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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Improving Boiler Efficiency Modeling Based on Ambient Air Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimum economic operation in a large power plant can cut operating costs substantially. Individual plant equipment should be operated under conditions that are most favorable for maximizing its efficiency. It is widely accepted that boiler load significantly effects boiler efficiency. In the study reported here, the measured performance of a 300,000 lb/h steam boiler was found to show more dependence on ambient air temperature than on boiler load. It also showed an unexplained dependence on the month of the year that is comparable to the load dependence.

Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Improving Boiler Efficiency Modeling Based On Ambient Air Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimum economic operation in a large power plant can cut operating costs substantially. Individual plant equipment should be operated under conditions that are most favorable for maximizing its efficiency. It is widely accepted that boiler load significantly effects boiler efficiency. In the study reported here, the measured performance of a 300,000 lb/h steam boiler was found to show more dependence on ambient air temperature than on boiler load. It also showed an unexplained dependence on the month of the year that is comparable to the load dependence.

Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Effect of Ambient Design Temperature on Air-Cooled Binary Plant Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-cooled binary plants are designed to provide a specified level of power production at a particular air temperature. Nominally this air temperature is the annual mean or average air temperature for the plant location. This study investigates the effect that changing the design air temperature has on power generation for an air-cooled binary plant producing power from a resource with a declining production fluid temperature and fluctuating ambient temperatures. This analysis was performed for plants operating both with and without a geothermal fluid outlet temperature limit. Aspen Plus process simulation software was used to develop optimal air-cooled binary plant designs for specific ambient temperatures as well as to rate the performance of the plant designs at off-design operating conditions. Results include calculation of annual and plant lifetime power generation as well as evaluation of plant operating characteristics, such as improved power generation capabilities during summer months when electric power prices are at peak levels.

Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility...

5

Ambient Air Quality Criteria (Manitoba, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Manitoba Ambient Air Quality Criteria schedule lists maximum time-based pollutant concentration levels for the protection and preservation of ambient air quality within the Province of Manitoba...

6

Evaluation of an Absorption Heat Pump to Mitigate Plant Capacity Reduction Due to Ambient Temperature Rise for an Air-Cooled Ammonia and Water Cycle: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air-cooled geothermal plants suffer substantial decreases in generating capacity at increased ambient temperatures. As the ambient temperature rises by 50 F above a design value of 50 F, at low brine-resource temperatures, the decrease in generating capacity can be more than 50%. This decrease is caused primarily by increased condenser pressure. Using mixed-working fluids has recently drawn considerable attention for use in power cycles. Such cycles are more readily amenable to use of absorption ''heat pumps.'' For a system that uses ammonia and water as the mixed-working fluid, this paper evaluates using an absorption heat pump to reduce condenser backpressure. At high ambient temperatures, part of the turbine exhaust vapor is absorbed into a circulating mixed stream in an absorber in series with the main condenser. This steam is pumped up to a higher pressure and heated to strip the excess vapor, which is recondensed using an additional air-cooled condenser. The operating conditions are chosen to reconstitute this condensate back to the same concentration as drawn from the original system. We analyzed two power plants of nominal 1-megawatt capacity. The design resource temperatures were 250 F and 300 F. Ambient temperature was allowed to rise from a design value of 50 F to 100 F. The analyses indicate that using an absorption heat pump is feasible. For the 300 F resource, an increased brine flow of 30% resulted in a net power increase of 21%. For the 250 F resource, the increase was smaller. However, these results are highly plant- and equipment-specific because evaluations must be carried out at off-design conditions for the condenser. Such studies should be carried out for specific power plants that suffer most from increased ambient temperatures.

Bharathan, D.; Nix, G.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

7

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ambient air quality standards are based on the national ambient air quality standards. The Vermont standards are classified as primary and secondary standards and judged adequate to protect...

8

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article lists specific standards for ambient air quality standards for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, lead and nitrogen dioxide.

9

The effect of hardware configuration on the performance of residential air conditioning systems at high outdoor ambient temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was performed which investigated the effect of hardware configuration on air conditioning cooling system performance at high outdoor temperatures. The initial phase of the investigation involved the testing of ten residential air conditioning units in psychrometric rooms at Texas A&M University. All units were tested using ARI Standard 210/240 (1989) test procedures. Tests were conducted at indoor conditions of 80'F (26.7'C) db and 67'F (19.4'C) wb, and outdoor db temperatures of 82'F (27.8'C), 95-F (35-C), 100-F (37.8-C), 105-F (40.6-C), 1 10-F (43.3-C), and 120-F (48.90C). The second phase of the research involved the analysis of manufacturers' published cooling performance data for various hardware configurations. For the experimental work, measurements were taken to determine total capacity, system power, EER, and power factor. These results were then compared to manufacturers' predicted values. For the capacity, the experimental results were an average of 2.6% below the manufacturers' published values for outdoor temperatures from 85'F (29.4'C) to 115'F (46.l'C). Experimental power measurements were on average 0.4% above manufacturers' listed results. For the EER, experimental results were an average of 2.9% less than the manufacturers' predicted values. The power factors of all units were above 0.95 for the tested outdoor temperatures. In the analysis of manufacturers' published data, relationships between steady-state performance, cyclic performance, and hardware configuration were investigated for a variety of air conditioning units. A statistical relationship was found between the SEER of a unit and its corresponding EER. The split-system units possessed greater increases in EER for a given increase in SEER than the package or two-speed units. Averages values of EER/SEER for EER's at 95F (350C) were highest for the split-system units, followed by the package and two-speed units, respectively. Normalized capacity, power, and EER curves were investigated at outdoor temperatures from 85F (29.40C) to 115OF (46.1"C). On average, the two-speed units showed the smallest decrease in capacity with an increase in outdoor temperature, followed by the split-system and package-system units. The smallest power increase and smallest EER decrease with an increase in outdoor temperature were exhibited by the split-system units, followed by the two-speed and package-system units.

Bain, Joel Alan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for airborne fine particles (PM2.5) are based on the mass of PM2.5 measured at outdoor monitoring stations; however, most people spend the majority of their time indoors. In order to fully understand the relationship between ambient PM2.5 and human health effects, it is important to define how ambient PM2.5 concentrations and compositions compare to those actually breathed by humans during normal daily activities. The objective of SCAMP is to measure the concentrations of PM2.5 and other potential air pollutants at ambient monitoring stations in and around Steubenville, OH, and relate them to the pollutant concentrations in air that is actually breathed by people living in the area. Steubenville was chosen by DOE for this study because of the ability to integrate its results with those of the UORVP, and also because Steubenville was one of the six cities where correlations between ambient PM2.5 mass and adverse health effects had been noted. These correlations had been cited by EPA as one of the primary justifications for its 1997 ambient PM2.5 standards. Complete characterization of the relationships between ambient PM2.5 and human exposure, including the chemical components of PM2.5 at various locations, will provide a comprehensive database for use in subsequent epidemiological studies, long-range transport studies, and State Implementation Program development. CONSOL Energy is the primary performer of SCAMP, and will provide the necessary coordination and data integration between the various components of the study.

11

Ambient Operation of Li/Air Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, Li/air batteries based on nonaqueous electrolytes were investigated in ambient conditions (with an oxygen partial pressure of 0.21 atm and relative humidity of ~20%). A heat-sealable polymer membrane was used as both an oxygen-diffusion membrane and as a moisture barrier for Li/air batteries. The membrane also can minimize the evaporation of the electrolyte from the batteries. Li/air batteries with this membrane can operate in ambient conditions for more than one month with a specific energy of 362 Wh kg-1, based on the total weight of the battery including its packaging. Among various carbon sources used in this work, Li/air batteries using Ketjenblack (KB) carbon-based air electrodes exhibited the highest specific energy. However, KB-based air electrodes expanded significantly and absorbed much more electrolyte than electrodes made from other carbon sources. The weight distribution of a typical Li/air battery using the KB-based air electrode was dominated by the electrolyte (~70%). Lithium-metal anodes and KB-carbon anodes account for only 5.12% and 5.78% of the battery weight, respectively. We also found that only ~ 20% of the mesopore volume of the air electrode was occupied by reaction products after discharge. To further improve the specific energy of the Li/air batteries, the microstructure of the carbon electrode needs to be further improved to absorb much less electrolyte while still holding significant amounts of reaction products

Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Deyu; Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Williford, Ralph E.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Effects of ambient humidity on the energy use of air conditioning equipment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper addresses the real-time use of ambient wet bulb temperature measurements in the optimization of building air conditioning system control as a means to… (more)

White, Justin George

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) 3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 53, entitled Ambient Air Quality, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet's Department for Environmental Protection. Chapter 53 sets the air quality standards for pollutants regulated under the federally mandated Clean Air Act. The purpose of the

14

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider State of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection This article lists specific standards for ambient air quality standards for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, lead and

15

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info Start Date 11/30/1995 State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department This regulation establishes ambient air quality standards for the areas of New Mexico under the jurisdiction of the Environmental Improvement Board. The maximum allowable concentrations of total suspended particulate in the ambient air are as follows: 24-hour average: 150 ug/m3; 7-day average: 110 ug/m3; 30-day average: 90 ug/m3; Annual geometric mean: 60 ug/m3. The maximum allowable concentrations of sulfur-containing

16

Winter Morning Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of temperature measurements, which may be applied to inference of winter temperatures in data-sparse areas, are presented. The morning air temperatures during three winters were measured at 80 places in a 10 km × 30 km area along the ...

A. Hogan; M. Ferrick

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations This...

18

Chapter 51 Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 51, entitled Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality...

19

Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about {+-}2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

Sevilla, J.

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

20

Ambient Air Sampling During Quantum-dot Spray Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient air sampling for nano-size particle emissions was performed during spot spray coating operations with a Sono-Tek Exactacoat Benchtop system (ECB). The ECB consisted of the application equipment contained within an exhaust enclosure. The enclosure contained numerous small access openings, including an exhaust hook-up. Door access comprised most of the width and height of the front. The door itself was of the swing-out type. Two types of nanomaterials, Cadmium selenide (Cd-Se) quantum-dots (QDs) and Gold (Au) QDs, nominally 3.3 and 5 nm in diameter respectively, were applied during the evaluation. Median spray drop size was in the 20 to 60 micrometer size range.1 Surface coating tests were of short duration, on the order of one-half second per spray and ten spray applications between door openings. The enclosure was ventilated by connection to a high efficiency particulate aerosol (HEPA) filtered house exhaust system. The exhaust rate was nominally 80 ft3 per minute producing about 5 air changes per minute. Real time air monitoring with a scanning mobility particle size analyzer (SMPS ) with a size detection limit of 7 nm indicated a significant increase in the ambient air concentration upon early door opening. A handheld condensation particle counter (CPC) with a lower size limit of 10 nm did not record changes in the ambient background. This increase in the ambient was not observed when door opening was delayed for 2 minutes (~10 air changes). The ventilated enclosure controlled emissions except for cases of rapid door opening before the overspray could be removed by the exhaust. A time delay sufficient to provide 10 enclosure air changes (a concentration reduction of more than 99.99 %) before door opening prevented the release of aerosol particles in any size.2 Scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated the presence of agglomerates in the surfaces of the spray applied deposition. A filtered air sample of the enclosure overspray examined by AFM also demonstrated the presence of agglomerates for the Au QDs. The AFM system was not able to resolve individual QDs as was the STEM. Chemical fingerprinting of the QDs with STEM/EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy) was performed for the Cd-Se surface deposition, but not the aerosol. Both STEM and AFM background characterization by morphology and chemical fingerprinting were performed throughout the laboratory for a period of about one year. Outdoor sources were primarily biological, combustion fume, salt and other crustal particles. Indoor sources were primarily paper/clothing fibers, spray-on insulation fragments, fiber glass, and human skin cells.

Jankovic, John Timothy [ORNL; Hollenbeck, Scott M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Air Quality Database and Analytical Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Database and Analytical Tool for Air Quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley Database and Analytical Tool for Air Quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. with Ohio University and Texas A&M University - Kingsville as subcontractors, will develop a state-of-the-art, scalable and robust computer application for NETL to manage the extensive data sets resulting from the DOE-sponsored ambient air monitoring programs in the upper Ohio River valley region. Efforts will be made to include, to the greatest extent possible, ambient air data collected by other agencies in the upper Ohio River valley region, such as U.S. EPA, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PA-DEP), West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WV-DEP), Ohio EPA, and the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD). Although emphasis will be placed on data collected in the upper Ohio River valley region, the computer application developed under this Agreement will be designed, to the greatest extent possible, to access data collected at NETL-sponsored ambient air monitoring sites outside the region, such as sites operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the Great Smoky Mountains (under DOE Interagency Agreement DE-AI26-98FT40406) and by Southern Research Institute in North Birmingham, AL (under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40770). The data base and analytical tool development effort will also be coordinated, to the greatest extent possible, with similar tools being developed for use by U.S. EPA. This will ensure that the database and analytical tools produced under this Agreement will be readily accessible to a wide variety of stakeholders.

22

Single-Duct Constant Air Volume System Supply Air Temperature Reset: Using Return Air Temperature or Outside Air Temperature?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supply air temperature set point for a singleduct constant air volume air handling unit (AHU) system is often reset based on either return air temperature or outside air temperature in order to reduce simultaneous cooling and heating energy consumption. Both reset strategies make engineering sense as long as the reset schedules are reasonable. Quite often the decision to use one over the other is made with the assumption that they will all achieve some sorts of energy savings. However, the impact of these two strategies on AHU energy consumption could be very different. A comparison of these two commonly used supply air temperature reset strategies for a single-duct constant air volume system is presented in this paper. It is shown that from either the building energy consumption or building comfort point of view, the reset strategy based on outside air temperature is inherently better than that based on return air temperature. Significant amount of heating energy savings can be achieved by switching from return air temperature based reset to outside air temperature based reset. The reset strategy can also benefit variable air volume (VAV) AHUs. An improved supply air temperature set point reset control strategy is proposed by combining and staging the outside air and return air temperature based resets.

Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D.; Liu, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Polymeric electrolytes for ambient temperature lithium batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new type of highly conductive Li{sup +} polymer electrolyte, referred to as the Innovision polymer electrolyte, is completely amorphous at room temperature and has an ionic conductivity in the range of 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm. This report discusses the electrochemical characteristics (lithium oxidation and reduction), conductivity, and physical properties of Innovision electrolytes containing various dissolved salts. These electrolytes are particularly interesting since they appear to have some of the highest room-temperature lithium ion conductivities yet observed among polymer electrolytes. 13 refs. 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Farrington, G.C. (Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Air Handling Unit Supply Air Temperature Optimization During Economizer Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most air handling units (AHUs) in commercial buildings have an air economizer cycle for free cooling under certain outside air conditions. During the economizer cycle, the outside air and return air dampers are modulated to seek mixing air temperature at supply air temperature setpoint. Mechanical cooling is always required when outside air temperature is higher than the supply air temperature setpoint. Generally the supply air temperature setpoint is set at 55°F for space humidity control. Actually the dehumidification is not necessary when outside air dew point is less than 55°F. Meanwhile the space may have less cooling load due to envelope heat loss and/or occupant schedule. These provide an opportunity to use higher supply air temperature to reduce or eliminate mechanical cooling and terminal box reheat. On the other hand the higher supply air temperature will require higher air flow as well as higher fan power. Therefore the supply air temperature has to be optimized to minimize the combined energy for fan, cooling and heating energy. In this paper a simple energy consumption model is established for AHU systems during the economizer and then a optimal supply air temperature control is developed to minimize the total cost of the mechanical cooling and the fan motor power. This paper presents AHU system energy modeling, supply air temperature optimization, and simulated energy savings.

Xu, K.; Liu, M.; Wang, G.; Wang, Z.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

McQuaid, James H. (Livermore, CA); Lavietes, Anthony D. (Hayward, CA)

1998-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

26

Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

27

Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions  

SciTech Connect

We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

28

Modeling Ambient Air Quality In The Detroit-Windsor Airshed.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The spatial variability of airborne contaminants in an international airshed was investigated using geostatistics and air dispersion modeling. Analyses were conducted on contaminant species measured… (more)

Molaroni, Shannon Marie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

A Climatic Model for the Prediction of Percentile Statistics for Ambient Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The probability density function (pdf) for ambient temperature is predicted from daily maximum and daily minimum temperature and sunshine, data by means of a climatic model.

Aleck J. Hunter

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Analysis of air-temperature measurements from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of the ambient air resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) just after the hydrogen burn in the TMI-2 Reactor Building is examined. The performance of the sensors is compared with physical models of the sensor/ambient air system. With one exception, the RTD data appear to be valid for the period examined. Based on the data, the hydrogen burn ended considerably before the first data points were recorded.

Fryer, M.O.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Automatic electrochemical ambient air monitor for chloride and chlorine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical monitoring system has been provided for determining chloride and chlorine in air at levels of from about 10-1000 parts per billion. The chloride is determined by oxidation to chlorine followed by reduction to chloride in a closed system. Chlorine is determined by direct reduction at a platinum electrode in 6 M H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 electrolyte. A fully automated system is utilized to (1) acquire and store a value corresponding to electrolyte-containing impurities, (2) subtract this value from that obtained in the presence of air, (3) generate coulometrically a standard sample of chlorine mixed with air sample, and determine it as chlorine and/or chloride, and (4) calculate, display, and store for permanent record the ratio of the signal obtained from the air sample and that obtained with the standard.

Mueller, Theodore R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

32

Time-resolved shadowgraphic study of femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum under different ambient air pressures  

SciTech Connect

Femtosecond pulse laser ablation of aluminum under different ambient air pressures between 1 atm and 4 x 10{sup -4} Pa is investigated using a femtosecond time-resolved shadowgraphic method. It is observed that as the ambient air pressure decreases, the contact front becomes more and more distinct for a certain pressure range, demonstrating that the confinement effect of the ambient air to the ablated target material can play a critically important role in the laser ablation process. It is also found that the concentric and semicircular stripe pattern, which results from the diffraction of the probe beam by the expanding plume of a specific material state and is typically observed in the shadowgraphs for 1-2 ns delay time, gradually blurs and disappears while the ambient air pressure decreases from 1 atm to 7000 Pa. If a prepulse or a relatively large pulse pedestal exists before the main pulse, however, the stripe pattern can still be observed even though the ambient air pressure is 5 x 10{sup -4} Pa. It is thus inferred that what contributes to the formation of the unique stripe pattern is a mixture of the ejected target material and ionized background gas induced by the femtosecond laser ablation.

Wu Zehua; Zhu Xiaonong; Zhang Nan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Hydrogen Storage at Ambient Temperature by the Spillover Mechanism  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to develop new nanostructured sorbent materials, using the hydrogen spillover mechanism that could meet the DOE 2010 system targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Hydrogen spillover may be broadly defined as the transport (i.e., via surface diffusion) of dissociated hydrogen adsorbed or formed on a first surface onto another surface. The first surface is typically a metal (that dissociates H2) and the second surface is typically the support on which the metal is doped. Hydrogen spillover is a well documented phenomenon in the catalysis literature, and has been known in the catalysis community for over four decades, although it is still not well understood.1, 2 Much evidence has been shown in the literature on its roles played in catalytic reactions. Very little has been studied on hydrogen storage by spillover at ambient temperature. However, it is also known to occur at such temperature, e.g., direct evidence has been shown for spillover on commercial fuel-cell, highly dispersed Pt/C, Ru/C and PtRu/C catalysts by inelastic neutron scattering.3 To exploit spillover for storage, among the key questions are whether spillover is reversible at ambient temperature and if the adsorption (refill) and desorption rates at ambient temperature are fast enough for automotive applications. In this project, we explored new sorbents by using a transition metal (e.g., Pt, Ru, Pd and Ni) as the H2 dissociation source and sorbents as the hydrogen receptor. The receptors included superactivated carbons (AX-21 and Maxsorb), metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolites. Different metal doping methods have been used successfully to achieve high metal dispersion thereby allowing significant spillover enhancements, as well as a bridging technique used for bridging to MOFs. Among the metals tested, Pt is the hardest to achieve high metal dispersion (and consequently spillover) while Ru is the easiest to disperse. By properly dispersing Pt on superactivated carbons (by following detailed doping and activation conditions given in our publications, e.g., Ref. 12), the storage capacities are increased two-fold (doubled) while slightly more than doubled by Ru doping. The bridging technique remains highly empirical and sample-to-sample consistency is difficult to achieve; however, significant enhancements by spillover can be achieved if the synthesis and pretreatment are done properly. Pitfalls in sample syntheses for both metal doped and bridged sorbents are pointed out in the report; deviations from the synthesis and pretreatment conditions will lead to diminished or no spillover effects. Due to the high bulk densities of zeolites, metal doped zeolites are shown to be most promising for achieving high volumetric storage capacities by spillover. Kinetics of both spillover and reverse spillover (i.e., desorption) at ambient temperature are also studied. This report summarizes the progress made in the project.

Yang , Ralph T.

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

34

average air temperature | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

average air temperature average air temperature Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Air Temperature at 10 m Above The Surface Of The Earth (deg C)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Air Temperature at 10 m Above The Surface Of The Earth (deg C)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated April 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords average air temperature

35

Optimization of non-aqueous electrolytes for Primary lithium/air batteries operated in Ambient Enviroment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selection and optimization of non-aqueous electrolytes for ambient operations of lithium/air batteries has been studied. Organic solvents with low volatility and low moisture absorption are necessary to minimize the change of electrolyte compositions and the reaction between lithium anode and water during discharge process. It is critical to make the electrolytes with high polarity so that it can reduce wetting and flooding of carbon based air electrode and lead to improved battery performance. For ambient operations, the viscosity, ionic conductivity, and oxygen solubility of the electrolyte are less important than the polarity of organic solvents once the electrolyte has reasonable viscosity, conductivity, and oxygen solubility. It has been found that PC/EC mixture is the best solvent system and LiTFSI is the most feasible salt for ambient operations of Li/air batteries. Battery performance is not very sensitive to PC/EC ratio or salt concentration.

Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Deyu; Zhang, Jiguang

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

36

Comparison of Ambient Radon Concentrations in Air in the Northern Mojave Desert from Continuous and Integrating Instruments  

SciTech Connect

As part of a program to characterize and baseline environmental parameters, ambient radon-222 (Rn) monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, NV, the closest community to Yucca Mountain. Passive integrating and continuous Rn monitoring instruments were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) station in Amargosa Valley. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated Rn measurements, verified the meteorological data collected by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument, and for provided instrumentation for evaluating the relationships between meteorological conditions and Rn concentrations. Hourly Rn concentrations in air measured by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument (AlphaGUARD®) were compared to the average hourly values for the integrating Rn measurements (E-PERM®) by dividing the total Rn measurements by the number of hours the instruments were deployed. The results of the comparison indicated that average hourly ambient Rn concentrations as measured by both methods ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 pico-curies per liter of air. Ambient Rn values for the AlphaGUARD exhibited diurnal variations. When Rn concentrations were compared with measurements of temperature (T), barometric pressure, and relative humidity, the correlation (inversely) was highest with T, albeit weakly.

David S. Shafer; David McGraw; Lynn H. Karr; Greg McCurdy; Tammy L. Kluesner; Karen J. Gray; Jeffrey Tappen

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

37

THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOL DROPLETS IN AMBIENT AIR: CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANTS AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of various urban sulfate aerosol production mechanisms.radius of an evaporating aerosol droplet in which oxidationEnvironment THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOL DROPLETS IN AMBIENT AIR:

Toossi, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Air Temperature in the Undulator Hall  

SciTech Connect

Various analyses have been performed recently to estimate the performance of the air conditioning (HVAC) system planned for the Undulator Hall. This reports summarizes the results and provides an upgrade plan to be used if new requirements are needed in the future. The estimates predict that with the planned loads the tunnel air temperature will be well within the allowed tolerance during normal operation.

Not Available

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

39

Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity [>=]10[sup [minus]4] (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1], and preferably [>=]0.01 (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1]. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag[sup +] ions, as in Ag[sub 2]WO[sub 4], or to F[sup [minus

Zaromb, S.

1994-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

40

Air Temperature Model Evaluation in the North Mediterranean Belt Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparative assessment of air temperature models, using hourly and daily air temperature measurements in 34 different stations in the north Mediterranean belt, is presented. Four air temperature models were used to estimate hourly and daily ...

Julia Bilbao; Argimiro H. de Miguel; Harry D. Kambezidis

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Stability Issues in Ambient-Temperature Passive Magnetic Bearing Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory achieves rotor-dynamic stability by employing special combinations of levitating and stabilizing elements. These elements, energized by permanent magnet material, create the magnetic and electrodynamic forces that are required for the stable levitation of rotating systems, such as energy-storage flywheels. Stability criteria, derived from theory, describe the bearing element parameters, i.e., stiffnesses and damping coefficients, that are required both to assure stable levitation (''Earnshaw-stability''), and stability against whirl-type rotor-dynamic instabilities. The work described in this report concerns experimental measurements and computer simulations that address some critical aspects of this overall stability problem. Experimentally, a test device was built to measure the damping coefficient of dampers that employ eddy currents induced in a metallic disc. Another test device was constructed for the purpose of measuring the displacement-dependent drag coefficient of annular permanent magnet bearing elements. In the theoretical developments a computer code was written for the purpose of simulating the rotor-dynamics of our passive bearing systems. This code is capable of investigating rotor-dynamic stability effects for both small-amplitude transient displacements (i.e., those within the linear regime), and for large-amplitude displacements, where non-linear effects can become dominant. Under the latter conditions a bearing system that is stable for small-amplitude displacements may undergo a rapidly growing rotor-dynamic instability once a critical displacement is exceeded. A new result of the study was to demonstrate that stiffness anisotropy of the bearing elements (which can be designed into our bearing system) is strongly stabilizing, not only in the linear regime, but also in the non-linear regime.

Post, R.F.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

42

Wet-Bulb Temperature from Relative Humidity and Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An equation is presented for wet-bulb temperature as a function of air temperature and relative humidity at standard sea level pressure. It was found as an empirical fit using gene-expression programming. This equation is valid for relative ...

Roland Stull

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Ozone (O3) and Particulate Matter Speaker(s): Morton Lippmann Date: May 17, 1997 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro Most scientific studies that are relevant to the setting of the NAAQS were not designed or performed with that specific application in mind, resulting in bits and pieces of the overall puzzle. Despite these limitations, the particulate matter (PM) and O3 literature reviews and analyses in the recently issued EPA Criteria documents and staff papers are the best prepared and most comprehensive ever available to an EPA Administrator as a basis for NAAQS decisions. This seminar will discuss the scientific basis

44

Optimal control of a bleed air temperature regulation system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates temperature control of an aircraft engine bleed air system, aiming at reducing ram air usage to reduce fuel consumption while maintaining fast… (more)

Shang, Lan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

Dooley, James J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

47

Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus and methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity .gtoreq.10.sup.-4 (ohm-cm).sup.-1, and preferably .gtoreq.0.01 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag+ ions, as in Ag.sub.2 WO.sub.4.4AgI, or to F- ions, as in Ce.sub.0.95 Ca.sub.0.05 F.sub.2.95. Electrical contacts serve to connect the electrodes to potentiostating and detecting circuitry which controls the potential of the sensing electrode relative to the reference electrode, detects the signal generated by the sensor, and indicates the detected signal.

Zaromb, Solomon (9 S 706 William Dr., Hinsdale, IL 60521)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity .gtoreq.10.sup.-4 (ohm-cm).sup.-1, and preferably .gtoreq.0.01 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag+ ions, as in Ag.sub.2 WO.sub.4.4AgI, or to F- ions, as in Ce.sub.0.95 Ca.sub.0.05 F.sub.2.95. Electrical contacts serve to connect the electrodes to potentiostating and detecting circuitry which controls the potential of the sensing electrode relative to the reference electrode, detects the signal generated by the sensor, and indicates the detected signal.

Zaromb, Solomon (9S 706 William Dr., Hinsdale, IL 60521)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Projected compliance with the PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, the State of Maryland had no available ambient Federal Reference Method data on particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) but did have annual ambient data for particulate matter smaller than 10 microns (PM10) at twenty-four sites. The PM10 data was analyzed in conjunction with local annual and seasonal ZIP code-level emission inventories and with speciated PM2.5 data from four nearby monitors in the IMPROVE network (located in the national parks and wilderness areas) in an effort to predict annual average and seasonal high PM2.5 concentrations at the twenty-four PM10 monitor sites operated from 1992 to 1996. All seasonal high concentrations were predicted to be below the 24-hour PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) at the sites operated in Maryland between 1992 and 1996. A geographic analysis of the emission inventories was also performed to evaluate the impact of PM2.5 emissions from Maryland`s power plants on fourteen monitor locations that were predicted to have a reading exceeding the annual NAAQS for any year.

Walsh, K.; Gardner, R.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Climate, ambient air quality, and noise  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate add air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of sulfide. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Reed, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hamilton, C.B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

High-precision diode-laser-based temperature measurement for air refractive index compensation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a laser-based system to measure the refractive index of air over a long path length. In optical distance measurements, it is essential to know the refractive index of air with high accuracy. Commonly, the refractive index of air is calculated from the properties of the ambient air using either Ciddor or Edlen equations, where the dominant uncertainty component is in most cases the air temperature. The method developed in this work utilizes direct absorption spectroscopy of oxygen to measure the average temperature of air and of water vapor to measure relative humidity. The method allows measurement of temperature and humidity over the same beam path as in optical distance measurement, providing spatially well-matching data. Indoor and outdoor measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. In particular, we demonstrate an effective compensation of the refractive index of air in an interferometric length measurement at a time-variant and spatially nonhomogeneous temperature over a long time period. Further, we were able to demonstrate 7 mK RMS noise over a 67 m path length using a 120 s sample time. To our knowledge, this is the best temperature precision reported for a spectroscopic temperature measurement.

Hieta, Tuomas; Merimaa, Mikko; Vainio, Markku; Seppae, Jeremias; Lassila, Antti

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Analysis of a Dedicated Outdoor Air System and Low Temperature Supply Air Conditioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the principles and the characteristics of a dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) and low temperature supply air system. DOAS is offered based on the demands of indoor air quality and the low temperature supply air system is offered based on the demands of saving energy. The two systems are very similar, which is analyzed in this paper. Using actual engineering, we compute the air flow rate, cold load and energy consumption in detail, and provide some good conclusions.

Guang, L.; Li, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

TASITA—Towed Air–Sea interface Temperature Analyzer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate platinum RTD-based (resistive temperature device) system has been developed to measure the vertical temperature profile in the region of the atmosphere-ocean interface. TASITA, the towed air–sea interaction temperature analyzer, ...

R. P. Cechet; J. Bennett; I. Helmond; P. A. Coppin; E. F. Bradley; I. J. Bapton; J. S. Godfrey

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Moving air for comfort. ASHRAE Journal, May, Arens, E. ,17-22, Copenhagen. . ASHRAE Standard 55- 2010. ThermalSensations of Sedentary Man, ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 80 (

Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Oxygen Pathways and Carbon Dioxide Utilization in Methane Partial Oxidation in Ambient Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ronmental impact. Present technology uses steam reforming to produce synthesis gas which is converted into enhance- ment of the carbon balance of methane conversion by reforming with CO2 in order to "recycleOxygen Pathways and Carbon Dioxide Utilization in Methane Partial Oxidation in Ambient Temperature

Mallinson, Richard

56

Ris Energy Report 3 Hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperatures and pressures,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.2 Risø Energy Report 3 Hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperatures and pressures, but it can be stored as a gas, a liquid or a solid. In the case of solid storage, the hydrogen exists as a chemical. Compared to fossil fuels such as gasoline, hydrogen has a very obvious shortfall in the amount of energy

57

Adsorption near ambient temperatures of methane, carbon tetrafluoride, and sulfur hexafluoride on commercial activated carbons  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption isotherms for CH{sub 4}, CF{sub 4}, and SF{sub 6} are measured at three or four temperatures near ambient on three commercial activated carbons. The data are reduced using a virial-type equation of adsorption. Using this equation, isosteric heats of adsorption are calculated. It is shown that this fundamental thermodynamic quantity provides a basis for differentiating between the carbons` micropore structures.

Jagiello, J.; Bandosz, T.J.; Putyera, K.; Schwarz, J.A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Air Temperature Variability: 1840–2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological station records and regional climate model output are combined to develop a continuous 168-yr (1840–2007) spatial reconstruction of monthly, seasonal, and annual mean Greenland ice sheet near-surface air temperatures. Independent ...

Jason E. Box; Lei Yang; David H. Bromwich; Le-Sheng Bai

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Simulation of Seasonal Snowcover Based on Air Temperature and Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation is performed for the time variation in depth of seasonal snow with variable air temperature and precipitation in Japan. Processes of snow densification and snowmelt are considered for snow depth calculation. The using parameters are ...

Hideaki Motoyama

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Approaches to Selecting Design Temperatures for Air-Conditioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Approaches to Selecting Design Temperatures for Air-Conditioning Speaker(s): Eric Peterson Date: July 7, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Philip...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Correction of Marine Air Temperature Observations for Solar Radiation Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of incoming solar radiation on merchant ships' observations of air temperature was assessed as part of the Voluntary Observing Ships' Special Observing Project for the North Atlantic (VSOP-NA), The ships' reports were compared with ...

