloroethylene Dry Cleaners, Chromium Electroplating and Anodizing Tanks, Ship Building and Repair Operations and Aerospace Manufacturing and Rework Operations. Other NESHAPs affecting military installations may be addressed if data are available.

  6. BOLD VENTURE COMPUTATION SYSTEM for nuclear reactor core analysis, Version III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vondy, D.R.; Fowler, T.B.; Cunningham, G.W. III.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a condensed documentation for VERSION III of the BOLD VENTURE COMPUTATION SYSTEM for nuclear reactor core analysis. An experienced analyst should be able to use this system routinely for solving problems by referring to this document. Individual reports must be referenced for details. This report covers basic input instructions and describes recent extensions to the modules as well as to the interface data file specifications. Some application considerations are discussed and an elaborate sample problem is used as an instruction aid. Instructions for creating the system on IBM computers are also given.

  7. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME III)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006Observations of the Madden(ARM-ACME III) ARM

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - DigiCORA-III transition and AIRS preparation IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5 CampaignSP2 DeploymentgovCampaignsDigiCORA-III

  9. DOE Audit Guidance for For-Profit Financial Assistance Awards (Part III)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO OverviewAttachments4 Chairs MeetingOrderCrosswalkEnergy EfficiencyProgram | DepartmentIII)

  10. WIPP SEIS-II - Volume III, Comment Response Document (Part 1 of 8)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE Awards Contract for WIPP Mobile4FebruaryIII

  11. Sandia Energy - III-Nitride core-shell nanowire arrayed solar cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757 (1)Tara46EnergyPowerHighlights - EnergyIII-Nitride

  12. Steady state protein levels in Geobacter metallireducens grown with Iron (III) citrate or nitrate as terminal electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrendt, A. J.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Lindberg, C.; Zhu, W.; Yates, J. R., III; Nevin, K. P.; Lovley, D.; Giometti, C. S.; Biosciences Division; The Scripps Research Inst.; Univ. of Massachusetts

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geobacter species predominate in aquatic sediments and submerged soils where organic carbon sources are oxidized with the reduction of Fe(III). The natural occurrence of Geobacter in some waste sites suggests this microorganism could be useful for bioremediation if growth and metabolic activity can be regulated. 2-DE was used to monitor the steady state protein levels of Geobacter metallireducens grown with either Fe(III) citrate or nitrate to elucidate metabolic differences in response to different terminal electron acceptors present in natural environments populated by Geobacter. Forty-six protein spots varied significantly in abundance (p<0.05) between the two growth conditions; proteins were identified by tryptic peptide mass and peptide sequence determined by MS/MS. Enzymes involved in pyruvate metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were more abundant in cells grown with Fe(III) citrate, while proteins associated with nitrate metabolism and sensing cellular redox status along with several proteins of unknown function were more abundant in cells grown with nitrate. These results indicate a higher level of flux through the TCA cycle in the presence of Fe(III) compared to nitrate. The oxidative stress response observed in previous studies of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) citrate was not seen in G. metallireducens.

  13. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 5. Hanna III field test research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna III was conducted during the spring and summer of 1977. The test involved only two process wells but also had twelve water monitoring wells, eight in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam and four in an aquifer above the coal seam. The test was designed to obtain information regarding the effects of the process on groundwater within the target seam and the overlying aquifer. The site for Hanna III had a low productivity aquifer above the Hanna No. 1 seam. The wells within the seam and the overlying aquifer were placed in such a manner that maximum information on groundwater flow and quality could be obtained. This report covers: (1) site selection and characterization; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 4 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Nucleosynthesis and mixing on the Asymptotic Giant Branch. III. Predicted and observed s-process abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Busso; R. Gallino; D. L. Lambert; C. Travaglio; V. V. Smith

    2001-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of s-process nucleosynthesis calculations for AGB stars of different metallicities and initial masses. The computations were based on previously published stellar evolutionary models that account for the III dredge up phenomenon occurring late on the AGB. Neutron production is driven by the 13C(alpha,n)16O reaction during the interpulse periods in a tiny layer in radiative equilibrium at the top of the He- and C-rich shell. The s-enriched material is subsequently mixed with the envelope by the III dredge up, and the envelope composition is computed after each thermal pulse. We follow the changes in the photospheric abundance of the Ba-peak elements (heavy s, or `hs') and that of the Zr-peak ones (light s, or `ls'), whose logarithmic ratio [hs/ls] has often been adopted as an indicator of the s-process efficiency. The theoretical predictions are compared with published abundances of s elements for Galactic AGB giants of classes MS, S, SC, post-AGB supergiants, and for various classes of binary stars. The observations in general confirm the complex dependence of n captures on metallicity. They suggest that a moderate spread exists in the abundance of 13C that is burnt in different stars. Although additional observations are needed, a good understanding has been achieved of s-process operation in AGB. The detailed abundance distribution including the light elements (CNO) of a few s-enriched stars at different metallicity are examined.

  15. Long-Term Experience With World Health Organization Grade III (Malignant) Meningiomas at a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Lewis A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Prayson, Richard A. [Department of Pathology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lee, Joung [Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Reddy, Chandana; Chao, Samuel T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Barnett, Gene H.; Vogelbaum, Michael A. [Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Suh, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)], E-mail: suhj@ccf.org

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes for patients with Grade III meningiomas as defined by the 2007 World Health Organization standards. Methods and Materials: The slides from patients who had been treated at the Cleveland Clinic for malignant meningiomas were reviewed by a single neuropathologist. The data from 13 patients treated between 1984 and 2006 satisfied the World Health Organization 2007 definition of Grade III meningioma. A total of 24 surgeries were performed, including 13 primary, 7 salvage, and 4 second salvage. Also, 14 courses of radiotherapy (RT) were administered, including fractionated RT in 3 patients after primary surgery, fractionated RT in 4 patients after salvage surgery, salvage stereotactic radiosurgery to six separate areas in 3 patients, and salvage intensity-modulated RT in 1 patient. Results: From the primary surgery, the median survival was 3.4 years, the 5-year survival rate was 47.2%, and the 8-year survival rate was 12.2%. The median time to recurrence was 9.6 months. A trend was seen toward longer survival for patients who had received adjuvant RT after initial surgery compared with those treated with surgery alone. Two patients developed radiation necrosis, and three had surgical complications. Conclusion: This is one of the few studies reporting the outcomes for malignant meningioma patients according to recent definitions. Our results are consistent with existing reports of the overall poor outcomes for atypical and malignant meningioma patients. From the available data, surgical resection followed by RT and salvage therapy can lead to extended survival.

  16. Accretion/Jet Activity and Narrow [O III] Kinematics in Young Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qingwen; Humphrey, Andrew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate black hole masses and Eddington ratios for a sample of 81 young radio galaxies (42 CSS +39 GPS). We find that the average black hole (BH) mass of these young radio galaxies is ~8.3, which is less than that of radio loud QSOs and low redshift radio galaxies. The CSS/GPS sources have relatively high Eddington ratios, with an average value of =-0.75, which are similar to those of narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s). This suggests that young radio galaxies may not only be in the early stages of their radio activity, but also in the early stage of their accretion activity. We find that the young radio galaxies as a class deviate systematically from M_bh-\\sigma relation defined by nearby inactive galaxies, when using [O III] as a surrogate for stellar velocity dispersion, \\sigma_* . We also find that the deviation of the [O III] line width is correlated with the Eddington ratio and sources with Lbol/LEdd~1 have the largest deviations, which are similar to those of radio quiet QSOs/NLS1s (radio jets i...

  17. Climate Change Mitigation: Case Studies from Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    October Climate Change; Sergei Avdiushin; Inna Gritsevich; Susan Legro (editor; Alexander Kolesov; Svetlana Sorokina; William U. Chandler

    Metallurguichesky District of Chelyabinsk Background 3 Approach 4 Project Evaluation 6 Case Study 2: An Industrial

  18. Mining Test Cases To Improve Software Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziftci, Celal

    Finding TestTracing Features to Test Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.4.2 Finding Test Intents Using

  19. 1100/,,1102... twin boundaries in wurtzite ZnO and group-III-nitrides Yanfa Yan and M. M. Al-Jassim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    11Ż00/,,1102... twin boundaries in wurtzite ZnO and group-III-nitrides Yanfa Yan and M. M. Al that the same twin boundaries in wurtzite group-III-nitrides adopt the same structure, but the twin states in the band gap in either ZnO or the wurtzite group-III-nitrides. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.71

  20. Calculation of two-centre two-electron integrals over Slater-type orbitals revisited. III. Case study of the beryllium dimer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesiuk, Micha?; Musia?, Monika; Jeziorski, Bogumi?; Moszynski, Robert

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present results of ab-initio calculations for the beryllium dimer with basis set of Slater-type orbitals (STOs). Nonrelativistic interaction energy of the system is determined using the frozen-core full configuration interaction calculations combined with high-level coupled cluster correction for inner-shell effects. Newly developed STOs basis sets, ranging in quality from double to sextuple zeta, are used in these computations. Principles of their construction are discussed and several atomic benchmarks are presented. Relativistic effects of order ${\\alpha}^2$ are calculated perturbatively by using the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian and are found to be significant. We also estimate the leading-order QED effects. Influence of the adiabatic correction is found to be negligible. Finally, the interaction energy of the beryllium dimer is determined to be 929.0$\\,\\pm\\,$1.9 $cm^{-1}$, in a very good agreement with the recent experimental value. The results presented here appear to be the most accurate ab-...