Elizabeth C. Kent; Raoul J. Tiddy; Peter K. Taylor

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Daily Air Temperature and Electricity Load in Spain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather has a significant impact on different sectors of the economy. One of the most sensitive is the electricity market, because power demand is linked to several weather variables, mainly the air temperature. This work analyzes the ...

Enric Valor; Vicente Meneu; Vicente Caselles

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Air Temperature Measurement Errors in Naturally Ventilated Radiation Shields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sources of systematic errors are considered for estimating air temperature. The first source is ambiguity of the definition of the standardized measurement height over vegetated surfaces of varying heights. Without such a standardization, ...

Reina Nakamura; L. Mahrt

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Solar Eclipse Effect on Shelter Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decreases in shelter temperature during eclipse events were quantified on the basis of observations, numerical model simulations, and complements conceptual evaluations. Observations for the annular eclipse on 10 May 1994 over the United States ...

M. Segal; R. W. Turner; J. Prusa; R. J. Bitzer; S. V. Finley

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Performance of an air-cooled ammonia-water absorption air conditioner at low generator temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An ammonia--water absorption air conditioning system has been tested to investigate the stability of operation near the cut-off conditions. Circulation ratios were from 8 to 30. Relations for the estimation of the coefficient of performance and for the prediction of operating temperatures were derived and verified experimentally. Possible operating conditions for an air-cooled ammonia--water air conditioning system were concluded.

Dao, K.; Simmons, M.; Wolgast, R.; Wahlig, M.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO[subscript 2] from ambient air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere (“air capture”) in an industrial process has been proposed as an option for stabilizing global CO[subscript 2] concentrations. Published analyses suggest these air capture systems ...

House, Kurt Zenz

67

The Effectiveness of the ASOS, MMTS, Gill, and CRS Air Temperature Radiation Shields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Periodic upgrades of air temperature measurement systems in surface weather station networks cause data discontinuities. From a climatological viewpoint, it is necessary to evaluate the air temperature data discontinuities when air temperature ...

K. G. Hubbard; X. Lin; E. A. Walter-Shea

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Effect of seasonal variations of ambient temperatures on the performance of low temperature power cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies on the performance of the binary fluid system was carried out in two stages. In the first stage the ideal case was analyzed as to the effects of sinusoidal variations of the heat rejection temperature on the ideal work available from a steady flow of a geothermal brine delivered to a power plant under constant wellhead conditions. In the second stage an approximate method for analyzing actual cases was introduced. Results indicate that sink temperature fluctuations have a drastic effect on the output of low-temperature power cycles. The severe fluctuations in the output are likely to have a strong influence on the design and optimization studies of such cycles. The impact of this on the economies of electric power generation from geothermal resources should be carefully assessed before choosing among possible energy-conversion systems. (JGB)

Khalifa, H.E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Approaches to Selecting Design Temperatures for Air-Conditioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Approaches to Selecting Design Temperatures for Air-Conditioning Approaches to Selecting Design Temperatures for Air-Conditioning Speaker(s): Eric Peterson Date: July 7, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Philip Haves Edward A. Arens The presentation will describe and compare the methods of determining cooling design conditions used by ASHRAE and the Australian Institute of Refrigeration, Air-Conditioning and Heating. A case study based on weather data for Brisbane will be used to illustrate the issues that arise. One issue is the usefulness of the 3-hourly temperature observations archived in International Weather Office records compared to the hourly observations required by the ASHRAE method. Another issue is the use of daily maxima, which have been archived for over 100 years at many Australian locations. Daily data can easily be used to find trends

70

Effect of metal Additions on the Hydrogen Uptake of Microporous Carbon at Near-Ambient Temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Enhancing the hydrogen sorption capacity of microporous carbon materials at near-ambient temperature continue to be a challenge and the subject of intense research. Physisorption alone on microporous carbons is not strong enough to provide the desired levels of hydrogen uptake. Modifying carbons with small amounts of metals has been proven effective to increase the amounts adsorbed. However, very different mechanisms may be involved when the promoters are transition metals or alkali metals. In this presentation we compare the effect of additions of palladium and/or alkali metals on the hydrogen uptake of microporous carbons, in an attempt to differentiate between the possible mechanisms leading to enhanced hydrogen capacity and fast kinetics.

Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Bhat, Vinay V [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A Ruggedized Ultrasensitive Field Air Sampler for Differentially Determining Tritium Oxide and Gas in Ambient Air Atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

The instrument described is an operational, practical, ruggedized, ultrasensitive, tritium field air sampler assembled for the simultaneous, differential sampling of the environmental air for tritium oxide and elemental tritium. The system uses hardware assembled and packaged in such manner as to facilitate use in the field as well as in the laboratory. The sampling system occupies relatively small space and is simple to operate. The detection sensitivity approaches tritium background levels and is achieved by high volume sampling, efficient removal of tritium oxide and elemental tritium ("tritium gas"), and counting the recovered fractions by liquid scintillation spectrometry.

Brown, R.; Meyer, H. E.; Robinson, B.; Sheehan, W. E.

1971-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

72

Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly Reflective Greenhouses in SE Spain Title Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly Reflective Greenhouses in SE Spain Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Campra, Pablo, and Dev Millstein Journal Environmental Science & Technology Volume 47 Issue 21 Pagination 12284 - 12290 Date Published 11/2013 ISSN 0013-936X Keywords buildings, Heat Island Group Abstract A long-term local cooling trend in surface air temperature has been monitored at the largest concentration of reflective greenhouses in the world, at the Province of Almeria, SE Spain, associated with a dramatic increase in surface albedo in the area. The availability of reliable long-term climatic field data at this site offers a unique opportunity to test the skill of mesoscale meteorological models describing and predicting the impacts of land use change on local climate. Using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, we have run a sensitivity experiment to simulate the impact of the observed surface albedo change on monthly and annual surface air temperatures. The model output showed a mean annual cooling of 0.25 °C associated with a 0.09 albedo increase, and a reduction of 22.8 W m-2 of net incoming solar radiation at surface. Mean reduction of summer daily maximum temperatures was 0.49 °C, with the largest single-day decrease equal to 1.3 °C. WRF output was evaluated and compared with observations. A mean annual warm bias (MBE) of 0.42 °C was estimated. High correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.9) were found between modeled and observed values. This study has particular interest in the assessment of the potential for urban temperature cooling by cool roofs deployment projects, as well as in the evaluation of mesoscale climatic models performance.

73

Recent Progress in Retrieving Air Temperature Profiles and Air-Sea Temperature Differences from Infrared and Microwave Scan...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Progress in Retrieving Air Temperature Profiles Recent Progress in Retrieving Air Temperature Profiles and Air-Sea Temperature Differences from Infrared and Microwave Scanning Radiometer Data D. Cimini University of L'Aquila L'Aquila, Italy J. A. Shaw Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montana State University Bozeman, Montana E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction A system of two scanning radiometers has been developed by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL) and deployed on the NOAA Ron H. Brown (RHB) Research Vessel (RV) during the Nauru99 cruise in the Tropical Western Pacific,

74

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This letter, from the Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Federal Activities, outlines EPA's position as to how the revised National Air Quality Standard should be reflected in NEPA evaluations of proposed actions.

75

Northern Hemisphere Surface Air Temperature Variations: 1851–1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new compilation of monthly mean surface air temperature for the Northern Hemisphere for 1851–1984 is presented based on land-based meteorological station data and fixed-position weather ship data. This compilation differs from others in two ...

P. D. Jones; S. C. B. Raper; R. S. Bradley; H. F. Diaz; P. M. Kellyo; T. M. L. Wigley

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Southern Hemisphere Surface Air Temperature Variations: 1851–1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new compilation of monthly mean surface air temperature data for the Southern Hemisphere for 1851–1984 is presented based on land-based meteorological station data. Where possible, the station data used in the analysis have been assessed for ...

P. D. Jones; S. C. B. Raper; T. M. L. Wigley

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Anomalies of Central England Temperature Classified by Air Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily anomalies of mean central England temperature (CET), relative to daily 1961–90 climatology, are analyzed in terms of the source of the air estimated from fields of mean sea level pressure. The average CET anomaly for a given source and ...

David E. Parker

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Global Interannual Variations in Sea Surface Temperature and Land Surface Vegetation, Air Temperature, and Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anomalies in global vegetation greenness, SST, land surface air temperature, and precipitation exhibit linked, low-frequency interannual variations. These interannual variations were detected and analyzed for 1982–90 with a multivariate spectral ...

Sietse O. Los; G. James Collatz; Lahouari Bounoua; Piers J. Sellers; Compton J. Tucker

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Formic Acid Dehydrogenation on Au-Based Catalysts at Near-Ambient Temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Formic acid (HCOOH) is a convenient hydrogen carrier in fuel cells designed for portable use. Recent studies have shown that HCOOH decomposition is catalyzed with Ru-based complexes in the aqueous phase at near-ambient temperatures. HCOOH decomposition reactions are used frequently to probe the effects of alloying and cluster size and of geometric and electronic factors in catalysis. These studies have concluded that Pt is the most active metal for HCOOH decomposition, at least as large crystallites and extended surfaces. The identity and oxidation state of surface metal atoms influence the relative rates of dehydrogenation (HCOOH {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) and dehydration (HCOOH {yields} H{sub 2}O + CO) routes, a selectivity requirement for the synthesis of CO-free H{sub 2} streams for low-temperature fuel cells. Group Ib and Group VIII noble metals catalyze dehydrogenation selectively, while base metals and metal oxides catalyze both routes, either directly or indirectly via subsequent water-gas shift (WGS) reactions.

Ojeda, Manuel; Iglesia, Enrique

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

80

Capturing CO2 from ambient air: a feasibility assessment Joshuah K. Stolaroff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

course. Second, the tower walls should be sprayed with a 1/2 inch layer of isofoam. Third, the internal model were exactly correct). We suggest to spray onto the vertical tower walls, all around and full, the central bearing tower walls are expanding for warmer air, causing a parabolic deformation of the ceiling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Surface Air Temperature Variations in the Amazon Region and Its Borders during This Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly average surface air temperature records from 17 stations in the Brazilian Amazon from 1913 to 1995 were used to compute annual air temperature means. The data were converted into temperature anomalies, as the differences between annual ...

R. L. Victoria; L. A. Martinelli; J. M. Moraes; M. V. Ballester; A. V. Krusche; G. Pellegrino; R. M. B. Almeida; J. E. Richey

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Statistical Predictability and Parametric Models of Daily Ambient Temperature and Solar Irradiance: An Analysis in the Italian Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochastic–dynamic models are discussed for both air temperature and solar irradiance daily time series in the Italian climate. Most of the methodologies discussed in this paper are well known and established for processes having a Gaussian ...

U. Amato; V. Cuomo; F. Fontana; C. Serio

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Ambient Backscatter: Wireless Communication Out of Thin Air Vincent Liu, Aaron Parks, Vamsi Talla, Shyamnath Gollakota, David Wetherall, Joshua R. Smith  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient Backscatter: Wireless Communication Out of Thin Air Vincent Liu, Aaron Parks, Vamsi Talla owned by others than ACM must be honored. Abstracting with credit is permitted. To copy otherwise. Request permissions from permissions@acm.org. SIGCOMM'13, August 12­16, 2013, Hong Kong, China. Copyright

Hochberg, Michael

84

Ambient-Temperature Passive Magnetic Bearings for Flywheel Energy Storage Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on prior work at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearings are being adapted for use in high-power flywheel energy storage systems developed at the Trinity Flywheel Power company. En route to this goal specialized test stands have been built and computer codes have been written to aid in the development of the component parts of these bearing systems. The Livermore passive magnetic bearing system involves three types of elements, as follows: (1) Axially symmetric levitation elements, energized by permanent magnets., (2) electrodynamic ''stabilizers'' employing axially symmetric arrays of permanent magnet bars (''Halbach arrays'') on the rotating system, interacting with specially wound electrically shorted stator circuits, and, (3) eddy-current-type vibration dampers, employing axially symmetric rotating pole assemblies interacting with stationary metallic discs. The theory of the Livermore passive magnetic bearing concept describes specific quantitative stability criteria. The satisfaction of these criteria will insure that, when rotating above a low critical speed, a bearing system made up of the three elements described above will be dynamically stable. That is, it will not only be stable for small displacements from equilibrium (''Earnshaw-stable''), but will also be stable against whirl-type instabilities of the types that can arise from displacement-dependent drag forces, or from mechanical-hysteritic losses that may occur in the rotor. Our design problem thus becomes one of calculating and/or measuring the relevant stiffnesses and drag coefficients of the various elements and comparing our results with the theory so as to assure that the cited stability criteria are satisfied.

Bender, D.; Post, R.

2000-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

85

Influence of a Tropical Island Mountain on Solar Radiation, Air Temperature and Vapor Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measured solar radiation, air temperature, and water vapor pressure at 17 stations on the northwest flank of Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii are compared with modeled clear day solar radiation and free atmosphere air temperature and water vapor pressure. ...

Dennis Nullet

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A Comparison of GCM-simulated and Observed Mean January and July Surface Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

January and July surface air temperature fields simulated by the GFDI, OSU, GISS, and UKMO general circulation models (GCMS) are compared to the global surface air temperature climatology compiled by Legates and Willmott. Legates and Willmott's ...

Cort J. Willmott; David R. Legates

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Radiative Heating Errors in Naturally Ventilated Air Temperature Measurements Made from Buoys*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiative heating errors in buoy-mounted, naturally ventilated air temperature sensors are examined. Data from sensors with multiplate radiation shields and collocated, fan-aspirated air temperature sensors from three buoy deployments ...

Steven P. Anderson; Mark F. Baumgartner

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Effect of Refrigerant Charge, Duct Leakage, and Evaporator Air Flow on the High Temperature Performance of Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of several installation items on the high outdoor ambient temperature performance of air conditioners. These installation items were: improper amount of refrigerant charge, reduced evaporator airflow, and return air leakage from hot attic spaces. There were five sets of tests used for this research: two of them for the charging tests, two for the reduced evaporator airflow, and one for the return air leakage tests. For the charging tests, the indoor room conditions were 80°F (27.8°C) dry-bulb and 50% relative humidity. The outdoor conditions ranged from 95°F (35°C) all the way up to 120°F (48.9°C). Charge levels ranged from 30% undercharged to 40% overcharged for the short-tube orifice unit. For the thermal expansion valve (TXV) unit, charge levels ranged from -36% charging to +27% charging. Performance was quantified with the following variables: total capacity, energy efficiency ratio (EER), and power. The performance of the orifice unit was more sensitive to charge than it was for the TXV unit. For the TXV unit on the -27% to +27% charging range, the capacity and EER changed little with charge. A TXV unit and a short-tube orifice unit were also tested for reduced evaporator airflow. As evaporator airflow decreased, the capacity and EER both decreased as expected. However, the drop was not as significant as with the charging tests. For the extreme case of 50% reduced evaporator airflow, neither unit's capacity or EER dropped more than 25%. Return air leakage from hot attic spaces was simulated by assuming adiabatic mixing of the indoor air at normal conditions with the attic air at high temperatures. Effective capacity and EER both decreased with increased return air leakage. However, power consumption was relatively constant for all variables except outdoor temperature, which meant that for the same power consumption, the unit delivered much lower performance when there was return air leakage. The increase in sensible heat ratio (SHR) with increasing leakage showed perhaps the most detrimental effect of return air leakage on performance, which was the inability of the unit to absorb moisture from the environment.

Rodriguez, Angel Gerardo

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

89

Vitrification of high level nuclear waste inside ambient temperature disposal containers using inductive heating: The SMILE system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach, termed SMILE (Small Module Inductively Loaded Energy), for the vitrification of high level nuclear wastes (HLW) is described. Present vitrification systems liquefy the HLW solids and associated frit material in large high temperature melters. The molten mix is then poured into small ({approximately}1 m{sup 3}) disposal canisters, where it solidifies and cools. SMILE eliminates the separate, large high temperature melter. Instead, the BLW solids and frit melt inside the final disposal containers, using inductive heating. The contents then solidify and cool in place. The SMILE modules and the inductive heating process are designed so that the outer stainless can of the module remains at near ambient temperature during the process cycle. Module dimensions are similar to those of present disposal containers. The can is thermally insulated from the high temperature inner container by a thin layer of refractory alumina firebricks. The inner container is a graphite crucible lined with a dense alumina refractory that holds the HLW and fiit materials. After the SMILE module is loaded with a slurry of HLW and frit solids, an external multi-turn coil is energized with 30-cycle AC current. The enclosing external coil is the primary of a power transformer, with the graphite crucible acting as a single turn ``secondary.`` The induced current in the ``secondary`` heats the graphite, which in turn heats the HLW and frit materials. The first stage of the heating process is carried out at an intermediate temperature to drive off remnant liquid water and water of hydration, which takes about 1 day. The small fill/vent tube to the module is then sealed off and the interior temperature raised to the vitrification range, i.e., {approximately}1200C. Liquefaction is complete after approximately 1 day. The inductive heating then ceases and the module slowly loses heat to the environment, allowing the molten material to solidify and cool down to ambient temperature.

Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The Impact of Tropical Indian Ocean Variability on Summer Surface Air Temperature in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence is presented that the boreal summer surface air temperature over south China and northeast China is remotely influenced by the Indian Ocean Basin mode (IOBM) sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies. Above-normal temperature in south China ...

Kaiming Hu; Gang Huang; Ronghui Huang

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Sensor and Electronic Biases/Errors in Air Temperature Measurements in Common Weather Station Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The biases of four commonly used air temperature sensors are examined and detailed. Each temperature transducer consists of three components: temperature sensing elements, signal conditioning circuitry, and corresponding analog-to-digital ...

X. Lin; K. G. Hubbard

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Optimal Indoor Air Temperature Considering Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort in the Shanghai Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor air temperature is the most important control parameter in air conditioning systems. It not only impacts the thermal comfort of occupants, but also also greatly affects the energy consumption in air conditioning systems. The lower the indoor air temperature is in summer or the higher the indoor temperature is in winter, the more energy the air conditioning system will consume. For the sake of energy conservation, the indoor air should be set as high as possible in summer and as low as possible in winter. Meanwhile, indoor thermal comfort should be considered. This paper will establish the optimal indoor air temperature for an air-conditioning system aiming at both energy savings and thermal comfort in the Shanghai area, based on the PMV equation and extensive field investigation.

Yao, Y.; Lian, Z.; Hou, Z.; Liu, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Laboratory Testing of the Heating Capacity of Air-Source Heat Pumps at Low Outdoor Temperature Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-source heat pump systems offer an alternative to the common heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) configuration of single split unitary air conditioners with gas heating. In simple terms, heat pumps are traditional air conditioning units with the added capability of running in reverse as required by the building load. Thus, where the traditional air conditioning unit has an indoor evaporator to remove heat from the space and an outdoor condenser to reject heat to the ambient environment, ...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

The effects of roof reflectance on air temperatures surrounding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the heating of condenser inlet air by the roof, and to assess the effects of condenser fan operation on the potential recirculation of hot discharge air from the condenser. The...

95

The Effect of Elevated Conductor and Ambient Temperatures on Polymer Insulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greater demand for power throughput on new and existing transmission lines will result in conductors being operated at progressively higher temperatures due to increased currents. The effect of these elevated conductor temperatures on polymer suspension insulators attached to the conductor is of concern. The maximum permissible conductor temperature has been generally limited by the maximum allowable conductor sag, which in turn is determined by conductor clearance regulations. Conductor sag is a functio...

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Temperatures of Air Parcels Lifted from the Surface: Background, Application and Nomograms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When the temperature of a parcel lifted adiabatically from the surface to a given pressure level (SLT) is subtracted from the ambient temperature at that level, the result is the surface index (SLI) for that level. This quantity, for the 500-mb ...

Frederick Sanders

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Influence of Topography and Ambient Stability on the Characteristics of Cold-Air Pools: A Numerical Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution numerical investigation of a cold-air pooling process (under quiescent conditions) is carried out that systematically highlights the relations between the characteristics of the cold-air pools (e.g., slope winds, vertical ...

Marwan Katurji; Shiyuan Zhong

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Investigation on a Microwave High-Temperature Air Heat Exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In present paper, an energy efficient air heat exchanger, based on accumulation of the heat generated by microwave absorbing materials is presented according  ...

99

The Geographical Distribution and Seasonality of Persistence in Monthly Mean Air Temperatures over the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eighty years of monthly mean station temperatures are used to evaluate the persistence of monthly air temperature anomalies over the United States. The geographical and seasonal dependence of the monthly persistence are described in term of the ...

H. M. van den Dool; W. H. Klein; J. E. Walsh

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Global Circuit Response to Seasonal Variations in Global Surface Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons are made between the seasonal behavior of the global electrical circuit and the surface air temperature for the Tropics and for the globe. Positive correlations between global circuit parameters and temperature are identified on both ...

Earle R. Williams

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Variations in Surface Air Temperatures: Part 2. Arctic Regions, 1881–1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe annual and seasonal changes in air temperatures over high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere during the period 1881–1980. Trends (that is, fluctuations on time scales greater than 20 years) in the average temperature of the Arctic ...

P. M. Kelly; P. D. Jones; C. B. Sear; B. S. G. Cherry; R. K. Tavakol

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The 1935–2003 Air Temperature Record from the Summit of Mount Washington, New Hampshire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological observations have been taken continuously at the summit of Mount Washington since 1932. Results of an analysis of the air temperature record over the 1935–2003 period show a statistically significant increase in mean temperature of ...

Andrea N. Grant; Alexander A. P. Pszenny; Emily V. Fischer

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Some Perspectives on Recent In Situ Air Temperature Observations: Modeling the Microclimate inside the Radiation Shields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air temperature measurement has inherent biases associated with the particular radiation shield and sensor deployed. The replacement of the Cotton Region Shelter (CRS) with the Maximum–Minimum Temperature System (MMTS) and the introduction of ...

X. Lin; K. G. Hubbard; E. A. Walter-Shea; J. R. Brandle; G. E. Meyer

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Seasonal Prediction of North American Surface Air Temperatures Using Space–Time Principal Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The statistical model proposed by Vautard et al. is applied to the seasonal prediction of surface air temperatures over North America (Canada and the United States). This model is based on sea surface temperature predictors filtered by ...

Robert Vautard; Guy Plaut; Risheng Wang; Gilbert Brunet

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Sensitivity of Surface Air Temperature Analyses to Background and Observation Errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional variational method is used to analyze 2-m air temperatures over a limited domain (4° latitude × 4° longitude) in order to evaluate approaches to examining the sensitivity of the temperature analysis to the specification of ...

Daniel P. Tyndall; John D. Horel; Manuel S. F. V. de Pondeca

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Spatial and Seasonal Variations of Air Temperature Lapse Rates in Alpine Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air temperature decrease with altitude was estimated by simple linear regression for several regions around northern Italy for minimum, maximum, and mean monthly temperatures. The comparison of the gradients with previous works revealed the ...

Christian Rolland

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The influence of tropical Pacific SST anomaly on surface air temperature in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the tropical Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) on the wintertime surface air temperature (SAT) in China is investigated using both the observational data and the output of coupled ocean-atmosphere numerical models during the ...

XiaoJing Jia; Hai Lin; Xia Yao

108

Influence of Forced Large-Scale Atmospheric Patterns on Surface Air Temperature in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonality of the influence of the tropical Pacific sea surface temperature (SST)-forced large-scale atmospheric patterns on the surface air temperature (SAT) over China is investigated for the period from 1969 to 2001. Both observations and ...

Xiaojing Jia; Hai Lin

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The Vertical Stratification of Air Temperature in the Center of Athens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intraurban temperature variation in the center of Athens, Greece, was investigated in relation to urban geometry. This paper describes two main tasks: 1) Air temperature was recorded in the center of Athens and at the Meteorological Service ...

C. Georgakis; M. Santamouris; G. Kaisarlis

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Influence of air conditioning management on heat island in Paris air street temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spatial cartography of air- cooled chillers and cooling towers in the city of Paris and surroundings have); secondly the actual situation including individual air dry coolers, wet cooling towers and an urban cooling the air cooling demand. Results of a meso-scale meteorological model (MESO-NH), coupled to an urban energy

111

Representative Air Temperature of Thermally Heterogeneous Urban Areas Using the Measured Pressure Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to measure an area-averaged ground air temperature based on the hydrostatic equation is shown. The method was devised to overcome the problem of finding the most representative surface air temperature over a wide region, a problem that ...

Hirofumi Sugawara; Ken-ichi Narita; Takehiko Mikami

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Ambient-temperature superconductor symetrical metal-dihalide bis-(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET).sub.2 MX.sub.2 wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET).sub.2 AuI.sub.2 exhibits a transition temperature of 5 K. which is high for organic superconductors.

Williams, Jack M. (Downers Grove, IL); Wang, Hsien-Hau (Willowbrook, IL); Beno, Mark A. (Woodridge, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Study of the Influence of Air Supply Temperature on Air Distribution in the Run-through Large Space Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The article introduces the concept and features of run-through large space. By using CFD technology, the paper simulates a velocity field and temperature field in the important air conditioned zone of China's science and technology museum (new museum) under winter operating conditions. At the same time, the indoor air flow regulations are summarized according to the simulation results. On the above basis, a new solution for airflow control of the connection in a run-through large space is put forward. The conclusion of this paper will offer guidance and reference for the air conditioning design of homogeneous architecture.

Tian, Z.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, M.; He, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Notification to Mirant by the Commonwealth of Virginia of Serious Violations of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Sulfur Dioxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2005 9, 2005 Lisa D. Johnson, President Mirant Potomac River, LLC 8711 Westphalia Road Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20774 Dear Ms. Johnson: DEQ is in receipt of the results of Mirant's "downwash" modeling provided by Mirant to DEQ pursuant to the consent special order between the State Air Pollution Control Board and Mirant Potomac River, LLC. A cursory review of the modeling reveals that emissions from the Potomac River Generating Station result in, cause or substantially contribute to serious violations of the primary national ambient air quality standards or "NAAQS" for sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and PM 10 . NAAQS are established by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency at concentrations necessary to protect human health with an adequate margin of safety.

115

Uncertainties of Derived Dewpoint Temperature and Relative Humidity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an evaluation of derived dewpoint temperature and derived relative humidity, in which the dewpoint temperature is calculated using measured ambient air temperature and measured relative humidity variables and the derived ...

X. Lin; K. G. Hubbard

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Influence of seasonal variations on ambient air quality in Al Jahra governorate, in the state of Kuwait  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work analyzes the air pollution yearlong hourly mean continuous data from one of the monitoring station located at the top of polyclinic in Al-Jahra city in the State of Kuwait. The measurements cover major pollutants such as carbon monoxide, methane, ... Keywords: Al-Jahra, air pollution, continuous monitoring, seasonal variations, traffic

Raslan Alenezi

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Properties of the Arctic 2-Meter Air Temperature Field for 1979 to the Present Derived from a New Gridded Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the behavior of the Arctic Ocean surface air temperature field for 1979–93. Temperatures are derived from a new gridded 6-h, 2-m air temperature dataset called POLES. These gridded air temperatures are estimated from optimal ...

Seelye Martin; Esther A. Munoz

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Pilot project of biogas production from pig manure and urine mixture at ambient temperature in Ventanilla (Lima, Peru)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parque Porcino de Ventanilla has an extension of 840 ha with 2200 farmers dedicated to pig production. There is a lack of services in the area (i.e., water supply, electricity, or waste collection). Anaerobic treatment of pig manure would replace current dumping and incineration, reducing environmental pollution and hazards to public health, as well as providing an organic fertilizer and biogas. The objective of the present work was to study the viability of ambient temperature anaerobic digestion of pig manure diluted in urine, by means of on-site pilot scale reactors. The final goal was to establish design parameters for anaerobic digesters to be implemented; since it was part of a project to improve life conditions for the farmers through the incorporation of better management techniques. Experiments were carried out in a low-cost pilot plant, which consists of three anaerobic digesters (225 L total volume), without heating or agitation, placed in a greenhouse. The start-up of the digestion process was performed with a mixture of temperature adapted pig manure-sludge and fresh rumen, and showed a good performance regardless of the dilution of pig manure with water or urine, which is a key parameter due to the scarcity of water in the area under study.

Ferrer, I. [Environmental Engineering Division, Department of Hydraulic Maritime and Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), C/Jordi Girona 1-3, Modul D1, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); GIRO Technological Center, Rambla Pompeu Fabra 1, 08100 Mollet del Valles, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: ivet.ferrer@upc.edu; Gamiz, M. [Environmental Engineering Division, Department of Hydraulic Maritime and Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), C/Jordi Girona 1-3, Modul D1, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Almeida, M.; Ruiz, A. [Ciudad Saludable NLO, Av. Jorge Basadre 255, Of. 401, Lima 27 (Peru)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Frequency Response of a Thermistor Temperature Probe in Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical study was conducted of the thermal frequency response of an atmospheric temperature probe consisting of a thermistor bead with two lead wires soldered to thin support posts. Such probes are used in aircraft temperature sensors and ...

P. L. Fuehrer; C. A. Friehe; D. K. Edwards

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Oxide modified air electrode surface for high temperature electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell is made having a porous cermet electrode (16) and a porous lanthanum manganite electrode (14), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) between them, where the lanthanum manganite surface next to the electrolyte contains a thin discontinuous layer of high surface area cerium oxide and/or praseodymium oxide, preferably as discrete particles (30) in contact with the air electrode and electrolyte.

Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Ruka, Roswell J. (Churchill Boro, Allegheny County, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Model Based Sensor System for Temperature Measurement in R744 Air Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal is the development of a novel principle for the temperature acquisition of refrigerants in CO2 air conditioning systems. The new approach is based on measuring the temperature inside a pressure sensor, which is also needed in the system. On the basis of simulative investigations of different mounting conditions functional relations between measured and medium temperature will be derived.

Reitz, Sven; Schneider, Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Detonation cell size measurements and predictions in hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at elevated temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present research reports on the effect of initial mixture temperature on the experimentally measured detonation cell size for hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. Experimental and theoretical research related to combustion phenomena in hydrogen-air-steam mixtures has been ongoing for many years. However, detonation cell size data currently exists or hydrogen-air-steam mixtures up to a temperature of only 400K. Sever accident scenarios have been identified for light water reactors (LWRs) where hydrogen-air mixture temperatures in excess of 400K could be generated within containment. The experiments in this report focus on extending the cell size data base for initial mixture temperatures in excess of 400K. The experiments were carried out in a 10-cm inner-diameter, 6.1-m long heated detonation tube with a maximum operating temperature of 700K and spatial temperature uniformity of {plus_minus}14K. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air initial gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K--650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The hydrogen-air detonability limits for the 10-cm inside-diameter test vessel, based upon the onset of single-head spin, decreased from 15 percent by hydrogen at 300K down to about 9 percent hydrogen at 650K. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments.

Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emissions data are often lacking or uncertain for many airborne contaminants. Chemicals, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), emitted from combustion sources, fall into this category. Currently available ambient-air emission inventories of PAHs either fail to account for population-based activities (such as residential wood combustion and motor vehicle activity) and/or report ''total PAH'' or particulate organic matter emissions instead of individual compounds. We measure the degree of overlap between predicted concentrations from estimated emissions with measured concentrations. Our analysis is, based on probabilistic analysis of measured outdoor air concentrations with those predicted from mass-balance models. Based on available information, we estimate the relative magnitude of emissions from four major sources of PAHs to outdoor air- (1) on-road motor vehicles, including light-duty gasoline vehicles and diesel-powered buses and medium and heavy duty trucks; (2) residential wood combustion; and (3) power generation from external combustion boilers. We use the CalTOX regional multimedia mass-balance model to evaluate our emissions estimates in rural and urban regions of the state of Minnesota, USA. We compare model estimates of outdoor PAH airborne concentrations with those reported by the Minnesota Children's Pesticide Exposure Study (MNCPES). With these measured concentrations we probabilistically evaluate our emissions and interpret the reliability of our emissions estimates for specific PAHs. The median estimates of our predicted outdoor air concentrations agree within an order of magnitude of measured concentrations. For four representative PAHs, we were able to obtain a reasonable degree of overlap between empirical and predicted distributions of outdoor air concentrations. Our combination of models, emissions estimates, and empirical concentration data estimate exposure in a manner that is more reliable than any of these tools alone. Thereby, we increase our confidence about our plausible ranges of emissions and predicted concentrations.

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Do Changes in the Midlatitude Circulation Have Any Impact on the Arctic Surface Air Temperature Trend?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The warming of the near-surface air in the Arctic region has been larger than the global mean surface warming. There is general agreement that the Arctic amplification of the surface air temperature (SAT) trend to a considerable extent is due to ...

R. G. Graversen

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

An Estimate of the Sampling Error Variance of the Gridded GHCN Monthly Surface Air Temperature Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sampling error variances of the 5° × 5° Global Historical Climatological Network (GHCN) monthly surface air temperature data are estimated from January 1851 to December 2001. For each GHCN grid box and for each month in the above time ...