  1. Calculation of two-centre two-electron integrals over Slater-type orbitals revisited. III. Case study of the beryllium dimer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micha? Lesiuk; Micha? Przybytek; Monika Musia?; Bogumi? Jeziorski; Robert Moszynski

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present results of ab-initio calculations for the beryllium dimer with basis set of Slater-type orbitals (STOs). Nonrelativistic interaction energy of the system is determined using the frozen-core full configuration interaction calculations combined with high-level coupled cluster correction for inner-shell effects. Newly developed STOs basis sets, ranging in quality from double to sextuple zeta, are used in these computations. Principles of their construction are discussed and several atomic benchmarks are presented. Relativistic effects of order ${\\alpha}^2$ are calculated perturbatively by using the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian and are found to be significant. We also estimate the leading-order QED effects. Influence of the adiabatic correction is found to be negligible. Finally, the interaction energy of the beryllium dimer is determined to be 929.0$\\,\\pm\\,$1.9 $cm^{-1}$, in a very good agreement with the recent experimental value. The results presented here appear to be the most accurate ab-initio calculations for the beryllium dimer available in the literature up to date and probably also one of the most accurate calculations for molecular systems containing more than four electrons.

  2. Nanowires, Capacitors, and Other Novel Outer-Surface Components Involved in Electron Transfer to Fe(III) Oxides in Geobacter Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past year studies have primarily focused on elucidating the role of pili in electron transport to Fe(III) oxide in Geobacter sulfurreducens. As summarized in last year's report, it was previously found that pili are specifically expressed during growth on Fe(III) oxide and that Fe(III) oxide reduction is inhibited if the gene for the structural pilin protein is deleted. However, it was also found that a pilin-deficient mutant of G. sulfurreducens could attached to Fe(III) oxide as well as wild type.

  3. Helium Exhaust Experiments on JET with Type I ELMs in H-Mode and with Type III ELMs in ITB Discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helium Exhaust Experiments on JET with Type I ELMs in H-Mode and with Type III ELMs in ITB Discharges

  4. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey; Brushy Basin detail survey: Price/Salina national topographic map sheets, Utah. Volume III. Area II: graphic data, Section III-IX Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains all of the graphic data for Area II, which include map lines 1660 to 3400 and 5360 to 5780 and tie lines 6100, 6120, and 6160. Due to the large map scale of the data presented (1:62,500), this area was further subdivided into eleven 7-1/2 min quadrant sheets. It should be noted that TL6100 resides in both Areas II and III. The graphic data for TL6100 are presented in Volume IV - Area III - Graphic Data of this report.

  5. Disaster case management and individuals with disabilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stough, Laura

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disaster Case Management and Individuals With Disabilities Laura M. Stough and Amy N. Sharp Texas A&M University Curt Decker and Nachama Wilker National Disability Rights Network, Washington, DC Purpose: To examine the case management and disaster... recovery needs of individuals with disabilities following Hurricane Katrina. The case managers and supervisors in this study provided case management to individuals with disabilities as part of the largest coordinated disaster case management program in U...

  6. FLARE-ASSOCIATED TYPE III RADIO BURSTS AND DYNAMICS OF THE EUV JET FROM SDO/AIA AND RHESSI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Naihwa; Ip, Wing-Huen [Graduate Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China); Innes, Davina, E-mail: d949001@astro.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: wingip@astro.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: innes@mps.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed description of the interrelation between the Type III radio bursts and energetic phenomena associated with the flare activities in active region AR11158 at 07:58 UT on 2011 February 15. The timing of the Type III radio burst measured by the radio wave experiment on Wind/WAVE and an array of ground-based radio telescopes coincided with an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jet and hard X-ray (HXR) emission observed by SDO/AIA and RHESSI, respectively. There is clear evidence that the EUV jet shares the same source region as the HXR emission. The temperature of the jet, as determined by multiwavelength measurements by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, suggests that Type III emission is associated with hot, 7 MK, plasma at the jet's footpoint.

  7. ELECTRONIC SOLUTION SPECTRA FOR URANIUM AND NEPTUNIUM IN OXIDATION STATES (III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baluka, M.; Edelstein, N.; O'Donnell, T. A.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectra have been recorded for solutions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) of uranium and neptunium in oxidation states (III) to (VI). The spectra for U(III), Np(III) and Np(IV) in AHF are very similar to those in acidified aqueous solution, but that for U(IV) suggests that the cationic species is UF{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The AHF spectra for the elements in oxidation states (V) and (VI) are not comparable with those of the formally analogous aqueous solutions, where the elements exist as well-defined dioxo-cations. However, the AHF spectra can be related to spectra in the gas phase, in the solid state or in non-aqueous solvents for each element in its appropriate oxidation state.

  8. Case Study: Goose Creek CISD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GOOSE CREEK CISD FINANCIALS • $4,866,124 project • $600k annual savings • 5,954,383 kWh annual savings IMPROVEMENTS • Lighting and water efficiency, computer power management, HVAC, controls redesign case study McKinstry first worked with Goose... Creek CISD performing retro-commissioning through the Centerpoint/Nexant RCx rebate program. McKinstry found additional projects with good returns on investment, warranting a performance contract. Working with the district to apply for the State...

  9. Insertion of apoLp-III into a lipid monolayer is more favorable for saturated, more ordered, acyl-chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathnayake, Sewwandi S. [Kent State University; Mirheydari, Mona [Kent State University; Schulte, Adam [Kent State University; Gillahan, James E. [Kent State University; Gentit, Taylor [Kent State University; Phillips, Ashley N. [Kent State University; Okonkwo, Rose K. [Kent State University; Burger, Koert N.J. [Utrecht University; Mann, Elizabeth K. [Kent State University; Vaknin, David [Ames Laboratory; Bu, Wei [Ames Laboratory; Agra-Kooijman, Dena Mae [Kent State University; Kooijman, Edgar E. [Kent State University

    2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutral lipid transport in mammals is complicated involving many types of apolipoprotein. The exchangeable apolipoproteins mediate the transfer of hydrophobic lipids between tissues and particles, and bind to cell surface receptors. Amphipathic a-helices form a common structural motif that facilitates their lipid binding and exchangeability. ApoLp-III, the only exchangeable apolipoprotein found in insects, is a model amphipathic a:helix bundle protein and its three dimensional structure and function mimics that of the mammalian proteins apoE and apoAI. Even the intracellular exchangeable lipid droplet protein TIP47/perilipin 3 contains an a-helix bundle domain with high structural similarity to that of apoE and apoLp-III. Here, we investigated the interaction of apoLp-III from Locusta migratoria with lipid monolayers. Consistent with earlier work we find that insertion of apoLp-III into fluid lipid monolayers is highest for diacylglycerol. We observe a preference for saturated and more highly ordered lipids, suggesting a new mode of interaction for amphipathic a-helix bundles. X-ray reflectivity shows that apoLp-III unfolds at a hydrophobic interface and flexible loops connecting the amphipathic cc-helices stay in solution. X-ray diffraction indicates that apoLp-III insertion into diacylglycerol monolayers induces additional ordering of saturated acyl-chains. These results thus shed important new insight into the protein-lipid interactions of a model exchangeable apolipoprotein with significant implications for its mammalian counterparts. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A deep mosaic of [O III] 5007 A CCD images of the environment of the LBV star P Cygni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Boumis; J. Meaburn; M. P. Redman; F. Mavromatakis

    2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A mosaic of six, deep, CCD images in the light of the [O III] 5007 A nebular emission line has been obtained with the 1.3-m Skinakas (Crete) telescope of the filamentary nebulosity surrounding P Cygni. The [O III] 5007 A line discriminates against confusing galactic H II regions along the same sight-lines and the new mosaic did not include the 4.8 mag. central star; a source of artifacts in the previous lower angular resolution observations. New giant `lobes' and `shells' are found to be clustered around P Cygni which must be the relics of historic eruptions between 2400 and up to ~10^5 yr ago.

  11. Variable-temperature solid-state NMR studies of iron(II) and iron(III) complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepard, Patricia Arlene

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the first communication reporting the use of C CP/MAS NMR to observe paramagnetic solids directly. Zust as shift reagents had been used in solution-state NMR, selected paramagnetic lanthanide acetates exhibited paramagnetic shifts in the solid state... of the Fe(III) chloride salt yields the w-oxo-bis[porphine- iron(III)] dimer where the two iron centers are bridged via an oxygen. The synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of the metallo-porphyrin dimer w-oxo-bis[tetra- phenylporphineiron...

  12. Title III List of Lists: Consolidated list of chemicals subject to the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act, as amended. Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This consolidated chemical list includes chemicals subject to reporting requirements under Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), also known as the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and chemicals listed under Section 112(r) of Title III of the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990. This consolidated list has been prepared to help firms handling chemicals determine whether they need to submit reports under sections 302, 304, or 314 or SARA Title III (EPCRA) and, for a specific chemical, what reports may need to be submitted. It also will also help firms determine whether they will be subject to accident prevention regulations under CAA section 112(r).