S. S. P. Shen; H. Yin; T. M. Smith

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Infrared Interferometric Measurements of the Near-Surface Air Temperature over the Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiometric measurement of the marine air temperature using a Fourier transform infrared spectroradiometer is described. The measurements are taken by the Marine-Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (M-AERI) that has been deployed on ...

P. J. Minnett; K. A. Maillet; J. A. Hanafin; B. J. Osborne

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

An Analytical Model of Heating Errors in Marine Air Temperatures from Ships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marine air temperature reports from ships can contain significant biases due to the solar heating of the instruments and their surroundings. However, there have been very few attempts to derive corrections. The biases can reverse the sign of the ...

David I. Berry; Elizabeth C. Kent; Peter K. Taylor

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Temporal Changes in the Observed Relationship between Cloud Cover and Surface Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationship between cloud cover and near-surface air temperature and its decadal changes are examined using the hourly synoptic data for the past four to six decades from five regions of the Northern Hemisphere: Canada, the United States, ...

Bomin Sun; Pavel Ya Groisman; Raymond S. Bradley; Frank T. Keimig

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Decade of Ground–Air Temperature Tracking at Emigrant Pass Observatory, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of air and ground temperatures collected between 1993 and 2004 from Emigrant Pass Geothermal Climate Observatory in northwestern Utah are analyzed to understand the relationship between these two quantities. The influence of surface ...

Marshall G. Bartlett; David S. Chapman; Robert N. Harris

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A Technique to Detect Microclimatic Inhomogeneities in Historical Records of Screen-Level Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method to detect errors or biases in screen-level air temperature records at standard climate stations is developed and applied. It differs from other methods by being able to detect microclimatic inhomogeneities in time series. Such ...

K. E. Runnalls; T. R. Oke

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Surface Air Temperature and Humidity from Intersatellite-Calibrated HIRS Measurements in High Latitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-latitude ocean surface air temperature and humidity derived from intersatellite-calibrated High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) measurements are examined. A neural network approach is used to develop retrieval algorithms. HIRS ...

Lei Shi; Ge Peng; John J. Bates

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Spatial Interpolation of Surface Air Temperatures Using Artificial Neural Networks: Evaluating Their Use for Downscaling GCMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many climate studies need to generate estimates of a climate variable at a given location based on values from other locations. In this research, a new method for the spatial interpolation of daily maximum surface air temperatures is presented. ...

Seth E. Snell; Sucharita Gopal; Robert K. Kaufmann

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Relationship between the Midlatitude Tropopause Potential Temperature and the Thermodynamics of Surface Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is postulated that a simple relationship exists between the thermodynamic state of surface air supporting severe storm convection and the potential temperature of the overlaying tropopause. The thesis is tested using tropopause observations ...

George Chimonas; Robert J. Rossi

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Seasonal and Synoptic Variations in Near-Surface Air Temperature Lapse Rates in a Mountainous Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To accurately estimate near-surface (2 m) air temperatures in a mountainous region for hydrologic prediction models and other investigations of environmental processes, the authors evaluated daily and seasonal variations (with the consideration ...

Troy R. Blandford; Karen S. Humes; Brian J. Harshburger; Brandon C. Moore; Von P. Walden; Hengchun Ye

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

An Effective, Economic, Aspirated Radiation Shield for Air Temperature Observations and Its Spatial Gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the design and evaluates the performance of a double-walled electrically aspirated radiation shield for thermometers measuring air temperature and its gradients in the atmospheric surface layer. Tests were performed to quantify ...

Christoph K. Thomas; Alexander R. Smoot

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Solar and Thermal Radiation Errors on Upper-Air Radiosonde Temperature Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles are important for weather prediction, but climate change has increased the interest in upper-air observations asking for very high quality reference measurements. Here we show an experimental approach ...

R. Philipona; A. Kräuchi; G. Romanens; G. Levrat; P. Ruppert; E. Brocard; P. Jeannet; D. Ruffieux; B. Calpini

137

Hourly Rainfall Changes in Response to Surface Air Temperature over Eastern Contiguous China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, late-summer rainfall over eastern contiguous China is classified according to hourly intensity and the changes of moderate, intense, and extreme precipitation in response to variation of surface air temperature are analyzed. The e-...

Rucong Yu; Jian Li

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Urbanization Effects on Observed Surface Air Temperature Trends in North China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dataset of 282 meteorological stations including all of the ordinary and national basic/reference surface stations of north China is used to analyze the urbanization effect on surface air temperature trends. These stations are classified into ...

Guoyu Ren; Yaqing Zhou; Ziying Chu; Jiangxing Zhou; Aiying Zhang; Jun Guo; Xuefeng Liu

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Impacts of Snow Initialization on Subseasonal Forecasts of Surface Air Temperature for the Cold Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study examines the impacts of snow initialization on surface air temperature by a number of ensemble seasonal predictability experiments using the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3) AGCM with and without snow ...

Jee-Hoon Jeong; Hans W. Linderholm; Sung-Ho Woo; Chris Folland; Baek-Min Kim; Seong-Joong Kim; Deliang Chen

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Hemispheric Surface Air Temperature Variations: A Reanalysis and an Update to 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-based compilations of gridded monthly surface air temperature anomalies, averaged into hemispheric values for the last 140 years, have been available for climatological analyses for the last 10 years or so. The analysis techniques used in ...

P. D. Jones

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Twentieth-Century Surface Air Temperature over China and the Globe Simulated by Coupled Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines variations of the surface air temperature (SAT) over China and the globe in the twentieth century simulated by 19 coupled climate models driven by historical natural and anthropogenic forcings. Most models perform well in ...

Tianjun Zhou; Rucong Yu

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Sounding the Skin of Water: Sensing Air–Water Interface Temperature Gradients with Interferometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence for the radiometric determination of air–water interface temperature gradients is presented. Inherent radiometric characteristics in the water molecule cause variations in the absorption coefficient that allow radiation at near-infrared ...

W. McKeown; F. Bretherton; H. L. Huang; W. L. Smith; H. L. Revercomb

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Variations in Surface Air Temperature Observations in the Arctic, 1979–97  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The statistics of surface air temperature observations obtained from buoys, manned drifting stations, and meteorological land stations in the Arctic during 1979–97 are analyzed. Although the basic statistics agree with what has been published in ...

Ignatius G. Rigor; Roger L. Colony; Seelye Martin

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Solar and Thermal Radiation Errors on Upper-Air Radiosonde Temperature Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles are important for weather prediction, but climate change has increased the interest in upper-air observations asking for very high-quality reference measurements. This paper discusses an experimental ...

R. Philipona; A. Kräuchi; G. Romanens; G. Levrat; P. Ruppert; E. Brocard; P. Jeannet; D. Ruffieux; B. Calpini

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Seasonal and Regional Variation of Pan-Arctic Surface Air Temperature over the Instrumental Record  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumental surface air temperature (SAT) records beginning in the late 1800s from 59 Arctic stations north of 64°N show monthly mean anomalies of several degrees and large spatial teleconnectivity, yet there are systematic seasonal and regional ...

James E. Overland; Michael C. Spillane; Donald B. Percival; Muyin Wang; Harold O. Mofjeld

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Smart Interpolation of Annually Averaged Air Temperature in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two “smart” interpolation procedures are presented and assessed with respect to their ability to estimate annual-average air temperatures at unsampled points in space from available station averages. Smart approaches examined here improve upon ...

Cort J. Willmott; Kenji Matsuura

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Room Temperature Control During Season Switchover with Single Duct Variable Air Volume System Without Reheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Langford “A” building houses the College of Architecture on TAMU campus. There are ten singleduct variable air volume (VAV) air-handling units (AHUs) without reheat serving the building. The local pneumatic thermostats modulate the dampers of VAV boxes to maintain room temperature at their setpoints. The thermostat action is switched from direct acting (DA) to reverse acting (RA) when the season changes from fall to winter and vice versa from winter to spring, based on the out side air temperature, when season changes. This results in various parts of the building ether too cold or too hot during the season change. This paper presents that the thermostat action will be switched according to cooling loads or discharge air temperature, instead of outside air temperature. For the interior zone, thermostat action does not need to be switched at all. The comfort is improved and savings is achieved by the new control scheme. Because some air-handling units (AHUs) serve both interior and exterior zones, this system never worked as intended. The system must be modified to have zone reheat and the AHUs discharge air temperature is set below dew point for humidity control.

Liu, C.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Ambient air monitoring during the 2011 Las Conchas wildland fire near Los Alamos, U.S.A.  

SciTech Connect

Air monitoring data collected during the Las Conchas fire near the Los Alamos National Laboratory during 2011 are presented. Data included are for selected radionuclides and selected metals found in particulate matter. None of these analytes were seen at levels which exceeded any state or federal standards.

Green, Andrew A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schlemann, Shea A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates; Young, Daniel L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Determination of the transient electron temperature in a femtosecond-laser-induced air plasma filament  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transient electron temperature in a weakly ionized femtosecond-laser-produced air plasma filament was determined from optical absorption and diffraction experiments. The electron temperature and plasma density decay on similar time scales of a few hundred picoseconds. Comparison with plasma theory reveals the importance of inelastic collisions that lead to energy transfer to vibrational degrees of freedom of air molecules during the plasma cooling.

Sun Zhanliang; Chen Jinhai; Rudolph, Wolfgang [University of New Mexico, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Variability of Surface Air Temperature over Gently Sloped Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperature and wind data from a rural micronet and nearby site of the Oklahoma Mesonet are analyzed to study the frequency, strength, and formation processes of cold-pool events in a region with gentle terrain. Spatial analyses were performed ...

David Bodine; Petra M. Klein; Sean C. Arms; Alan Shapiro

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Statistical relationships between the surface air temperature anomalies and the solar and geomagnetic activity indices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical analysis of the data series from 1856 to 2000 for the annual global and hemispheric surface air temperature anomalies is completed. Statistically significant correlations are found between global and hemispheric temperature anomalies and solar and geomagnetic indices. The temperature anomalies in the Northern and Southern hemispheres show similar statistical relations with the solar and geomagnetic indices. The cross-correlation analysis shows no statistically significant global temperature lag behind the sunspots as well as behind aa-indices. The correlation between the temperature anomalies and the geomagnetic indices is about two times higher than the correlation between the temperature anomalies and the solar indices. These results support the suggestion that the geomagnetic forcing predominates over the solar activity forcing on the global and hemispheric surface air temperatures.

Valev, Dimitar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Urban Bias in Area-averaged Surface Air Temperature Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A data set derived from the United States Historical Climate Network has been compared to two global land-based temperature data sets that have been commonly cited in connection with the detection of the greenhouse effect and in other studies of ...

Thomas R. Karl; Philip D. Jones

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Variability of Battery Wear in Light Duty Plug-In Electric Vehicles Subject to Ambient Temperature, Battery Size, and Consumer Usage: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Battery wear in plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) is a complex function of ambient temperature, battery size, and disparate usage. Simulations capturing varying ambient temperature profiles, battery sizes, and driving patterns are of great value to battery and vehicle manufacturers. A predictive battery wear model developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory captures the effects of multiple cycling and storage conditions in a representative lithium chemistry. The sensitivity of battery wear rates to ambient conditions, maximum allowable depth-of-discharge, and vehicle miles travelled is explored for two midsize vehicles: a battery electric vehicle (BEV) with a nominal range of 75 mi (121 km) and a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) with a nominal charge-depleting range of 40 mi (64 km). Driving distance distributions represent the variability of vehicle use, both vehicle-to-vehicle and day-to-day. Battery wear over an 8-year period was dominated by ambient conditions for the BEV with capacity fade ranging from 19% to 32% while the PHEV was most sensitive to maximum allowable depth-of-discharge with capacity fade ranging from 16% to 24%. The BEV and PHEV were comparable in terms of petroleum displacement potential after 8 years of service, due to the BEV?s limited utility for accomplishing long trips.

Wood, E.; Neubauer, J.; Brooker, A. D.; Gonder, J.; Smith, K. A.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Errors of Naturally Ventilated Air Temperature Measurements in a Spatial Observation Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spatial network of 25 air temperature sensors was deployed over an area of 3.5 km × 3.5 km of agricultural land, aiming to calculate the sensible heat flux by spatial averaging instead of temporal averaging. Since temperature sensors in ...

Matthias Mauder; R. L. Desjardins; Zhiling Gao; Ronald van Haarlem

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Air Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooling Cooling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Air Cooling: Air cooling is commonly defined as rejecting heat from an object by flowing air over the surface of the object, through means of convection. Air cooling requires that the air must be cooler than the object or surface from which it is expected to remove heat. This is due to the second law of thermodynamics, which states that heat will only move spontaneously from a hot reservoir (the heat sink) to a cold reservoir (the air). Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Air Cooling Air Cooling Diagram of Air Cooled Condenser designed by GEA Heat Exchangers Ltd. (http://www.gea-btt.com.cn/opencms/opencms/bttc/en/Products/Air_Cooled_Condenser.html) Air cooling is limited on ambient temperatures and typically require a

156

Impact of Subsurface Temperature Variability on Surface Air Temperature Variability: An AGCM Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anomalous atmospheric conditions can lead to surface temperature anomalies, which in turn can lead to temperature anomalies in the subsurface soil. The subsurface soil temperature (and the associated ground heat content) has significant memory—...

Sarith P. P. Mahanama; Randal D. Koster; Rolf H. Reichle; Max J. Suarez

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Opportunities to Reduce Air-Conditioning Loads Through Lower Cabin Soak Temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air-conditioning loads can significantly reduce electric vehicle (EV) range and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) fuel economy. In addition, a new U. S. emissions procedure, called the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (SFTP), has provided the motivation for reducing the size of vehicle air-conditioning systems in the United States. The SFTP will measure tailpipe emissions with the air-conditioning system operating. If the size of the air-conditioning system is reduced, the cabin soak temperature must also be reduced, with no penalty in terms of passenger thermal comfort. This paper presents the impact of air-conditioning on EV range and HEV fuel economy, and compares the effectiveness of advanced glazing and cabin ventilation. Experimental and modeled results are presented.

Farrington, R.; Cuddy, M.; Keyser, M.; Rugh, J.

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

158

TY JOUR T1 Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly Reflective Greenhouses in SE Spain JF Environmental Science Technology A1 Campra Pablo A1 Dev Millstein KW buildings KW Heat Island Group AB p span A long term local cooling trend in surface air temperature has been monitored at the largest concentration of reflective greenhouses in the world at the Province of Almeria SE Spain associated with a dramatic increase in surface albedo in the area The availability of reliable long term climatic field data at this site offers a unique opportunity to test the skill of mesoscale meteorological models describing and predicting the impacts of land use change on local climate Using the Weather Research and Forecast WRF mesoscale model we have run a

159

A Comparison of SNOTEL and GHCN/CRU Surface Temperatures with Free-Air Temperatures at High Elevations in the Western United States: Data Compatibility and Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares high-elevation surface temperatures based on the Global Historical Climate Network/Climatic Research Unit (GHCN/CRU) and snow telemetry (SNOTEL) datasets, with simultaneous free-air equivalent temperatures, interpolated from ...

N. C. Pepin; M. Losleben; M. Hartman; K. Chowanski

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Climate: monthly and annual average air temperature at 10 m GIS data at  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

air temperature at 10 m GIS data at air temperature at 10 m GIS data at one-degree resolution of the World from NASA/SSE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Air Temperature at 10 m Above The Surface Of The Earth (deg C)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Air Temperature at 10 m Above The Surface Of The Earth (deg C)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region are -90 to -89 (south) and -180 to -179 (west). The last region, 89/180, is bounded by 89 to 90 (north) and 179 to 180 (east). The mid-point of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Near-surface air temperature estimation from ASTER data based on neural network algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm based on the radiance transfer model (MODTRAN4) and a dynamic learning neural network for estimation of near-surface air temperature from ASTER data are developed in this paper. MODTRAN4 is used to simulate radiance transfer from the ground ...

K. B. Mao; H. J. Tang; X. F. Wang; Q. B. Zhou; D. L. Wang

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Greenhouse air temperature predictive control using the particle swarm optimisation algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The particle swarm optimisation algorithm is proposed as a new method to design a model-based predictive greenhouse air temperature controller subject to restrictions. Its performance is compared with the ones obtained by using genetic and sequential ... Keywords: Agriculture, Greenhouse climate, Model predictive control, Particle swarm optimisation algorithms

J. P. Coelho; P. B. de Moura Oliveira; J. Boaventura Cunha

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Development of global hourly 0.5-degree land surface air temperature datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface air temperature (SAT) is one of the most important variables in weather and climate studies, and its diurnal cycle and day-to-day variation are also needed for a variety of applications. Global long-term hourly SAT observational data, ...

Aihui Wang; Xubin Zeng

164

Development of Global Hourly 0.5° Land Surface Air Temperature Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface air temperature (SAT) is one of the most important variables in weather and climate studies, and its diurnal cycle is also needed for a variety of applications. Global long-term hourly SAT observational data, however, do not exist. ...

Aihui Wang; Xubin Zeng

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

STUDY ON AIR INGRESS MITIGATION METHODS IN THE VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS COOLED REACTOR (VHTR)  

SciTech Connect

An air-ingress accident followed by a pipe break is considered as a critical event for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). Following helium depressurization, it is anticipated that unless countermeasures are taken, air will enter the core through the break leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure. Thus, without mitigation features, this accident might lead to severe exothermic chemical reactions of graphite and oxygen. Under extreme circumstances, a loss of core structural integrity may occur along with excessive release of radiological inventory. Idaho National Laboratory under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the VHTR. Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) studies to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Oh et al. 2006, Schultz et al. 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) requirements are part of the experimental validation plan. This paper discusses about various air-ingress mitigation concepts applicable for the VHTRs. The study begins with identifying important factors (or phenomena) associated with the air-ingress accident by using a root-cause analysis. By preventing main causes of the important events identified in the root-cause diagram, the basic air-ingress mitigation ideas can be conceptually derived. The main concepts include (1) preventing structural degradation of graphite supporters; (2) preventing local stress concentration in the supporter; (3) preventing graphite oxidation; (4) preventing air ingress; (5) preventing density gradient driven flow; (4) preventing fluid density gradient; (5) preventing fluid temperature gradient; (6) preventing high temperature. Based on the basic concepts listed above, various air-ingress mitigation methods are proposed in this study. Among them, the following two mitigation ideas are extensively investigated using computational fluid dynamic codes (CFD): (1) helium injection in the lower plenum, and (2) reactor enclosure opened at the bottom. The main idea of the helium injection method is to replace air in the core and the lower plenum upper part by buoyancy force. This method reduces graphite oxidation damage in the severe locations of the reactor inside. To validate this method, CFD simulations are addressed here. A simple 2-D CFD model is developed based on the GT-MHR 600MWt design. The simulation results showed that the helium replace the air flow into the core and significantly reduce the air concentration in the core and bottom reflector potentially protecting oxidation damage. According to the simulation results, even small helium flow was sufficient to remove air in the core, mitigating the air-ingress successfully. The idea of the reactor enclosure with an opening at the bottom changes overall air-ingress mechanism from natural convection to molecular diffusion. This method can be applied to the current system by some design modification of the reactor cavity. To validate this concept, this study also uses CFD simulations based on the simplified 2-D geometry. The simulation results showed that the enclosure open at the bottom can successfully mitigate air-ingress into the reactor even after on-set natural circulation occurs.

Chang H. Oh

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Estimating the Time Dependence of Air Temperature Using Daily Maxima and Minima: A Comparison of Three Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many models in a variety of disciplines require air temperature throughout the day as an input, yet often the only data available are daily extrema. Several methods for estimating the diurnal change in temperature from daily extrema have been ...

J. M. Baker; D. C. Reicosky; D. G. Baker

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Evaluation of the Relationship between Air and Land Surface Temperature under Clear- and Cloudy-Sky Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clear and cloudy daytime comparisons of land surface temperature (LST) and air temperature (Tair) were made for 14 stations included in the U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) of stations from observations made from 2003 through 2008. ...

Kevin Gallo; Robert Hale; Dan Tarpley; Yunyue Yu

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

On the Origin of the Surface Air Temperature Difference between the Hemispheres in Earth's Present-Day Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In today's climate, the annually averaged surface air temperature in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) is 1°–2°C higher than in the Southern Hemisphere (SH). Historically, this interhemispheric temperature difference has been attributed to a number of ...

Georg Feulner; Stefan Rahmstorf; Anders Levermann; Silvia Volkwardt

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Background Error Correlation between Surface Skin and Air Temperatures: Estimation and Impact on the Assimilation of Infrared Window Radiances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper makes use of ensemble forecasts to infer the correlation between surface skin temperature Ts and air temperature Ta model errors. The impact of this correlation in data assimilation is then investigated. In the process of assimilating ...

Louis Garand; Mark Buehner; Nicolas Wagneur

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Influence of Air-Conditioning Waste Heat on Air Temperature in Tokyo during Summer: Numerical Experiments Using an Urban Canopy Model Coupled with a Building Energy Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled model consisting of a multilayer urban canopy model and a building energy analysis model has been developed to investigate the diurnal variations of outdoor air temperature in the office areas of Tokyo, Japan. Observations and numerical ...

Yukitaka Ohashi; Yutaka Genchi; Hiroaki Kondo; Yukihiro Kikegawa; Hiroshi Yoshikado; Yujiro Hirano

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Energy Consumption Estimation for Room Air-conditioners Using Room Temperature Simulation with One-Minute Intervals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the purpose of developing optimized control algorithm for room air-conditioners to ensure their energy efficiency, a short time interval (i.e., one minute) simulation of building thermal performance is necessary because the sampling time interval for room air-conditioner control is one minute in general. This paper studies the short-time interval room air temperature simulation method using the response factor method. Using the simulated room air temperature, an air-conditioner's running time can be known so that its energy consumption can be estimated accurately. In order to verify the simulation accuracy, an actual room equipped with a gas-engine heat pump (GHP) air-conditioning system is studied by both simulation and measurement. The cooling amount produced by the GHP is calculated using measured refrigerant pressure and temperature at condenser and evaporator respectively. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) between measured cooling amount and simulated cooling load is 18.9 percent of the average measured value. The profile of simulated room air temperature in both air-conditioned daytime and nighttime without air-conditioning can match the measured room air temperature. With respect to the estimated energy consumption, the profile of simulated energy consumption can match the measured data. The simulation accuracy of room air temperature and energy consumption during the air-conditioner start-up period is not good and needs to be improved in future research. But in general, the verification shows that this energy consumption simulation method is acceptable for evaluating the energy performance of a room air-conditioner, and can also be a useful tool for commissioning room air-conditioners.

Wang, F.; Yoshida, H.; Matsumoto, K.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

An experimental and kinetic study of syngas/air combustion at elevated temperatures and the effect of water addition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental and kinetic study of syngas/air combustion at elevated temperatures and the effect 20 December 2011 Keywords: Syngas combustion Elevated temperatures Water addition Laminar flame speed a b s t r a c t Laminar flame speeds of premixed syngas/air mixtures were measured at various fuel

Qiao, Li

173

Correcting Airborne Temperature Data for Lags Introduced by Instruments with Two-Time-Constant Responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne resistance wire temperature sensors can introduce a time lag before ambient air temperature changes are registered. It has been found that a second-order linear response system adequately describes the behavior of the Rosemount non-...

G. W. Inverarity

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators. 4 figs.

Kuo, L.J.H.; Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Vasilow, T.R.; Bratton, R.J.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

175

Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators.

Kuo, Lewis J. H. (Monroeville, PA); Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Ruka, Roswell J. (Churchill Boro, PA); Vasilow, Theodore R. (Penn Township, PA); Bratton, Raymond J. (Delmont, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses on Very High Temperature Reactor Air Ingress  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to understand density-gradient-induced stratified flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) air-ingress accident. Various parameters were taken into consideration, including turbulence model, core temperature, initial air mole-fraction, and flow resistance in the core. The gas turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) 600 MWt was selected as the reference reactor and it was simplified to be 2-D geometry in modeling. The core and the lower plenum were assumed to be porous bodies. Following the preliminary CFD results, the analysis of the air-ingress accident has been performed by two different codes: GAMMA code (system analysis code, Oh et al. 2006) and FLUENT CFD code (Fluent 2007). Eventually, the analysis results showed that the actual onset time of natural convection (~160 sec) would be significantly earlier than the previous predictions (~150 hours) calculated based on the molecular diffusion air-ingress mechanism. This leads to the conclusion that the consequences of this accident will be much more serious than previously expected.

Chang H Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Controlling a rabbet load and air/oil seal temperatures in a turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

During a standard fired shutdown of a turbine, a loaded rabbet joint between the fourth stage wheel and the aft shaft of the machine can become unloaded causing a gap to occur due to a thermal mismatch at the rabbet joint with the bearing blower turned on. An open or unloaded rabbet could cause the parts to move relative to each other and therefore cause the rotor to lose balance. If the bearing blower is turned off during a shutdown, the forward air/oil seal temperature may exceed maximum design practice criterion due to "soak-back." An air/oil seal temperature above the established maximum design limits could cause a bearing fire to occur, with catastrophic consequences to the machine. By controlling the bearing blower according to an optimized blower profile, the rabbet load can be maintained, and the air/oil seal temperature can be maintained below the established limits. A blower profile is determined according to a thermodynamic model of the system.

Schmidt, Mark Christopher (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

HEAT PUMP AND AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM ANALYSIS BASED ON VARIABLE SPEED COMPRESSOR.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mechanical Engineering M.S.E. Experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of ambient air temperatures on the heat pump performance using a variable speed compressor.… (more)

Zhang, Hao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

An updated global grid point surface air temperature anomaly data set: 1851--1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents land-based monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1951--1970 reference period mean) on a 5{degree} latitude by 10{degree} longitude global grid. Monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1957--1975 reference period mean) for the Antarctic (grid points from 65{degree}S to 85{degree}S) are presented in a similar way as a separate data set. The data were derived primarily from the World Weather Records and the archives of the United Kingdom Meteorological Office. This long-term record of temperature anomalies may be used in studies addressing possible greenhouse-gas-induced climate changes. To date, the data have been employed in generating regional, hemispheric, and global time series for determining whether recent (i.e., post-1900) warming trends have taken place. This document also presents the monthly mean temperature records for the individual stations that were used to generate the set of gridded anomalies. The periods of record vary by station. Northern Hemisphere station data have been corrected for inhomogeneities, while Southern Hemisphere data are presented in uncorrected form. 14 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

Sepanski, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Daniels, R.C.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Ambient-temperature Conditioning as a Probe of Double-C Transformation Mechanisms in Pu-2.0 at. % Ga  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gallium-stabilized Pu-2.0 at. % Ga alloy undergoes a partial or incomplete low-temperature martensitic transformation from the metastable {delta} phase to the gallium-containing, monoclinic {alpha}{prime} phase near -100 C. This transformation has been shown to occur isothermally and it displays anomalous double-C kinetics in a time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram, where two nose temperatures anchoring an upper- and lower-C describe minima in the time for the initiation of transformation. The underlying mechanisms responsible for the double-C behavior are currently unresolved, although recent experiments suggest that a conditioning treatment--wherein, following an anneal at 375 C, the sample is held at a sub-anneal temperature for a period of time--significantly influences the upper-C of the TTT diagram. As such, elucidating the effects of the conditioning treatment upon the {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation can provide valuable insights into the fundamental mechanisms governing the double-C kinetics of the transition. Following a high-temperature anneal, a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was used to establish an optimal conditioning curve that depicts the amount of {alpha}{prime} formed during the transformation as a function of conditioning temperature for a specified time. With the optimal conditioning curve as a baseline, the DSC was used to explore the circumstances under which the effects of the conditioning treatment were destroyed, resulting in little or no transformation.

Jeffries, J R; Blobaum, K M; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Medium-temperature air-heater development program. Final report, October 1, 1977-December 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to design, fabricate, and verify by test a low-cost (in volume production), modularized, practical solar air heater adaptable for new or retrofit space-heating and hot-water applications is described. The unique hardware elements of the SOLAIR II medium-temperature air heater described are the TCA solar collectors, energy transfer module, interconnecting ductwork, and mounting hardware. SOLAIR II is a two-tank domestic hot-water-augmented system. The system is described in detail; market and design analyses are described; fabrication procedures are noted; and design verification tests and results are discussed. The design used for the pre-production lot was essentially the SOLAIR II design and will serve as the basis for future design evaluations as the product is introduced into the commercial market.

Not Available

1979-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

CONTAINMENT VESSEL TEMPERATURE FOR PU-238 HEAT SOURCE CONTAINER UNDER AMBIENT, FREE CONVECTION AND LOW EMISSIVITY COOLING CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

The EP-61 primary containment vessel of the 5320 shipping package has been used for storage and transportation of Pu-238 plutonium oxide heat source material. For storage, the material in its convenience canister called EP-60 is placed in the EP-61 and sealed by two threaded caps with elastomer O-ring seals. When the package is shipped, the outer cap is seal welded to the body. While stored, the EP-61s are placed in a cooling water bath. In preparation for welding, several containers are removed from storage and staged to the welding booth. The significant heat generation of the contents, and resulting rapid rise in component temperature necessitates special handling practices. The test described here was performed to determine the temperature rise with time and peak temperature attained for an EP-61 with 203 watts of internal heat generation, upon its removal from the cooling water bath.

Gupta, N.; Smith, A.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

183

Prediction of Air Conditioning Load Response for Providing Spinning Reserve - ORNL Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the use of air conditioning load for providing spinning reserve and discusses the barriers and opportunities. Air conditioning load is well suited for this service because it often increases during heavy load periods and can be curtailed for short periods with little impact to the customer. The report also provides an appendix describing the ambient temperature effect on air conditioning load.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A Relationship between the Bowen Ratio and Sea–Air Temperature Difference under Unstable Conditions at Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the air–sea interface, estimates of evaporation or latent heat flux and the Monin–Obukhov stability parameter require the measurements of dewpoint (Tdew) or wet-bulb temperature, which are not routinely available as compared to those of air (T...

S. A. Hsu

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Energy and Buildings, 8 (1985) 105 -122 105 Temperature-and Wind-induced Air Flow Patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Buildings, 8 (1985) 105 - 122 105 Temperature- and Wind-induced Air Flow Patterns measurements, wind pressure data and air infiltration calculation. INTRODUCTION Studies on the energy,B. DICKINSON,D. GRIMSRUDand R. LIPSCHUTZ Energy Performance of Buildings Group, Energy and Environment Division

186

Turbulent Transfer Coefficients and Calculation of Air Temperature inside Tall Grass Canopies in Land–Atmosphere Schemes for Environmental Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for estimating profiles of turbulent transfer coefficients inside a vegetation canopy and their use in calculating the air temperature inside tall grass canopies in land surface schemes for environmental modeling is presented. The ...

D. T. Mihailovic; K. Alapaty; B. Lalic; I. Arsenic; B. Rajkovic; S. Malinovic

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Assimilating AIRS Temperature and Mixing Ratio Profiles Using an Ensemble Kalman Filter Approach for Convective-Scale Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One satellite data product that has received great interest in the numerical weather prediction community is the temperature and mixing ratio profiles derived from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on board the Aqua satellite. ...

Thomas A. Jones; David J. Stensrud

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

A New Method for Deriving Ocean Surface Specific Humidity and Air Temperature: An Artificial Neural Network Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new methodology for deriving monthly averages of surface specific humidity (Qa) and air temperature (Ta) is described. Two main aspects characterize the new approach. First, remotely sensed parameters, total precipitable water (W), and sea ...

Charles Jones; Pete Peterson; Catherine Gautier

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Remote-Sensing Method of Selecting Reference Stations for Evaluating Urbanization Effect on Surface Air Temperature Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the global lands, the bias of urbanization effects still exits in the surface air temperature series of many city weather stations to a certain extent. Reliable reference climate stations need to be selected for the detection and correction of ...

Yuyu Ren; Guoyu Ren

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Regional Climate Model Simulations of U.S. Precipitation and Surface Air Temperature during 1982–2002: Interannual Variation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5)-based regional climate model (CMM5) capability in simulating the interannual variations of U.S. precipitation and surface air temperature during 1982–2002 is evaluated ...

Jinhong Zhu; Xin-Zhong Liang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Seasonal Prediction of Air Temperature Associated with the Growing-Season Start of Warm-Season Crops across Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal prediction of growing-season start of warm-season crops (GSSWC) is an important task for the agriculture sector to identify risks and opportunities in advance. On the basis of observational daily surface air temperature at 210 stations ...