  13. Exploring the biochemistry at the extracellular redox frontier of bacterial mineral Fe(III) respiration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, David J.; Edwards, Marcus; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Zachara, John M.; Gates, Andrew J.; Butt, Julea N.; Clarke, Thomas

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many species of the bacterial Shewanella genus are notable for their ability to respire in anoxic environments utilizing insoluble minerals of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as extracellular electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis, the process is dependent on the decahaem electron-transport proteins that lie at the extracellular face of the outer membrane where they can contact the insoluble mineral substrates. These extracellular proteins are charged with electrons provided by an inter-membrane electron-transfer pathway that links the extracellular face of the outer membrane with the inner cytoplasmic membrane and thereby intracellular electron sources. In the present paper, we consider the common structural features of two of these outermembrane decahaem cytochromes, MtrC and MtrF, and bring this together with biochemical, spectroscopic and voltammetric data to identify common and distinct properties of these prototypical members of different clades of the outer-membrane decahaem cytochrome superfamily.

  14. Redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beifiori, Alessandra; Maraston, Claudia; Steele, Oliver; Masters, Karen L; Pforr, Janine; Saglia, Roberto P; Bender, Ralf; Tojeiro, Rita; Chen, Yan-Mei; Bolton, Adam; Brownstein, Joel R; Johansson, Jonas; Leauthaud, Alexie; Nichol, Robert C; Schneider, Donald P; Senger, Robert; Skibba, Ramin; Wake, David; Pan, Kaike; Snedden, Stephanie; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Shelden, Alaina; Ebelke, Garrett

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of ~180,000 massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS combined with a local early-type galaxy sample from SDSS-II in the redshift range 0.12sigma significance. By combining our sample with high-redshift literature data we find that this evolution of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio continues beyond z~0.7 up to z>2 as Mdyn/Mstar~ (1+z)^{-0.30+/- 0.12} further strengthening the evidence for an increase of Mdyn/Mstar with cosmic time. This result is in line with recent predictions from galaxy formation simulations based on minor merger driven mass growth, in which the dark matter fraction within the half-light radius increases with cosmic time.

  15. Improved Spectrophotometric Calibration of the SDSS-III BOSS Quasar Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margala, Daniel; Dawson, Kyle; Bailey, Stephen; Blanton, Michael; Schneider, Donald P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for spectrophotometric calibration errors in observations of quasars from the third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) and describe the correction procedure we have developed and applied to this sample. Calibration errors are primarily due to atmospheric differential refraction and guiding offsets during each exposure. The corrections potentially reduce the systematics for any studies of BOSS quasars, including the measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations using the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest. Our model suggests that, on average, the observed quasar flux in BOSS is overestimated by $\\sim 19\\%$ at 3600 \\AA\\ and underestimated by $\\sim 24\\%$ at 10,000 \\AA. Our corrections for the entire BOSS quasar sample are publicly available.

  16. Lattice-Mismatched III-V Epilayers for High-Efficiency Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrenkiel, Scott Phillip [South Dakota School of Mines & Technology] [South Dakota School of Mines & Technology

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project focused on development of new approaches and materials combinations to expand and improve the quality and versatility of lattice-mismatched (LMM) III-V semiconductor epilayers for use in high-efficiency multijunction photovoltaic (PV) devices. To address these goals, new capabilities for materials synthesis and characterization were established at SDSM&T that have applications in modern opto- and nano-electronics, including epitaxial crystal growth and transmission electron microscopy. Advances were made in analyzing and controlling the strain profiles and quality of compositional grades used for these technologies. In particular, quaternary compositional grades were demonstrated, and a quantitative method for characteristic X-ray analysis was developed. The project allowed enhanced collaboration between scientists at NREL and SDSM&T to address closely related research goals, including materials exchange and characterization.

  17. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  18. Large zenith angle observations with the high-resolution GRANITE III camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Petry; the VERITAS Collaboration

    2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRANITE III camera of the Whipple Cherenkov Telescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona (2300 m a.s.l.) has the highest angular resolution of all cameras used on this telescope so far. The central region of the camera has 379 pixels with an individual angular diameter of 0.12 degrees. This makes the instrument especially suitable for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at large zenith angles since the increase in average distance to the shower maximum leads to smaller shower images in the focal plane of the telescope. We examine the performance of the telescope for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at zenith angles up to 63 degrees based on observations of Mkn 421 and using Monte Carlo Simulations. An improvement to the standard data analysis is suggested.