Zhiwei Wu; Hai Lin; Ted O’Brien

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Thermal Comfort under Transient Metabolic and Dynamic Localized Airflow Conditions Combined with Neutral and Warm Ambient Temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human thermal environments constitute complex combinations of various interacting thermal factors. The transient and non-uniform nature of those thermal factors further increases the complexity of the thermal comfort problem. The conventional approach to the thermal comfort problem has been simplifying the problem and providing steady thermal environments which would satisfy the majority of the people in a given space. However, several problems emerged with this approach. People became finely tuned to the narrow range of conditions and developed expectations for the same conditions which made them uncomfortable when there were slight deviations from those conditions. Also, the steady approach didn't solve the comfort problem because, in practice, people move between spaces, and thermal conditions such as metabolic rate, surface temperatures, airflow speed and direction vary in a typical day. A human subject test was designed to determine the transient relationship between the people and their environments. In the first part, thermal perceptions of people were taken during various metabolic rate conditions. In the second and the third parts, transient conditions of different thermal factors were created. Various combinations of airflow frequencies, airflow location around the body, metabolic rate, and room temperatures were tested for their individual and interaction effects of providing thermal comfort. The concept of Localized Dynamic Airflow was proposed in which room airflow was simply redirected to different parts of the body with a varying airflow speed. Results showed that males and females respond differently to the thermal conditions. The room temperatures they found neutral were significantly different. People?s thermal comfort during transient metabolic conditions was similar to high metabolic conditions. This heightened response extended into the next ten minutes after the high metabolic conditions ended. Test results suggested that people tolerate higher temperatures during transient environmental conditions. The average response was for comfortable even during the high temperature (83°F) and high metabolic rate (4 met) conditions. Low energy use of the localized dynamic airflow and the increased room temperatures has significant potential for monetary savings.

Ugursal, Ahmet

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

High-temperature hydrogen-air-steam detonation experiments in the BNL small-scale development apparatus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Small-Scale Development Apparatus (SSDA) was constructed to provide a preliminary set of experimental data to characterize the effect of temperature on the ability of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonations and, equally important, to support design of the larger scale High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) by providing a test bed for solution of a number of high-temperature design and operational problems. The SSDA, the central element of which is a 10-cm inside diameter, 6.1-m long tubular test vessel designed to permit detonation experiments at temperatures up to 700K, was employed to study self-sustained detonations in gaseous mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam at temperatures between 300K and 650K at a fixed initial pressure of 0.1 MPa. Hydrogen-air mixtures with hydrogen composition from 9 to 60 percent by volume and steam fractions up to 35 percent by volume were studied for stoichiometric hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K-650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The hydrogen-air detonability limits for the 10-cm inside diameter SSDA test vessel, based upon the onset of single-head spin, decreased from 15 percent hydrogen at 300K down to between 9 and 10 percent hydrogen at 650K. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments.

Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsburg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sato, K.; Kinoshita, M. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

High-temperature hydrogen-air-steam detonation experiments in the BNL Small-Scale Development Apparatus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Small-Scale Development Apparatus (SSDA) was constructed to provide a preliminary set of experimental data to characterize the effect of temperature on the ability of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonations and, equally important, to support design of the larger-scale High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) by providing a test bed for solution of a number of high-temperature design and operational problems. The SSDA, the central element of which is a lo-cm inside diameter, 6.1-m long tubular test vessel designed to permit detonation experiments at temperatures up to 700K, was employed to study self-sustained detonations in gaseous mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam at temperatures between 300K and 650K at a fixed pressure of 0.1 MPa. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K to 650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments. Experiments were conducted to measure the rate of hydrogen oxidation in the absence of ignition sources at temperatures of 500K and 650K, for hydrogen-air mixtures of 15 percent and 50 percent, and for a mixture of equimolar hydrogen-air and 30 percent steam at 650K. The rate of hydrogen oxidation was found to be significant at 650K. Reduction of hydrogen concentration by chemical reaction from 50 to 44 percent hydrogen, and from 15 to 11 percent hydrogen, were observed on a time frame of minutes.

Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.; Finfrock, C.; Gerlach, L.; Sato, K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

PLUG-IN HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE AND HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE EMISSIONS UNDER FTP AND US06 CYCLES AT HIGH, AMBIENT, AND LOW TEMPERATURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) is to displace consumption of gasoline by using electricity from the vehicle’s large battery pack to power the vehicle as much as possible with minimal engine operation. This paper assesses the PHEV emissions and operation. Currently, testing of vehicle emissions is done using the federal standard FTP4 cycle on a dynamometer at ambient (75°F) temperatures. Research was also completed using the US06 cycle. Furthermore, research was completed at high (95°F) and low (20°F) temperatures. Initial dynamometer testing was performed on a stock Toyota Prius under the standard FTP4 cycle, and the more demanding US06 cycle. Each cycle was run at 95°F, 75°F, and 20°F. The testing was repeated with the same Prius retrofi tted with an EnergyCS Plug-in Hybrid Electric system. The results of the testing confi rm that the stock Prius meets Super-Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements under current testing procedures, while the PHEV Prius under current testing procedures were greater than Super-Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements, but still met Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements. Research points to the catalyst temperature being a critical factor in meeting emission requirements. Initial engine emissions pass through with minimal conversion until the catalyst is heated to typical operating temperatures of 300–400°C. PHEVs also have trouble maintaining the minimum catalyst temperature throughout the entire test because the engine is turned off when the battery can support the load. It has been observed in both HEVs and PHEVs that the catalyst is intermittently unable to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, which causes further emission releases. Research needs to be done to combat the initial emission spikes caused by a cold catalyst. Research also needs to be done to improve the reduction of nitrogen oxides by the catalyst system.

Seidman, M.R.; Markel, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Development and experimental evaluation of a high temperature mechanism for blended n-heptane-isooctane-ethanol-air-mixtures and gasoline-ethanol-air-mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laminar burning velocity measurements using the closed vessel bomb method have been done for fuel-blend-air-mixtures at 373 K initial temperature and up to 20 bar initial pressure. The two experimentally investigated fuel blends consist, on the one hand, ... Keywords: ethanol-gasoline-blends, laminar burning velocity

S. Jerzembeck; C. Glawe; N. Peters

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Energy Savings in Buildings Using Air Movement and Allowing Floating Temperature in Rooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the research study was to determine if building loads could be reduced by using an intelligent controller rather than a thermostatic controller to operate heating and air conditioning equipment. In order to switch the equipment on and off at the proper times, the intelligent controller calculated temperature limits using a mathematical procedure that determined the percentage of people who would be comfortable in rooms of the building. Simulations showed the annual cost savings from intelligent controllers ranged from 6 to 37 percent for residences and from 6 to 29 percent for the offices. An ancillary study showed that a ceiling fan provided comfort in a 112 square foot floor area to 85 F and in a 200 to 250 square foot area to 82 F.

Spain, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Detonation cell size measurements in high-temperature hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at the BNL high-temperature combustion facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) was designed and constructed with the objective of studying detonation phenomena in mixtures of hydrogen-air-steam at initially high temperatures. The central element of the HTCF is a 27-cm inner-diameter, 21.3-m long cylindrical test vessel capable of being heating to 700K {+-} 14K. A unique feature of the HTCF is the {open_quotes}diaphragmless{close_quotes} acetylene-oxygen gas driver which is used to initiate the detonation in the test gas. Cell size measurements have shown that for any hydrogen-air-steam mixture, increasing the initial mixture temperature, in the range of 300K to 650K, while maintaining the initial pressure of 0.1 MPa, decreases the cell size and thus makes the mixture more detonable. The effect of steam dilution on cell size was tested in stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric (e.g., equivalence ratio of 0.5) hydrogen-air mixtures. Increasing the steam dilution in hydrogen-air mixtures at 0.1 MPa initial pressure increases the cell size, irrespective of initial temperature. It is also observed that the desensitizing effect of steam diminished with increased initial temperature. A 1-dimensional, steady-state Zel`dovich, von Neumann, Doring (ZND) model, with full chemical kinetics, has been used to predict cell size for hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at different initial conditions. Qualitatively the model predicts the overall trends observed in the measured cell size versus mixture composition and initial temperature and pressure. It was found that the proportionality constant used to predict detonation cell size from the calculated ZND model reaction zone varies between 10 and 100 depending on the mixture composition and initial temperature. 32 refs., 35 figs.

Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.L. [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A New Definition of the Virtual Temperature, Valid for the Atmosphere and the CO2-Rich Air of the Vadose Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In speleological environments, partial pressures of carbon dioxide (CO2) are often large enough to affect overall air density. Excluding this gas when defining the gas constant for air, a new definition is proposed for the virtual temperature T? ...

Andrew S. Kowalski; Enrique Pérez Sánchez-Cañete

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ambient Temperature Synthesis of Ba  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Second order ambient intelligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This text attempts to describe an imagined future of ambient intelligence. It assumes that one day most of the current issues within ambient intelligence will be solved and that a second order ambient intelligence will be formulated, one with new research ... Keywords: Critique of ambient intelligence, adaptive systems, animal machine interaction, critical futurism, long-term behavior, second order ambient intelligence, temporal design

Marc Böhlen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

PRESERVATION OF H2 PRODUCTION ACTIVITY IN NANOPOROUS LATEX COATINGS OF RHODOPSEUDOMONAS PALUSTRIS CGA009 DURING DRY STORAGE AT AMBIENT TEMPERATURES  

SciTech Connect

To assess the applicability of latex cell coatings as an "off-the-shelf' biocatalyst, the effect of osmoprotectants, temperature, humidity and O{sub 2} on preservation of H{sub 2} production in Rhodopseudomonas palustris coatings was evaluated. Immediately following latex coating coalescence (24 h) and for up to 2 weeks of dry storage, rehydrated coatings containing different osmoprotectants displayed similar rates of H{sub 2} production. Beyond 2 weeks of storage, sorbitol- treated coatings lost all H{sub 2} production activity, whereas considerable H{sub 2} production was still detected in sucrose- and trehalose-stabilized coatings. The relative humidity level at which the coatings were stored had a significant impact on the recovery and subsequent rates of H{sub 2} production. After 4 weeks storage under air at 60% humidity, coatings produced only trace amounts of H{sub 2} (0-0.1% headspace accumulation), whereas those stored at <5% humidity retained 27-53% of their H{sub 2} production activity after 8 weeks of storage. When stored in argon at <5% humidity and room temperature, R. palustris coatings retained full H{sub 2} production activity for 3 months, implicating oxidative damage as a key factor limiting coating storage. Overall, the results demonstrate that biocatalytic latex coatings are an attractive cell immobilization platform for preservation of bioactivity in the dry state.

Milliken, C.; Piskorska, M.; Soule, T.; Gosse, J.; Flickinger, M.; Smith, G.; Yeager, C.

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Relationship between Relative Humidity and the Dewpoint Temperature in Moist Air: A Simple Conversion and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative humidity (RH) and the dewpoint temperature (td) are two widely used indicators of the amount of moisture in air. The exact conversion from RH to td, as well as highly accurate approximations, are too complex to be done easily without ...

Mark G. Lawrence

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Origins and Levels of Monthly and Seasonal Forecast Skill for United States Surface Air Temperatures Determined by Canonical Correlation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical techniques have been used to study the ability of SLP, SST and a form of persistence to forecast cold/warm season air temperatures over the United States and to determine the space–time evolution of these fields that give rise to ...

T. P. Barnett; R. Preisendorfer

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

The Coordinated Control of a Central Air Conditioning System Based on Variable Chilled Water Temperature and Variable Chilled Water Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, regulation of water flow by means of pump frequency conversion is one of the major methods for power-saving in central air conditioning systems. In this article, optimization regulation for central air conditioning system on the basis of coordinative optimization control for variable chilled water temperature and variable chilled water flow to obtain better power savings is put forward. According to typical meteorological year data, hourly air conditioning load of whole year for every typical room has been calculated with the transmission function method. In order to guarantee each typical room, the highest cooling load rate is used as an input parameter for optimization calculation. Based on the surface cooler check model, the smallest energy consumption of chiller and chiller water pump was taken as the objective function of the optimization model. The performance characteristics of a chiller, water pump, regulation valve and pipeline are taken into account, and the optimization chilled water temperature and chilled water flow were carried out. The case study for a commercial building in Guangzhou showed that the annual power consumption of the chillers and pumps of the air conditioning system is lower by 17% only with employment of variable water flow regulation by pump frequency conversion. In the case of optimization control with coordinative control of variable chilled water temperature and variable chilled water flow, the annual power consumption of the chillers and pumps of the air conditioning system is reduced by 22% in presence of remarkable power saving effects. Increasing the chilled water temperature will reduce the dehumidified capability of the air cooler, and the indoor relative humidity will increase. The simulation showed that the adjustment optimized process meets the comfort of each typical room. The lower the cooling load rate is, the more obvious the effect of power-saving is. The highest power-saving rate appears in December, which is 36.7%. Meanwhile, the least rate appears in July, which is only 14.5%.

Liu, J.; Mai, Y.; Liu, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Flow-temperature-humidity control system operating manual. [Controlled atmospheres for industrial hygiene and air pollution studies  

SciTech Connect

A manual containing operating, maintenance, and troubleshooting procedures for the flow-temperature-humidity control system used at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to prepare test atmospheres for industrial hygiene and air pollution studies is presented. The system consists of two basic components: a commercially available temperature/humidity indicator unit and a specially built flow-temperature-humidity control module. Procedures are given for using the control system with a vapor generation system or with a trace-gas flowmeter to add vapor or a trace gas to the airstream after it leaves the control module.

Nelson, G.O.; Taylor, R.D.

1978-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

207

Predictive clothing insulation model based on outdoor air and indoor operative temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE. (2010) ANSI/ASHRAE 55-2010: Thermal environmentaland Air-Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta. ASHRAE. (1981) ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55-1981: Thermal environmental

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Long-Term Trends in Air Temperature Distribution and Extremes, Growing Degree?Days, and Spring and Fall Frosts for Climate Impact Assessments on Agricultural Practices in Nebraska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air temperature influences agricultural practices and production outcomes, making detailed quantifications of temperature changes necessary for potential positive and negative effects on agricultural management practices to be exploited or ...

Kari E. Skaggs; Suat Irmak

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A new ambient-pressure organic superconductor,. kappa. -(ET) sub 2 Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Br, with the highest transition temperature yet observed (inductive onset T sub c = 11. 6 K, resistive onset = 12. 5 K)  

SciTech Connect

The preparation of a new ambient-pressure organic superconductor, {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br (BEDT-TTF or ET = bis(ethylenedithio)tetrafulvalene) is reported. This compounds exhibits the highest inductive onset temperature, T{sub c} = 11.6K (resistive onset = 12.5K) yet reported. The crystallographic and bond electron structure, ESR characteristics, and its superconductivity transition have all been measured, and the results are reported. 28 refs., 3 figs.

Kini, A.M.; Geiser, U.; Wang, H.H.; Carlson, K.D.; Williams, J.M.; Kwok, W.K.; Vandervoort, K.G.; Thompson, J.E.; Stupka, D.L. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA)); Jung, D.; Whangbo, Myunghwan (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (USA))

1990-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

210

National Ambient Radiation Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

211

PRESERVATION OF H2 PRODUCTION ACTIVITY IN NANOPOROUS LATEX COATINGS OF RHODOPSEUDOMONAS PALUSTRIS CGA009 DURING DRY STORAGE AT AMBIENT TEMPERATURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess the applicability of latex cell coatings as an "off-the-shelf' biocatalyst, the effect of osmoprotectants, temperature, humidity and O{sub 2} on preservation of H{sub 2} production in Rhodopseudomonas palustris coatings was evaluated. Immediately following latex coating coalescence (24 h) and for up to 2 weeks of dry storage, rehydrated coatings containing different osmoprotectants displayed similar rates of H{sub 2} production. Beyond 2 weeks of storage, sorbitol- treated coatings lost all H{sub 2} production activity, whereas considerable H{sub 2} production was still detected in sucrose- and trehalose-stabilized coatings. The relative humidity level at which the coatings were stored had a significant impact on the recovery and subsequent rates of H{sub 2} production. After 4 weeks storage under air at 60% humidity, coatings produced only trace amounts of H{sub 2} (0-0.1% headspace accumulation), whereas those stored at production activity after 8 weeks of storage. When stored in argon at production activity for 3 months, implicating oxidative damage as a key factor limiting coating storage. Overall, the results demonstrate that biocatalytic latex coatings are an attractive cell immobilization platform for preservation of bioactivity in the dry state.

Milliken, C.; Piskorska, M.; Soule, T.; Gosse, J.; Flickinger, M.; Smith, G.; Yeager, C.

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

212

Ambient dependence of the phase of nanowires grown by annealing brass  

SciTech Connect

The growth of oxide nanowires has been studied by the annealing of brass (Cu 65%, Zn 35%) at different annealing temperatures and in different ambient. The annealing temperature was varied from 400 deg. C to 650 deg. C. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) results showed that the temperature has a significant effect on the density and size of the nanowires. The annealing temperature of 600 deg. C was found to be optimum for the growth of nanowires. The growth at 600 deg. C was observed in two ambient-air and moist nitrogen. Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) results on Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) showed that with changing the ambient from air to moist nitrogen, the phase of the nanowires changed from Zn doped CuO to Cu doped ZnO. This result can be of significance importance as it suggests the use of ambient for the tuning of phase of oxide nanowires and in turn for the tuning of their physical properties.

Srivastava, Himanshu; Ganguli, Tapas; Tiwari, Pragya; Srivastava, A. K.; Deb, S. K. [Indus Synchrotron Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced technology, Indore-452013 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

213

Ambient pressure fuel cell system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ambient pressure fuel cell system is provided with a fuel cell stack formed from a plurality of fuel cells having membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs) that are hydrated with liquid water and bipolar plates with anode and cathode sides for distributing hydrogen fuel gas and water to a first side of each one of the MEAs and air with reactant oxygen gas to a second side of each one of the MEAs. A pump supplies liquid water to the fuel cells. A recirculating system may be used to return unused hydrogen fuel gas to the stack. A near-ambient pressure blower blows air through the fuel cell stack in excess of reaction stoichiometric amounts to react with the hydrogen fuel gas.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Automatic temperature control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic temperature control system is described for maintaining a preset temperature in an enclosed space in a building, comprising: heating and cooling means for conditioning the air in the enclosed space to maintain the preset temperature; exterior thermostat means outside the building for sensing ambient exterior temperature levels; interior thermostat means in the enclosed space, preset to the preset temperature to be maintained and connected with the heating and cooling means to energize the means for heating or cooling, as appropriate, when the preset temperature is reached; means defining a heat sink containing a volume of air heated by solar radiation, the volume of the heat sink being such that the temperature level therein is not affected by minor or temporary ambient temperature fluctuations; and heat sink thermostat means in the heat sink sensing the temperature in the heat sink, the heat sink thermostat means being connected in tandem with the exterior thermostat means and operative with the exterior thermostat means to switch the interior thermostat means to either a first readiness state for heating or a second readiness state for cooling, depending upon which mode is indicated by both the exterior and heat sink thermostat means, whereby the system automatically switches between heating and cooling, as required, in response to a comparison of exterior and heat sink temperatures.

Sheridan, J.P.

1986-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

215

Seasonal Surface Air Temperature and Precipitation in the FSU Climate Model Coupled to the CLM2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current Florida State University (FSU) climate model is upgraded by coupling the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Land Model Version 2 (CLM2) as its land component in order to make a better simulation of surface air ...

D. W. Shin; S. Cocke; T. E. LaRow; James J. O’Brien

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

De-icing thermostat for air conditioners  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an electronic thermostat adapted to be connected to an air-cooling apparatus to control the operative state of the apparatus. The thermostat includes a means for generating a digital electrical signal representative of a desired temperature setpoint and means for generating a digital electrical signal representative of the ambient temperature at the thermostat. The improvement described here comprises: means for generating control signals for the aircooling apparatus in order to inhibit the accumulation of ice on the cooling element of the air-cooling apparatus when the ambient temperature is above the temperature setpoint; means, responsive to the control signals, for deenergizing the compressor in the air-cooling apparatus for a first preselected period of time whenever the compressor is determined to have run continuously for a second preselected period of time; and means for adaptively adjusting the length of at least one of the first or second preselected periods of time as a function of the change in the rate of change of the ambient temperature.

Levine, M.R.

1986-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

217

Detection of Rainfall Events Using Underwater Passive Aquatic Sensors and Air–Sea Temperature Changes in the Tropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several years of long-term high temporal resolution ocean ambient noise data from the tropical Pacific Ocean are analyzed to detect oceanic rainfall. Ocean ambient noise generated by rainfall and wind are identified through an acoustic ...

Barry B. Ma; Jeffrey A. Nystuen

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Improvement to Air2Air® Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cooling tower with relatively drier and cooler ambient air. This is done in an air-to-air heat exchanger made up of plastic sheets with two discreet air pathways. As the warm,...

219

Comparison of Vertical Soundings and Sidewall Air Temperature Measurements in a Small Alpine Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tethered balloon soundings from two sites on the floor of a 1-km-diameter limestone sinkhole in the eastern Alps are compared with pseudovertical temperature “soundings” from three lines of temperature dataloggers on the basin's northwest, ...

C. David Whiteman; Stefan Eisenbach; Bernhard Pospichal; Reinhold Steinacker

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Comparing Temperature and Humidity on a Mountain Slope and in the Free Air Nearby  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface temperature and humidity data measured by eight remote weather stations on a south-facing slope in the San Bernardino Mountains of Southern California were compared with temperature and humidity data measured by a rawinsonde at the same ...

Morris H. McCutchan

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Seasonal influence of insolation on fine-resolved air temperature variation and snowmelt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses GIS-based modeling of incoming solar radiation to quantify fine-resolved spatiotemporal responses of year-round monthly average temperature within a field study area located on the eastern coast of Sweden. A network of temperature ...

Nikki Vercauteren; Steve W. Lyon; Georgia Destouni

222

Impacts of Urban Albedo Increase on Local Air Temperature at Daily–Annual Time Scales: Model Results and Synthesis of Previous Work  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors combine urban and soil–vegetation surface parameterization schemes with one-dimensional (1D) boundary layer mixing and radiation parameterizations to estimate the maximum impact of increased surface albedo on urban air temperatures. ...

E. Scott Krayenhoff; James A. Voogt

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Uncertainties, Trends, and Hottest and Coldest Years of U.S. Surface Air Temperature since 1895: An Update Based on the USHCN V2 TOB Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper estimates the sampling error variances of gridded monthly U.S. Historical Climatology Network, version 2 (USHCN V2), time-of-observation-biases (TOB)-adjusted data. The analysis of mean surface air temperature (SAT) assesses ...

Samuel S. P. Shen; Christine K. Lee; Jay Lawrimore

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

An Analysis of Near-Surface Winds, Air Temperature, and Cyclone Activity in Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica, from 1993 to 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 2009, the first unmanned aerial vehicles were flown over Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica, to collect information regarding air–sea interactions. Prior to the field season, wind and temperature data from a local automatic weather station (...

Shelley L. Knuth; John J. Cassano

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Bias Correction and Forecast Skill of NCEP GFS Ensemble Week-1 and Week-2 Precipitation, 2-m Surface Air Temperature, and Soil Moisture Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple bias correction method was used to correct daily operational ensemble week-1 and week-2 precipitation and 2-m surface air temperature forecasts from the NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS). The study shows some unexpected and striking ...

Yun Fan; Huug van den Dool

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Measurement Requirements for Climate Monitoring of Upper-Air Temperature Derived from Reanalysis Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a reanalysis of the climate of the past half century as a model of temperature variations over the next half century, tests of various data collection protocols are made to develop recommendations for observing system requirements for ...

Dian J. Seidel; Melissa Free

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Variations in Surface Air Temperatures: Part 1. Northern Hemisphere, 1881–1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have produced, using objective techniques, a long-term series of average Northern Hemisphere temperatures based on monthly mean station data gridded on a 5° latitude by 10° longitude grid. Difficulties in the estimation of this parameter are ...

P. D. Jones; T. M. L. Wigley; P. M. Kelly

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Influences of Snow Cover and Soil Moisture on Monthly Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of objective specification experiments are performed with monthly 700 mb heights and surface station temperatures for the United States during 1947–80. The errors in these specifications are used in conjunction with observed snow cover ...

John E. Walsh; William H. Jasperson; Becky Ross

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Measurements of the Air Temperature Profile near the Ground by Two Laser Beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two neon-helium gas lasers were used for temperatures profile measurements near the ground. The experiment was carried out during the cold season (when absolute humidity is small on the asphalt pavement) to be free from humidity effects. The ...

Takehisa Yokoi

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Air-Sea Interaction as a Propagator of Equatorial Ocean Surface Temperature Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The westward propagation of equatorial sea surface temperature anomalies exceeds the surface drift velocity and is probably associated with propagating changes in the depth of the surface mixed layer and upper thermocline. These can be caused by ...

Eric B. Kraus; Howard P. Hanson

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The accuracy of miniature bead thermistors in the measurement of upper air temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A laboratory study was made of the errors of miniature bead thermistors of 5, 10, and 15 mils nominal diameter when used for the measurement of atmospheric temperature. Although the study was primarily concerned with the ...

Thompson, Donald C. (Donald Charles), 1933-

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Influence of Operating Modes, Room Temperature Set Point and Curtain Styles on Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A field investigation was carried out in an office building of Changsha city in winter and summer, the influence of different running modes, curtain styles and room temperature set point on energy consumption of room air conditioner (RAC) was studied. The results show that: In summer automatic speed mode consumes the least refrigerating energy in different running modes, compared with low speed and high speed modes, it can conserve energy for 27.3% and 15.8%, respectively. In the same running mode, setting outer curtain can conserve energy for 40.9% and 20.4% compared with no curtain and inner curtain states, respectively. In winter high speed mode is the most efficient for saving energy which can decrease 40.3% and 30.9% compared with low speed and automatic speed modes. In the same running mode, setting inner curtain state makes the least heating energy consumption in cloudy day, about 10.8% and 2.7% less than no curtain and outer curtain states. However, it is not obvious when the day is fine. The heating energy consumption decreases as room temperature set point falls, compared with the energy consumption at 20.5 C and 19.5 C, it is decreases for 34.1% and17.0 % at 18.5 C, respectively. All the results will be the reference of environment design and control for air conditioning room.

Yu, J.; Yang, C.; Guo, R.; Wu, D.; Chen, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Autoignited laminar lifted flames of methane, ethylene, ethane, and n-butane jets in coflow air with elevated temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The autoignition characteristics of laminar lifted flames of methane, ethylene, ethane, and n-butane fuels have been investigated experimentally in coflow air with elevated temperature over 800 K. The lifted flames were categorized into three regimes depending on the initial temperature and fuel mole fraction: (1) non-autoignited lifted flame, (2) autoignited lifted flame with tribrachial (or triple) edge, and (3) autoignited lifted flame with mild combustion. For the non-autoignited lifted flames at relatively low temperature, the existence of lifted flame depended on the Schmidt number of fuel, such that only the fuels with Sc > 1 exhibited stationary lifted flames. The balance mechanism between the propagation speed of tribrachial flame and local flow velocity stabilized the lifted flames. At relatively high initial temperatures, either autoignited lifted flames having tribrachial edge or autoignited lifted flames with mild combustion existed regardless of the Schmidt number of fuel. The adiabatic ignition delay time played a crucial role for the stabilization of autoignited flames. Especially, heat loss during the ignition process should be accounted for, such that the characteristic convection time, defined by the autoignition height divided by jet velocity was correlated well with the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time for the critical autoignition conditions. The liftoff height was also correlated well with the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time. (author)

Choi, B.C.; Chung, S.H. [Clean Combustion Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fracture and fatigue properties of Mo-Mo{sub 3}Si-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} refractory intermetallic alloys at ambient to elevated temperatures (25-1300 degrees Centigrade)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for structural materials with high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance coupled with adequate lower-temperature toughness for potential use at temperatures above {approx} 1000 degrees C has remained a persistent challenge in materials science. In this work, one promising class of intermetallic alloys is examined, namely boron-containing molybdenum silicides, with compositions in the range Mo (bal), 12-17 at. percentSi, 8.5 at. percentB, processed using both ingot (I/M) and powder (P/M) metallurgy methods. Specifically, the oxidation (''pesting''), fracture toughness and fatigue-crack propagation resistance of four such alloys, which consisted of {approx}21 to 38 vol. percent a-Mo phase in an intermetallic matrix of Mo3Si and Mo5SiB2 (T2), were characterized at temperatures between 25 degrees and 1300 degrees C. The boron additions were found to confer superior ''pest'' resistance (at 400 degrees to 900 degrees C) as compared to unmodified molybdenum silicides, such as Mo5Si3. Moreover , although the fracture and fatigue properties of the finer-scale P/M alloys were only marginally better than those of MoSi2, for the I/M processed microstructures with coarse distributions of the a-Mo phase, fracture toughness properties were far superior, rising from values above 7 MPa sqrt m at ambient temperatures to almost 12 MPa sqrt m at 1300 degrees C.

Choe, Heeman; Schneibel, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Solar Cycle Signal in Air Temperature in North America: Amplitude, Gradient, Phase and Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ll-year solar cycle temperature signal in records from North America is further elucidated by single- and two-channel (Morf et al., 1978) high-resolution signal processing. In agreement with earlier analysis (Currie, 1979) the signal Te, is ...

Robert G. Currie

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Variations in Surface Air Temperatures. Part 3: The Antarctic, 1957–82  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antarctic temperature variations for 1957°82 have been objectively analyzed by gridding monthly data, from 16 stations, onto a 5° latitude by 10° longitude grid, from 65 to 90°S. These gridded data were used to calculate monthly values of the ...

S. C. B. Raper; T. M. L. Wigley; P. R. Mayes; P. D. Jones; M. J. Salinger

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

CDQ System Designing and Dual-Loop PID Tuning Method for Air Steam Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we mainly introduce the key technology of a steel plant's CDQ(Coke Dry Quenching) control system design based on PLC (Programmable LogicController). The CDQ control system is divided into five systems which are as follows: the coke loading, ... Keywords: CDQ system, steam temperature control, Dualloop PID Tuning, environment protecting

Gao Jian, Chen Xianqiao

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Measurement of gas species, temperatures, coal burnout, and wall heat fluxes in a 200 MWe lignite-fired boiler with different overfire air damper openings  

SciTech Connect

Measurements were performed on a 200 MWe, wall-fired, lignite utility boiler. For different overfire air (OFA) damper openings, the gas temperature, gas species concentration, coal burnout, release rates of components (C, H, and N), furnace temperature, and heat flux and boiler efficiency were measured. Cold air experiments for a single burner were conducted in the laboratory. The double-swirl flow pulverized-coal burner has two ring recirculation zones starting in the secondary air region in the burner. As the secondary air flow increases, the axial velocity of air flow increases, the maxima of radial velocity, tangential velocity and turbulence intensity all increase, and the swirl intensity of air flow and the size of recirculation zones increase slightly. In the central region of the burner, as the OFA damper opening widens, the gas temperature and CO concentration increase, while the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and coal particles ignite earlier. In the secondary air region of the burner, the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and the gas temperature and CO concentration vary slightly. In the sidewall region, the gas temperature, O{sub 2} concentration, and NOx concentration decrease, while the CO concentration increases and the gas temperature varies slightly. The furnace temperature and heat flux in the main burning region decrease appreciably, but increase slightly in the burnout region. The NOx emission decreases from 1203.6 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 0% to 511.7 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 80% and the boiler efficiency decreases from 92.59 to 91.9%. 15 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Jianping Jing; Zhengqi Li; Guangkui Liu; Zhichao Chen; Chunlong Liu [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Energy Science and Engineering

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Formation Mechanisms of the Extreme High Surface Air Temperature of 40.9°C Observed in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area: Considerations of Dynamic Foehn and Foehnlike Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A record-breaking high surface air temperature in Japan of 40.9°C was observed on 16 August 2007 in Kumagaya, located 60 km northwest of central Tokyo. In this study, the formation mechanisms of this extreme high temperature event are ...

Yuya Takane; Hiroyuki Kusaka

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A Parameterization of the Particle Size Spectrum of Ice Clouds in Terms of the Ambient Temperature and the Ice Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A data set obtained in cirrus clouds has been examined to deduce any dependencies of the particle size spectral form or the crystal habit on the temperature. It was found that both form of the spectra and crystal habit changed systematically with ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; C. M. R. Platt

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Interaction of Plutonium with Diverse Materials in Moist Air and Nitrogen-Argon Atmospheres at Room Temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical and radiolytic interactions of weapons-grade plutonium with metallic, inorganic, and hydrogenous materials in atmospheres containing moist air-argon mixtures have been characterized at room temperature from pressure-volume-temperature and mass spectrometric measurements of the gas phase. A reaction sequence controlled by kinetics and gas-phase composition is defined by correlating observed and known reaction rates. In all cases, O{sub 2} is eliminated first by the water-catalyzed Pu + O{sub 2} reaction and H{sub 2}O is then consumed by the Pu + H{sub 2}O reaction, producing a gas mixture of N{sub 2}, argon, and H{sub 2}. Hydrogen formed by the reaction of water and concurrent radiolysis of hydrogenous materials either reacts to form PuH{sub 2} or accumulates in the system. Accumulation of H{sub 2} is correlated with the presence of hydrogenous materials in liquid and volatile forms that are readily distributed over the plutonium surface. Areal rates of radiolytic H{sub 2} generation are determined and applied in showing that modest extents of H{sub 2} production are expected for hydrogenous solids if the contact area with plutonium is limited. The unpredictable nature of complex chemical systems is demonstrated by occurrence of the chloride-catalyzed Pu + H{sub 2}O reaction in some tests and hydride-catalyzed nitriding in another.