  19. Large zenith angle observations with the high-resolution GRANITE III camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petry, D

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRANITE III camera of the Whipple Cherenkov Telescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona (2300 m a.s.l.) has the highest angular resolution of all cameras used on this telescope so far. The central region of the camera has 379 pixels with an individual angular diameter of 0.12 degrees. This makes the instrument especially suitable for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at large zenith angles since the increase in average distance to the shower maximum leads to smaller shower images in the focal plane of the telescope. We examine the performance of the telescope for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at zenith angles up to 63 degrees based on observations of Mkn 421 and using Monte Carlo Simulations. An improvement to the standard data analysis is suggested.

  20. III-nitride nanowires : novel materials for solid-state lighting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, George T.; Upadhya, Prashanth C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Prasankumar, Rohit P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Armstrong, Andrew M.; Huang, Jian Yu; Li, Qiming; Talin, Albert Alec (NIST, Gaithersburg, MD)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although planar heterostructures dominate current solid-state lighting architectures (SSL), 1D nanowires have distinct and advantageous properties that may eventually enable higher efficiency, longer wavelength, and cheaper devices. However, in order to fully realize the potential of nanowire-based SSL, several challenges exist in the areas of controlled nanowire synthesis, nanowire device integration, and understanding and controlling the nanowire electrical, optical, and thermal properties. Here recent results are reported regarding the aligned growth of GaN and III-nitride core-shell nanowires, along with extensive results providing insights into the nanowire properties obtained using cutting-edge structural, electrical, thermal, and optical nanocharacterization techniques. A new top-down fabrication method for fabricating periodic arrays of GaN nanorods and subsequent nanorod LED fabrication is also presented.

  1. Finding the first cosmic explosions. III. Pulsational pair-instability supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Smidt, Joseph [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Woosley, S. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCSC, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Heger, Alexander [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Stiavelli, Massimo [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Population III supernovae have been the focus of growing attention because of their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that can be seen at the edge of the observable universe. But until now pulsational pair-instability supernovae, in which explosive thermonuclear burning in massive stars fails to unbind them but can eject their outer layers into space, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the earliest redshifts. These shells can later collide and, like Type IIn supernovae, produce superluminous events in the UV at high redshifts that could be detected in the near infrared today. We present numerical simulations of a 110 M {sub ?} pulsational pair-instability explosion done with the Los Alamos radiation hydrodynamics code Radiation Adaptive Grid Eulerian. We find that collisions between consecutive pulsations are visible in the near infrared out to z ? 15-20 and can probe the earliest stellar populations at cosmic dawn.

  2. Dilute Group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  3. Conceptual design report for environmental, safety and health phase III FY-91 line item

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mound Facility (Mound), located in Miamisburg, Ohio, is a Department of Energy (DOE) development and production facility performing support work for DOE`s weapons and energy-related programs. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies (EG&G) is the Operating Contractor (OC) for this Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facility. The work performed at Mound emphasizes nuclear energy and explosives technology. Mound is currently implementing an Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Program designed to protect its employees, the public, and the environment from adverse effects caused by the facility`s activities. Design has been completed, and construction is in progress for Phase I of this multiphase program. Phase II has been submitted for fiscal year (FY) 89 funding and Phase IV is being submitted as an FY 92 line item. This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) addresses Phase III of the ES&H program.

  4. nu-Process Nucleosynthesis in Population III Core-Collapse Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Yoshida; Hideyuki Umeda; Ken'ichi Nomoto

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effects of neutrino-nucleus interactions (the nu-process) on the production of iron-peak elements in Population III core-collapse supernovae. The nu-process and the following proton and neutron capture reactions produce odd-Z iron-peak elements in complete and incomplete Si burning region. This reaction sequence enhances the abundances of Sc, Mn, and Co in the supernova ejecta. The supernova explosion models of 15 M_sol and 25 M_sol stars with the nu-process well reproduce the averaged Mn/Fe ratio observed in extremely metal-poor halo stars. In order to reproduce the observed Mn/Fe ratio, the total neutrino energy in the supernovae should be 3 - 9 x 10^{53} ergs. Stronger neutrino irradiation and other production sites are necessary to reproduce the observed Sc/Fe and Co/Fe ratios, although these ratios increase by the nu-process.