John M. Haschke; Raymond J. Martinez; Robert E. Pruner II; Barbara Martinez; Thomas H. Allen

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Contribution of Land Use Changes to Near-Surface Air Temperatures during Recent Summer Extreme Heat Events in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of 1973–2005 land use–land cover (LULC) changes on near-surface air temperatures during four recent summer extreme heat events (EHEs) are investigated for the arid Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan area using the Weather Research and ...

Susanne Grossman-Clarke; Joseph A. Zehnder; Thomas Loridan; C. Sue B. Grimmond

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Superheater/intermediate temperature air heater tube corrosion tests in the MHD coal fired flow facility (Montana Rosebud POC tests)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nineteen alloys have been exposed for approximately 1000 test hours as candidate superheater and intermediate temperature air heater tubes in a U.S. DOE facility dedicated to demonstrating Proof of Concept for the bottoming or heat and seed recovery portion of coal fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generating plants. Corrosion data have been obtained from a test series utilizing a western United States sub-bituminous coal, Montana Rosebud. The test alloys included a broad range of compositions ranging from carbon steel to austenitic stainless steels to high chromium nickel-base alloys. The tubes, coated with K{sub 2}SO-containing deposits, developed principally, oxide scales by an oxidation/sulfidation mechanism. In addition to being generally porous, these scales were frequently spalled and/or non-compact due to a dispersed form of outward growth by oxide precipitation in the adjacent deposit. Austenitic alloys generally had internal penetration as trans Tranular and/or intergranular oxides and sulfides. While only two of the alloys had damage visible without magnification as a result of the relatively short exposure, there was some concern about Iona-term corrosion performance owing to the relatively poor quality scales formed. Comparison of data from these tests to those from a prior series of tests with Illinois No. 6, a high sulfur bituminous coal, showed less corrosion in the present test series with the lower sulfur coal. Although K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}was the principal corrosive agent as the supplier of sulfur, which acted to degrade alloy surface scales, tying up sulfur as K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} prevented the occurrence of complex alkali iron trisulfates responsible for severe or catastrophic corrosion in conventional power plants with certain coals and metal temperatures.

White, M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Impact of Solar Control PVB Glass on Vehicle Interior Temperatures, Air-Conditioning Capacity, Fuel Consumption, and Vehicle Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the study was to assess the impact of Saflex1 S-series Solar Control PVB (polyvinyl butyral) configurations on conventional vehicle fuel economy and electric vehicle (EV) range. The approach included outdoor vehicle thermal soak testing, RadTherm cool-down analysis, and vehicle simulations. Thermal soak tests were conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility in Golden, Colorado. The test results quantified interior temperature reductions and were used to generate initial conditions for the RadTherm cool-down analysis. The RadTherm model determined the potential reduction in air-conditioning (A/C) capacity, which was used to calculate the A/C load for the vehicle simulations. The vehicle simulation tool identified the potential reduction in fuel consumption or improvement in EV range between a baseline and modified configurations for the city and highway drive cycles. The thermal analysis determined a potential 4.0% reduction in A/C power for the Saflex Solar PVB solar control configuration. The reduction in A/C power improved the vehicle range of EVs and fuel economy of conventional vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

Rugh, J.; Chaney, L.; Venson, T.; Ramroth, L.; Rose, M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A liquid over-feeding military air conditioner  

SciTech Connect

A 3-ton military air conditioning unit has been experimentally studied for baseline and liquid over-feeding operation (LOF). The test results indicate that LOF outperforms the baseline case over a wide ambient temperature range in terms of cooling capacity, power consumption, and system coefficient of performance (COP). At 95 F test point, the COP improvement for LOF is 19.8% over that of the baseline case. However, optimal refrigerant charge is essential for LOF to work properly.

Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bolton, C. [Army CECOM Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Fort Belvoir, VA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

An inlet air washer/chiller system for combined cycle planet repowering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conditioning method to achieve increased output at any relative humidity condition is an air washer and absorption chiller arrangement. At elevated temperatures and low humidity, the air washer operates as an evaporative cooler without the chiller in operation. In this mode, the air washer will give similar results as a media type evaporative cooler at a fraction of the pressure loss. In the air washer plus chiller operating mode the chiller maintains cooling effectiveness of the air washer during periods of high relative humidity. This makes such a system very appropriate anywhere relative humidity is high. Many combined cycle plants utilize supplemental firing of the heat recovery steam generators to offset the loss of gas turbine power at high ambient temperatures. This paper shows that in contrast to supplementary firing, the combination air washer/chiller system can generate power more efficiently and at lower cost.

Sengupta, U.; Soroka, G. (Bechtel Power Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

A plug and play framework for an HVAC air handling unit and temperature sensor auto recognition technique.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A plug and play framework for an HVAC air handling unit control system is proposed in this study. This is the foundation and the first… (more)

Zhou, Xiaohui

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Effects of ambient conditions and fuel composition on combustion stability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent regulations on NO, emissions are promoting the use of lean premix (LPM) combustion for industrial gas turbines. LPM combustors avoid locally stoichiometric combustion by premixing fuel and the air upstream of the reaction region, thereby eliminating the high temperatures that produce thermal NO.. Unfortunately, this style of combustor is prone to combustion oscillation. Significant pressure fluctuations can occur when variations in heat release periodically couple pressure to acoustic modes in the combustion chamber. These oscillations must be controlled because resulting vibration can shorten the life of engine hardware. Laboratory and engine field testing have shown that instability regimes can vary with environmental conditions. These observations prompted this study of the effects of ambient conditions and fuel composition on combustion stability. Tests are conducted on a sub-scale combustor burning natural gas, propane, and some hydrogen/hydrocarbon mixtures. A premix, swirl-stabilized fuel nozzle typical of industrial gas turbines is used. Experimental and numerical results describe how stability regions may shift as inlet air temperature, humidity, and fuel composition are altered. Results appear to indicate that shifting instability instability regimes are primarily caused by changes in reaction rate.

Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J. [USDOE Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV (United States); Robey, E.H. [EG& G Technical Services of West Virginia (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

High strength air-dried aerogels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

250

Variable temperature seat climate control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature climate control system comprises a variable temperature seat, at least one heat pump, at least one heat pump temperature sensor, and a controller. Each heat pump comprises a number of Peltier thermoelectric modules for temperature conditioning the air in a main heat exchanger and a main exchanger fan for passing the conditioned air from the main exchanger to the variable temperature seat. The Peltier modules and each main fan may be manually adjusted via a control switch or a control signal. Additionally, the temperature climate control system may comprise a number of additional temperature sensors to monitor the temperature of the ambient air surrounding the occupant as well as the temperature of the conditioned air directed to the occupant. The controller is configured to automatically regulate the operation of the Peltier modules and/or each main fan according to a temperature climate control logic designed both to maximize occupant comfort during normal operation, and minimize possible equipment damage, occupant discomfort, or occupant injury in the event of a heat pump malfunction.

Karunasiri, Tissa R. (Van Nuys, CA); Gallup, David F. (Pasadena, CA); Noles, David R. (Glendale, CA); Gregory, Christian T. (Alhambra, CA)

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

251

Primary and secondary ambient temperature lithium batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings collect papers on the subject of batteries. Topics include: lithium-oxygen batteries, lithium-sulphur batteries, metal-metal oxide batteries, metal-nonmetal batteries, spacecraft power supplies, electrochemistry, and battery containment materials.

Gabano, J.P.; Takehara, Z.; Bro, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Temperature decoupling control of double-level air flow field dynamic vacuum system based on neural network and prediction principle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Double-level air flow field dynamic vacuum (DAFDV) system is a strong coupling, large time-delay, and nonlinear multi-input-multi-output system. Decoupling and overcoming the impact of time-delay are two keys to obtain rapid, accurate and independent ... Keywords: ASSAVP, BP, DAFDV, Decoupling control, Double-level air flow field, EBTC, HX, IPSO, MIMO, Neural networks, OIF, PID, Particle swarm optimization, Prediction, RBF, SISO, TITO, WBTC

Li Jinyang; Meng Xiaofeng

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Experiments with structural concrete blocks which double as solar air heaters. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because concrete is a low cost, low energy content material, and because many buildings have unobstructed south-facing walls, the concept of an air heating structural block was evolved. Four configurations are described, two routinely available from concrete block manufacturers, and two specially designed. Test walls were evaluated heating ambient air in a single pass, so the temperature difference was low. With that reservation, there was little difference between any of the configurations (one of the special designs was best) or between the blocks and conventional solar air heaters.

Payne, P.R.; Brown, J.P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Elimination of Temperature Effects in Microbarometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A microbarometer based on a differential-pressure transducer has been developed, in which an air chamber provides a near-ambient reference pressure. This differential mode ensures high sensitivity to ambient-pressure changes but suffers from the ...

Barrie W. Jones

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Environmental Quality This chapter enumerates primary and secondary ambient air quality standards and the significant deterioration increments. Significant deterioration refers to an increase in ambient air pollution above a baseline plus a specific increment allowed for one of three classes of areas. It is required for potential sources of air contaminants to register with the

256

Hemispheric and Large-Scale Surface Air Temperature Variations: An Extensive Revision and an Update to 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is an extensive revision of the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) land station temperature database that is used to produce a gridbox dataset of 5° latitude × 5° longitude temperature anomalies. The new database comprises 5159 station ...

P. D. Jones; A. Moberg

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Icelandic Coastal Sea Surface Temperature Records Constructed: Putting the Pulse on Air–Sea–Climate Interactions in the Northern North Atlantic. Part I: Comparison with HadISST1 Open-Ocean Surface Temperatures and Preliminary Analysis of Long-Term Patterns and Anomalies of SSTs around Iceland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new comprehensive record of long-term Icelandic sea surface temperature measurements, which have been updated and filled in with reference to air temperature records, is presented. The new SST series reveal important features of the variability ...

Edward Hanna; Trausti Jónsson; Jon Ólafsson; Hedinn Valdimarsson

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Numerical analysis of temperature and flow effects in a dry, one-dimensional aquifer used for compressed air energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed description of the method of analysis and the results obtained for an investigation of the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic response of a model of a dry porous media reservoir used for compressed air energy storage (CAES) is presented. Results were obtained from a one-dimensional simulation of the cycling of heated air to and from a radial flow field surrounding a single well in a porous rock. It was assumed that the performance of the bulk of the reservoir could be characterized by the performance of a single well.

Smith, G.C.; Wiles, L.E.; Loscutoff, W.V.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and PM2.5: A case study of benzo(a)pyrene in California metropolitan regions Title Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and PM2.5: A case study of benzo(a)pyrene in California metropolitan regions Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-514E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Lobscheid, Agnes B., Thomas E. McKone, and D. A. Valleroc Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5659-5672 Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and particulate matter (PM) are co-pollutants emitted as by-products of combustion processes. Convincing evidence exists for PAHs as a primary toxic component of fine PM (PM2.5). Because PM2.5 is listed by the US EPA as a "Criteria Pollutant," it is monitored regularly at sites nationwide. In contrast, very limited data is available on measured ambient air concentrations of PAHs. However, between 1999-2001, ambient air concentrations of PM2.5 and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) are available for California locations. We use multivariate linear regression models (MLRMs) to predict ambient air levels of BaP in four air basins based on reported PM2.5 concentrations and spatial, temporal and meteorological variables as variates. We obtain an R2 ranging from 0.57-0.72 among these basins. Significant variables (p<0.05) include the average daily PM2.5 concentration, wind speed, temperature and relative humidity, and the coastal distance as well as season, and holiday or weekend. Combining the data from all sites and using only these variables to estimate ambient BaP levels, we obtain an R2 of 0.55. These R2-values, combined with analysis of the residual error and cross validation using the PRESS-statistic, demonstrate the potential of our method to estimate reported outdoor air PAH exposure levels in metropolitan regions. These MLRMs provide a first step towards relating outdoor ambient PM2.5 and PAH concentrations for epidemiological studies when PAH measurements are unavailable, or limited in spatial coverage, based on publicly available meteorological and PM2.5 data

260

Effectiveness of Shading Air-Cooled Condensers of Air-Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In air-conditioning (A/C) systems with air-cooled condensers, the condensing unit has to be kept in the open for easy access to outdoor air in order to efficiently dissipate heat. During daytime, the solar radiation falling on the surfaces of the condenser and the high ambient temperatures can be detrimental for the energy performance. The effectiveness of shading the condensing unit to mitigate this adverse impact is investigated in this paper. A limiting analysis compares the performance of several A/C systems with ideal shade to those with ideal solar heat gain. The comparison is based on a theoretical model and data from equipment catalogs. The theoretical increase in the coefficient of performance (COP) due to shading is found to be within 2.5%. Furthermore, this small improvement in ideal efficiency decreases at higher ambient temperatures, when enhancements to efficiency are more needed. The actual efficiency improvement due to shading is not expected to exceed 1%, and the daily energy savings will be lower.

ElSherbini, A.; Maheshwari, G. P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Ambiental PV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambiental PV Ambiental PV Jump to: navigation, search Name Ambiental PV Place Bahia, Brazil Zip 40140-380 Sector Carbon Product Bahia-based carbon consultancy firm. References Ambiental PV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ambiental PV is a company located in Bahia, Brazil . References ↑ "Ambiental PV" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ambiental_PV&oldid=342095" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 186306960

262

STEP—A Temperature Profiler for Measuring the Oceanic Thermal Boundary Layer at the Ocean–Air Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast measuring system has been designed and built to determine the oceanic thermal microstructure at the ocean–air interface. The system consists of a profiler sonde, which amends through the uppermost few meters of the ocean with a time of ...

Theodor C. Mammen; Nikolaus von Bosse

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Imaging with ambient noise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent developments in seismology, ultrasonics, and underwater acoustics have led to a radical change in the way scientists think about ambient noise--the diffuse waves generated by pressure fluctuations in the atmosphere, the scattering of water waves in the ocean, and any number of other sources that pervade our world. Because diffuse waves consist of the superposition of waves propagating in all directions, they appear to be chaotic and random. That appearance notwithstanding, diffuse waves carry information about the medium through which they propagate.

Snieder, Roel; Wapenaar, Kees [Colorado School of Mines, Golden (United States); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Contribution of Semi-volatile Organic Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project In a collaborative effort between ChemImage Biothreat, LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project will acquire the ability to discern between chemical/biological threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. The project will focus on potential background interferences, specifically from the ambient backgrounds collected at NETL-supported ambient air collection facilities. Potential substrate interferences such as pollen, insecticides and industrial PM will be addressed. Using Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) and fluorescence chemical imaging, a background - void of pathogen spores - will be collected and compared to known pathogens. Interactions causing possible false positives will be identified and studied. This study would systematically identify potential problems and provide a baseline of ambient particulates found in the mid-eastern United States .

265

Evaluation of the Impact of Off-Design Operation on an Air-Cooled Binary Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal power plants are designed and constructed to provide a rated power output at specific resource and ambient conditions. Due to both diurnal and seasonal changes in the ambient air temperature, as well as a decline in resource productivity over time, plants seldom operate at these ''design'' conditions. This paper examines the impact of ''off- design'' operation of an air-cooled binary geothermal power plant. An available energy analysis is used to evaluate operation at these conditions. This evaluation identifies those portions of the power cycle that are most sensitive to changing resource and ambient conditions, as well as where improvements in cycle component or system performance would have the largest impact in increasing power output.

Mines, G.L.

2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

266

Ambient Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corp Place Newton, Massachusetts Zip 24580 Product Ambient develops open standards-based technologies for creating smart grid communication platforms and technologies. References...

267

Improvement of the Temperature and Moisture Retrievals in the Lower Troposphere Using AIRS and GPS Radio Occultation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate temperature and water vapor profiles in the middle and lower troposphere (LT) are crucial for understanding the water cycle, cloud systems, and energy balance. Global positioning system (GPS) radio occultation (RO) is the first technique ...

Shu-Peng Ho; Ying-Hwa Kuo; Sergey Sokolovskiy

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Joint Diagnostic of the Surface Air Temperature in Southern South America and the Madden–Julian Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to explore the relationship between maximum and minimum temperatures, daily precipitation, and the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO). It was found that the different phases of the MJO show a consistent signal on ...

Gustavo Naumann; Walter M. Vargas

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

An Investigation into the Spatial Variability of Near-Surface Air Temperatures in the Detroit, Michigan, Metropolitan Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On an annual basis, heat is the chief cause of weather-related deaths in the United States. Therefore, understanding the temperature structure where people live is important for reducing the health burden imposed by hot weather. This study focused ...

Evan M. Oswald; Richard B. Rood; Kai Zhang; Carina J. Gronlund; Marie S. O’Neill; Jalonne L. White-Newsome; Shannon J. Brines; Daniel G. Brown

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Estimation of Sensible and Latent Heat Fluxes from Soil Surface Temperature Using a Linear Air-Land Heat Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present a linearized model of the heat transfer between the soil layer and the atmosphere. Using this model, the moisture availability at the surface can be estimated from the diurnal variations of the soil surface temperature and ...

Fujio Kimura; Yugo Shimizu

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Effects of Historical Urbanization in the Brussels Capital Region on Surface Air Temperature Time Series: A Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the local impact of change in impervious surfaces in the Brussels capital region (BCR), Belgium, on trends in maximum, minimum, and mean temperatures between 1960 and 1999. Specifically, data are combined from remote sensing ...

R. Hamdi; A. Deckmyn; P. Termonia; G. R. Demarée; P. Baguis; S. Vanhuysse; E. Wolff

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Fixed Bed Countercurrent Low Temperature Gasification of Dairy Biomass and Coal-Dairy Biomass Blends Using Air-Steam as Oxidizer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concentrated animal feeding operations such as cattle feedlots and dairies produce a large amount of manure, cattle biomass (CB), which may lead to land, water, and air pollution if waste handling systems and storage and treatment structures are not properly managed. However, the concentrated production of low quality CB at these feeding operations serves as a good feedstock for in situ gasification for syngas (CO and H2) production and subsequent use in power generation. A small scale (10 kW) countercurrent fixed bed gasifier was rebuilt to perform gasification studies under quasisteady state conditions using dairy biomass (DB) as feedstock and various air-steam mixtures as oxidizing sources. A DB-ash (from DB) blend and a DB-Wyoming coal blend were also studied for comparison purposes. In addition, chlorinated char was also produced via pure pyrolysis of DB using N2 and N2-steam gas mixtures. The chlorinated char is useful for enhanced capture of Hg in ESP of coal fired boilers. Two main parameters were investigated in the gasification studies with air-steam mixtures. One was the equivalence ratio ER (the ratio of stochiometric air to actual air) and the second was the steam to fuel ratio (S:F). Prior to the experimental studies, atom conservation with i) limited product species and ii) equilibrium modeling studies with a large number of product species were performed on the gasification of DB to determine suitable range of operating conditions (ER and S:F ratio). Results on bed temperature profile, gas composition (CO, CO2, H2, CH4, C2H6, and N2), gross heating value (HHV), and energy conversion efficiency (ECE) are presented. Both modeling and experimental results show that gasification under increased ER and S:F ratios tend to produce rich mixtures in H2 and CO2 but poor in CO. Increased ER produces gases with higher HHV but decreases the ECE due to higher tar and char production. Gasification of DB under the operating conditions 1.59less than0.8 yielded gas mixtures with compositions as given below: CO (4.77 - 11.73 %), H2 (13.48 - 25.45%), CO2 (11-25.2%), CH4 (0.43-1.73 %), and C2H6 (0.2- 0.69%). In general, the bed temperature profiles had peaks that ranged between 519 and 1032 degrees C for DB gasification.

Gordillo Ariza, Gerardo

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A Triple-Path Denuder Instrument for Ambient Particulate Sampling and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field instrument for sampling sulfate and nitrate particulate matter in a controlled chemical environment has been constructed and field tested. The instrument contains HNO3 and NH3 denuders and an ambient air path, all connected by manifold to ...

Briant L. Davis; L. Ronald Johnson; Bryan J. Johnson; Robert J. Hammer

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Two-dimensional model of the air flow and temperature distribution in a cavity-type heat receiver of a solar stirling engine  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical study on the air flow and temperature in the heat receiver, affected by free convection, of a Stirling Engine for a Dish/Stirling Engine Power System is presented. The standard {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model for the fluid flow has been used and the boundary conditions employed were obtained using a second level mathematical model of the Stirling Engine working cycle. Physical models for the distribution of the solar insolation from the Concentrator on the bottom and side walls of the cavity-type heat receiver have been taken into account. The numerical results show that most of the heat losses in the receiver are due to re-radiation from the cavity and conduction through the walls of the cavity. It is in the region of the boundary of the input window of the heat receiver where there is a sensible reduction in the temperature in the shell of the heat exchangers and this is due to the free convection of the air. Further, the numerical results show that convective heat losses increase with decreasing tilt angle.

Makhkamov, K.K.; Ingham, D.B.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Abatement of Air Pollution: Connecticut Primary and Secondary Standards (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

No person shall operate a source which has a significant impact on air quality in such a manner as to cause or contribute to a violation of ambient air quality standards. Connecticut primary and...

276

Air–Sea Heat Exchange along the Northern Sea Surface Temperature Front in the Eastern Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric response to the oceanic forcing in the eastern Pacific along the northern equatorial sea surface temperature (SST) front is investigated in terms of sensible and latent heat flux during the 6-month period from 28 July 1999 to 27 ...

Nicolai Thum; Steven K. Esbensen; Dudley B. Chelton; Michael J. McPhaden

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Physical Mechanisms of the Wintertime Surface Air Temperature Variability in South Korea and the near-7-Day Oscillations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first three principal modes of wintertime surface temperature variability in Seoul, South Korea (37.33°N, 126.59°E), are extracted from the 1979–2008 observed records via cyclostationary EOF (CSEOF) analysis. The first mode represents the ...

Kwang-Yul Kim; Joon-Woo Roh

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Numerical Analysis of the Channel Wheel Fresh Air Ventilator Under Frosting Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As new equipment, the channel wheel fresh air ventilator has become increasingly popular in recent years. However, when such equipment is operated under low ambient temperature in the freezing area in winter, the formation of frost on the outdoor waste air surface becomes problematic, leading to the degradation of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator's performance or even the shutdown of equipment. Therefore, it is necessary to have a detailed investigation on the operational characteristics of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator under frosting in order to guide its application. This paper first reports on the development of a detailed model for the channel wheel heat exchanger, which is the core part of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator under frosting conditions. The model developed, first seen in open literature, consists of a frosting sub-model and a channel wheel heat exchanger sub-model. This is followed by reporting an evaluation of the operational characteristics of a frosted channel wheel heat exchanger under different ambient conditions using the model developed. These include frost formation on the surface of the channel wheel heat exchanger, and impacts on the operational performance of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator. Furthermore, the interval of defrosting is obtained, which provides the basis for the adoption of effective defrosting measures, and thus increasing the channel wheel fresh air ventilator's energy efficiency and operating reliability.

Gao, B.; Dong, Z.; Cheng, Z.; Luo, E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Combustion Gas Turbine Power Enhancement by Refrigeration of Inlet Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion gas turbines have gained widespread acceptance for mechanical drive and power generation applications. One key drawback of a combustion turbine is that its specific output and thermal efficiency vary quite significantly with variations in the ambient temperature. On hot days, a machine may experience considerable difficulty in meeting its power demand. One concept that has not received much attention is the cooling down of compressor inlet air. This paper will examine the theoretical and practical implications of concept such as evaporative cooling, intercooling, expansion cooling and compression and absorption refrigeration.

Meher-Homji, C. B.; Mani, G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Test facility for well logging cables (in air at atmospheric pressure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system has been built to test, in air at ambient pressure, short sections of electromechanical cables which are potentially useful for geothermal well logging service. Electrical characteristics of the test cable are monitored while the cable is exposed to elevated temperature and tensioned in a manner simulating loading experienced by a typical well logging cable. Cable conductor resistance, dielectric resistance and capacitance are measured. The cable can be exposed to bending, simulating that which occurs when passing over sheaves or wound on or off a drum. Cable anchors are arranged to permit nearly 100 percent strength tensioning in the heated section. Electrical connectors are made at the unstrained ends at ambient temperature. The system can also be used to tension test cable terminations at elevated temperatures.

Not Available

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Low temperature sodium-beta battery  

SciTech Connect

A battery that will operate at ambient temperature or lower includes an enclosure, a current collector within the enclosure, an anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, a cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, and a separator and electrolyte within the enclosure between the anode and the cathode. The anode is a sodium eutectic anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower. The cathode is a low melting ion liquid cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower.

Farmer, Joseph C

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

282

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Management Permits are required to construct, install, or modify any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant. Minimum quantities are specified in Table III of these regulations. Permits will be granted based in part on the impact of the projected emissions of the stationary source on acceptable ambient levels

283

Structure, optical, and electrical properties of indium tin oxide thin films prepared by sputtering at room temperature and annealed in air or nitrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films have been grown onto soda-lime glass substrates by sputtering at room temperature with various oxygen to argon partial pressure ratios. After deposition, the samples have been annealed at temperatures ranging from 100 to 500 degree sign C in nitrogen or in air. The structure, optical, and electrical characteristics of the ITO coatings have been analyzed as a function of the deposition and the annealing parameters by x-ray diffraction, spectrophotometry, and Hall effect measurements. It has been found that the as-grown amorphous layers crystallize in the cubic structure by heating above 200 degree sign C. Simultaneously, the visible optical transmittance increases and the electrical resistance decreases, in proportions that depend mainly on the sputtering conditions. The lowest resistivity values have been obtained by annealing at 400 degree sign C in nitrogen, where the highest carrier concentrations are achieved, related to oxygen vacancy creation. Some relationships between the analyzed properties have been established, showing the dependence of the cubic lattice distortion and the infrared optical characteristics on the carrier concentration.

Guillen, C.; Herrero, J. [Departamento de Energia, CIEMAT, Avda Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Flywheel Cooling: A Cooling Solution for Non Air-Conditioned Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Flywheel Cooling" utillzes the natural cooling processes of evaporation, ventilation and air circulation. These systems are providing low-cost cooling for distribution centers, warehouses, and other non air-conditioned industrial assembly plants with little or no internal loads. The evaporative roof cooling system keeps the building from heating up during the day by misting the roof surface with a fine spray of water -just enough to evaporate. This process keeps the roof surface at 90° levels instead of 150° and knocks out the radiant heat transfer from the roof into the building. The system is controlled by a thermostat and automatically shuts off at night or when the roof surface cools below the set point. The same control system turns on exhaust fans to load the building with cool night air. Air circulators are installed to provide air movement on workers during the day. Best results are achieved by closing dock doors and minimizing hot air infiltration during the day. The typical application will maintain inside temperatures that will average 84° -86° when outside ambient temperatures range from 98 °-100°. Many satisfied users will attest to marked improvements in employee moral and productivity, along with providing safe storage temperatures for many products. Installed "Flywheel" systems' costs are usually less than 20% of comparable air-conditioning equipment. By keeping a built up roof cooler, the system will eliminate thermal shock and extend roof life while reducing maintenance.

Abernethy, D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Low temperature joining of ceramic composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

2001-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

286

Low temperature joining of ceramic composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

287

Low temperature joining of ceramic composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

288

Low temperature joining of ceramic composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 C to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

289

Low temperature joining of ceramic composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

290

Alpha-environmental continuous air monitor inlet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind deceleration and protective shroud that provides representative samples of ambient aerosols to an environmental continuous air monitor (ECAM) has a cylindrical enclosure mounted to an input on the continuous air monitor, the cylindrical enclosure having shrouded nozzles located radially about its periphery. Ambient air flows, often along with rainwater flows into the nozzles in a sampling flow generated by a pump in the continuous air monitor. The sampling flow of air creates a cyclonic flow in the enclosure that flows up through the cylindrical enclosure until the flow of air reaches the top of the cylindrical enclosure and then is directed downward to the continuous air monitor. A sloped platform located inside the cylindrical enclosure supports the nozzles and causes any moisture entering through the nozzle to drain out through the nozzles.

Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

RESPIRATORY DISEASES Prenatal ambient air exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Charlie Matulka, who lost to Senator Chuck Hagel of Nebraska the same year, does not trust the results- counting machines, which happen to have been manufactured by a company Mr. Hagel used to run. Mr. Matulka, against Mr. Matulka, he won more than 80 percent of the vote. What gets conspiracy theorists excited

292

Lifting of Ambient Air by Density Currents in Sheared Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two aspects of vorticity associated with cold pools are addressed. First, tilting of horizontal vortex tubes by the updraft at a gust front has been proposed as a means of getting near-ground rotation and hence a tornado. Theory and a numerical ...

Robert Davies-Jones; Paul Markowski

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Prototype Roof Deck Designed to Self-Regulate Deck Temperature and Reduce Heat Transfer  

SciTech Connect

A prototype roof and attic assembly exploits the use of radiation, convection and insulation controls to reduce the heat transfer penetrating its roof deck by almost 85% of the heat transfer crossing a conventional roof and attic assembly. The assembly exhibited attic air temperatures that did not exceed the peak day outdoor ambient temperature. The design includes a passive ventilation scheme that pulls air from the soffit and attic into an inclined air space above the deck. The design complies with fire protection codes because the air intake is internal and closed to the elements. Field data were benchmarked against an attic computer tool and simulations made for new and retrofit home constructions in hot, moderate and cold climates to access economics for the assembly.

Miller, William A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A Prototype Roof Deck Designed to Self-Regulate Deck Temperature and Reduce Heat Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype roof and attic assembly exploits the use of radiation, convection and insulation controls to reduce its peak day heat transfer by almost 85 percent of the heat transfer crossing a conventional roof and attic assembly. The assembly exhibits attic air temperatures that do not exceed the maximum daily outdoor ambient temperature. The design includes a passive ventilation scheme that pulls air from the soffit and attic into an inclined air space above the roof deck. The design complies with fire protection codes because the air intake is internal and closed to the elements. Field data were benchmarked against an attic computer tool and simulations made for new and retrofit constructions in hot, moderate and cold climates to gauge the cost of energy savings and potential payback.

Miller, William A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chinese translation of the Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces fact sheet. Provides suggestions on how to improve furnace energy efficiency. Fuel-fired furnaces discharge combustion products through a stack or a chimney. Hot furnace gases are less dense and more buoyant than ambient air, so they rise, creating a differential pressure between the top and the bottom of the furnace. This differential, known as thermal head, is the source of a natural draft or negative pressure in furnaces and boilers. A well-designed furnace (or boiler) is built to avoid air leakage into the furnace or leakage of flue gases from the furnace to the ambient. However, with time, most furnaces develop cracks or openings around doors, joints, and hearth seals. These openings (leaks) usually appear small compared with the overall dimensions of the furnace, so they are often ignored. The negative pressure created by the natural draft (or use of an induced-draft fan) in a furnace draws cold air through the openings (leaks) and into the furnace. The cold air becomes heated to the furnace exhaust gas temperature and then exits through the flue system, wasting valuable fuel. It might also cause excessive oxidation of metals or other materials in the furnaces. The heat loss due to cold air leakage resulting from the natural draft can be estimated if you know four major parameters: (1) The furnace or flue gas temperature; (2) The vertical distance H between the opening (leak) and the point where the exhaust gases leave the furnace and its flue system (if the leak is along a vertical surface, H will be an average value); (3) The area of the leak, in square inches; and (4) The amount of operating time the furnace spends at negative pressure. Secondary parameters that affect the amount of air leakage include these: (1) The furnace firing rate; (2) The flue gas velocity through the stack or the stack cross-section area; (3) The burner operating conditions (e.g., excess air, combustion air temperature, and so on). For furnaces or boilers using an induced-draft (ID) fan, the furnace negative pressure depends on the fan performance and frictional losses between the fan inlet and the point of air leakage. In most cases, it would be necessary to measure or estimate negative pressure at the opening. The amount of air leakage, the heat lost in flue gases, and their effects on increased furnace or boiler fuel consumption can be calculated by using the equations and graphs given in Industrial Furnaces (see W. Trinks et al., below). Note that the actual heat input required to compensate for the heat loss in flue gases due to air leakage would be greater than the heat contained in the air leakage because of the effect of available heat in the furnace. For a high-temperature furnace that is not maintained properly, the fuel consumption increase due to air leakage can be as high as 10% of the fuel input.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers DOE/NETLÂ’s Air Quality Research Program is in direct response to the need to ensure that fossil-fuel-fired power systems continue to meet current and future environmental requirements. Specific environmental regulatory requirements driving this research are briefly summarized below: I. Clean Air Act (Including 1990 Amendments) Title I - Air Pollution Prevention and Control Part A - Air Quality and Emission Limitations Sect. 109 - National Ambient Air Quality Standards In July 1997 EPA promulgated new standards for particulate matter finer than 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5) and revised the ambient ozone standards. Sect. 111 - Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources Part C - Prevention of Significant Deterioration of Air Quality

297

Moments of ambient Doppler spectra  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The author studied the first four moments (center of mass, standard deviation, skew, and kurtosis) of the Doppler spectra in ambient regions of LLNL-Hughes real aperture radar data collected during WCSEX91--92. The goal was to correlate trends in the moments with wind velocity and direction. Although the center of mass appears to increase when the wind is blowing into the radar antenna, no other conclusions have been drawn from the higher order moments.