  5. Direct observation of interface and nanoscale compositional modulation in ternary III-As heterostructure nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatesan, Sriram; Scheu, Christina [Department of Chemistry and Center for NanoScience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Butenandstr 5-13(E), 81377 München (Germany)] [Department of Chemistry and Center for NanoScience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Butenandstr 5-13(E), 81377 München (Germany); Madsen, Morten H.; Krogstrup, Peter; Johnson, Erik [Nano-Science Center and Center for Quantum Devices, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Nano-Science Center and Center for Quantum Devices, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Schmid, Herbert [INM-Leibniz Institute for New Materials, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)] [INM-Leibniz Institute for New Materials, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Straight, axial InAs nanowire with multiple segments of Ga{sub x}In{sub 1?x}As was grown. High resolution X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) mapping reveals the distribution of group III atoms at the axial interfaces and at the sidewalls. Significant Ga enrichment, accompanied by a structural change is observed at the Ga{sub x}In{sub 1?x}As/InAs interfaces and a higher Ga concentration for the early grown Ga{sub x}In{sub 1?x}As segments. The elemental map and EDS line profile infer Ga enrichment at the facet junctions between the sidewalls. The relative chemical potentials of ternary alloys and the thermodynamic driving force for liquid to solid transition explains the growth mechanisms behind the enrichment.

  6. A DECADE OF SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURSTS OBSERVED BY THE NANCAY RADIOHELIOGRAPH 1998-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saint-Hilaire, P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vilmer, N.; Kerdraon, A., E-mail: shilaire@ssl.berkeley.edu [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universite Paris-Diderot 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a statistical survey of almost 10,000 radio type III bursts observed by the Nancay Radioheliograph from 1998 to 2008, covering nearly a full solar cycle. In particular, sources sizes, positions, and fluxes were examined. We find an east-west asymmetry in source positions that could be attributed to a 6 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign eastward tilt of the magnetic field, that source FWHM sizes s roughly follow a solar-cycle-averaged distribution (dN/ds) Almost-Equal-To 14 {nu}{sup -3.3} s {sup -4} arcmin{sup -1} day{sup -1}, and that source fluxes closely follow a solar-cycle-averaged (dN/ds {sub {nu}}) Almost-Equal-To 0.34 {nu}{sup -2.9} S {sup -1.7} {sub {nu}} sfu{sup -1} day{sup -1} distribution (when {nu} is in GHz, s in arcminutes, and S {sub {nu}} in sfu). Fitting a barometric density profile yields a temperature of 0.6 MK, while a solar wind-like ({proportional_to}h {sup -2}) density profile yields a density of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} at an altitude of 1 R{sub S} , assuming harmonic emission. Finally, we found that the solar-cycle-averaged radiated type III energy could be similar in magnitude to that radiated by nanoflares via non-thermal bremsstrahlung processes, and we hint at the possibility that escaping electron beams might carry as much energy away from the corona as is introduced into it by accelerated nanoflare electrons.

  7. Reliability-based casing design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maes, M.A. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Civil Engineering Dept.; Gulati, K.C.; Johnson, R.C. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); McKenna, D.L. [Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria); Brand, P.R.; Lewis, D.B. [Mobil E and P Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper describes the development of reliability-based design criteria for oil and/or gas well casing/tubing. The approach is based on the fundamental principles of limit state design. Limit states for tubulars are discussed and specific techniques for the stochastic modeling of loading and resistance variables are described. Zonation methods and calibration techniques are developed which are geared specifically to the characteristic tubular design for both hydrocarbon drilling and production applications. The application of quantitative risk analysis to the development of risk-consistent design criteria is shown to be a major and necessary step forward in achieving more economic tubular design.

  8. FOIA Cases | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager6-OPAM FLASH2011-16-OPAM DOEFLEXLAB FLEXLABFOIA Cases

  9. FOIA Cases | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager6-OPAM FLASH2011-16-OPAM DOEFLEXLAB FLEXLABFOIA CasesMay

  10. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability of the UBC Food System Project III Scenario 8-Perceptions of UBC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability of the UBC Food System Project III Scenario 8- Perceptions of UBC Customers regarding the price of food at UBC Sustainability of the UBC Food System Project III Scenario 8- Perceptions of UBC Customers regarding the price

  11. FATE OF NICKEL ION IN (II-III) HYDROXYSULPHATE GREEN RUST SYNTHESIZED BY... 813 R. Bras. Ci. Solo, 31:813-818, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    FATE OF NICKEL ION IN (II-III) HYDROXYSULPHATE GREEN RUST SYNTHESIZED BY... 813 R. Bras. Ci. Solo, 31:813-818, 2007 FATE OF NICKEL ION IN (II-III) HYDROXYSULPHATE GREEN RUST SYNTHESIZED the environment by coprecipitation. Index terms: nickel incorporation, nickel adsorption, X-ray diffraction

  12. Hydrogen Production: Fundamentals and Case Study Summaries (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, K.; Remick, R.; Hoskin, A.; Martin, G.