Lehman, S.K.

1993-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

298

Investigating the association between birth weight and complementary air pollution metrics: a cohort study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land use regression models for traffic-related air pollution.air pollution metrics, for pregnancy-long exposures (a) Landpollution were used (measurements from ambient monitoring stations, predictions from land

Laurent, Olivier; Wu, Jun; Li, Lianfa; Chung, Judith; Bartell, Scott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Spectral analysis of ambient weather patterns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Fourier spectral analysis of ambient weather data, consisting of global and direct solar radiation, dry and wet bulb temperatures, and wind speed, is given. By analyzing the heating and cooling seasons independently, seasonal variations are isolated and a cleaner spectrum emerges. This represents an improvement over previous work in this area, in which data for the entire year were analyzed together. As a demonstration of the efficacy of this method, synthetic data constructed with a small number of parameters are used in typical simulations, and the results are compared with those obtained with the original data. A spectral characterization of fluctuations around the moving average is given, and the changes in the fluctuation from season to season are examined.

Anderson, J.V.; Subbarao, K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Review: Ambient intelligence: Technologies, applications, and opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient intelligence is an emerging discipline that brings intelligence to our everyday environments and makes those environments sensitive to us. Ambient intelligence (AmI) research builds upon advances in sensors and sensor networks, pervasive computing, ... Keywords: Ambient intelligence, Artificial intelligence, Context awareness, Decision making, Privacy, Sensors

Diane J. Cook; Juan C. Augusto; Vikramaditya R. Jakkula

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Air Quality Research Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Air Quality Research Innovations for Existing Plants Air Quality Research Ambient Monitoring Emissions Characterization Predictive Modeling & Evaluation Health Effects Regulatory Drivers Air Quality Research Reference Shelf The NETL Air Quality Research program is designed to resolve the scientific uncertainties associated with the atmospheric formation, distribution, and chemical transformation of pollutant emissions from today's coal-fired power plants, and to obtain a realistic assessment of the human health impacts of these emissions. Results of this research will help the DOE Office of Fossil Energy address policy questions regarding coal plant emissions and provide guidance for future emissions control R&D programs at

302

Numerical Analysis of a Cold Air Distribution System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cold air distribution systems may reduce the operating energy consumption of air-conditioned air supply system and improve the outside air volume percentages and indoor air quality. However, indoor temperature patterns and velocity field are easily non-uniform so that residents usually feel uncomfortable. The distribution of indoor airflow by cold air distribution is researched in this paper. We study indoor air distribution under different low temperature air supply conditions by numerical simulation. The simulated results agree well with the experiments.

Zhu, L.; Li, R.; Yuan, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Surface Temperature Humidity Reference System Handbook - November 2005  

SciTech Connect

The Surface Temperature and Humidity Reference (SURTHREF) system is intended to provide accurate reference values of ambient temperature and relative humidity for comparison with radiosonde prelaunch values.

MT Ritsche

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

Thin Air Breathing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thin Air Breathing Thin Air Breathing Name: Amy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why is it hard to breathe in thin air? What health dangers do mountain climbers face at high altitudes? Replies: Among the obvious dangers of losing ones footing, the oxygen available in the air is considerable less at higher altitudes. If I recall correctly, 21% of the atmosphere at standard temperature and pressure at sea level is composed of oxygen. This is less at higher altitudes. One can lose consciousness and even die in an oxygen deficient environment with changes from oxygen content to lower than 19.5%. This can unfortunate effect can occur within minutes. Dr. Myron The air is not really thin at high altitudes. The problem is that air pressure is lower. As altitude increases, air pressure decreases. In order for your lungs to fill with air, the air pressure in your lungs has to be less than the pressure of the air outside your lungs. Air moves from areas of higher pressure to lower pressure. As your diaphragm (the muscle that separates your chest cavity from your abdominal cavity) moves downward, the size of your chest cavity increases. This decreases the pressure in your chest and air flows in. When the diaphragm is up, it puts pressure on the chest cavity and the pressure in the lungs is greater than outside the lungs. Air flows out. This is an example of Boyle's Law. The movement of the diaphragm is controlled by the brainstem. Anyway-the reason that it is harder for some people to breathe at higher altitudes is that the air pressure differences aren't as great between the inside of the lungs and outside.

305

Temperature dependence of the indentation size effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of temperature on the indentation size effect is explored experimentally. Copper is indented on a custom-built high-temperature nanoindenter at temperatures between ambient and 200 °C, in an inert atmosphere ...

Franke, Oliver

306

Air-Cooled Condensers in Next-Generation Conversion Systems Geothermal Lab  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Air-Cooled Condensers in Next-Generation Conversion Systems Geothermal Lab Air-Cooled Condensers in Next-Generation Conversion Systems Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Air-Cooled Condensers in Next-Generation Conversion Systems Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Air-Cooling Project Description As the geothermal industry moves to use geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. Because of increasing demand on finite supplies of water, this next generation of more efficient plants will likely need to reject heat sensibly to the ambient (air-cooling). This will be especially true in western states having higher grade Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) resources, as well as most hydrothermal resources. If one had a choice, an evaporative heat rejection system would be selected because it would provide both cost and performance advantages. The evaporative system, however, consumes a significant amount of water during heat rejection that would require makeup. Though they use no water, air-cooling systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at a higher temperature), lower power sales due to higher parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power output (because of large variation in the dry-bulb temperature).

307

A Field Study on Residential Air Conditioning Peak Loads During Summer in College Station, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Severe capacity problems are experienced by electric utilities during hot summer afternoons. Several studies have found that, in large part, electric peak loads can be attributed to residential airconditioning use. This air-conditioning peak depends primarily on two factors: (i) the manner in which the homeowner operates his air-conditioner during the hot summer afternoons, and (ii) the amount by which the air-conditioner has been over-designed. Whole-house and air-conditioner electricity use data at 15 minute time intervals have been gathered and analyzed for 8 residences during the summer of 1991, six of which had passed the College Station Good Cents tests. Indoor air temperatures were measured by a mechanical chart recorder, while a weather station located on the main campus of Texas A&M university provided the necessary climatic data, especially ambient temperature, relative humidity and solar radiation. The data were analysed to determine the extent to which air-conditioning over-sizing and homeowner intervention contributes to peak electricity use for newer houses in College Station, Texas.

Reddy, T. A.; Vaidya, S.; Griffith, L.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Claridge, D. E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Experimental Research and Performance Analysis of a Solar-Powered Air-conditioning System in a Green Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the green building of the Shanghai Institute of Architectural Science, a solar-powered adsorption air-conditioning system was designed. The operational performance under a typical operating mode in summer was studied, which includes temperature variations of solar collector arrays, heat storage tank and adsorption chillers as well as refrigerating output variations of the system. Experimental results show that adsorption chillers have the advantages of low driving temperature, stability and long working time with high efficiency. Under representative working conditions in summer, the average refrigerating output of solar powered air-conditioning system is 15.31kW during operation of 8 hours; moreover, the maximum attains 20kW. Correspondingly, the average system COP is 0.35, and the average solar COP is 0.15. The solar fraction in summer is concluded to be 71.73%. In addition, the variations of solar-powered air-conditioning system performance with ambient parameters (solar radiant intensity and ambient temperature) and operating parameters (temperatures and flow rates) are analyzed.

Zhai, X.; Wang, R.; Dai, Y.; Wu, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

GATE Air-Sea Interactions II: Numerical-Model Calculation of Regional Sea-Surface Temperature Fields Using the GATE Version III Gridded Global Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The numerical model of air-sea interaction previously described in Brown et al. (1982), Pandolfo and Jacobs (1972) and Pandolfo (1969) is applied over a limited horizontal portion of the GATE III Gridded Global Data set (including continental ...

P. S. Brown Jr.; J. P. Pandolfo; G. D. Robinson

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Development and Analysis of Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory OA outdoor air P amb ambient pressure (psi) P fan fan power (kW) v PP polypropylene Q cooling total cooling (kW or Btuh) Q latent latent...

311

Reliable Gas Turbine Output: Attaining Temperature Independent Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvements in gas turbine efficiency, coupled with dropping gas prices, has made gas turbines a popular choice of utilities to supply peaking as well as base load power in the form of combined cycle power plants. Today, because of the gas turbine's compactness, low maintenance, and high levels of availability, it is the major option for future power generation. One inherent disadvantage of gas turbines is the degradation of output as the ambient air temperature increases. This reduction in output during times of peak load create a reliability concern as more gas turbines are added to the electric system. A 10% reduction in gas turbine output, when it comprises only 10% of the electric system, does not cause reliability concerns. A 10% reduction in gas turbine output, when it comprises 50% of the electric system, could create reliability and operational problems. This paper explores the potential for maintaining constant, reliable outputs from gas turbines by cooling ambient air temperatures before the air is used in the compressor section of the gas turbine.

Neeley, J. E.; Patton, S.; Holder, F.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Oil and Gas Air Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most conventional air heaters adopt indirect heat transfer, which uses combustion gases to indirectly heat fresh air by heating surfaces to generate hot air used for material drying and dehumidification. We call them indirect air heaters. However, they have a higher manufacturing cost and lower thermal efficiency, especially when high temperature air is needed. For this reason, a direct air heater applicable for or feed and industrial raw products is put forward, which has advantages such as less production cost, smaller dimensions and higher thermal efficiency. Their design, working principles, characteristics, structure and applications are presented in this article, and brief comparisons are made between the indirect and direct air heater. Finally, the relation of hot-air temperature, oil or gas consumption and fresh airflow is determined based on energy equilibrium.

Kou, G.; Wang, H.; Zhou, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Investigation of Feasibility of All-Fresh Air Supply in an All-Air System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feasibility of an all-fresh air supply in an all-air system is investigated in theory, and the problem of AHU-handling air in low efficiency in summer and winter conditions is analyzed. The air supply temperature is almost up to standards when a heat recovery unit is fixed in the air conditioning system.

Wang, J.; Yan, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Monitor & Why » What We Monitor & Why » Air Quality Air Quality To preserve our existing wilderness-area air quality, LANL implements a conscientious program of air monitoring. April 12, 2012 Real-time data monitoring for particulate matter An air monitoring field team member tests one of LANL's tapered element oscillating microbalance samplers, which collects real-time particulate matter data. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email LANL monitors air quality 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Why we monitor air LANL monitors many different pathways in order to assess their impact on workers, the public, animals, and plants. We monitor the air around the Laboratory to ensure our operations are not affecting the air of nearby

315

Proposal for a Vehicle Level Test Procedure to Measure Air Conditioning Fuel Use  

SciTech Connect

The air-conditioning (A/C) compressor load significantly impacts the fuel economy of conventional vehicles and the fuel use/range of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). A National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) vehicle performance analysis shows the operation of the air conditioner reduces the charge depletion range of a 40-mile range PHEV from 18% to 30% in a worst case hot environment. Designing for air conditioning electrical loads impacts PHEV and electric vehicle (EV) energy storage system size and cost. While automobile manufacturers have climate control procedures to assess A/C performance, and the U.S. EPA has the SCO3 drive cycle to measure indirect A/C emissions, there is no automotive industry consensus on a vehicle level A/C fuel use test procedure. With increasing attention on A/C fuel use due to increased regulatory activities and the development of PHEVs and EVs, a test procedure is needed to accurately assess the impact of climate control loads. A vehicle thermal soak period is recommended, with solar lamps that meet the SCO3 requirements or an alternative heating method such as portable electric heaters. After soaking, the vehicle is operated over repeated drive cycles or at a constant speed until steady-state cabin air temperature is attained. With this method, the cooldown and steady-state A/C fuel use are measured. This method can be run at either different ambient temperatures to provide data for the GREEN-MAC-LCCP model temperature bins or at a single representative ambient temperature. Vehicles with automatic climate systems are allowed to control as designed, while vehicles with manual climate systems are adjusted to approximate expected climate control settings. An A/C off test is also run for all drive profiles. This procedure measures approximate real-world A/C fuel use and assess the impact of thermal load reduction strategies.

Rugh, J. P.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Estimating the Urban Bias of Surface Shelter Temperatures Using Upper-Air and Satellite Data. Part II: Estimation of the Urban Bias  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology is presented for estimating the urban bias of surface shelter temperatures due to the effect of the urban heat island. Multiple regression techniques were used to predict surface shelter temperatures based on the time period 1986?89 ...

David L. Epperson; Jerry M. Davis; Peter Bloomfield; Thomas R. Karl; Alan L. McNab; Kevin P. Gallo

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Properties and Cycle Performance of Refrigerant Blends Operating Near and Above the Refrigerant Critical Point, Task 2: Air Conditioner System Study  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of this project was to investigate and compare the performance of an R410A air conditioner to that of an R22 air conditioner, with specific interest in performance at high ambient temperatures at which the condenser of the R410A system may be operating above the refrigerant's critical point. Part 1 of this project consisted of conducting comprehensive measurements of thermophysical for refrigerant R125 and refrigerant blends R410A and R507A and developing new equation of state formulations and mixture models for predicting thermophysical properties of HFC refrigerant blends. Part 2 of this project conducted performance measurements of split-system, 3-ton R22 and R410A residential air conditioners in the 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C) outdoor temperature range and development of a system performance model. The performance data was used in preparing a beta version of EVAP-COND, a windows-based simulation package for predicting performance of finned-tube evaporators and condensers. The modeling portion of this project also included the formulation of a model for an air-conditioner equipped with a thermal expansion valve (TXV). Capacity and energy efficiency ratio (EER) were measured and compared. The R22 system's performance was measured over the outdoor ambient temperature range of 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C). The same test range was planned for the R410A system. However, the compressor's safety system cut off the compressor at the 135.0 F (57.2 C) test temperature. The highest measurement on this system was at 130.0 F (54.4 C). Subsequently, a custom-manufactured R410A compressor with a disabled safety system and a more powerful motor was installed and performance was measured at outdoor temperatures up to 155.0 F (68.3 C). Both systems had similar capacity and EER performance at 82.0 F (27.8 C). The capacity and EER degradation of both systems were nearly linearly dependent with rising ambient outdoor ambient test temperatures. The performance degradation of R410A at higher temperatures was greater than R22. However, the R22 and R410A systems both operated normally during all tests. Visual observations of the R410A system provided no indication of vibrations or TXV hunting at high ambient outdoor test conditions with the compressor operating in the transcritical regime.

Piotr A. Domanski; W. Vance Payne

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Properties and Cycle Performance of Refrigerant Blends Operating Near and Above the Refrigerant Critical Point, Task 2: Air Conditioner System Study  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of this project was to investigate and compare the performance of an R410A air conditioner to that of an R22 air conditioner, with specific interest in performance at high ambient temperatures at which the condenser of the R410A system may be operating above the refrigerant's critical point. Part 1 of this project consisted of conducting comprehensive measurements of thermophysical for refrigerant R125 and refrigerant blends R410A and R507A and developing new equation of state formulations and mixture models for predicting thermophysical properties of HFC refrigerant blends. Part 2 of this project conducted performance measurements of split-system, 3-ton R22 and R410A residential air conditioners in the 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C) outdoor temperature range and development of a system performance model. The performance data was used in preparing a beta version of EVAP-COND, a windows-based simulation package for predicting performance of finned-tube evaporators and condensers. The modeling portion of this project also included the formulation of a model for an air-conditioner equipped with a thermal expansion valve (TXV). Capacity and energy efficiency ratio (EER) were measured and compared. The R22 system's performance was measured over the outdoor ambient temperature range of 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C). The same test range was planned for the R410A system. However, the compressor's safety system cut off the compressor at the 135.0 F (57.2 C) test temperature. The highest measurement on this system was at 130.0 F (54.4 C). Subsequently, a custom-manufactured R410A compressor with a disabled safety system and a more powerful motor was installed and performance was measured at outdoor temperatures up to 155.0 F (68.3 C). Both systems had similar capacity and EER performance at 82.0 F (27.8 C). The capacity and EER degradation of both systems were nearly linearly dependent with rising ambient outdoor ambient test temperatures. The performance degradation of R410A at higher temperatures was greater than R22. However, the R22 and R410A systems both operated normally during all tests. Visual observations of the R410A system provided no indication of vibrations or TXV hunting at high ambient outdoor test conditions with the compressor operating in the transcritical regime.

Piotr A. Domanski; W. Vance Payne

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Microwave remote sensing of ionized air.  

SciTech Connect

We present observations of microwave scattering from ambient room air ionized with a negative ion generator. The frequency dependence of the radar cross section of ionized air was measured from 26.5 to 40 GHz (Ka-band) in a bistatic mode with an Agilent PNA-X series (model N5245A) vector network analyzer. A detailed calibration scheme is provided to minimize the effect of the stray background field and system frequency response on the target reflection. The feasibility of detecting the microwave reflection from ionized air portends many potential applications such as remote sensing of atmospheric ionization and remote detection of radioactive ionization of air.

Liao, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Heifetz, A.; Elmer, T.; Fiflis, P.; Koehl, E. R.; Chien, H. T.; Raptis, A. C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Ga Air Compressor, Ga Air Compressor Products, Ga Air ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ga Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Ga Air Compressor Products from Global Ga Air Compressor Suppliers and Ga Air Compressor ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Airflow Characteristics of Commonly Used Temperature Radiation Shields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The air temperature radiation shield is a key component in air temperature measurement in weather station networks; however, it is widely recognized that significant errors in the measured air temperature exist due to insufficient airflow past ...

X. Lin; Kenneth G. Hubbard; George E. Meyer

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Thermoelectric Ambient Energy Harvester - Energy Innovation Portal  

A novel thermoelectric generator (TEG) design by PNNL allows the conversion of ambient thermal energy into electric power for a variety of low-power uses. These ...

323

GATE Air-Sea Interaction. I: Numerical Model Calculation of Local Sea-Surface Temperatures on Diurnal Time Scales Using the GATE Version III Gridded Global Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The numerical model of air-sea interaction previously described in Jacobs (1978), Pandolfo and Jacobs (1972) and Pandolfo (1969) is inserted at one horizontal grid point in the GATE III Gridded Global Data Set to calculate a model-generated, ...

P. S. Brown Jr.; J. P. Pandolfo; S. J. Thoren

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Temperature compensated photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

Mosher, Dan Michael (Plano, TX)

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

325

Temperature compensated photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

Mosher, D.M.

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

326

A liquid over-feeding military air conditioner  

SciTech Connect

A 3.3-ton military air conditioning unit has been studied experimentally in both baseline (as received) and as modified for liquid over-feeding (LOF) operation. Tne baseline test, using a proper refrigerant charge, showed the measured cooling capacity to be less than 1% off the rated capacity at 95{degrees}F ambient temperature. The test results indicate that LOF operation outperforms the baseline case over a wide ambient temperature range in terms of cooling capacity, power consumption, and system coefficient of performance (COP). At a 95{degrees}F test point, LOF operation has a cooling capacity of 51,100 BTU per hour, which is a 28.9% improvement over the baseline operation capacity of 39,600 BTU per hour. The COP for LOF at 95{degrees}F is 2.62, which is 29% better than the baseline COP of 2.03. However, an optimal refrigerant charge is essential for LOF to work properly.

Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Observations on the Coke Air Reactivity Test - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coke air reactivities are strongly dependent on coke calcination levels and it is possible to drive air reactivities lower by increasing calcining temperatures.

328

Process for light-driven hydrocarbon oxidation at ambient temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical reaction for the oxidation of hydrocarbons uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A reductive photoredox cycle that uses a tin(IV)- or antimony(V)-porphyrin photosensitizer generates the reducing equivalents required to activate oxygen. This artificial photosynthesis system drives a catalytic cycle, which mimics the cytochrome P{sub 450} reaction, to oxidize hydrocarbons. An iron(III)- or manganese(III)-porphyrin is used as the hydrocarbon-oxidation catalyst. Methylviologen can be used as a redox relay molecule to provide for electron-transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the Fe or Mn porphyrin. The system is long-lived and may be used in photo-initiated spectroscopic studies of the reaction to determine reaction rates and intermediates. 1 fig. 2 tab.

Shelnutt, J.A.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

329

Nanomechanical studies of metallic glasses at ambient and elevated temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulk metallic glasses, though attractive for use in structural applications for their high strength and elastic limit, display several unacceptable features upon deformation, including quasi-brittle failure along shear ...

Packard, Corinne E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Ambient Temperature Stress Corrosion Cracking of 304L Stainless ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Study on the Stress Test of Truck Frames for Freight Trains · A Study on the ... Defect Energetics and Fission Product Transport in ZrC · Deformation Field and ...

331

Process for light-driven hydrocarbon oxidation at ambient temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical reaction for the oxidation of hydrocarbons uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A reductive photoredox cycle that uses a tin(IV)- or antimony(V)-porphyrin photosensitizer generates the reducing equivalents required to activate oxygen. This artificial photosynthesis system drives a catalytic cycle, which mimics the cytochrome P.sub.450 reaction, to oxidize hydrocarbons. An iron(III)- or manganese(III)-porphyrin is used as the hydrocarbon-oxidation catalyst. Methylviologen can be used as a redox relay molecule to provide for electron-transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the Fe or Mn porphyrin. The system is long-lived and may be used in photo-initiated spectroscopic studies of the reaction to determine reaction rates and intermediates.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources South Dakota's Air Pollution Control Program is intended to maintain air quality standards through monitoring the ambient air quality throughout the

333

SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental Jump to: navigation, search Name SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental Agency/Company /Organization Peruvian Society for Environmental Law (SPDA) Sector Energy, Land, Water, Climate Resource Type Video, Publications, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.actualidadambiental UN Region Caribbean, Central America, South America References SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental[1] SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental Screenshot "SPDA current environmental journalism is a service of the Peruvian Society for Environmental Law (SPDA) , which seeks to inform about the latest news and events related to the environment in Peru and the world in search of greater awareness and action for preservation of our planet. On this site you can also obtain and use for free videos, high resolution photos and the

334

Temperature Variability over Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variation of near-surface air temperature anomalies in Africa between 1979 and 2010 is investigated primarily using Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) total lower-tropospheric temperature data from the Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) and the ...

Jennifer M. Collins

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Hygrometry with Temperature Stabilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for stabilizing the temperature of air to allow the use of temperature-sensitive, humidity sensors for direct determination of an invariant humidity characteristic such as specific humidity and/or its fluctuations. Problems ...

Krzysztof E. Haman; Andrzej M. Makulski

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Optimal Outside Air Control for Air Handling Units with Humidity Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most air handling units (AHUs) in commercial buildings have the (air) economizer cycle to use outside air for free cooling under certain outside air conditions. Ideally the economizer cycle is enabled if outside air enthalpy is less than return air enthalpy. During the economizer cycle, outside air flow is modulated to seek mixed air temperature at a supply air temperature set point. Since the outside air may be dry during the economizer cycle, humidification is required for AHUs with humidity control. As a result, the economizer cycle saves cooling energy but requires excessive steam for humidification. Therefore the economizer cycle may not be economical. An optimal outside air control method is developed to minimize the total cost of mechanical cooling and steam humidification. The impacts of chilled water price, steam price, and space minimum humidity set point are analyzed. Finally the optimal outside air control zones are presented on a psychrometric chart under differential energy price ratios and minimum indoor humidity set points.

Wang, G.; Liu, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands  

SciTech Connect

World energy use is the main contributor to atmospheric CO2. In 2002, about 7.0 giga metric tons of carbon (GtC) were emitted internationally by combustion of gas, liquid, and solid fuels (CDIAC, 2006), 2 to 5 times the amount contributed by deforestation (Brown et al., 1988). The share of atmospheric carbon emissions for the United States from fossil fuel combustion was 1.6 GtC. Increasing use of fossil fuel and deforestation together have raised atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration some 25% over the last 150 years. According to global climate models and preliminary measurements, these changes in the composition of the atmosphere have already begun raising the Earth's average temperature. If current energy trends continue, these changes could drastically alter the Earth's temperature, with unknown but potentially catastrophic physical and political consequences. During the last three decades, increased energy awareness has led to conservation efforts and leveling of energy consumption in the industrialized countries. An important byproduct of this reduced energy use is the lowering of CO{sub 2} emissions. Of all electricity generated in the United States, about one-sixth is used to air-condition buildings. The air-conditioning use is about 400 tera-watt-hours (TWh), equivalent to about 80 million metric tons of carbon (MtC) emissions, and translating to about $40 billion (B) per year. Of this $40 B/year, about half is used in cities that have pronounced 'heat islands'. The contribution of the urban heat island to the air-conditioning demand has increased over the last 40 years and it is currently at about 10%. Metropolitan areas in the United States (e.g., Los Angeles, Phoenix, Houston, Atlanta, and New York City) have typically pronounced heat islands that warrant special attention by anyone concerned with broad-scale energy efficiency (HIG, 2006). The ambient air is primarily heated through three processes: direct absorption of solar radiation, convection of heat from hot surfaces, and man-made heat (exhaust from cars, buildings, etc.). Air is fairly transparent to light--the direct absorption of solar radiation in atmospheric air only raises the air temperature by a small amount. Typically about 90% of solar radiation reaches the Earth's surface and then is either absorbed or reflected. The absorbed radiation on the surface increases the surface temperature. And in turn the hot surfaces heat the air. This convective heating is responsible for the majority of the diurnal temperature range. The contribution of man-made heat (e.g., air conditioning, cars) is very small, compared to the heating of air by hot surfaces, except for the downtown high-rise areas.

Akbari, Hashem

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Hybrid membrane--PSA system for separating oxygen from air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable, non-cryogenic, oxygen generation system capable of delivering oxygen gas at purities greater than 98% and flow rates of 15 L/min or more is described. The system consists of two major components. The first component is a high efficiency membrane capable of separating argon and a portion of the nitrogen content from air, yielding an oxygen-enriched permeate flow. This is then fed to the second component, a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit utilizing a commercially available, but specifically formulated zeolite compound to remove the remainder of the nitrogen from the flow. The system is a unique gas separation system that can operate at ambient temperatures, for producing high purity oxygen for various applications (medical, refining, chemical production, enhanced combustion, fuel cells, etc . . . ) and represents a significant advance compared to current technologies.

Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vaughn, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, A. Keith (Albuquerque, NM); Cornelius, Christopher J. (Blackburg, VA)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

339

AirCore: An Innovative Atmospheric Sampling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes the AirCore, a simple and innovative atmospheric sampling system. The AirCore used in this study is a 150-m-long stainless steel tube, open at one end and closed at the other, that relies on positive changes in ambient ...

Anna Karion; Colm Sweeney; Pieter Tans; Timothy Newberger

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Estimating the Urban Heat Island Contribution to Urban and Rural Air Temperature Differences over Complex Terrain: Application to an Arid City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study proposes a method for estimating the canopy-layer net urban heat island (UHI) in regions with complex terrain that lack preurban observations. The approach is based on a linear relationship between the urban–rural temperature ...

Hadas Saaroni; Baruch Ziv

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A Comparison among Strategies for Interpolating Maximum and Minimum Daily Air Temperatures. Part I: The Selection of “Guiding” Topographic and Land Cover Variables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the derivation and selection of a comprehensive set of continuous topographic and land cover–related variables to guide the interpolation of daily maximum and minimum temperatures over England and Wales, for an entire annual ...

Claire H. Jarvis; Neil Stuart

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

A Comparison among Strategies for Interpolating Maximum and Minimum Daily Air Temperatures. Part II: The Interaction between Number of Guiding Variables and the Type of Interpolation Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a comparative experiment, the sequence of daily maximum and minimum temperatures for 1976 was interpolated over England and Wales to a resolution of 1 km using partial thin plate splines, ordinary kriging, trend surface, and an automatic ...

Claire H. Jarvis; Neil Stuart

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Calculation of oxygen diffusion in plutonium oxide films during the high-temperature oxidation of plutonium-1 weight percent gallium in 500 torr of air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxygen self-diffusion in PuO/sub 1.995/ was calculated from rate constants obtained for the parabolic oxidation of the Pu-1 wt % Ga alloy in 500-torr dry air between 250 and 480/degree/C. The activation energy for oxygen vacancy diffusion in the n-type PuO/sub 2-x/ is 22.6 kcal/mole. Results from this investigation are compared with other reported results, and possible explanation for the difference in results is discussed. 21 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Stakebake, J.L.

1988-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

344

Air thermosiphon solar heating system: the Jones house, Santa Fe, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hybrid passive/active solar heating system, featuring a passive air thermosiphon loop, is described. Heated air is supplied to a rock storage bin, coupled with blower-driven air distribution to the house. The house, of 246 m/sup 2/ (2650 ft/sup 2/) heated area and located in Santa Fe, New Mexico, also includes a greenhouse located under the planar collector array. Architectural features and construction details of the house, the solar collector, storage, and distribution system are presented. Representative results of three months of monitoring by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of collector, rock bin, and greenhouse temperatures, as well as outside ambient temperature and insolation, are reported and discussed. Data recorded hourly since the system was placed in operation in early February 1978, show temperatures in the rock bin in excess of 71/sup 0/C (160/sup 0/F) and in the collector absorber mesh in excess of 93/sup 0/C (200/sup 0/F). Delivery temperatures from the charged bin, without auxiliary boost, range from 38 to 54/sup 0/C (100 to 130/sup 0/F).

Hunn, B.D.; Jones, M.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Experimental analysis of a window air conditioner with a R-22 and R32/R125/R134a mixture  

SciTech Connect

Much experimental and theoretical analysis of potential R-22 replacements has been accomplished. However, published information about the experimental analysis of any off-the-shelf air conditioner with a potential R-22 replacement at realistic, operating conditions is still rare. This type of work could be useful because it provides baseline data for comparing the performance of R-22 and its potential replacement at drop-in conditions. In this study, an off-the-shelf window air conditioner was tested at Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI)-rated indoor conditions and at different ambient temperatures, including the ARI-rated outdoor condition, with R-22 and with its potential replacement, a ternary mixture of R-32(30%)/R-125(10%)/R-134a(60%) (the ternary mixture). A test rig was built that provided for baseline operation and for the option of operating the system with a flooded evaporator by means of liquid over-feeding (LOF). The test results indicated the cooling capacity of the ternary mixture was 7.7% less than that of R-22 at 95{degrees}F ambient for baseline operation. The cooling capacity for both refrigerants improved when a flooded evaporator, or LOF, was used. For LOF operation, the cooling capacity of the ternary mixture was only 1.1% less than that of R-22. The ternary mixture had slightly higher compressor discharge pressure, a lower compressor discharge temperature, slightly lower compressor power consumption, and a higher compressor high/low pressure ratio.

Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C.; Chen, D.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); HuangFu, E.P. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Considering Air Density in Wind Power Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the wind power production calculations the air density is usually considered as constant in time. Using the CIPM-2007 equation for the density of moist air as a function of air temperature, air pressure and relative humidity, we show that it is worth taking the variation of the air density into account, because higher accuracy can be obtained in the calculation of the power production for little effort.

Zénó Farkas

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

347

Thermal storage HVAC system retrofit provides economical air conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes an EMS-controlled HVAC system that meets the ventilation and cooling needs of an 18,000-seat indoor ice hockey arena. The Buffalo Memorial Auditorium (affectionately referred to as the Aud) was built in 1937 under the Works Project Administration of the federal government. Its original configuration included a 12,000-seat arena with an ice skating rink. By the late 1980s, the city was unsuccessfully attempting to attract events and tenants to the auditorium, which lacked air conditioning and other modern amenities. Thus, it was decided to renovate the facility to make it marketable. The first phase of the renovation included installing an air-conditioning system in the arena and repairing the existing building systems that were inoperable because of deferred maintenance. After considering the existing conditions (such as size of the space, intermittent usage, construction restrictions, operating budgets and the limited operations staff), the engineering team designed an innovative HVAC system. The system's features include: a carbon dioxide monitoring device that controls the intake of outside air; an ice storage system that provides chilled water and shifts electrical demand to off-peak hours; and a design that uses the building mass as a heat sink. A new energy management system (EMS) determines building cooling needs based on the type of event, ambient conditions and projected audience size. Then, it selects the most economical method to obtain the desired arena temperature.

Smith, S.F. (Wendel Engineers, P.C., Buffalo, NY (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

SPURIOUS SULFATE FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES B. W. Loo, R.FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES Billy W. Lao,ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES* _B_il_l~y ___ W_. _L~o

Loo, B.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Solar Powered Radioactive Air Monitoring Stations  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring of ambient air for radioactive material is required as stipulated in the PNNL Site radioactive air license. Sampling ambient air at identified preferred locations could not be initially accomplished because utilities were not readily available. Therefore, solar powered environmental monitoring systems were considered as a possible option. PNNL purchased two 24-V DC solar powered environmental monitoring systems which consisted of solar panels, battery banks, and sampling units. During an approximate four month performance evaluation period, the solar stations operated satisfactorily at an on-site test location. They were subsequently relocated to their preferred locations in June 2012 where they continue to function adequately under the conditions found in Richland, Washington.

Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Gervais, Todd L.

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Depth profiling ambient noise in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic Ambient Noise in the Ocean: Spectra and Sources,"and Osterhus, S. (1999). "Ocean Ambient Sound Instrumenta Subsurface Package," J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech. 16, 1118-1126.

Barclay, David Readshaw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Ambient-pressure organic superconductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET).sub.2 MX.sub.2 wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET).sub.2 AuI.sub.2 exhibits a transition temperature of 5 K which is high for organic superconductors.

Williams, Jack M. (Downers Grove, IL); Wang, Hsien-Hau (Willowbrook, IL); Beno, Mark A. (Woodridge, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Regenerative air heater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-cooled steel skirt is used to support a refractory cored brick matrix and dome structure in a high temperature regenerative air heater useful in magnetohydrodynamic power generation. The steel skirt thermally expands to accommodate the thermal expansion of the dome structure despite substantial temperature differential thereby reducing relative movement between the dome bricks. Gas cooling of the steel skirt allows the structure to operate above its normal temperature during clean-out cycles and also allows for the control of the thermal expansion of the steel skirt.

Hasselquist, Paul B. (Maple Grove, MN); Baldner, Richard (Minnetonka, MN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Regenerative air heater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-cooled steel skirt is used to support a refractory cored brick matrix and dome structure in a high temperature regenerative air heater useful in magnetohydrodynamic power generation. The steel skirt thermally expands to accommodate the thermal expansion of the dome structure despite substantial temperature differential thereby reducing relative movement between the dome bricks. Gas cooling of the steel skirt allows the structure to operate above its normal temperature during clean-out cycles and also allows for the control of the thermal expansion of the steel skirt.

Hasselquist, P.B.; Baldner, R.

1980-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

354

Reactive Air Aluminizing - Energy Innovation Portal  

Reactive Air Aluminizing is a process for applying a protective coating on steel components in solid oxide fuel cells and other high temperature electrochemical devices.

355

Liquid phase thermal swing chemical air separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature swing absorption separation of oxygen from air is performed with an oxygen acceptor of alkali metal nitrate and nitrite. 2 figs.

Erickson, D.C.

1988-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

356

Low Temperature Sodium-Beta Battery - Energy Innovation Portal  

A battery that will operate at ambient temperature or lower includes an enclosure, a current collector within the enclosure, an anode that will ...

357

Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Alabama Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider ADEM This rule states standards for emission inventory reporting requirements, ambient air quality standards, sampling and testing methods and guidelines for maintenance of equipment. It also states guidelines for air pollution

358

Microsoft Word - INL_EXT-13-30178 Air-Cooled Condenser for Next...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of water. In this method of heat rejection, the heat sink temperature is the wet-bulb temperature instead of the higher ambient (dry-bulb) temperature. Because the wet bulb...

359

Effect of refrigerant charge, duct leakage, and evaporator air flow on the high temerature performance of air conditioners and heat pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of several installation items on the high outdoor ambient temperature performance of air conditioners. These installation items were: improper amount of refrigerant charge, reduced evaporator airflow, and return air leakage from hot attic spaces. There were five sets of tests used for this research: two of them for the charging tests, two for the reduced evaporator airflow, and one for the return air leakage tests. For the charging tests, the indoor room conditions were 80'F (27.8'C) dry-bulb and 50% relative humidity. The outdoor conditions ranged from 95'F (350C) all the way up to 120'F (48.9'C). Charge levels ranged from 30% undercharged to 40% overcharged for the short-tube orifice unit. For the thermal expansion valve (TXV) unit, charge levels ranged from-36% charging to +27% charging. Performance was quantified with the following variables: total capacity, energy efficiency ratio (EER), and power. The performance of the orifice unit was more sensitive to charge than it was for the TXV unit. For the TXV unit on the -27% to +27% charging range, the capacity and EER changed little with charge. A TXV unit and a short-tube orifice unit were also tested for reduced evaporator airflow. As evaporator airflow decreased, the capacity and EER both decreased as expected. However, the drop was not as significant as with the charging tests. For the extreme case of 50% reduced evaporator airflow, neither unit's capacity or EER dropped more than 25%. Return air leakage from hot attic spaces was simulated by assuming adiabatic mixing of the indoor air at normal conditions with the attic air at high temperatures. Effective capacity and EER both decreased with increased return air leakage. However, power consumption was relatively constant for all variables except outdoor temperature, which meant that for the same power consumption, the unit delivered much lower performance when there was return air leakage. The increase in sensible heat ratio (SHR) with increasing leakage showed perhaps the most detrimental effect of return air leakage on performance, which was the inability of the unit to absorb moisture from the environment.

Rodriguez, Angel Gerardo

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Exploring the concept of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns at shallow depth: A modeling study of air tightness and energy balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical modeling study of coupled thermodynamic, multiphase fluid flow and heat transport associated with underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns. Specifically, we explored the concept of using concrete lined caverns at a relatively shallow depth for which constructing and operational costs may be reduced if air tightness and stability can be assured. Our analysis showed that the key parameter to assure long-term air tightness in such a system was the permeability of both the concrete lining and the surrounding rock. The analysis also indicated that a concrete lining with a permeability of less than 1×10{sup -18} m{sup 2} would result in an acceptable air leakage rate of less than 1%, with the operational pressure range between 5 and 8 MPa at a depth of 100 m. It was further noted that capillary retention properties and the initial liquid saturation of the lining were very important. Indeed, air leakage could be effectively prevented when the air-entry pressure of the concrete lining is higher than the operational air pressure and when the lining is kept moist at a relatively high liquid saturation. Our subsequent energy-balance analysis demonstrated that the energy loss for a daily compression and decompression cycle is governed by the air-pressure loss, as well as heat loss by conduction to the concrete liner and surrounding rock. For a sufficiently tight system, i.e., for a concrete permeability off less than 1×10{sup -18} m{sup 2}, heat loss by heat conduction tends to become proportionally more important. However, the energy loss by heat conduction can be minimized by keeping the air-injection temperature of compressed air closer to the ambient temperature of the underground storage cavern. In such a case, almost all the heat loss during compression is gained back during subsequent decompression. Finally, our numerical simulation study showed that CAES in shallow rock caverns is feasible from a leakage and energy efficiency viewpoint. Our numerical approach and energy analysis will next be applied in designing and evaluating the performance of a planned full-scale pilot test of the proposed underground CAES concept.

Kim, H.-M.; Rutqvist, J.; Ryu, D.-W.; Choi, B.-H.; Sunwoo, C.; Song, W.-K.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NON-SOOTING, LOW FLAME TEMPERATURE MIXING-CONTROLLED DI DIESEL COMBUSTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methods of producing non-sooting, low flame temperature diesel combustion were investigated in an optically-accessible, quiescent constant-volume combustion vessel under mixing-controlled diesel combustion conditions. Combustion and soot processes of single, isolated fuel jets were studied after auto-ignition and transient premixed combustion and while the injector was fully-open (i.e. during the mixing-controlled phase of heat release for diesel combustion). The investigation showed that small injector tip orifices could be used to produce non-sooting and low flame temperature combustion simultaneously. The use of small orifices was shown to enable non-sooting and low flame temperature combustion in two different ways as summarized below. A more detailed description of the experimental methods and results is provided in Ref. [1-3]. First, using an injector tip with a 50 micron orifice and ambient oxygen concentrations as low as 10% (simulating the use of extensive EGR), a fuel jet was non-sooting at typical diesel ambient temperatures (1000 K). Second, using the same injector tip at a reduced ambient gas temperature (850 K), but with 21% oxygen, it was shown that non-sooting, mixing-controlled combustion occurred at the lift-off length in a fuel-air mixture with a cross-sectional average equivalence ratio of approximately 0.6-suggesting that the quasi-steady combustion was fuel-lean and thereby avoided the formation of a diffusion flame. The adiabatic flame temperature with reduced ambient oxygen concentration or fuel-lean combustion was approximately 2000 K, compared to typical diesel flame temperatures that exceed 2600 K. The 50 micron orifice results above were obtained using a No.2 diesel fuel. However, using an oxygenated fuel (20 wt% oxygen), the investigation showed that the same low temperature combustion, either with reduced ambient oxygen concentration or fuel-lean combustion, was realized with a 100 micron orifice. Although these single, isolated jets do not have jet-jet interactions that would occur in realistic engines, the results are useful for understanding limiting-case behavior of single-jet mixing and combustion during an injection event. The non-sooting and low flame temperature mixing-controlled combustion realized using small orifice tips suggests that the use of small orifices offers the potential for a simultaneous soot and NOx reduction in an engine, much like diesel HCCI combustion. However, further research is needed to determine whether these methods could be successfully implemented in real engines.

Pickett, L; Siebers, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

362

Hybrid Cooling Systems for Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the identification and evaluation of methods by which the net power output of an air-cooled geothermal power plant can be enhanced during hot ambient conditions with a minimal amount of water use.

Ashwood, A.; Bharathan, D.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Winterscape and ambient video: an intermedia border zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Ambient Video" is an emergent media form that operates in an intermedia border zone, sharing the aesthetics of cinema, video, painting, and fine art photography. Winterscape is an ambient video work that incorporates these directions. Like any ambient ... Keywords: ambient video, cinema, experimental film, moving image, poetics, post-production, video, video art, visual effects

Jim Bizzocchi

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Program on Technology Innovation: An Alternate Framework for the Risk Assessment of Ambient Particulate Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The designation of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is based on the protection of human health. PM2.5 is currently regulated on a mass concentration basis (particle mass per volume of air), with the standard providing limits on both 24-hour and annual average concentrations. A fundamental tenet of this mass-based approach to regulation is its implicit assumption that all particle components are equally harmful to health. In light of the complexity of t...

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

365

Ambient Hydro Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambient Hydro Ltd Ambient Hydro Ltd Place Corsham, United Kingdom Zip SN13 9TZ Sector Hydro, Services Product Ambient Hydro Ltd develops small Hydroelectric projects. It also offers a range of technical and financial consultancy services. Coordinates 51.431505°, -2.187229° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.431505,"lon":-2.187229,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

366

Thermoelectric power source utilizing ambient energy harvesting for remote sensing and transmitting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for providing electrical energy to an electrical device wherein the electrical energy is originally generated from temperature differences in an environment having a first and a second temperature region. A thermoelectric device having a first side and a second side wherein the first side is in communication with a means for transmitting ambient thermal energy collected or rejected in the first temperature region and the second side is in communication with the second temperature region thereby producing a temperature gradient across the thermoelectric device and in turn generating an electrical current.

DeSteese, John G

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

367

Evolution of temperature dependent properties of oriented YBaCo{sub 4}O{sub 7} thin films  

SciTech Connect

Bulk YBaCo{sub 4}O{sub 7} was synthesized using a ceramic route in air. Thin films of this compound were grown on (100) oriented LaAlO{sub 3} substrate using a Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. X-ray diffraction results of thin film indicate that the film has (110) orientation. Electrical resistivity measurements, in 300K to 100K temperature range showed that the film is insulating, similar to that of the bulk. Spectroscopic ellipsometric measurements on thin films in the energy range 1.5 to 5 eV and at temperatures from 300 K to 400 K showed that the direct band gap s 2.45 eV at ambient temperature while its value increases with increase in temperature. The increase in band gap with temperature is attributed to the Moss-Burstein effect.

Nithya, R.; Sundari, S. Tripura; Kumary, T. Geetha; Chandra, Sharat; Mani, Awadhesh; Dash, S.; Sastry, V. Sankara [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603 102, TN (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

368

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational

369

Estimation of heat load in waste tanks using average vapor space temperatures  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a method for estimating the total heat load in a high-level waste tank with passive ventilation. This method relates the total heat load in the tank to the vapor space temperature and the depth of waste in the tank. Q{sub total} = C{sub f} (T{sub vapor space {minus}} T{sub air}) where: C{sub f} = Conversion factor = (R{sub o}k{sub soil}{sup *}area)/(z{sub tank} {minus} z{sub surface}); R{sub o} = Ratio of total heat load to heat out the top of the tank (function of waste height); Area = cross sectional area of the tank; k{sub soil} = thermal conductivity of soil; (z{sub tank} {minus} z{sub surface}) = effective depth of soil covering the top of tank; and (T{sub vapor space} {minus} T{sub air}) = mean temperature difference between vapor space and the ambient air at the surface. Three terms -- depth, area and ratio -- can be developed from geometrical considerations. The temperature difference is measured for each individual tank. The remaining term, the thermal conductivity, is estimated from the time-dependent component of the temperature signals coming from the periodic oscillations in the vapor space temperatures. Finally, using this equation, the total heat load for each of the ferrocyanide Watch List tanks is estimated. This provides a consistent way to rank ferrocyanide tanks according to heat load.

Crowe, R.D.; Kummerer, M.; Postma, A.K.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Effect of Return Air Leakage on Air Conditioner Performance in Hot/Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of return air leakage from hot/humid attic spaces on the performance of a residential air conditioner. Tests were conducted in psychrometric facilities where temperatures and humidities could be controlled closely. Return air leakage from hot attic spaces was simulated by assuming adiabatic mixing of the indoor air at normal conditions with the attic air at high temperatures. Effective capacity and Energy Efficiency Ratio both decreased with increased return air leakage. However, power consumption was relatively constant for all variables except outdoor temperature, which meant that for the same power consumption, the unit delivered much lower performance when there was return air leakage. The increase in sensible heat ratio (SHR) with increasing leakage showed one of the most detrimental effects of return air leakage on performance.

O'Neal, D. L.; Rodriguez, A.; Davis, M.; Kondepudi, S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The ambient wood journals: replaying the experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ambient Wood project aims to facilitate a learning experience using an adaptive infrastructure in an outdoor environment. This involves sensor technology, virtual world orchestration, and a wide range of devices ranging from hand-held computers to ... Keywords: adaptive infrastructure, consolidation, record and replay, storytelling

Mark J. Weal; Danius T. Michaelides; Mark K. Thompson; David C. DeRoure

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Visual calibration and correction for ambient illumination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many applications require that an image will appear the same regardless of where or how it is displayed. However, the conditions in which an image is displayed can adversely affect its appearance. Computer monitor screens not only emit light, but can ... Keywords: Viewing conditions, ambient illumination, contrast correction, device independence, ergonomics, perceptually accurate display, reflections

Kate Devlin; Alan Chalmers; Erik Reinhard

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Showing 7 properties using this type. A Property:AvgGeoFluidTemp C Property:Combustion Intake Air Temperature F Property:FirstWellTemp G Property:GeofluidTemp M...

374

The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at Ambient Conditions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at Ambient Conditions The water molecule, H2O, has deceptively simple structure, but contains all the prerequisites for building complexity. The oxygen atom has a greater affinity for electrons and pulls them away from the hydrogens making them slightly positive. On the back side of molecule oxygen has a lone pair - electrons that do not assist in binding the hydrogens in the molecule, but to which the hydrogens of another water molecule can be attracted to form a so-called hydrogen bond (H-bond). Hydrogen bond is much weaker than the bonding inside water molecule, but it is still strong enough with the possibility to make from one up to four H-bonds per water molecule. The network connected by H-bonds between water molecules makes liquid water so special compared to other normal liquids with about 66 anomalies, e.g. density maximum at 4 °C and large heat capacity. The anomalies of water become extreme in the supercooled region (below freezing point), whilst they are also present at ambient conditions where most of waters' physical, chemical and biological processes of importance occur. Water at ambient conditions has traditionally been considered as a homogeneous distribution of near- tetrahedral H-bonded structures with thermal fluctuations increasing with temperature. This picture has been challenged by recent studies based on x-ray Raman (XRS), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), suggesting two distinct local structures with tetrahedral as a minority and highly H-bond distorted asymmetrical as the majority. In particular, the proposed predominant asymmetrical structure has caused intense debate in the last years.

375

Detonation of hydrogen-air mixtures. [PWR; BWR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The detonation of a hydrogen-air cloud subsequent to an accidental release of hydrogen into ambient surroundings cannot be totally ruled out in view of the relative sensitivity of the hydrogen-air system. The present paper investigates the key parameters involved in hydrogen-air detonations and attempts to establish quantitative correlations between those that have important practical implications. Thus, for example, the characteristic length scale lambda describing the cellular structure of a detonation front is measured for a broad range of hydrogen-air mixtures and is quantitatively correlated with the key dynamic detonation properties such as detonability, transmission and initiation.

Lee, J.H.S.; Knystautas, R.; Benedick, W.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter (BI City Concentrated Ambient Particle Study)  

SciTech Connect

Alterations in heart rate variability (HRV) have been reported in rodents exposed to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) from different regions of the United States. The goal of this study was to compare alterations in cardiac function induced by CAPs in two distinct regional atmospheres. AirCARE 1, a mobile laboratory with an EPA/Harvard fine particle (particulate matter <2.5 {micro}m; PM{sub 2.5}) concentrator was located in urban Detroit, MI, where the PM mixture is heavily influenced by motor vehicles, and in Steubenville, OH, where PM is derived primarily from long-range transport and transformation of power plant emissions, as well as from local industrial operations. Each city was studied during both winter and summer months, for a total of four sampling periods. Spontaneously hypertensive rats instrumented for electrocardiogram (ECG) telemetry were exposed to CAPs 8 h/day for 13 consecutive days during each sampling period. Heart rate (HR), and indices of HRV (standard deviation of the average normal-to-normal intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared difference of successive normal-to-normal intervals [rMSSD]), were calculated for 30-minute intervals during exposures. A large suite of PM components, including nitrate, sulfate, elemental and organic carbon, and trace elements, were monitored in CAPs and ambient air. In addition, a unique sampler, the Semi-Continuous Elements in Air Sampler (SEAS) was employed to obtain every-30-minute measurements of trace elements. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) methods were applied to estimate source contributions to PM{sub 2.5}. Mixed modeling techniques were employed to determine associations between pollutants/CAPs components and HR and HRV metrics. Mean CAPs concentrations in Detroit were 518 and 357 {micro}g/m{sup 3} (summer and winter, respectively) and 487 and 252 {micro}g/m{sup 3} in Steubenville. In Detroit, significant reductions in SDNN were observed in the summer in association with cement/lime, iron/steel, and gasoline/diesel factors, while associations with the sludge incineration factor and components were less consistent. In winter, increases in HR were associated with a refinery factor and its components. CAPs-associated HR decreases in winter were linked to sludge incineration, cement/lime, and coal/secondary factors and the majority of their associated components. Specific relationships for increased rMSSD in winter were difficult to determine due to lack of consistency between factors and associated constituents. In Steubenville, we observed significant changes in HR (both increases and decreases), SDNN, and rMSSD in the summer, but not in the winter. We examined associations between individual source factors/PM components and HRV metrics segregated by predominant wind direction (NE or SW). Changes in HR (both increases and decreases) were linked with metal processing, waste incineration, and iron/steel factors along with most of their associated elemental constituents. Reductions in SDNN were associated with metal processing, waste incineration, and mobile source factors and the majority of elements loading onto these factors. There were no consistent associations between changes in rMSSD and source factors/components. Despite the large number of coal-fired power plants in the region, and therefore the large contribution of secondary sulfate to overall PM mass, we did not observe any associations with the coal/secondary factor or with the majority of its associated components. There were several inconsistencies in our results which make definitive conclusions difficult. For example, we observed opposing signs of effect estimates with some components depending on season, and with others depending on wind direction. In addition, our extensive dataset clearly would be subject to issues of multiple comparisons, and the 'true' significant results are unknown. Overall, however, our results suggest that acute changes in cardiac function were most strongly associated with local industrial sources. Results for coal-fired power plant-deriv

Annette Rohr; James Wagner Masako Morishita; Gerald Keeler; Jack Harkema

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Comprehensive air monitoring plan: general monitoring report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recommendations are provided for general monitoring of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) in ambient air in parts of Colusa, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma counties potentially impacted by emissions from geothermal development projects in the Geysers-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area. Recommendations for types, placement, performance guidelines, and criteria and procedure for triggering establishment and termination of CAMP monitoring equipment were determined after examination of four factors: population location; emission sources; meteorological considerations; and data needs of permitting agencies and applicants. Three alternate financial plans were developed. Locations and equipment for immediate installation are recommended for: two air quality stations in communities where the State ambient air quality standard for H/sub 2/S has been exceeded; three air quality trend stations to monitor progress in reduction of H/sub 2/S emissions; two meteorological observation stations to monitor synoptic wind flow over the area; and one acoustic radar and one rawinsonde station to monitor air inversions which limit the depth of the mixing layer.

Not Available

1980-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Cryogenic deformation of high temperature superconductive composite structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in a process of preparing a composite high temperature oxide superconductive wire is provided and involves conducting at least one cross-sectional reduction step in the processing preparation of the wire at sub-ambient temperatures.

Roberts, Peter R. (Groton, MA); Michels, William (Brookline, MA); Bingert, John F. (Jemez Springs, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

An evaluation of thermal energy storage options for precooling gas turbine inlet air  

SciTech Connect

Several approaches have been used to reduce the temperature of gas turbine inlet air. One of the most successful uses off-peak electric power to drive vapor-compression-cycle ice makers. The ice is stored until the next time high ambient temperature is encountered, when the ice is used in a heat exchanger to cool the gas turbine inlet air. An alternative concept would use seasonal thermal energy storage to store winter chill for inlet air cooling. The objective of this study was to compare the performance and economics of seasonal thermal energy storage in aquifers with diurnal ice thermal energy storage for gas turbine inlet air cooling. The investigation consisted of developing computer codes to model the performance of a gas turbine, energy storage system, heat exchangers, and ancillary equipment. The performance models were combined with cost models to calculate unit capital costs and levelized energy costs for each concept. The levelized energy cost was calculated for three technologies in two locations (Minneapolis, Minnesota and Birmingham, Alabama). Precooling gas turbine inlet air with cold water supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage system provided lower cost electricity than simply increasing the size of the turbine for meteorological and geological conditions existing in the Minneapolis vicinity. A 15 to 20% cost reduction resulted for both 0.05 and 0.2 annual operating factors. In contrast, ice storage precooling was found to be between 5 and 20% more expensive than larger gas turbines for the Minneapolis location. In Birmingham, aquifer thermal energy storage precooling was preferred at the higher capacity factor and ice storage precooling was the best option at the lower capacity factor. In both cases, the levelized cost was reduced by approximately 5% when compared to larger gas turbines.

Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Hot Air Stratification of Ceiling Air Supply in a Large Space Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of different states of air supply and airflow patterns on temperature gradient distribution are calculated and analyzed with the help of FFSV3.0 software, using the LB models and LES and RANS methods. An experimental study with upper supply and upper return air flow was performed in normal airflow room. The results were compared with numerical simulation results and were found to agree well. Information on delaminating laws, and measurements of the relationship of delaminating heights and air supply temperature and velocity is also presented. According to the simulation results, a formula that avoids hot air delaminating in ceiling air supply is derived, which can guide engineering design.

Wang, H.; Wang, Z.; Liu, C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Minimum Temperatures, Diurnal Temperature Ranges, and Temperature Inversions in Limestone Sinkholes of Different Sizes and Shapes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air temperature data from five enclosed limestone sinkholes of various sizes and shapes on the Hetzkogel Plateau near Lunz, Austria (1300 m MSL), have been analyzed to determine the effect of sinkhole geometry on temperature minima, diurnal ...

C. D. Whiteman; T. Haiden; B. Pospichal; S. Eisenbach; R. Steinacker

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Correlations between Ambient Noise and the Ocean Surface Wave Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the ambient noise spectrum level N with simultaneous, coincident wind and wave measurements were made from RP FLIP in fall 1991. The measurements were designed to investigate the correlation between the ambient noise and relevant ...

Francis C. Felizardo; W. Kendall Melville

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Air-Cooled Stack Freeze Tolerance Freeze Failure Modes and Freeze Tolerance Strategies for GenDriveTM Material Handling Application Systems and Stacks Final Scientific Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-cooled stack technology offers the potential for a simpler system architecture (versus liquid-cooled) for applications below 4 kilowatts. The combined cooling and cathode air allows for a reduction in part count and hence a lower cost solution. However, efficient heat rejection challenges escalate as power and ambient temperature increase. For applications in ambient temperatures below freezing, the air-cooled approach has additional challenges associated with not overcooling the fuel cell stack. The focus of this project was freeze tolerance while maintaining all other stack and system requirements. Through this project, Plug Power advanced the state of the art in technology for air-cooled PEM fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive material handling application fuel cell systems. This was accomplished through a collaborative work plan to improve freeze tolerance and mitigate freeze-thaw effect failure modes within innovative material handling equipment fuel cell systems designed for use in freezer forklift applications. Freeze tolerance remains an area where additional research and understanding can help fuel cells to become commercially viable. This project evaluated both stack level and system level solutions to improve fuel cell stack freeze tolerance. At this time, the most cost effective solutions are at the system level. The freeze mitigation strategies developed over the course of this project could be used to drive fuel cell commercialization. The fuel cell system studied in this project was Plug Power's commercially available GenDrive platform providing battery replacement for equipment in the material handling industry. The fuel cell stacks were Ballard's commercially available FCvelocity 9SSL (9SSL) liquid-cooled PEM fuel cell stack and FCvelocity 1020ACS (Mk1020) air-cooled PEM fuel cell stack.

Hancock, David, W.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

384

Ambient Control Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Control Systems Control Systems Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ambient Control Systems Name Ambient Control Systems Address 1810 Gillespie Way Place El Cajon, California Zip 92020 Sector Solar Product Solar energy device with a computerized energy management Website http://www.ambientalert.com/ma Coordinates 32.8193566°, -116.981232° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.8193566,"lon":-116.981232,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

385

Electric Power From Ambient Energy Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes research on opportunities to produce electric power from ambient sources as an alternative to using portable battery packs or hydrocarbon-fueled systems in remote areas. The work was an activity in the Advanced Concepts Project conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Office of Research and Development in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

386

External vs. body temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External vs. body temperature External vs. body temperature Name: jacqui Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: If one's internal body temperature is approximately 98.6, WHY when the external temperature is 98.6 do we feel hot? Since both temperatures are "balanced", shouldn't we feel comfortable? I am assuming here that humidity levels are controlled, and play no factor in the external temperature. Replies: First of all, skin temperature is lower than 98.6F; 98.6F is internal body temperature, so air at 98.6F is hotter than skin. But more important, it is the nervous system, and the cells in your skin that your brain uses to detect temperature that determine whether you "feel" hot or not, not whether the air is hotter than your skin. These are set so that you feel hot when the air is actually colder than your skin. Why? They are probably set to make you feel hot whenever the air is warm enough so that your body has some trouble getting rid of the excess heat it produces through metabolism. This insures that you take some actions to help your body cool off. Like drinking cool water, or reducing exercise

387

Ambient social tv: drawing people into a shared experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine how ambient displays can augment social television. Social TV 2 is an interactive television solution that incorporates two ambient displays to convey to participants an aggregate view of their friends' current TV-watching status. Social TV ... Keywords: ambient displays, field trial, interactive television, social presence awareness, social television

Gunnar Harboe; Crysta J. Metcalf; Frank Bentley; Joe Tullio; Noel Massey; Guy Romano

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Optimizing Electric Humidifier Operation with an Air Side Economizer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air side economizer cycle is a control scheme that is often used in WAC systems to reduce cooling energy consumption by introducing variable quantities of ambient air into a conditioned space to satisfy the space cooling load (free cooling). Humidifiers are used to maintain the pre-set humidity levels in a conditioned space by introducing steam or atomized water into the space. An WAC system containing both electric humidifier and air side economizer cycle can appear to be energy efficient, but has the potential of being inefficient due to lack of proper controls. The economizer, which often operates independently of the humidifier, introduces large quantities of cool and dry ambient air into the space to reduce the mechanical cooling energy, but because of the environmental requirement of the space, the air has to be humidified. The humidification energy could offset the energy savings from the reduction in mechanical cooling energy. The solution for this potential problem is a control scheme that makes the operation of the economizer and electric humidifier interdependent. The control scheme will use ambient conditions and space environmental requirements to calculate the appropriate amount of outside air that the economizer should draw into the space. The control scheme can be implemented through a Direct Digital Control system.

Shami, U. F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

O estudo de impacto ambiental e sua complexidade jurídico-administrativa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O Estudo de Impacto Ambiental (EIA) como instrumento da Política Nacional do Meio Ambiente, é imprescindível para a gestão pública ambiental. Contudo, são inúmeras as… (more)

Andréia Ponciano de Moraes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

ORIGINAL PAPER J. B. Williams A. Mun~ oz-Garcia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

periods of high ambient air temperature (Ta), intense solar radiation, desiccating winds, unpredictable

Williams, Jos. B.

391

Temperature impacts on the set pressure of soft seated pressure relief valves  

SciTech Connect

From a safety standpoint, regardless of plant or facility type, the most important pieces of equipment are the pressure relief devices. The most critical characteristics of a pressure relief device are its set pressure and the related relieving capacity. The Set Pressure of a pressure relief device is defined as that value of increasing inlet static pressure at which the discharge becomes continuous (ASME PTC 25-1994, Performance Test Codes). To preclude an unsafe overpressure situation, the set pressure of the pressure relief device must not exceed the maximum allowable working pressure of the equipment or system being protected. Because of testing facility limitations, size or pressure, pressure relief valves intended for elevated temperature service are often set using ambient temperature air. Adjustments are made to the ambient valve opening pressures to compensate for the temperature differences. The extent of the adjustments to the pressure relief valve set pressure is important to ensure the valve will provide the required overpressure protection at the elevated in-service temperature.

Engel, J.J.; Zirps, G.T.; Gleason, R.B. [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Air Pollution (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states regulations for monitoring air pollution, methods for permit applications, emission limitations for pollutants and air quality standards.

393

Analysis of mixing layer heights inferred from radiosonde, wind profiler, airborne lidar, airborne microwave temperature profiler, and in-situ aircraft data during the Texas 2000 air quality study in Houston, TX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mixing layer (ML) heights inferred from radiosondes, wind profilers, airborne lidar, airborne microwave temperature profiler (MTP), and in-situ aircraft data were compared during the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study in the Houston area. The comparisons and resulting good agreement between the separate instruments allowed for the spatial and temporal evolution of the ML height distribution to be determined across the Houston area on September 1, 2000. A benchmark method was created for determining ML heights from radiosonde data. The ML heights determined using this method were compared to ML heights determined using wind profiler data. The airborne lidar and MTP heights were also compared to the wind profiler heights. This was the first time the MTP was used for estimating ML heights. Because of this, the MTP heights were also compared to the ML heights determined by in-situ aircraft data. There was good agreement between the ML estimates when the instruments were co-located. The comparisons between the benchmark method and the wind profilers were independent of the quality of the profiler heights. The statistics for lidar and the wind profilers were better for the inland profiler comparisons. Even so, the results for coastal profilers were similar to the other comparisons. The results between the MTP and the wind profilers were comparable with the results found between the other instruments, and better, in that the statistics were similar for the both the inland and coastal profilers. The results between the MTP and in-situ aircraft data provided additional support for the use of MTP for determining ML heights. The combination of the inland and coastal wind profilers with the airborne instruments provided adequate information for the spatial and temporal evolution of the ML height to be determined across the Houston area on September 1, 2000. By analyzing the ML height distribution, major features were evident. These features included the shallow ML heights associated with the marine air from Galveston Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, and the sharp gradient of increasing ML heights north of Houston associated with the variation in the inversion depth found on this day.

Smith, Christina Lynn

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Diffusion Tubes for Ambient NO2 Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the field of diffusive sampling, and other stakeholders. The following (in alphabetical order) actively or vapour phase pollutant directly from the surrounding air by means of diffusion, without actively drawing

Short, Daniel

395

Infrared Continental Surface Emissivity Spectra Retrieved from AIRS Hyperspectral Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS; NASA Aqua platform) observations over land are interpreted in terms of monthly mean surface emissivity spectra at a resolution of 0.05 ?m and skin temperature. For each AIRS observation, an estimation of the ...

E. Péquignot; A. Chédin; N. A. Scott

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Contribution of Semi-volatile Organic Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semi-volatile Organics in PM Semi-volatile Organics in PM This project is a cooperative effort between Brigham Young University (BYU) and researchers from the DOE-NETL Office of Science and and Engineering Research to determine the contribution of semi-volatile particulate organic compounds (SVOC) to total ambient suspended fine particulate mass at the NETL-Pittsburgh air monitoring facility. Project funding comes from DOE‘s University Coal Research (UCR) program. The hypothesis of the project is that fine particulate mass will be significantly under-determined in urban environments using single filter samplers such as the PM2.5 Federal Reference Method (FRM) because of the loss of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) from the particles during sampling and storage. It is postulated that fine particulate mass, including the semi-volatile fine particulate organic species, are an appropriate surrogate for the components of fine particles which are associated with observed mortality and morbidity effects in epidemiological studies. Further, it is postulated that the most important fraction of the semi-volatile organic material with respect to exacerbation of health problems will be semi-volatile secondary compounds formed from reactions of volatile organic material with ozone and nitrogen oxides. Under-determination of these semi-volatile species will tend to over emphasize the importance of non-volatile fine particulate components such as sulfate or may reduce the significance of correlations with measured health effects.