    2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes hydrogen production fundamentals and case studies, including hydrogen to wind case studies.

  13. Influence of photoperiod on the time of parturition in the rat. III. Comparison of different daily light lengths with changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Influence of photoperiod on the time of parturition in the rat. III. Comparison of different daily light lengths with changes in light timing or light pulse given during darkness. M. J. BOSC Agnès to the light regime applied throughout pregnancy (day 1 : beginning of pregnancy). The majority of deliveries

  14. Biophysical Characterization of Chlamydia trachomatis CT584 Supports Its Potential Role as a Type III Secretion Needle Tip Protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markham, Aaron P.; Jaafar, Zane A.; Kemege, Kyle E.; Middaugh, C. Russell; Hefty, P. Scott

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Starnbach MN. The Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium-encoded type III secretion systems can translocate Chlamydia trachomatis proteins into the cytosol of host cells. Infect Immun. 2005; 73:905–911. [PubMed: 15664932] 20. Hower S, Wolf K, Fields KA...

  15. Enhanced Adsorption of Arsenic onto Maghemites Nanoparticles: As(III) as a Probe of the Surface Structure and Heterogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Geen, Alexander

    Enhanced Adsorption of Arsenic onto Maghemites Nanoparticles: As(III) as a Probe of the Surface between 300 and 20 nm. However, nanoparticles smaller than 20 nm exhibit enhanced adsorption capacity. The origin of this observed size-dependence for adsorption or "nano effect" is unclear. Arsenic was chosen

  16. HTST 383 WAR AND SOCIETY III: COLD WAR AND T/R 1200-1445. EDC 388

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    HTST 383 ­ WAR AND SOCIETY III: COLD WAR AND BEYOND SPRING T/R 1200-1445. EDC 388 ADAM LAJEUNESSE For nearly half a century the world stood on the brink of total, perhaps even apocalyptic, war. The competing. This course is the history of the Cold War. The military struggle, the economic competition

  17. Chemical modeling of arsenic(III, V) and selenium(IV, VI) adsorption by soils surrounding ash disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, S.; Hyun, S.; Lee, L.S. [USDA, Riverside, CA (United States). US Salinity Laboratory

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Leachate derived from coal ash disposal facilities is a potential anthropogenic source of As and Se to the environment. To establish a practical framework for predicting attenuation and transport of As and Se in ash leachates, the adsorption of As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) had been characterized in prior studies for 18 soils obtained downgradient from ash landfill sites and representing a wide range of soil properties. The constant capacitance model was applied for the first time to describe As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) adsorption on soils as a function of equilibrium solution As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) concentrations. Prior applications of the model had been restricted to describing Se(IV) and As(V) adsorption by soils as a function of solution pH. The constant capacitance model was applied for the first time to describe As(III) and Se(VI) adsorption by soils. The model was able to describe adsorption of these ions on all soils as a function of solution ion concentration by optimizing only one adjustable parameter, the anion surface complexation constant. This chemical model represents an advancement over adsorption isotherm equation approaches that contain two empirical adjustable parameters. Incorporation of these anion surface complexation constants obtained with the constant capacitance model into chemical speciation transport models will allow simulation of soil solution anion concentrations under diverse environmental and agricultural conditions.

  18. SFWR ENG 3BB4 --Software Design 3 --Concurrent System Design 1.2 4 Software Design III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carette, Jacques

    of Engineering McMaster University SFWR ENG 3BB4 -- Software Design 3 -- Concurrent System Design 1.3 5 CourseSFWR ENG 3BB4 -- Software Design 3 -- Concurrent System Design 1.2 4 Software Design III Concurrent Description (Calendar) · Processes, threads, concurrency; · Synchronization mechanisms, resource management

  19. Effects of Methanol on the Thermodynamics of Iron(III) [Tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)]porphyrin Chloride Dissociation and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    Effects of Methanol on the Thermodynamics of Iron(III) [Tetrakis in acetonitrile but is catalytically active if the solvent contains methanol. It was suggested that the precursor to the active species is (F20TPP)Fe(OCH3) in methanol-containing solvents. The present study was aimed

  20. III. CONFINEMENT R. J. GOLDSTON (PPPL), R. E. WALTZ (GA) G. BATEMAN (PPPL), D. P. STOTLER (PPPL),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are not in a position to perform "first- principles" calculations of the projected perfor- mance of BPX. On the other Force and the Doublet III-D (DIII-D) and Toka- mak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) experimental teams, has, in order to develop techniques to optimize such plasmas for an Engineering Test Reactor, and in order