397

Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links Speaker(s): Julian Marshall Date: May 18, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone It is well documented that exposure to ambient air pollution at concentrations typically found in U.S. cities causes significant health effects. Reducing exposure to air pollution is a large, long-term goal for the environmental health community. In this talk, I will address three questions: 1) How should we prioritize emission reduction efforts? 2) Can urban planning help reduce exposure to air pollution? 3) Are there correlations between exposure to air pollution and demographic attributes such as ethnicity and income? I use three case studies to address these

398

Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We applied coupled nonisothermal, multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling to study the coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in concrete-lined rock caverns. The paper focuses on CAES in lined caverns at relatively shallow depth (e.g., 100 m depth) in which a typical CAES operational pressure of 5 to 8 MPa is significantly higher than both ambient fluid pressure and in situ stress. We simulated a storage operation that included cyclic compression and decompression of air in the cavern, and investigated how pressure, temperature and stress evolve over several months of operation. We analyzed two different lining options, both with a 50 cm thick low permeability concrete lining, but in one case with an internal synthetic seal such as steel or rubber. For our simulated CAES system, the thermodynamic analysis showed that 96.7% of the energy injected during compression could be recovered during subsequent decompression, while 3.3% of the energy was lost by heat conduction to the surrounding media. Our geomechanical analysis showed that tensile effective stresses as high as 8 MPa could develop in the lining as a result of the air pressure exerted on the inner surface of the lining, whereas thermal stresses were relatively smaller and compressive. With the option of an internal synthetic seal, the maximum effective tensile stress was reduced from 8 to 5 MPa, but was still in substantial tension. We performed one simulation in which the tensile tangential stresses resulted in radial cracks and air leakage though the lining. This air leakage, however, was minor (about 0.16% of the air mass loss from one daily compression) in terms of CAES operational efficiency, and did not significantly impact the overall energy balance of the system. However, despite being minor in terms of energy balance, the air leakage resulted in a distinct pressure increase in the surrounding rock that could be quickly detected using pressure monitoring outside the concrete lining.

Rutqvist, J.; Kim, H. -M.; Ryu, D. -W.; Synn, J. -H.; Song, W. -K.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

GENERATION, TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF TUNGSTEN-OXIDE AEROSOLS AT 1000 C IN FLOWING AIR-STEAM MIXTURES.  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were conducted to measure the rates of oxidation and vaporization of pure tungsten rods in flowing air, steam and air-steam mixtures in laminar flow. Also measured were the downstream transport of tungsten-oxide condensation aerosols and their region of deposition, including plateout in the superheated flow tube, rainout in the condenser and ambient discharge which was collected on an array of sub-micron aerosol filters. The nominal conditions of the tests, with the exception of the first two tests, were tungsten temperatures of 1000 C, gas mixture temperatures of 200 C and wall temperatures of 150 C to 200 C. It was observed that the tungsten oxidation rates were greatest in all air and least in all steam, generally decreasing non-linearly with increasing steam mole fraction. The tungsten oxidation rates in all air were more than five times greater than the tungsten oxidation rates in all steam. The tungsten vaporization rate was zero in all air and increased with increasing steam mole fraction. The vaporization rate became maximum at a steam mole fraction of 0.85 and decreased thereafter as the steam mole fraction was increased to unity. The tungsten-oxide was transported downstream as condensation aerosols, initially flowing upwards from the tungsten rod through an 18-inch long, one-inch diameter quartz tube, around a 3.5-inch radius, 90{sup o} bend and laterally through a 24-inch horizontal run. The entire length of the quartz glass flow path was heated by electrical resistance clamshell heaters whose temperatures were individually controlled and measured. The tungsten-oxide plateout in the quartz tube was collected, nearly all of which was deposited at the end of the heated zone near the entrance to the condenser which was cold. The tungsten-oxide which rained out in the condenser as the steam condensed was collected with the condensate and weighed after being dried. The aerosol smoke which escaped the condenser was collected on the sub-micron filter assemblies. There was no aerosol generation for the case of all air, so the plateout, condensate and smoke were all zero. For the case of all steam, there was very little plateout in the superheated regions (several percent) and the rest of the aerosol was collected in the condensate from the condenser. There was no smoke discharge into the filters. For the experiments with intermediate air-steam fractions, there was some aerosol plateout, considerable aerosol in the condensate and aerosol smoke discharged from the condenser with the escaping air.

GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Inlet Air Filtration Assessment: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of inlet air filtration is to capture the largest amount of particulate (solid or liquid) by filter media in the airflow path of the gas turbine. With engines operating at higher temperatures and with downstream components that are more susceptible to problems associated with harmful effects such as fouling, erosion, and corrosion, the need for good inlet air filtration in this newest generation of gas turbines is more important than ever. Recent advances in inlet air filtration have ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Air source heat pump system for drying application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the performance of an air source heat pump for drying purpose. In order to evaluate the performance analysis; a simulation study has been done. The results of simulation of heat pump dryer for different evaporator temperatures ... Keywords: air source heat pump, coefficient of performance (COP), condenser temperature and compressor work, dryer, evaporator temperature

R. Daghigh; M. H. Ruslan; A. Zaharim; K. Sopian

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Title Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5553E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Mile Lubliner, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Journal 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings The Climate for efficiency is now Date Published 08/2010 Abstract In recent years, great strides have been made in reducing air leakage in residential and to a lesser extent small commercial forced air duct systems. Several authorities have introduced low leakage limits for thermal distribution systems; for example, the State of California Energy Code for Buildings gives credit for systems that leak less than 6% of the total air flow at 25 Pa.

403

Metal-Air Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Metropolitan New York in the greenhouse: Air quality and health effects  

SciTech Connect

A variety of potential effects on human health resulting from climate change have been identified in several assessments. According to an international panel{sup 1} they include direct effects of extreme temperatures on cardiovascular deaths, secondary effects due to vector-borne diseases or crop yields, and tertiary effects such as those that might arise from conflicts over freshwater supplies. To this fist we add the secondary effects of increased air pollution, which may result either directly from climate change or indirectly from increased air conditioning loads and the corresponding pollutant emissions from electric utilities. Higher ozone concentrations have been linked to increased ambient temperatures by both theory and observations of monitoring data. A similar association with particulate matter has been limited to observations, thus far. The pollution-heat linkage has been recognized before` but health effects have not been evaluated in terms of predictions of the joint effects of both agents. This paper has been prepared in two sections. First, we discuss the ozone situation with special reference to the Northeast Corridor and New York. In the second section, we present estimates of the health effects of climate change on New York and discuss some mitigation options.

Kleinman, L.I.; Lipfert, F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Supply Fan Control for Constant Air Volume Air Handling Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since terminal boxes do not have a modulation damper in constant volume (CV) air handling unit (AHU) systems, zone reheat coils have to be modulated to maintain the space temperature with constant supply airflow. This conventional control sequence causes a significant amount of reheat and constant fan power under partial load conditions. Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) can be installed on these constant air volume systems. The fan speed can be modulated based on the maximum zone load. This paper present the procedure to control the supply fan speed and analyzes the thermal performance and major fan energy and thermal energy savings without expensive VAV retrofit through the actual system operation.

Cho, Y.; Wang, G.; Liu, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Stress-Rupture, Overstressing and a Proposed New Methodology to Assess the Durability and Reliability of Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new testing strategy is proposed to assess the durability and reliability of non- oxide continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites for high temperature structural applications. The strategy is based on determining the reliability (probability of failure) of these materials when subjected to random loading schedules consisting of load and temperature spikes that are superimposed on otherwise constant stress and temperature histories. The frequency and magnitude of the load and temperature spikes would be representative of the number and characteristics of the transients that are associated with a particular industrial application and that are expected to occur over the life of the component. The effect of overstressing on the stress- ruptttre behavior of a CG-NicalonTM fiber-reinforced SiC composite was investigated and results arc presented from tests conducted in ambient air at 950"C.

Lara-Curzio, E.

1999-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

407

New Developments in High Velocity Air-fuel Spraying  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is possible because of the low temperature of air-fuel combustion. The heating of the spray ... Conditioning of Composite Lubricant Powder for Cold Spray.

408

Multi-stage combustion using nitrogen-enriched air - Energy ...  

Multi-stage combustion technology combined with nitrogen-enriched air technology for controlling the combustion temperature and products to extend the maintenance and ...

409

An investigation of the air flow structure over a rooftop in the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by DEMROES weather station. Solar Radiation Temperaturesolar radiation and temperature difference between roof surface and air captured by DEMROES weathersolar radiation and temperature difference between roof surface and air captured by DEMROES weather

Hayes, William Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Thermoregulatory model to predict physiological status from ambient environment and heart rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A real-time thermoregulatory model was developed for predicting real-time physiological responses of workers engaged in various tasks for prolonged time. The unique feature of the present model is primarily on metabolic activity inputs derived from minimum ... Keywords: Air temperature, Core temperature, Heart rate, Heat stress, Real-time modeling

Miyo Yokota; Larry Berglund; Samuel Cheuvront; William Santee; William Latzka; Scott Montain; Margaret Kolka; Daniel Moran

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Ambient-pressure silica aerogel films  

SciTech Connect

Very highly porous (aerogel) silica films with refractive index in the range 1.006--1.05 (equivalent porosity 98.5--88%) were prepared by an ambient-pressure process. It was shown earlier using in situ ellipsometric imaging that the high porosity of these films was mainly attributable to the dilation or `springback` of the film during the final stage of drying. This finding was irrefutably reconfirmed by visually observing a `springback` of >500% using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Ellipsometry and ESEM also established the near cent per cent reversibility of aerogel film deformation during solvent intake and drying. Film thickness profile measurements (near the drying line) for the aerogel, xerogel and pure solvent cases are presented from imaging ellipsometry. The thickness of these films (crack-free) were controlled in the range 0.1-3.5 {mu}m independent of refractive index.

Prakash, S.S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brinker, C.J. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hurd, A.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Feasibility of air capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing CO2 from air, referred to as Air Capture, is being proposed as a viable climate change mitigation technology. The two major benefits of air capture, reported in literature, are that it allows us to reduce the ...

Ranjan, Manya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Re:Cycle - a Generative Ambient Video Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Navigating the Database. DVD-video. Cambridge MA: MITnetworked and more ubiquitous. Video screens are steadily [with the nature of the ambient video experience, and can be

Bizzocchi, Jim; Ben Youssef, Belgacem; Quan, Brian; Suzuki, Wakiko; Bagheri, Majid; Riecke, Bernhard E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

NETL: Health Effects - Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the potential for adverse cardiopulmonary effects of airborne...

415

Age Inversiones in Media Ambiente AIMA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product Invests in projects that aim to generate energy from biodegradable residues and waste. References Age Inversiones in Media Ambiente (AIMA)1 LinkedIn Connections...

416

Design of an ambient aerosol sampling system for high and medium speed applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two ambient sampling systems were designed and tested for high speed sampling application for a wind speed range of 4.47 m/s to 26.82 m/s. These systems will be used as inlets for sampling of bioaerosol from air. These systems consist of shrouded probes for sampling at higher speeds and omni-directional inlets for low speed ambient sampling. The two systems operate at 780 L/min and 90 L/min. Another system was designed and tested for medium speed ambient sampling. This unit will be used as a reference sampler for speed ranges from zero to 20.12 m/s. This system consists of a Sierra-Andersen SA-246 inlet for sampling at speeds up-to 6.71 m/s (15 mph) and a shrouded probe operating at variable flow rate for sampling in speed range of 6.71 m/s and 20.12 m/s. An aircraft-borne shrouded probe was also tested at wind speeds as high as 50 m/s in an upgraded high speed wind tunnel.

Irshad, Hammad

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Primary zone air proportioner  

SciTech Connect

An air proportioner is provided for a liquid hydrocarbon fueled gas turbine of the type which is convertible to oil gas fuel and to coal gas fuel. The turbine includes a shell for enclosing the turbine, an air duct for venting air in said shell to a gasifier, and a fuel injector for injecting gasified fuel into the turbine. The air proportioner comprises a second air duct for venting air from the air duct for mixing with fuel from the gasifier. The air can be directly injected into the gas combustion basket along with the fuel from the injector or premixed with fuel from the gasifier prior to injection by the fuel injector.

Cleary, Edward N. G. (San Diego, CA)

1982-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

418

Air Pollution Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes the Department of Environmental Management and the Air Pollution Control Board, which are tasked with the prevention, abatement, and control of air pollution by all...

419

Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by Concent Issued to Mirant Potomac River, LLC, Registration No. 70228 Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by Concent Issued to Mirant Potomac River, LLC, Registration No. 70228 Docket No. EO-05-01: This is a Consent Order issued under the authority of Va. Code § § 10.1-1307D and 10.1-1307.1, between the Board and Mirant Potomac River, LLC for the purpose of ensuring compliance with ambient air quality standards incorporated at 9 VAC Chapter 30 and Va, Code § 10.1-1307.3(3) requiring certain emissions modeling and analysis related to the Potomac River Power Station located in Alexandria, Virginia, Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by

420

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest As part of a Cooperative Agreement with DOE-NETL, the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing advanced sampling and analysis methodologies for particulate matter that can be used for source apportionment and to assist in health studies. These techniques will be used to determine sources of fine particulate matter in rural states such as North Dakota. Ambient particulate matter (PM) sampling and automated scanning electron microscopy, (ASEM) are being used to characterize and evaluate the sources of PM2.5 at three rural sites. Land use in the sampling site locations is dominated by ranching and small grain farming. Potential sources of PM in these areas include diesel- and gasoline-fueled motor vehicles, fugitive dust from gravel roads and agriculture, vegetation and fires, an oil refinery, and coal-fired power plants. PM2.5 samples were collected using an automatic cartridge collection unit for ASEM analysis. An ASEM method has been developed to size and chemically classify individual particles composing PM2.5.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE Presented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE CEM, CEA, CLEP, CDSM, CPE Air Conditioning (HVAC) system is to provide and maintain a comfortable environment within a building for the occupants or for the process being conducted Many HVAC systems were not designed with energy efficiency as one of the design factors 3 Air Air is the major conductor of heat. Lack of heat = air conditioning OR 4 Btu - Amount of heat required to raise one pound of water 1 F = 0.252 KgCal 1 Pound of Water = About 1 Pint of Water ~ 1 Large Glass 1 Kitchen Match Basics of Air Conditioning = 1 Btu 5 = 6 Low Cost Cooling Unit 7 8 Typical Design Conditions 75 degrees F temperature 50% relative humidity 30 - 50 FPM air movement

422

Mental models of ambient systems: a modular research framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines our current research program in the fields of ambient intelligence and context-aware computing and the tools we are building to accomplish this research program. From a discussion of our conception of mental models in the domain of ... Keywords: ambient intelligence, context awareness, mental models

Felix Schmitt; Jörg Cassens; Martin Christof Kindsmüller; Michael Herczeg

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Generating Ambient Behaviors in Computer Role-Playing Games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many computer games use custom scripts to control the ambient behaviors of nonplayercharacters. As a result, story authors mustwrite computer code for the game world'shundreds or thousands of NPCs. Creating entertaining, nonrepetitive NPC behaviors without ... Keywords: ambient behavior, nonplayer character, intelligent agents, scripting language, generative pattern, collaborative behavior, computer games

Maria Cutumisu; Duane Szafron; Jonathan Schaeffer; Matthew McNaughton; Thomas Roy; Curtis Onuczko; Mike Carbonaro

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Learning patterns in ambient intelligence environments: a survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is essential for environments that aim at helping people in their daily life that they have some sort of Ambient Intelligence. Learning the preferences and habits of users then becomes an important step in allowing a system to provide such personalized ... Keywords: Ambient intelligence, Intelligent environments, Machine learning techniques, Pattern learning

Asier Aztiria; Alberto Izaguirre; Juan Carlos Augusto

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Extracting Key Factors to Design Applications in Ambient Intelligence Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an ambient intelligence environment, the design of applications influences the users behavior heavily. The purpose of this paper is to provide key factors considered necessary in developing those applications. We developed four applications applied ... Keywords: ambient feedback, persuasive technology, behavior modification, emotional engagement

Hiroaki Kimura; Tatsuo Nakajima

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The DFKI competence center for ambient assisted living  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DFKI Competence Center for Ambient Assisted Living (CCAAL) is a cross-project and cross-department virtual organization within the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence coordinating and conducting research and development in the area ... Keywords: ambient assisted living, intelligent environments, living labs

Jochen Frey; Christoph Stahl; Thomas Röfer; Bernd Krieg-Brückner; Jan Alexandersson

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Ambient intelligence technologies in support of shipping markets' operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intelligent Maritime Environment (i-MARE) framework and technological platform we introduce in our paper conceptualize an innovative, collaborative and context-aware network business model for cargo shipping. The i-MARE framework considers ambient-intelligence ... Keywords: Agent technology, Ambient intelligence, Cargo shipping operations, Enterprise modelling, Web semantics

Maria A. Lambrou; Kay Endre Fjørtoft; Efstathios D. Sykas; Nikitas Nikitakos

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

An Algorithm to Generate Deep-Layer Temperatures from Microwave Satellite Observations for the Purpose of Monitoring Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm for generating deep-layer mean temperatures from satellite-observed microwave observations is presented. Unlike traditional temperature retrieval methods, this algorithm does not require a first guess temperature of the ambient ...

Mitchell D. Goldberg; Henry E. Fleming

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Solar assisted heat pump on air collectors: A simulation tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heating system of the bioclimatic building of the Greek National Centre for Renewable Energy Sources (CRES) comprises two heating plants: the first one includes an air source heat pump, Solar Air Collectors (SACs) and a heat distribution system (comprising a fan coil unit network); the second one is, mainly, a geothermal heat pump unit to cover the ground floor thermal needs. The SAC configuration as well as the fraction of the building heating load covered by the heating plant are assessed in two operation modes; the direct (hot air from the collectors is supplied directly to the heated space) and the indirect mode (warm air from the SAC or its mixture with ambient air is not supplied directly to the heated space but indirectly into the evaporator of the air source heat pump). The technique of the indirect mode of heating aims at maximizing the efficiency of the SAC, saving electrical power consumed by the compressor of the heat pump, and therefore, at optimizing the coefficient of performance (COP) of the heat pump due to the increased intake of ambient thermal energy by means of the SAC. Results are given for three research objectives: assessment of the heat pump efficiency whether in direct or indirect heating mode; Assessment of the overall heating plant efficiency on a daily or hourly basis; Assessment of the credibility of the suggested simulation model TSAGAIR by comparing its results with the TRNSYS ones. (author)

Karagiorgas, Michalis; Galatis, Kostas; Tsagouri, Manolis [Department of Mechanical Engineering Educators, ASPETE, N. Iraklio, GR 14121 (Greece); Tsoutsos, Theocharis [Environmental Engineering Dept., Technical University of Crete, Technical University Campus, GR 73100, Chania (Greece); Botzios-Valaskakis, Aristotelis [Centre for Renewable Energy Sources (CRES), 19th km Marathon Ave., GR 19001, Pikermi (Greece)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Reactive Air Aluminization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

431

A Synthesis of Antarctic Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly surface air temperatures from land surface stations, automatic weather stations, and ship/buoy observations from the high-latitude Southern Hemisphere are synthesized into gridded analyses at a resolution appropriate for applications ...

William L. Chapman; John E. Walsh

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

On the USCRN Temperature System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2004 a new aspirated surface air temperature system was officially deployed nationally in the U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) commissioned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The primary goal of the USCRN is to ...

K. G. Hubbard; X. Lin; C. B. Baker

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014 PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014 La conferencia regresa a D.C. del 26 al 28 de marzo de 2014 con la celebración de los 20 años de justicia ambiental pasados y futuros. PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014 More Documents & Publications SE HAN FINALIZADO LOS PREPARATIVOS PARA LA CONFERENCIA NACIONAL DE JUSTICIA MEDIOAMBIENTAL Y PROGRAMA DE FORMACIÓN 2013 2013 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program EIS-0281: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary (Spanish)

434

Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Ambient Corporation submits the following comments to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in hopes that their contribution can highlight and further the understanding of the DOE on the key role that integrated communications will play ineneabling utilities to deploy cost-effective long-term smart grid benefits. Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation More Documents & Publications Comments of Tendril Networks Inc Technical Standards Newsletter - September 2001

435

A New Portable Instrument for Continuous Measurement of Formaldehyde in Ambient Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new instrument for the in situ measurement of formaldehyde with online concentration output was built on the base of the Hantzsch chemistry fluorimetric detection of formaldehyde in liquid phase. The instrument was specially designed for ...

W. Junkermann; J. M. Burger

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO2 from ambient air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artist, Robin Hopper, required The Artist's Guide, Jackie Battenfield, required Ceramics Handbook clay and glaze materials and applying glaze with a spray gun. Fowlett's Bookstore has ordered N95 PROTECTION. The link for information regarding the SA+AH H&S policy and handbook on health and safety is

437

The Contribution of Motor Vehicles and Other Sources to Ambient Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industries Petrol evaporation Gasoline vehicle exhaustb Solvents and storage Fuel combustion by electric

Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Effects of ambient humidity on the energy use of air conditioning equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related to fan electricity demand. All of these equationsmeasurements. The electricity demand outputs of all modelsonly overall building electricity demand measurements. The

White, Justin George

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

The Contribution of Motor Vehicles and Other Sources to Ambient Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mainly residential wood combustion) Chemicals and alliedmainly residential wood combustion) Chemicals and alliedmainly residential wood combustion) Chemicals and allied

Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOLS IN AMBIENT AIR: CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANTS AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lltion to tre sol,thll! ' aerosols and sulfur dioxidP. inof snlfur rlioxirle by aerosols of rnanganesP KinPtics ofof various urhan Sillfate aerosols prorluction r1echani sns.

Toossi, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Effects of ambient humidity on the energy use of air conditioning equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

els to the solar measurements from the ebu weather stationels to the solar measurements from the ebu weather stationto the hourly solar data from the cz07 weather file. The

White, Justin George

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Dewpoint Temperature Prediction Using Artificial Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dewpoint temperature, the temperature at which water vapor in the air will condense into liquid, can be useful in estimating frost, fog, snow, dew, evapotranspiration, and other meteorological variables. The goal of this study was to use ...

D. B. Shank; G. Hoogenboom; R. W. McClendon

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Automated flow-temperature-humidity control system  

SciTech Connect

An automated system that controls air flow, temperature, and humidity was developed from a commercially available temperature-humidity indicator and a specially built flow-temperature-humidity control module. Parameters are set using direct-reading dials on the control module. The air flow is maintained using a mass-flow controller while process controllers connected to the indicator regulate humidity and temperature. The system will run indefinitely without need for operator intervention. If the module and indicator are calibrated properly, accurate air flows (+-2% of full scale), temperatures (+-0.3/sup 0/C), and humidities (+-2% RH) can be achieved.

Nelson, G.O.; Taylor, R.D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

2006 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the impacts from emissions of radionuclides at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2006. This report fulfills the requirements established by the Radionuclide National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Rad-NESHAP). This report is prepared by LANL's Rad-NESHAP compliance team, part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to an off-site member of the public was calculated using procedures specified by the EPA and described in this report. LANL's EDE was 0.47 mrem for 2006. The annual limit established by the EPA is 10 mrem per year. During calendar year 2006, LANL continuously monitored radionuclide emissions at 28 release points, or stacks. The Laboratory estimates emissions from an additional 58 release points using radionuclide usage source terms. Also, LANL uses a network of air samplers around the Laboratory perimeter to monitor ambient airborne levels of radionuclides. To provide data for dispersion modeling and dose assessment, LANL maintains and operates meteorological monitoring systems. From these measurement systems, a comprehensive evaluation is conducted to calculate the EDE for the Laboratory. The EDE is evaluated as any member of the public at any off-site location where there is a residence, school, business, or office. In 2006, this location was the Los Alamos Airport Terminal. The majority of this dose is due to ambient air sampling of plutonium emitted from 2006 clean-up activities at an environmental restoration site (73-002-99; ash pile). Doses reported to the EPA for the past 10 years are shown in Table E1.

David P. Fuehne

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

445

Energy Basics: Solar Air Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Solar Air Heating Solar air heating systems use air as the working fluid for absorbing and transferring solar energy. Solar air collectors (devices to heat air...

446

Isokinetic air sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isokinetic air sampler includes a filter, a holder for the filter, an air pump for drawing air through the filter at a fixed, predetermined rate, an inlet assembly for the sampler having an inlet opening therein of a size such that isokinetic air sampling is obtained at a particular wind speed, a closure for the inlet opening and means for simultaneously opening the closure and turning on the air pump when the wind speed is such that isokinetic air sampling is obtained. A system incorporating a plurality of such samplers provided with air pumps set to draw air through the filter at the same fixed, predetermined rate and having different inlet opening sizes for use at different wind speeds is included within the ambit of the present invention as is a method of sampling air to measure airborne concentrations of particulate pollutants as a function of wind speed.

Sehmel, George A. (Richland, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: In-House R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Ambient Monitoring - NETL / OST Monitoring Site This project is part of the NETL In-House R&D Ambient Air Quality Research Program. As part of the overall DOE-FE air quality sampling and analysis activities, NETL's Office of Science & Technology (OST) has initiated an in-house ambient monitoring program that builds upon the Center's core capabilities and competencies in inorganic and organic analyses and instrumentation. The program has culminated with the establishment of a fine particulate/air toxics sampling station at the Center's research laboratory in Pittsburgh. This air monitoring station consists of a new 715 ft2 indoor facility housing equipment to monitor continuously gaseous pollutants O3, SO2, NH3, NOy, NOx, CO, H2S, and peroxide, and PM2.5 particulates containing carbon and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. In addition, a fully-instrumented, fourteen bay rack has been constructed to support a variety of ambient monitoring equipment. OST will also collaborate with Consol and the Allegheny (PA) County Health Department in evaluating the performance of PM2.5 FRM samplers. The NETL sampling station will use an existing 10-meter meteorological tower that has been collecting weather-related data for the past seven years. Two in-house laboratories have been completely renovated to support the analysis of PM2.5/air toxics samples, including the installation of a Kratos MS50 high-resolution mass spectrometer for the detailed characterization of organic compounds.

448

Automobile air-conditioning unit. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In this study the refrigerant in the automobile air-conditioner is compressed by thermal energy in a unique compression system rather than by work in a standard compressor. The compression uses an intermittent compression process with a solid absorbent. The vapor is absorbed by an absorbent at relatively low temperature and ejected as the absorbent temperature is raised. A set of one way valves limits flow to one direction. Major contributions are heat transfer requirements, molecular sieve-refrigerant matching, minimizing non-producing mass, solving thermal fatigue and shock problems, and applying this to automobile air-conditioning. The performance study shows energy savings up to fifty percent are possible, depending on engine load. A twenty percent energy savings with the vehicle tested with the air-conditioner in operation is average. The study also showed that less fuel is used with the windows open than with the air-conditioner operating.

Schaetzle, W.J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient temperature with 40 C (104 F) cooling water temperature. This is in close agreement with the manufacturer data of 0.60 for COP and 3.9 kW for cooling capacity. This study resulted in a complete performance map of RAC which will be used to evaluate the potential benefits of rotating heat exchangers in making the "next-generation" absorption chillers more compact and cost effective without any significant degradation in the performance. In addition, the feasibility of using rotating heat exchangers in other applications will be evaluated.

Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Suppliers ...

451

China Ga Air Compressor, China Ga Air Compressor Products ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

China Ga Air Compressor, China Ga Air Compressor Suppliers and Manufacturers Directory - Source a Large Selection of Ga Air Compressor Products at ...

452

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Products from Global Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Suppliers ...

453

Screw Type Ac Air Compressor Manufacturers, Screw Type Ac Air ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Screw Type Ac Air Compressor, Screw Type Ac Air Compressor Manufacturers & Suppliers Directory - Find here Screw Type Ac Air Compressor Traders, ...

454

Chemical characterization of the ambient organic aerosol soluble in water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the water-soluble organic car- bon (WSOC) components of ambient aerosol particles into hydrophilic and Weber [2006]. In the XAD-8 method, the WSOC components that penetrate the column are hydro- philic

Weber, Rodney

455

Ambient pressure synthesis of nanostructured tungsten oxide crystalline films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the results of the ambient pressure synthesis of tungsten oxide nanowires and nanoparticles on AlN substrates using the hot filament CVD techniques. The morphologic surface, crystallographic structures, chemical compositions, and bond structures ...

H. X. Zhang; B. Q. Yang; P. X. Feng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Shipping source level estimation for ambient noise forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to accurately estimate shipping source levels from ambient noise data is an essential step towards creating a forecast model of the ocean soundscape. Source level estimates can be obtained by solving the system of linear equations

Jeffrey S. Rogers; Steven L. Means; Stephen C. Wales

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Street media : ambient messages in an urban space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient street media are the media of our everyday lives in cities. Manifested in bits and fragments on the surfaces of the streetscape, these media often escape our notice - tuned out as visual clutter or dismissed as ...

Murthy, Rekha (Rekha S.)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Space and Time Scales in Ambient Ozone Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the characteristic space and time scales in time series of ambient ozone data. The authors discuss the need and a methodology for cleanly separating the various scales of motion embedded in ozone time series data, namely, ...

S. T. Rao; I. G. Zurbenko; R. Neagu; P. S. Porter; J. Y. Ku; R. F. Henry

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local and/or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Air Conditioning and lungs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Conditioning and lungs Name: freeman Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: What affect does air conditioning have upon the lungs of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Air Flow Distribution in the Sales Area of a Supermarket  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many kinds of goods are displayed in a supermarket, which have their own particularities. The consumer flow rate is great and the type of shelved goods varies significantly, thereby influencing the objects that generate heat, and the demands of air temperature, air velocity and humidity in different zones. The results of a study of a sales area of a supermarket in Harbin are presented in this paper, including air temperature, air velocity and humidity. According to the assessment index of air flow distribution (EDT, ADPI, temperature efficiency, energy coefficient of utilization, coefficient of ununiformity and so on), the experimental data were analyzed. The rationality of airflow distribution was then evaluated. Suggestions for air conditioning system design are also presented in this paper.

Fang, X.; Song, C.; Zhao, J.; Wang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

CO2 Capture by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Sub-Ambient Membrane by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing

463

TV as a human interface for Ambient Intelligence environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the challenges that Ambient Intelligent (AmI) faces is the provision of a usable interaction concept to its users, especially for those with less technical background. In this paper, we describe a new approach to integrate interactive services ... Keywords: information service, human interface, ambient intelligence environments, usable interaction concept, interactive services, television set, home environment, natural human computer interface, elderly people, graphical user interfaces, TV remote control, voice interaction, videoconference

Gorka Epelde; Xabier Valencia; Julio Abascal; Unai Diaz; Ingo Zinnikus; Christian Husodo-Schulz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

ISOTHERMAL AIR INGRESS VALIDATION EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Idaho National Laboratory carried out air ingress experiments as part of validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. An isothermal test loop was designed and set to understand the stratified-flow phenomenon, which is important as the initial air flow into the lower plenum of the very high temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) when a large break loss-of-coolant accident occurs. The unique flow characteristics were focused on the VHTR air-ingress accident, in particular, the flow visualization of the stratified flow in the inlet pipe to the vessel lower plenum of the General Atomic’s Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR). Brine and sucrose were used as heavy fluids, and water was used to represent a light fluid, which mimics a counter current flow due to the density difference between the stimulant fluids. The density ratios were changed between 0.87 and 0.98. This experiment clearly showed that a stratified flow between simulant fluids was established even for very small density differences. The CFD calculations were compared with experimental data. A grid sensitivity study on CFD models was also performed using the Richardson extrapolation and the grid convergence index method for the numerical accuracy of CFD calculations . As a result, the calculated current speed showed very good agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the current CFD methods are suitable for predicting density gradient stratified flow phenomena in the air-ingress accident.

Chang H Oh; Eung S Kim

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Measurements of the Skin Temperature on Small Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparatus to measure the skin temperature and related variables on inland lakes is described. The apparatus is a transparent frame with sensors to measure the skin and bulk water temperature, the wind velocity, and the air temperature and ...

Robert Kurzeja; Malcolm Pendergast; Eliel Villa-Aleman

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Air Pollution- Local Air Quality (Ontario, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Air Pollution regulation administered by the Ministry of the Environment enforces compliance to the standards set in the Ontario law. The law is phased in, with portions taking effect in 2010,...

467

Advanced Strategy Guideline: Air Distribution Basics and Duct Design  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses considerations for designing an air distribution system for an energy efficient house that requires less air volume to condition the space. Considering the HVAC system early in the design process will allow adequate space for equipment and ductwork and can result in cost savings. Principles discussed that will maximize occupant comfort include delivery of the proper amount of conditioned air for appropriate temperature mixing and uniformity without drafts, minimization of system noise, the impacts of pressure loss, efficient return air duct design, and supply air outlet placement, as well as duct layout, materials, and sizing.

Burdick, A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Low temperature aqueous desulfurization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a chemical process for desulfurizing coal, especially adaptable to the treatment of coal-water slurries, at temperatures as low as ambient, comprising treating the coal with aqueous titanous chloride whereby hydrogen sulfide is liberated and the desulfurized coal is separated with the conversion of t